Page 1

Forces and Motion  Prentice Hall Physical Science,  Concepts in Action, pages 354 – 387;  http://www.physicsclassroom.com/  Class/newtlaws/newtltoc.html 


Objective 1 

Define force and describe how  forces affect the motion of an object;  state the SI unit for force.


Forces  A force is a push or pull that acts on 

an object.   A force can set an object at rest into  motion, or it can accelerate a moving  object by changing the object’s speed  or direction.


The Newton  Force is measured in Newtons, 

abbreviated as N.   One Newton is the force that causes a  1­kilogram mass to accelerate at a rate  of 1 meter per second each second (1  m/s2).   One Newton is equal to one  kilogrammeter per second squared (1  N = 1 kgm/s2).


Objective 2 

List the four universal forces and  describe each of these forces.


Universal Forces  Observations of planets, stars and 

galaxies strongly suggest four  different forces exist throughout the  universe.   These forces are known as universal  forces.   The four universal forces are the  electromagnetic, strong nuclear, weak  nuclear, and gravitational.


1.  Electromagnetic Forces  Electric and magnetic forces are two 

different aspects of the  electromagnetic force.   Electromagnetic force is associated  with charged particles.   Electric force and magnetic force are  the only forces that can both attract  and repel. 


Electric Forces  Electric forces act between charged 

objects or particles such as electrons  and protons.   Objects with opposite charges –  positive and negative – attract one  another.   Objects with like charges repel one  another. 


Magnetic Forces  Magnetic forces act on certain 

metals, on the poles of magnets and  on moving charges.   Magnets have two poles, north and  south.   Two poles that are alike repel each  other.   Two opposite poles attract each other. 


2. Strong Nuclear Forces  The strong nuclear force is a powerful 

force of attraction that holds the nucleus  together.   Although this force acts over only extremely  short distances, it is 100 times stronger than  the electric force of repulsion.


3. Weak Nuclear Forces  The weak nuclear force is weaker in 

strength than the strong nuclear force.   The weak nuclear force is an attractive  force that acts only over a short range  and affects all particles.


Your mass on different planets

 http://www.solarviews.com/eng/edu/weight.htm


4. Gravitational Forces  Gravitational force is an attractive force 

that acts between any two masses.   Newton’s law of universal gravitation  states that every object in the universe  attracts every other object.   Gravitational forces act over large  distances.   Gravity is the weakest universal force, but  it is the most effective force over long  distances. 


Objective 3 

Identify forces as vector quantities  and define net force.


Forces  Forces are vector quantities.   That is, they have both magnitude and 

direction.   Vectors are represented by using  arrows.   The direction of the arrow represents  the direction of the force.   The length of the arrow represents the  strength, or magnitude, of the force. 


Combining Force Vectors  Vector addition may be used to combine 

force vectors.   Forces acting in the same direction add  together; forces acting in opposite  directions are subtracted.   The Pythagorean Theorem may be used  to combine vectors acting at right angles.  A net force is the overall force acting on  an object after all the forces are combined.


Finding Net Force


Objective 4  Distinguish 

between  balanced and  unbalanced  forces. 


Balanced and Unbalanced Forces  Balanced forces are forces that combine 

to produce a net force of zero.   When balanced, there is no change in the  object’s motion.  It is at rest.  An unbalanced force results when the  net force acting on an object is not equal  to zero.   When an unbalanced force acts on an  object, the object accelerates. 


Balanced Forces


Unbalanced Forces


Situation A  What is the net 

force vertically? 20 N – 20 N = 0

 What is the net 

force horizontally? 0

 Are the forces 

balanced? yes


Situation B  What is the net 

force vertically? 3 N – 3 N = 0

 What is the net 

force horizontally? 5 N – 5 N = 0

 Are the forces 

balanced? yes


Situation C  What is the net force 

vertically?

 40 N – 25 N = 15 N ↑

 What is the net force 

horizontally? 0

 Are the forces 

balanced?  no

 What is the net 

force?

