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BRAMHAM CUM OGLETHORPE NEIGHBOURHOOD DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2033

Choose your way www.bramham.org.uk BRAMHAM NEIGHBOURHOOD DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2033 2 DESIGN BY WWW.ZEPPOCREATIVE.COM

PRE SUBMISSION DRAFT DECEMBER 2017

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Foreword

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resumed work on the Neighbourhood Plan, using all of the views and information gathered to inform the Neighbourhood Plan questionnaire, which was issued in September 2016, and the Plan itself.

nce approved, our plan will have legal force in setting out what development is acceptable in our parish and for what reasons. Without it, we will have little control over any development that takes place and, in addition, will receive less funds for the community from those developments.

Dear resident,

The Plan you are seeing is still a draft – in fact this stage in the process of producing our Plan is known as the ‘pre-submission consultation’. Following on from your feedback and our subsequent amendments, we will produce a ‘submission draft’ to send to Leeds City Council for further discussion and examination before it finally comes back to you to vote on at a referendum.

The purpose of this Neighbourhood Plan is to set out a vision and objectives for the future of Bramham cum Oglethorpe (referred to hereafter as Bramham). We are doing this primarily because we care about our parish, as do the vast majority of residents. We love living here and wish to:

Work on the Plan commenced in December 2011 when the Parish Council created the Neighbourhood Plan Steering Group (NPSG), consisting of Parish Councillors and other volunteer residents, to oversee the process of producing the Plan. Preparation began in January 2012 with the NPSG’s first meeting.

• have an influence on future development,

In May 2012 the Parish Council organised a village Community Conference in Bramham Village Hall. At the Conference the NPSG set up displays explaining what a Neighbourhood Plan is about and gathered comments and ideas from residents attending, all of which provided the first input to the content of this Plan.

• retain, protect and possibly enhance aspects of Bramham that are important to residents, • ensure that our parish continues to provide a special place to live for future generations and new residents.

In addition to the engagement outlined above with the initial Community Conference, and questionnaires and drop in sessions on the SHLAA sites, we have throughout kept residents involved and informed through the village’s monthly Parish magazine, and through our Neighbourhood Plan and Parish Council websites. At conferences and drop in sessions members of the group have been there to engage personally with residents. We have also stressed throughout that new members are welcome and needed, and are pleased to have had new members joining. On the wider spectrum of engagement, we encouraged residents to engage with Leeds City Council by advising them how take part in the SHLAA consultation and encouraging them to do so. We kept them advised of progress and developments within LCC as well as within our own group.

In Autumn 2012 we issued information and a questionnaire on Leeds City Council’s (LCC) proposed Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) sites asking for comments. Then in 2013 LCC added a further, very large, proposed site on green belt land at Headley Hall to the SHLAA. The NPSG issued a further questionnaire and held drop in sessions in the village hall to again give information to residents and gather views. The majority of responses indicated firm opposition to the proposed large site and work within the NPSG therefore became focused on opposing it rather than developing the Neighbourhood Plan. Then in Autumn 2015 Leeds University, owners of the land at Headley, withdrew the site and the NPSG

At every stage of consultation residents’ responses were retained and analysed, providing the basis for our vision and for the Neighbourhood Plan questionnaire, which was issued by volunteers to each of the 760 households in Bramham. Completed questionnaires could be returned by Freepost, and also by handing in at our Village Shop, a focal point in Bramham. We were delighted that over 40% of households returned their completed questionnaires. This continued engagement and ensuing responses have ensured that our Neighbourhood Plan has been developed using residents’ views at every step. This, and our use of the Bramham’s well used community facilities and hubs, such as the Parish magazine, websites, the Village Hall and the Village Shop have resulted in a Neighbourhood Plan that is a true community product.

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Contents 1. Introduction....................................................................4 2. About the parish..............................................................8 3. Themes, vision, objectives.............................................12 4. Policies..........................................................................14 4.1 Community facilities (CF)..................................................14 4.2 Leisure and recreation (LR)................................................16 4.3 Housing (HOU)...................................................................20 4.4 Natural Environment (NE).................................................22 4.5 Heritage (H).......................................................................30 4.6 University of Leeds (UoL)...................................................54 4.7 Bramham Neighbourhood Plan Policies Maps...................58 5. Projects & aspirations...................................................62 APPENDIX 1 – Local Green Space Assessment ................64 APPENDIX 2 – Local Green Spaces maps..........................66 APPENDIX 3 – Community Survey 2016 ..........................72 APPENDIX 4 – Bramham NDP Business Survey 2017.......78

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1. Introduction What is a Neighbourhood Development Plan?

Bramham Neighbourhood Area October 2016

A Neighbourhood Development Plan (NDP) is a new way for local people to influence the planning and development of the area in which they live and work. Such Plans should develop a shared vision for a town, village or parish; and may, for example, consider where new homes, offices and other developments should be built; influence how much housing should be built, and of what type; identify and protect important local green spaces or other treasured assets; and consider all other aspects of the area covered by the Plan which are influenced by planning policies.

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hilst it is feasible for a NDP to allocate sites for new homes, the NPSG for Bramham has chosen against this route, due to the advanced stage that the Leeds City Council Site Allocation Process had reached at the time the Plan process in Bramham was reinvigorated in 2016. Consequently, this Plan sets out policies and criteria which will guide new development, rather than state the precise location of any such development. Once approved, the Plan will have legal force in setting out what development is acceptable in Bramham parish and for what reasons. Developers and local authority planners will have to take notice of it. Without a NDP, we will have little control over any development that takes place and will receive less community funds – known as the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) - from those developments. Our NDP must comply with Leeds City Council’s Local Plan and the government’s wider policy of sustainable development set out in the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF). This means it is inevitable that some new housing will have to be built in Bramham parish in the future. Having a NDP in place will help us ensure that this housing is suitable for the parish and meets the needs of our area. It will also help us to identify the facilities and services that need to be in place to meet the demands that any new housing will make upon our community.

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The Neighbourhood Area Following a decision by the Parish Council to proceed with a Neighbourhood Development Plan, a formal application was made by Bramham Parish Council to Leeds City Council to designate the whole of the parish as the Neighbourhood Area – a first and necessary step in the neighbourhood planning process. For parished communities it is normal to apply for the whole of a parish to be applied for and designated as the Neighbourhood Area, although it is possible to vary from this rule. Bramham’s Plan and its policies can only apply to this Neighbourhood Area, not beyond.

Revised Bramham Neighbourhood Area (Parish Boundary) October 2016

© Crown copyright and database rights 2016 Ordnance Survey 100019567 Scale 1:21,000 @ A3

Map 1: Bramham Neighbourhood Area

This application was approved on 17th September 2012. Following changes to the parish boundary, a revised application was made to approve the new Neighbourhood Area on 3rd February 2016, subsequently approved by the City Council on 15th November 2016. The revised Neighbourhood Area is shown on Map 1 below.

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Engaging the community In May 2012 the Parish Council organised a village Community Conference in Bramham Village Hall. At the Conference the NPSG set up displays explaining what a Neighbourhood Plan is about and gathered comments and ideas from residents attending, all of which provided the first input to the content of this Plan.

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n Autumn 2012 we issued information and a questionnaire on Leeds City Council’s (LCC) proposed Strategic Housing Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) sites asking for comments. Then in 2013 LCC added a further, very large, proposed site on Green Belt land at Headley Hall to the SHLAA. The NPSG issued a further questionnaire and held drop in sessions in the village hall to again give information to residents and gather views. The majority of responses indicated firm opposition to the proposed large site and work within the NPSG therefore became focused on opposing it rather than developing the Neighbourhood Plan. Then, in Autumn 2015, Leeds University, owners of the land at Headley, withdrew the site and the NPSG resumed work on the Neighbourhood Plan, using all of the views and information gathered to inform the Neighbourhood Plan questionnaire, which was issued in September 2016, and the Plan itself. In addition to the engagement outlined above with the initial Community Conference, and questionnaires and drop in sessions on the SHLAA sites, we have throughout kept residents involved and informed through the monthly Parish magazine, and through our Neighbourhood Plan and Parish Council websites. At conferences and drop in sessions, members of the group have been there to engage personally with residents. We have also stressed throughout that new members are welcome and needed, and are pleased to have had new members joining. On the wider spectrum of engagement, we encouraged residents to engage with Leeds City Council by advising them how take part in the SHLAA consultation and encouraging them to do so. We kept them advised of progress and developments within LCC as well as within our own group. At every stage of consultation residents’ responses were retained and analysed, providing the basis for our

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vision and for the Neighbourhood Plan questionnaire, which was issued by volunteers to each of the 760 approx. households in Bramham, during the summer of 2016. Completed questionnaires could be returned by Freepost, and also by handing in at our Village Shop, a focal point in Bramham. We were delighted that over 40% of households returned their completed questionnaires. A summary of the responses is shown in Appendix 3 Community Survey 2016. A consultation event was held to discuss the draft vision, themes, objectives and policies in the Village Hall on 4th February 2017. 32 people attended the event which resulted in a number of useful discussions and comments. These comments were analysed by the steering group and were incorporated into the Plan where appropriate. A business survey was conducted and a questionnaire was delivered to businesses within the parish in June 2017. 47 questionnaires were posted to local businesses whilst another 36 were made available at Bowcliffe Hall. The responses were analysed and are the results are shown in Appendix 4 Bramham NDP Business Survey 2017. In August 2017, the NPSG opened a conversation with Leeds University with the aim of consulting on its future plans for the land that it owns in the south of the parish, that is currently used for agricultural research and education. This continued engagement and ensuing responses have ensured that our Neighbourhood Plan has been developed using the views of local residents and local businesses at every step. This, and our use of Bramham’s well used community facilities and hubs, such as the Parish magazine, websites, the Village Hall and the Village Shop have resulted in a Neighbourhood Plan that is a true community product.

