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works PROJECT UPDATE 2018, EDITION 04

LUCERNE UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCES AND ARTS LUCERNE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE – INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE COMPETENCE CENTER FOR TYPOLOGY AND PLANNING IN ARCHITECTURE (CCTP)

OPEN ARCHITECTURE The position paper Open Architecture summarizes CCTP’s approach to architecture in the conflicting fields of individual and collective interests.


PROJECTS

CTTP’s main activity is to investigate the strategic transformation of buildings and neighborhoods in close partnership with research and industry. The range of research projects encompasses highly topical issues from densification strategies for existing neighborhoods and space for creative and innovative activities for the office of the future to the research of cooperation and sufficiency as a winning strategy in architecture.

FLEXIBLE FLOORING Floor systems for residential and hybrid buildings During their life cycle, buildings are under constant internal and external pressure to adapt. A building’s future will be determined by demographic change, new guidelines, service life of building components and variation of use. Buildings therefore need to remain agile and react to changing requirements, – they need to become Open Architecture that offers flexible typologies and components to facilitate adaptations during planning, construction and operation. Flexible Flooring is a practice-oriented, interdisciplinary research project to determine how floor systems can contribute to flexible and sustainable architecture. Besides the context of flexible typologies, consideration is also given to functional, technical, economic and aesthetic requirements. Floor systems allow the supporting structure and building technology systems to be decoupled, which not only simplifies planning but also makes adjustments during planning phase and use easier. Based on interviews, prototypes, cost and use scenarios, CCTP developed strategies and products for the use of high-quality floor systems in residential and hybrid buildings. By using a systemic approach, it is possible to meet given requirements on acoustics, height of the construction element as well as cost. Funding: CTI*; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Business Contact: lars.schuchert@hslu.ch

HYBRID TIMBER HIGH-RISE BUILDINGS Development of a typology for a hybrid timber high-rise construction for urban densification Revised standards and technological developments in timber prefabrication have opened new fields of application for wood as a building material. Preliminary projects for hybrid timber high-rise construction already exist and now it is a question of investigating their potential for urban densification. Compared to conventional high-rise typologies, the hybrid timber highrise offers new benefits for investors. These prospects are to be investigated regarding their economic efficiency, the construction process and resource efficiency. Rather than examining the individual aspects in isolation, CCTP analyzes the interactions and synergies in the interplay of architecture, construction and economic viability. The research project offers an interdisciplinary platform for the involved partners from research, engineering and industry to develop and evaluate a new typology for high-rise buildings. Under the coordination of CCTP, different concepts in hybrid timber construction are elaborated at different levels and compared with regard to their efficient use of floor space, implementation procedure and viability. The contribution of the new hybrid timber high-rise building typology for densification is being evaluated in different building regulation scenarios. The aim of the project is to develop a new typology for hybrid timber high-rise buildings for urban densification and to provide a new, important dimension to the current debate on tall buildings.

INFORMATION ABOUT CCTP AND THE PROJECTS

www.hslu.ch/cctp www.hslu.ch/cctp-aktuelles www.hslu.ch/cctp-projekte www.hslu.ch/cctp-mitarbeitende www.hslu.ch/cctp-publikationen www.hslu.ch/cctp-publikationsreihe

TEXLINING 2 Textile interior insulation system for the renovation of halls

INTERFACE FAÇADE SPACE Creating possibilities for interaction and retreat in high density housing

The aim of the Texlining 2 project is to develop the prototypes from the Stoffwechsel preliminary project in relation to their physical characteristics for the renovation of trussed halls. Energy Strategy 2050 strives to double the renovation rate of buildings in Switzerland and this project is a contribution to that policy. The textile interior insulation system is being developed with regard to its static specifications, different types of material for the filling and casing as well as the manufacturing process. To date, appropriate interior insulation systems have been designed for three types of halls and their possible components have been identified. The interdisciplinary team consisting of researchers from the fields of architecture, static, building physics, insulation, membrane and glass fabric manufacturers and planners is currently working on a prototype to develop and test the interior insulation system.

In the psychology of architecture, it is well known that being able to decide whether to interact or retreat makes a significant contribution to residents’ well-being and this in turn increases the likelihood of gaining acceptance for high density housing. There is clearly huge potential in the area of the façades and in the in-between spaces – so, where private and public domains intersect. Under the supervision of CCTP, an interdisciplinary team from the Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture and Lucerne School of Social Work is involved in the research of the so-called extended façade space. This includes the building envelope, the area up to the façades of the houses on the opposite side, verandas, balconies and loggias, and extends to the indoor rooms beyond them. The key issue is how private, semi-private and public spaces relate to each other and how his interaction can be designed and influenced in every-day use. CCTP is interested in the built environment, the way it is used, its planning and how the users feel about it – since it is the interplay between interaction and retreat that finally determines its success. Nine case studies were carried out to survey the constructional and sociological aspects of different neighborhoods and to contrast their perspectives. The project addresses the question of how constructional and normative measures influence interaction and retreat, how they relate to different living qualities and how they influence acceptance of high density housing projects.

Funding: CTI*; business partners Contact: thomas.heim@hslu.ch

E2REBUILD Industrialized energy efficient retrofitting of residential buildings in cold climates E2ReBuild is a collaborative project of the seventh framework program (FP7) involving twenty project partners from Germany, Finland, France, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Poland, Sweden and Switzerland. E2ReBuild stands for industrialized energy efficient retrofitting of multifamily housing. The aim of the project was to demonstrate alternatives to the current craft and resource based construction in situ in order to cope with the imminent renovation of a large number of multi-family houses from the post-war era. Collaboration between researchers and industry partners made it possible to thoroughly investigate the advantages and challenges of new renovation methods with a high replication potential on seven different residential buildings in seven different European cities. This showed that improved processes shorten the renovation phase and reduce disturbance for the residents. At the same time, it is possible to significantly prolong the buildings life cycle, substantially reduce energy consumption and considerably improve residents’ life quality without having to burden them with an excessive increase in rent and energy costs. CCTP was responsible for the innovation in planning and design work package as well as the research in the field of building typology cooperation models and holistic renovation strategies. Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; European Commission within the Seventh Framework Program Contact: doris.ehrbar@hslu.ch

Funding: CTI*; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; Partners from architecture, construction management, timber engineering and manufacturing Contact: sonja.geier@hslu.ch; frank.keikut@hslu.ch

*CTI (Commission for Technology and Innovation), since January 1, 2018 Innosuisse (Swiss Innovation Agency)

Funding: CTI*; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Social Work; authorities; associations; business partners Contact: angelika.juppien@hslu.ch; richard.zemp@hslu.ch

HOMOGENEOUS BRICK FAÇADES A constructive system An interdisciplinary team is developing an innovative façade system which will significantly extend the range of brick-built façades. Homogeneous, from one basic material: Clay. The low maintenance, sustainable façade system has few interfaces, is breathable and statically suited to multi-story buildings. CCTP is focusing on the façades performance with regard to statics, building physics and feasibility as well as eco-balancing alternatives such as life cycle assessments. Durability of the entire system is also being strived for. To date, an appropriate wall system has been designed and possible components have been identified. An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the fields of architecture, static, building physics and sustainability as well as planners and brick, window and insulation manufacturers is currently working on a prototype to continue developing and testing the wall system. Working on a scale of 1:1 is the most suitable to test the potential of the new system. Funding: CTI*; business partners Contact: uli.herres@hslu.ch


works

“THE ONLY Potential of adaptability

Flexible Flooring improves performance in new buildings and renovation projects due to flexible use and greater adaptability.

Costs Planning

Construction

Operation

Time

CONSTANT IN THE UNIVERSE IS CHANGE.”

using flexible building components using conventional building components

HERACLITUS

Texlining 2 Prototype of an interior insulation system from the Stoffwechsel preliminary project at HP Gasser AG’s manufacturing plant.

Interface Façade Space High living quality by designing areas for interaction and withdrawal in high density housing. Photo: Andréa Zemp Santana do Nascimento

Homogeneous Brick Façades Bricks on kiln cars at the Keller AG Ziegeleien brick manufacturing plant. Left tunnel kilns, right chamber dryer. Photo: Keller AG Ziegeleien

E2ReBuild Student accommodation in Oulu, Finland after renovation

E2ReBuild Townhouses in Roosendaal, the Netherlands before (top) and after renovation (middle, bottom)

More projects and information at www.hslu.ch/cctp


INFORMATION ON CCTP PUBLICATIONS

www.hslu.ch/cctp-publikationen

SMART DENSITY Qualified densification with timber

NETWORK OF COOPERATIVE IMPLEMENTATION IN INWARD DEVELOPMENT Pilot project of sustainable development 2014 – 2018

According to the Swiss Federal Statistical Office, the population of Switzerland will increase to nine million by 2020. Population increase and the growing demand for living space are subjecting many local councils to strong urban pressure which has been met by allocating new building zones or optimizing density within the community. The Smart Density project focuses on regenerating existing resources as laid down by the federal government and addresses possible densification in existing neighborhoods. Following a potential analysis, densification strategies of existing neighborhoods were defined together with local authorities. CCTP then included property owners to develop scenarios for specific locations taking regional and local characteristics into account. The advantages of timber construction were highlighted based on structural concepts for specific densification measures. The results of the Smart Density project have been published in the Qualitätsvolle Innenentwicklung von Städten und Gemeinden – durch Dialog und Kooperation guidebook and in Lignatec Magazine no. 29 (published by Lignum Holzwirtschaft Schweiz).

The first partial revision of the Swiss federal spatial planning law (RPG) from May 1, 2014 has raised the question of inward development in all municipalities. The new regulations demand inward development and the creation of compact, high quality settlements. Due to this new legislation and subsequent changes in cantonal guidelines, it is mainly the small and medium sized municipalities that are faced with new challenges. Structural and spatial conditions, increasing volumes of traffic and complicated ownership structures are just some of the aspects that must be taken into consideration. On the other hand, inward development presents an opportunity to effectively drive the future development of the municipality. Field-proven tools already exist for recording use potential and strategy development of municipalities. The problems lie in implementing these strategies with the parties concerned. The Federal Council’s Network of Cooperative Implementation in Inward Development pilot project tested in eight case study municipalities, new cooperative procedures for the implementation of inward development strategies application maturity in collaboration with the Lucerne School of Social Work at the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts. The findings are available in German on the inward development platform (Netzwerk Innenentwicklung) of the County of Lucerne or at rawi.lu.ch/themen/siedlungsentwicklung/Netzwerk_Innenentwicklung

Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Social Work; kämpfen für architektur; Federal Office for the Environment; County of Lucerne (rawi); cities and communities; business partners Contact: ulrike.sturm@hslu.ch

Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; Swiss Federal Office for Spatial Development; Swiss Federal Office for Agriculture; County of Lucerne; County of Basel-Country; Verband Luzerner Gemeinden Contact: ulrike.sturm@hslu.ch

CCTP PUBLICATION

QUALITÄTSVOLLE INNENENTWICKLUNG VON STÄDTEN UND GEMEINDEN durch Dialog und Kooperation

DURCH DIALOG UND KOOPERATION Argumentarium und Wegweiser

AM PLAN

ERMITTELN VON MÖGLICHKEITSRÄUMEN

Was liegt vor? politischer Auftrag zur Innen­ entwicklung, Grundlagen

ULRIKE STURM 2017, 120 PAGES, VDF HOCHSCHULVERLAG AG ZÜRICH, ISBN 978-3-7281-3790-6, ALSO AVAILABLE AS AN EBOOK The modular Living Shell construction system offers a sustainable solution for the renovation and extension of roofs and façades of existing buildings. It was developed with the aim of combining the advantages of standardization with the desire for a variety of solutions when extending upwards and extending façades. Standardization in the construction industry aims for a high degree of prefabrication and a limited range of products. This cuts time and costs. The modular Living Shell construction system combines these advantages with a high degree of versatility to meet different user needs, react to different requirements and, in the case of a building extension, ensures that they are adjustable to that context.

