__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

H U M A N

R I G H T S

C A M P A I G N

LATE S P R I N G / EAR LY S U M M E R 2015

A HISTORIC VICTORY...


...AS KEY BATTLES LOOM DIRECTLY AHEAD FIGHTING FOR A FEDERAL BILL ENSURING OUR FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS GEARING UP FOR DELUGE OF ANTI-LGBT BILLS ACROSS THE COUNTRY


1950 | Mattachine Society forms — one of the earliest organizations advocating for equal rights for gay people in the country.

1970–1979

1966 | Transgender patrons of Compton’s Cafeteria in San Francisco revolt against police officers who target them for their gender expression.

1955 | Daughters of Bilitis forms. It is the country’s first lesbian civil and political rights organization.

1950–1969

Patrons of the Stonewall Inn in New York City — gay men, transgender women and others — fight back against police harassment.

1969 STONEWALL INN

1967 | Police raid Los Angeles’ Black Cat Tavern, beating several patrons, arresting 16 people. More than 200 people protest.

At long last, the U.S. Supreme Court has recognized the constitutionality of same-sex marriage — a decisive moment in the fight for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality. This struggle has its roots in a long history — every setback and every victory bears heavily on our moment today. And as America celebrates these new freedoms, it’s important to remember how they were earned.

A MOMENT 65 YEARS IN THE MAKING

MARRIAGE EQUALITY


2008 | While many Americans celebrate the election of President Obama, others decry the passage of amendments in California, Florida and Arizona banning marriage for same-sex couples.

2012 | The American Psychological Association no longer classifies being transgender as a mental disorder.

80

Over 80 cases are filed in federal and state courts challenging state marriage bans across the country.

2013 - 2014 | The U.S. Supreme Court overturns Section 3 of DOMA in United States v. Windsor and reinstates marriage equality in California with Hollingsworth v. Perry. During oral arguments for these cases, HRC shares a red version of its equality logo on social media, which becomes the most virally shared image in Facebook history.

2010–2015

2009 | The Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act — the first piece of federal legislation that is inclusive of the entire LGBT community — is signed into law.

60

%

February 2015 | Polls show 60% of Americans support marriage equality.

2014 - 2015 | State bans on same-sex marriage are struck down in: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho, Kentucky, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Virginia and Wisconsin. Legal challenges continue, however.

2004 | The U.S. Congress defeats the proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which would have prohibited same-sex couples from marrying. The FMA is introduced 10 times. It never successfully passes.

FEDERAL MARRIAGE AMENDMENT

2003 | The U.S. Supreme Court rules in Lawrence v. Texas that laws criminalizing sodomy are unconstitutional, invalidating antiLGBT legislation in 14 states.

2012 | President Obama becomes the first sitting president to announce support for marriage equality.

2003 | Massachusetts Supreme Court’s ruling in Goodridge v. Department of Public Health brings marriage equality to the state.

2012 | Voters go to the polls to pass marriage equality in three states — Maine, Maryland and Washington. Meanwhile, Minnesota voters defeat an amendment that would have banned same-sex marriage.

2011 | Three major national polls show that, for the first time in history, a majority of Americans support marriage equality.

VERMONT COUPLES CAN FORM ‘CIVIL UNIONS’ JULY 1

2000 | Vermont becomes the first state to grant civil unions to same-sex couples.

2000–2009


1993 | The Hawaii Supreme Court rules in favor of marriage equality, prompting backlash across the country. Several states ban same-sex marriage.

1980 | The Human Rights Campaign Fund is established as a political action committee to raise money for gay-supportive congressional candidates.

In this landmark decision, the U.S. Supreme Court strikes down a state constitutional amendment in Colorado that would have prevented the passage of a state law recognizing gay, lesbian and bisexual people as a protected class.

1998 | Matthew Shepard, a 21-year-old student, is beaten and left to die near Laramie, Wyo. His death brings national attention to state and federal hate crimes legislation.

1987 | The Second National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights is held, and is the first public display of Cleve Jones’ NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt.

1979 | The first-ever National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights is held.

1996 | The U.S. Congress overwhelmingly passes the Defense of Marriage Act. President Clinton signs the act into law, preventing the federal government from recognizing same-sex marriages until its partial repeal 17 years later.

1986 | In Bowers v. Hardwick, the U.S. Supreme Court upholds the constitutionality of a Georgia law criminalizing sodomy.

1978 | Harvey Milk is sworn in as the first openly gay member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in January. Later that year, in November, he is assassinated by fellow city supervisor Dan White.

DOMA

1990–1999

1982 | AIDS is first named and defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, replacing less accurate terms like “gay-related immune deficiency,” and bringing the condition into the public eye.

1980–1989

1996 ROMER V. EVANS

After the Minnesota Supreme Court ruled that the state was allowed to ban same-sex marriage, the plaintiff, Richard Baker, appeals to the U.S. Supreme Court. In a one-sentence order, the case is dismissed because of its lack of a “substantial federal question.”

1972 BAKER V. NELSON

1973 | The American Psychological Association removes homosexuality from its list of mental disorders.


100

%

IT’S A START

Bank of America thanks the Human Rights Campaign for recognizing us with a 100% score on the Corporate Equality Index. We’ll keep doing our best to share the benefits of diversity at work and in the communities we serve. And we invite everyone to join us on a journey that is by no means finished. We are 100% grateful. bankofamerica.com/diversity

©2015 Bank of America Corporation. | AD-02-15-0221 | ARK7VJFW


BOARD OF DIRECTORS Lacey All WA, Ian Barrett TX, Bruce Bastian UT, Vanessa Benavides TX, Michael Berman DC, Scott Bishop NC, Paul Boskind TX, Chris Carolan NY, Bill Donius MO, Patty Ellis PA, Christopher Flynn MA, Kirk Hamill DC, Suzanne Hamilton OH, James Harrison TX, Sheila Kloefkorn AZ, Tom Knabel MN, Chris Labonte PA, Joan Lau PA, Bryan Parsons CA, Lester Perryman LA, Hank Provost CO, Cheryl Rose OH, Linda Scaparotti CA, Mol Simmons GA, Ashley Smith DC, Steve Sorenson CA, Meghan Stabler TX, Ben Waldman WA, Brad White CA, Frank Woo CA

BEYOND MARRIAGE LIE SOME OF OUR BIGGEST CHALLENGES YET.

FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS Gwen Baba CA, Elena Baca CA, John Barry IL, Bruce Bastian UT, Scott Bishop NC, Todd Canon TX, Lee Carter NC, Edie Cofrin GA, Bill Donius MO, Patty Ellis PA, Christopher Flynn MA, Charlie Frew GA, Suzanne Hamilton OH, Sheila Kloefkorn AZ, Britt Kornmann TX, Tom Kovach NV, Joan Lau PA, Andy Linsky CA, Joshua Miller NV, Bryan Parsons CA, Hank Provost CO, Cat Reid WA, Cheryl Rose OH, John Ruffier FL, Mol Simmons GA, Cathi Scalise TX, Judy Shepard WY, Steve Sorenson CA, Faye Tate CO, Robb Webb IL, Frank Woo CA

DEAR FRIEND, There has been much to celebrate in recent days. At long last, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that loving same-sex couples have a right to marry nationwide. These couples and their children have never been less than, and the nation’s highest court has agreed. This is a victory that has been a long time coming. But it’s important to remember, amid all the celebrations, that our work is far from over. HRC won’t be closing up shop. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender advocates aren’t going to take their ball and go home. Beyond marriage lie some of our biggest challenges yet. Even securing marriage equality doesn’t guarantee that our families will be treated equally under the law. And that’s because of this simple fact: There is still no federal LGBT non-discrimination law on the books in this country. We’ve made progress fighting discrimination from courtrooms to state legislatures. Despite that progress, a crucial measure has never, ever been passed. It is a federal law to guarantee that we are fully equal under the law, covering housing, public accommodations, employment, credit and education. That means that, even after a 50-state marriage victory at the Supreme Court, in most states in this country, a couple who gets married at 10 a.m. can be fired from their jobs by noon and evicted from their home by 2 p.m. simply for posting their wedding photos on Facebook. 4

EQUALITY

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

And that’s why, starting in this session of the U.S. Congress, HRC will lead the fight for a comprehensive federal non-discrimination bill. This will be the biggest legislative battle in the history of this movement. No matter what it takes, this is a battle we must win. Because I know a majority of Americans agree that the time has come in this country for full federal equality, nothing more, nothing less. The question the Supreme Court justices were presented with dealt with marriage, but the issues at hand in this case were far broader. This was a case that, at its heart, was about making those words etched into the marble above the high court — “Equal Justice Under Law” — apply fairly to everyone. It was a case about equality and justice for all, and the devastating and irreparable harm caused by discrimination. There’s still much to do to achieve full equality for LGBT people in this country and around the globe. But as our most recent victories show us, progress can’t be halted. And together, we will win. Yours,

Marilyn Abalos NY, John Affuso MA, Tal Anderson MN, Debra Bacchi NY, Jennifer Bajorek TX, Greg Battaglia NY, Kevin Baucom TX, Andrew Beaudoin FL, Jay Biles NC, Brittany Binler PA, Doris Bobadilla LA, Chris Boone LA, Brian Bourquin MA, Kathy Bowman OH, Blake Brockway TN, Linda Brown OR, K Jason Bryan MN, Brian Buzby TX, Rory Cahn OH, Nancy Caldwell TX, Jeremy Carter NC, Steven Cayton GA, Conan Cleveland LA, Angie Cottrell MO, Dolores Covrigaru NY, Thomas Cowley CA, June Crenshaw DC, Lynn Currie TX, Dani Daley CA, Lance Demaline OH, Brad DiFiore GA, Jaime Duggan TX, Cordy Elkins MA, Alex Ernst VA, Chris Fasser NY, Maria Fasulo NY, Gabe Fischer CO, Taylor Fiscus IL, Jenny Ford TN, Heather Freyer CA, Sarah Garber MO, Matt Garrett GA, Ben Gibbs GA, Melinda Greene GA, Jon Groppe OH, Annie Groth AZ, Lisa Guillory LA, Randall Hance TX, Matt Hendry CA, S. Kelly Herrick CA, Gary Hilbert NJ, Latoya Holman NV, Ann Hooper NC, Lon Hurst TN, Bob Jacobson AZ, Tim Jenkins IL, Alyssa Jones MA, Dean Keppler WA, John Kim WA, Champ Knecht NY, Kevin Knoblock MA, Kristine Kuzemka NV, Keith Laepple WA, David Lahti CA, Andrew Land GA, Jason Laney DC, Duane Lefevre MA, Christine Lehtonen CA, Char Ligo OH, Alex Lindquist CO, Chris Lindsey TX, Anna Lineback NC, Michael Long OR, Thomas Macias CA, Lisa Marchbanks CA, Jeffrey Marsocci NC, David Martinez, III AZ, Paul Mataras MA, Dan Mauney NC, Sean MéHew UT, Rich Meyers CA, Earnest Morgan MN, Karen Morgan OH, Missy Morgan NV, DyShaun Muhammad MN, Chris New GA, Robert Newhart IL, Khoa Nguyen DC, Roger Nyhus WA, Derek Osterman MA, Tonya Pachetti-Perkins TX, Brandon Patterson GA, Devin Payne CA, Byron Pelt MO, Angela Pisecco TX, Densil Porteous OH, Kaitlin Porter GA, Steve Pospisil MN, Robert Puckett TX, Ron Quinn NV, Victor Ravago CA, Chad Reumann TX, Geri Rochino CA, Mario Rodas MA, Liz Rodriguez TX, Paul Schiminsky NV, Elizabeth Schlesinger MO, Shelly Schoenfeld NC, Dustin Schrecengost UT, Alicia Schwarz MN, Thearon Scurlock FL, Candice Shapiro MA, Camron Shelton CA, Kristin Shrimplin OH, Dan Slater CA, Ashley Smith DC, Matt Smith TX, Neil Smith NC, Michael Smithson OH, Amy Speers CO, Katherine Sprissler-Klein PA, Kevin Stone CA, Rick Straits OH, Jeff Strater TX, Paul Thompson CA, Tiffany Tosh TX, Julian Tovar TX, Bonnie Uphold CA, Sean VanGorder NV, Lauren Verrusio NY, Melissa Vivanco TX, Ed Wagner IL, Lou Weaver TX, Jamaul Webster IL, Aaron Weiner OH, Stef-Anie Wells Koty OR, Amy White WA, Andrew Winters MD, Sharon Wong MD, Philip Wright TX