 15 N upward


Situation D  What is the net 

force vertically?  3 N – 3 N = 0

 What is the net 

force horizontally?  5 N leftward

 Are the forces 

balanced?  no

 What is the net 

force?

 5 N leftward


Sample Problem  A rightward force of 24 N is applied to 

a 100 N object to move it across a  rough surface at constant velocity.  The frictional force is 24 N. Draw a  force diagram showing all forces  acting on the object. Are the forces  balanced?


Answer: net F = 0 Ftable = 100 N constant  velocity

Ff = 24 N

Fa = 24 N

Fgrav = 100 N


Sample Problem  Suppose the object in the above 

problem has an applied force of 36 N.  Draw the new force diagram. Are the  forces balanced? What is the net  force?


Answer: net F = 12 N right Ftable = 100 N

Ff = 24 N

Fa = 36 N

Fgrav = 100 N


Objective 5  Define friction and describe the 

four main types of friction. 


Friction  All moving objects are subject to friction, 

a force that opposes the motion of objects  that touch as they move past each other.   Friction acts at the surface where objects  are in contact.   There are four main types of friction:  static friction,  sliding friction,  rolling friction, and  fluid friction. 


1. Static Friction  Static friction acts on objects that 

are not moving.   Static friction always acts in the  direction opposite to that of the  applied force. 


2. Sliding Friction  Sliding friction opposes the direction 

of motion of an object as it slides over  a surface.   Less force is needed to keep an  object moving than to start it moving.


3. Rolling Friction  When a round object rolls across a 

flat floor, both the object and the floor  are bent out of shape.   This change in shape at the point of  rolling contact is the cause of rolling  friction, the frictional force that acts  on rolling objects.


Rolling Friction, continued  For a given set of materials, the force 

of rolling friction is about 100 to 1000  times less than the force of static or  sliding friction.   Because of this, wheeled dollies are  used to move heavy objects and ball  bearings are used to reduce friction in  machines. 


4. Fluid Friction  Water and air are both fluids.   The force of fluid friction opposes 

the motion of an object through a  fluid.   Fluid friction increases as the speed  of the object moving through the fluid  increases.


Air Resistance  Fluid friction acting on an object 

moving through the air is known as  air resistance.   At higher speeds, air resistance can  become a significant force. 


Falling With Air Resistance  As an object falls 

through air, it usually  encounters some  degree of air  resistance.   Air resistance is the  result of collisions of  the object's leading  surface with air  molecules. 


Objective 6  Describe how Earth’s gravity and air 

resistance affect falling objects.


Gravity  Gravity is a force that acts between 

any two masses.   Gravity is an attractive force, that is, it  pulls objects together.   Earth’s gravitational force exerts a  force of attraction on every other  object that is near Earth. 


Gravity, continued  The force of gravity does not require 

objects to be in contact for it to act on  them.   Gravity can act over large distances.   Earth’s gravity acts downward toward  the center of Earth. 


Gravity and Air Resistance  Gravity causes objects to accelerate 

downward, whereas air resistance acts  opposite to the direction of motion.  As objects fall to the ground they  continue to accelerate and gain speed.   With increasing speed comes  increasing air resistance. 


Terminal Velocity  If an object falls for a long time, the upward 

force of air resistance becomes equal to the  downward force of gravity.   At this point, acceleration is zero and the  object continues falling at a constant  velocity.   Terminal velocity is the constant velocity  of a falling object when the force of air  resistance equals the force of gravity. 


Gravity and Air Resistance


Gravity and Air Resistance  Suppose that an elephant and 

a feather are dropped off a  very tall building from the  same height at the same time.   We will assume the realistic  situation that both feather and  elephant encounter air  resistance.   Which object ­ the elephant or  the feather ­ will hit the ground  first? 


An Explanation


Warm­Up Question Universal Forces A. Electromagnetic B. Strong Nuclear C. Weak Nuclear D. Gravitational

Characteristics 1. Only forces that can both  attract and repel. 2. Weakest force, but most  effective over long distances. 3. Affects all particles in nucleus. 4. Holds neutrons and protons  together in the nucleus.