Was sind die Ergebnisse? Akteursanalyse, Kommunika­ tions­/Beteiligungskonzept, Katalog mit Ortsmerkmalen, Standortbewertung/Um­ gebungsanalyse

Wie geht man vor? Analysen (Geo­/Daten, Pläne, Dokumente), Begehungen, Workshops

Kompetenzzentrum Regionalökonomie (CCRO) Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP)

AM RUNDEN TISCH

AUSHANDELN VON ZIELRÄUMEN

Was sind die Ergebnisse? Prozessvereinbarung/Arbeits­ programm, räumliche Zielverein­ barung/integraler Masterplan und Aktionsplan

Wer ist beteiligt? Gemeinde, Ortsplaner Eigentümer, Investoren/Bau­ träger, Nutzende, Experten Wie geht man vor? Plan­ und Datenanalysen Begehungen, Interviews, Workshops

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Wer ist beteiligt? Gemeinde, Ortsplaner Eigentümer, Investoren/Bauträger, Nutzende, Experten Wie geht man vor? Plan­ und Datenanalysen Begehungen, Interviews, Workshops

AM OBJEKT

HANDELN IN LÖSUNGSRÄUMEN Was folgt? Wie geht man vor? städtebauliche Detailkonzepte, Studien, Wettbewerbe, Media­ formelle Planungen, konkrete tion/Verhandlungen, reguläre Bauprojekte Planungs­ und Bewilligungs­ verfahren Wer ist beteiligt? Gemeinde, Ortsplaner, Eigen­ tümer, Investoren/Bauträger, Experten

DAS MODULARE BAUSYSTEM LIVING SHELL

1 AM PLAN – ERMITTELN VON MÖGLICHKEITSRÄUMEN

WAS LIEGT VOR? POLITISCHER AUFTRAG ZUR INNENENTWICKLUNG Erste wesentliche Voraussetzung zur Innenentwicklung ist ein Auftrag der Politik, z.B. in Form von Legislaturzielen und Leitsätzen. Eine Strategie zur qualitätsvollen Innenentwicklung kann auf drei Arten im Planungsprozess einer Gemeinde platziert werden: – als Bestandteil der Entwicklungsstrategie der Gemeinde (z.B. Siedlungsleitbild) – als Bestandteil der Ortsplanung – als eigenständige Strategie HILFSMITTEL Im Idealfall ist eine Strategie zur Innenentwicklung bereits Raum+ (ETHZ) bei der Erarbeitung einer kommunalen Entwicklungsstrategie LUBAT (Kanton LU) ein zentraler Bestandteil. Spätestens bei der nächsten Revision Dichtebox (Metron) der Ortsplanung sollte eine Strategie zur Innenentwicklung vorliegen. Neben dem Grundsatz ist auch das generelle Vorgehen zur Innenentwicklung (Arbeitsschritte, Zeitplan, Budget) durch die zuständigen Behörden festzulegen.

AM ORT

Was ist zu tun? a) Erfassen der Akteure und ihrer Perspektiven b) Feststellen ortsspezifischer Merkmale und Identitäten

Wer ist beteiligt? Gemeinde, Ortsplaner

Was ist zu tun? a) Einigung auf einen gemein­ samen Prozess b) Festlegen gemeinsamer Grundsätze zur Entwicklung und Gestaltung

2

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ERMITTELN VON SPIELRÄUMEN

Was sind die Ergebnisse? politisches Commitment, Potenzial­/Strategieplan

Funding: CTI*; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Social Work; École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne; HafenCity University Hamburg; Technical University of Berlin; business partners, cantonal and city authorities Contact: ulrike.sturm@hslu.ch

Qualitätsvolle Verdichtung durch Ausbau und Sanierung von Dächern und Fassaden

The effective use of land and consistent settlement development are declared goals on Switzerland’s political agenda. To achieve these objectives, it is necessary to regenerate land reserves such as spaces between buildings, under-exploited and derelict sites within cities and municipalities. However, putting this policy into practice is fraught with a wide range of obstacles. The complexity of the regulatory framework calls for thinking, planning and taking action beyond the proverbial ‘garden fence’, a location specific approach as well as the specific inclusion of all parties involved. The publication offers practical assistance in identifying and regenerating reserves within existing built up areas. It follows an exemplary approach for inward development which can be adapted as required and focuses on informal, location specific stages during the overall process as the basis for implementation. Case studies illustrate various initial situations, objectives, strategies and their implementation. In addition, the publication offers an overview on currently available tools for inward development.

1

The Living Shell project is a contribution to the imminent, extensive renovation of the Swiss building stock. By extending upwards and extending the façades during building envelope renovation, the aim is to gain additional usable areas which can be used for living, office, high quality outdoor space or for renewable energy production. In cooperation with the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Social Work; the Laboratory of Architecture and Sustainable Technologies at the EPF Lausanne, industry partners and city authorities, CTTP developed a compact 3D module, which in combination with 2D elements, is designed for flexible use when extending upwards. Based on an analysis of different locations and relevant stakeholders, typological concepts were developed. Furthermore, an added value evaluation was carried out as a comparative case study to compare the compact module with conventional renovation options. A process model assists local authorities and property owners to initiate and communicate a renovation with the compact module in the context of densification.

DAS MODULARE BAUSYSTEM LIVING SHELL

ULRIKE STURM 2014, 88 PAGES, VDF HOCHSCHULVERLAG AG ZÜRICH, ISBN 978-3-7281-3622-0, ALSO AVAILABLE AS AN EBOOK

QUALITÄTSVOLLE INNEN­ ENTWICKLUNG VON STÄDTEN UND GEMEINDEN

LIVING SHELL High quality densification through the development and renovation of roofs and façades

CCTP PUBLICATION

Argumentarium und Wegweiser

VORWORT

TEKTUR (CCTP)

CTP) der Hochschule n Mensch und ge­ um im Kontext sich on Gebäuden und ntwickelt Strategien elt an gesellschaft­ praxis­ und lösungs­ selbst wesentlich

www.hslu.ch/cctp-projekte

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Luzern – Wirtschaft ten Fragen, sowohl auf der Ebene von ysen und Gutachten, d die Entwicklung Kompetenzzentrum ag zu einer nach­

INFORMATION ON CCTP PROJECTS

Qualitätsvolle Verdichtung durch Ausbau und Sanierung von Dächern und Fassaden

GRUNDLAGEN Eine Strategie zur Innenentwicklung bezieht sich auf übergeordnete Instrumente wie kantonale und regionale Richtpläne und vorhandene räumliche Konzepte und Planungen. Die Gemeinde stellt für die Erarbeitung der Innenentwicklungsstrategie die wichtigsten Grundlagen und Vorgaben in allen relevanten Bereichen wie Siedlung und Landschaft, Verkehr und Infrastrukturen, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft zusammen. POTENZIALHINWEISKARTE In einem ersten Schritt werden mögliche Entwicklungsflächen im bestehenden Siedlungsgebiet identifiziert und grob quantifiziert. Dazu werden die planungsrechtlich zulässigen Flächen und Bauvolumen den realisierten Flächen und Bauvolumen gegenübergestellt. Aus der Differenz ergeben sich die verbleibenden Flächenkapazitäten, aus denen sich mögliche zusätzliche Einwohner- und Arbeitsplatzkapazitäten ableiten lassen. Diese Berechnungen können durch die Gemeinden resp. den Ortsplaner erfolgen oder von kantonalen Dienststellen bereitgestellt werden. Die identifizierten Entwicklungsflächen werden auf einer Potenzialhinweiskarte parzellenscharf lokalisiert und die Einwohnerkapazitäten in einer Übersichtstabelle ausgewiesen. Beide Dokumente sollten durch die Gemeinden oder kantonalen Dienststellen regelmässig aktualisiert werden.

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Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Institut für soziokulturelle Entwicklung (ISE) Laboratory of Architecture and Sustainable Technologies (LAST)

Einwohnerdichte Die Abweichung der effektiven Einwohnerdichte (Ew/ha) vom Mittelwert ist… grösser als –50% zwischen –25% und –50% kleiner als –25% +/–5 Ew/ha kleiner als +25% zwischen +25% und +50% grösser als +50% nicht ausgewertet

Öffentlicher Verkehr­ Güteklassen eine oder weniger Kurspaare pro Stunde zwei bis drei Kurspaare pro Stunde

GSEducationalVersion

vier oder mehr Kurspaare pro Stunde

Potenzialhinweiskarte zur a) Darstellung des aktuellen Überbauungsgrades b) Verortung und Bewertung freier Flächenkapazitäten Quelle: Kanton Luzern (2013a)

GSEducationalVersion

Living Shell Use of the compact 3D module and the 2D elements on an existing building

GSEducationalVersion

AM ORT

ERMITTELN VON SPIELRÄUMEN

More projects and information at www.hslu.ch/cctp

GSEducationalVersion


“You can’t control.” JOHN HABRAKEN

Condominium ownership was recognized across Switzerland in 1965 and is becoming increasingly popular. However, the operation and maintenance of these buildings is often difficult due to the complex decision-making processes between the owners. The research project deals with the development of long term strategies for the operation, maintenance and renovation of condominiums. Firstly, the key challenges of condominium ownership had to be determined. Following interviews with experts and group workshops with condominium owners, a system layout which includes the relevant processes and milestones in the life cycle of a condominium building was prepared and linked to an overview of the key challenges. This resulted in the development of the Luzerner Toolbox containing instruments for process optimization and knowledge transfer in condominium ownership. Besides information for prospective condominium buyers, a description of an optimized renovation procedure, a renovation schedule with cost evaluation and a forecasting tool for the progression of the reserve funds, the toolbox also includes input regarding the declaration of regulations and administrative duties as well as a communication and conflict management tool.

Conflicts of public interest between reducing energy consumption and preserving building culture often leads to long delays when renovating residential buildings and estates built between the 1940s and 1970s, with some not being renovated at all. With the help of experts on energy, building culture, city development and implementation, thirteen case studies of protected residential buildings and estates showed that cultural and energy related issues can mainly be combined when carrying out holistic renovations. It is also possible for the owners to carry out these holistic strategies in stages, and to do it well. However, this requires that all parties are involved in the preparation of the carefully considered and mutually negotiated renovation strategies, that the buildings and estates are considered as a whole and across their entire life cycle and that additional, reversible measures with minimal impact are applied. To solve complex issues, the planning tools, coordination matrix and cluster diagram which have been developed in this project can be introduced already at the strategic phase to support the planning process.

Funding: CTI*; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Social Work; business partners Contact: doris.ehrbar@hslu.ch

CCTP PUBLICATION

CCTP PUBLICATION

STADTKLANG

SANSTRAT

Argumentarium und Wegweiser Ganzheitliche Sanierungsstrategien für Wohnbauten und Siedlungen der 1940er bis 1970er Jahre

Wege zu einer hörenswerten Stadt Perspektiven

Stadtklang – Wege zu einer hörenswerten Stadt is the first in a series that contributes to understanding sound as a designable, qualitative dimension and aims at raising awareness of an expert audience. The publication highlights city sounds from different perspectives. It presents contributions from the fields of acoustic design, urban studies, social science and architecture. Instances of urban spaces worth listening to exemplify the texts. The perspective research shows how to close existing gaps in information and knowledge so that reliable and promising directives are available for the field in future. The results of this research will be published in further volumes of the series.

TOOL 1

TOOL 2

KTI-PROJEKT «Luzerner Toolbox» für die Entwicklung von Langzeitstrategien im Stockwerkeigentum

KTI-PROJEKT «Luzerner Toolbox» für die Entwicklung von Langzeitstrategien im Stockwerkeigentum

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Institut für Soziokulturelle Entwicklung (ISE) Institut für Betriebs- und Regionalökonomie (IBR)

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Institut für Soziokulturelle Entwicklung (ISE) Institut für Betriebs- und Regionalökonomie (IBR)

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Institut für Soziokulturelle Entwicklung (ISE) Institut für Betriebs- und Regionalökonomie (IBR)

TOOL 4

TOOL 5

TOOL 6

INFORMATIONEN ZUM STOCKWERKEIGENTUM

INSTRUMENTE ZUR ERNEUERUNGSPLANUNG VON STOCKWERKEIGENTUM KTI-PROJEKT «Luzerner Toolbox» für die Entwicklung von Langzeitstrategien im Stockwerkeigentum

DORIS EHRBAR, PETER SCHWEHR 2013, 124 PAGES, FAKTOR VERLAG AG ZÜRICH, ISBN 978-3-905711-25-7 In Switzerland, one in four apartments is in a multi-family house from the 1940s to the 1970s (Swiss Federal Office of Energy). Due to the rise in heritage-related interests and increasing pressure to adapt, these buildings are subjected to a growing conflict of interests. Together with the planning tools, the publication for holistic renovation serves as a practical guideline and shows which goals the players involved in the renovation are pursuing, how successful the collaboration between those involved in the project is, and which renovation measures help retain the cultural heritage value.