EMERITUS COUNCIL

Chad Griffin President

David Beckwith CA, Ken Britt GA, Lawrie Demorest GA, Tim Downing OH, Anne Fay TX, Mike Holloman TX, Barry Karas DC, Lucilo Peña TX, Dana Perlman CA, John Sullivan MN, Rebecca Tillet PA CURRENT AS OF JUNE 15, 2015

Photo: Matt McClain / Getty Images Cover: Eleanor Skrzat

BOARD OF GOVERNORS


HRC SENIOR STAFF Chad Griffin President Jay Brown Director, Research & Public Education Ann Crowley Membership & Online Strategy Director Robert Falk General Counsel Andrea Green Finance Director Ellen Kahn Director, Programmatic Development & Training Initiatives Anastasia Khoo Marketing Director Don Kiser Creative Director Ana Ma Chief of Staff & Chief Operating Officer

INSIDE

Cathy Nelson Vice President for Development & Membership

FEATURES

Jason Rahlan Communications Director

Photos: Jason Kempin / Getty Images for HRC, Phelan M. Ebenhack / AP, Heather Phelps-Lipton, Justin Lofton for HRC, Kevin Wolf / AP Images for HRC

Cover: Eleanor Skrzat

Jim Rinefierd Vice President for Finance & Operations Marty Rouse National Field Director

Christopher Speron Development Director David Stacy Governmental Affairs Director

VICTORY!

1 MARRIAGE EQUALITY: A TIMELINE

Fred Sainz Vice President of Communications & Marketing Susanne Salkind Vice President of Human Resources & Leadership Development

LATE SPRING EARLY / SUMMER 2015

10 THE U.S. SUPREME COURT DECISION

23

CHALLENGES AHEAD

15 ON CAPITOL HILL: A CRUCIAL FEDERAL BILL

Sarah Warbelow Legal Director

17 IN THE STATES: MORE ANTI-LGBT MEASURES

JoDee Winterhof Vice President, Policy and Political Affairs

19 U.S. REP. MIKE HONDA’S TWEET FOR TRANSGENDER EQUALITY

HRC EQUALITY STAFF Janice Hughes Publications Director Robert Villaflor Design Director Sarah Streyle Associate Director of Design Jessie Sheffield Marketing Coordinator

25

23 HIV & AIDS IN THE HARD-HIT SOUTH 25 BREAKING NEW GROUND ON BROADWAY

SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORS

29 LABELS & LOVE: ACTOR MARIA BELLO

Erika Kehrer, Drew Kiser, Helen Parshall, Jennifer Pike Bailey

40 SCOTT, MARCO, JEB & BOBBY: DISCRIMINATORY STANCES?

OTHER CONTRIBUTORS Tim Bahr, Kerry Brodie, Nöel Gordon, Zach Hasychak, Kristian Hoysradt, Mitch Johnson, Christal JonesHarrod, Erika Kehrer, Rose Matias, Mollie Levin, Jeremy Pittman, Jason Lott, Mike Mings, Marty Rouse, Karin Quimby, Justin Snow, David Stacy Equality is a publication of the Human Rights Campaign and the Human Rights Campaign Foundation. Equality (ISSN 10925791) is published quarterly by HRC, 1640 Rhode Island Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Copyright 2015. All rights reserved. Subscription rates: Free to members. Printed in the USA. The Human Rights Campaign and HRC Foundation names and Equality logos are trademarks of HRC and the HRC Foundation. To join HRC, call 800-727-4723, visit www.hrc.org or TTY at 202-216-1572. Are you an HRC member? Have a question? ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­HRC’s Member Services team works every day to provide HRC’s more than 1.5 million members and supporters with the best membership experience possible. Email membership@hrc.org or call 800-727-4723. All advertisers in Equality magazine are HRC National Corporate Partners. Because of HRC’s commitment to improving the lives of LGBT Americans in the workplace, all of our National Corporate Partners must demonstrate their own dedication by achieving a score of 85 percent or greater on HRC’s Corporate Equality Index. Companies such as these have advanced the cause of LGBT equality in the workplace. See www.hrc.org/CEI.

Read Equality on your iPad — now available in the Apple iTunes Apps Store. Just type in “Human Rights Campaign Equality Magazine.”

40

LEADING EQUALITY

33 FEDERAL CLUB COUNCIL MEMBERS

WHY I’M AN HRC MEMBER “I firmly believe that parents should unconditionally support their children. It was HRC who helped me spread that message. That’s why I’m an HRC member.”     Betty DeGeneres, advocate and mother, HRC member since 1997


up front

Photo: Mike Pont / WireImage

TWITTER POWER!

63%

Six-time Tony-award-winning singer/actor Audra McDonald was slated to perform two shows in Indiana just as Hoosier Gov. Mike Pence decided to step over to the wrong side of history, signing a bill that could allow individuals and businesses to discriminate under the guise of religion. McDonald, a staunch HRC member, took aim at Pence on Twitter, threatening to cancel her shows and deciding, instead, to donate proceeds to HRC and other opponents of the bill. The legislature ultimately amended the bill to be less damaging, but it still leaves municipal protections for LGBT people in education and healthcare vulnerable. HRC, a founding member of Freedom Indiana, a statewide coalition created to fight the bill, is also mobilizing in other states where “religious freedom” measures emerge. MCDONALD TO PENCE:

“@GovPenceIN Some in my band are gay & we have 2 gigs in your state next month. Should we call ahead to make sure the hotel accepts us all?” (6:15 p.m.)

“@GovPenceIN Or could you maybe send us a list of where its okay for us to go? Might the law apply to me? (I’m black.)” (6:16 p.m.)

“@GovPenceIN Or maybe I should fire my gay band members just to be on the safe side.” (6:17 p.m.)

HEADED OVER TO TRADER JOE’S THIS SUMMER? Between the Hawaiian shirts and Tiki motif, Trader Joe’s seems like the friendliest option on the block. But looking friendly is one thing and actually investing in LGBT-friendly policies, benefits and practices for workers and their families takes more effort. HRC’s Workplace Equality Program has, for years, held companies accountable for full LGBT inclusion. Unfortunately, Trader Joe’s has never responded to the HRC Foundation’s annual Corporate Equality Index survey while most of the Fortune 500, Am Law 200 and hundreds of other major employers have. Trader Joe’s shows some promise of inclusion in its non-discrimination protections on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity — critical for sure — but merely the first building blocks to full LGBT workplace equality. Urge Trader Joe’s to take the CEI — www.traderjoes.com/contact-us.

“@GovPenceIN Or MAYBE...we need to stick to singing in states that don’t legislate hate?” (6:18 p.m.)

of LGBT Americans reported experiencing discrimination in their personal lives. See p. 15 on why HRC is leading the fight for a critical federal comprehensive LGBT non-discrimination bill.

Perhaps we will simply … capitulate to Jihadism just as we have to LGBTIQism.” — Janice Shaw Crouse, executive director, World Congress of Families IX Conference One of the world’s most notoriously anti-LGBT organizations, the World Congress of Families, is gearing up to host its international conference for the first time in the United States, drawing thousands of anti-LGBT and anti-choice activists to Salt Lake City in October. HRC, local activists and allies are holding their own family gathering — same time, same city. The second annual Inclusive Families Conference, a celebration of diversity, will also call attention to the damage done by WCF and other such groups. HRC has released an update of Exposed: The World Congress of Families, a groundbreaking report documenting WCF’s work across five continents, including its anti-LGBT conferences in Nigeria, efforts to silence LGBT people in Russia and more. WWW.HRC.ORG

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

7


We’re proud of our differences. All 65,000 of them. We support The Human Rights Campaign in the fight for equality for everyone and applaud the amazing work that has been accomplished. We Value Northrop Grumman People


Do more. Achieve more. At Microsoft, we want every individual to thrive. That means, as the communities we serve evolve, we evolve. It’s the business of inclusion. Microsoft continues to be a proud sponsor of the Human Rights Campaign. youatmicrosoft.com


SUPREME COURT RULES F HRC URGES STATES TO SWI

I

n a historic 5-4 ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court found bans on marriage equality to be unconstitutional — and that the right to marriage is a fundamental right for all. The high court’s sweeping ruling is also a clear mandate for governors, state attorneys general and officials in all 50 states to halt their attempts to uphold any discriminatory statutes, said Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin minutes after the court’s June 26 decision. “Today’s ruling makes perfectly clear that there is no legal or moral justification for standing in the path of marriage equality,” said Griffin. “Couples from Mississippi to North Dakota to Texas shouldn’t have to wait even a moment longer to be treated equally under the law.” Griffin called on state officials countrywide to act swiftly to ensure that every

obstacle to obtaining a marriage license is removed — or else continue to be “on the wrong side of history.” He also called for the passage of a comprehensive federal bill — to ensure LGBT Americans are not fired, evicted or denied services because of a marriage license. (See p.15.) Meanwhile, supporters of equality celebrated. HRC staff and volunteers gathered at the steps of the high court and across the country. Griffin and others spoke to domestic and international news outlets. Jim Obergefell of Cincinnati, Ohio, the named plaintiff in one of the four cases before the high court, also spoke to the press, praising the ruling. “Today, I could not be prouder of my country, more grateful for the memory of my late husband John, and more indebted to the incredible lawyers, advocates and fellow plaintiffs who made this landmark day possible,”

said the longtime HRC member. “The fact that the state I have long called home will finally recognize my marriage to the man I honored and cherished for more than 20 years is a profound vindication — a victory I’m proud to share with countless more couples across the country,” he said. In April, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Obergefell v. Hodges, a case originating in Ohio, along with the other cases from Michigan, Kentucky and Tennessee. The arguments were consolidated under the name Obergefell, and the questions posed by the court dealt with the constitutionality of marriage bans more broadly. Before the ruling, marriage equality had come to 37 states as well as the District of Columbia — representing more than 70 percent of the U.S. population. Before the oral arguments, HRC had organized and delivered to the high court

Today’s ruling makes perfectly clear that there is no legal or moral justification for standing in the path of marriage equality.”

10

EQUALITY

SUMMER 2015


Photo Illustration: Eleanor Skrzat

FOR MARRIAGE EQUALITY IFTLY CARRY OUT DECISION The People’s Brief, signed by 200,000-plus Americans in support of full nationwide marriage equality. Griffin stressed that, along with fighting for a federal non-discrimination bill, HRC will redouble its efforts through campaigns like Project One America and the work of the HRC Foundation to guarantee that LGBT people countrywide are treated equally in all aspects of their lives at the federal and the state level. “We don’t believe for one second that this fight is over,” said Griffin, citing recent battles for LGBT equality in Arkansas and Indiana. “The opponents of equality will stop at nothing to enshrine discrimination into law.” The morning of the court’s decision, several opponents spoke out, including a few Republican presidential candidates. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker called for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution to “reaffirm the ability of the states to continue to define marriage.” Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee called the decision an “outof-control act of unconstitutional, judicial tyranny.” However, HRC released new polling the day of ruling that showed that those White House candidates who continue to oppose marriage equality face the risk of backlash. A 55 percent majority of voters are less likely to support a candidate for president who opposes allowing same-sex couples to marry, including 40 percent who strongly oppose, according to the polling, conducted by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner for HRC. This majority includes Independents, married women and white millennials. All of these groups voted Republican in the last congressional election.