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2. About the parish A short history of Bramham The most likely derivation for the name Bramham is from the Old English meaning “homestead in the broom”. Without doubt it is an ancient settlement. One of the main reasons for its historical development has been its location lying at the junction of two important Roman roads, The Great North Road running north south and the east west route between York and Ilkley.

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ramham’s Saxon heritage is witnessed by the shape of its oval churchyard where several artefacts from that period have been found. The Church itself is Bramham’s oldest building dating from 1150. Predating that, at the very start of the Norman period Bramham is mentioned in the Domesday Survey of 1086. In Medieval times the influence of the church in the form of Nostel Priory which had land around the village granted to it in 1126 was a big influence on the area. During the War of the Roses some of the dead from the Battle of Towton (1461) may have been buried in a communal grave in the churchyard. Again, in the English Civil War the victims of the fighting at the Battle of Marston Moor (1644) are recorded as having been buried in the churchyard. The area has always been agricultural, however throughout its history the Parish has been quarried for its limestone which was used in the construction of Roman York and has continued to be exploited ever since. More recently, the village’s position on the Great North Road (A1) has shaped its development. By the seventeenth century Bramham had established itself as an important staging post for travellers and had many coaching inns. The village was at its peak in the nineteenth century when further development may have been constrained by the presence of major landowners in the area such as Bramham Park which is now home amongst other things to internationally famous events such as the Bramham Horse Trials and the Leeds Festival.

In the first half of the 20th century Bramham also played its part in the two World Wars. During the First World War an airfield opened at Headley at which a squadron of the RFC/RAF was based. During the Second World War dummy aircraft were placed on the airfield to mislead the enemy into thinking that the base was still active. There can still be found one of the aircraft hangars now a listed building. Also during the Second World War Bramham Park was home to a Prisoner of War camp for Italian prisoners. The War Memorial in the village square bears witness to the human cost to the parish. The Great North Road continued to pass through the village until 1960 when the first bypass was built. This had the effect of giving the village back some of its rural character. However, the lack of passing trade meant the decline of local shops. The 20th century has seen the village expand on its northern and southern fringes and Bramham today is a village of some 1700 inhabitants and much of the activity still centres around the historic core where the Church, the Village Hall and the two remaining pubs are to be found. It retains its village shop/post office and a handful of other small businesses. It is home to an active community with many thriving clubs and events.

Bramham today Today, Bramham is a modern village within the metropolitan district of Leeds and has a very active and lively community. This is well demonstrated by the existence of a wide range of committees, clubs and groups, organising events and activities for people of all ages, as well as maintaining important facilities and services that benefit residents. The village retains very close ties with the Lane Fox family (descendants of Robert Benson, first Lord Bingley), owners of the nearby Bramham Park estate. Bramham Park is not only home to a fine, Baroque country house and splendid gardens, both open to the public during the summer months, but also known for hosting an international four day equestrian event (Bramham Horse Trials), and more recently as the site of the Leeds Festival. Currently, residents of Bramham are given free tickets for the latter in return for making a small financial contribution to the Bramham Community Fund. Leeds University owns Headley Hall. It forms part of the University’s Field Research Unit and is used as the main arable centre. A considerable amount of ecological and agronomic work is carried out at the farms including crop tests, field trials of GM crops, small mammals (including radio-tracking), beneficial insects, trees and crops, intercropping and farm animal nutrition1.

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Leeds City Council’s adopted Core Strategy identified Bramham as a smaller settlement. Smaller settlements are defined as communities which have a population of at least 1500, a primary school, and a shop or pub. According to the 2011 Census, the parish of Bramham had a population of 1650, of which 99% were from a white ethnic group. Of the 718 households, 534 households had access to one or two cars or vans and 86 households had access to at least three cars or vans. 98 households did not have access to a car or van. The Census showed that 18% of the population were between the ages of 0-17, 6% were between the ages of 18-24, 10% between the ages of 25-34, 16% between the ages of 35-44, 25% between the ages of 45-59, 14% between the ages of 60-69 and 11% were 70 and over. It is now known that the number of households in the Parish in 2017 is 771 (LCC, 2017 figures based on Council Tax data). There is low unemployment in the parish. According to the 2011 Census, the economic activity of all people usually resident in the area at the time of the Census aged 16-74 indicates that the majority of people were employed, self-employed or retired. A full breakdown of the population by age and economic activity is presented by the charts below.

http://foodhub.leeds.ac.uk/facilities.php

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Age breakdown by population

Economic activity

2011 Census

2011 Census

11%

18% 600

545

500

14%

5% 9%

5%

7%

8% 8%

Number of People

6% 400

300

200

165 137

100

9%

195

47

36

25

35

37

19

14

0 Employee: Part time

0-17

18-24 0-17

25-29 0-17

30-34 0-17

35-39 0-17

40-44

Self-employed: Unemployed Retired Part time Employee: Self-employed: Full time Full time Full time student (working)

Looking after Other home or family Students Long term sick (including full or disabled time - not working)

Economic activity 45-49

10

50-54 0-17

55-59 0-17

BRAMHAM NEIGHBOURHOOD DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2033

60-69 0-17

0-17 70+

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3. Themes, vision, objectives Key themes The Plan’s policies are arranged under the following six themes which have emerged as the key areas that the community are determined to address, through planning policies and/or projects to be implemented through the planning period ahead.

They are: Community facilities (CF) Leisure and recreation (LR) Housing (HOU) Natural environment (NE) Heritage (H) University of Leeds (UoL)

Vision

Strategic objectives

In consultation with the community, the following Vision Statement has been developed which encapsulates the views of the majority of residents. This Vision guides the Plan and all the policies developed can be tracked back to this Statement:

Delivering the Vision is critical for this Plan. To do this, the following strategic objectives have been formulated, to provide the link between the aspirations expressed in the Vision and the policies which follow on. The objectives of the Plan are: • To protect and develop valuable community facilities.

“Bramham in 2033 will be a village set in some of the highest quality countryside in Yorkshire, with historic parkland on our doorstep. Our village too is steeped in history and is wonderfully conserved. The facilities we have now buck the trend of decline in rural areas, with a well attended primary school on our doorstep, shops, pubs, community buildings and vibrant and dynamic community groups and societies serving all ages.”

• To respond to the housing needs of our communities through sympathetic development, promoting the availability of a mix of dwellings accessible to all. • To ensure an adequate and safe network of access for pedestrians, cyclists, motorists and horse riders throughout the parish, connecting to neighbouring villages and towns. • To support and expand facilities to enable all to enjoy a healthy lifestyle. • To protect all aspects of the parish’s natural environment. • To retain and enhance the historic character and appeal of the existing Conservation Area and wider parish, including the historic parklands of Bramham Park and the valued farmland surrounding Headley and Oglethorpe Halls. • To support the continuing use of the Headley Hall (University of Leeds estate) for agricultural/ research/ academic purposes.

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4. Policies 4.1 Community facilities (CF) The intention in setting out policies for community facilities is to ensure that community buildings and facilities are preserved, maintained and improved for current and future residents.

Policies summarised CF1: Protect and enhance existing community facilities

Objectives addressed • To protect and develop valuable community facilities.

4.1.2 CF1 Protect and enhance existing Community facilities The community of Bramham enjoy the facilities provided by many community facilities, including the village hall, village shop, pubs, church, pavilion, recreational sites and other buildings designed to encourage communal activity. These assets are central to village life and need to be protected. The community survey highlighted the support for local village assets, for example 91% (275 respondents) considered the village shop/post office to be essential, 72% (215 respondents) considered the village hall to be essential and 67% (202 respondents) considered the village pub to be essential. The community has access to a wide range of facilities, which are supported both locally and by some high profile events, including Bramham Horse Trials, Leeds Festival and Bramham in Bloom. During the last two years, at least 1472 people or families have attended annual organized events, 373 people or families have supported or attended events associated with community or sporting groups and 153 children attended or used local groups. According to the results of the community survey, when asked “what do you enjoy about living in Bramham Parish?” 193 people said they liked the village facilities a lot and 156 people said they liked the village activities/ community groups a lot:

The top five local community facilities considered to be highly important to protect are:

Village Shop/Post Office 87% (262 respondents) Medical Centre 86% (258 respondents) Primary School 82% (243 respondents)2 Village Hall 78% (231 respondents) Playing Fields 73% (219 respondents). The community facilities are shown on the Bramham Neighbourhood Plan Policies Map 2 – Community Facilities (map 15). The Leeds City Council’s Core Strategy Spatial Policy 8: Economic Development Priorities supports the retention and development of local services and community facilities for smaller settlements. The Core Strategy further supports this with Policy P9: Community Facilities and Other Services, where access to local community facilities and services is recognised as being important and should be accessible by foot, cycling or public transport. If a development proposal would result in the loss of an existing facility or service, an alternative provision should be made elsewhere in the community, if a sufficient level of need is identified.