KTI-PROJEKT «Luzerner Toolbox» für die Entwicklung von Langzeitstrategien im Stockwerkeigentum

KOMMENTIERTES PFLICHTENHEFT VERWALTUNG STOCKWERKEIGENTUM

4 Ganzheitliche SanierunGSStrateGien am BeiSpiel von FallStudien

KTI-PROJEKT «Luzerner Toolbox» für die Entwicklung von Langzeitstrategien im Stockwerkeigentum

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Institut für Soziokulturelle Entwicklung (ISE) Institut für Betriebs- und Regionalökonomie (IBR)

SCHALLQUELLEN Kinder

Bahn

Verkehr

Strassenbahn

Industrie

Wasser

Personen Versammlung

Musik

Flugzeug

Geräte

Tiere

SCHALLPEGEL Mittel

Hoch

Long term Strategies in Condominium Ownership Alongside the eight brochures the Luzerner Toolbox includes in-depth thematic reports and practical tools

STUFEN DER KLANGQUALITÄT Angenehm

Gleichgültig

Erträglich

Aggressiv

ELEMENTE DER KLANGARTIKULATION Absorption

Echo/Nachhall

Diffusion

Resonanz

89

WOLKENGRAFIK

Strategievariante 1 Strategievariante 2

KOMMUNIKATION UND KONFLIKTMANAGEMENT IM STOCKWERKEIGENTUM

T Techni k

Hülle

Raum

Überlagerter Bereich von Strategievariante 1 und Strategievariante 2

KTI-PROJEKT «Luzerner Toolbox» für die Entwicklung von Langzeitstrategien im Stockwerkeigentum Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Institut für Soziokulturelle Entwicklung (ISE) Institut für Betriebs- und Regionalökonomie (IBR)

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EXEMPLARISCHE VISUALISIERUNG

Tief

TOOL 3

88

MUSTERREGLEMENT UND ZIELSETZUNGEN FÜR STOCKWERKEIGENTUM

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Institut für Soziokulturelle Entwicklung (ISE) Institut für Betriebs- und Regionalökonomie (IBR)

ARCHITEKTUR

OPTIMIERTER ERHALTUNGSPROZESS FÜR STOCKWERKEIGENTUM

Reduktion Wärmeverluste

ULRIKE STURM 2016, 192 PAGES, VDF HOCHSCHULVERLAG AG ZÜRICH, ISBN 978-3-7281-3757-9 ALSO AVAILABLE AS AN EBOOK

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Funding: CTI*; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; business partners; authorities; charitable trusts; Platform Zukunft Bau; brenet/bisol Contact: doris.ehrbar@hslu.ch

h1a Dämmung gegen unbeheizt: Estrichboden

h1b Dämmung gegen unbeheizt: Kellerdecke

h2 Dachdämmung: Ersatz bestehende Dämmung

h3 Türerneuerung: Einbau Windfang

h4 Verminderung Wärmebrücken: Entkoppelung Balkone

h5 Aussendämmung: Giebelfassade

h6 Aussendämmung Längsfassaden

TOOL 7

TOOL 8

ANREIZE ERNEUERUNG VON STOCKWERKEIGENTUM

PLANERISCHE EMPFEHLUNGEN FÜR STOCKWERKEIGENTUM

KTI-PROJEKT «Luzerner Toolbox» für die Entwicklung von Langzeitstrategien im Stockwerkeigentum

KTI-PROJEKT «Luzerner Toolbox» für die Entwicklung von Langzeitstrategien im Stockwerkeigentum

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Institut für Soziokulturelle Entwicklung (ISE) Institut für Betriebs- und Regionalökonomie (IBR)

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Institut für Soziokulturelle Entwicklung (ISE) Institut für Betriebs- und Regionalökonomie (IBR)

h7 Innendämmung Längs- & Giebelfassaden

T1 Erneuerbare Energien: Anschluss an Fernwärme

h8 Fenstererneuerung: Glasersatz

R1 Transformation innerhalb EBF: Verschiebung Wohnungstrennwand

T2 Erneuerbare Energien: Photovoltaik auf Gauben

R3 Erneuerung ausserhalb EBF: Vergrösserung Balkone

R2 Veränderung EBF: Ausbau Dach

T3 Erneuerbare Energien: Photovoltaik auf Schrägdächern

R4 Erneuerung Erschliessung: Einbau Aufzug in 4 Häusern

T4 Erneuerung Gebäudetechnik: WRG bestehende Abluftanlage

R6 Ersatzneubau: Bernerring 41 – 45

R5 Anbau: Verlängerung Längszeilen

R7 Neubau: Verdichtung im Hof

Abb. 17: Wolkengrafik der Wohnsiedlung Zum Blauen mit empfohlener Sanierungsstrategie

CCTP PUBLICATION LUZERNER TOOLBOX für die Entwicklung von Langzeitstrategien im Stockwerkeigentum Amelie-Theres Mayer Stefan Haase

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Institut für Soziokulturelle Entwicklung (ISE) Institut für Betriebs- und Regionalökonomie (IBR)

LUZERNER TOOLBOX

22

für die Entwicklung von Langzeitstrategien im Stockwerkeigentum AMELIE-THERES MAYER, STEFAN HAASE 2016, 144 PAGES, VDF HOCHSCHULVERLAG AG AN DER ETH ZÜRICH, ISBN 978-3-7281-3739-5 (Luzerner Toolbox: 8 booklets in a slipcase) ALSO AVAILABLE AS AN EBOOK

All additional thematic reports and instruments of the Luzerner Toolbox and an overview of all high-resolution diagrams are available at www.hslu.ch/cctp-stwe

8

1 Wohnbauten und Siedlungen der 1940er biS 1970er Jahre

PRoJEKTlAyoUT UNd METhodIK Die Städte Basel, Luzern, St. Gallen und Zug beteiligten sich mit je einem Städteteam, bestehend aus Experten der Fachbereiche Stadtentwicklung, Baukultur, Energie und Umsetzung, und insgesamt dreizehn Fallstudien am Forschungsprojekt SanStrat. Für jede Fallstudie wurde anhand einer ersten Strategievariante abwechselnd in disziplinären Experten­Fachgrup­ pen8 und den interdisziplinären Städteteams9 eine von allen beteiligten Akteuren getragene Sanierungsstrategie ausgearbeitet. Gleichzeitig wur­ de der interdisziplinäre Abwägungs­ und Aushandlungsprozess beobach­ tet sowie die Interessen und Forderungen der beteiligten Experten erfragt und dokumentiert (Abb. 4). Die Kenntnis der Interessen und Forderungen der wichtigsten Akteure oder Akteur­Gruppen (d.h. allen aktiv an der Ausarbeitung der ganzheit­ lichen Sanierungsstrategien beteiligten Experten aus Stadtentwicklung, Baukultur, Energie und Umsetzung sowie den Eigentümern) ermöglichte, Grundsätze für die Ausarbeitung von ganzheitlichen Sanierungsstrate­ gien zu entwickeln, die bei geschützten wie auch bei baukulturell wert­ Z.B. Fachgruppe Energie mit vollen, nicht geschützten Gebäuden angewendet allen beteiligten Experten werden können. des Fachbereichs Energie.

23

Fallstudie 1

Fachgruppe baukultur

mehrerer Fachbereiche.

Fallstudie n

Fachgruppe energie

disziplinäre und interdisziplinäre Arbeit an den Fallstudien Entwurfsworkshops

Fachgruppe umsetzung

Fallstudiendoku 2

Fallstudiendoku n

Abb. 4: Layout des Forschungsprojekts SanStrat

Rechts: Lorem ipsum

argumente Stadtentwicklung argumente baukultur argumente energie argumente umsetzung

Koordination

Fallstudiendoku 1

9 Bestehend aus Experten

Fallstudie 2

Fachgruppe Stadtentwicklung

Moderation & Dokumentation

Funding: CTI*; Federal Office for the Environment; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Social Work; Zürich University of the Arts, Zürich University of Applied Sciences; business partners; cities Contact: ulrike.sturm@hslu.ch

SANSTRAT Holistic renovation strategies for residential buildings and housing estates from the 1940s to the 1970s

Räumlicher Mehrwert

Good acoustics also contribute to the quality of urban open spaces, yet very little is known about how high quality urban sound can be created That is why the CCTP initiated the CTI* Stadtklang project in collaboration with the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Social Work in 2016. Based on four case studies and working with acoustic consultants for outside spaces and industry partners, physical and spatial, location and use specific as well as organizational methods are developed to analyze and evaluate the acoustic qualities of urban outside spaces. This resulted in a holistic model for the systematic mapping and evaluation of acoustic qualities. Besides expert opinions from different disciplines (architecture, urban development, landscape architecture, construction material science, acoustic, social sciences), the model integrates a user-oriented procedure to collect and evaluate acoustic qualities. The sources of the acoustic qualities recorded are determined in an impact analysis and measures are established to increase sound quality in outdoor spaces. The results of the project will expand the knowledge of the acoustic environment with practical tools and formulate principles for their planning and design. This knowledge serves as a basis for the conception of new building elements.

Toolbox for the development of LONG-TERM STRATEGIES IN CONDOMINIUM OWNERSHIP

Reduktion Co2-Ausstoss

STADTKLANG Advancing acoustic qualities in urban outdoor spaces

Argumentarium ganzheitliche Sanierungsstrategien inkl. Planungswerkzeuge und Kommunikationsgrundlagen


works

OPEN ARCHI TEC TURE

Sustainable urban development is geared to qualities for the users, long term strategies and has the necessary potential to become robust enough to react to changes. However, merely focusing on quantitative indicators such as efficiency and technical optimization does not do justice to the city’s character and weakens its ability to be resilient. As an open and adaptive system, a city must be able to continuously develop and needs room for experiment. This requires dynamic, diverse and fault tolerant development strategies. Yet this contradicts the rigid corset of regimentation or a prescribed technology. GUERRILLA URBANISM An alternative approach to urban research practice

Guerrilla Urbanism Street furniture in Industriestrasse, Lucerne, Switzerland

With the trend of urbanization, more and more attention is being paid to the questions of ownership and use of public space. Looking at urban development around the world, one sees many different forms of urban design. It is increasingly common for locals to take matters into their own hands and physically participate in spontaneous activities. The interdisciplinary research project Guerrilla Urbanism experimented with this type of activity that is driven by the needs of the local population. Street furniture was assembled and placed in various locations to evaluate its acceptance and use. Interviews with passers-by and local residents as well as documenting tactical urbanism projects resulted in a roadmap to put DIY urbanism into action. Tactical urbanism is especially suited to trigger a dialogue about the built environment at a local level. Collaborative activities also uncover latent energies, explore the potential of places and non-places and the need to make an active contribution. Open to outcome, these activities are a valuable concrete and spatial addition to strategic planning and can enrich conventional participation processes through highly engaging experiences in towns and cities. Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; Interdisciplinary Focus Creative Living Lab Contact: lars.schuchert@hslu.ch

More projects and information at www.hslu.ch/cctp

POSITION: BUILDING AS LIVING SPACE Architecture is in the conflicting fields between concrete/specific and the adaptable/dynamic, between individual and collective interests. This often leads to architecture being reduced to its objectness. In contrast, Open Architecture expresses a viewpoint which systemically considers the building as living space. Together with John Habraken, the CCTP believes that “as a physical form, our buildings have to be brought to life”. (John Habraken, 1961). A building not only consists of structural and technical components, but also of a living environment with complex spatial, social and economic interaction. Systemic consideration includes an “environmental understanding which extends from interacting systems with dynamic references to everyday reality” (Jesko Fezer, 1980). Human-environment-interaction can be specifically developed during the planning stage, realization, use and renovation. The aim of Open Architecture is to achieve the highest possible quality of human-environment-interaction. Systemic consideration of the building as living space

Designing Open Architecture is part of human-environmentinteraction and necessitates negotiation processes. Different individual interests and collective responsibilities are often assumed to be in competition with each other. One must therefore succeed in bringing together all stakeholders and decision makers of these interest groups at an early stage in the planning process with the aim of transferring conflicting goals into target agreements. These agreements are the basis of a long term, iterative planning process. Process

Open Architecture cannot come into being without the participation of all parties concerned. When planning spaces, buildings and neighborhoods in an interdisciplinary process, one must identify the relevant developments that will influence buildings in the future and formulate scenarios of possible developments. The scenarios serve as the foundation for further decisions. This procedure takes the “unknown as a basis” (John Habraken 2000/1961, p. 31) and seeks “approaches to deal with the unknown” (Jesko Fezer 1980, p. 16). Participation

Open Architecture is a reaction to the needs and requirements of current and future users. It must fulfill flexible functions that are also subject to constant change. That is why Open Architecture has an adaptable structure yet with a specific, not random, organization. It is characterized by high demands which is a basic requirement for the aspired high human-environment-interaction. It calls for action and creates a range of possibilities to simulate everyday lives. Adaptability, learning ability, resilience

Open Architecture focuses on the effect of the built structure on human beings. Whereas the built environment in its physical state is objective, the way in which it is experienced and how it characterizes behavior is subjective. To take this blur into account in the design process yet to build something specific that is subjective and can be accepted, presents a challenge yet a tremendous opportunity for architects. Impact


Acknowledging John Habraken’s theory “You can’t control”, Open Architecture can only be planned to a certain extent. All buildings are under constant pressure to adapt. This pressure is applied by changes in various areas such as economy, society, ecology etc. and cannot be immediately neutralized by architectural concepts. Solutions that are being put forward today must therefore also be considered with a view to their expiry date. Open Architecture has to be able to react to change with different strategies. Potential to adapt, expiry date

Open Architecture creates qualitative values for future users. An adaptable building is a specific, high quality product that allows for changes. If one considers value retention and profitability as indicators for long-term sustainability as well as different uses of the building, effectiveness rather than efficiency is the more appropriate measure for assessing added value. This means, seeking the right effect and not to optimize a solution which is thought to be correct. Sustainability, efficiency, effectiveness

Open Architecture makes it possible to exploit synergies between individuals and community and between building and neighborhood thus creating added value. Through cooperation in a higher-ranking system, single buildings can benefit from the specific strengths of others. The aim is not to create an autonomous building that can achieve everything, but the activation of synergies between the different buildings and different uses. Lively neighborhoods are rated in terms of the concentration and quality of community interaction that encourages a lively living and working environment. The overall balance on a neighborhood or town level is what counts. Synergies, living neighborhoods, sufficiency, cooperation

CONCLUSION Architecture can only become fully effective once it has been activated. Two levels of information play a key role in this process: The first information level is the building itself as a static object (hardware e.g. materiality, space allocation etc.). This includes the structural spatial potential. A second higher level of information assumes the function of software (immaterial aspects, acceptance etc.). The software activates the structural spatial potential of the building and is responsible for the humanenvironment-interaction. This process transforms the building into a higher-quality state of living space.