MARRIAGE EQUALITY! Does This Affect Healthcare? Adoption? The Workplace? Will marriage equality change my medical decision-making rights? How about my health insurance options? Will the court’s decision clear the path for same-sex couples to adopt? What kind of questions will adoption agencies ask about our marriage? Will companies continue to offer domestic partner benefits? My state now has marriage equality but has no LGBT non-discrimination protections. HRC Foundation experts have created guides that answer these questions and others. See www.hrc.org/ PostDecisionResources.

WWW.HRC.ORG

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

11


We take pride in our diversity. Come join the team that values equality. Be exactly who you are: an innovator, a professional, a driving force in shaping the future of Dell. Learn more at dell.com/careers



ExCEPTIONAL PEOPLE

ExCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITIES A DYNAMIC, DIVERSE AND INCLUSIVE CULTURE UNDERLIES THE SUCCESS OF OUR COMPANY, OUR CLIENTS AND OUR EMPLOYEES. At Morgan Stanley, we pair talented people and outstanding resources. Our workplace is inclusive, alive with ideas and known globally for our ability to meet the needs of the world’s most sophisticated and demanding clients. Diversity of backgrounds, interests and specialties have been part of our rich heritage for more than 75 years and are critical to our strategy today. morganstanley.com/diversity Morgan Stanley is a Proud National Corporate Partner of the Human Rights Campaign and Shares Its Commitment to Ensuring LGBT Equality. Morgan Stanley is an equal opportunity / affirmative action employer committed to workforce diversity. (M / F / D / V) 14

EQUALITY

© 2014 Morgan Stanley.

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015


HRC SPEARHEADS FIGHT FOR CRUCIAL FEDERAL BILL By Jennifer Pike Bailey

A

Photo: Thinkstock

historic federal comprehensive LGBT nondiscrimination bill is expected to be introduced in July by Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., and Rep. David Cicilline, D-R.I., at Equality presstime. If passed, it would go down in history alongside other landmark legislation such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Fair Housing Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Even with the U.S. Supreme Court’s marriage equality ruling, a lack of fundamental federal protections will continue to leave LGBT people vulnerable across the country. Currently, dozens of states provide few, if any, protections against discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity in employment, public places, housing, education and more. Despite the high court’s decision, LGBT people will still face discrimination in their day-to-day lives. An employee can still be fired after he is outed by a co-worker. Transgender women can still be refused service in public stores. Landlords can still reject housing applications from same-sex couples. LGBT youth will still fear harassment from students and faculty alike. “Building solid bipartisan support for the bill will be key,” according to JoDee Winterhof, the Human Rights Campaign’s

vice president for policy and political affairs. HRC — which is leading the charge to pass the federal bill — has already begun to build a diverse coalition of legislators, civil rights groups, businesses and faith leaders. In addition to leading the charge on Capitol Hill, HRC will be working to galvanize its members countrywide to press their representatives to pass the comprehensive bill, which also covers the areas of credit, federally funded programs and jury service. “It won’t be an easy path to success,” cautions David Stacy, HRC’s government affairs director, particularly because anti-equality leaders control both chambers of Congress.

WWW.HRC.ORG

But the tide is changing, he says, even in a gridlocked Congress that consistently lags behind public opinion. There is overwhelming support for a federal non-discrimination law, according to polling data released by HRC. Voters across party lines approve it. Republicans support it 51 to 43 percent; Independents, 72 to 23 percent; Democrats, 80 to 18 percent, the polling found. The national survey was of 1,000 likely voters in 2015 in early spring, and conducted by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner for HRC. Additionally, voters are prepared to hold opponents of the bill accountable. Nearly 65% of likely voters said they would be less likely to support their member of Congress if he or she opposed the bill. Further, intensity of supporters was high as well; more than 40 percent said they would be “much less likely” to support their member of Congress if he or she opposed the bill. The incredible progress made on marriage equality over the last few years has overshadowed the fact that a huge percentage of LGBT Americans — nearly two-thirds — have experienced continued on p. 16

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

15


discrimination, according to a separate survey of 1,000 LGBT Americans by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner for HRC. Sixty-three percent of the respondents reported experiencing discrimination in their personal lives. And 47 percent of that number reported experiencing discrimination in the workplace while 19 percent reported discrimination in housing. And 8 percent reported discrimination while in the education system. Of these LGBT Americans, 74 percent believed a federal non-discrimination bill should be the “top priority” or “top two or three” priorities for the country’s LGBT community. Only marriage scored higher. “Mobilizing all of HRC’s forces to pass a federal bill is crucial,” stressed HRC President Chad Griffin, noting such protections already exist on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, disability and sex. “It’s time that the LGBT community is fully protected as well,” Griffin says. “This is a battle we must win.”

63+37+H 63%

of LGBT Americans reported experiencing discrimination in their personal lives.

47% 19% 8% 47 percent of that number reported experiencing discrimination in the workplace.

16

EQUALITY

19 percent reported experiencing discrimination in housing.

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

8 percent reported experiencing discrimination while in the education system.

Photo: Thinkstock

Federal Bill con’t from p. 15

BOOTS ON THE GROUND IN TEXAS The Human Rights Campaign and some key partners in the Lone Star State teamed up this year to fend off more than 20 anti-LGBT bills at the state level. Tens of thousands of HRC members in Texas sent more than 53,000 e-mails and made 5,000 phone calls to state lawmakers in Austin, and worked closely with Equality Texas, Texas Freedom Network and the ACLU of Texas to keep the pressure on. If passed, the bills could have unleashed extensive damage by undermining local non-discrimination protections, unfairly targeting transgender people, hindering the progress of marriage equality and allowing individuals and corporations to discriminate against LGBT people. One bill would have criminalized HIV. Passage of the anti-LGBT bills also would have hurt the state economy, said HRC and its business partners. The Texas Association of Business cautioned that potential investors could relocate to a more accepting state. Over the last few years, HRC has worked closely with municipal, business and other community leaders and advocates to pass protections in Houston and San Antonio. HRC has had dedicated volunteer communities in Austin, Dallas/Fort Worth, Houston and San Antonio for decades. When Texas state lawmakers reconvene again, HRC and its partners will be ready, says Marty Rouse, HRC’s national field director. “Our message to anti-LGBT legislators is this: ‘Don’t Mess with Texas.’”


WA

VT

NH

ME

ND

MT

MN

OR ID

NY

WI

SD

MI

WY

NV

IL

UT CO

AZ

RI PA

IA

NE

KS

VA

KY

DC MD

NC

TN

OK NM

DE

WV

MO

CT NJ

OH

IN

MA

SC

AR MS

AL

GA

ANTI-LGBT BILLS IN 2015 LEGISLATIVE SESSIONS

LA TX

Religious Refusals

AK

FL

Anti-Transgender Promoting “Conversion Therapy” HI

Nullifying Local Civil Rights Protections

GEARING UP FOR A DELUGE OF ANTI-LGBT BILLS

T

he Human Rights Campaign is gearing up to battle another wave of antiLGBT bills next year in statehouses countrywide as many opponents will use the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision as an excuse to push anti-LGBT measures. HRC and its allies worked to stave off more than 100 anti-LGBT measures in 29 states — including several “religious freedom” bills — in the 2015 legislative sessions. Anti-LGBT legislators were able to pass a number of negative bills (and came close to passing several more), thanks to the large numbers of conservative lawmakers at the state level. Several anti-LGBT bills targeted adoption by same-sex couples and safe schools for youth. Other bills sought to criminalize HIV and further stigmatize transgender people. And, of course, there were the “religious freedom” bills. Known as “Religious Freedom

Restoration Acts,” or RFRAs, these bills were originally intended to balance the government’s interests and burdens placed on religious practice. But the bills are often vague, and could empower any individual to sue the government to attempt to end enforcement of a non-discrimination law. Thus, deeply religious owners of businesses providing a secular service could sue, claiming that their personal faith empowers them to refuse to serve LGBT people, Jews or interfaith couples. Similarly, a landlord could claim the right to refuse to rent an apartment to a transgender person or a divorced person. Some of the “religious freedom” bills focus on marriage-related services. One bill in Arkansas would have explicitly given for-profit business owners the ability to discriminate in selling wedding-related services and supplies. Draft legislation in Oklahoma and South Carolina sought to bar state WWW.HRC.ORG

employees from issuing marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples, and would have prevented those employees from collecting their salaries or pensions if they did so. To defeat these anti-LGBT bills, HRC is working closely with state-based LGBT advocacy groups — like Equality Texas and Freedom Indiana — as well as local groups, businesses and faith leaders, says HRC Deputy Field Director Jeremy Pittman, who is leading HRC’s campaign on the ground. As in the past, HRC will provide financial and staff resources to state campaigns. Pittman underlines that there are supporters of equality on both sides of the aisle. For instance, Sen. Mark Kirk, R-Ill., promptly criticized Indiana Gov. Mike Pence’s decision to sign the state’s RFRA into law. “We should not enshrine bigotry under the cover of religion. It’s not just bad practice — it’s un-American,” said Kirk in a statement. LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

17


At Cox Enterprises, we believe our differences – whether ethnicity, age or gender – make us stronger. We’re proud to call the HRC one of our national partners. Together, as one we can make a difference. coxinc.com/diversity


U.S. REP. MIKE HONDA

OF PRIDE & PREJUDICE By Janice Hughes

CAPITOL HILL

M

ike Honda is many things — a former science teacher and school principal, a survivor of a Japanese-American internment camp and a longtime member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Honda is also a grandfather of Malisa, 8, who is transgender. Not long ago, he famously tweeted how proud he was of her, with a photo of the two, prompting coverage by NBC and CNN, and drawing 30,000 interactions on the Twittersphere. Equality sat down with the California Democrat, one of the Human Rights Campaign’s staunchest allies, in his office on the Hill and talked about a range of issues — including his childhood, self-esteem, the Constitution and who his heroes are. Some excerpts follow.