Warm­Up Question  A rightward force is applied to a 60­N 

object to move it across a rough  surface at constant velocity.  Constant  velocity means net force = 0. The  object encounters 15 N of frictional  force. Draw the force diagram and  determine the applied force.


Warm­Up Question  Answered  Weight is downward

60 N

 Table pushes upward 

15 N

15 N

60 N

with the same force  Frictional force  pushes backward  Net force = 0  (constant velocity)  Applied force = 15 N


Prelab: Frictional Forces 1. What is friction? 2. What is the difference between static  and sliding friction? 3. What effect does rolling friction have on  an object? 4. Compare the strengths of static, sliding  and rolling friction. 5. Draw a force diagram for a block that is  being pulled across a table.


Force Diagram  FGravity = ­ FTable

Velocity 

FTable

 FApplied = ­ FFriction  Starting Force – 

just starts to move

FApplied

FFriction

 Three trials  Moving Force – 

FGravity

moves at constant  speed  Three trials


Lab: Frictional Forces Velocity 

 Effect of Type of 

FTable

FApplied

FFriction FGravity

Surface  Effect of Force  Pressing the  Surfaces Together  Effect of Rolling  Friction


Lab Frictional Forces      

Start with the blue force measurer. The four surfaces are:  wood, vinyl, sandpaper  and cardboard. Three trials with each surface with a 500 g mass  on top of the block. Record starting force and moving force. Add an extra 500 g mass, pull on wood side  down. They place wooden dowels under using 1 500 g  mass and wood side down.


Objective 7  State Newton’s first law of motion 

and apply it to physical situations.


Newton’s First Law of Motion  Newton’s first law of motion states: 

the state of motion of an object does  not change as long as the net force  acting on the object is zero.   Unless an unbalanced force acts, an  object at rest remains at rest, and an  object in motion remains in motion  with the same speed and direction.


Inertia  Newton’s first law of motion is 

sometimes called the law of inertia.  Inertia is the tendency of an object to  resist a change in motion.


The Motorcyclist


The Car and the Wall


Activity, pages 357 ­ 359 Figure 2A 2B 3 5A 5B

Is Net Force 0?

Effect on Motion


Activity, pages 357 ­ 359 Figure

Is Net Force 0?

2A

Yes

2B 3 5A 5B

Effect on Motion


Activity, pages 357 ­ 359 Figure

Is Net Force 0?

Effect on Motion

2A

Yes

No motion

2B 3 5A 5B


Activity, pages 357 ­ 359 Figure

Is Net Force 0?

Effect on Motion

2A

Yes

No motion

2B

Yes

3 5A 5B


Activity, pages 357 ­ 359 Figure

Is Net Force 0?

Effect on Motion

2A

Yes

No motion

2B

Yes

No motion

3 5A 5B


Activity, pages 357 ­ 359 Figure

Is Net Force 0?

Effect on Motion

2A

Yes

No motion

2B

Yes

No motion

3

Yes

5A 5B


Activity, pages 357 ­ 359 Figure

Is Net Force 0?

Effect on Motion

2A

Yes

No motion

2B

Yes

No motion

3

Yes

No motion

5A 5B


Activity, pages 357 ­ 359 Figure

Is Net Force 0?

Effect on Motion

2A

Yes

No motion

2B

Yes

No motion

3

Yes

No motion

5A

Yes

5B


Activity, pages 357 ­ 359 Figure

Is Net Force 0?

Effect on Motion

2A

Yes

No motion

2B

Yes

No motion

3

Yes

No motion

5A

Yes

No motion

5B


Activity, pages 357 ­ 359 Figure

Is Net Force 0?

Effect on Motion

2A

Yes

No motion

2B

Yes

No motion

3

Yes

No motion

5A

Yes

No motion

5B

No


Activity, pages 357 ­ 359 Figure

Is Net Force 0?

Effect on Motion

2A

Yes

No motion

2B

Yes

No motion

3

Yes

No motion

5A

Yes

No motion

No

Potted tree  accelerates

5B


Objective 8  State Newton’s second law of motion 

and apply it to physical situations. 