Fezer, Jesko (1980): Politik – Umwelt – Mensch. In: Burckhardt, Lucius: Wer plant die Planung? Architektur, Politik und Mensch. Kassel: Martin Schmitz Verlag: Berlin Habraken, N. John (2000): Die Träger und die Menschen: Das Ende des Massenwohnungsbaus. Den Haag: Arch-Edition/original edition 1961 Habraken, N. John (2008): Eine offene Architektur ist keine neutrale Architektur. Interview published in World Architects magazine

If one succeeds in consciously taking the interplay between these information levels into consideration during the planning stage, fragile (object oriented) states can be transformed into antifragile (human-environment-interaction oriented) states. Since the aspired level of high human-environment-interaction assumes specific consideration of use, building and context and already considers as a principle in design “the unknown as a basis” (Habraken 2000/1961, p. 31). For this reason, architecture must be adaptable to be classed as Open Architecture. As soon as the building is viewed as an isolated (material) object without taking its (immaterial) human-environment-interaction into account, the process leads to an undue reduction of complex interrelations and unsatisfactory evaluations of the architectural effect increasing the risk of fragility. “Activating natural relations is only made possible through interaction” (Habraken, 1961, p. 29). It is fundamental in developing sustainable architecture. We need spaces, buildings and neighborhoods that can react as Open Architecture to changing requirements and which, despite change, are guarantor of high quality living space. Our spaces, buildings and neighborhoods must urge us to act and thereby to fulfill our responsibility. This process impels all architects to take action: This is about involving different players and disciplines and the easy access to architecture for amateurs as experts of everyday life.

EVO III Antifragility in architecture

COOPERATIVE ARCHITECTURE Sufficiency as a winning strategy

Antifragility in Architecture is another CCTP research project which focuses on evolutionary processes in architecture. Inspired by evolutionary epigenetic processes and mechanisms, strategies are developed for an adaptable built environment. According to the principle of Open Architecture, architecture can only become fully effective once it has been activated. The immaterial aspects and acceptance processes activate the structural spatial potential of the architecture and transform the building to a higher quality state as living space. Disorder triggers stressors that pressurize a building to react. By analyzing specific case studies, CCTP examines how disorder, as a positive stressor, can trigger sustainable development of the built environment. Using a criteria grid of fragile, robust, resilient and antifragile (according to Taleb), the case studies are subjected to a stress test to develop solutions for the conscious application of positive stressors in the planning and realizing of adaptable buildings and neighborhoods. The project is part of CCTP’s research in the context of the CIB W104 Open Building Implementation (International Council for Research and Innovation in Building and Construction)

In line with the concept of “What’s Mine Is Yours” (Botsmann/Rogers), the sufficiency in architecture project cycle examines how cooperative systems are changing architecture and the way we live. Sufficiency is often associated with loss or abandonment of prosperity or individuality. It will therefore be difficult to implement any moderation at the required levels if it does not have an immediate added value for individuals. CCTP examines sufficiency from the point of view of generated added value for society as well as individuals using specific neighborhoods as an example. The research work focuses on strategies for sharing, connecting, interacting and densifying. The social good of each society “is not measured by the level and speed of individual consumption, but on the density and quality of social interaction” (project 21). Lively urban districts address social interaction and cooperation. Interaction and cooperation, in the form of communal use, lead to a reduction in individual consumption. For example, the living area requirements per person can be reduced through shared rooms (such as guest rooms).

Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture Contact: peter.schwehr@hslu.ch

LITERATURE

Cooperative Architecture (Re)designing urban districts to achieve sufficiency in living space by applying cooperative strategies

“WHAT’S MINE IS YOURS” [RACHEL BOTSMAN / ROO ROGERS]

Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture Contact: peter.schwehr@hslu.ch

TO RE-USE

TO CONNECT

System level Antifragility

WE © CCTP

S1 S2

Resilience Robustness Fragility

TO INTERACT

S3

S4 S5 Strategies

Sn Time TO DENSIFY

Applying the densification strategy in an existing neighborhood of single family homes

TO SHARE


INFORMATION ON CCTP PROJECTS

www.hslu.ch/cctp-projekte INFORMATION ON CCTP PUBLICATIONS

www.hslu.ch/cctp-publikationen

CORPORATE COLLABORATION SPACES Strategies and products for collaboration spaces to increase efficiency and identification in the office The CTI* project Corporate Collaboration Space examines how rooms for formal meetings and collaboration could better fulfill the requirements of knowledge workers. The focus is on a holistic, interdisciplinary approach that not only considers the room, equipment, integration of Information and communication technology but also includes the relevant methods, procedures as well as organizational factors. The room settings are also checked in view of flexibility and variability. The project shows the extent to which the adaptability of the workspaces aid team work processes. It also includes contrasting mono-functional with multi-functional work settings that can adapted to various future forms of cooperation. Typologies are developed for meeting rooms and infrastructure for knowledge workers in the office of the future. Funding: CTI*; business partners Contact: peter.schwehr@hslu.ch

leanWOOD Planning processes and cooperation models in prefabricated timber construction

SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES/MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING Transferring single-family home qualities to multi-family housing

Prefabricated timber construction has clear advantages: Shorter construction times, simplified logistics at the construction site, recyclable, resource efficient construction and an improved carbon balance. Prefabricated timber construction is therefore a key technology for sustainable buildings. However, in practice, prefabricated timber construction is confronted with numerous barriers: Procurement models that are based on the tradition of conventional solid construction lack integrative planning processes in early planning phases. Planning processes are inadequately synchronized and do not reflect the needs of timber construction. Contract award criteria most likely discriminate timber construction. If one wants to exploit the potential of prefabricated timber construction, these shortcomings must be eliminated and the knowledge of the specific requirements of prefabricated timber construction has to be increased. Action is needed to establish timber as a merited construction and building material through innovative processes and procedures. Action is needed to establish timber as a merited building material in the construction process. The WoodWisdom-Net project leanWOOD analyzed the reasons for these shortcomings in current processes, demonstrated different solution strategies to improve planning processes and proposed specific recommendations on how to work under the current legal situation. The results of the project highlight the need for action in terms of necessary changes in regulatory and standardization frameworks, improved market knowledge and targeted support for SMEs.

Urban sprawl is one of the biggest problems confronting Switzerland. The limitation of land use is one of the major political targets. As a contribution to the more economical use of land resources, the EFH/MFH** project focused on the transferability of qualities associated with single-family homes to the physical structure and living surroundings of multi-family housing. The possibilities for realizing user preferences in a variety of typologies and scales were researched. This resulted in a final rationale (Argumentarium) on the advantages of multi-family housing with single-family homes qualities, the relevant planning guidelines and an indicator system for assessing single-family home qualities in multi-family housing. Funding: CTI*; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Social Work; Federal Housing Office; Canton Lucerne (rawi); Horw local council; business partners Contact: peter.schwehr@hslu.ch

Funding: CTI*; WoodWisdom-Net Contact: sonja.geier@hslu.ch 11

10

ANTEIL DER ARBEITSZEIT IN MEETINGS

ERGEBNISSE DER SCHRIFTLICHEN UMFRAGE

CORPORATE COLLABORATION SPACES

ZUFRIEDENHEIT MIT ANGEBOT AN MEETINGRÄUMEN

Geschäftsleitung oder Abteilungsleitung

27.6%

Projektleitung

26.9%

Teamleitung

20.6%

Mitarbeitende ohne Leitungsfunktion

14.9%

5.0%

43.2%

0

0

5

10

15

20

25

20

51.8%

40

60

80

100

unzufrieden (ausserordentlich unzufrieden, sehr unzufrieden)

30

teils-teils (ziemlich unzufrieden, teils-teils, ziemlich zufrieden) Anzahl Meetings pro Woche

Strategien und Produkte für Räume der Zusammenarbeit zur Steigerung von Effizienz und Identifikation im Office

zufrieden (sehr zufrieden, ausserordentlich zufrieden)

weniger als 1 1 bis 2 3 bis 5 mehr als 10

Stand September 2017

SCHLUSSDOKUMENTATION SCHWEIZ

Gesamtergebnis zur Zufriedenheit mit Angebot an Meetingräumen in Prozent auf die Frage: Bitte geben Sie an, wie zufrieden Sie grundsätzlich mit dem Angebot an Meetingräumen in Ihrem Unternehmen sind?

6 bis 10

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP)

FALLBEISPIELE SCHWEIZ

leanWOOD

Anteil der Arbeitszeit in Meetings (in Prozent) nach Leitungsfunktion im Unternehmen (Wie hoch ist der Anteil Ihrer Arbeitszeit, den Sie durchschnittlich in Meetings verbringen?) und nach durchschnittlicher Anzahl Meetings pro Woche (Wie viele Meetings haben Sie durchschnittlich in einer Arbeitswoche?)

leanWOOD

Planen und Kooperieren für den vorgefertigten Holzbau

Geschäftsleitung/Abteilungsleitung/Projekt­ leitung verbringen fast 30 Prozent ihrer Arbeitszeit in Meetings. Rund die Hälfte der Geschäftsleitung/Abteilungsleitung hat pro Woche durchschnittlich 6 oder mehr Meetings.

Fast 50 Prozent sind höchstens ziemlich zufrieden mit dem Angebot an Meetingräumen.

EFH MFH PLANUNGSEMPFEHLUNGEN

Best Practice im vorgefertigten Holzbau

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP)

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP)

September 2017

September 2017

efh mfh IndIkatoren-SyStem

zur Entwicklung von Mehrfamilienhäusern mit Einfamilienhaus-Wohnqualitäten

zur messung von einfamilienhaus-Wohnqualitäten in mehrfamilienhäusern

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Kompetenzzentrum Stadt- und Regionalentwicklung (CC StaR)

kompetenzzentrum typologie & Planung in architektur (CCtP) kompetenzzentrum Stadt- und regionalentwicklung (CC Star)

Meetings

MO DI MI DO FR SA SO

links links

rechts

rechts

Sonja Geier 19

Mit Beiträgen von Wolfgang Huß Frank Keikut Frank Lattke Sandra Schuster Manfred Stieglmeier

efh mfh ARgumenTARium

PROZESSVERLÄUFE IM VERGLEICH

zu den Vorteilen von mehrfamilienhäusern mit einfamilienhaus-Wohnqualitäten

PROZESSVERLAUF IM KONVENTIONELLEN MASSIVBAU Im konventionellen Massivbau mit niedrigen Vorfertigungsgraden wird der Planungszeitraum bis in die Ausführungsphase ausgedehnt. Damit erfolgt oftmals eine baubegleitende Ausführungsplanung. Viele Entscheidungen werden spät im Projektverlauf oder erst auf der Baustelle getroffen. Nachteile: Eingeschränkter Entscheidungsfreiraum und lange Realisierungszeiträume Risiken: Qualitätsverlust und Bauschäden

9

MEETINGS

RAUM

MO DI MI DO FR SA SO

Welches ist die optimale Raum­ grösse, die gewünschte Atmos­ phäre und wie ist die Zufriedenheit mit den Komfortfaktoren? Welche Faktoren wirken sich auf die Effizienz aus?

Vorprojekt

Vergabe Bauprojekt

Ausschreibungsplanung

Planungszeitraum

Vorprojekt

Bauprojekt

MEETINGS

HÄUFIGKEIT EINZELNER MEETING-TYPEN

Vorfertigung Montage Planungszeitraum

32.6%

Ausschreibungsplanung

Ausführungsplanung

Termin Übergabe Design-Freeze Werkstattplanung 34

Vorfertigung

SAVOGNIN

35

25

28

ländlichen Raum PROJEKTBESCHRIEB

Bereits zu Projektbeginn war klar, dass die vier Appartementhäuser mit insgesamt 28 Wohneinheiten in Holz errichtet werden sollten. Aus Gründen der Erdbebensicherheit, des Schall- und Brandschutzes wurde das Treppenhaus in Stahlbeton errichtet. Die Aussenwände wurden vorgefertigt und die innere Installationsebene sowie die äussere Bekleidung sind nachträglich vor Ort montiert worden. Die Decken sind als Holzbetonverbund ausgeführt, die Dächer wurden aus vorgefertigten Kastenelementen vorproduziert und eingebaut. Eine der Herausforderungen im Projekt war die kontrollierte Wohnungslüftung. Da jede Wohnung über eine eigene Komfortlüftung verfügt, wurden diese aus Platzgründen im Keller untergebracht, die Leitungen vertikal im Massivbaukern geführt und horizontal innerhalb der Zwischendecken zu den einzelnen Bereichen der Wohnungen verteilt.