Tell us a little about your granddaughter. It’s a constant learning process. The constant asking of yourself the question, “Is there someone in our family that needs to be cared about?” So when my daughter, Michelle, told me about Malisa, that she said at 18 months, “I’m a girl,” that became a journey, my daughter’s journey. For seven years, my daughter was watching, waiting, providing the environment for Malisa. At three, she said, “I’m a girl. My name is Malisa, and this is how you spell it.” There’s no coercion, there’s no coaching. Some people say, “Oh, they’re too young to make that kind of decision.” But these children

Photo: Dakota Fine

continued on p. 21

WWW.HRC.ORG

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

19


Around here, being yourself is a job requirement. When we encourage Googlers to express themselves, we really mean it. In fact, we count on it. Intellectual curiosity and diverse perspectives drive our policies, our work environment, our perks, and our profits. At Google, we don’t just accept difference -- we thrive on it. We celebrate it. And support it, for the benefit of our employees, our products, and our community. We are proud that Google’s spirit of inclusion has been recognized with a 100% HRC Corporate Equality Index rating for seven years in a row. We congratulate HRC for all of its work furthering equal rights for the LGBT community and look forward to our continued partnership.

www.google.com/diversity


Honda con’t from p. 19

know. There’s a sense of who they are inside, so you just have to respect that. The important thing is how parents respond to it the first time. Because on a child’s insistence if they are met with resistance, that’s the first planting of the door, the proverbial closet that starts to close. So if parents don’t accept it … Well, they’re the powerful people in the child’s life. You’re a founder of the Congressional Anti-Bullying Caucus — and called for more federal funding to train school employees about the problem. When I was a teacher and a principal, we had certain ways to create a safe environment, not only at school but in the neighborhood, too. … Bullying is about power, about fear and other things. It’s also about trying to infuse in kids a sense of self and respect for other people. As educators and leaders of the system, you have to deal with it first — by understanding your own internalized oppressions or impressions, before you tell youngsters to be empowering or accepting of what they’re believing. Because if you can’t do it, don’t be asking youngsters to do it. It cuts across everything, including orientation — kids who

are perceived as, or are, LGBT — and ethnicity and religion. I remember clearly, after the war when I was in kindergarten, being called “Jap-this” and “Jap,” parents were encouraging their kids to chase me around the schoolyard. I was fighting all the time, until I got a little older and figured out that fighting is not the best way to win this. When you were a year old, your family was forced to leave your home in California and live in an internment camp in Colorado for 2 1/2 years. Can you talk about that? People still don’t know that those camps existed or that Japanese Americans were incarcerated because of World War II — because of war hysteria, because of racial prejudice, because of greed and lack of leadership in the political system. On the whole, it was mass incarceration, mass evacuation — the denial and the setting aside of due process and more. As I grew up, what I learned in school — like studying history — affected my self-esteem because nothing was ever said that we were important or that I was important, that I was unique. My uniqueness came about being the “only one,” but it wasn’t pointed out as being desirable. Asian Americans and people of

color, in general, in this country during the ’40s, ’50s, and even the ’60s, were not reflected in our media or anywhere. For years, you’ve represented much of Silicon Valley where many companies have led the way in adopting LGBT-inclusive policies and practices. The firms are also speaking out in legislative battles across the states. The more we create an open and accepting workplace, the more we as a society benefit from it. We’ve seen this for decades in Silicon Valley — one reason why I’ve advocated for domestic benefits for same-sex couples since I was a county supervisor in Santa Clara County in the 1990s. In September, I testified before the House Rules Committee about the need for the House to extend these protections to congressional staff. Let’s go back to Malisa. What prompted you to tweet about your support for her? A common thread that you and I are having in our conversation today is basically about making sure that people have their constitutional rights, and the expectation is understood that it includes being protected. … It didn’t start with Malisa. I used to tell homophobic jokes, but at one point I thought, “Wait

a minute, if ethnic and sexist jokes create pain, how are these jokes that I’m telling cute or funny? How does that affect people?” I found out a friend of mine had died. His auntie, who was one of my teachers, told me that and confided in me that he was gay. I began thinking, “Did I ever say anything, and if I did, did it drive him away? Did what I say hurt him?” When I started thinking about that kind of behavior, I just said, “It has got to stop.” How has it been since you sent out the tweet? A lot of folks have thanked me for doing so and are sharing with me their experiences. I feel this occurs more than we realize. A number of folks have been dealing with it on their own, but silently. My daughter has been doing a lot of research, talking, trying to understand, and reaching out to others who have been publicly talking about it. Some people would call you a hero, really… and your daughter and your granddaughter, too.  They’re the heroes, not me. I’m just learning still. For resources on supporting transgender youth, visit www. hrc.org/trans-youth.

As I grew up, what I learned in school — like studying history — affected my selfesteem because nothing was ever said that we were important or that I was important, that I was unique. Honda tweeted about being the “proud grandpa” of Malisa and his concerns for her safety.

WWW.HRC.ORG

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

21


WE SUPPORT EQUALITY

You can rest easy knowing we stand together

Use only as directed.

TYLENOL速 PM relieves pain while helping you fall fast asleep and stay asleep.


PREVENTING HIV AND ITS STIGMA By Drew Kiser

“I am doing this for the next generation,” says Marvell Terry II. And Terry knows a thing or two about the next generation. For more than a decade, he has been organizing and educating young black men in the South to eliminate the stigma around lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender identities. The Memphis, Tenn., native founded The Red Door Foundation in his hometown, organizing public symposiums, support groups and more, bringing together healthcare experts and LGBT leaders to promote unity and empowerment. His main goal: preventing HIV and ending stigma around it. “This work is personal for me,” says Terry, 29, the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s first HIV and AIDS Project Fellow. “I don’t only work hard for those gay black men living with HIV, like myself, who feel we have no voice, but I also work for the millions of young people born into a world where we still have to aggressively fight HIV.” In the United States, the South has been hit especially hard. Southern states represent 50 percent of new HIV infections in this country, according to the Birmingham, Ala.-based Southern AIDS Coalition. One in five gay African-American men in the South is living with HIV. The South has lower levels of income, education and insurance coverage and higher levels of HIV stigma and racism than many other areas of the country. Transmission rates also are still on the rise in the LGBT community, and HIV poses a particular threat to young black and Latino gay or bisexual men, and transgender women. What can be done to fight such a daunting situation? HRC and Terry are working to try to answer the question, thanks to a $300,000 grant from the Elton John AIDS Foundation, awarded to HRC to increase HIV

awareness, prevention, treatment and care among LGBT people. The first step is awareness. And reliable medical information is especially critical in the South, where HIV is largely ignored. Most Southern states are mandated to stress abstinence-only education in high schools, and Alabama, Texas and South Carolina are legally required to portray same-sex relationships in a negative light. HRC and AIDS United have created a new guide, What Do I Do? A Handbook to Understanding Health and HIV. HRC is distributing it at pride events, focusing on regions where LGBT people are most at risk. HRC also prioritizes prevention. PreExposure Prophylaxis, or PrEP, offers an unprecedented opportunity for safety. Also known by the brand name Truvada, it prevents the HIV virus from taking root within an individual’s body and can reduce the risk of transmission by up to 92 percent, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. Through public education campaigns, HRC is working to provide up-to-date information to the public on research and costs about PrEP. “PrEP can literally save lives in the South,” says Terry, who just returned from a statewide conference spearheaded by HRC Arkansas. “I met a Little Rock clinician with 40 years of service to patients — she had never heard of PrEP. She wasn’t alone.” HRC’s online HIV-awareness campaign, “BeInTheKnow,” also boosts awareness among the LGBT community and allies, featuring blog posts and online ads, lifting up their stories. Terry lauded HRC’s collaborative efforts in pushing forward. “HRC is committed, through a collective effort, to ending the HIV/ AIDS epidemic and helping secure the health and well-being of people living with HIV,” he says. “I’m looking forward to what we will do in the time ahead.”

WWW.HRC.ORG

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

23


/™ ©2015 Jenn-Air. All rights reserved. ®

THE ONLY REFRIGERATOR THAT GIVES YOU THE CHILLS. Introducing the Obsidian interior. Food has never looked so beautiful—dramatically illuminated by LED lighting and kept fresh with advanced climate control. Now in a built-in refrigerator with details that thrill, every time you open its doors.

jennair.com/obsidian


LISA KRON

BREAKING NEW GROUND WRITING ABOUT OUR LIVES, WINNING BIG ON BROADWAY

I

whole political side of it — what gay marriage has done — that allows these audiences to apprehend this in a way they would have been unable to, even two or three years ago.

n June, playwright Lisa Kron took home two Tony Awards, including one for best book and another for best original score, with composer Jeanine Tesori, for the Broadway show Fun Home. It snagged five Tonys in all, including one for best new musical — a big deal in a brutal business where some 75 percent of shows fail every year. Fun Home is based on graphic novelist Alison Bechdel’s searing memoir about self-discovery, her family and her father, who was secretly attracted to men. It’s the first Broadway show to feature a lesbian protagonist, and the first musical Kron has ever written. And it’s a box office success. Kron, who spent six years writing Fun Home, started out in New York theater in the 1980s, writing and performing with the madcap, anything-goes Five Lesbian Brothers in a small upstairs space on the Lower East Side. She now teaches at Yale and New York University. This summer, HRC members in the New York City area attended a performance of Fun Home. Excerpts from an interview with Equality with Kron follow.

ON THE AUDIENCE IT IS DRAWING

Theater is about being in a room with people who are different from you — both in terms of what’s on the stage and who’s in the audience. The audience makes the narrative themselves, based on watching these characters do things, and so they end up identifying with people who are unlike them. … And there’s certainly no theatrical art form that is more humanizing than a protagonist in a musical. And to have that be a butch lesbian? One of the previously most invisible creatures in the cultural world? Something else really satisfying is that young, genderqueer performance kids have come from other cities, have flown in to see the show. And there are kids who never would go to the musical theater, who never felt like there was anything there for them, saying “Yes, this feels authentically queer.” They’re sitting next to the woman from Westchester who’s weeping her way through Judy Kuhn’s song [the wife of Alison’s closeted father], and they feel a connection to that person. And that’s what theater is meant to do.

Photo: Heather Phelps-Lipton

ON FUN HOME’S SUCCESS

It’s very exciting. I think it feels very lucky. There have been many, many lesbians who have been creating lesbian comedy, fiction and graphic novels for a long time. Little by little, that has been seeping into the “mainstream” culture, creating a framework of images in the minds of that audience so that Fun Home can arrive there. Then there’s the

ON WRITING THE SONGS

I kept thinking, particularly early on, we were making the right choice, one with integrity, but that we’re going to pay for it — to do this thing that felt authentically queer.

The song “Changing My Major” [when Alison falls into bed with a woman for the first time, giddily proclaiming that her new love is now her college “major”] is about the transformative power of sex. I was very adamant that I didn’t want to fade down on a kind of gauzy, romantic image of them. I wanted it to be goofy, to be awkward and to be clear that she is exploding with physical desire. She has never dated. She’s never made out with anybody. It needs to be funny. ON NOT BEING A “COMMERCIAL BLOCKBUSTER”

It’s about filling seats, and seats are expensive, and it’s a question now of who goes to Broadway and what Broadway is right now. One question is, “Can a piece that’s not a commercial blockbuster survive on Broadway at all?” Another question, which has abated somewhat, is “Are people interested in this material?” I have no patience for that anymore. Because we see that they are. We were teetering on the brink of this echo chamber of people who say, “I’m not scared of this work, but I worry that other people will be scared of it.” [Critic] Mark Harris had a really wonderful tweet, saying essentially, “Fun Home is a show for a niche audience. You should only go see it if you are a mother or a father or a son or a daughter. Otherwise, stay away.”

WWW.HRC.ORG

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

25


MAKING PROGRESS OVER PREJUDICE. Ensuring equality and mutual respect in our society often starts with asserting your own rights as well as your respect for the rights of others. For nearly 30 years, on behalf of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) Americans, the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) has shown tireless leadership on gay rights and gender identity issues. Recognized as the largest civil rights organization for LGBT Americans, the HRC represents a grassroots force of more than 1.5 million members and supporters nationwide. We value our long standing partnership with HRC as they support our efforts in building a more sustainable energy future for all. www.shell.com


Symantec is proud to support the Human Rights Campaign. To learn more, visit symantec.com/corporate_responsibility

Š 2015 Symantec Corporation. All rights reserved.


THANKS HRC FOR DOING WHAT YOU DO.