3

Bramham Primary School is located in neighbouring Clifford parish.

2

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CF1: Protect and enhance existing community facilities Development proposals which include measures to improve one or more of the following community facilities and services for the benefit of the residents of Bramham will be supported, where such developments are of a scale appropriate to their surroundings:

• Village Hall • Bramham Pavilion • Bramham Playing field3 • Playground • Adult gym equipment • Tenter Hill allotments • Folly allotments • Senior Citizens Centre and garden • The Swan Public House • Red Lion Public House • Village shop and Post Office • All Saints’ Church and churchyard4 • Bramham Medical Centre • Village Square

Designated as a Field in Trust in 2017, excluding the Pavilion. Recent allocation of a Commonwealth War Grave.

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4.2 Leisure and recreation (LR) The intention in setting out policies for sport, leisure and recreation is to support and encourage a healthy lifestyle throughout the parish and to develop a safe network of access which builds on the existing Public Rights of Way.

Policies summarised LR1: Improving Public Rights Of Way LR2: New sports and leisure facilities

Objectives addressed • To support and expand facilities to enable all to enjoy a healthy lifestyle.

4.2.1 LR1: Improving Public Rights Of Way Bramham parish benefits from a network of existing byways, bridleways and footpaths. According to the community survey, 58% (170 respondents) want to protect and expand sports, leisure and recreational facilities within the village. Within the Neighbourhood Area there are a number of existing byways, bridleways and footpaths. These are shown on Leeds City Council’s Public Rights of Way (PROW), (map 2). The Core Strategy supports the PROW network and confirms that it is essential in helping to access the countryside and linking people to rural areas. Policy G1: Enhancing and Extending Green Infrastructure seeks to protect and enhance the PROW network through avoiding unnecessary diversions and by adding new links. According to the community survey, 61% (179 respondents) would like more recreational footpaths/scenic walks/bridleways and 56% (164 respondents) would like a cycle route connecting local parishes.

LR1: Improving Public Rights Of Way New developments must take into consideration opportunities to improve and/or extend the existing byways, bridleways, footpaths and cycle paths; thus, allowing greater access and connecting residents in new developments in Bramham to the village and the open countryside. In addition: a) The construction and appearance of new paths, tracks or links must be appropriate and sensitive to the local character of the area. b) The loss of existing footpaths and cycle paths will be resisted.

Bramham Parish: Definitive, Claimed and Permissive Public Rights of Way Key Footpath Bridleway Restricted Byway Byway

Definitive

Claim/Review

Permissive

Recreational

V V V V V V V V V V V V VV V Λ Λ Λ Λ Λ

­

03570140210280 Meters

Please Note: This is a working copy of the Definitive Map and is not a legal document. It should only be treated as an indication of public rights of way. Furthermore, the data shown on this map has currently not been corrected according to the OS Positional Accuracy Improvement Programme. The map base used by Leeds City Council follows the Ordnance Survey data from Pre August 2004 so some rights of way may be misaligned to the current Ordnance Survey maps. Any queries or errors in relation to public rights should be raised with the Definitive Map Team on 0113 3782906

This map is reproduced from Ordnance Survey materials with the permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of the Controller of Her Majesty's Stationery Office Crown Copyrights. Unauthorised reproduction infringes Crown Copyright and may lead to prosecution or criminal proceedings. Leeds City Council 100019567 (2017)

Map 2: Leeds Public Rights Of Way

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4.2.2 LR2: New sports and leisure facilities Bramham is fortunate to have a Village Hall. The Hall is a large indoor facility, which hosts a variety of activities such as pilates, yoga, badminton, art classes, and Mums and Tots sessions as well as a wide range of social activities including private parties, fund raising events by local groups such as the NSPCC and the Village Hall committee itself, and weddings. Of the survey respondents 78% thought it highly important to protect the Village Hall.

Bramham’s other key facility is the Pavilion and Playing Field. The Pavilion is a relatively small building providing a small social space plus toilets and changing rooms for events on the field. The field is a substantial size, with two full size football pitches plus significant other space. The facility hosts football from Bramham Football Club and Collingham Juniors, and 5 Star Sports. There is also an annual 10k run and Barbecue, plus a summer play group and winter Christmas workshop, as well as the Village Gala. In addition, Bramham Open Gardens event has used it as a base, and there is a weekly ‘Saturday kitchen’ to provide refreshments during events. The Pavilion is also hired for small private events and meetings. There is also a children’s playground adjoining the field and outdoor adult exercise equipment near the Pavilion. The field, adult gym equipment and playground are accessible by the public at all times. 73% of survey respondents thought the field highly important to protect and 52% thought the Pavilion highly important to protect.

According to the community survey, 58% (170 respondents) want to protect and expand sports, leisure and recreational facilities within the village. A number of different activities were suggested during the consultation process, however the steering group agreed that, initially, the parish would focus on developing the following facilities:

• Running track • Boules playing area • Additional children’s play facilities • Enhancement of the Pavilion • Enhancement of the Senior Citizens’ Centre

A third facility is the Senior Citizens’ Centre and garden which occupies a focal position opposite the village square. The very small building and the garden are open daily for free use by residents. The garden is maintained by the Bramham in Bloom group and is adjacent to the Wildlife area. The building lacks water and toilet facilities and there is an aspiration to enhance it. 48% of survey respondents thought it highly important to protect.

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LR2: New sports and leisure facilities

In particular, the provision of the following facilities have been identified as priorities for the community: • Running track

Development proposals for the provision of new sports and leisure facilities within Bramham village, as identified through community consultation will be supported where such developments:

• Boules playing area • Additional children’s play facilities

a) Do not undermine existing provision.

• Enhancement of the Pavilion

b) Are in accordance with all other policies in the Plan

• Enhancement of the Senior Citizens’ Centre

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Through the survey, the current and future composition of housing in Bramham parish was addressed. The survey responses are presented below:

4.3 Housing (HOU) The intention in setting out policies for housing is to ensure that the right number of homes are built in the Neighbourhood Area, and of the right mix, type and design, which will meet the needs of the community.

Policies summarised

Objectives addressed

HOU1: Housing type and mix

• To respond to the housing needs of our communities through sympathetic development, promoting the availability of a mix of dwellings accessible to all.

4.3.1 HOU1 Housing type and mix The Core Strategy’s Spatial Policy 1: Location of Development, states that Smaller Settlements will contribute to development needs, with the scale of growth having regard to the settlement’s size, function and sustainability and that development will respect and enhance the local character and identity of places and neighbourhoods. Bramham’s Neighbourhood Plan is not opposed to a sustainable level of development but wants to ensure that any new dwellings are built to meet the needs and profile of the resident population.

501-1000 – 1% (2 respondents) 1000+ - 0% (0 respondents) Leeds City Council has identified four potential sites that could be developed over the Plan period. Each site has the following potential housing allocation:

Farfield House approximately 14 dwellings Bramham House approximately 30 dwellings

According to the results of the survey, the community considered the following number of additional dwellings in the parish that could be accommodated were:

The Biggin (east entrance to Bramham Park) approximately 7 dwellings

0-25 - 25% (74 respondents)

Spen Common Lane (Headley Hall) approximately 9 dwellings

26-50 – 34% (99 respondents) 51-100 – 27% (79 respondents) 101-200 – 10% (30 respondents)

As the potential number of dwellings are not large in scale, this presents a good opportunity to ensure the right housing type and mix is provided for the community.

Type of housing

Need a lot more Need a few more About right Too many already Total respondents

Luxury Housing (5+ Bedrooms)

1% 4

12% 33

60% 26% 164 72

273

Family Housing (3-4 Bedrooms)

8% 22

33% 93

53% 6% 147 16

278

Flats/1-2 bedroom properties 12% 33

41% 111

41% 6% 112 16

272

Social Housing / Housing 10% association 27

24% 64

52% 14% 136 36

263

Housing for the elderly/retired

42% 118

40% 3% 112 8

281

Affordable Starter Housing 33% 92

42% 117

22% 4% 61 11

281

Rental Properties 8% 22

17% 44

63% 12% 167 32

265

15% 43

The survey results indicate that, from the choice given, the community supports developing more affordable starter homes, more housing for the elderly/retired, more flats/1-2 bedroom properties and more family housing (3-4 bedroom properties) in Bramham. Larger houses of 5 or more bedrooms are generally not supported.

HOU1: Housing type and mix Any housing development proposal of 10 or more dwellings should seek to provide a mix of dwelling types. Developments should seek to incorporate the following types of home, which are listed in order of priority: a) Affordable starter homes; b) Homes for the elderly/retired; c) 1-2 bedroom homes, including flats; d) Family homes (3-4 bedroom).

201-500 – 3% (9 respondents)

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4.4 Natural Environment (NE) The intention in setting out these policies is to protect the high quality natural environment and associated habitats and biodiversity throughout the whole parish.