Newton’s Second Law of Motion  According to Newton’s second law 

of motion, the acceleration of an  object is equal to the net force acting  on it divided by the object’s mass. 


Objective 9  Use Newton’s second law of motion 

to calculate acceleration, force and  mass 


Second Law of Motion net force acceleration = mass

F a= m  The acceleration of an object is always in 

the same direction as the net force. 


Second Law, continued  Newton’s second law also applies when a 

net force produces an acceleration that  reduces the speed.   This is the principle used by automobile  seat belts.   In a collision, the seat belt applies a force  that opposes a passenger’s forward  motion.   This force decelerates the passenger in  order to prevent serious injury. 


Sample Problem  A sailboat and its crew 

have a combined mass  of 655 kg. If the sailboat  experiences a net force  of 895 N pushing it  forward, what is the  sailboat’s acceleration?  1.37 m/s2


Sample Problem  Zookeepers lift a stretcher that holds a 

sedated lion. The total mass of the lion and  stretcher is 175 kg, and the lion’s upward  acceleration is 0.657 m/s2. What is the net  force necessary to produce this  acceleration of the lion and the stretcher?  115 N 


Sample Problem  A child is playing with 

some blocks and gets  mad. If a block  pushed with a force of  13.5 N accelerates at  6.5 m/s2 to the left,  what is the mass of  the block?  2.1 kg 


Objective 10 

Relate the mass of an object to its  weight.


Mass and Weight  Mass and weight are not the same.   Mass is a measure of the inertia of an 

object.   Weight is a measure of the force of  gravity acting on an object. 


Weight  An object’s weight is the product of the 

object’s mass and the acceleration due to  gravity acting on it.

w = m• g


Sample Problem  How much does 

a 5.0­kg puppy  weigh on Earth?  49 N


Sample Problem  A bag of sugar 

weighs 22 N.  What is its  mass?  2.2 kg


Sample Problem  What is the weight 

of the same bag of  sugar on the moon,  where the  acceleration due to  gravity is one­sixth  that on Earth?  3.6 N


Warm­Up Question  A beach ball is left in the bed of a pickup 

truck. Describe what happens to the ball  when the truck accelerates forward.


Answer to Warm­Up Question  A beach ball will tend to stay at rest when 

the truck accelerates forward.  The ball will move backward relative to the  truck.


Warm­Up Question 

A duck is on a scooter accelerating  at 2.0 m/s2. If the duck and scooter  have a combined mass of 8.0 kg,  what net force acts on the duck and  scooter?  16 N

Where did this force come from?  The duck’s foot pushes backward on  the ground and the ground pushes the  duck’s foot forward with an equal and  opposite force (3rd law).


Quiz: Forces and Motion  Get out a sheet of 

paper.  Place your name at  the top of the page.  Number it from 1­15.  You may use a  calculator if you  have one in class  today.


Objective 11 

Explain how  action­reaction  forces are  related  according to  Newton’s third  law of motion.


Newton’s Third Law of Motion  Forces always exist in pairs.   Newton’s third law of motion 

states: whenever one object exerts a  force on a second object, the second  object exerts an equal and opposite  force on the first object.   These two forces are called action  and reaction forces. 


Third Law, continued  When you kick a soccer ball with your foot, 

you notice the effect of the force exerted  by your foot on the ball.   The ball experiences a change in motion.  But this is not the only force present.   The soccer ball exerts an equal but  opposite force on your foot.   The force exerted on the ball by your foot  is the action force, and the force exerted  on your foot by the ball is the reaction  force. 


Third Law, continued  Note that the action and reaction 

forces are applied to different objects.   These forces are equal and opposite,  but this is not a case of balanced  forces because two different objects  are involved.   The action force acts on the ball and  the reaction force acts on the foot. 


Action­Reaction Forces  Identify at least six action­reaction 

pairs in the picture below.


Objective 12 

Calculate the momentum of an object  and describe what happens when  momentum is conserved during a  collision.


Momentum  A slow moving bicycle is easier to 

stop than a fast moving one.   Also, a slow moving bicycle is easier  to stop than a car traveling at the  same speed.   Increasing either the speed or mass  of an object makes it harder to stop.


Momentum, continued  A moving object has a property called 

momentum that is related to how  much force is needed to change its  motion.   Momentum is the product of an  object’s mass and its velocity. 


Momentum, continued momentum = mass x velocity

p = m •v  The unit for momentum is kgm/s.   Momentum is a vector quantity (it 

has direction) because velocity has  a direction. 


Sample Problem  Calculate the 

momentum of a  6.00­kg bowling ball  moving at 10.0 m/s  down the alley.  60.0 kgm/s down  the alley


Sample Problem  Calculate the 

momentum of a  48.5­kg  passenger on a  train stopped on  its tracks.  0 kgm/s


Sample Problem  The train starts to 

move eastward with a  constant velocity of  72 m/s. A baby on the  train has a  momentum of 360  kgm/s. What is the  mass of the baby?  5.0 kg


Sample Problem  A 135­kg ostrich 

has a  momentum of  2190 kgm/s  north. What is its  velocity?  16.2 m/s north


Conservation of Momentum  Imagine that two cars of different 

masses and traveling with different  velocities collide head on.   Momentum can be used to predict the  motion of the cars after the collision.   This is because, in the absence of  outside influences, the momentum is  conserved. 


Conservation of Momentum, cont’d.  In physics, the word conservation 

means that something has a constant  value.   That is, conservation of momentum  means that momentum does not  increase or decrease. 


Closed Systems  Momentum is conserved when the 

objects are part of a closed system.   A closed system means other objects  and forces cannot enter or leave a  system.   Objects within the system can exert  forces on one another. 


Law of Conservation of Momentum  According to the law of conservation 

of momentum, if no net force acts on  a system, then the total momentum of  the system does not change.   In a closed system, the loss of  momentum of one object equals the  gain of momentum of another object –  momentum is conserved.


Conservation of Momentum, cont’d.  In the example above, the total 

momentum of the two cars before the  collision is the same as the total  momentum after the collision.   This is true if the cars bounce off each  other or get tangled together.


Conservation of Momentum,  cont’d.   Cars can bounce off each other to 

move in opposite directions.   If the cars stick together after a head­ on collision, the cars will continue in  the direction of the car that originally  has the greater momentum. 


Car “Rear Ends” Truck


Truck “Rear Ends” Car


Head­On Collision


Warm­Up Question  The pairs of forces referred to in 

Newton’s third law  are equal in __________; strength opposite in __________; and direction act on __________ __________. different objects


Warm­Up Question  For every force there 

exists an equal and  opposite force. If the  action force is considered  to be that of the earth  pulling down on the ball,  can you identify the  reaction force? Ball pulling up on earth


Warm­Up Question  If a truck and a car have a head­on 

collision, which vehicle will experience the  greater impact force?  The truck  The car  Both the same  It depends on other factors


Warm­Up Question  Jocko, who has a 

mass of 80 kg and  stands at rest on ice,  catches a 20­kg ball  that is thrown to him  at 5 m/s. How fast do  Jocko and the ball  move across the ice?  500 km­m/s


Warm­Up Question The law of conservation of momentum states  that a.  In a closed system, the total momentum of all  objects equals zero. b.  In a closed system, the loss of momentum of  one object is less than the gain in momentum  of another object. c.  In a closed system, the loss of momentum of  one object is greater than the gain in  momentum of another object. d.  In a closed system, the loss of momentum of  one object equals the gain of momentum of  another object. 


Lab: Investigating a Balloon Jet 

 

Blow up the balloon to  the same length for all  trials.  Observe the motion of a  balloon as it moves  across the room.  Identify the action and  reaction forces. Use Newton’s second  and third laws to explain  the motion you observe.


/PP_Revised  

http://www.houstonchristian.org/data/files/gallery/ClassFileGallery/PP_Revised.ppt

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you