LasVegas.com/gaytravel


4 QUESTIONS FOR…

MARIA BELLO By Helen Parshall

S

ince drawing considerable attention in her New York Times essay, “Coming Out as a Modern Family,” Maria Bello has become an outspoken advocate for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. In her essay, Bello — a film and TV actor — spoke about coming out to Jack, her 12-year-old, about her romantic relationship with a woman. His reply: “Mom, love is love, whatever you are.” Bello has released her first book, “Whatever… Love Is Love,” expanding on the ideas she raised. She encourages readers to ask questions about who they love and what they believe in. She also talks about her partner, Clare, and how Jack’s father, Dan, is still very much part of the family, For Bello, it’s not who you love. It’s how you celebrate that love that matters most. In her book, the Philadelphia native — who has spoken at several Human Rights Campaign gala dinners — talks about how her volunteer work in Haiti after the devastating earthquake there has also helped her find herself and lead a better life. A portion of the sales of “Whatever… Love Is Love” goes to HRC.

Photo: Neville Elder / Corbis

Many folks connected with your Times piece because they also feel most comfortable being “whatever.” For others, however, taking on an identity like “lesbian,” “gay,” “bisexual” and “transgender” feels right — as a powerful political act, bringing visibility to underrepresented communities. You’ve hit on something important. Labels should be empowering. We need to change labels that make people feel afraid or judged. Let’s continue to ask questions about who we want to be, who we love and who we want to share our lives with. Labels are useless and meaningless unless they are the labels you

want for yourself and make you feel part of a community to which you are proud to belong. Gay, straight or “whatever,” I am proud to be part of the LGBT community.

cope with crises and natural disasters. We’re always looking for volunteers to help manage the site, keep important conversations going and more.

You’ve said that your Catholic background plays a key part in who you are today.

Has your relationship with Clare affected your relationship with Jack and his father?

I am proud to be a Catholic. I am so encouraged by Pope Francis’ vision of an inclusive church. And I am not surprised at all that many Catholics support equality. One of my most important mentors was Father Ray Jackson, an Augustinian priest at Villanova University. He inspired me to learn how to live a worthy life. I was also inspired by his ideas about teaching peace and justice through understanding other cultures and religions. Catholicism is part of my heritage, my upbringing and my experience in life. It’s the framework through which I extend my relationship with God.

As my son gets older, we both are learning to adapt and accept change. Because I have been mostly happy in my relationship with Clare, this of course has made my son happy, and Dan too. I have also grown tremendously over the past few years. Perhaps because of my age and/or perhaps because I’ve not been full of angst, I’ve had the space to ask myself these questions and sink higher into my preferred self. This has helped my relationship with Jack become deeper. …

How did you become so involved in Haiti? I’ve been so fortunate to have traveled around the world. I’ve seen the most beautiful and the most awful places. Before I went to Haiti, I thought I’d seen it all. But the moment, I stepped foot on her soil, I fell in love. …When the earthquake happened, I jumped in to help without hesitation. I and a motley crew of professional aid workers, doctors, Hollywood folks, a tugboat captain, a yoga instructor and a woman with her espresso machine and a suitcase full of makeup were on the next plane out. Our work in Haiti is done through our foundation, www. weadvance.org — an online center, providing critical information to Haitian communities who are empowering themselves to develop community businesses and better WWW.HRC.ORG

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

29


Great Combinations.

You and Us. What a great combination.

Since 2010, Nationwide® has been a proud HRC Platinum National Partner, serving HRC members as our own. Nationwide has scored 100% on the HRC Corporate Equality Index for eleven consecutive years, and our specially trained agents understand insurance for domestic partners. What matters to you, matters to us, and that’s a great combination.

Remember, insurance rules, like LGBT rights, vary by state. Nationwide knows how things work where you live. Become a member today by calling 1-888-490-1561 or visit nationwide.com/HRCsaves for a free, no-obligation quote including your HRC discount.

Nationwide may make a financial contribution to this organization in return for the opportunity to market products and services to its members or customers. Products Underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies, Columbus, OH 43215. Subject to underwriting guidelines, review, and approval. Products and discounts not available to all persons in all states. Nationwide policies are written by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company or a company directly or indirectly owned by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. Not all Nationwide companies are mutual companies, and not all Nationwide policyholders are members of a mutual company. Policyholder rights and benefits are determined by policy language, underwriting company charter and bylaws, and applicable law. Nationwide, the Nationwide N and Eagle design, and Nationwide is on your side ® are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. ©2015 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.


BE SEEN. BE HEARD.

THE FIRST- EVER NX 200t F SPORT It’s impossible to go unnoticed behind the wheel of the boldly sculpted NX 200t F SPORT. As its sharp angular lines, cutting-edge technology and luxurious interior make it beautiful inside and out. The NX is engineered for the enjoyment of those who start and drive conversations, of all kinds. Lexus.com/NX | #LexusNX Options shown. ©2015 Lexus.


Lincoln Financial Group is proud to be a national partner of the Human Rights Campaign.

life

income

retirement

group benefits

advice

LCN-931640-052214 Lincoln Financial Group is the marketing name for Lincoln National Corporation and insurance company affiliates, including The Lincoln National Life Insurance Company, Fort Wayne, IN, and in New York, Lincoln Life & Annuity Company of New York, Syracuse, NY. Variable products distributed by broker-dealer-affiliates. Lincoln Financial Distributors, Inc., Radnor, PA. Securities and investment advisory services offered through other affiliates. Š 2014 Lincoln National Corporation.


LEADING CHANGE

THE WORK STILL AHEAD For every step that America takes toward equality, our opponents harden their resolve to make discrimination and hate legal. Now more than ever, we face the immense task of ensuring that no LGBT American remains a secondclass citizen in any aspect of their life — including employment, housing, healthcare, adoption, education and faith. We thank our Federal Club Council members for their crucial leadership as our fight continues. This list includes all active members of the Federal Club Council (Major Donor) program as of March 31, 2015. PRESIDENT’S CABINET

Rose A. Hagan & Mark A. Lemley Sandra J. Hartness & Karen A. Ellis Mel Heifetz Fund at The Miami Foundation Michael C. Holloman & Timothy A. Surratt James C. Hormel & Michael P. Nguyen Barry R. Kob & Dr. David L. Lundquist Dennis Lamont & Richard Machado Paula Larson & Teresa Di Falco Michael C. Malone & Brian P. O’Connor Jane & Tami Marquardt James D. Matte & J. Christopher Beck Joseph J. McCaskey Mark McGuire & Craig Wilson Dr. Amit Rakhit & Brad Senatore Kate Raymond & Michelle Krocker Edward F. Ribaudo Jr. Philip W. Richardson & Joseph W. Seagle John Rivers & Gavin Morrow Robin Sommers & Mike Martin Steven M. Sorenson, M.D. Tracy Spellman & Kristin Wood Greg Swalwell & Terry Connor Vickie Tillman B. Rodney White & Michael P. Williams Virgil Williams & J. Patrick Mooneyham Wesley Wilson & Greg Teviotdale Jackie K. Winburn & Rossann J. Williams Hudson Young

Anonymous Bruce W. Bastian Edith Dee Cofrin The Yeardley Smith Foundation

PRESIDENT’S COUNCIL Leslie & Bill Biggs Robert L. Boughner Sonny Ward & Michael Lombardo

SPEAKER’S COUNCIL Adam & Rachel Albright Morgan Cox L. Garvey Dr. Thomas Knabel & Kent Allin Francois Leclair Frank Selvaggi & Bill Shea Greg Weaver & Luciano Zamora Walter & Sandra Wilkie The Yarbrough Family Foundation

AMBASSADOR’S COUNCIL

Photo: Freddy Perez

Tracie Ahern & Daniele DeOliveira Jason Berkowitz & Matt Smith Laurence Best & Kory Chatelain Dr. Paul A. Boskind David W. Carlson Chaiken Foundation Joe Covelli & Bill Lucia John M. DeCiccio Patti Flint, M.D. & Ashley Hill Christopher L. Flynn & Daniel S. Newton Anthony M. Garavaglia James & William Harrison David H. Jacobs Jr. Sheila Kloefkorn & Sue Wieger Toby D. Lewis Matthew Meehan & Rod Hildebrant Michael Morris & Richard Blinkal Robert & Kathy Olsen Colonel (IL) J.N. Pritzker IL ARNG (Retired) Hilary B. Rosen Lee A. Schreter & De Linda G. Bunnell John Sell Darren Star Peter Steinauer & Kevin Sawyers Randy Ubillos & Rick Fath Michael & Donna Weinholtz Paul E. Willer

SENATE COUNCIL

Anonymous John Alchin & Hal Marryatt Richard J. Allen & Jon S. Shaffer James Ardery & Gary Hawley Brad & Mia Aronson John & Mike August Elena Baca & Sydney Herwer Jamie & Liz Baskin Vanessa Benavides & Sheila Bryant Judith & Richard Berkowitz Dr. Clifton O. Bingham & Dr. Kenneth J. Cohen Mark E. Blair & Lance Demaline Borcherding Family Fund Katherine B. Bowman & Kimberly S. Seibert Dr. Harold J. Brody & Donald E. Smith Steven Brown & Lance Koenig Trevor Bunker & Dominick Gullia Leland Burk & Thomas Feulmer Kelly Burris Daniel C. Cochran & Gregory B. Sutphin Roberta Conroy Dr. & Mrs. Robert B. Daroff Sr. Robert B. Daroff Jr. & Brian K. Nagai Paul DeBenedittis & Ernest Rodriguez Robert Dogens Jason Donchin & Jim Hanson Fancy Fechser William O. Fifield & David L. Roseberry Timothy G. Fischer & Jonathan R. Russell Ky L. Fiser Ted & Amy Gavin Gary Gibson & Tim Henry Elizabeth Gilbert Don & Carol Glendenning Marc Gofstein & Mark Dunaway Robert Goodrich

CAPITOL COUNCIL

Robert Annas & Douglas Shaw Sofya Asfaw & Juliene Britz Michael S. Berman & Deborah Cowan Chris Boone & Matthew Fior Donald & Eileen Bradley Jason Bright & Alex Matusevich Robin Brown & Christi Murphy Richard Candelaria & Michael Kelly Lee Carter & Greg Bradley Dr. Keith Coffee & McKay Otto Ben Colvin & Anthony Noberini William A. Donius & Jay Perez Adam Feild & Erik Torkells Gregory P. Filippone & Michael A. Reynolds

WWW.HRC.ORG

Robert Greenblatt Robin & Danny Greenspun Ellen J. Griffith & Mary Ellen Garrity Paul Guillory & Leon Johnson-Guillory Craig Hagen & Ben Arvizo Mary Stewart Hall & Nancy McCaskell Lisa Hannusch & Lisa Richardson Dr. Nancy Haslett & Dr. Irene Love Thomas A. Hess & James D. Epstein Kathy Hewitt & Anne Fay Cherie & Steven Holm Darrin Jensen-Peterson & Michael Peterson Mimi Jigarjian Hutchinson Johnson Family Julie E. Johnson & Susan G. Moster Scott Johnstone & Jerome Funaro Dan Ketelaars & Todd Harl Jay T. Kinn & Jules B. Vogel Ervin Knezek & Revered David Bieniek Britt Kornmann & Erin Miller Kornmann Cynthia Koulax & Lorraine Ferrini Henry M. Lambert & R. Carey Bond Wallace J. Lanci David Lapham & Clark Mitchell Joan & Brook Lau Jessica Ledbetter & Ranee Barsanti James LeJeune & Max Curry Luigi Lewin & Howard Matthews Andrew Linsky Michael Mankins & Robert Camp Maria Margenot Matthew Marks & Jack Bankowsky Scott R. Martin Mark F. McElreath Peter Meyer & Luis Tollinche Josh Miller & Steven Amend Susan & Monte Miller Weston Milliken & Anand Pandya Pamela Morgan & Joyce Rowland John C. Morrison IV Eric Mueller & Daniel Olsen Kevin R. Naughton & James C. George Robert Normile & Shane Nguyen Shawn O’Connor & Joshua Bruner Cindy Olsen & Michele Bakkila Laurie J. Olson & Maria J. Fasulo Michael Palmer Dean Pitchford & Michael Mealiffe Dorothy Fuller Polash Mike Putiak & Gary Schexnayder Chris & Francisco Reid Ernie Reyes & Matt Petrone Raymond Roberge & George Barvinchak Ansel Rognlie & David Steindl John Ruffier Scott A. Sapperstein & Robert L. Petris Cathi Scalise & Denise Costello Jamie & Bonnie Schaefer Dr. Stephen B. Scheibner & Luther S. Turner David Schintzius & Geoff Guidera James R. Seitz John L. Shaw Laurie Shedler & Mary Snider Bradford Shellhammer & Georgi Balivov Eric Shreiber & Eric Phifer Ted Skidmore LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

33


OUR MISSION IS CLEAR WE INVITE YOU TO JOIN OUR QUEST TO MAKE THE WORLD A M O R E CO M F O RTA B L E P L AC E : F O R E V E RYO N E .