Policies summarised

4.4.1 NE1 Local Green Spaces

NE1: Local Green Spaces

The community greatly value the green spaces within Bramham. This Plan seeks to protect and enhance these areas and prevent the unnecessary development of the countryside.

NE2: Enhancement and protection of nature areas and biodiversity

The survey question “how important would you consider the protection of the following local community facilities…?” indicated that a significant number of people support local green areas, for example:

Objectives addressed • To protect all aspects of the parish’s natural environment whilst maintaining the separation between villages.

158 people considered protecting the allotments was highly important 219 people considered protecting the playing fields was highly important 109 people considered protecting Jubilee Gardens was highly important 87% (259 respondents) agreed that it is highly important to protect village boundaries and green spaces. 66% (185 respondents) wanted the Plan to increase the provision of green space. An assessment was undertaken by members of the Neighbourhood Planning Group of all potential areas of local green space within the village. This assessment was based upon local knowledge, a visual appraisal and walk around all avenues and roadways of the village, and a review of all comments and observations gained from the 2016 Community Survey. As a result, 10 potential sites were identified. The NPPF guidance was utilised as is demonstrated in the Local Green Spaces Assessment in Appendix 1. One site is the Churchyard within the boundaries of Bramham All Saints’ Church and as such, already attracts considerable protection from development. A further site, the Playing Fields, are already adequately protected as a result of being awarded “Field in Trust” status. Two further sites are the allotments on Tenter Hill, (Tenter Hill Allotments) and Aberford Road, (Folly Allotments), owned by the Parish Council and Bramham Park Estate respectively.

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The Tenter Hill allotments were purchased in December 2010 from the Diocese of York by the Parish Council. The Parish Council improved the facility with the addition of a fence and entrance and lets them to residents. There are approximately 26 allotments which provide a valuable area for growing of produce and a relaxing environment, and are a facility which is in demand, with any that become vacant being taken quickly. Folly allotments, although still owned by the Estate, were bequeathed by Bramham Park to ‘returning heroes’ from WW1. A further six sites, all relatively small in nature and comprising of a mix of open green space, mature trees and/or formal gardens (Jubilee Gardens), were also identified. All sites, most no greater than 0.3 hectares,

are owned by Leeds City Council and bounded by further council land &/or private residences. All sites are within Bramham village, special to the community in the distinctiveness they offer (the two ‘Welcome to Bramham’ signs are particularly unique to Bramham) and local in character. A number of the sites contain managed beds supported by the Bramham in Bloom committee. The Core Strategy supports the policy of designating green space and is intent on increasing the amount, distribution and accessibility of green space throughout the district. The Local Green Spaces are shown on the Bramham Neighbourhood Plan Policies Map 3 and in Appendix 2 ‘Local Green Spaces’.

NE1: Local Green Space The following sites are designated as Local Green Spaces.

• • • • • • • • • • •

Tenter Hill Allotments Folly Allotments Bramham Playing Field Churchyard, All Saints’ Church Green space joining Lyndon Road/Lyndon Close/Lyndon Square Two green spaces either side of Croft Drive/Lyndon Road Entrance to Bramham – Paradise Way/Bowcliffe Road Entrance to Bramham – Paradise Way/Aberford Road Entrance to Bramham – Paradise Way/Wetherby Road Green space at end of Milnthorpe Way Jubilee Garden

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Bramham-cum-Oglethorpe Neighbourhood Area and Leeds Habitat Network

4.4.2 NE2: Enhancement and protection of nature areas and biodiversity The parish benefits from an abundant and diverse range of nature areas and wildlife habitats. A number of nature areas are already protected by existing legislation, but there are still some key areas that would benefit from protection under this Plan.

stated that they or their family had supported or attended Bramham in Bloom in the past two years. The Leeds Habitat Network map, (map 3 below) shows areas within the parish which have been designated as different habitats by Leeds City Council. Local wildlife that has been recorded include deer, great crested newts, bats, foxes, otters, red kites, herons and many different types of flora and fauna.

According to the survey, 80% (223 respondents) wanted the NP to include the positive management and enhancement of existing wildlife areas and the creation of new ones. The existing areas are well supported by locals, for example, 41% (29 respondents) stated that the children in their household had visited the wildlife area behind the beck in the past two years and 38% (95 respondents)

Bramham-cum-Oglethorpe Parish Council Boundary Bramham-cum-Oglethorpe Neighbourhood Area Heathland Habitat Grassland Habitat Woodland Habitat Wetland Habitat Other Habitats Š Crown copyright and database rights 2017 Ordnance Survey 100019567 Path: L:\CGM\GIS Projects\Neighbourhood Planning Progress\Bramham\Bramham Proposed Neighbourhood Area A4 LEEDS HABITAT NETWORK.mxd

Map 3: Leeds Habitat Network 24

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The Leeds Landscape Assessment 1994 describes the areas surrounding Leeds as follows: the ancient townships of the Leeds area were largely established by the late 10th century, when the township comprised a population and its associated exploitable territory, which commonly included unenclosed arable lands, pasture, meadow, woodland, common and waste. Over this landscape of villages and fields were superimposed two additional administrative systems. These were firstly an ecclesiastical system of parishes, usually coincident with one or more townships, with a church at the parish centre and secondly a manorial organisation which was not always so directly related to the township framework. The parish structure was largely in place in the Leeds area by the 11th century and remained relatively unchanged until the urban growth of the industrial period. The ownership of land and the attendant manorial framework, however, were subject to continual change. This changing pattern of ownership and tenurial organisation through the Middle Ages and later, led amongst other things, to the unusually large number of 17th-18th century park estates, which still survive in the belt from Harewood in the north, through Bramham and Parlington, round to the south-east side of the District at Ledston and Temple Newsam. Today, features such as manor houses, moated buildings, gardens, castles, mills, fishponds and deer parks still survive from this time. Local buildings in Bramham were historically built with Magnesian Limestone, although more recently, brick and other materials are used.

In 2010 study by Natural England3 looked at green infrastructure corridors for Yorkshire and the Humber. It determined that much of the area surrounding Bramham village, (although not the village itself), including Bramham Park, was designated by S19 Limestone Ridge (see map 4: Green Infrastructure Corridor Map4 ). The Limestone Ridge is a subregional corridor which runs from the south of Doncaster to Wetherby. Most of the corridor is rural and it is characterised by large blocks of woodland and rolling farmland bounded by hedges and distinctive limestone buildings. There are also a number of parkland estates including Bramham and, as such, the area has both landscape and historical importance. Bramham is located within the Magnesian Limestone Belt and is further characterised by gently rolling fields of arable which are bordered by low gappy hedgerows and isolated hedgerow trees, with small pockets of intact pasture occurring around the village fringes. It is surrounded by open arable farmland which typically occurs in the lower lying and gently rolling eastern pans of the district, including east Bramham. The openness of the farmland and lack of woodland allows for long uninterrupted views. Bramham Moor was unenclosed until the nineteenth century but is now enclosed and cultivated, forming a productive area of large regular fields, interrupted by occasional woodland and patches of pasture.

Map 4: Green infrastructure corridors (Natural England)

The main watercourses that run directly through Bramham are Carr Beck and Bramham Beck. The Environment Agency’s flood maps (map 5 and map 6) indicate that there is a low risk of flooding from rivers and seas and a medium risk of flooding from surface water.

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20140605112209/http://www.naturalengland.org.uk/regions/yorkshire_and_ the_humber/ourwork/yandhgreeninfrastructuremappingproject.aspx 3

4 Ref: http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20140605090108/http://www.naturalengland.org.uk/Images/gimapscore_tcm6-20421.pdf

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A major characteristic of the area is the number of large blocks of woodland and the surrounding rural landscape. In Bramham parish, there are, as expected, a large number of woodlands, including a large block of historically important wooded parkland at Bramham Park and smaller blocks of mixed woodland throughout the parish, including West Woods, Wilk Woods, Old Woods, Headley Plantation Rakes Woods and surrounding area as well as smaller deciduous plantations throughout the parish.

NE2: Enhancement and protection of nature areas and biodiversity Map 5: Environment Agency Risk of Flooding from Rivers and Seas map

The following nature areas, will be protected from development that would reduce or damage their nature conservation value:

Wildlife Area, behind the Senior Citizens Centre

Some of the woodland is actively managed, by either Bramham Park Estate or by Leeds City Council. The Core Strategy supports the protection of nature areas and biodiversity and states in Policy G8: Protection of Important Species and Habitats, that development will not be permitted which would seriously harm any sites (including locally designated sites).

In addition: a) New development proposals should provide opportunities to enhance and support wildlife and/or biodiversity on or adjacent to the development site. b) Existing trees, hedges and other landscape features of value to biodiversity should continue to be part of any development proposal unless clear evidence is provided that these are not worthy of retention. Replacement of existing trees should be done on a one to one basis.

Bramham in Bloom sites: Bowcliffe Road and Wetherby Road gateway areas.

Map 6: Environment Agency Risk of Flooding from Surface Water map

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Map 7: Roman Roads

4.5 Heritage (H) The intention in setting out policies for heritage is to retain and enhance the historic character of Bramham, in particular recognising that not all historic or heritage assets enjoy formal protection through, for example, listing.

Policies summarised

Objectives addressed

H1: Non designated local heritage assets

• To retain and enhance the historic character and appeal of the existing conservation area and unique assets of the Parish.

H2: Bramham Moor Battlefield – Local Heritage Area H3: Development within the Conservation Area H4: Development outside the Conservation Area H5: Key views

The Neighbourhood Plan steering group have assessed the local area and identified a number of assets they consider important to protect.

4.5.1 H1 Non designated local heritage assets There are many listed and scheduled buildings and assets in and around Bramham, in particular Bramham Park which is a registered park and garden. However, there are other non designated assets, which contribute to the character of the parish. It is important that these assets are recognised and taken account of, especially when new development takes place. This is supported by the Core Strategy’s Policy P11: Conservation which states that locally significant undesignated assets and their settings, will be conserved and enhanced.

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As well as the already known Roman road that runs through the Parish, a section of the route between Tadcaster and Ilkley, two further roads have been discovered. These came to light as a result of excavations carried out by the West Yorkshire Archeological Service and were commissioned by Northern Powergrid prior to the latter installing new pylons on Bramham Moor. These three Roman Roads are marked on map 7 below. One of the roads discovered was military and the second apparently agricultural in purpose. They may be a spur off the known Roman road between Tadcaster and Ilkley or run parallel to it. Further archeological investigation would be needed to determine this.

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H1: Non designated local heritage assets

The current non designated local heritage assets identified are:

Non designated local heritage assets will be conserved and enhanced, wherever possible for their historic significance and/or their importance to local distinctiveness, character and sense of place. Proposals for development that affect such assets should take full and proper account of the scale and impact of any harm or loss to the community.

• Milestone on Front Street, outside the Senior Citizens Centre • Milestone on east side of West Woods Road • Cobbles, Town Hill/Square • Cobbles and gully, Church Hill • 2 village painted gateway signs • 4 village stone gateway signs • Bramham battlefield sign • Three Roman Roads

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4.5.1 H2 Bramham Moor Battlefield - Local Heritage Area The Battle of Bramham Moor took place on Monday 19th February 1408. It was the final battle in the Percy Rebellion of 1402 – 1408 and was between Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland and King Henry IV. The battle ranged over the area bounded by Camp Hill, Headley Hall and Oglethorpe Hills (the highest point of the Moor), either side of the road to Toulston5.

Memorial board

Percy Cross

In February, in heavy snow, Percy’s army marched towards York. Sir Thomas Rokeby, High Sheriff of Yorkshire, heard of Percy’s approach and raised his own army, and blocked the bridge at Knaresborough.

army was rapidly defeated with Lord Bardolph being fatally wounded and Percy himself lost his life, either by being killed in action or captured and then quickly executed.

Percy’s army advanced through Boroughbridge and Wetherby, and was being pursued by the King’s men, so he went on to Tadcaster, until he stopped and positioned his men on Bramham Moor to await the arrival of Rokeby and his men.

The spot where Percy fell was subsequently marked by a memorial stone cross, which was removed to a wood on the edge of the battlefield as it interfered with the farmers’ cultivation of the land.

The battle started at 2pm, and although it was short, it was said to be furious and bloody. It is generally believed that Rokeby led the charge against Percy and began a violent spree of hand-to-hand combat. Percy’s

Moves are afoot to move the cross into the village where it will better protected and appreciated by villagers and visitors to the battlefield.

Our survey showed that 82% (245 people) wanted the battle of Bramham Moor site and memorial stone to be protected. This Plan therefore designates Bramham Moor Battlefield, as specified on map 8, as a ‘Local Heritage Area’. This designation is the equivalent of that covered by the previous policy H1 for local non designated heritage assets and informed by the same criteria published by Historic England in their Local Heritage Listing Advice Note 7 (11th May 2016). However, due the to key differences in the nature of the site compared to other proposed local heritage assets, the Steering Group decided to create a separate policy for the battlefield, recognising:

a) The extensive nature of the battlefield. b) The lack of certaintly of its precise boundaries i.e. where the battle started or finished. c) The essential nature of the land which is almost entirely agricultural with few physical features that distinguish it as an heritage asset from other parts of the adjoining countryside. In summary, the area covered is important for the history that took place there, not for any remaining physical features.

http://historicbramham.org.uk/battle-of-bramham-moor3.html

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4.5.2 H3 Development within the Conservation Area

Character Area 1 – The Historic Core (see map 10)

A large part of the village was first designated a Conservation Area in 1975. The boundary was reviewed in 2010 and two small changes were made.

Character Area 2 – The 20th Century (see map 11)

The Conservation Area protects architectural characteristics, landmarks and local details including materials and boundaries and the steering group are keen to ensure that there is uniformity going forward between old and new developments.

The CAAMP identified three character areas within the Conservation Area:

Character Area 3 – Open Spaces (see map 12)

The Conservation Area is shown on the Conservation Area map 9. The H2 Development within the Conservation Area policy is based on information provided by the Bramham Conservation Area Appraisal and Management Plan (CAAMP) written by Leeds City Council, and approved as a material consideration in the determination of planning decisions on 19th April 2010.

Key

Bramham Moor Battlefield Marker stone and information board Original siting of Percy Cross Current siting of Percy Cross

Map 8: Bramham Moor Battlefield map

H2: Bramham Moor Battlefield – Local Heritage Area The area of Bramham Moor battlefield, as defined on the Bramham Moor Battlefield map (map 8), is designated as a Local Heritage Area. Development within or adjacent to this area should:

• • • • •

Respect the historic nature of the battlefield Retain and enhance green spaces Retain excellent accessibility to these green spaces Not compromise the views both into and out of Bramham Moor Take into account the potential for archaeological finds, in particular, those dating from the late 14th and early 15th Centuries

The sympathetic enhancement of Bramham Moor will be supported.

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Map 9: Bramham Conservation Area

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Map 12: Character Area 3 – Open Spaces (extracted from CAAMP)

Map 10: Character Area 1 – The Historic Core (extracted from CAAMP)

The Conservation Area includes the majority of the built up area of the parish and all structures within this area are protected in accordance with the CAAMP. Since being designated a Conservation Area it should be noted that strict adherence to the principles of conservation areas has not been adhered to, nor enforced. This has resulted in a number of instances where the unique character of the buildings and the environment have been lost. Part of the character of the vernacular architecture of the area is the use of local materials. Many original buildings were constructed of local limestone walls with slate or red- pan tile roofs. Unfortunately, repairs, alterations and even new buildings have seen the use sandstone and bricks for external walls and concrete tiles for roofs. It should also be noted that the original dwellings had timber windows. UPVC windows are unfortunately permitted in Conservation Areas but again the result is damage to the visual appearance of many structures.

Map 11: Character Area 2 – The 20th Century (extracted from CAAMP)

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In Conservation Areas, there is a restriction on the erection of satellite dishes on chimneys, walls and roofs facing onto a highway. However, this restriction would appear not to be enforced resulting in a plethora of dishes seriously affecting the overall appearance of the street scene. Overall many of the factors are changing the built landscape and although some diversity is desirable and acceptable the original

character needs to be maintained or the overall appearance could result in the village looking the same as any other built - up area in the country. Bramham should retain its unique nature and qualities that make it so attractive. In addition, greater consideration needs to be given to permitted development in the Conservation Area. In some instances, permitted development leads to the destruction of the overall appearance of the area. If permitted development cannot be prevented it is essential to ensure that any proposals are of high quality design and help to enhance the local environment rather than destroying the existing character. Of ever increasing importance is the part played by motor vehicles within the parish. The village was never designed with motor vehicles in mind and these vehicles are becoming an ever increasing problem affecting daily life and the appearance of the village as on-road car parking proliferates. One aspect that needs to be considered is the conversion of garages into additional accommodation of a family dwelling. This results in the loss of one or more parking spaces and should not be permitted unless there is adequate space available within the curtilage of the site for parking of the vehicles previously housed in the garage. The alternative is for even more street parking.

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H3: Development in the Conservation Area Within the defined Conservation Area, development proposals must respond sensitively and creatively to its historic environment, character and appearance; and respect the following key guiding principles: a) Development proposals should seek to complement existing design within the character areas of the Conservation Area, as identified in the CAAMP:

Character Area 1 The Historic Core - key characteristics

Character Area 3 Open Spaces – key characteristics

• Properties with pavement frontages. • Two storey buildings with gabled roofs. • Buildings constructed from coursed magnesian limestone. • Slate roof tiles. • Simple building design.

• Large open areas with mature trees • Large plot sizes with high status dwellings, notably Bramham Lodge and Bramham House. • Buildings constructed from coursed magnesian limestone. • Slate roof tiles. • Simple building design.

e) Mature trees which make a positive contribution to the character of the Conservation Area should be retained wherever possible. Opportunities should be taken as appropriate to plant young trees to ensure continued existence tree cover in the future.

b) Surviving historic features should be retained and where necessary sympathetically repaired. Opportunities to reinstate lost features should be capitalised upon. c) Development which involves below-ground excavation must have regard to the potential for archaeological finds. d) Any development proposing the infill of a site or the subdivision of a plot should respond to the scale, massing, layout and distribution of positive structures within the Conservation Area. The historic toft-andcroft plan should be respected.

f) Stone boundary walls which make a positive contribution to the Conservation Area will be retained. New boundary treatments should fit with the character of existing boundary walls and should be constructed from matching limestone. g) The siting and design of road signs and street furniture and the use of surfacing materials should have regards to current “Street Design Guide” guidance.

Character Area 2 The 20th Century – key characteristics

• Cul-de-sac layout. • Buildings set back from road. • One and two storey buildings with gabled roofs. • Buildings constructed from coursed stone. • Red pantile roof tiles. • Simple building design.

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4.5.3 H4 Development outside the Conservation Area Bramham has a unique character that must be preserved and enhanced wherever possible. This does not mean that new ideas and materials should be dismissed but these need to be considered alongside high levels of design to ensure that the unique character of Bramham is never lost. Any alterations, extensions or additions to the built environment need to be carefully considered in order for them to help maintain and enhance the overall appeal of the parish. Outside the Conservation Area, there are the areas of housing on the north side of the village together with small pockets of housing elsewhere. The original council estate is a great asset to the village with solidly built houses. Their unique character with spacious gardens especially onto Clifford Road need to be retained. Similarly, the newer estates within the parish have a character of their own. Although they are not unique in their design and similar examples can be found throughout the country they add to diversity of the area. The principles of design and detailing of all structures within the Conservation Area should be extended to the remainder of the parish in order that the unique nature of the village is never lost nor dwarfed by buildings of a different nature surrounding the conservation area. In particular, the small hamlet around Headley Hall is quite unique and care should be taken to ensure that it does not lose its appeal owing to its existing character.

H4: Development outside the Conservation Area Development proposals outside the Conservation Area should: a) Respect the surrounding and adjacent built form. b) Reflect local building design, form and style. c) Provide appropriate local infrastructure, including provision for off road parking and green spaces. d) Where possible, reflect the best design within those parts of the Conservation Area, adjacent to the proposed development.

This has had a detrimental effect on the appearance of the village and care must be taken to ensure that the overall character is not destroyed. It is essential that spaces between buildings are given a high priority when consideration is given to any planning application for extensions and in fills. It is not merely the buildings that make the village unique it is the roads, footpaths, courts and spaces between structures that add to the character and well-being of the parish. The design and detailing of all external spaces are as important as the design of actual buildings that surround them, (including car parking spaces). The character of the area can be greatly enhanced by the detailing of street furniture and materials. The street scene is very important. Care needs to be taken to retain areas of paving and setts and not replacing them with tarmac. The existing stone walls around the parish need to be protected and kept in good order as they add to the character of the parish. Of specific importance are the walls bounding Aberford Road, Windmill Hill and Bowcliffe Road.

The parish is a small community in rural surroundings but the existing small spaces within the actual village are vital to the overall appearance and character that we aim to retain and enhance. The spaces are of equal importance to the actual buildings and it is not only the actual spaces enclosed by the buildings but the views that are to be seen between these structures. Over recent years, many spaces have been lost, gardens have been built on and many views blocked.

http://www.leeds.gov.uk/docs/FPI_SDG_001%20Street%20Design%20Guide%20Final.pdf

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4.5.4 H5 Key views

Short range views:

The community of Bramham highly value the surrounding countryside and the key short and long range views afforded to those looking in to and out of the village. These views should be protected.

1. From New Road, east towards All Saints’ Church – aim to protect view of historic church and churchyard.

The CAAMP notes the importance of key views as follows: “Despite the gradient of Town Hill, Bramham village effectively nestles in a distinct hollow and is therefore not highly visible within the wider landscape, though good views into the village are possible from the outer edges of the settlement. From within the village itself Town Hill and Almshouse Hill offer commanding views of the houses around the historic core, and views out of the village toward the surrounding agricultural and park land are always important.” In addition, the Core Strategy Policy P10: Design, states that development will protect and enhance locally important buildings, spaces, skylines and views. There are eight key short range views and nine key long range views in to and out of Bramham. These are illustrated in map 13 and noted as follows:

2. From village square, south towards Almshouse Hill – aim to protect view of traditional village buildings dating from the village’s early history and the war memorial. 3. From the Jubilee Gardens, south towards village centre – aim to protect view of traditional dwellings leading to village square. 4. From cattle ramp towards the Red Lion public house – aim to protect view of historic cattle ramp, Carr Beck, public house, and square. 5. From village square towards Senior Citizens’ Centre and garden – aim to protect view of traditional building and green space in the heart of the village facing the square. 6. From Lyndon Road incorporating green space and then north towards Clifford – aim to protect view of green space on Lyndon Road and rural aspect to north of village. 7. From the junction of Aberford Road and Freely Lane looking north up Freely Lane – aim to protect view of Historic building (Bramham Lodge) and playing field opposite. 8. From Almshouse Hill looking north over the village – aim to protect view of panorama over village centre.

1. From Aberford Road south east down Headley Lane – aim to protect view of open countryside and agricultural land in south of Bramham parish. 2. From the junction of Paradise Way and Bowcliffe Road towards Bramham village centre – aim to preserve rural entrance to Bramham. 3. From the cycle path running parallel to, and east of, the A1, south east towards the village – aim to protect the immediate environment of the village and conservation area. 4. From junction of Thorner Road and Paradise Way towards All Saints’ Church – aim to protect the village panorama and skyline.

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5. South along Windmill Road, looking uphill towards the Windmill – aim to protect open countryside with view of the historic windmill. 6. Oglethorpe Hills towards Oglethorpe Hall Farm – aim to protect open countryside on eastern edge of village giving view of historic farmhouse. 7. Warren Lane south from the Quarry entrance – aim to protect view to Headley settlement showing its rural position. 8. From the cycle path running parallel to, and east of, the A1, east towards lynchets (medieval terraces) on hillside – aim to protect view of historic landscape. 9. Windmill Road looking north towards Clifford – aim to protect panorama of open space between Bramham village and Clifford village which provides delineation between the villages.

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Map 13: Short range views

Long range views:

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H5: Key views Development should consider the visual impact of proposals and ensure careful design to protect the following key views, (identified on maps 13 and 14), in order to maintain the character and appearance of Bramham parish.

Short range views: SR1. From New Road, east towards All Saints Church SR2. From village square, south towards Almshouse Hill SR3. From the Jubilee Gardens, south towards village centre SR4. From cattle ramp towards the Red Lion public house SR5. From village square towards Senior Citizens’ Centre and garden SR6. From Lyndon Road incorporating green space and then north towards Clifford SR7. From the junction of Aberford Road and Freely Lane looking north up Freely Lane SR8. From Almshouse Hill looking north over the village

Long range views: LR1. From Aberford Road south east down Headley Lane LR2. From the junction of Paradise Way and Bowcliffe Road towards Bramham village centre LR3. From the cycle path running parallel to, and east of, the A1, south east towards the village

Map 14: Long range views

LR4. From junction of Thorner Road and Paradise Way towards All Saints Church

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LR5. South along Windmill Road, looking uphill towards the Windmill LR6. Oglethorpe Hills towards Oglethorpe Hall Farm LR7. Warren Lane south from the Quarry entrance LR8. From the cycle path running parallel to, and east of, the A1, east towards lynchets (medieval terraces) on hillside LR9. Windmill Road looking north towards Clifford

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Short range views

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SR1. From New Road, east towards All Saints’ Church

SR3. From the Jubilee Gardens, south towards village centre

SR2. From village square, south towards Almshouse Hill

SR4. From cattle ramp towards the Red Lion public house

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Short range views

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SR5. From village square towards Senior Citizens’ Centre and garden

SR7. From the junction of Aberford Road and Freely Lane looking north up Freely Lane

SR6. From Lyndon Road incorporating green space and then north towards Clifford

SR8. From Almshouse Hill looking north over the village

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Long range views

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LR1. From Aberford Road south east down Headley Lane

LR3. From the cycle path running parallel to, and east of, the A1, south east towards the village

LR2. From the junction of Paradise Way and Bowcliffe Road towards Bramham village centre

LR4. From junction of Thorner Road and Paradise Way towards All Saints’ church

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Long range views

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LR5. South along Windmill Road, looking uphill towards the Windmill.

LR7. Warren Lane east from the Quarry entrance.

LR6. Oglethorpe Hills towards Oglethorpe Hall Farm.

LR8. From the cycle path running parallel to, and east of, the A1, east towards lynchets (medieval terraces) on hillside.

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4.6 University of Leeds (UoL) The intention in setting out these policies is to support the University of Leeds to continue to use their Headley Hall estate for agricultural/ research/ academic purposes.

Policies summarised UoL1: University of Leeds Estate

Objectives addressed • To support the continuing use of the Headley Hall (University of Leeds estate) for agricultural/ research/ academic purposes).