Abbildungen 15–17: Prozessverläufe im konventionellen Massivbau und im vorgefertigten Holzbau in der vergleichenden Betrachtung

20 15 10

8

5

11.5

13 5

9

15

5

5

0

M1

M1: Schulen & trainieren M2: Entscheidungen fällen & Probleme lösen M3: Inhalte erarbeiten & diskutieren M4: Präsentieren & vortragen M5: Informationen weitergeben & austauschen

M2

M3

M4

CCTP PUBLICATION

MFH Ual da Flex

KompletZeiterMontage Appartementhäuser tierung sparnis im Ausführungszeitraum

M5

EFH/MFH

Argumentarium und Instrumente zur Planung von MFHs mit EFH-Wohnqualitäten

M1: Schulen & trainieren M2: Entscheidungen fällen & Probleme lösen M3: Inhalte erarbeiten & diskutieren M4: Präsentieren & vortragen M5: Informationen weitergeben & austauschen

Gre

bsta

nd

Ort, Datum:

+11.19

+7.00

+4.20

+1.40

3.10 2.80 2.80

Treppenhaus

Treppenhaus

-1.40

Die Gemeinde:

EG 1236.22 M.ü.M.

EG

Zimmer

1235.28 M.ü.M.

+1.40

Treppenhaus

UG

1236.68 M.ü.M.

-1.40

Treppenhaus

1232.48 M.ü.M.

-2.80

Gre

nza

bsta

nd

18.25

UG

15.25

296.250

Kat. Nr.

Terrasse

367

Mst. 1:100 Form. Küche 84/50 Gez. BF 5.01 m br/bb Dat. 9.03.12/26.09.12

Wohnen/Essen

BF 11.78 m2

2

BF 43.62 m2 FF 13.67 m2

Whg C4

Lift

Bad/WC

BF 5.27 m2

Küche WM TU

BF 5.15 m2

EI30 nbb

8.56

Whg C3

Eingang

BF 12.68 m2 FF 5.17 m2

BF 5.36 m2

Zimmer 1

Terrasse

BF 9.15 m2

Whg A3

1.50

EI30

BF 13.05 m2

Whg A4

14.50 4.23

BF 5.15 m2

Lift

Bad/WC WM TU

BF 5.27 m2

11.95

BF 8.27 m2

Zimmer 2

Zimmer 1

4.50

BF 12.00 m2 FF 5.17 m2

18.25 Terrasse

3.00

CCTP PUBLICATION

za

Ort, Datum:

15.25

tan

d

3.30

11.95 15.25

Terrasse

Wohnen/Essen

BF 11.78 m2

WM TU

Küche

BF 5.01 m2

Bad/WC

BF 43.62 m2 FF 13.67 m2

BF 5.52 m2

Zimmer 1

Der Gesuchsteller:

BF 15.28 m2 FF 7.57 m2

EI30

10.00

BF 5.95 m2

Der Architekt:

Lift

Bad/WC

BF 5.27 m2

Küche WM TU

14.50

13.00

EI30 nbb

BF 5.15 m2

Eingang

EI30

Zimmer 1

SIBYLLA AMSTUTZ 2017, 36 PAGES THE STUDY IS AVAILABLE AS A PRINTED BOOKLET AND IN PDF TO DOWNLOAD AT www.hslu.ch/cctp-publikationen The publication Corporate Collaboration Spaces summarizes the results of the questionnaire sent to companies and examines the question: How should meeting rooms be designed best? The study shows the connections between room quality, equipment and meeting results.

Planen und Kooperieren im vorgefertigten Holzbau SONJA GEIER 2017, 76 PAGES, THE FINAL DOCUMENTATION IS AVAILABLE AS A PRINTED BOOKLET AND IN PDF TO DOWNLOAD AT www.hslu.ch/cctp-publikationen The final documentation gives an overview of the project results, recommendations for planning processes specifically suited to timber construction, contract award and cooperation models and shows the need for future action.

Terrasse

BF 13.05 m2

Lichte Durchgangsbreite der Türen:

1.50

Interne Türen: WHG-Eingangstüren: Hauszugangstüren: Kellertüren:

UDF

bs

tan

d

80cm 90cm 100cm 80cm

Wohnhäuser "Ual da Flex" Savognin

Baueingabeplan "Austauschplan" 1. Obergeschoss

Plan Nr.

296.202

Kat. Nr.

367

zu den Vorteilen von Mehrfamilienhäusern mit Einfamilienhaus-Wohnqualitäten 2012, 74 PAGES

Mst. 1:100 84/70 Form. Gez. br/bb Dat. 9.03.12/26.09.12

±0.00 Eingang = Tga Lagn 1238.23 / Tga Ava 1235.82 / Tga Crap 1238.00 / Tga Tarratsch 1235.60 Bes

uch

er

19

.................................................................................................

3.30 15.25

za

m2a2 Mareischen Maurus atelier d'architectura Veia Tect 2 7460 Savognin

Gemeinde Savognin Veia Naloz 1 7460 Savognin

BF 11.35 m2 FF 3.44 m2

11.95

en

1171

.................................................................................................

Nüesch & Partner Beteiligungen Cantung bel 60 7453 Tinizong

Die Gemeinde:

Zimmer 2

BF 12.00 m2 FF 5.17 m2

Gr

1

leanWOOD

BF 26.20 m2 FF 19.78 m2

2

Strategien und Produkte für Räume der Zusammenarbeit zur Steigerung von Effizienz und Identifikation im Office

leanWOOD

Wohnen/Essen

BF 8.27 m2

4.50

8.56

Whg T3

.................................................................................................

Ual da Flex AG Veia Padnal 1 7460 Savognin

Vorplatz/Garderobe

Whg T4

EI30 nbb

CORPORATE COLLABORATION SPACES

Volketswil, 14. Mai 2012

bs

4.44

en

1.50

BF 12.94 m2

Gr

3.30 15.25

EI30 nbb

Eingang

BF 11.35 m2 FF 3.44 m2

rechts

CCTP PUBLICATION

13.00

EI30 nbb

Küche

Argumentarium

BF 11.35 m2 FF 3.44 m2

Eingang

BF 38.71 m2 FF 17.43 m2

Wohnen/Essen

4

BF 26.20 m2 FF 19.78 m2

Zimmer 2

BF 12.00 m2 FF 5.17 m2

Wohnen/Essen

Wohnen/Essen

BF 8.27 m2

Zimmer 1

Bad/WC

BF 5.01 m2

EI30

5.77

WM TU

Küche

BF 15.54 m2

BF 26.20 m2 FF 19.78 m2

links

Zimmer 1

BF 15.28 m2 FF 7.57 m2

BF 5.95 m2

EI30 nbb

Grabenwisstr. 1 - Postfach 314 - 8603 Schwerzenbach - Tel. 043 399 30 70 - Fax. 043 399 30 80

15.25

Terrasse

rechts

BF 5.52 m2

Vorplatz/Garderobe

Architekten

13.00

18.25

4

links

WM TU

Bad/WC

±0.00 Eingang = Tga Lagn 1238.93 / Tga Ava 1236.82 / Tga Crap 1238.00 / Tga Tarratsch 1235.60

1231.04 M.ü.M.

AG für Architektur und Planung

3.00

Plan Nr.

Wohnhäuser "Ual da Flex" Savognin

Baueingabeplan Schnitte 1-1 / 2-2

Nüesch & Partner

TARATSCH

Schnitt 2–2

3

80cm 90cm 100cm 80cm

UDF

EG 1233.88 M.ü.M.

-4.24

CRAP

.................................................................................................

Interne Türen: WHG-Eingangstüren: Hauszugangstüren: Kellertüren:

1.OG

3.00

±0.00 Zimmer

UG 1233.18 M.ü.M.

Gemeinde Savognin Veia Naloz 1 7460 Savognin

2.OG 1239.48 M.ü.M.

Lichte Durchgangsbreite der Türen:

-2.84

-4.44

m 2 a2 Mareischen Maurus atelier d'architectura Veia Tect 2 7460 Savognin

1242.28 M.ü.M.

+4.20

Treppenhaus

Zimmer

Reserve

.................................................................................................

Nüesch & Partner Beteiligungen Cantung bel 60 7453 Tinizong

Attika

+7.00

Treppenhaus

Zimmer

Zimmer

+2.80

3.04

1234.78 M.ü.M.

2.84

UG

Zimmer

+5.60

2

Bilder und Pläne: © Uffer AG, Nüesch Architekten, www.uffer.ch, www.nuesch-arch.ch

Zimmer

1.OG

1238.08 M.ü.M.

Zimmer

1245.38 M.ü.M.

+8.70

2.OG

1.OG 1239.02 M.ü.M.

Zimmer

±0.00

Der Architekt:

+10.10

Attika

2.OG 1241.82 M.ü.M.

1240.88 M.ü.M.

Zimmer

EG 1237.62 M.ü.M.

1244.62 M.ü.M. 1243.98 M.ü.M.

Zimmer Treppenhaus Zimmer

+2.80

1240.42 M.ü.M.

10.00

Zimmer Treppenhaus Zimmer

+5.60

1243.22 M.ü.M.

1.OG

1247.72 M.ü.M.

+8.70

2.OG

gew. Terrain

.................................................................................................

Ual da Flex AG Veia Padnal 1 7460 Savognin

14.50

+10.10

Der Mittelwert (Median) der Anzahl Teilnehmenden bei den Meeting-Typen M2, M3 und M5 beträgt 5 Personen, maximal nehmen 15 Personen teil.

Volketswil, 13. März 2012

Der Gesuchsteller:

+11.19

1246.32 M.ü.M.

Bei einem Drittel aller Meetings geht es um Informationen weitergeben und austauschen.

AMELIE-THERES MAYER THE THREE-PART PUBLICATION EFH/MFH IS AVAILABLE IN PDF TO DOWNLOAD AT www.hslu.ch/cctp-publikationen

nza

Schnitt 1–1

4.50

1’970 m2

4.44

HAUTNUTZFLÄCHE HNF

EI30

2’621 m2

EI30

Uffer Holzbau AG

3.10

Uffer AG

GESCHOSSFLÄCHE GF

2.80

Nüesch und Partner Architekten

BAUMANAGEMENT HOLZBAUINGENIEUR

2.80

Ual da Flex AG

ARCHITEKT

2.80

BAUHERR

2.84

Boxplotgrafik (ohne Ausreisser) zum Gesamtergebnis der Anzahl Teilnehmenden pro Meeting-Typ zur Frage: Bitte geben Sie an, wie viele Personen an diesem letzten Meeting teilgenommen haben.

3.10

Median

2.80

50% aller Meetings

3.10

Anzahl Personen maximal (minimal 2)

2.80

Durchschnitt in Prozent auf die Frage: Wie oft berufen Sie folgende Meeting-Typen über ein Jahr gesehen selber ein?

2.80

0

Bauprojekt

2.80

5

Vergabe Vorprojekt

40

35

Komplettierung

Ausführungszeitraum

2.80

10

Werkstattplanung

2.80

3 6

Umplanung

30

11.5%

15

12 9

24.3%

20

Ausreichende Planungszeiträume, holzbaugerechte Planungskoordination und rechtzeitiges Schliessen von Entscheidungsfenstern (wie der «Design-Freeze») ermöglichen die kooperative gestalterische, technische und wirtschaftliche Optimierung der Planung. Vorteile: Kosten- und Terminsicherheit, Steigerung der Ausführungsqualität

Termin Übergabe

Vergabe

= Ausführungsplanung

Planungszeitraum

40

21.9%

30 25

ANZAHL PERSONEN NACH MEETING-TYPEN

Wer hat wie viele Meetings? Wie häufig kommen die verschiedenen Meeting-Typen vor? Wie ist die Zufriedenheit mit dem Angebot an Meetingräumen? M1 M2 M3 M4 M5 Was sind Voraussetzungen, um optimale Ergebnisse zu erzielen? 8.8%

35

Ausführungszeitraum

Ausschreibungsplanung

HOLZBAUGERECHTER PROZESSVERLAUF

17

16

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Kompetenzzentrum Stadt- und Regionalentwicklung (CC StaR)

Ausführung

STÖRUNGEN IM PROZESSVERLAUF IM VORGEFERTIGTEN HOLZBAU Im vorgefertigten Holzbau werden Prozessverlauf und Planungszeitraum oftmals nicht auf die Anforderungen der Vorfertigung angepasst. Fehlendes Know-how, unpräzise oder unvollständige Ausschreibungsunterlagen führen zu Umplanungen nach der Vergabe. Verspätete Entscheidungen verzögern den Produktionsstart oder führen zu Nacharbeiten an bereits produzierten Elementen. Nachteile: Unnötiger Planungsaufwand, Zeitdruck Risiken: Teure Nacharbeiten, Qualitätsverlust und Verzögerungen

Termin Übergabe

Baubegleitende Ausführungsplanung

PP

Best Practice im vorgefertigten Holzbau A

SONJA GEIER 2017, 48 PAGES, THE BROCHURE IS AVAILABLE IN PDF TO DOWNLOAD AT www.hslu.ch/cctp-publikationen The brochure gives an overview of the six case studies selected. It also includes information about the procedure in terms of organization and timeframe, explains the type of contract award and cooperation model, lays down benchmarks and documents the lessons learnt from the point of view of those involved in the project.