SUPPORTING LGBT ORGANIZATIONS, FAIR-MINDED POLITICAL CANDIDATES AND HRC SINCE OUR EARLIEST YEARS.


LEADING CHANGE Barbara Smallwood & Maura Geoghegan Thomas Stephens & Todd Enders John L. Sullivan Gary Tannenbaum & Helen Mills Kay Tanner & Molly Clark David Topel Alan Uphold & Jeff Olde Benjamin Waldman Lavonne Wesner & Martha Tirrell Amy White & Lacey All John N. Willey David Williams & Mike Probst John & Craig Williams-Crawford Frank H. Woo & Sheldon J. Sloan Brian Younger & Tige Stading Cote Vahidi Jerre van den Bent & Justin Vance David N. von Storch

Jann Blanton & Wendy Johnson Susan Block & Frieda Smith Joseph W. Blount Doris Bobadilla & Deana Jacob John Boccardo & Derek Esplin Andrea Bohannon & Jane Sumner James H. Bolin Jr. & Catherine S. Stempien Monica Boll & Ellen Marks Christopher Bolling & Stephen Peterson Steve Bolton & Bob Valentine Dr. Robert Bonar & Viet Dinh-Do Bruce Bonn, M.D. & Steven Russell Aimee Boone & Ed Cunningham Suzanne Deal Booth Phil Boustani & Ted Schweitzer William Bowdle & Thomas See Alexander Bradley Dr. Larry Brady Brian V. Breheny Dr. Daniel Brelsford & Andrew LaBadie Trinda & Heidi Brennan-Farris Donald M. Brescia & John A. Spinelli Susie Brodsky & Kimberly Allen Dr. Daniel Brown & Mark Haggard Karen Ann Brown & Sandy Campagna Lewis A. Brown & John D. White Ray Brown & Gene Barber Robin Brown Jeffrey Brumett & Marc LaFont Mark Buchanan & Shinya Kurebayashi Tara Bunch & Eleanor Mercado Philip Burgess & James Nutter Deiadra M. Burns Laurie Burns & Jill Ramsier Robert S. Burress & Thomas L. Seymour Barclay Butera Brian Buzby Pam Buzby Jeff Cacy & Curt Black Christopher & Richard Cahill Nancy V. Caldwell Bruce Cameron & Joseph Coyne Brian Campbell & Michael Sosso Philip J. Cannon, M.D. Todd A. Canon & Perry S. Heitman Randi Caplan & Linda Newmark Margaret Capossela & Erika Tencic Amy Carenza & Nathan Offerdahl Stephen Carlino & Dennis Fee Carolyn Carlton-Lowe & Mickie Bohlmann Christopher J. Carolan & Vernon S. Bauer Robert J. Carr Dean Carter & Mark Stori Paul Carter Christopher & Jeffrey Carver Dane Castille Steven N. Cayton Jeffrey Caywood & Robert Neel Joshua & Dixon Charles Linda Chidester & Andrea Rubin Ed Chin John S. Clements Dr. Christopher Coad & Kevin Kowalski John Coblenz Ernie Coffey & Will Hamp Gladys G. Cofrin Mary Ann Cofrin Marjorie Cohen Renee Cohen & Margo Cook Mark Coker & Kirk Stone Craig A. Colbert Kenneth Colen & Blaise Bonaventure Kelly & Benjamin Collamore Roxann Collin & Raye Ann Hoffman Anna & Debbie Collins Gary Collins Katie Colopy & Dave Whitney Steven Comingdeer & Dominic Thayer Conely Foundation Camille Cook & Laura Hutcheson Mark Cook Mark Coolidge & H.R. McCanless*

Photo: Paul Morigi/Getty Images for HRC

HOUSE COUNCIL

Anonymous Lebowitz Aberly Family Foundation Robert Abernathy & Peter Vamvakas Greg Albright & Wesley Combs Eric Allen Trevor Allen & Ben Costa Michael Amend & Jeff Ashley Eric Anderson & Roger Beck James S. Anderson & David W. Wittkowsky James Anderson & George Estelle Jeffrey Anderson & Torey Carrick Andrew M. Arnold Todd Arp & Brian Donlan Desiree Asher Jonathon Aubry & Abdi Nazemian Ward Auerbach & Andy Baker Bill Aulwes & Brad Howell April Ayers Monica Ayres Gwendolyn Baba James J. Bachand & Robert M. Hamilton Timothy S. Bahr & Ronald W. Jagels Ed Baklor & Jeff Cannon Kirk Ballard & Timothy Dordell Polo Banuelos & Justin Olsen Howard Bard & Christopher Speron Gary K. Barg & Dr. Ross T. Jackson Jeremy Barlow & Gabe Holland Eliav Barr & Paul Koulogeorge Brett E. Barrett Drs. Ian Barrett & Bryant Brazeal John K. Barry & Daniel Otto Kevin Baucom & Alex Frigini Alvin H. Baum Nina Beattie & Michael Eberstadt Ward Beattie Andrew Beaudoin & Darin Schneider Ronny & Dave Beck William F. Becker John M. Becket David Beckwith & Dietrich Nelson Curtis T. Bell Stuart & Allen Bell Jana Belot & Eva Simpson Les W. Bendtsen & Jim S. Newstrom Craig Benson & David Cohen John F. Bergner & Charles R. Stewart Mindy Berkson; Lotus Blossom Consulting, LLC Nate Berkus & Jeremiah Brent Brad Berman Fernando Berrios Jr. & Neil Leatherbury Delta Best & Peggy Garrison Timothy Bice & Walter Kearns Bernard Bierman, M.D. & David Weissberg Lee A. Biersdorf & Ellyn L. Hosch Jay Biles & Dan Swift Lucy & Henry Billingsley Elizabeth M. Birch Scott Bishop & Ron Sperry John Biske & Duane Lefevre Alexis Bittar Paul Blank

Michael Copenhaver & HoangNam Huynh Ernest E. Cordova & David S. Zyck Brent Couzens-Schultz & Robert Van Lenten M. Todd Cramer & Ernie Hoskins Thomas S. Crewson Trust Jared Crystal Lynn Currie & Becky Arreaga Jeff Danis & Mike Waddington Michael Dansky Susan Davidson & Diana Miller Brad Davis & Kevin Stone Phil Davis Roger N. Davis Jr. & Ron H. Laurentius Robert Paul Dean & Robert Andrew Epstein Elaine DeCanio Dr. Darren Deering & Frank Rawls Laura Degnon & Sheila Caldwell Thomas S. DeNapoli, M.D. & Mark D. Walker Dodd Denton & Will Winebrenner Thomas J. Desantis Ethan & Hudley Dettmer Alexander H. Devine & John E. Manning Andy Dews & Tom Warshauer Kevin DeYager & Kewchang Lee, M.D. Diane DiCarlo & Jeanne Leszczynski Richard Dickson & Luis Morales Lopez Brad DiFiore Ben Dillon & Craig Maurice Sheri Disney Libbyette & Wendy Donald-Wright Thomas & Mary Donnelly David M. Douglass & Mark L. Peroni Anne R. Dow Family Foundation Timothy Downing & Kenneth Press Ferrell Drum T. Keith DuBois & Keith Gowlak Greg E. Duffield & Raymond E. Wilmer Jason Duggan Kevin Duhrkopf & Tony Era Barton Duncan Casey Duncan & David Stewart Dr. Kenneth N. Dunn Brian J. Dupnick Dayna Early & Meleia Carter Jonathan Eaton & Eric Carlson Arthur H. Edge III Laura Edwards Anthony L. Eldridge Jeff Eller & Diana Kirby Roz Elliott & Tina Oteka Dr. Sean L. Elliott & Byron L. Pelt Steven Elmendorf James Emlet & Rick Little Robert F. Epplin Alexandra C. Ernst & Denise M. Cohen Todd Evans Kate Falberg & Monique Predovich Robert N. Falk Melanie K. Falls & Tina L. Posey Mark Fancher Rick Fedrizzi Fernando Feliciano Jr. & Joseph Chodash Richard Myatt Ferguson Dr. Susan Fiester Edward A. Finger Cathy Fink Steve Fisher Brian Flanagan & Cory Hagopiah Polly Foss & Laura Vander Wegen Andrew Foster John Fowler & Peter Laffoon Bruce E. Franck Barbara Frank & Veronica McCaffrey Matthew Frazier Charlie S. Frew Bruce Frishman Clara L. Fryer Robert Fuller & Juan Mata Dorothy Furgerson & Carrie Reid Lynn Fussell Tannia Galindo & Janice Jabido Jason Garcia WWW.HRC.ORG

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

35


LEADING CHANGE Manny Garcia Chad Gardner & Rolando Carvajal Gordon G. Gardner Jody Gates & Marilyn McConnell Bill Gee & Susan Crothers-Gee Dr. James M. Gerhart & Rev. Todd D. Smelser Nora Ghobrial Jason Gibson Lynn & Bruce Gibson Patrick Gibson & Scott Jacqmein Wolfgang E. Giesecke & William E. Vastardis Amb. Rufus Gifford Alexandra Glickman & Gayle Whittemore Neil Gobioff Paul Goetzheimer & Jan Schamis James E. Goral, M.D. & Trey A. McCampbell III Cherie Green & Danielle Daley Scott Green & Garrett Warren Cheryl Greene & Angela Craig Jonathan & Ivy Greenman Julie Greenspoon & Donna Lorson Sherry Gregory Chad Griffin Samuel P. Grissom & Douglas S. Vocelle Gregory E. Grosh Susan Groszkiewicz & Teri Gann Janine Guillot & Shannon Wilson Jim Gurney & Dan Goss Joe Guthridge & David Ritter Jeffrey Guthrie & Sebastian De Kleer Don Haisch & Hersin Magante Paul H. Hale & Oscar L. Gomez Clayton Halunen & David Duddingston Kirkland Hamill & Dave Downey Dr. G. Christopher Hammet Randall Hance William M. Hardin Esmond Harmsworth Michael Harper & Jed Duhon Michael P. Harrell Tim Harrington Elizabeth Harris Grover Hartt III & Charles Foster Justin & Wendy Harvey Robert Haskell Jed Hastings & Joe Solmonese Robert A. Hayes & James E. Burba David Hayter Bo Headlam Michael R. Heflin & David C. Yu David Hendryx Manuel Hernandez & Richard Postler Beth Herndon & Robin Huskey S. Kelly Herrick & James P. Shean Dr. R. Glenn Hessel & Mark K. Smith Scott Hiler & James Brey John & Peggy Hintz Steven Hochstadt & Stephen Sass Robert Hoffman & Wayne Clark, Jr. Dr. John S. Hogg & David M. Garza David Hollis & Dr. Charles Griffith William & Marjorie Holodnak Nanette Marie Hoover Phillip Hoover & Edward Westreicher Clifford Hopkins & Stephen Callcott Kimberly A. Howard Austin Hudler & Lajos Molnar Amb. David Huebner & Dr. Duane McWaine Edward Hunt & Joseph Ando Rich Hurley Tim Hurst & Jay Shinn Mike Isaacson & Joe Ortmeyer Dennis Ivill, M.D. & Robert Van Horn Dan Jackson & Jeremy Guiberteau Travis Jackson & Stephen Friedfeld Harry N. Jacobs & Lauren B. Goodman Robert A. Jacobson Samuel Jacobson & Jack Slaughter Robert C. Jakosh & W. Blair Meixell Stacey Jefferson Patrick Joggerst & Terry Jackson 36