The University of Leeds have owned or leased the majority of the land identified on the site location plan (Map 15 University of Leeds estate boundary) since around the 1940s. The site was originally predominantly used for teaching and research on arable, dairy and pig production. In the 1990s, the University leased much of the land to a wholly owned subsidiary company called the University of Leeds Farms Ltd. However, since this point the use of the farms for teaching has broadly declined. Many of the current buildings within the site are vacant and in need of repair, e.g. Wise Warren Farm. There are three main areas of built development at the site as illustrated in the site plan (Map 16: University of Leeds site map): • Wise Warren Farm - the farm comprises an occupied house and a series of outbuildings that are predominantly unused (see map 16). • Headley Hall Farm – the site comprises of a collection of disused farm buildings. It is at this location that a previous housing scheme was approved in February 2009 (see map 16). • Spen Farm - the farm is currently used as a research facility including a pig research unit (see map 16). The University are committed to maintaining and expanding their research facility at Spen Farm. In the last year, the University committed to a £10 million expansion of the pig research facility. Planning permission was obtained in March 2017 for five agricultural buildings along with ancillary research/ office/ teaching facilities for the agricultural research facility (LPA ref: 16/07798/FU). The proposals demonstrate that the landholding is not a typical agricultural use and the research operation has specific operational requirements.

The University are currently in the process of dissolving the University of Leeds Farms Ltd and developing a new estate strategy. The intention is to dissolve the limited company with a view to managing the estate within the Facilities Directorate under a new structure. The research activities will bring some buildings on the three existing farms back into use where possible. However, it is likely that some vacant buildings will need to be converted to other viable uses (eg residential). There is the potential to convert the existing agricultural barns at Wise Warren Farm to dwellings. The University consider there is potential to develop renewable energy solutions on the estate (eg a solar farm) and these could be linked to the existing expansion of research activity at Spen Farm. With regard to the above issue of renewable energy, the community survey asked the following question: Within your Neighbourhood Plan, would you support the development of any renewable energy schemes (i.e. Wind/Water Turbines, Solar Panels, Biomass Energy) within the boundaries of Bramham Parish?

13% (39 respondents) answered, I am against all forms of development associated with renewable energy within Bramham Parish. 49% (145 respondents) answered, yes, providing it is small scale and out of sight. 31% (91 respondents) answered, yes, no problems with any small development including visible small scale turbines, solar panels, etc. 7% (21 respondents) answered, yes, completely supportive of any developments associated with renewable energy.

At Headley Hall Farm, a housing scheme was approved in February 2009 (LPA ref: 08/05954/FU) for the change of use involving demolitions, alterations, extensions, recladding and new pitched roofs to existing farm buildings to form 3 two bed, 4 three bed and 2 four bed dwellings. The planning permission was later extended to December 2014 (LPA ref: 11/04642/EXT) but was never implemented and has since expired. The housing scheme worked within the existing built form to respect the Green Belt setting and provided a mix of dwelling sizes. The proposal demonstrates that the re-use of some vacant buildings on the estate can be considered acceptable subject to appropriate design and layout.

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Map 15: University of Leeds estate boundary

Map 16: University of Leeds site map

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UoL1: University of Leeds Estate Subject to compliance with other relevant national, local and neighbourhood plan policies, the following activities and developments will be supported on the estate as identified in Map 15 University of Leeds estate boundary and Map 16 University of Leeds site map.

• The continued use and expansion of research activities; • Within the three main areas of built development (ie Wise Warren Farm, Headley Hall Farm and Spen Farm) the reuse and conversion of existing, vacant buildings for appropriate, viable uses; • The development of small-scale renewable energy schemes.

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58 BRAMHAM NEIGHBOURHOOD DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2033 Green Belt

Conservation Area

Local Green Space

Village Asset

Map 18 Bramham Neighbourhood Plan Policies Map 2 - Community facilities

Bramham Neighbourhood Plan Policies Map 2 - Community Facilities

Map 17: Bramham Neighbourhood Plan Policies Map 1

Key

Bramham Neighbourhood Plan Policies Map 1

4.7 Bramham Neighbourhood Plan Policies Maps

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60 BRAMHAM NEIGHBOURHOOD DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2033 Entrance to Bramham Paradise Way/Aberford Road

Jubilee Garden

Green space joining Lyndon Road/ Lyndon Close/Lyndon Square

Bramham Playing Field

Green space at end of Milnthorpe Way

Map 19: Bramham Neighbourhood Plan Policies Map 3 - Local Green Spaces

Entrance to Bramham Paradise Way/Bowcliffe Road

Tenter Hill Allotments

Entrance to Bramham Paradise Way/Wetherby Road

2 green spaces either side of Croft Drive/Lyndon Road

Bramham Neighbourhood Plan Policies Map 3 - Local Green Spaces

Folly Allotments

Churchyard, All Saints Church

4.7 Bramham Neighbourhood Plan Policies Maps

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5. Projects & Aspirations

Enhanced / Additional Children’s Play Area facilities • Monitor use /demand • Consider additional play areas

Supporting the policies of the Plan are a set of aspirations and projects which will primarily be the responsibility of the Parish Council to drive forward.

A1 noise abatement schemes

Funding for community projects may be delivered utilising Community Infrastructure Levy, potentially matched from additional funding from the Parish Council and other external funding sources.

Continue to develop the Pavilion to the benefit of the community • Ensure the pavilion building is well maintained

• Liaise with West Yorkshire Ecology Service for support and guidance

• A1 noise abatement schemes

• Consider additional sports facilities – e.g. running track / boules consider extension of the meeting room to enable wider use

Reinstatement /enhancement of character of Village Square

• Continue to develop the Pavilion to the benefit of the community • Continue to enhance the Christmas lights display in Bramham • Development of foot / cycle / bridle ways within Bramham and surrounding parishes • Development of car parking provision near the Primary School • Enhanced / Additional Children’s Play Area facilities • Enhancement of the Wildlife Area around the Beck

• Explore possibilities of funding / development of noise abatement with any developers working in the Parish • Investigate any schemes that the Parish Council or Leeds City Council could put in place.

• encourage sports and community events

Continue to enhance the Christmas lights display in Bramham • Provide financial & practical support to the Community Action Group to continue with Christmas lights & festivities

Development of foot / cycle / bridle ways within Bramham and surrounding parishes • Identify any potential routes

• Reinstatement /enhancement of character of Village Square

• Explore funding

• Traffic control measures

• Investigate LCC highways responsibility/provision

• To support local village assets, including the village hall and village shop

Development of car parking provision near the Primary School

• Assess traffic management of the whole village, including speeding, irresponsible parking, one way system.

• Engage with LCC Highways & Children’s services re assessment of school expansion

• To improve public transport links in the parish and to seek to maximise the connectivity with neighbouring parishes and communities.

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• Engage support of Ward Councillors

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• Maintain a maintenance fund

Enhancement of the Wildlife Area around the Beck • Provide financial & practical support to Bramham in Bloom group to continue with maintenance of the area

• Develop & cost a proposal

Traffic control measures / Assess traffic management of the whole village, including speeding, irresponsible parking, one way system. • Commission an assessment of issues and a proposal for traffic control

To support local village assets, including the village hall and village shop • Ensure links maintained between the Parish Council & owners / managers of assets

To improve public transport links in the parish and to seek to maximise the connectivity with neighbouring parishes and communities. • To ensure an adequate and safe network of access for pedestrians, cyclists, motorists and horse riders throughout the parish and to the neighbouring villages and towns. • Public transport links in Bramham are limited to two bus services – 770/1 Harrogate to Leeds via Bramham, (now known as 70/71) and 174 (Wakefield to Wetherby via Bramham). There are several byways, bridleways and footpaths. Part of National Route 67 of the National Cycle Network includes an open section on an old railway path between Wetherby and Spofforth (Harland Way). The community benefits greatly from the existing transport but have clearly expressed a desire to improve transport and transport links within the parish. • The responses to the consultation question “how important are public transport links to your household (both now and in the future)?” were summarised as follows: • 52% (154 respondents) considered public transport links to be essential • 33% (97 respondents) considered public transport links to be quite necessary • 16% (47 respondents) considered public transport links to be not necessary • There are two buses that provide a public transport service in Bramham. • 770/1 (Leeds to Harrogate), (now known as 70/71), is used by 239 people • 174 (Wakefield to Wetherby) is used by 85 people • There is a need within the community to improve transport links between Bramham and York and Bramham and Tadcaster. This was supported by the community survey where 74% (217 respondents) wanted a direct bus service to Tadcaster and York.

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APPENDIX 1 – Local Green Space Assessment Site name/ location

Characteristics of the site

Close proximity to community?

Local significance?

Area in Hectares

Land owner/

Site name/ location

Characteristics of the site

Close proximity to community?

Local significance?

Area in Hectares

Land owner/

Tenter Hill Allotments (off Meadow Lane)

Managed Allotments – tended and maintained by Bramham parishioners.

On fringes of village but within Parish boundaries

Allotments, typical of rural village life, tranquil space, adding recreational value to its users

2 ha

Parish Council

Entrance to Bramham – Paradise Way/Bowcliffe Road

Entrance to village

LCC

Managed Allotments – tended and maintained by Bramham parishioners.

Within village boundaries

Allotments, typical of rural village life, tranquil space, adding recreational value to its users

0.4 ha

Bramham Park

Historic space and signage in to village, managed beds, benches, mature trees. Signage characteristic of village. Restful spot for walkers/runners.

0.1 ha

Folly Allotments (off Aberford Road)

Green spaces at entrance to village containing unusual ‘Welcome to Bramham’ sign

Entrance to Bramham – Paradise Way/Wetherby Road

Entrance to village

LCC

Within heart of village Sports field – 2 football pitches, large open green space, pavilion, adjoining children’s play area, surrounded by mature native trees

Significant recreational facility for use by parishioners, nothing else exists like it in the village. Regularly used by sports societies throughout the year. Host site of many annual and ad-hoc events including village gala. Mainly surrounded by mature native trees.

4 ha

Historic space and signage in to village, managed beds, benches, mature trees. Signage characteristic of village. Restful spot for walkers/runners.

0.1 ha

Bramham Playing Field

Green spaces at entrance to village containing unusual ‘Welcome to Bramham’ sign

Green space end of Milnthorpe Way

Within village Green space and walkthrough at end of Milnthorpe Way

Enclosed green space and walkthrough at end of Milnthorpe Way. Walkthrough links footpath running alongside Paradise Way. Mature trees. Play space for local children.

0.2 ha

LCC

Historically Within heart of village important churchyard

Historically important, graves dating back centuries; includes graves of soldiers from historic battles/skirmishes. Oval Saxon churchyard, one of only a few in the country. Site of natural beauty & tranquillity. Rich in wildlife.

1.8 ha

Jubilee Garden – (corner of Wetherby Road/Lyndon Road)

Formal public garden with benches and beds managed by local ‘Bramham Community Action Group’

Within heart of village

Restful spot, referenced repeatedly in ‘Village in Bloom’ awards process. Tended by Parishioners.

0.01 ha

LCC

Entrance to Bramham – Paradise Way/Aberford Road

Green space at entrance to village along Paradise Way (nr traffic lights/ bench).

Entrance to village

Open green space at entrance to village. Contains bench frequently utilised by runners and walkers.

0.1 ha

LCC

Open green space containing benches, trees, and walkthrough from Lyndon Square to Lyndon Rd. Provides essential green space within the estate, frequently used as a playing space by local children (as witnessed by rope swing). Restful spot within estate/ village.

0.3 ha

Open green space containing flower beds & rockery recently introduced by ‘Bramham in Bloom’ Committee.

0.2 ha

Churchyard, All Saints’ Church

Green space joining Lyndon Road/Lyndon Close/Lyndon Square

2 green spaces either side of Croft Drive/Lyndon Road

Green space and walkthrough within the Lyndon’s estate

2 semi large green spaces. Contains beds recently introduced by ‘Bramham in Bloom’ Committee.

Within heart of village

Green space upon entering village (From Clifford)

Parish Council

Benefice of Bramham, Diocese of York

LCC

Note NPPF describes Local Green Space as follows: The Local Green Space designation will not be appropriate for most green areas or open space. The designation should only be used: 8

• where the green space is in reasonably close proximity to the community it serves; • where the green area is demonstrably special to a local community and holds a particular local significance, for example because of its beauty, historic significance, recreational value (including as a playing field), tranquility or richness of its wildlife; and • where the green area concerned is local in character and is not an extensive tract of land.

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APPENDIX 2 – Local Green Spaces maps

Bramham Playing Field

Tenter Hill Allotments

Churchyard All Saints’ Church

Tenter Hill Allotments

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Green space joining Lyndon Road/Lyndon Close/Lyndon Square

Entrance to Bramham – Paradise Way/Bowcliffe Road Two green spaces either side of Croft Drive/Lyndon Road

Entrance to Bramham – Paradise Way/Wetherby Road

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Green space at end of Milnthorpe Way

Entrance to Bramham – Paradise Way/Aberford Road

Jubilee Garden

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APPENDIX 3 – Community Survey 2016 The responses from the community survey were analysed and a report was produced. Listed below is a summary of the responses and the key issues raised during the consultation process.

• 304 responses were received in total. • 97% of respondents live in the parish of Bramham. • 6  4% were extremely satisfied with all aspects of living in Bramham.

The top five local community facilities considered to be highly important to protect are: Village Shop/PO – 87%

• 72% consider the village hall to be essential. • 67% consider the village pub to be essential. • 91% consider the village shop/post office to be essential.

Residents enjoy living in Bramham – the respondents like the following a lot:

The number of additional dwellings in the parish that could be accommodated were considered to be:

Quiet village/rural location - 91%

The top three local businesses/services that are visited at least twice weekly are:

Easy access to A1/Leeds/York/ Harrogate – 85%

0-25 - 25%

Village identity/feeling part of a community – 73%

51-100 – 27%

Village Shop/PO - 41%

Village activities/community groups 54%

Local Bus Service – 14% Village Pubs – 14%

26-50 – 34% 101-200 – 10%

Village facilities - 67%

201-500 – 3% 501-1000 – 1% 1000+ - 0%

Medical Centre – 86% Primary School – 82% Village Hall – 78% Playing Fields – 73%

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APPENDIX 3 – Community Survey 2016

The question of the current housing composition in Bramham raised several different views. To summarise, the current composition was thought to be:

Support for future development:

Luxury Housing (5+ Bedrooms) – 60% about right, 26% too many already

41% fully support proposals for development at Farfield House

Family Housing (3-4 Bedrooms) – 53% about right, 33% need a few more

31% fully support proposals for development at Bramham House

Flats/1-2 bedroom properties – 41 about right, 40% need a few more

55% fully support proposals for development at The Biggin

Social Housing / Housing association – 52% about right, 24% need a few more Housing for the elderly/retired – 42% need a few more, 40% about right Affordable Starter Housing – 42% need a few more, 33% need a lot more Rental Properties – 63% about right, 17% need a few more • 89% thought it was highly important that future development must be in keeping with local characteristics. • 87% thought it was highly important that village boundaries and green spaces must be protected.

53% fully support proposals for development at Headley Hall • 74% wanted an improvement with a direct bus service to Tadcaster/York. • 67% wanted an improvement in parking facilities near Bramham Primary School. • 61% wanted more recreational footpaths/scenic walks/bridleways. • The most attended annual event in the last two years was the village gala (72% of respondents). • 38% of respondents had supported or attended Bramham in Bloom.

• 77% thought it was highly important that any development must cater for additional local facilities.

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APPENDIX 3 – Community Survey 2016

The most popular schemes children had attended or used in the past two years are: Village Play Area - 75% Wildlife area behind the Beck – 41% Brownies - 20% Pavilion Summer Playgroup 20% Beavers – 19%

The most popular schemes to spend money on were: Development of foot/cycle/bridleways within Bramham and surrounding parishes Reinstatement /enhancement of character of Village Square A1 noise abatement schemes

• 47% think there are enough facilities for 0-5 year olds. • 34% think there are enough facilities for 6-12 year olds. • 46% think there are not enough facilities for 13-17 year olds. • 25% think there are not enough facilities for 18+ year olds and 22% think there are enough. • 49% would support a renewable energy scheme providing it is small and out of sight. • 31% had no problems with any small renewable energy development including visible small scale turbines, solar panels etc.

Development of car parking provision near the Primary School • 90% wanted the Neighbourhood Plan to ensure that any future development is sympathetic to the needs of the existing population and in keeping with local characteristics. • 85% wanted the Neighbourhood Plan to protect valued village assets. • 77% wanted the Neighbourhood Plan to enhance the protection of the landscape and natural environment.

• The responses indicated strong support for the protection of all the village assets listed in the questionnaire with the lowest support for the WW1 Aircraft Hangar at Headley with 53%. • 80% supported the idea of a signed heritage trail in the parish.

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APPENDIX 4 – Bramham NDP Business Survey 2017

The analysis of the responses we received and sample comments:

Nature of businesses Languages, Executive Search, Job Search, Property Ownership, Investments, Pension, Antiques, Private Hire, Engineering Consultancy, Online Retail, Fine Art Auctioneers

Number of employees

Are there any specific sites in the parish that you think should be developed for industry or commerce?

What do you consider to be the main barriers to growth for business in the parish?

Land surrounding the perimeter of the village, but close too so not to detract from green belt surrounding.

Employment land

Are there any specific sites in the parish that you think should NOT be developed for industry or commerce? No office development (should space arise) around/on Low Way, High Street, Town Hill as roads too narrow. Small enterprises from residential/ small commercial premises should be encouraged through the village.

Full time – 1 to 12 Part time – 0 to 4

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Have you any specific ideas as to how this Plan could be used to encourage businesses, and business growth?

Percentage of respondents.

10%

Skilled workers Poor transport links

10 %

Inadequate business support Broadband / mobile phone communications

50 %

Rent/rate levels

50 %

A lack of affordable premises

40 %

A lack of premises to expand into

10 %

Perhaps if there was greater awareness of what business activity currently takes place in the village, therefore could be mutual/cross development business opportunities identified and shared. Bramham needs superfast broadband – We’re now moving out because of it. As a lone home-based worker my main issue has been broadband speed – The introduction of Superfast Broadband has resolved this.

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Bramham Neighbourhood Plan Dec 2017  
Bramham Neighbourhood Plan Dec 2017  

Bramham cum Oglethorpe - Neighbourhood Plan - Pre-submission Draft - December 2017

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