367

Nüesch & Partner

AG für Architektur und Planung

Architekten

Grabenwisstr. 1 - Postfach 314 - 8603 Schwerzenbach - Tel. 043 399 30 70 - Fax. 043 399 30 80

Planungsempfehlungen zur Entwicklung von Mehrfamilienhäusern mit Einfamilienhaus-Wohnqualitäten 2012, 54 PAGES

Indikatoren-System zur Messung von Einfamilienhaus-Wohnqualitäten in Mehrfamilienhäusern 2012, 68 PAGES

** EFH/MFH (German) EFH Einfamilienhaus MFH Mehrfamilienhaus

Single-family home Multi-family housing


leanWOOD Renovation in Grüntenstrasse, Augsburg, Germany Photo: lattkearchitekten

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“UNIVERSE IS MAKING MUSIC ALL THE TIME.” TOM WAITS

Corporate Collaboration Spaces Strategies and products for collaboration spaces to increase efficiency and identification in the office

MEET2CREATE Laboratory for Collaboration, research unit at NEST

Solutions for tomorrow’s work environment are being investigated at the Meet2Create research unit

The main theme at Meet2Create is the transformation of the work environment

Further development of the Meet2Create research unit by CCTP and partners

Components and spaces for creative and innovative work are being investigated at Meet2Create, a research unit initiated by the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture.

Work environments are constantly changing and this calls for spatial and technical strategies to adapt to these changes. At the Meet2Create unit, an interdisciplinary team researches systems that can adapt to ever-changing requirements and thereby retain their value for as long as possible with a sustainable effect.

The research and innovation unit Meet2Create was opened in May 2016. The unit is not just a laboratory for collaboration and work processes, but also serves to develop sustainable work environments. Research results and use of the rooms evaluated to date, were fundamental for the following level of development. CCTP has devised a new furnishing and use concept for the Meet2Create research unit.

Meet2Create is located at NEST, an experimental modular building at Empa (the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology) in Dübendorf near Zürich. NEST consists of a highly sophisticated, concrete backbone structure built to accommodate modular research units. It offers innovative enterprises the opportunity to investigate new ways of living and working, test new construction methods and technologies under realistic conditions whilst providing a plat-form for new knowledge in research and development. The individual units are specifically designed to suit the research content, inserted into the basic structure and replaced by another module on completion of the research. People live, work and spend their free time in these units. The Meet2Create laboratory for collaboration, work processes and innovation at NEST was initiated and designed by the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture and managed by CCTP. At Meet2Create, researchers join forces with interested companies to develop sustainable solutions for the work environment. Research focuses on the interplay between humans, space and technology, which is tested and optimized within the scope of the projects.

Research at Meet2Create is currently addressing the following questions: – How can offices be designed and realized to ensure that they remain adaptive and adaptable? – How can office buildings adapt spatially and technically to new requirements? – What makes office buildings and office concepts of long-term value? – How can the energy demand and use of resources be reduced in the work environment of the future? – How can a high user identification potential be achieved by the working environment? – How can the interaction between humans, space and technology be harmonized? The answers provide fundamental information for the construction of future and renovation of existing office buildings.

More projects and information at www.hslu.ch/cctp

External teams are invited to use the rooms for project work, workshops and meetings as well as to attend CCTP’s Foresight & Innovation workshop series – a cross-disciplinary ThinkTank for sustainable development in the construction industry. Please send your request directly to CCTP. Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; Empa; business partners Contact: peter.schwehr@hslu.ch


THEME INCUBATORS

In close cooperation with research and industry, CCTP continues to address highly topical issues of future relevance: From affordable housing, migration and urban development to digitalization in the construction industry. Specific research projects are not the only result of these theme incubators. They also generate ideas for the Foresight & Innovation construction workshop series. These workshops focus on different topics including blockchain cities which can be used by companies and organizations as an impulse for further development to generate ideas or identify development potential and future markets.

INFORMATION ON CCTP PROJECTS

www.hslu.ch/cctp-projekte

THEME INCUBATOR

THEME INCUBATOR

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

MIGRATION AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT DIGITALIZATION IN ARCHITECTURE

The demand for affordable housing is omnipresent and underlies a complex system of cause and effect. Projects, each with a different focus, draw attention to the various interrelated systems by illustrating specific examples for implementation and debated theories. They demonstrate interdependency as well as the opportunities and risks in realizing affordable housing. Without neglecting national circumstances, CCTP deliberately compared international strategies and put them up for debate.

Given the forecast that more refugees will lead to an increase in the number of inhabitants and a change in the demographic composition of the population in cities and agglomerations, CCTP is engaged in different projects concerning the impact of migration on sustainable urban development. CCTP has adopted the position that resilient urban and community development must include migration and integration.

VARIO LIVING – RESEARCH AND PRACTICE Accommodation for young persons in Marzahn, Berlin, Germany Flexible, sustainable and affordable: As part of the Zukunft Bau research program, the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) is promoting Vario Living, a nationwide, innovative pilot project for the construction and research of sustainable and affordable apartments for students and apprentices. Berlin, Junges Wohnen in Marzahn is funded by the governments future investment program. Dr. Barbara Hendricks, Federal Environment Minister: “Vario apartments offer intelligent solutions for demographic change. They are flexible in use. For students and apprentices today, and possibly for senior citizens in the future. With the pilot project, CCTP also wants to provide incentives to intensify efforts to construct affordable apartments, because they are most needed. Berlin has recognized this need and set a good example.” Further information about BMUB’s investment program can be found at: www.forschungsinitiative.de/variowohnungen/ CCTP partners a new building project. By 2019, five buildings for affordable accommodation will be constructed in Berlin’s Marzahn district. One of these buildings is a pilot project which will incorporate so-called Vario apartments. Vario Living is a concept that responds to the specific requirements of different user groups such as students, apprentices, pensioners and refugees. The apartments have sensiblyproportioned rooms and depending on specification have their own kitchenette and bathroom. Through generous communal areas, the single flats can be joined together to a larger unit, a family apartment or shared accommodation resulting in inexpensive layout typologies. The new building project Vario Living in Marzahn is being realized by thoma architekten and degewo Marzahner Wohnungsgesellschaft mbH, the leading house builders who manage around 75,000 apartments. CCTP has been involved in the project since its conception, provides guidance during implementation and scientifically evaluates the project.

CITIES, REFUGEES & KIDS Mobile learning environments for child refugees and adolescents The objective of the Cities, Refugees & Kids project is to develop temporary and flexible units for children and adolescents in temporary reception centers. The units offer a place to retreat and, due to their acoustic effectiveness, create individual settings for learning that provide the children with a space for concentration. The use of this learning city envisages the involvement of various actors from psychological and social-pedagogical fields. The units offer opportunities that go beyond pure learning. They also support the children in the integration and interaction with their neighborhood and provide a retreat which, due to its acoustic effectiveness, relieves the often over-stimulated senses to lead to better concentration for specific tasks. Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture Contact: elsakatharina.jacobi@hslu.ch

REFUGEES & RESILIENT CITIES Influence of migration on a resilient city Based on literature research, statistical analyzes, expert debates as well as collecting and evaluating current projects, CCTP identifies opportunities, potential, risks and barriers of providing accommodation for refugees at city, neighborhood and building level. In an additional step, CCTP defines guidelines and areas where action is needed for housing refugees in urban districts as part of a resilient city development. The key issue is the avoidance of competition with other low-income groups (e.g. students, single parents, pensioners etc.) through cooperative housing models and synergy-oriented neighborhoods. Practical knowledge transfer is guaranteed by monitoring processes and analyzing current projects (Berlin, Switzerland). Funding: Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture Lucerne Contact: richard.zemp@hslu.ch; peter.schwehr@hslu.ch

Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; business partners; German Federal Institute for Research on Building, Urban Affairs and Spatial Development Contact: peter.schwehr@hslu.ch; elsakatharina.jacobi@hslu.ch Vario Living (Variowohnen) in Marzahn, Berlin, Germany Photos: thoma architekten

Trans-Hybrid What is the future of department stores?

THEME INCUBATOR

Digitalization is changing every facet of our daily lives and prompting us to review existing ways of living. It also severely impacts our built environment and its planning. Smart cities and homes, security technology, big data, blockchain, e-mobility, sharing economy etc. already have a profound influence on our cities and communities and are changing these accordingly. CCTP is involved in different projects to investigate the opportunities and risks of this development for a future-oriented and sustainable city and community.

BLOCKCHAIN CITIES Utopia, dystopia and chance In the Blockchain Cities project, CCTP investigates the possible impact of blockchain technology on urban development, real estate management and added value chains in the construction industry. Scenarios are developed and possible consequences are demonstrated from an architectural/urban development and real estate management viewpoint and interdisciplinary perspective. In the process, CCTP considers the social relevance of peer to peer review (exchange of information, alternating distribution of roles between server and client), cryptography (combination of transparency and anonymity) and smart contracts (definition of the ground rules). CCTP develops visions for future real estate processes, explores fields of application and demonstrates the possible linking of individual business sectors. Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture Contact: elsakatharina.jacobi@hslu.ch

E-MOBILITY AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Chances and potential for an urban environment worth living in The combination of self-driving vehicles and car sharing has great potential for the city and can lead to a reduction of motorized private transport. It frees up areas such as curb-side parking space, car parks and streets so that they can be used for other purposes. The project outlines future scenarios and demonstrates system relationships from an over-riding holistic point of view. Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture Contact: peter.schwehr@hslu.ch; matthias.buergin@hslu.ch

TRANS-HYBRID Hybrid typologies for the task of transforming department stores in inner-city development Developments in the retail trade show that department stores in urban areas are facing increased pressure due to digitalization. Online shops, delivery services, 24/7/365 accessibility etc. have led to a change in consumer behavior and are questioning the legitimacy of department stores. The typology of the department store of the future offers an opportunity to transform a large-volume and mono-functional structure for dynamic requirements. Transformation into a multi-functional building which interacts with the location creates added value for the residents and a valuable contribution to city center development. The transformation is based on the idea of a hybrid. Hybrid typologies relate to the development of the structure and the possible combinations of different use layouts. The department store is investigated as a hybrid building typology and potential determined for resilient inner-city development in view of structural, functional and urban integration, structural design and the impulse to enliven public space. Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; business partners Contact: peter.schwehr@hslu.ch; stefan.kunz@hslu.ch


Foresight & Innovation The Meet2Create laboratory at NEST, located at Empa, is a place for creative collaboration offering a pro-innovation environment, rooms and flexible furnishings that can be adapted to suit individual requirements and an optimal work space with tools for prototyping and walls that can be written on.

FORE SIGHT & INNO VATION IN ARCHI TEC TURE

A cross-disciplinary ThinkTank for sustainable development in building construction

Please contact CCTP directly.

Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; business partners Contact: peter.schwehr@hslu.ch

FOCUS FORESIGHT & INNOVATION

Blockchain technology changes real estate

Blockchain Cities workshop

BLOCK CHAIN CITIES

– What would happen if blockchain technology was introduced across Switzerland or internationally to register the ownership of land and property thus making transfer of ownership more transparent? – What would happen if added value chains of all the materials used to construct the house could be verified using blockchain technology? – What affect would this have on your work and on your company? – Which institutions, other than the finance industry, have already implemented the technology and what are the consequences for these companies and for society? – What does one learn from the past and from the use of the World Wide Web? – What are the chances and risks of these technologies besides Bitcoin & Co?

CCTP investigates this still relatively young field of digitalization together with innovative and forward-thinking companies, software developers and a young technology-inspired network.

The city with its houses, buildings and technologies is not a finished product. Social, economic, ecological and technological changes have a direct impact on everyday lives and on the built environment. A city is under constant pressure to adapt and must continually react to new requirements. Resilient buildings and neighborhoods meet such changes through the ability to adapt and be developed. For these processes to be successful, a systematic exploration with the possible consequences of social, economic and technical developments for the built environment has been carried out and serves as a prerequisite of sustainable planning in this field. In an interdisciplinary process, the ThinkTank identifies relevant influences and developments on our built environment and formulates scenarios of possible developments for construction and real estate. The scenarios serve as the foundation for further decisions. This procedure takes the “unknown as a basis” (John Habraken) and seeks “approaches to deal with the unknown” (Jesko Fezer). The objective of the Foresight & Innovation construction workshop is to deliver thought-provoking impulse for your company, to generate ideas for your services products or processes, to identify development potential and future markets as well as offering a cyclical reflection and review. The workshops take place at the Meet2Create research and innovation unit at NEST. Companies and teams are invited to use the rooms for project work, workshops or meetings.

Blockchain technology – relevant areas that call for action

Target audiences – Planners, general and overall contractors, real estate companies, investors, authorities, administrations, cities and communities, building suppliers etc. Objectives – Impulses for the continuity and further development of the company – Ideas for services, products and processes – Identifying development potential and future markets – Cyclical reflection and review Added Value – Boosting innovation power of the company – Thinking out of the box with professional guidance and methodology – Guided process in an innovation-promoting environment beyond the day-to-day – Fostering and strengthening team spirit – Use of synergies from theory and in practice Premises The Meet2Create laboratory is a place for creative collaboration and offers: – An innovation-promoting environment at NEST located at Empa – Rooms and flexible furnishings that can be adapted to suit individual requirements – An optimal work environment with tools for prototyping and walls that can be written on

Using interactive methods and input presentation, CCTP shows the possible consequences and scenarios for your company whilst considering the potential, opportunities and risks of this technology for your business sector. The objective of the Blockchain Cities workshop is to make real estate companies aware of the technology and to adopt a company-specific position: – To give you an overview of the blockchain technologies outside the financial sector that focus on real estate and other businesses with similar company structures. – To moderate expert debates and expand your network in this field of technology. – To initiate an in-house analysis to answer individually aligned questions: Where do you stand in the field of innovative digitalization methods as a real estate company today? Where do blockchain technologies stand with respect to real estate companies? Is your company willing to adopt this technology? And, in which internal and external processes does the technology already create significant added value for your company? Funding: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture Contact: elsakatharina.jacobi@hslu.ch

Urban development

Entries in the land registry, surveyors’ offices etc.

Real Estate Management Buying and selling process etc.

Added value chains in the construction industry Building elements and technology systems (the Internet of Things) etc.


THE COMPETENCE CENTER TYPOLOGY AND PLANNING IN ARCHITECTURE (CCTP)

works

The Competence Center Typology and Planning in Architecture (CCTP) researches the interaction between humans and architecture. The main focus of the scientific work is the strategic transformation of the built environment.

© CCTP 2018, edition 04 Print: www.newspaperclub.com

Since November 2015

Since November 2015

CCTP Berlin c/o tafkaoo architects Langhansstrasse 86 D-13086 Berlin

CCTP Zürich c/o NEST/Empa Unit Meet2Create Überlandstrasse 129 CH-8600 Dübendorf

THE CCTP TEAM Lukrezia Berwert Matthias Bürgin Doris Ehrbar Sonja Geier Dieter Geissbühler Thomas Heim Uli Herres Katharina Jacobi Angelika Juppien Frank Keikut Stefan Kunz Jochen Lang C. Lars Schuchert Elke Schultz Peter Schwehr Ulrike Sturm Susanne Triller Timo Walker Franziska Winterberger Peter Wittmann Lorenz Zahler Richard Zemp www.hslu.ch/cctp-mitarbeitende MANAGEMENT Prof. Dr. Peter Schwehr T +41 41 349 33 48 peter.schwehr@hslu.ch www.linkedin.com/in/peterschwehr Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture Institute of Architecture Competence Center Typology and Planning in Architecture (CCTP) Technikumstrasse 21, CH-6048 Horw T +41 41 349 39 79, cctp.technik-architektur@hslu.ch www.hslu.ch/cctp

Our buildings and cities are under constant pressure to adapt. Responding appropriately to this situation is a responsibility of high social relevance. CCTP undertakes status assessment and develops solutions in close partnership with research and industry which are implemented into practice to increase the resilience of buildings and residential areas and to enhance the ability of cities to develop and learn. CCTP has made this challenge its mission. It examines the system behavior, the impact and the potentials of different building and urban district types within the context of changing requirements. The generated solutions prioritize their relevance for the users. In doing so, CCTP creates added value for man and the environment. CCTP approaches this comprehensive and complex task based on four interacting perspectives in combination with fundamental research, within the thematic areas of architecture and urban development. SERVICES – Surveys of Systemic Interrelations – Analyses of Case Studies – Interdisciplinary Studies – Potential Assessments – Planning Methodology – Quantitative and Qualitative Data Evaluation and Analysis – Evaluations and Second Opinions – Future Board and Foresight & Innovation Seminars – Tools for the Practice – Workshops and Participatory Processes – Speeches and Conferences

001 Die Typologie der Flexibilität im Hochbau Peter Schwehr, Natalie Plagaro Cowee 2008, 122 pages, vdf Hochschulverlag AG Zürich ISBN 978-3-7281-3781-4 Also available as an eBook

001 The Typology of Adaptability in Building Construction Peter Schwehr, Natalie Plagaro Cowee 2012, 112 pages, vdf Hochschulverlag AG Zürich ISBN 978-3-7281-3515-5 Also available as an eBook

002 Contracting im Hochbau – Einführung in das Zyklische Systemmodell Jörg Lamster 2008, 176 pages, vdf Hochschulverlag AG Zürich ISBN 978-3-7281-3783-8 Also available as an eBook

003 Module für das Haus der Zukunft Peter Schwehr, Robert Fischer 2009, 88 pages, vdf Hochschulverlag AG Zürich ISBN 978-3-7281-3286-4 Also available as an eBook

004 Nachhaltige Quartiersentwicklung im Fokus flexibler Strukturen Amelie Mayer, Peter Schwehr, Matthias Bürgin 2010, 208 pages, vdf Hochschulverlag AG Zürich ISBN 978-3-7281-3287-1 Also available as an eBook

005 Human Office – Arbeitswelten im Diskurs Peter Schwehr, Sibylla Amstutz 2014, 168 pages, vdf Hochschulverlag AG Zürich ISBN 978-3-7281-3594-0 Also available as an eBook

LEVELS OF CONSIDERATION AT CCTP

1 Material & Construction

CCTP PUBLICATIONS www.hslu.ch/cctp-publikationsreihe

2 Structure & Building

3 Neighborhood & Spatial Development

4 Interaction & Processes

LABORATORIUM PUBLICATIONS www.hslu.ch/cctp-publikationsreihe Laboratorium 1 Das Klima als Entwurfsfaktor Christian Hönger, Roman Brunner, Urs-Peter Menti, Christoph Wieser 2013, 88 pages, Quart Verlag ISBN (D) 978-3-03761-072-5 ISBN (EN) 978-3-03761-073-2

Fundamentals & Methods

CCTP NEWS KOMPETENZZENTRUM TYPOLOGIE & PLANUNG IN ARCHITEKTUR (CCTP)

INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE COME TOGETHER

KOMPETENZZENTRUM TYPOLOGIE & PLANUNG IN ARCHITEKTUR (CCTP)

KOMPETENZZENTRUM TYPOLOGIE & PLANUNG IN ARCHITEKTUR (CCTP)

Kompetenzzentrum typologie & planung in architeKtur (cctp)

Unsere Gebäude und Städte sind einem permanenten Anpassungsdruck ausgesetzt. Auf diese Ausgangslage angemessen zu reagieren ist eine verantwortungsvolle Aufgabe von hoher gesellschaftlicher Relevanz: Ist-Zustände analysieren, Konzepte entwickeln, in partnerschaftlichen Kooperationen Lösungen erarbeiten und in der Praxis implementieren – und damit Mehrwert für Mensch und Umwelt generieren.

Das Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) erforscht die Interaktion zwischen Mensch und gebauter Umwelt. Dabei steht die Transformation von Gebäuden und Quartieren im Zentrum der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit. Unsere Gebäude und Städte sind einem permanenten Anpassungsdruck ausgesetzt. Auf diese Ausgangslage angemessen zu reagieren ist eine verantwortungsvolle Aufgabe von hoher gesellschaftlicher Relevanz. Das CCTP analysiert Ist-Zustände, entwickelt Konzepte, erarbeitet in partnerschaftlichen Kooperationen Lösungen die in der Praxis implementiert werden – und generiert damit Mehrwert für Mensch und Umwelt. Diese Herausforderung hat das CCTP zu seiner Mission gemacht. Es untersucht das Systemverhalten, die Wirkung und die Leistungsfähigkeit unterschiedlicher Innenraum-, Gebäude- und Quartierstypen im Kontext sich verändernder Anforderungen. Dabei begreift das CCTP den architektonischen Raum als Lebensraum. Die entwickelten Lösungen orientieren sich an deren Konsequenzen für die Nutzenden.

Unsere Gebäude und Städte sind einem permanenten Anpassungsdruck ausgesetzt. Auf diese Ausgangslage angemessen zu reagieren ist eine verantwortungsvolle Aufgabe von hoher gesellschaftlicher Relevanz: Ist-Zustände analysieren, Konzepte entwickeln, in partnerschaftlichen Kooperationen Lösungen erarbeiten und in der Praxis implementieren – und damit Mehrwert für Mensch und Umwelt generieren.

Diese Herausforderung hat das Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) zu seiner Mission gemacht. Dabei steht die Transformation von Gebäuden und Quartieren im Zentrum der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit. Das CCTP untersucht das Systemverhalten, die Wirkung und die Leistungsfähigkeit unterschiedlicher Gebäude- und Quartierstypen im Kontext sich verändernder Anforderungen. Dabei begreift das CCTP den architektonischen Raum als Lebensraum. Die entwickelten Lösungen orientieren sich an deren Konsequenzen für die Nutzenden – also der Interaktion Mensch und gebaute Umwelt.

Diese Herausforderung hat das Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) zu seiner Mission gemacht. Dabei steht die Transformation von Gebäuden und Quartieren im Zentrum der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit. Das CCTP untersucht das Systemverhalten, die Wirkung und die Leistungsfähigkeit unterschiedlicher Gebäude- und Quartierstypen im Kontext sich verändernder Anforderungen. Dabei begreift das CCTP den architektonischen Raum als Lebensraum. Die entwickelten Lösungen orientieren sich an deren Konsequenzen für die Nutzenden – also der Interaktion Mensch und gebaute Umwelt.

Diesen umfassenden Aufgabenkomplex geht das CCTP in drei interagierenden Fokusbereichen zusammen mit der Grundlagenforschung an.

Diesen umfassenden Aufgabenkomplex geht das CCTP mit drei interagierenden Fokusbereichen und der Grundlagenforschung im Themenfeld Architektur und Innenarchitektur an.

CCTP is responsible for the research work at the newly-founded Institute of Architecture (IAR) of the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture.

Hochschule Luzern – Technik & Architektur Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Technikumstrasse 21, CH-6048 Horw T +41 41 349 39 79, cctp.technik-architektur@hslu.ch www.hslu.ch/cctp

The integration into IAR intensifies the use of synergies between research and teaching. At the same time, it is the starting point for the expansion of a practical course program in the field of architecture and spatial development.

Diesen umfassenden Aufgabenkomplex geht das CCTP in drei interagierenden Fokusbereichen zusammen mit der Grundlagenforschung an.

Diese Herausforderung hat das kompetenzzentrum typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCtP) zu seiner Mission gemacht. Dabei steht die transformation von gebäuden und Quartieren im Zentrum der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit. Das CCtP untersucht das systemverhalten, die Wirkung und die Leistungsfähigkeit unterschiedlicher gebäude- und Quartierstypen im kontext sich verändernder Anforderungen. Dabei begreift das CCtP den architektonischen raum als Lebensraum. Die entwickelten Lösungen orientieren sich an deren konsequenzen für die nutzenden – also der interaktion Mensch und gebaute Umwelt. Diesen umfassenden Aufgabenkomplex geht das CCtP in drei interagierenden Fokusbereichen zusammen mit der grundlagenforschung an.

hochschule Luzern – Technik & Architektur kompetenzzentrum typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCtP) technikumstrasse 21, CH-6048 Horw t +41 41 349 39 79, cctp.technik-architektur@hslu.ch www.hslu.ch/cctp

www.hslu.ch/iar

CCTP GOES BERLIN LECTURE CYCLE “URBANISM FOR ALL” AT REM – TU BERLIN Peter Schwehr is a lecturer on town planning and urban development for the Real Estate Management (REM) master lecture cycle at the Technical University (TU) in Berlin. He is responsible for the Urbanism for All lecture cycle. The main theme of the series is the city’s development potential and ability to learn. The aim is to create adaptable and antifragile structures for the built environment. Relevant influence factors are identified and strategies for urban transformation and resilient urban development are established from a cross-disciplinary perspective and with a high degree of interaction with the students. Themes such as gentrification, segregation and mobility are discussed in detail. In his capacity as honorary professor, Prof. Dr. Peter Schwehr supervises the master theses and dissertations on strategic transformation of buildings and neighborhoods.

www.hslu.ch/cctp-aktuelles www.rem-berlin.de

Das Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) erforscht die Interaktion zwischen Mensch und gebauter Umwelt. Dabei steht die Transfor‑ mation von Gebäuden und Quartieren im Zentrum der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit.

Das Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) erforscht die Interaktion zwischen Mensch und gebauter Umwelt. Dabei steht die Transformation von Gebäuden und Quartieren im Zentrum der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit.

Unsere Gebäude und Städte sind einem permanenten Anpassungsdruck aus‑ gesetzt. Auf diese Ausgangslage angemessen zu reagieren ist eine verantwor‑ tungsvolle Aufgabe von hoher gesellschaftlicher Relevanz. Das CCTP analysiert Ist‑Zustände, entwickelt Konzepte, erarbeitet in partnerschaftlichen Kooperationen Lösungen die in der Praxis implementiert werden – und generiert damit Mehr‑ wert für Mensch und Umwelt. Diese Herausforderung hat das CCTP zu seiner Mission gemacht. Es untersucht das Systemverhalten, die Wirkung und die Leistungsfähigkeit unterschiedlicher Innenraum‑, Gebäude‑ und Quartierstypen im Kontext sich verändernder Anforderungen. Dabei begreift das CCTP den architektonischen Raum als Lebensraum. Die entwickelten Lösungen orientieren sich an deren Konsequenzen für die Nutzenden.

Unsere Gebäude und Städte sind einem permanenten Anpassungsdruck ausgesetzt. Auf diese Ausgangslage angemessen zu reagieren ist eine verantworPRojeKTeRGebNISSe tungsvolle Aufgabe von hoher gesellschaftlicher Relevanz. Das CCTP analysiert Ist-Zustände, entwickelt Konzepte, erarbeitet in partnerschaftlichen Kooperationen Lösungen die in der Praxis implementiert werden – und generiert damit Mehrwert für Mensch und Umwelt. Diese Herausforderung hat das CCTP zu seiner Arbeitswelten für Mission die Wissensarbeitenden von morgen gemacht. Es untersucht das Systemverhalten, die Wirkung und die Leistungsfähigkeit unterschiedlicher Innenraum-, Gebäude- und Quartierstypen im Kontext sich verändernder Anforderungen. Dabei begreift das CCTP den Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung Architektur architektonischen Raum als in Lebensraum. Die(CCTP) entwickelten Lösungen orientieren sich an deren Konsequenzen für die Nutzenden.

OffiCe in MOTiOn

Stand oktober 2012

Diesen umfassenden Aufgabenkomplex geht das CCTP mit drei interagierenden Fokusbereichen und der Grundlagenforschung im Themenfeld Architektur und Innenarchitektur an.

PROJEKTSTATUS

GUERRILLA URBANISM An Alternative Approach to Urban Research Practice Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP)

Stand Januar 2014

Diesen umfassenden Aufgabenkomplex geht das CCTP mit drei interagierenden Fokusbereichen und der Grundlagenforschung im Themenfeld Architektur und Innenarchitektur an.

«Guerrilla Urbanism» erprobt in einem alternativen Ansatz, wie räumlich‑architektonische Dimensionen in partizipative Kommu‑ nikationsprozesse zwischen Stadtentwicklung, Forschung und Nutzenden einfliessen können. In kompakten, effektvollen und zielgerichteten «Raumexperimenten» im öffentlichen Raum entstehen Prototypen für strategische Ziele, die konkret und ein‑ prägsam als Gegenstand des Gesprächs dienen sollen.

PROJEKTSTATUS

PROJEKTZIELE

MEET2CREATE

SMART DENSITY

PROJEKTSTATUS

Hochschule Luzern – Technik & Architektur Kompetenzzentrum Typologie Planung in (CCTP) Architektur (CCTP) Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in &Architektur Technikumstrasse 21, CH-6048 Horw T +41 41 349 39 79, cctp.technik-architektur@hslu.ch www.hslu.ch/cctp

Laboratorium 3 Räumliches Denken Dieter Geissbühler 2012, 84 pages, Quart Verlag ISBN (D) 978-3-03761-041-1 ISBN (EN) 978-3-03761-055-8

SUFFIZIENZ IM QUARTIER

Verdichtetes Bauen mit Holz

Collaboration Space, Forschungsunit im NEST

Wie kooperative Strategien unseren Lebensalltag beeinflussen Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Hochschule Luzern – Technik & Architektur Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Technikumstrasse 21, CH-6048 Horw T +41 41 349 39 79, cctp.technik-architektur@hslu.ch Stand März 2013 www.hslu.ch/cctp

Hochschule Luzern – Technik & Architektur Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Technikumstrasse 21, CH-6048 Horw T +41 41 349 39 79, cctp.technik-architektur@hslu.ch www.hslu.ch/cctp

Stand Januar 2014

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP)

Stand Januar 2014

Kompetenzzentrum typologie & planung in architeKtur (cctp) Unsere gebäude und städte sind einem permanenten Anpassungsdruck ausgesetzt. Auf diese Ausgangslage angemessen zu reagieren ist eine verantwortungsvolle Aufgabe von hoher gesellschaftlicher relevanz: ist-Zustände analysieren, konzepte entwickeln, in partnerschaftlichen kooperationen Lösungen erarbeiten und in der Praxis implementieren – und damit Mehrwert für Mensch und Umwelt generieren.

KOMPETENZZENTRUM TYPOLOGIE & PLANUNG IN ARCHITEKTUR (CCTP)

Laboratorium 2 Forschende Architektur Andri Gerber, Tina Unruh, Dieter Geissbühler 2010, 104 pages, Quart Verlag ISBN (D) 978-3-03761-019-0 ISBN (EN) 978-3-03761-023-7

KOMPETENZZENTRUM TYPOLOGIE & PLANUNG IN ARCHITEKTUR (CCTP) KOMPETENZZENTRUM TYPOLOGIE & PLANUNG IN ARCHITEKTUR (CCTP)

Kompetenzzentrum typologie & planung in architeKtur (cctp) Unsere gebäude und städte sind einem permanenten Anpassungsdruck ausgesetzt. Auf diese Ausgangslage angemessen zu reagieren ist eine verantwortungsvolle Aufgabe von hoher gesellschaftlicher relevanz: ist-Zustände analysieren, konzepte entwickeln, in partnerschaftlichen kooperationen Lösungen erarbeiten und in der Praxis implementieren – und damit Mehrwert für Mensch und Umwelt generieren. Diese Herausforderung hat das kompetenzzentrum typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCtP) zu seiner Mission gemacht. Dabei steht die transformation von gebäuden und Quartieren im Zentrum der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit. Das CCtP untersucht das systemverhalten, die Wirkung und die Leistungsfähigkeit unterschiedlicher gebäude- und Quartierstypen im kontext sich verändernder Anforderungen. Dabei begreift das CCtP den architektonischen raum als Lebensraum. Die entwickelten Lösungen orientieren sich an deren konsequenzen für die nutzenden – also der interaktion Mensch und gebaute Umwelt. Diesen umfassenden Aufgabenkomplex geht das CCtP in drei interagierenden Fokusbereichen zusammen mit der grundlagenforschung an.

Unsere Gebäude und Städte sind einem permanenten Anpassungsdruck ausgesetzt. Auf diese Ausgangslage angemessen zu reagieren ist eine ver‑ antwortungsvolle Aufgabe von hoher gesellschaftlicher Relevanz: Ist‑Zustände analysieren, Konzepte entwickeln, in partnerschaftlichen Kooperationen Lösungen erarbeiten und in der Praxis implementieren – und damit Mehrwert für Mensch und Umwelt generieren. Projektergebnisse

SAnSTrAT

Diese Herausforderung hat das Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) zu seiner Mission gemacht. Dabei steht die Transformation von Gebäuden und Quartieren im Zentrum der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit. Das ganzheitliche sanierungsstrategien Wohnbauten die Wirkung und die Leistungsfähigkeit CCTP untersucht dasfür Systemverhalten, und siedlungen der 1940er bis 1970er jahreund Quartierstypen im Kontext sich verändernder unterschiedlicher Gebäude‑ Anforderungen. Dabei begreift das CCTP den architektonischen Raum als Kompetenzzentrum Typologie Planung inLösungen Architektur (CCTP)sich an deren Konsequen‑ Lebensraum. Die & entwickelten orientieren zen für die Nutzenden – also der Interaktion Mensch und gebaute Umwelt.

stand oktober 2012

Diesen umfassenden Aufgabenkomplex geht das CCTP in drei interagierenden Fokusbereichen zusammen mit der Grundlagenforschung an.

KOMPETENZZENTRUM TYPOLOGIE & PLANUNG IN ARCHITEKTUR (CCTP)

Unsere Gebäude und Städte sind einem permanenten Anpassungsdruck ausgesetzt. Auf diese Ausgangslage angemessen zu reagieren ist eine ver‑ antwortungsvolle Aufgabe von hoher gesellschaftlicher Relevanz: Ist‑Zustände analysieren, Konzepte entwickeln, in partnerschaftlichen Kooperationen Lösungen erarbeiten und in der Praxis implementieren – und damit Mehrwert für Mensch und Umwelt generieren.

Unsere Gebäude und Städte sind einem permanenten Anpassungsdruck ausgesetzt. Auf diese Ausgangslage angemessen zu reagieren ist eine verantwortungsvolle Aufgabe von hoher gesellschaftlicher Relevanz: Ist-Zustände analysieren, Konzepte entwickeln, in partnerschaftlichen Kooperationen Lösungen erarbeiten und in der Praxis implementieren – und damit Mehrwert für Mensch und Umwelt generieren.

Diese Herausforderung hat das Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in PROJEKTERGEBNISSE Architektur (CCTP) zu seiner Mission gemacht. Dabei steht die Transformation von Gebäuden und Quartieren im Zentrum der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit. Das CCTP untersucht das Systemverhalten, die Wirkung und die Leistungsfähigkeit unterschiedlicher Gebäude‑ und Quartierstypen im Kontext sich verändernder Anforderungen. Dabei begreift das CCTP den architektonischen Raum als Lebensraum. Die entwickelten Lösungen orientieren sich an deren Konsequen‑ zen für die Nutzenden – also der Interaktion Mensch und gebaute Umwelt. Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Diesen umfassenden Aufgabenkomplex geht das CCTP in drei interagierenden Fokusbereichen zusammen mit der Grundlagenforschung an.

HUMAN BUILDING OFFICE

Diese Herausforderung hat das Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) zu seiner Mission gemacht. Dabei steht die Transformation von Gebäuden und Quartieren im Zentrum der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit. Das CCTP untersucht das Systemverhalten, die Wirkung und die Leistungsfähigkeit unterschiedlicher Gebäude- und Quartierstypen im Kontext sich verändernder Anforderungen. Dabei begreift das CCTP den architektonischen Raum als Lebensraum. Die entwickelten Lösungen orientieren sich an deren Konsequenzen für die Nutzenden – also der Interaktion Mensch und gebaute Umwelt. Diesen umfassenden Aufgabenkomplex geht das CCTP in drei interagierenden Fokusbereichen zusammen mit der Grundlagenforschung an.

Stand März 2013

UNTERSTÜTZT DURCH:

Projektergebnisse

PROJEKTERGEBNISSE

Efh/Mfh transfer der Wohnqualitäten vom einfamilienhaus auf das Mehrfamilienhaus Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Hochschule Luzern – Technik & Architektur kompetenzzentrum typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCtP) technikumstrasse 21, CH-6048 Horw t +41 41 349 39 79, cctp.technik-architektur@hslu.ch stand oktober 2012 www.hslu.ch/cctp

Hochschule Luzern – Technik & Architektur Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Technikumstrasse 21, CH‑6048 Horw T +41 41 349 39 79, cctp.technik‑architektur@hslu.ch www.hslu.ch/cctp

www.hslu.ch/cctp-aktuelles

Hochschule Luzern – Technik & Architektur Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Technikumstrasse 21, CH‑6048 Horw T +41 41 349 39 79, cctp.technik‑architektur@hslu.ch www.hslu.ch/cctp

PROJEKTERGEBNISSE

ENERBUILD

SBIB-STUDIE

ENERgy Efficiency and Renewable Energies in the BUILDing Sector in the Alpine Space

Schweizerische Befragung in Büros

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Hochschule Luzern – Technik & Architektur Zentrum für Integrale Gebäudetechnik (ZIG)& Planung in Architektur (CCTP) Kompetenzzentrum Typologie Technikumstrasse 21, CH-6048 Horw

Kompetenzzentrum Typologie & Planung in Architektur (CCTP)

Stand Februar 2013

T +41 41 349 39 79, cctp.technik-architektur@hslu.ch www.hslu.ch/cctp

Laboratorium 4 Erneuerung von Innen Tina Unruh, Christian Hönger, Urs-Peter Menti, Peter Omachen, Uli Herres, Davide Bionda 2014, 88 pages, Quart Verlag ISBN 978-3-03761-093-0

Stand März 2013

www.hslu.ch/cctp-projekte

RESEARCH COOPERATION WITH TU BERLIN Already in the autumn of 2014, CCTP finalized a contract for long-term research cooperation with the Master’s program Real Estate Management (REM) of the Technical University of Berlin. The REM program is unique and stands for process-oriented, interdisciplinary education. It is based on the entire life cycle of structural-spatial projects and ranges from location, through project development to facility management. It focuses on the transformation ability of the location and the question of how the immense pressure for change with the participation of all actors and stakeholders is dealt with. The research cooperation results in common positions and the further development of methodological thematic areas. This research alliance in fields such as urban development, architecture, urban sociology and economy, project development and real estate management creates strong synergies and facilitates the transfer of new scientific methods for use in practice. Joint research projects have been in progress since the conclusion of the agreement. The projects are a platform to share resources and knowledge, transmit systematic know-how to professionals, create doctorate opportunities and encourage exchanges.

UNICEF SWITZERLAND INVITES CCTP TO INTRODUCE CITIES, REFUGEES & KIDS The project explores ways of developing classrooms for child refugees and adolescents. Temporary and flexible units offer places of retreat to develop children’s potential and promote ability to learn. UNICEF Switzerland invited CCTP to introduce the Cities, Refugees & Kids project at their third round-table session Child Refugees in Switzerland. The aim is to develop temporary and flexible units for children and adolescents in temporary reception centers. The units offer opportunities to retreat which, due to their acoustic effectiveness, create individual settings for learning and spaces for concentration. The use of this learning city envisages the involvement of various actors from psychological and socialpedagogical fields. It offers opportunities that go beyond pure learning. It supports the children in the integration and interaction with their neighborhood and provides a retreat which, due to its acoustic effectiveness, relieves the often over-stimulated senses to lead to better concentration for specific tasks. The project relies on sponsorship money. If you are interested, please contact CCTP.

CCTP works – english  
CCTP works – english