EQUALITY

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

Erik Johnson & Derek Osterman Glenn Johnson & Michael Melancon Michael K. Johnson & I. Esteban O’Kingston Ronald P. Johnson & William J. Roane Jr. William K. Johnson Amy Jones & Renee Chase Gorman Jones & Jerry LaSuer Stephanie Jones & Diana Iwanski Mary E. Jordan Sally Juday Grant Kaiser & John Furnish Royce Kam Carl R. Kamb & Greg M. Griffin Arthur M. Kaplan & R. Duane Perry Robert Kaplan Barry Karas & Bruce Green Michael Kaufman & Durward Watson Charley Kearns & Frank Ching Julie & Tim Kelleher Tara Kelly & Rhonda Sigman John Kerr & Doug Knutson Kyle Kerr & Gaston Maurin Craig Keyes & Jeffrey Oren PK Kilty & Stoddard Lambertson Alan S. King & Benjamin E. Buie Drs. Karen King & Diana Benitez Michael Patrick King Sonia L. King, M.D. & Colleen L. Murphy Joseph H. Kinnarney & Bradley S. Marlow Gregory D. Kirk & James P. Gariepy Charles Knippen & Nate Moster Kaye Knox & Michelle King David & Blair Kohan Tim Kollatschny & Stephen Goldberg Joan Krajewski Pegeen Kramer & Sandra Whitley Ken Krupp & Leon Gessula David Kuebler & James Alexander Kim D. Kuehner Ken Kuhn & Seth Kalish Stuart Kurlander & David Martin Phillip La Susa Christopher R. Labonte & Joseph E. Sinkus Mark Lacy & Scott Barrett Daniela Ladner & Sara Stone Keith Laepple & David Wang Dawn Lafreeda & Lupita Corbeil Roger Henry LaGreca David Lahti Angela Lai Dr. John C. Lalonde Andrew Land & Jake Green Thomas Patrick Lane Jason, Susan & John Laney John Larsen & Michael Stewart James E. Law CFP ® Monica Lawfield Dr. Reita Lawrence & Robin Marks Bradley Laye & Alex Amby Tim & Karrie League C.A. Lee III & Patrick Scarborough Stewart D. Lee Molly Lehman Dr. Richard Leithiser Gregg A. Levine & Dr. Howard G. Epstein Andrew & Marina Lewin Sharon Lewis Dr. Marty Lieberman & Peter Cohen Thomas Lien Christopher & Scott Lindsey Beth Linton & Katherine Strong Ann Litke & Michelle Bentcliff Brian K. Little Chris Long Wendy A. Lopez & Connie C. Moorer Michael Lovell & Stanley Wisilosky Cary Lowe & Allan Ames Kevin Lucas & Matt Hendry Heather & Alan Luecke Sean Lynch & Justyn Lefebvre Thomas J. Maciula & Charles F. Greenfield

Joni Madison & Gina Kilpatrick Nelda Majors & Karen Bailey Charles S. Mann & William G. Gilmore Deanna Manning & Katherine O’Bitz Steven C. Manns & Dennis F. Tamburo Orlando Manzo-Ocañas & Reymundo Ocañas Thomas R. Mapp Jeffrey Marburg-Goodman Michael Marriott & Juan Sanchez Michele & Amy Martin-Tyler Clif Mathews & Dustin Basco Drs. Wendy Matis & Dale Smith Regina O. Matthews Michele Maynard Kelly Mazzei & Karen Dickinson Catherine McCabe & Jill Popovich Juliet McCarthy & Luke McCarthy III Tracy & Andrew McConaghie Alvin McCray & Jason Rudman Madeleine McDonough & Cyd Slayton John McDowell Mary McEvoy & Lisa Johnston Steven K. McGee Kathleen McGrath Sherrey McGraw & Lisa Peterson The Ruth Church McKay Foundation/Perry McKay Michael McKelvey Dr. Eric McLaughlin Sharlea McMurtry & Glenda Pemble Kevin R. McNamara, M.D. & Stephen J. Black Kenneth McNeely & Inder Dhillon Nan M. McRaven Tammy Meador & Pamela Seghers Joe Mendelsohn III Fund of The Greater Cincinnati Foundation Helen Mendoza & Pamela Privett Nancy Menke & Sara Rosson Lynn & Tom Meredith Jackie Mickle & Megan Phillips Dr. Charles R. Middleton & Dr. John S. Geary Valerie Milano/El Cid Cabaret, Silver Lake Allison Milgard Charles R. Miller Calvin Mitchell Brad Miyasato & Brad Duerre Laura Moffat & Kelly Sanders Richard Mollineaux & Maxwell Blake Dorian Moore Kristin Morico & Shaun Zitting Rodney Morris & Dean Emmons DyShaun Muhammad & Jeremy Black Henry R. Munoz III Jonathan Murray & Harvey Reese II Heidi Musser & Anna Moretto Rick Myracle & John Taylor Rives Neblett Caroline Nelson & Cindy Quart Chris Nelson H. Joe Nelson III Kenneth Newberry & Sebastian Elias Robert W. Newhart Michael L. Nieder Dan Nilsen Aguilar Warn Nuñez Family Deirdre O’Brien Michael O’Brien & Kenneth Filoso Joseph O’Gorman Molly K. O’Neill & K. Victoria Threlfall Michael D. Oard & Ronald L. Attrell David & Bradley Odom-Harris John Ollmann & Mike Rosenzweig Jason Olsen Jay Oppenheimer Thomas A. Ortenzi Daniel Pacheco Thomas Paese & Charles Porvoznick Dr. Mark Parker & Eric Johnson LaDonna R. Parris Ray Parrish & Guillermo Lomeli Pamela & Jacque Passino Susan Patton


LEADING CHANGE Devin Elizabeth Payne & Nicola Romanski Richard Pearce-Moses & Frank Loulan Lucilo A. Peña & Lee A. Cobb Terry Penrod & Brent McMurry James Pepper & Thomas Macias Tonya Perkins & Isabella Pacetti Dana M. Perlman & Hugh M. Kinsellagh Daniel Perrone Lester Perryman Lars H. Peterssen & Robert D. Zimmerman Mark Phariss & Vic Holmes Rocco Piazza, M.D. & Michael Miller Ted Pierot Randy D. Pierson Milo Pinkerton & Virgil Taus The Pinocci-Wrightsman Family Jim Pitts Michael Plastow Joel & Tamara Podolny James E. Pollin Robert Pompey & Joseph Holstine Madeleine Ponder, M.D. & Stacy Cantrell Jeremy Porche & Huston Dorris Drs. Roni D. Posner & Jeri L. Berc Dr. Steven Pounders & Jimmy O’Reilly Glen Powell & Chad Barringer Donald Press & John Harris Mellie Price & Elizabeth Myers Hank Provost Mark Purpura & John Lucas John Quattlebaum CFP ® & Jay Sitlani Brian Quinn & Martin Bouma Scott Ramer & John Saksa Bruce Rashbaum, M.D. Margaret & Joel Rebmann Robert Reddinger & Christopher Gorman Jeffrey Reinke & Manish Thakur Randy Renick Catherine Reynolds & Colette Wilson Nathan Rhoton & Joen Martinez Michael L. Rice Kevin & Patrick Richardson Jenelle Roberts & Cathy Wiblemo Mark A. Robertson Henry Robin & Robert McGarity Sean M. Robinson Mary C. Roemer & Susan J. Robinson Christian Rogers & Jonathan Reazin John Rohde & Manuel Ramirez Alexander Rosanelli & Benjamin Lund Cheryl Rose & Carol Cosler Gary Rosen George Rosenfield & Christopher Hoover Mark Ross & Joseph Savnik Worth Ross & Jason Mitchell Dan Rothmann Dr. Patricia Rubin & Teresa Smith Katherine Rumbaugh Nate Russell & Neil Young Scott A. Safier & Champ R. Knecht Ginger Sager Richard N. Sager Osmundo R. Saguil Maria Salas Claude Salzberger & Joseph Lavine Grey Manning Sample Eddie Sargent Jim Savko & Mike Adams Linda Scaparotti & Gail Price Dr. Brett Schaffter Mark Schichtel Alexandre Schleider & Sean Whalen Robert & David Schneiderman Kevin & Suzanne Schon John S. Schwartz William Schwartz & Tom Nixon Lynn Schwartzenburg & Linda Arnold Dean Scott & Dirk Rihn Glen Senk & Keith Johnson Jean & Larry Shaffer Kevin Shanahan & Michael Montoya

Michael D. Shanahan Scott Shane Michael C. Shannon Harvey Shapiro & Michael Dager Michele Sharar & Michael Grossman Ofer Shaul John Shea & Ray Booth Camron Shelton & Cody Crawrford Becca Sherrill & LeeAnn Jones Martin V. Sherrill II & Andrew W. Clarke Thomas Shirk & Juan Felipe Lara Mikhail Shneyder James Shreve & Mark Brashear Douglas S. Silveira Mol Simmons Thomas G. Simmons & Mark A. Skruhak Matthew Simonetti & Philip McCarthy Drue Smethers, M.D. & Dean Kleyn Dr. Jon Smith & Christian Sidwell Monty D. Smith & Gary M. Hilbert Dr. Patrick Smith & Peter Coleridge Richard Smith & Paul Goulet Shannon & Andera Smith Michael Smithson Wayne Sobon & Robert McDonald Doug & Deana Sockman Trina Soske Jim Spearman David Spector Dr. Christopher D. Spradley & William D. Lowery Jr. Meghan Stabler Richard P. Stahl Joshua Stein Billy Stern Kara & Liz Sternhell-Blackwell Sam & Diane Stewart Cheryl & Jeffrey Stibel Dr. Jeffrey Stolz & Timothy O’Connor Suzy Stone & Beth Davis David W. Strickler William Sullivan & David Cunningham Victor Sun & Jim Dower Indraneel Sur Sally Susman & Robin Canter Eric J. Swanson & Curt D. Nelson Joshua Tabak David J. Taborelli Deborah Taft & Terri Rutter Mayan Tahan & Russ Levine Samuel Tallman & Michael Zuravel Rabindra Tambyraja Dan Tanner & Steve Hickey Gordon O. Tanner & Robert L. Patlan Don Tapani & David Sassano Amy Taylor & Wendy Herm Jodi & Howard Tenenbaum Lee Terrell & John Richard Graham Shawn Terry & David Gonzalez David Theisen & Bryan Hlavinka Augusta Thomas Clare Thomas & Karen Melick Dr. Curtis Thompson & Joseph Mitchoff Drs. John A. Thompson & Lee R. Rocamora Paul F. Thompson & Patrick T. Doonan George C. Thorne Jr. Hillary Thrasher & Amy Mintz Barbara Thwaites & Angela Owens Rebecca Tillet & Patricia Ellis Marcia C. Tillotson & Sharon K. Blalock Brett & Kathy Tobey Ed Todeschini & John Ferrante Richard Tollefson & Marc Kellenberger David Tomola Stephen Tosha & Stephen Strecansky Christopher Tower & Robert Celio Jr. Larry Trachtenberg Jenni & Scott Tranweaver Jacob & Carl Triplett Gary Trowbridge & Frank Benedetti Robin Trush Michael Tucker & Frank Siano

WWW.HRC.ORG

Jason Turner & Robert Listerman Scott Tyson & Richard Irizarry Alicia Underwood Mark Utterback Duane J. Vajgrt, M.D. & Jeffrey L. Benedick Ronniel Valdez & Dustin Clewell Gina M. VanderLoop Kay L. VanWey & Stephanie A. Sammons Christine Vatidis & Mary Barnes Janis Verruso & Deb Graves Ted Voloyiannis & Ivan del Puerto-Voloyiannis James D. Wagner Jason Waguespack & Jeff Morgan Daniel R. Waldmann & Giles C. Davidson Joey Walker Kathryn Wallace & Amy Good Beth Walter Jeffery Walters & Edward Comitz Lee Warbinton & Susan Adair J. Brook Ward & Jason Stark Michael Ward Marc Anthony Ware Jerry Warner Russ Weakley-Brown & Steve Thomas Jason Weatherholtz & Mike Akers Michael T. Weaver & Noor Dudekula Robert & Liz Webb Diana & Amy Weinberg Jim & Miriam Weisman Geoff Weiss John Wentworth & Jamie Gluck Richard Werner & Tony Bravo Debbie Wernet Susan Werstak & Lori Light John D. West & Michael J. Lappin Susan R. West & Jan Erickson Geoffrey C. Westergaard Brad White Tina Madison White & Mary White Roger Whitehouse Sue Wieger Christopher Williams Judy Williams & Lene Larsen Michael Williams & Richard Michael David L. Wilson & Robert D. Compton Robert B. Wilson Kenneth F. Winter Sherry Winternitz & Jean Frazier Stephen R. Winters & Don D. Curtis Mary Witherow & Susan Schneider Dr. Michael H. Wojtanowski & Matthew L. Arnold Noah & Sara Wyle Lynn Slayton Yeldell & Alisa Weldon Daniel L. Yokas & Timothy A. Walsh Stuart W. Yothers Barbara Young Linda M. Young Lucy B. Young Shone Zachariah & Stephen Crook Omar Zantua Karen P. Zeligson Joseph Zibrak Russell P. Zink & Sean L. Callaway *Deceased

FEDERAL CLUB COUNCIL ANNUAL GIVING LEVELS President’s Cabinet ($250,000+) President’s Council ($100,000 – $249,999) Speaker’s Council ($50,000 – $99,999) Ambassador’s Council ($25,000 – $49,999) Capitol Council ($15,000 – $24,999) Senate Council ($10,000 – $14,999) House Council ($5,000 – $9,999) HRC strives to produce a complete and accurate list of our Federal Club Council donors. Please contact Tim Bahr, HRC’s director of major gifts, at 202-572-8977 or tim.bahr@hrc.org, with any comments or corrections. LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

37


GET YOUR ON

LUX

Open up to new experiences at Luxor Las Vegas. The pyramid is pulsing with long-awaited moments, a tempting pool party and intimate nightspots. Perfect for every body.

luxor.com/lgbt

/luxorlgbt

@luxorlgbt

luxorlgbt


SUPPORT OUR NATIONAL CORPORATE PARTNERS PLATINUM AMERICAN AIRLINES APPLE THE COCA-COLA COMPANY DIAGEO / BV / KETEL ONE MICROSOFT MITCHELL GOLD + BOB WILLIAMS NATIONWIDE INSURANCE NORTHROP GRUMMAN TARGET

GOLD BANK OF AMERICA CHEVRON CITI DELOITTE LAS VEGAS CONVENTION & VISITORS AUTHORITY LEXUS PRUDENTIAL W HOTELS WORLDWIDE

SILVER COX ENTERPRISES EY GOOGLE HYATT HOTELS CORPORATION MGM RESORTS INTERNATIONAL NIKE TYLENOL

BRONZE BOSTON SCIENTIFIC BP CREDIT SUISSE DELL GAYDESTINATIONWEDDINGS.COM/ SANDOS HOTELS & RESORTS GOLDMAN SACHS HERSHEY IBM JPMORGAN CHASE & CO. LINCOLN FINANCIAL GROUP MACY’S INC. METLIFE MORGAN STANLEY ORBITZ PEPSICO PFIZER REPLACEMENTS LTD. SHELL STARBUCKS SYMANTEC CORPORATION TD BANK WHIRLPOOL

FOUNDATION PARTNERS AMERICAN COUNCIL OF LEARNED SOCIETIES ANONYMOUS AT&T BANK OF AMERICA FOUNDATION BBVA COMPASS FOUNDATION BLACK TIE DINNER, INC. BROWN-FORMAN E. RHODES AND LEONA B. CARPENTER FOUNDATION THE COCA-COLA FOUNDATION GILL FOUNDATION GOOGLE ELTON JOHN AIDS FOUNDATION THE JOHN C. KISH FOUNDATION THE KORS-LEPERE FOUNDATION LEVI STRAUSS FOUNDATION MARGARET AND DANIEL LOEB — THIRD POINT FOUNDATION METLIFE FOUNDATION MICROSOFT MORNINGSTAR PHILANTHROPIC FUND NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION NIKE PEPSICO FOUNDATION PFIZER, INC. PhRMA THE SHERWOOD FOUNDATION PAUL E. SINGER FOUNDATION TIE THE KNOT TIME WARNER UPS FOUNDATION, INC. WELLS FARGO FOUNDATION CURRENT AS OF JUNE 1, 2015

HRC’S GALA EVENTS PORTLAND GALA JULY 25 • The Estate Garden at Lewis & Clark College • Stef-Anie Wells Koty & Karen Petersen • hrcportlandgala.org ORANGE COUNTY GARDEN PARTY AUGUST 1 • The residence of May & Charles Deischter • Jeff Brumett • hrc.org/ocgardenparty   CLEVELAND GALA AUGUST 22 • Cleveland Convention Center • Melanie Falls, Luz Pellot & Justin Weseloh • hrc.org/events/entry/2015-hrccleveland-gala   SAN DIEGO GALA AUGUST 22 • Grand Hyatt • Lisa Mata & Dorian Moore • hrcsandiegogala.com

TWIN CITIES GALA SEPTEMBER 12 • Minneapolis Convention Center • Alicia Schwartz & Tal Anderson • www.hrc.org/events/entry/ save-the-date-twin-cities-gala SEATTLE GALA SEPTEMBER 19 • Sheraton Seattle Hotel • Christie Brezina & Jennifer McCullar • hrcseattle.org  

NATIONAL DINNER OCTOBER 3

• Walter E. Washington Convention Center • Lynn Fussell & Hudson Young • hrcnationaldinner.org CHICAGO GALA OCTOBER 17 • Hilton Chicago • Xavier Esters, Pete Cassell & Anne Klingeberger • hrcchicago.org

SAN FRANCISCO GALA OCTOBER 24 • Westin St. Francis • Cherie Green & Jim Baney • www.sfhrcgala.org PALM SPRINGS GARDEN PARTY NOVEMBER 7 • www.hrc.org/psgardenparty NEW ENGLAND GALA NOVEMBER 7 • hrc.org/events/entry/ hrc-2015-new-england-gala DALLAS BLACK TIE NOVEMBER 14 • blacktie.org   ST. LOUIS GALA NOVEMBER 14 • www.hrc.org/events/entry/ st.-louis-gala SAN ANTONIO GALA NOVEMBER 21 • www.hrc.org/events/entry/ hrc-2015-san-antonio-gala

To buy tickets for HRC gala events, please contact: Box Office Tickets 800-494-8497 or visit www.hrc.org/boxoffice.

Her will provides for her wife, her niece and a future when everyone, everywhere, enjoys full equality. Make your dreams for the future a reality by leaving a gift for HRC in your will or trust. Including HRC as a beneficiary is the best way to ensure that your values live on for future generations. For more information, contact Adam Swaim, director of estate planning, at 866-772-9499, adam.swaim@hrc.org, or visit hrc.org/legacy.

Leave a gift for HRC in your will or trust.


WHERE DO THE CANDIDATES STAND

ON DISCRIMINATION? By Erika Kehrer

Scott Walker, who has come out in favor of a constitutional amendment to reverse a U.S. Supreme Court ruling in favor of marriage equality, said of the controversy,

“I just think this is people who are chronically looking for ways to be upset about things instead of really looking at what it is.” The Wisconsin governor expressed support for the “principle” of the RFRA bills.

measures introduced in statehouses across the country — known as Religious Freedom Restoration Act bills, or RFRAs — designed to undermine progress for LGBT equality. Meanwhile, none of the major candidates for the Republican presidential nom-

Marco Rubio may be willing to attend a same-sex wedding, but unsurprisingly has not been invited to one. The U.S. senator from Florida thinks that any legal consequence for someone who discriminates against LGBT people by withholding professional services

“violates their faith. You’re violating that religious liberty that they have.”

ination spoke out against the Indiana bill or other such bills in other states. Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal went so far as to sign an executive order — over the objections of his own legislature — allowing for the use of religion to discriminate. Here’s what some of the candidates have been saying:

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush apparently defines tolerance differently than the rest of us. He thinks businesses should “absolutely” have the right to use their religious beliefs as an excuse to discriminate against LGBT people, and that

“a tolerant country ought to be able to figure [this] out. …This should not be that complicated, but gosh, it is.”

Bobby Jindal allowed an existing executive order protecting LGBT Louisianans from discrimination to expire because he didn’t think it was

“necessary to create additional special categories or special rights.” The governor apparently believes in making a special exception for the right of people to use their religion to discriminate against LGBT people.

HRC is monitoring the 2016 elections and providing in-depth analysis on the potential candidates’ stances on LGBT-related issues. See HRC’s research report at www.hrc.org/2016republicanfacts. 40

EQUALITY

LATE SPRING / EARLY SUMMER 2015

Photos: Rainier Ehrhardt / AP, Phelan M. Ebenhack / AP, Alonzo Adams / AP

E

arlier this year, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence signed a bill allowing individuals and businesses, under the guise of religious liberty, to discriminate against LGBT people, prompting immediate outrage nationwide. The bill was just one of a wave of


GREAT BRANDS. NO LABELS. Diageo’s celebration of life in all of its shapes, sizes, colors and expressions has earned us the top score of 100% on the Human Rights Campaign Corporate Equality Index for the seventh year in a row.

PLE A SE D R INK R E SPO NSIBLY.

© 2015 D IAG EO, N O RWALK , C T


Wherever we fly, we fly together. Ever since the Human Rights Campaign started identifying the best places to work for LGBT equality, one airline has led the way. Because American Airlines has achieved a perfect score from the Corporate Equality Index every single year since it began. We’re proud to count our lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender employees and their allies among our American family. Learn more on aa.com/diversity.

AmericanAirlines, aa.com and the Flight Symbol logo are marks of American Airlines, Inc. oneworld is a mark of the oneworld Alliance, LLC. Š 2015 American Airlines, Inc. All rights reserved.

Profile for Human Rights Campaign

Equality Magazine Late Spring/Early Summer 2015  

Equality magazine is the nation's largest-circulation LGBT magazine and is free with an HRC membership. Get Equality and read our in-depth i...

Equality Magazine Late Spring/Early Summer 2015  

Equality magazine is the nation's largest-circulation LGBT magazine and is free with an HRC membership. Get Equality and read our in-depth i...

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded