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OF THE YEAR Our incredible winner: a rustic rural retreat

New Zealand's six best new homes

Modern alpine style in Queenstown

Wellington's smartest new apartments

A sleek black take on the traditional villa


Great design is a product of technological advancement and economics.The new Steelia ™ “physical vapour deposition” technology released from Arclinea converts stainless steel into scratch and chemical resistant door and panel surfaces available in four stunning JVSV\YMHZ[ÄUPZOLZ)YVUaL*OHTWHNUL:[LLSHUK)SHJR[YHUZMVYTPUN`V\YRP[JOLUPU[VHYLZPSPLU[JSLHUHUKOLHS[O`VIQLJ[VM beauty and extroadinary design


90 Years 1925 - 2015

99 The Strand, Parnell, Auckland | 134 Victoria Street, Christchurch Auckland +64 9 302 2284

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Christchurch +64 3 366 0623

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| www.matisse.co.nz

E design@matisse.co.nz

where design becomes art


SEE WHAT YOU CAN SEE The way a shadow falls. The way light bounces. The colour of rock. The unfaltering straightness of a line. The delicate beauty of a curve. The strong and noble angle. Noticing what isn’t. Savouring every detail. Seeing what others cannot. Seeing through someone else’s eyes.

A LT / H O M E 11 / 3 D P S

THERE IS MUCH TO INSPIRE US WHEN WE LOOK AROUND.


PROUD SPONSORS OF HOME OF THE YEAR When you know where to look for inspiration, you can ďŹ nd it with Altherm Window Systems.

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Authentic Design Elegance Modern

Old favourites are making a comeback in new finishes in the latest Tom Dixon releases. Leather upholstery and solid oak legs grace the Wingback collection of chairs. These re-mastered British classics are inspired by the 17th century wingback and its smaller sibling the 18th century balloon back chair. The Bell table lamp comes in

a gold finish now, which looks elegant alongside the Plane Chandelier. Marble and brass combine in the new Stone candle holders, which come in a variety of sizes. Come into our Tom Dixon shopin-shops in our Auckland and Wellington stores. Mike Thorburn Managing Director, ECC


Since 1909

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Auckland Wellington Christchurch Milano


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Contents 76.

92.

106.

120.

134.

146.

IRON MAIDEN

SOCIAL RECLAMATION

DEEP CALM

ANGLE POISE

VIEW FINDER

SHED EQUITY

Herbst Architects’ winning design in Coromandel

Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell’s city-fringe home

Stevens Lawson create a meditative seaside space

Anthony Hoete reinterprets the villa

Density done well by Parsonson Architects

Anna-Marie Chin’s sleek design in Queenstown

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92

106

120

134

146

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 15


ART & DESIGN 27. DESIGN DISCOVERIES Fresh finds for the home

The Resene Architecture and Design Film Festival

32. NEW SPACES

48. ISLAND LIFE

CoCA gallery in Christchurch

New Zealand at the Venice Architecture Biennale

34. INTERIOR WORLD David Moreland designs and Drikolor’s new palette 27

62

Designers work with wool

52. DINING IN

Gidon Bing ceramics and Danskina rugs

Set the table in style

Flexform and Kartell serve fresh furniture designs

40. HIGH STANDARDS A new Dunedin eatery in a restored historic building

42. EAT STREETS London’s Jidori and Gentle Giant in Christchurch

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50. NATURAL FIBRE

36. HOMEWARE

38. NEW ARRIVALS

68

46. SCREEN SHOTS

56. DREAM HOMES Douglas Lloyd Jenkins’ weekend daydreams

60. RESENE COLOUR CHALLENGE Celebrating autumnal tones

62. STOP, LOOK, LISTEN Pip Cheshire’s Rore Kahu

44. ART AND DESIGN

68. SOMETHING’S COOKING

Fisher & Paykel’s new centre; Auckland Art Fair returns

Katie Lockhart’s dreamscapes of domesticity

EXTRAS

34

16 / HOME NEW ZEALAND

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158. HOME OF THE YEAR JUDGING

170. SUBSCRIBE TO HOME

Architect Tom Kundig discusses the winning homes

A year’s worth of design, plus the chance to win

160. 21 YEARS OF GREAT DESIGN

178. MY FAVOURITE BUILDING

A Home of the Year retrospective

Stuart Gardyne is a fan of College House in Christchurch

166. STYLE SAFARI Join our Auckland tour


Auckland: 19 Earle St, Parnell | 09 309 0500 | auckland@backhousenz.com Wellington: 12 Kaiwharawhara Rd | 04 499 8847 | wellington@backhousenz.com

backhousenz.com


25 Nugent ST, Grafton, AKL tel. +64.9.523 2105 info@studioitalia.co.nz

Home at last.

GROUNDPIECE SECTIONAL SOFA design by Antonio Citterio

FLEXFORM www.flexform.it


Auckland 547a Parnell Road, Parnell 1052 | Tel +64 9 358 3771 Christchurch 148 Victoria Street, Christchurch 8013 | Tel +64 3 929 0013 Arrowtown 18 Buckingham Street, Arrowtown 9302Tel +64 3 442 0128 Email info@cavitco.com | www.cavitco.com


Get the latest online homemagazine.co.nz @homenewzealand @_jeremyhansen facebook.com/homenewzealand instagram.com/homenewzealand

Photography / Mark Smith

EDITOR’S LETTER

Top left The Home of the Year 2016, designed by Herbst Architects, p.76. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds. Top right The Zavos Corner Apartments by Parsonson Architects, p.134. Photograph by Jeff Brass. Above left Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell’s Auckland home, p.92. Photograph by Simon Devitt. Above right The Villameter by Anthony Hoete, p.120. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.

Sometimes we get so focused on limitations that we forget to engage our imaginations. The great pleasure of the rich variety of homes in this issue, however, is that none of their architects suffered from this when creating them; all of them have broken with convention in inspiring ways. Wellington’s Zavos Corner Apartments by Parsonson Architects (p.134), for example, shows how higher-density buildings can, despite popular belief, be sensitively inserted into character suburbs. Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell’s city-fringe abode (p.92) proves that, with good design, we can happily create homes in semi-industrial areas, kids and all. Anthony Hoete’s Villameter (p.120) endured a 10-year resource consent process, only to show how comfortably contemporary architecture can sit in a heritage neighbourhood. So many residents of our cities seem to fear change in our built environment; we hope these projects show that when good architects are involved, change won’t diminish a neighbourhood, but enhance it. Our 21st Home of the Year winner, of course, didn’t have to deal with these urban pressures. But this resolute, rustic building in a valley on the Coromandel Peninsula by Herbst Architects (p.76) is the product of a different sort of struggle behind the scenes, in which architects Lance and Nicola Herbst wrestled with their own preconceptions of what the building should be. The Herbsts’ best-known buildings until now have been diffuse (and beautiful) timber baches. They made a conscious decision to break that mould with this year’s winning home, an assertive sculptural form that is a thrilling addition to the local landscape – and just as delightful for its owners. It’s inspiring to see this talented duo – and all the architects and homeowners in this issue – have the courage to step off the expected path, engage their imaginations and take bold creative leaps. Jeremy Hansen

We’re celebrating the 21st anniversary of our Home of the Year award with this issue, which seems like a good time to offer a short refresher on how it all works (you can see a gallery of all our previous winners and finalists on p.160). Our open entry process began in December, when we called for entries and our jury members examined them to choose a shortlist of homes to visit in person. This year’s jury was made up of me, Wellington architect Stuart Gardyne of Architecture +, and Seattlebased architect Tom Kundig, who travelled here in late January to visit the shortlisted homes with us. All six projects published in this issue are finalists in the supreme award. This year we’ve also introduced new sub-categories to ensure we continue to attract a wide range of entries in the competition: best small home, best city home and best multi-unit residential project. Lance and Nicola Herbst, the architects of 2016’s supreme winner, receive a cash prize of $15,000. On behalf of our award sponsors, Altherm Window Systems, I’d like to extend our warm congratulations to them.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 21


CONTRIBUTORS

OLIVER WORSFOLD

STUART GARDYNE

PATRICK REYNOLDS

Ahead of his move to Berlin, the designer at Inhouse Design reflects on three years working laying out the pages of HOME magazine.

The Wellington architect and New Zealand member of our Home of the Year 2016 jury shares insights from his judging experience.

The photographer shot the Home of the Year 2016 (p.76), Anthony Hoete’s Villameter (p.120), and Rore Kahu, a building by Pip Cheshire (p.62).

Don’t leave us Oliver! But since you insist on doing so, tell us what your favourite issues of HOME have been, graphically speaking. I always love the February/March Art Issues, but two others I particularly enjoyed working on were the Global Villages issue with Karen Walker (August/ September 2014) and Architects’ Own Homes (October/November 2014). It was interesting to get Karen’s perspective on architecture and community and use that as a guide for laying out the magazine. The architects’ own homes issue was unusual as we only had one photographer throughout. I thought Simon Devitt’s shots, which are somewhat portraitlike in nature, were beautiful. It allows you to tell a slightly more intimate story with your image selection and layouts.

You were the New Zealand architect on this year’s Home of the Year jury. How did you find the judging process? What a great week! It was a privilege to visit houses that are of exceptional architectural quality in stunning parts of the country, and in the company of fellow jurors Tom [Kundig] and Jeremy [Hansen] whose experience, insight and judgment were at the highest level. And we met owners who were, without exception, so obviously happy to be living in wonderful homes. The week got off to a great start. On day one every house was impressive and I was humbled by the work of the architects. Seeing the houses in their context, experiencing them spatially and seeing the resolution of details and materials is important.

What do you think is most successful about the winning home, and what does it say about the way the Herbsts’ work is heading? Their houses always have a sexiness in their elegance. Here, however, perhaps in response to the setting and relative toughness of a working farm, they’ve added a bit more grunt, and the earthiness feels more solid than in earlier dwellings.

Which are your favourite houses in this issue, and why? It’s hard to pick favourites but I really like the rusty winner gracing our cover. They’ve chosen a range of materials that help the building integrate really nicely into the landscape. Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell’s house (p.92) is also a great project. The city-fringe industrial style of house is something we don’t often consider in New Zealand, but with so much sprawl it’s increasingly appealing. What are you looking forward to most about living in Berlin? I think it’s going to be amazing to be immersed in a city which seems to provide a very different experience for artists and designers.

What stood out for you collectively about the homes in this issue? What do they say about the directions New Zealand architecture is heading in? The personality of the place and the occupants was very strong. Lifestyles seemed to be reflected and enhanced by the spaces. That’s a great mandate for the skills of the architects. What made the winning house stand out from the crowd for you? It demonstrated that Lance and Nicky are at the top of their game. They are good at tuning into a lifestyle and their work is always thoughtful and thoroughly resolved. I liked the way that this house had a casual and objet-trouvé character despite its rigour. It is modest yet noble.

You also photographed Rore Kahu, a building in Northland by Pip Cheshire that’s designed for contemplation of a historic site. How does it help a building to be freed of pragmatic constraints and to exist for a view? Looks like a wonderful but tough gig to me; such opportunity yet with so few practical constraints, so where do you start? The result is fantastic, with a dramatic reveal of the view as you round the entrance between the massive earth walls. This material is not only beautiful but also carries a timelessness appropriate to the contemplative function of the place. It’s the 21st birthday of Home of the Year. Which winners stand out the most for you? Oh that’s not fair! So many great buildings; it’s like being asked to pick your favourite child. What else are you working on at the moment? A new book on contemporary residential architecture with John Walsh. It’s a dynamic field, with dwellings of all sizes by great architects.

BULLET TIME STEVE CARR • DANIEL CROOKS • HAROLD EDGERTON • EADWEARD MUYBRIDGE

25 March–10 July 2016

Steve Carr Screen Shots 2011. Courtesy Michael Lett, Auckland. 22 / HOME NEW ZEALAND


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Editor Jeremy Hansen A view from the living area of the Home of the Year 2016 by Herbst Architects. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds More on p.76.

Art Director Arch MacDonnell Inhouse Design Senior Designer Sarah Gladwell Inhouse Design Senior Designer Oliver Worsfold Inhouse Design

On our cover, Lance and Nicola Herbst at the rural home they designed for a couple in Coromandel. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds. For more, see p.76.

Designer Hamish Haydon Inhouse Design Senior Stylist/Designer Sam Smith Stylist/Designer Catherine Wilkinson Editorial Assistant Fiona Williams

Contributors Jo Bates Aimie Cronin Simon Farrell-Green Mary Gaudin Amelia Holmes Douglas Lloyd Jenkins Katie Lockhart Henry Oliver Daron Parton Photographers Jeff Brass Kate Claridge Simon Devitt Wendy Fenwick Guy Frederick Mary Gaudin Sam Hartnett Paul McCredie Patrick Reynolds Mark Smith David Straight Darryl Ward

Chief Executive Officer Paul Dykzeul Publisher Brendon Hill Commercial Director Paul Gardiner Marketing Manager Martine Skinner Commercial Sales Manager Liezl Hipkins-Stear lhipkins@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2873 Advertising Account Manager Nicola Saunders nsaunders@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 366 5345 Classified Advertising Kim Chapman classifieds@xtra.co.nz +64 7 578 3646 Financial Business Analyst Ferozza Patel Group Production Manager Lisa Sloane Production Co-ordinator Clare Pike

Editorial Office Bauer Media Group Shed 12 City Works Depot 90 Wellesley St Auckland, New Zealand homenewzealand@ bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2739 Postal address HOME magazine Bauer Media Group Private Bag 92512 Wellesley Street Auckland 1141 New Zealand

Subscription Enquiries magshop.co.nz/home 0800 MAGSHOP or 0800 624 746 magshop@magshop.co.nz +64 9 308 2721 (tel) +64 9 308 2769 (fax) Bulk/Corporate Subscriptions corporates@magshop.co.nz +64 9 308 2700

24 / HOME NEW ZEALAND

Advertising Auckland Liezl Hipkins-Stear lhipkins@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2873 Sydney Rachel McLean rmclean@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2760

Printer Webstar Distributor Netlink Distribution Company

HOME is subject to copyright in its entirety and the contents may not be reproduced in any form, either in whole or in part, without written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved in material accepted for publication, unless initially specified otherwise. All letters and other material forwarded to the magazine will be assumed intended for publication unless clearly labelled “not for publication”. We welcome submissions of homes that architects or owners would like to be considered for publication. Opinions expressed in HOME New Zealand are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of Bauer Media Group. No responsibility is accepted for unsolicited material. ABC average net circulation, April 2014 to March 2015: 10,795 copies. ISSN 1178-4148


L U X U R Y

R U G S

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DESIGN

FALLING FOR AUTUMN NEW DESIGN ITEMS THAT ARE PERFECT FOR A SEASONAL SHIFT.

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01—Clutch by Deadly Ponies, $295 from Deadly Ponies, deadlyponies.com 02—Scarf by Deadly Ponies, $230 from Deadly Ponies, deadlyponies.com 03—Cushion by Megan Park, $165 from Annex, annex.net.nz 04—‘Easy’ chair by Jerszy Seymour for Magis, $230 from ECC, ecc.co.nz 05—‘Hinoki’ soap dish by DO Shop, $29 from Everyday Needs, everydayneeds.com 06—Egg cups, $32 each from Father Rabbit, fatherrabbit.com 07—Cap by Twenty-Seven Names, $130 from Twenty-Seven Names, twentysevennames.co.nz 08—‘Living Room’ pigment by Everyday Needs Colour, $60 from Everyday Needs, everydayneeds.com. Edited by Amelia Holmes.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 27


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SUNNY DISPOSITION THERE’S LATE-SUMMER WARMTH IN ALL THESE DESIGN FINDS.

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01—‘Sam Son’ chair by Konstantin Grcic for Magis, $1030 from ECC, ecc.co.nz 02—‘Minimal’ toilet brush by Giulio Gianturco, $595 from Boffi, boffi.com 03—‘Confetti’ vessel by

Kirsten Dryburgh, $46 from Widdess, widdess.co.nz 04—Leather bag by Juliette Hogan, $589 from Juliette Hogan, juliettehogan.com 05—‘Agnes Curran’ jug, $165 from Flotsam & Jetsam, flotsamandjetsam.co.nz 06—‘Vienna Motif VIII’ silk scarf by Areez Katki, $240 from Miss Crabb, misscrabb.com 07—Duster, $88 from Father Rabbit, fatherrabbit.com 08—Cashmere blanket by Juliette Hogan, $649 from Juliette Hogan, juliettehogan.com. Edited by Amelia Holmes.

28 / HOME NEW ZEALAND


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DAW S O N & C O .


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LITTLE LUXURIES HAND-CRAFTED GOODS TO ADD SOME SERIOUS TEXTURE TO YOUR PLACE.

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01—Jacket by Harry Were and Felix Henning-Tapley, $465 from Harry Were, shop.harrywere.com 02—Preserved apricots, $14 from Were Bros, werebros.co.nz 03—Coffee and tea set by Hasami, $275 from Everyday Needs, everydayneeds.com 04—Kilim cushion, $149 from Everyday Needs, everydayneeds.com 05—Socks by

Bonne Maison, $34 from Widdess, widdess.co.nz 06—Bag by Vine Bay, $89 from Widdess, widdess.co.nz 07—‘Iringa’ baskets, $263 for two from Citta, cittadesign.com 08—‘Lapis’ Balancing Facial Oil by Herbivore, $179 from Father Rabbit, fatherrabbit.com. Edited by Amelia Holmes.

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BRUTALIST REVIVAL A CHRISTCHURCH ARTS INSTITUTION IS RESTORED AND TRIUMPHANTLY REOPENED.

Following five years of closure and $4.5 million worth of refurbishment and quake strengthening, Christchurch gallery CoCA Toi Moroki, is open once again. Founded in 1880 as the Canterbury Society of Arts, the gallery – New Zealand’s oldest – went on to become known for hosting some of the country’s most progressive exhibitions. In 1968 it made its home in a remarkable Brutalist building, a significant work in the modernist Christchurch style by Minson, Henning-Hansen and Dines. The building won a New Zealand Institute of Architects National Award, as well as a subsequent Enduring Architecture award. The restoration offered the chance to remove unsympathetic additions and reinstate heritage features, including the demolition of a 130-square-metre 1970s addition at the rear of the gallery site that wasn’t designed by the original architects, which has now become an outdoor project space. Best of all, the original Georgian-wired glass pyramid roof lights in the main gallery, which had been covered by paint over the years, have now been replaced and re-exposed. Concrete double-T beams and expressed concrete frames have been soda-blasted to remove paint and expose the raw concrete, and original rimu detailing has also been reinstated. “The gallery looks as architecturally brilliant today as it did at the time of its opening in 1968,” says architectural designer Pippin Wright-Stow of F3 Design. The gallery’s new director and principal curator Paula Orrell, who has relocated from the UK, will run four contemporary curated shows there each year.

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COCA 66 Gloucester Street, Christchurch 03 366 7261 coca.org.nz Photography by Samuel Hartnett. 01—A CoCA space with the work ‘Big Bull Market’ 2016 by Rob Hood. 02—The building’s entrance and new cafe. 03—05 Inside the newly restored and earthquake-strengthened building. 06 The skylights viewed in profile.

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MORE THE MERRIER DESIGNER DAVID MORELAND CELEBRATES THE NEW YEAR WITH TWO NEW RELEASES.

Furniture designer David Moreland has added the ‘Helix’ and ‘Area’ tables to his expanding furniture and lighting range. Moreland describes the ‘Helix’ table (left, from $2495) as having an “accurately engineered aesthetic that still appears soft and light”. The base is available in either black or white matt powdercoat and is topped with clear or smoke-grey glass, or oak plywood. The ‘Area’ side tables (below left, from $497) and coffee table (far left, from $897), in matt white laminate or oak, are paired with either a matching edge or black, which highlights the table’s continual edge. Both designs are made in New Zealand. davidmorelanddesign.com

D:06

TINTED LOVE EVERYDAY NEEDS TEAMS UP WITH DRIKOLOR TO CREATE A LUSCIOUS NEW PAINT RANGE.

The new Everyday Needs Colour range of 17 paints is a uniquely New Zealand design collaboration. Everyday Needs founder (and HOME contributor) Katie Lockhart has teamed up with Aucklandbased Drikolor, which has pioneered the creation of pigment that’s mixed into neutral acrylic or enamel base paints, to create a range of hues she describes as “gently surprising”. Lockhart called in two leading product designers to assist: Jamie McLellan designed the flask-like pigment bottles, and graphic designer Brogen Averill created the canister-like packaging.

EVERYDAY NEEDS 270 Ponsonby Rd, Auckland 09 378 7988 everyday-needs.com drikolor.com

34 / HOME NEW ZEALAND


D:07

POT SHOTS A NEW ZEALAND CERAMICIST UNVEILS A NEW COLLECTION.

Suddenly, it seems everyone is paying a whole lot more attention to what we’re serving our food on, not only in restaurants, but at home, too. The good thing is a bunch of New Zealand ceramicists and potters are stepping up to the plate, so to speak. One of them is Aucklandbased sculptor and ceramicist Gidon Bing, whose new range of plates, bowls, vases, platters and more combines simple sculptural forms with tactile satin lustre, crackle and speckle glazes, and a range of soft, inviting shades. They’re all designed and made in his small harbourside studio. gidonbingceramics.com

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FLOOR SCORES A NETHERLANDS RUG-MAKER FINDS A NEW ZEALAND HOME.

The works of one of the Netherlands’ leading rug-makers are now available in New Zealand at Simon James Design. Danskina was founded in the early 1970s and specialises in creating made-to-order rugs that combine modern techniques and traditional methods, using artisans in the Netherlands, Nepal, India, Scotland and Germany. Even better, the company has recently brought on board Dutch designer Hella Jongerius as their design director. Jongerius’s determination to take the company in new directions is already paying dividends, featuring the strong textures and the playful colour combinations that have become her forté.

SIMON JAMES DESIGN 61 Upper Queen Street, Auckland 09 377 5556 simonjamesdesign.com

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D:09

MASTER CLASS NEW ARRIVALS FROM THE DEFT HAND OF AN ITALIAN PRO.

Italian designer Antonio Citterio’s output is prodigious, but what’s more amazing is that the quality of his creations never seems to wane. His latest designs for furniture label Flexform were released at last year’s Milan furniture fair and have now arrived in Studio Italia’s Auckland showroom. All of them possess his expert (and effortless) blend of comfort and classicism, and have us eagerly anticipating what he has in store for this year’s Milan Design Week.

STUDIO ITALIA 25 Nugent Street, Grafton, Auckland 09 523 2105 studioitalia.co.nz

D:10

COMEBACK KID SOME OF THE LATE, LEGENDARY ETTORE SOTTSASS’S DESIGNS GET A FRESH NEW AIRING.

The postmodern designs of the Memphis Group are making a comeback, thanks in part to Italian furniture company Kartell. It turns out that Ettore Sottsass, who founded Memphis Group in 1981 (and died in 2007 at the age of 90), designed items for Kartell in 2004 that never made it into production. The revived popularity of all things Memphis means Sottsass’s colourful vases and stools (below left) will finally arrive in stores soon, along with some of his fabric designs on Kartell classics such as Patricia Urquiola’s ‘Foliage’ (above left) and ‘Clap’ furniture (left).

BACKHOUSE INTERIORS 35 Teed Street, Newmarket, Auckland, and 12 Kaiwharawhara Road, Wellington 09 522 7099, 04 499 8847 backhousenz.com

38 / HOME NEW ZEALAND


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D:11

HIGH STANDARDS A HISTORIC DUNEDIN BUILDING MAKES A CHARMING COMEBACK.

From the street outside a Renaissance revival building in Dunedin where The Standard Kitchen has set up shop, you can see through light we`lls to the stone-walled basement below. Home to a fishmonger in the 1900s, fish was once carried down the holes for cleaning and filleting. Having undergone a sensitive restoration to retain as much original detail as possible, and a two-year process to reinstate the exterior ornamentation alone, the heritage building is now home to the wholefoods café run by Angela Bates and James Roberts, where everything is prepared from scratch, and heritage features star along with the food. Originally designed by Mason & Wales, New Zealand’s oldest established architectural firm, and completed in 1874, Bates says “the building is quite incredible and we needed to fit in with that. We wanted a lived-in, homely feeling, nothing plastic. We wanted to casual it down a bit.” As “big recyclers”, they worked with the building’s owner, Ted Daniels, to reuse original floorboards that were unsuitable for restoration into tables, which are accompanied by chairs collected during the final year of the four-year restoration. It’s great to see a venerable old building getting such fresh and loving attention.

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STANDARD KITCHEN 201 Princes St, Dunedin 03 474 1188 Photography by Guy Frederick.

01—The café features original details, including the wall tiles. 02—Diners with a view onto Princes Street. 03—Some of the building’s floorboards were salvaged to make tables, which are paired with second-hand chairs. 04—Formerly home to an insurance company, fishmonger, and then a Chinese restaurant, a wholefoods café now takes pride of place in this heritage building.

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A HAPPY UNION A NEW ZEALAND ARCHITECT DESIGNS A NEW LONDON EATERY.

Photography by Mary Gaudin.

Is this what they mean by fusion food? Not really, but you’ll see what we’re getting at: London-based New Zealand architect Giles Reid and Australian chef Brett Redman have brought Japanese street food to the London district of Dalston with yakitori restaurant Jidori. Reid deftly slotted his upbeat design into what was a nondescript wedding-dress shop; while the space offered little inspiration, he liked the immediacy of the street offered by the double-bay window. He pitched the ceiling to create a “contained and special” space in the dining area, then folded it back under the open kitchen in a zigzag. “The key was to bring just the right number of elements into play and hopefully do this with some warmth and style,” he says.

JIDORI 89 Kingsland High Street, London jidori.co.uk gilesreidarchitects.com

D:13

LOCAL FLAVOUR Owned and operated by sisters May and Ji Shin, Christchurch’s Gentle Giant café is sandwiched between second-hand car dealers on the south-eastern fringe of the central city – not the most promising locale, but that hasn’t stopped the pair from creating a haven for local businesses and those making the short journey from the city. Ji’s eldest son Kevin and his wife Angela are behind Gentle Giant’s branding and construction, while May, an arts major, used her keen eye to create an interior “like a little cabin in the woods” by trawling weekend flea markets for artwork, ceramics and furniture (the tables and countertops use wood salvaged from demolition yards). “Our aim was to build a café that felt like it had always been there,” May says. GENTLE GIANT 158 Ferry Road, Christchurch 03 366 9144

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Photography by Centuri Chan.

A BRAND-NEW CHRISTCHURCH CAFÉ CREATES A SETTLED-IN FEEL.


Every book has an author. Every film has a director. Every painting has an artist. Every dance has a choreographer. Every play has a playwright. Every symphony has a composer. Every building has an architect. Every exhibition has a curator. Every poem has a poet. Every sculpture has a sculptor.

. . . Architecture matters

See why architecture matters in your region at the 2016 Local Architecture Awards. Free.* All welcome. RSVP to awards@nzia.co.nz *$20 door charge for Auckland Architecture Awards; all others free

Auckland* 6pm Thursday 28 April Auckland Heliport Waikato / Bay of Plenty 6pm Friday 29 April Waikato University Performing Arts Centre, Hamilton Wellington 6pm Wednesday 4 May National Library, Wellington Nelson / Marlborough 6pm Thursday 5 May Saxton Oval Pavilion, Nelson

Gisborne / Hawke’s Bay 6pm Friday 13 May Blythe Performing Arts Centre, Iona College, Havelock North Western 6pm Friday 20 May New Plymouth Golf Club Canterbury 6pm Thursday 26 May Hagley Oval Pavilion, Christchurch Southern 6pm Saturday 28 May Skyline, Queenstown


D:14

GLOBAL FOCUS A NEW ZEALAND DESIGN FIRM EXTENDS ITS FOOTPRINT.

Fisher & Paykel’s brand-new Sydney Experience Centre is a big gesture for the New Zealand brand, but it’s only the beginning of a global rollout of centres where customers, designers, architects and specifiers can get a full immersion in the brand’s kitchen and whiteware offerings. The Experience Centres – there’s also one in New York City, with more planned for other cities soon – include materials that allude to New Zealand landscapes, and are a collaborative design project between Fisher & Paykel’s own design team, Fearon & Hay Architects and Alt Group.

FISHER & PAYKEL EXPERIENCE CENTRE 96 Bourke Street, Alexandria, Sydney. fisherpaykel.com

D:15

NEW EDITION THE AUCKLAND ART FAIR’S ACCESSIBLE OFFERINGS.

This year’s Auckland Art Fair genuinely provides something for almost every collector, thanks to the presence of institutions like McCahon House, Objectspace, Te Tuhi, Artspace and more offering artists’ editions for sale at much lower prices than many of the original works in the dealer gallery booths at the fair. The editions, by artists including Imogen Taylor (top left), Alex Monteith, Kim Pieters, Dane Mitchell, Fiona Clark (bottom) and more, range from works on paper to limited-edition tote bags and small sculptural pieces by Nate Savill (top right). Proceeds will go to the institutions to whom the artists donated the works. AUCKLAND ART FAIR 25-29 May The Cloud, Queens Wharf, Auckland artfair.co.nz

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01—AKA Norman Parkinson examines the photographer’s life and delves into his archives, including this image of Jerry Hall that he shot for a cover of Vogue in 1975. 02 and 04 The work of Todd Saunders features in Strange and Familiar: Architecture on Fogo Island. 03—Infinite Space explores the life and work of American architect John Lautner. 05—This building and others by German architect Gottfried Böhm and his three architect sons are covered in Concrete Love – the Böhm Family. 06—The work of Brazilian Eduardo de Almeida is the subject of Arquiteto da Medida Justa.

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D:16

SCREEN SHOTS THE RESENE ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN FILM FESTIVAL HITS SCREENS NATIONWIDE.

There are so many good films in this year’s Resene Architecture and Design Film Festival, we’re tempted to shirk work so we can see them all. The festival returns to Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin this year with a lineup of films that traverses the globe to reveal a wealth of acclaimed architecture and design, as well as the personal stories behind the buildings. Some highlights, according to us: On a remote Newfoundland island, Strange and Familiar: Architecture on Fogo Island, explores the socially ambitious architectural venture designed by Todd Saunders and commissioned by Zita Cobb. Their artists’ studios and an inn have garnered worldwide media attention and put the formerly foundering outpost in the spotlight. Meanwhile, in Germany, Concrete Love – the Böhm Family, explores a dynasty of architects and its patriarch, Gottfried Böhm. The 96-year-old Pritzker Prize winner is widely regarded as Germany’s pre-eminent architect, and the film sensitively documents his inspirations and interactions with his wife, also an architect, and his three architect sons. There are also trips to Cape Cod and the Bauhaus era of Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer in Built on Narrow Land, and to Brazil with Vilanova Artigas: the Architect and the Light, which recreates the life of João Batista Vilanova Artigas, one of the country’s most important and influential modernist architects. This is just a glimpse of what’s on offer. We suggest you check out the full programme online and on homemagazine. co.nz to start planning your schedule.

RESENE ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN FILM FESTIVAL Auckland: 5-18 May Rialto Cinemas Wellington: 26 May-12 June Embassy Theatre Dunedin: 16-26 June Rialto Cinemas Christchurch: 30 June-13 July Academy Gold 06

rialto.co.nz

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01—The ‘Future Islands’ creative team. Top row, from left: Bruce Ferguson, Jessica Barter, Maggie Carroll, Kathy Waghorn, Jon Rennie and Minka Ip. Bottom row, from left Stephen Brookbanks, Rewi Thompson and Charles Walker. 02, 04—Renderings of how the exhibition will look in Venice. 03—A plant exchange and seating are incorporated into an entrance gate for the exhibition. 05, 06— Islands under construction in the factory of Core Builders Composites in Warkworth.

D:17

ISLAND LIFE

So how will it look? Walker, who is director of Colab at AUT’s Faculty of Design and Creative Technologies, says the exhibition will take the form of miniature islands hanging in a Venetian room, with architectural models of past (some of them well-known) and imagined future projects placed on them. (The islands themselves were fabricated in Warkworth by Core Builders Composites, which normally builds racing yachts.) “We’re interested in how New Zealand, which foreigners might presume is relatively homogeneous and staid, is actually one of the most dynamic societies in the world in terms of population demographics, political economy and culture,” Walker says. The exhibition is also, importantly, a space to dream in a profession dominated by pragmatics. “Architecture in New Zealand tends to be circumscribed by pragmatic ideas of what’s possible and in current conditions, and architects are busy enough working on real projects that they don’t have the time to wonder about what-ifs,” Walker says. Hopefully New Zealand’s presence in Venice helps them start their wondering.

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Ivelina Velkova

The exhibition is already on its way there, packed up early this year and placed in a shipping container bound for its watery destination. The precious cargo is Future Islands, the New Zealand Institute of Architects’ second exhibition at the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale, the world’s most important gathering of architectural creativity. Like the art biennale, there will be national pavilions as well as a central exhibition curated by the architecture biennale’s creative director, Argentinian architect Alejandro Aravena, a vocal advocate for architecture’s social importance. Don’t call it a trade show: New Zealand’s contribution to the festival isn’t intended to tidily define our architecture, says creative director Charles Walker, but present it as an imagined archipelago of different approaches and responses to the uncertain conditions of contemporary global practice. “We’re interested in architecture’s obligation to be speculative, to invent different ways of living, to make new things possible,” Walker says.

Jane Ussher

NEW ZEALAND TAKES ITS PLACE AT THE 2016 VENICE ARCHITECTURE BIENNALE.

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Simon Devitt

VENICE ARCHITECTURE BIENNALE 28 May-27 November 2016 venice.nzia.co.nz


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D:18

NATURAL FIBRE A WEEKEND OF WOOL IN ONE OF NEW ZEALAND’S BEST LOCATIONS.

Could there be a better location for a brainstorming? In early March, a group of students from all over the country retreated to Ngamatea, a wonderful home on a sheep station in the Hawke’s Bay high country designed in 1981 by the late John Scott. They were there to dream up new ways to work with wool. The exercise was run by the Campaign for Wool, which is keen to remind architects, designers and everyone else that, in a world awash with synthetic fibres, wool still offers superior insulation, fire retardation, environmental performance, humidity regulation, neutralisation of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) and, of course, natural beauty. The post-graduate students – who are working in architecture and interiors as well as industrial, product and spatial design – workshopped potential future applications for wool in domestic and commercial interiors. Ngamatea is home to 40,000 sheep, including cross Romney, East Friesian, Texel, and polled Dorset, that produce 180,000 kilograms of wool a year – so the students certainly got to see the wool at its source. Previous retreats have focused on senior designers, so it was a natural progression to bring this challenge to a younger generation this time. “Re-imagining wool was the students’ challenge and we are thrilled with the concepts created,” says Stephen McDougall, director of Studio Pacific Architecture and an ambassador for CFW Wool in Architecture. “They push the edge of thinking yet realise the unique qualities of this natural and sustainable fibre, perfect for the built environment.”

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campaignforwool.co.nz Photography by Paul McCredie

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01—The view takes in the Hawke’s Bay high-country station at Ngamatea. 02–05 John Scott designed the Ngamatea homestead. 06—07 Post-graduate design students brainstorm ideas for the use of wool in domestic and commercial interiors.

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D:19

TURNING THE TABLES 04

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DINING TABLES AND ACCESSORIES DESIGNED IN EASILY DIGESTIBLE STYLE.

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01—Salt and pepper spitz by Martino Gamper, $225 each from Everyday Needs, everydayneeds.co.nz 02—‘Ihada’ knife-and-fork set by Masanori Oji for Futagami, $195 from Douglas and Bec, douglasandbec.com 03—‘RD’ dining table by Douglas and Bec, $4050 from Douglas and Bec, douglasandbec.com 04—‘Cyborg Club’ armchair by Marcel Wanders for Magis, $1125 from ECC, ecc.co.nz 05—Bowls by Gidon Bing, $75 each from Gidon Bing Ceramics, gidonbingceramics.com 06—‘Solo’ chair and table by Studio Nitzan Cohen for Mattiazzi, from $746 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com 07—Belgian linen tea towel by Libeco, $35 from Everyday Needs, everydayneeds.co.nz 08—‘Olio’ jug by BarberOsgerby for Royal Doulton, $99.95 from Everyday Needs, everydayneeds.co.nz 09—‘Remo’ chair by Konstantin Grcic for Plank, $1080 from Backhouse, backhousenz.co.nz 10—‘Mad’ dining table by Marcel Wanders for Poliform, $11,900, from Studio Italia, studioitalia.co.nz 11—‘Play’ chair by Alain Berteau for Wildspirit, $2255 from ECC, ecc.co.nz. Edited by Sam Smith.

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CONTEMPORARY RUGS OF DISTINCTION

09 377 3068 - www.sourcemon dial.co.nz - Showroom: 70 Stanley St, Parnell, Auckland


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D:20

FOOD FOR THOUGHT THE IDEAL MEAL AT HOME STARTS WITH THE RIGHT FURNITURE AND ACCESSORIES.

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01—‘Calippo’ table by Philippe Starck for Magis, $3075 from ECC, ecc.co.nz 02—‘Leslie’ chair by Rodolfo Dordoni for Minotti, $11,175 from ECC, ecc.co.nz 03—‘Concord’ table

by Emmanuel Gallina for Poliform, $7960 from Studio Italia, studioitalia.co.nz 04—‘Tank’ flutes by Tom Dixon, $175 for two from ECC, ecc.co.nz 05—Pitcher by Nousaku, $100 from An Astute Assembly, aaaselect.co 06—Titanium cutlery, $499 for 16-piece set from Father Rabbit, fatherrabbit.co.nz 07—‘Cyborg’ armchair by Marcel Wanders for Magis, $800 from ECC, ecc.co.nz 08—‘CH88’ chair by Hans J Wegner for Carl Hansen & Søn, $1038 from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz 09—‘Canyon’ dining table, $3180, and chairs, $2780 for four, from King Living, kingliving.com 10—‘Jellies Family’ tableware by Patricia Urquiola for Kartell, from $35 from Backhouse, backhousenz.com. Edited by Sam Smith.

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UNU STORAGE SYSTEM

31 Crummer Road Ponsonby, Auckland, New Zealand Phone +64 9 360 4290 admin@katalog.co.nz www.katalog.co.nz


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COME DINE WITH ME DINING FURNITURE AND ACCESSORIES TO IMPRESS ANY GUEST. 07

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01—‘Marcel’ dining chair by Shinsaku Miyamoto for Ritzwell, $2390 from ECC, ecc.co.nz 02—‘Sammen’ chair by Jaime Hayon for Republic of Fritz Hansen, $1837 from Cult,

cultdesign.co.nz 03—Plates by Hasami Porcelain, $105 from An Astute Assembly, aaaselect.co 04—Stonewashed linen napkins, $23 from Tessuti, tessuti.co.nz 05—‘IDS’ dining table by Piet Boon Collection, $15,545 from ECC, ecc.co.nz 06—‘AJ’ salad servers by Arne Jacobsen for Stelton, $110 from Mildred & Co, mildredandco.com 07—‘Paper Porcelain’ coffee cup and saucer by Scholten & Baijings for Hay, $102 each from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz 08—‘EM’ cutlery set by Erik Magnussen for Stelton, $470 from Mildred & Co, mildredandco.com 09—‘Branca’ chair by Sam Hecht /Industrial Facility for Mattiazzi, $1376 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com 10—‘Moon’ dining table by Space Copenhagen for Gubi, $11,042 from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz 11—‘Golden Dot’ carafe by Hay, $102 from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz 12—‘Tetu’ kettle by Makoto Koizumi, $420 from An Astute Assembly, aaaselect.co. Edited by Sam Smith.

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www.peterfell.co.nz


D:22

DREAM HOMES For the price of a coffee and some blissfully squandered time, our correspondent gets to bestow an award on a different home every week, and dream of what might be.

TEXT

— Douglas Lloyd Jenkins

I L L U S T R AT I O N

Coffee on a Saturday morning usually involves a battle over the newspaper – or, should I say, part thereof. There are sections widely thought desirable: the news section in which one catches up with the opinions of Dan and Richie on the issues of the day, the business section where you learn what’s going on, and sports, where you catch up with the other All Blacks. On a good day these are lying on the table when you arrive. On a bad day you are left with motoring or property, which some (not I) would say was far worse. The mutterings and filthy glances that emanate from the other side of the table regarding which café-goers are ‘just sitting on’ and ‘not reading’ the newspaper usually pass me by. I have happily gathered up the property section and I am busy awarding my House of the Week. Making the long list of House of the Week has very little to do with architectural quality or good design. It has everything to do with imagination. In most cases, anything with contemporary architectural kudos passes me by because I‘ve seen it in this magazine over the years. Earlier architecture of the modern period makes the list but, in most cases, only because you’re looking at what they’ve done to it since it last came on the market, before every good 50s and 60s house got pimped. What gets on the eventual shortlist, after much flicking backwards and forwards of the pages, are under-the-radar properties and houses that time forgot. Although I have nothing against cliff-top luxury, in-ground pools and state-of-the art kitchens (well, as it happens, I kind of do), the full-page ads never do it for me. The houses seem too massaged, too manicured and too obviously belonging to someone else. There is usually just a glimpse of the eventual House of the Week winner. The winner wins because most of the rest is left to my overactive imagination. This week’s House of the Week winner occupies a small advert at the bottom of a double-page spread. It is almost squeezed off the page by the obvious eye-catchers, with their capacious pools, Sky Tower views, luxury

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— Daron Parton

penthouse living and sprawling vineyard settings. Then there it is. A villa photographed from the back end. I am hooked. The House of the Week has been selected. Analysing why I’ve stopped at this house, I decide it’s a combination of things. The decision to photograph the back porch leaves both garden and house to the imagination. The two interior shots – one of the kitchen, the other of a lounge – have that nice combination of existing style and being in dire need of renovation. The ad mentions, but doesn’t illustrate, leadlight windows. I love the bright orange colour scheme in the kitchen with an authentic patterned feature wall and orange vinyl Danske Møbler furniture. I linger on the extensive use of Axminster carpet, the type grandmothers once considered quality. The Stanley Palmer print on the wall wins me over. I know that these things either don’t come with the house or would eventually have to go. I love the overgrown garden but I’m already thinking about pushing it back from the house and creating some new spaces. In the end it’s all about the romantic possibilities of house renovation and the decorating process. The House of the Week usually doesn’t linger in the mind much longer than the length of time it takes for my partner to manipulate the other sections of paper away from café patrons and to read them. However, some weeks, Overactive House Imagination Syndrome takes over. OHIS can be bad and involve a visit to the agent’s website and excessive examination of the detail in every image. When the agent provides a plan it gets enlarged and printed out multiple times to be obsessively drawn on. In this process, walls are moved, rooms are merged or closed up again. When no plan is provided, it means sketching an imagined plan from the images. Then come the décor considerations. What might each room look like? Is the feature fireplace really a feature good enough to carry off a room? Would the carpet have to go? Would that room get any light? What furniture could fill such an obviously immense room? At its worst, OHIS once led me as far as buying an


artwork to hang in a house that I’d never seen in the flesh but fantasised I would buy if I got a job in another city (for which I didn’t, in the end, apply). I had figured out in my mind that it was a good house and I knew the direction that the home might take and the collecting opportunities that the new spaces might open up. If that happened, I’d want this (very small) artwork as part of that process. So I made the purchase. It is now just a collecting anomaly in the house in which I live. Really, I’ve been able to constrain most of my decorating and renovating fantasies in the cycle of the week until the weekend property section arrives – I might be reading the Saturday paper in any city. That is, until recently, when a friend of mine started a free service via Facebook in which he sends out clipped advertisements

taken from property sites. These are mostly neglected Victorian mansions of immense scale for sale in provincial towns or deep in the South Island where the price of property fuels the fire of decorating fantasy. Dealing with my recent long-term fixation, a 37-room house spread over two storeys contained within two distinctive wings plus a collection of out-buildings, has occupied sheets of paper, led me back to forgotten books on interior decorating, kept me awake at night and has generally absorbed too much time. It has been dropped into a few conversations as a semi-possibility, each time with a largely predictable response along the lines of – ‘well, off you go then’. So, it seems destined to be filed away and then suddenly I have an idea – my own Home of the Year Award.

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RESENE COLOUR CHALLENGE The challenge? To use Resene paints to bring autumn’s warm, earthy tones into an interior. STYLING

— Sam Smith and Catherine Wilkinson — Wendy Fenwick

PHOTOG RAPHY

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HOME: Your challenge was to create an interior that was redolent of autumn. What was the concept, and how did you go about executing it? Sam Smith Autumn is such an inspiring season. The sunshine takes on a mellower tone, the skies are a vivid, beautiful blue, the leaves turn gold – everything seems to be amplified before nature takes on the greyer hues of winter. Our interior here is a tribute to the bold earthiness of autumn. We were inspired by a few things: the artist Oliver Perkins’ wonderful paintings in the Necessary Distraction exhibition at Auckland Art Gallery, beautiful scarves by Deadly Ponies, natural elements such as the interior colour palette of a home by Parsonson Architects, and furniture in weathered metals. Catherine Wilkinson We also wanted to show how bold colours can easily be combined in interiors – that neutrals aren’t the only option for creating a stylish backdrop for living. We especially love the depth of Resene ‘Space Shuttle’, and the way it pops with the much lighter grey-blue of Resene ‘Edward’ on the floor.


COLOUR CHALLENGE / HOME + RESENE

From far left: ‘Beat Vessel’ by Tom Dixon, $1955 from ECC, ecc.co.nz; ‘Ballerina’ table by Goldsworthy, $2395 from Backhouse, backhousenz.com with tumbler by Laurie Steer, $78 from Everyday Needs, everydayneeds.co.nz, and Kat and Roger carafe, $130 from Douglas and Bec, douglasandbec.com; ‘He Said’ chair by Studio Nitzan Cohen for Mattiazzi, $1518 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com; painted sheet (far left) and panels, stylists’ own; flowers by Muck Floral.

IDEA GENERATORS TH E M O O D B OAR D O F I N S PI R I N G I M A G E S T H AT G U I D E D T H E C R E AT I O N O F O U R I N T E R I O R S E T.

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Resene Space Shuttle

Resene Mai Tai

Resene Cumin

Resene Half Malta

Resene Edward

Resene Astronaut

Resene Pizza

Resene Anglaise

Take our lead and bring rooms to life with Resene paint colours and a little imagination. For information, advice and samples, visit the Resene ColorShop nearest you, call 0800 RESENE (737 363), or resene.co.nz.

01—The lovely bronzed patina of nesting tables by Dawn Sweitzer for Notre Monde, $2860 from ECC, ecc.co.nz. 02—Bold blue – Resene ‘Kumutoto’ – works with earthy orange – Resene ‘Tia Maria’ – in this coastal home by Parsonson Architects. Photograph by Paul McCredie. 03—Rugged texture and colour in ‘Dune 482’ rug by Danskina, from $6789 from Simon James, simonjamesdesign.com. 04—Earthy marble tones in scarves by Deadly Ponies, $230 each from Deadly Ponies, deadlyponies.com.

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STOP, LOOK, LISTEN A new building in Northland by Pip Cheshire is designed for contemplation of a historically loaded site. TEXT

— Aimie Cronin

P H OTO G R AP H Y

— Patrick Reynolds

Left Architect Pip Cheshire at Rore Kãhu, which he worked on for 10 years. He says he loves the drama of the site, both past and present.

In the end, Pip Cheshire decided to let the land tell the story. He stands inside the tapered walls of Rore Kãhu, the building he designed to commemorate the arrival of Anglican clergyman Samuel Marsden in New Zealand just over 200 years ago, and looks out toward the horizon. About 30 minutes from Kerikeri, the land is worn, but traces of its history remain. Cheshire points to terraces from the Rangihoua pa site, home to hundreds of Maori and few Europeans in the 1810s; worn stripes down the side of the banks from old kumara-growing trenches; wetlands once full of puha and cress. Down the valley where the sands of Hohi beach meet blue that stretches out forever, Marsden came to shore in 1814 and delivered a sermon on Christmas Day. He told the gathering of Maori and Europeans, “Behold! I bring you glad tidings of great joy,” perhaps in English, perhaps in Maori: “He kaikauwhau tenei ahau ki a koutou mo te hari nui.” Those words are etched along clay walls inside the new building. Samuel Marsden didn’t stay long at Rangihoua. He sailed back to Sydney, leaving horses, fencing wire,

guns and high hopes for the proliferation of Christianity, thanks to the three families he had plucked from his congregation to set up a mission station. They were allowed to stay because of an agreement Marsden had made with Ruatara, the Ngapuhi rangatira of Rangihoua. It was New Zealand’s first planned European settlement, and the first formal relationship between Maori and Pakeha. Before Cheshire’s building came along, the Marsden Cross, erected in 1907, was almost the only indicator of the Hohi mission site, along with some terraces and a memorial stone. To some, the arrival of Marsden is important because it marks the beginning of Christianity in Aotearoa. It also marks a coming together of Maori and Europeans and fits within a wider conversation around culture, migration and race relations. Cheshire is thrilled to have been part of it. “The thing I found so exciting is that you are only 200 years removed from something that is incredibly contested, has multiple readings and, yet, is shaping the way we are making this country.” When you arrive at Rangihoua Heritage Park, Cheshire’s work has begun. Before, the view revealed

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Left Sturdy walls made from mixing and compacting cement-stabilised clay embrace you as you engage with the site. Right The Celtic Marsden Cross, erected in 1907, marks the spot where the reverend Samuel Marsden preached his first sermon in New Zealand in 1814.

itself as you stepped out of the car. Cheshire wanted to hold something back. He raised ground level by three metres to block the view, so that you arrive and see a building that looks like a wonky shape and you ask, ‘what the hell is that?’ When the building presents itself, it tells a story and so does the land. The striking roof looks like a note that has been folded up and then spread back out again. It’s made of a composite carbon fibre and foam sandwich that shelters you from sun and rain, and makes for a beautifully high-tech foil to the structure’s earthy walls, which are made from mixing and compacting cement-stabilised clay. When you stand in the structure and look across the valley to the sea, the walls feel like the strongest arms holding you. Rore Kãhu started out as a church project. About 170 years after Marsden’s arrival at Rangihoua, Patricia Bawden, an ordained minister with a doctorate in history, had a vision of Jesus appearing over the nearby Mt Mataka. She saw it as a call to action and fundraised and facilitated the purchasing of land. Ten years before the bicentenary of Marsden’s arrival, it was decided the event would be marked with a new building on this site.

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Cheshire’s brief was for a chapel on top of the hill. He looked for ways to communicate the significance of the land and what had happened there, without wanting to be too literal. He drew plans for a cluster of buildings that included a chapel and referenced ideas of migration and pilgrimage. The purple shirts liked it. At one of the early meetings, Bawden leapt to her feet and said, “Praise the lord, Pip’s here!” It was a high point he still laughs about. Cheshire loves the drama of the site, both past and present. When he talks about the process of conceptualising, he pauses to make room for exclamation marks. There were frustrations in those early days. “I kept saying this is celebrating the first formal engagement of two people! This land has the first legal title in New Zealand! There’s a pine that marks the placenta of the first surviving white child! We’re really in the heartland here. We should’ve been drinking cups of tea for years!” In total he worked on it for a decade but, in retrospect, he felt the level of consultation with Maori in the first stages was not profound enough. After taking his initial plans to Te Tii Marae and then several meetings after, it became clear the project needed to broaden so that all


Left The striking roof, which resembles a note that’s been folded, then unfolded, is made of composite carbon fibre and foam. Right The walls, which bear inscriptions, lead the eye to the valley and the sea.

interests in the site were consulted and included. The chapel lost out. There was agreement that the building would not be a marae and it would not be a chapel. “They would all argue like hell and then get up and say, ‘we look forward to seeing what you do’ and you sit there thinking, ‘well... ’” It was a conundrum. “If you look at Maori culture, they only have one form of building and it’s a whare, so if it’s not a whare, then what the hell is it? And what will have resonance to Maori? So that’s where it became a manipulation of land and space and the emphasis went on making a building and a celebration of the whole valley.” Cheshire named it an interpretive centre and his challenge became to create something that was “dramatic and visible, but not dominant”. When the religious connotations of the place were dropped, so was Patricia Bawden’s dream. She still emails Cheshire her disappointment about it. “I get these blasts of emails,” he says, “I admire her passionate drive.” But there is a spirituality in this place that is more vast than Christianity. Maybe it has to do with the fact that you are charmed into spending

time there and, as a result, deep thought takes place. Cheshire says there is scope for the structure to hold a service, or a meeting, or a school trip, or just be a place for people to come and sit. It’s easy to see how it works on all these levels. Its greatest accomplishment, though, is how the building has framed the way we relate to the historic sites of the valley below. The longer you sit, the more powerful the space becomes. You build a connection to the land. Without the building, the site would be another grassy hill, another pretty view. Cheshire’s work has been about giving you a reason to stay. There are a lot of physiological cues he worked on in the background: making sure the steps are going to get warmed from the sun, that visitors will be comfortable, that they will be sheltered from the prevailing wind, that the walls will shape the acoustics and amplify the sound of the birds. “I mean, these are not accidents,” he says. “These are the things that make a place and what I’m hoping to do is particularise it for you, so that it does sear into you in a way that occasionally unmodified landscapes do. Very often, we just go trundling through.”

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While Cheshire’s initial brief was to design a chapel for the hilltop, the religious connotations were eventually dropped. What transpired is a place where you could hold a meeting or a service, but mostly, it’s a place where you can take respite and connect with the site and its history.

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Something’s cooking New attitudes in interiors combine appliances, art and hot, spicy hues.

ART DIRECTION PHOTOG RAPHY

— Katie Lockhart — Darryl Ward


Wall colour Resene ‘Eighth Friar Grey’, resene.co.nz. Artwork ‘Leaden Circles’ 2014 by Milli Jannides, $2000 from Hopkinson Mossman, hopkinsonmossman. com. Furniture and objects From far left: plant, $89 from Muck General Store, muck.co.nz, on Chinese ceremonial handpainted rice barrel, POA from Bashford Antiques, bashford. co.nz; ‘Elise 110’ Dual Fuel Cooker by Falcon, $10,995 from FL Bone & Son, flbone.co.nz; stock pot by Reiff, $229 from Milly’s Kitchen, millyskitchen. co.nz; kettle by Noda Horo, $235 from Everyday Needs, everydayneeds.co.nz; ‘209’ chair by Thonet, POA from Thonet, thonet. co.nz; ‘Eos’ outdoor table by Matthew Hilton for Case, $701 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com; German Majalica c1900 candle holder, $1800 (sold as a pair) from Art and Industry, 09 630 0310, with candle by Cidex, $3.60 from Design Denmark, designdenmark.co.nz; Phoenix Ware hand-painted urn by AE Deans c1930, $900 from Art and Industry, 09 630 0310.


Wall colour Resene ‘Eighth Friar Grey’, resene.co.nz. Artwork ‘Untitled 2016’ by Oliver Perkins (on wall at far right), $4000 from Hopkinson Mossman, hopkinsonmossman. com. Furniture and objects From far left: ‘4801’ chair by Joe Colombo for Kartell, $4534 from Backhouse, backhousenz.com; Salt lamp, $125 from Jewels and Gems, jewelsandgems.co.nz; vintage mat, $450 from Mary Kelly Kilims, marykellykilims.co.nz; footstool, $3.50 from Daiso Japan, daisojapan.com; French 19th-century cot, $1450 from Bashford Antiques, bashford. co.nz; ‘Brick Lane’ single duvet cover, $399, and pillow cases, $110 each, both by Libeco from Everyday Needs, everydayneeds.com.


Wall colour Resene ‘Eighth Friar Grey’, resene.co.nz. Artwork ‘Never Skipping a Beat’ 2015 (bell ceramics) by Kate Newby, $3600 from Hopkinson Mossman, hopkinsonmossman. com. Objects From far left: French antique jug, $195 from Bashford Antiques, bashford. co.nz, with toothbrushes, $3.50 for a set of five from Daiso Japan, daisojapan.com; French antique wine jug, $275 from Bashford Antiques, bashford.co.nz; soap dish, $3.50 from Daiso Japan, daisojapan.com, with soap by Claus Porto, $20 from World, worldbrand.co.nz; German Majolica c1900 candle holder, $1800 (sold as a pair) from Art and Industry, 09 630 0310, with Cidex candle, $3.60 from Design Denmark, designdenmark.co.nz; tea towel (on table) by Libeco, $35 from Everyday Needs, everydayneeds.com.


SEE WHAT YOU CAN SEE PROUD SPONSORS OF HOME OF THE YEAR The way a shadow falls. The way light bounces. The colour of rock. The unfaltering straightness of a line. The delicate beauty of a curve. The strong and noble angle. Noticing what isn’t. Savouring every detail. Seeing what others cannot. A LT / H O M E 11 / 3 F P

Seeing through someone else’s eyes.

When you know where to look for inspiration, you can find it with Altherm Window Systems. altherm.co.nz


PRESENTS

The Home of the Year by Herbst Architects

Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell’s cityfringe pad

Stevens Lawson create a blueprint for urban calm

Anthony Hoete’s new spin on the traditional villa

Gerald Parsonson’s bold city development

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Brought to you in association with Altherm Window Systems

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Winner 2016 HOME OF THE YEAR

Tucked away in a valley on the Coromandel Peninsula, the 2016 Home of the Year by Herbst Architects combines rusty allusions to local farm buildings with a proudly contemporary form.

TE X T

— Jeremy Hansen

P H OTO G R AP H Y

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— Patrick Reynolds


Nicola and Lance Herbst on the deck of the, which is clad in rusted corrugated iron sourced from a building in Thames.

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Left The owners run sheep on their Coromandel property. To the right is an extension of the sheltered entry and wood store area that contains a ďŹ re that doubles as a barbecue. Above Steel rods criss-cross the living room windows to strengthen the structure in high winds. The sofa in the living area is from Bob and Friends in Ponsonby, Auckland.

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In some ways, it was an unusual brief. It asked for “humble and basic” home and expressed a desire for bunker-like solidity. Its location, on a small farm in a valley on the Coromandel Peninsula, meant it required a woodshed and a place for wet raincoats and muddy boots. The brief expressed enthusiasm for the interiors of old shearing sheds and materials that were “cracked, rusted, scratched, bashed”. The owners, a couple who work in the film industry and retreat to the Coromandel for long periods between projects to plant trees and vegetables and tend their animals, wanted one main bedroom and a small additional one for guests. Their brief to architects Lance and Nicola Herbst had photographs, including one of a large windowless shed clad entirely in rusted corrugated iron, and two interior shots of a simple timber bach that the Herbsts had designed years earlier. The bach in those photographs was located on Great Barrier Island; its earthy simplicity was one of the reasons the owners of the home on these pages approached the Herbsts. But this new project wasn’t a case of the Herbsts ordering up more of the same.

The home is a big architectural gesture with low-impact modesty. It looks simultaneously ancient and contemporary. It proves how a thoughtful piece of architecture can enhance a beautiful landscape and the sense of connection to it.

The husband-and-wife team have become wellknown for their mastery of lightweight timber baches, assemblages of feathery, diffuse, intricate structures intent on dissolving the boundaries between inside and out. This home is an entirely different proposition: a solid, resolute, blunt-edged form that could be described as agrarian brutalism. The stark contrast to the Herbsts’ previous work is entirely deliberate and marks the beginning of a period of “active disruption” of their customary approach to designing homes. “We just felt the need to come at things from a slightly different angle,” Lance says. They’ve made a great start. The Home of the Year 2016 is one of those rare buildings that make you catch your breath when you see it, either in photographs or in the distance as you round a corner on the winding valley road that offers a first glimpse. It combines graphic impact with down-to-earth practicality, a big architectural gesture with low-impact modesty. It looks simultaneously ancient and contemporary. It proves how thoughtful architecture can enhance a beautiful

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landscape and the sense of connection to it. The owners mention a recent evening when they hunkered down in the living room and watched a lightning storm rage up the valley around them. “It’s a visceral house,” one of its owners says. “You can experience nature on a really visceral level. We love being on the land, and the house doesn’t shut us away from it.” The dramatic gesture of that upper-level skin of recycled rusty corrugated iron was inspired partly by the owners’ brief, and also by a clutch of ancient farm sheds a little further down the valley. Of course, many New Zealand buildings have emulated these vernacular forms, but the Herbsts eschewed the conventional gabled-roof tribute and took a more oblique approach. They noticed how the absence of windows in the old sheds helped them acquire an abstract sculptural power and applied this approach to the home, levitating the rusty skin above the main living floor and refusing to puncture it with windows. To do so would have reduced this mysterious skin to domestic scale, adding an element of banality to something beautiful. Instead, thin slits in the iron allow narrow linear views down the valley from the top floor, while the main bedroom and bathroom upstairs open to the rear of the property through full-length sliding doors. It may seem perverse to block valley views from the top floor, but the home’s interior doesn’t feel as if it lacks them. At the top of the long driveway, the 115-square-metre home starts out anchored to the earth: the ridgeline was cut and replaced by a retaining wall that backs the lower level. The deliberately casual ground-floor entry is a covered, open-air space with a beautiful floor of sawn pine logs and serves as a wood store, a place to hang coats and boots, and somewhere for the dogs to shelter. At one end of it, an outdoor fire doubles as a barbecue and offers a place to sit and admire the view. Inside, a service pod holds a little bathroom and the stairwell on one side and a pantry and laundry on the other. The kitchen and dining space are a simple linear arrangement of bench, island and table, with cabinetry made from industrial materials by Kirsty Winter. Doors on both sides of the kitchen and dining area open to small decks. The sitting room is two steps lower, where the view is cropped into a horizontal 270-degree panorama up and down the valley. “It became very apparent early on to crop the foreground and sky so you get that intensification of the panorama,” Lance says. Looming high above is the hollowed-out interior of that rusty iron skin, criss-crossed by Oregon beams and lined in recycled rimu. The Herbsts have long talked about the need for every home to have a secure space with a solid wall to shield your back while you enjoy the primal pleasures of a blazing fire. Here, though, their aim was to create that feeling not with a solid wall – the sitting room is surrounded by windows – but by utilising the mass of the ceiling volume hovering above. “Because of the weight of the box, which levitates above the glass pavilion below, you’ve got an intimate and enclosed sense of comfort,” Nicola says.


The resolute, blunt-edged form is a deliberate departure from Herbst Architects’ previous work and an “active disruption” of their customary approach to designing homes – it could be described as agrarian brutalism. “We just felt the need to come at things from a slightly different angle,” says Lance Herbst.

The home is full of rustic, muscular details. A large concrete fireplace anchors the sitting space and rises to form a backrest for the bench beside the dining table. Doorhandles, taps, coat hooks, bathroom basins and many other elements were sourced secondhand. The kitchen splashback and the shower are lined with copper panels that were deliberately aged by artist Louise Purvis. The valley is sometimes blasted by strong winds, so rusted, criss-crossed steel bracing reinforces the living room windows. The corrugated iron on the exterior was sourced from a building in Thames and carefully removed by a contractor, then aged by builders Doug Fleming and Paul Oxford for use on the new home. About 60 percent of the home’s materials are recycled, and new ones were treated so they acquired a patina of age. The overall effect is suitably bucolic, with an authenticity that means it never feels like it’s striving for a particular style.

Much of the Herbsts’ earlier work is notable for its attention to the smallest details. The home they designed at Piha that won this magazine’s Home of the Year award in 2012, for example, is highly crafted, with patterned timber screens and intricately detailed cedar. The home on these pages, while beautifully built, doesn’t have the same aspirations. Lance recounts a conversation with the Indian architect Bijoy Jain of Studio Mumbai about “the tyranny of craft”, and how an obsessive focus on refined details can obscure the search for what Lance calls “the poetry of buildings, and their presence in the landscape in a positive way”. This home represents an exciting sort of liberation for the Herbsts. “The more we’re asked to do different building typologies, the more we feel free to use different modes of expression,” Lance says. If strong, poetic buildings like this are the result, then we can’t wait to see more of them.

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The large concrete ďŹ replace surround serves to anchor the sitting area, while also serving as a backrest for the bench seat at the dining table. Rustic materials and details used throughout the home are often vintage or deliberately aged. The leather folding chair in the foreground is from Design Denmark. The kitchen cabinetry was designed and made by Kirsty Winter.

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“Because of the weight of the box, which levitates above the glass pavilion below, you’ve got an intimate and enclosed sense of comfort.”

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Above In a rich gallery of wood, Oregon beams and recycled rimu feature inside the hollowed-out interior of the rusty iron skin. Left Large sliding doors on either side of the kitchen and dining area open up to small decks. Glen Loane made the wooden joinery for the sliding windows and shutters.

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Left and above Digger the dog sits at the ground-oor entry, which is paved with sawn pine logs. The space includes storage for ďŹ rewood, as well as a place to hang coats and boots. Right In the main bedroom, slim cuts in the exterior iron skin allow narrow views down the valley.

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Above The sitting room offers a carefully cropped 270-degree panorama of the valley. The coffee table in the living room is from Auckland’s The Vitrine, while much of the rest of the home is furnished with second-hand ďŹ nds from Trade Me. Wooden nail boxes are used as side tables. Right While the house was in part inspired by a clutch of old farm buildings in the valley, the Herbsts eschewed the conventional reference of a shed-like gable roof.

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Right The main bedroom can be seen through the vertical window above the wood store and dog run. Middle and far right The owners sourced many of the recycled details that feature throughout the home, including the bathroom basin and taps. The copper panels in the shower were given an aging treatment by artist Louise Purvis.

Ground floor 1. Sitting 2. Dining 3. Kitchen 4. Pantry 5. Laundry 6. WC 7. Lobby 8. The cave 9. Dog run

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DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with the architects behind the 2016 Home of the Year, Lance and Nicola Herbst

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This is a very different building from the baches you’re best-known for. Nicola Herbst For a whole lot of reasons we found ourselves going down a certain track and honing that. But we’ve always thought about architecture in more than one way. We were asked to do beach houses a lot, so the idea of covered outside spaces and moving walls and so on were brought out of those briefs. Now the more we’re asked to do different building typologies, the more we feel free to use different modes of expression. Lance Herbst We just felt a need to come at things from a slightly different angle. [Our] buildings don’t need to exhibit that striving for craft. That’s a skill we now have. So now we can concentrate on something else, which is the poetry of buildings and their presence in landscape in a positive way. We tend to do buildings that are quite fractured and recessive, but this one presented this opportunity for us to make an object we thought could enhance the landscape.

How did you devise the form? LH We were looking for clues as to how to approach the building and we isolated these little farm sheds – the fields are dotted with rusty old sheds. They’re very tight forms with no windows, and the doors are always closed, so it’s a complete form. NH We were talking about architecture as a form in the landscape and how that’s quite difficult to achieve in a beautiful way, because you have to make apertures in this form. So we levitated the skin to the first floor and circumnavigated that issue of punctures in the frame. There’s a purity in the glazed strata and in the upper one. What do you think is most successful about the building now that it’s complete? NH The way it sits in the land with such a small footprint is surprisingly strong. And inside, the weight of the box which levitates above the glass pavilion below means you’ve got a very intimate and enclosed sense of comfort with panoramic views.


Finalist 2016 HOME OF THE YEAR

WINNER BEST CITY HOME 2016

A new home by Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell in a tough semiindustrial neighbourhood brings family living to Auckland’s centre.

TE X T

— Aimie Cronin

P H OTO G R AP H Y

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— Simon Devitt


Architects Andrew Kissell and Andrea Bell, with their children Oscar and Lulu, in the home they designed in a light-industrial area on Auckland’s city fringe. The artwork at the foot of the stairs is ‘Liquido Russo’ by Ekarasa Doblanovic.

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The home is a magniďŹ cent challenge to the conventional notion that the city is no place for children.

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Left The home’s entry leads from the street into the kitchen and living areas. The apparent transparency of the stairs is because of the perforations in the 3mm-thick steel plate. Ceramic works by Len Castle hang just inside the door. ‘Play’ chairs by Alain Berteau for Wildspirit from ECC sit at an oak ‘Hugo’ dining table from Katalog. The cloche industrial shades are from Loft Motif and the lights above the kitchen island are brass with LED bulbs. Above At the top of the stairs, the upstairs living room looks across to the stairwell, where ‘Remembrance’ quatrefoils by Max Gimblett hang.

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Walk past Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell’s house in its unlikely spot next to a car dealership in a light-industrial neighbourhood on Auckland’s city fringe, and through the glass front door. You will be greeted with a loud smack of bright green grass. It’s like a gift to the street. Years ago, when Bell and Kissell, both architects, walked through the alleys of Seville as they travelled through Spain, every so often someone would open a door to a house and passersby would get a glimpse of life behind it. Those visions of domesticity in the middle of gritty environments inspired Bell and Kissell as they plotted the design of their own Auckland home. Their home is a magnificent challenge to the conventional notion that the city is no place for children. Bell and Kissell have created an enviable home for themselves and their kids Oscar, four, and one-year-old Lulu, on an almost-hostile site without resorting to suburban design tropes. Their design shows how we can better use our cities by re-occupying areas once considered undesirable, rather than spreading stand-alone homes further and further from the centre. Those visiting the home for the first time may raise an eyebrow when they can’t find a car park, when they aren’t greeted with a row of picket fences, or when they can’t see the large backyard. They might think, ‘kids can’t live here’. They will be challenged by the concept of family living in the city, but they will see that not only does it work, but it works really well. Bell, who has her own architecture practice, Bell & Co Architecture, and Kissell, an associate director at the architecture firm Peddle Thorp, purchased the site in a rush in late 2010 and then took their time deciding what to do with it. The site was originally occupied by an old cottage that had been burnt to the ground in a fire. They

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decided to honour the neighbourhood’s industrial flavour with an economical material palette of raw concrete walls, exposed ceilings and a strikingly beautiful metal staircase with a mesh screen. Traces of construction, such as builder’s notes and measurements, have been deliberately left exposed, and Kissell says he enjoys that aspect of the house. “I really love buildings when they are at that three-quarters-finished stage,” he says, “before you add all the stuff you have to have – the bones and structure and space, and this house partly reflects that.” The 375-square-metre home’s living areas are situated on the entry floor: a large combined kitchen, dining and sitting space that opens onto a deck with steps leading down to the lawn. Downstairs is Andrew’s workshop; Andrea’s office is upstairs along with three bedrooms and a place to watch TV. Bell’s favourite space is the main bedroom, which is utterly simple in design, its key feature being expansive views that lend the feel of sitting on a mountain looking out. “We lived without curtains for a couple of months,” says Bell, laughing. “The sunsets are amazing. I love lying in bed in the dark with the curtains open at night, watching the changing cityscape with the cranes and what’s going on, all of the lights. If there’s a concert on at Western Springs we can hear that. It does feel like we are pretty lucky.” From the outset, the home was designed for maximum flexibility. When the couple began the project, children weren’t even part of their plans. But the home has also been carefully configured for possible future uses. Initially, the couple planned to build as much as they could reasonably afford. The structure has been engineered to take another storey for a separate apartment or, perhaps, a rooftop garden. The front courtyard could be reconfigured for, say, a café. The staircase has been designed at the foot of the entrance and the edge of the house so that it could be walled off and each floor could work as a separate tenancy. Bell says “there are all sorts of ways you could cut this house up” for future combinations of residential or commercial use. The family has no plans to change the current setup. The children’s bedrooms face the street with sliding doors opening onto a small balcony where they like to blow bubbles. Visibility from the street is subtly managed on both levels with layers of timber screens and frosted glass. The family enjoys the backyard, says Kissell, and the “whole idea of living in the city but having green space and a veggie garden”. He plans to set up a projector to screen films on the neighbouring white wall. He likes how the front terrace where the car is parked also works as the perfect morning coffee spot because of how it catches the sun. He likes the large living space that opens to outdoor living. He looks around the house and says there’s not really anything he would change, even with a more generous budget. The real proof of the home’s success is evident when Oscar’s friends visit, their eyes wide with surprise. This concept of home is unfamiliar, and they are delighted by it. To them, the house is an adventure. Kissell says he sometimes misses that they don’t live in a residential street that houses plenty of other children for his kids to hang out with. But with more people moving into the area, the feeling of community is growing. Hopefully Bell and Kissell’s home is a harbinger of change.


Above The main bedroom is lined in pine plywood. The ‘Tolomeo Mini Tavolo’ bedside lights are by Michele de Lucchi and Giancarlo Fassina for Artemide from ECC. The industrial lightshade is from Loft Motif. The flue from the Bosca wood fire in the living room below is left exposed for warmth during winter. Below The family gathers in the kitchen. The living area features a ‘Miller’ sofa from Forma. Far left The library upstairs, in the space that Andrea also uses as the office for her architecture firm, Bell & Co.

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Bell and Kissell stand on the home’s street-facing balcony. Timber screens and frosted glass manage privacy between the street and the home.

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Left In its light-industrial setting, the verdant lawn at the back of the home is a surprise. Kissell’s workshop occupies the ground floor. Above The couple had long envisaged living in a converted warehouse, and their material palette of concrete, Modulit, plywood and steel in their new home reflects this. ‘A2’ stools from IMO sit at the outdoor table, which was designed and built by Kissell from recycled decking timber. In the foreground, the ‘Heaven’ chair by Jean-Marie Massaud for Emu is from ECC. Right The ensuite features exposed copper water pipes. The natural-stone freestanding bath is from VCBC. The Alape wall-hanging basins, ‘Pixel’ basin mixers and shower head by Paini are all from Metrix. The brass pendant lights are the same as those in the kitchen.

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Left The rosewood dresser and bedside table in the guest bedroom were designed in 1973 by Rudi Schwarz for Whitmore Arti Domo. A ‘Bimbo’ stool by Peter Brandt from Katalog sits at the dresser. The ‘Tolomeo Micro Pinza’ light by Michele De Lucchi and Giancarlo Fassina for Artemide is from ECC. Above A glimpse of the rear of the home, with the main bedroom up top, from the neighbouring street.

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Right The minimally dressed bathroom includes a little step for the children. Middle The stairs lead down to Kissell’s workshop. Far right A glimpse of the sitting room through the mesh screen surrounding the stairs.

Basement level 1. Workshop 2. Lawn 3. Veggie garden

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DESIGN NOTEBOOK

What surprises people when they visit? Andrew Kissell The view out the back, and the garden. You are not expecting to come through an urban environment and see that.

Q&A with Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell

What was the first conversation you had around the concept of this home? AK There has always been the desire to convert a warehouse on the city fringe. The reality was that they were so pricey you had to go into the industrial areas much further out of the city and we didn’t want that. Andrea Bell We liked the concept of an open, simple space with a rawness to it, but also something we could add our own ideas to, so I guess, a shell. Andrew called me and said he had pretty much bought this. AK I got a good deal.

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AB It was always going to be about simple, open space. AK And making it liveable. What do you think this home adds to the conversation about the best ways to live in Auckland or other growing cities in the present day? AB I think it’s very relevant to what is happening in Auckland at the moment. With the shortage of spaces, you are not going to get the traditional 600-square-metre sites anymore. This is kind of the reality – city fringe among businesses. AK You look at this building and, to me, it could be three apartments. It has huge potential for alternative future uses, or retail or office, and was designed with that in mind.


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Finalist 2016 HOME OF THE YEAR

Full of tactile pale timber and light, lofty spaces, an Auckland home by Stevens Lawson creates a new blueprint for urban serenity.

TE X T

— Jeremy Hansen

P H OTO G R AP H Y P R O D U C TI O N

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— Mark Smith

— Katie Lockhart

The home’s long, slender form is broken up with courtyards that invite light and air through the building. The landscaping is by Philip Smith of O2 Landscapes. The walnut sofa was designed by Katie Lockhart and made by Grant Bailey.


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How do you create a sanctuary? Architects Nicholas Stevens and Gary Lawson were recently asked to do so on a site beside Auckland’s Waitemata Harbour. Normally a client writing an architectural brief might start with a descriptive term like this before going on to write a long list of other, less evocative requirements. But here on this quiet piece of land in a suburb not far from the city centre, the owner kept things simple by making just one request: to encapsulate the feeling of a sanctuary in built form. So Stevens and Lawson got to work, aiming to create “a soulful house and a spiritual house,” Stevens says. “The client was very open about how we developed that.” The home they have designed looks like what should be the first hit if you type ‘sanctuary’ into a Google image search (I tried – there are hundreds of images of a now-cancelled Canadian web and TV series of that name before you reach a picture of a lovely thatchedroof lodge in Botswana). There are quiet, delicately planted courtyards, floors of oiled oak, tactile walls and lofty ceilings of beautifully pale, sustainably harvested totara. The tide washes in and out at the bottom of the property. The overall effect is restful, monastic, deeply calm. “Everything is a bit earthy and textured – it’s not slick,” Stevens says. The sense of serenity in the home seems to affect almost everyone: when members of his extended family made their first visit there one recent afternoon, the owner soon found most of them curled up in various parts of the living room taking a nap. This feeling, of course, is not an accident, but the result of thoughtful planning. From the street, the home has a deliberate modesty that gives little away, with a simple gable form of concrete and cedar. Inside the front door, there is a spine of concrete running all the way through the home and culminating in a terrace overlooking the harbour. The heft of this thick, anchoring wall sets up a lovely interplay of solidity and transparency. The 420-square-metre home is not a monolithic block stretching for the water, but is broken into fragments with courtyards inserted between them. This brings light into all the rooms and allows linear views through the house. The main bedroom looks across a courtyard and through the living area to the water, for example, while the yoga and meditation room on the northeastern side of the house has views through the kitchen to the harbour’s edge. “It’s very much a house you see through,” Lawson says. (This arrangement handily avoids staring at the neighbouring homes, which are both rather close to the boundaries.) This planning had a loose precedent in a house Stevens and Lawson designed nearby that won this magazine’s Home of the Year award in 2007. That home is also located on a long, thin site and features courtyards between some of the rooms, but the similarities end there. While that home was all dark timber and highly crafted curves, this one has a less complex geometry. And the decision here to locate the main bedroom on the ground floor (instead of upstairs at the

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front of the home facing the water) allows the ceiling heights in the living spaces to soar to a peak of seven metres, giving the rooms a sense of luxurious spaciousness and ease. The interiors have been left blissfully uncluttered, thanks to the work of interior designer Katie Lockhart. She designed most of the Shaker-style furniture herself and had it made in walnut by local craftsman Grant Bailey. A large grey rug of New Zealand wool covers the living room floor, while white paper lampshades by Isamu Noguchi and BarberOsgerby hang from the ceilings. In the kitchen, Stevens and Lawson designed a central island and cabinetry in totara (with recessed drawer pulls in a triangular motif) and topped the benches with granite, integrating the pantry and appliances so they look less like workspaces and more like pieces of furniture. Lofty skylights bring light deep into the space, creating a play of sun on the walls that changes continually throughout the day. The sense of calm is more than skin-deep. The home was built (by Bruce Ogilvy of Moir Point Park Developments) according to the principles of Baubiologie, a branch of building research that aims to minimise the presence of irritants in the home such as toxic substances and electromagnetic radiation. To achieve this, natural materials and finishes were specified throughout the home, and electrical wiring was designed so it is mostly contained in a central recessed floor cavity. The home also has a large photovoltaic array for solar power, high levels of insulation, and a grey water recycling system. “It’s high performing environmentally, but it’s still very architecturally driven,” Lawson says. Of course Stevens and Lawson sweated the details, but there is something relaxed in their execution that makes this home feel easy, not uptight. It also marks a period of intense architectural development for the duo who, as well as creating intricately crafted homes like this one, have recently designed a great variety of other buildings, including over 40 lower-priced terrace homes at Auckland’s Hobsonville Point, and several more affordable homes for a Nga¯ti Wha¯tua development in Orakei. Late last year they won the New Zealand Architecture Medal from the NZ Institute of Architects for the design of the Blyth Performing Arts Centre at Hawke’s Bay’s Iona College. The diversity of work doesn’t mean Stevens and Lawson have any desire to stop creating beautiful homes like this: if anything, this building’s self-assured sense of calm suggests they are enjoying the process of making them more than ever. The home’s owner, too, is continually delighted by how the architects interpreted his evocative open brief. The sanctuary he asked for has been happily realised. “I have so much respect for Nicholas and Gary that I felt it was important to give them the freedom to be truly expressive,” he says. “I think [the brief] gave them the chance to create more with their hearts than their minds. I feel like I was really heard.”


The home presents a modest face to the street, with concrete and cedar forming a simple gable roof. The home was constructed by Bruce Ogilvy.

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The sitting room’s ceiling rises to a peak of seven metres, and its walls and ceiling are lined with bandsawn, sustainably harvested totara. The furniture was designed by Katie Lockhart (except for the vintage rocking chair by Hans Wegner) and made from walnut timber by craftsman Grant Bailey. The lightshade at left is by Isamu Noguchi, while the ‘Double Bubble’ shade at right is from the ‘Hotaru’ collection by BarberOsgerby for Akari. The grey rug is from The Ivy House and is made from New Zealand wool. The floorboards are oiled oak.

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Left Stevens and Lawson designed the kitchen, with its totara cabinetry and granite benchtops, to look like pieces of furniture rather than a workspace. The pendants are by Monmouth Glass. Right The dining area faces the harbour on one side, but in this view looks back through the kitchen to one of the home’s courtyards. The dining table and benches are by Sawkille Furniture, a firm based in Rhinebeck, New York. Below right The main bedroom opens onto one of the home’s courtyards. The bed was designed by Lockhart and made from walnut by Jason Lowe.

There are quiet, delicately planted courtyards, floors of oiled oak, tactile walls and lofty ceilings of beautifully pale, sustainably harvested totara.

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The client requested a room for yoga and meditation, which opens off the hallway but is normally concealed behind a hidden door. The room looks across a courtyard and through the kitchen and dining area to the harbour. The walls are lined in bandsawn sustainably harvested totara. The vase is by Estelle Martin. The shoe cabinet was designed by Katie Lockhart and is made from walnut.

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Top left Light from a skylight spills down a bathroom wall. Top right The home’s narrow site meant side windows would have looked straight at the neighbours, so the architects deployed skylights by Vantage to bring light deep into the home. The roof and side walls are clad in cedar shingles, a reference to shingled details on the bungalows in the area. Above left The yoga and meditation room looks onto one of the courtyards. Above right The main bathroom features hexagonal tiles and a long granite sink atop a custom totara cabinet. Right The home opens onto a lawn that faces the Waitemata Harbour.

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The owner kept things simple by making just one request: to encapsulate the feeling of a sanctuary in built form. So they set about creating “a soulful house and a spiritual house”.

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Right Two chairs by Katie Lockhart on the terrace overlooking the harbour. Middle The stairs leading to the home’s first floor. Far right The home’s street elevation.

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DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with Nicholas Stevens and Gary Lawson of Stevens Lawson Architects

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What were you asked to create here? Nicholas Stevens It wasn’t super prescriptive. He wanted a soulful house and a spiritual house. How we developed that he was very open about. And how did you go about doing that? NS One way is to get some height and volume into the room. The eye is drawn up, it’s uplifting. The creation of the courtyards gave a sense of contemplation, and they bring nature into the house as well as light at all times of the day. Everything is a bit earthy and textured. It’s not slick. Gary Lawson The other thing that was important was to have a strategy of a big weighty concrete spine with a simple gable hanging off it. It harmonises with the older buildings in the area. Then it became about how to do the concrete in a really beautiful way, so we had it sandblasted to age it. The gable form is cut and pulled apart to reveal the courtyards. We also focused on bringing in light in interesting ways with the sky lights.

You’ve been working on a huge variety of projects, from public architecture to multi-unit housing to highly crafted homes like this. Are you enjoying this? NS It’s wonderful working with these highly crafted houses where you can practice an art form to a high level. And we’re really committed to the multi-unit housing projects as part of bringing good design to higher-density living in Auckland. With the multi-unit housing projects you’re designing a neighbourhood. That’s a very satisfying thing to do. GL The breadth of work is great. The lessons from doing neighbourhoods and homes like this and public buildings all inform one another: Working at a bigger scale and having more consideration for the urban environment, on one hand, as well as trying to bring a high level of design and thinking to the planning of homes like this. What’s most satisfying about this home? GL I’m getting such a kick out of how thrilled [the owner] is with the house. It has affected him in amazing and beautiful ways, and that’s so satisfying. Architecture can uplift the spirit and satisfy the soul, and in this house it’s been the case.


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What are the colours offered in the Corian range? We have four different collections within the overall New Zealand Corian range. These are Solid Whites, Essentials (affordable and neutral contemporary patterns), Design Collection and Organics (the most premium collection, where each sheet is unique). What are the latest trends in kitchen surfaces? Apart from quality, which is always in style, white is consistently popular. Your kitchen benchtop should have either a striking design or some texture within the white to ensure it doesn’t look sterile. Both Venaro White and Cirrus White from the Corian Organics collection deliver this extra interest via sophisticated veining and layering. Otherwise, colours are deepening in intensity and becoming more moody. We are seeing a surge of interest in Corian Lava Rock – a deep, warm grey base with umber and golden veining. Our new DUO sinks are made with formed Corian sides and a high-quality stainless-steel base. These come in eight colours and are proving extremely popular as they combine stunning aesthetics with great functionality. Above left Kitchen benchtops in Corian® Lava Rock and Corian® Designer White by Minosa. Top right Corian® Glacier White kitchen benchtop by Morgan Cronin. Above Custom-designed bathroom vanity, basin and door fronts in Corian® Designer White by Celia Visser.


Finalist 2016 HOME OF THE YEAR

After a gruelling 10-year resource consent journey, a contemporary villa tribute by Anthony Hoete settles carefully into its Auckland neighbourhood.

TE X T

— Henry Oliver

P H OTO G R AP H Y

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— Patrick Reynolds


While the home’s monochromatic mass appears to stand in contrast to its surroundings, its intention is to build on the character of the neighbourhood, rather than diminish it. A closer look reveals an inventive reinterpretation of the classic villa elements, with its weatherboards, bay window, pitched roof and central access.

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The home’s dark exterior opens up from the street to a light, open and minimalist interior. Amy Oding walks up the stairs to the upper level. The main entry is visible at the bottom of the stairs.

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Auckland is changing. The city is growing at an ever-increasing rate in both population and geography. And with the number of people wanting to live near the city centre far outnumbering the places for them to live, what was recently a hot property market is quickly turning into a housing crisis. And over the last decade or so, two opposing forces have been gaining strength: those who want to modernise Auckland’s approach to housing with a smart combination of design, density and integration with the past; and those who see the modernisation of certain pockets of Auckland as a threat to both their property values and the very essence of their city. The council’s way of dealing with these forces to date is through a strictly regulated zoning system, where certain streets are deemed more historic or important than others. That means buildings on those streets have to meet strict guidelines, and that new or renovated houses must fit the street’s character and heritage. In theory, zoning ensures that neighbourhoods aren’t radically altered by development. In practice, it often produces an over-abundance of lazy interpretations of the traditional villa, with updated materials but little of the charm. Swimming against this tide is the Villameter, a brand-new villa in Ponsonby by Anthony Hoete, a longlost New Zealand expat and director of London-based WHAT_Architecture. On first sight, Villameter stands in contrast to its surroundings – a monochromatic modernist mass that folds both towards and away from the street. Its intricate, irregular weatherboards and flush windows possess a perfectionism that makes the house look as if it has been Photoshopped onto its plot. But, on closer inspection, the house is an inventive reinterpretation of the villa, taking its essential elements – the weatherboards, the bay windows, a pitched roof, central access – and folding them into a new form. The dark, recessive exterior conceals a light and open minimalism inside. It is lean and angular, clean and disciplined. There are four bedrooms, three bathrooms, and what seems like acres of concealed storage, with only a select few items in sight. It’s one thing to exercise perfectionism in a rectangular box, but quite another in the origami-like structure of Villameter – the villa where every aspect, Hoete says, had to be designed to the millimetre. It’s a family home, but for a family that, according to Hoete, “lives in a very uncluttered, very modern way”. At 145 square metres including the garage, it’s also compact. Hoete met co-owner Michael Pervan at university in the late 1980s. The two had long intended to make a house together, so when Pervan and his wife, Amy Oding, bought this property with its original rotting villa, they knew they’d ask Hoete to turn it into their family home. “He’s done things like Lego-fronted school buildings in the UK, and his architecture’s always been reasonably radical,” says Pervan. “So we just knew we’d get something that would push us and would hopefully push him, too.” When they started, no-one knew that trying to build a “reasonably radical” home on a character-zoned street

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would take nearly a decade. The house needed to be a ‘villa’ as defined by design guidelines, which vaguely set out requirements in form, massing, materiality and scale to match the character of the street. Over the years, Hoete went through several iterations of the design, refining the house to its present form. “By embracing the constraints and the rules and regulations, it actually improved the design,” he says. “It’s all about finding opportunities in the constraints, finding margins.” For Hoete, who recently completed a doctorate in practice-based research, it was an opportunity to study the Ponsonby villa and how it had evolved over more than a century. “I liked this thing that I kept seeing – people just adding to them out the back, ad hoc. So we wanted a similar ad-hoc elevation,” he says, referring to the big open-plan living area out the back of the house, which is a riff on many classic villa renovations. “The traditional villa has a central plan, so we had a central plan,” says Hoete. “It’s got to have a bay window, so there’s a bay window. It was pretty prosaic. I was at architecture school reading about deconstruction and French philosophy, and [it was great] to go back and go – bay window, central plan, asymmetrical gable – just break it all down to really simple language.” For Hoete, if it had to be weatherboarded to be a villa, he wanted it to be “New Zealand’s first entirely weatherboard house, including the roof”. To waterproof an entirely weatherboard house, they built a timber frame inside a plywood box, wrapped it in a rubber membrane and an air cavity, and then fixed weatherboards on top. After years of tweaks and negotiations, Villameter was still rejected by the council. Thinking that they had done everything they could to meet requirements, Oding and Pervan took their case to a public hearing. “We knew that we had tick-boxed everything in their guidelines,” says Pervan. “So they couldn’t get us on that, but they just knew it was a radical piece of design. So we took it to public hearing and the commissioners just couldn’t reject it because they knew that it met the intent of the guidelines.” They proved to the panel that Villameter was a villa that not only worked with, but complemented and updated the street’s heritage. By modernising the villa, it didn’t ruin the character of the neighbourhood, but built on it rather than merely replicating it. “Heritage is about living,” says Hoete. “We don’t cryogenically freeze buildings, we have to make them also purposeful for the emerging conditions.” While the compliance process challenged Hoete to design a better house than he may have initially, there aren’t many homeowners like Oding and Pervan who not only have the resources but the patience to spend years fighting to build an architecturally innovative home. “If you want a city with sustainable heritage, then architects have to provide legible planning ammunition that demonstrates the presence of the old with the new,” says Pervan.


Above The open-plan living area at the back of the home is a riff on the classic villa renovation. A ‘Twiggy’ floor lamp by Marc Sadler for Foscarini stands in the corner of the living area. ‘Hal’ chairs by Jasper Morrison for Vitra from Matisse sit at the ‘Soul’ table by Nonn from Simon James. Behind the table is a ‘Ray’ sofa by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia from Matisse.

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“Heritage is about living. We don’t cryogenically freeze buildings, we have to make them also purposeful for the emerging conditions.”

Top The main bedroom is modest in size but generous in its engagement with the outdoors. Above left Much like a villa, the central hallway leads from the front door. Above right Decking extends into the grassy backyard and leads to the veggie patch. Right Michael and Benjamin Pervan sit at the dining table. With a home that’s designed to the millimetre, and with acres of concealed storage, the family can live here in a “very uncluttered, very modern way”, says architect Anthony Hoete.

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The home’s living area opens completely to the small back lawn. In this photo, Benjamin Pervan plays at the edge of the grassy lawn.

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The origami-like structure of the Villameter’s exterior is expressed throughout the interior, making spaces such as the bathroom even more engaging.

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The home’s mass folds both towards and away from the street. Taking the villa interpretation further than initially intended, the house is wrapped completely in weatherboards, including the roof.

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Right Benjamin reaches for a toy in the bedroom. Far right A bathroom is located behind the wall in the guest bedroom.

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DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with WHAT_Architecture director Anthony Hoete

A lot of architects hate villas. What do you think of them? I think they hate villas because of the apparent threat to suppressing creative freedom. Working with an existing villa means considering something old and present. It becomes a ‘heritage refurbishment’, whereas architects universally prefer the clean slate of a new build. What effect did the consent and hearing processes have on your ability to design the house you wanted? The house that eventually got built is much better than the house we started with. The distillation period allowed us to really understand the context and prioritise the design goals: to legitimately try to embrace the legacy of the villa, but at the same time develop the villa in relation to emergent issues: accommodating the car, the great Kiwi backyard, open living space – which the historic villa was not designed to do. Normally, architects aren’t really that contextual. We just do what we

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First floor 4. Garden 5 Deck 6. Living 7. Kitchen 8. Bedroom 9. Bathroom 10. Ensuite 11. Main bedroom 12. Laundry 13. Wardrobe

like and then wrap it up in a nice qualifying argument. In this case, we really were presenting a contemporary interpretation of the traditional villa. There is complex geometry in the house. What was the rationale behind this? The geometry might look purposefully complex but it’s actually simple. The house has two faces: traditional and closed to the street, modern and open to the garden. That geometry merely connects the traditional gabled face to the modern box face. I think the builder’s job was made easier because we (client and architect) resolved to have all the construction information ready prior to the contractor starting on site. There was little information issued after the start date. The more complex weatherboard junctions were also resolved by 1:2 scale models in our office here in Shoreditch. Also, the more the design information is resolved prior to start, the greater the cost certainty as the contractor has little to no variations.


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Finalist 2016 HOME OF THE YEAR

WINNER BEST MULTI-UNIT RESIDENTIAL 2016

Intricate, intimate and bold, a new Wellington apartment development by Parsonson Architects shows how high-density living can enhance a historic neighbourhood.

TE X T

— Jeremy Hansen

P H OTO G R AP H Y

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— Jeff Brass


Despite ensuring plans complied with council regulations, the consent process was “a bastard,� according to architect Gerald Parsonson. Public opposition to the building has diminished since the development was completed.

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Left Architect Gerald Parsonson playfully referenced the rooines of heritage homes in the area, as well as multi-unit work by Sir Ian AthďŹ eld and Roger Walker. Above Finished to a high standard, the owners developed the apartments to rent out rather than sell. The kitchen cabinetry in every unit is bamboo, while the appliances are by Fisher & Paykel.

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Each apartment in the complex has a different layout. The tenants in the space above moved here from a traditional 320-square-metre house, and love the 96-square-metre apartment for its natural light, spaciousness and the way the windows capture views of the hills as well as the activity of the street below. A ‘Mite’ lamp by Marc Sadler for Foscarini stands in the corner of the living room.

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It started as a tribute. In the late 1930s, George and Eleftheria Zavos immigrated to New Zealand from Greece and moved into a villa on a prominent site in the Wellington suburb of Mount Victoria. The home became a hub of the Greek community, and the couple lived there for decades: Eleftheria remained there after George’s death until she passed away in 2010, just shy of her 100th birthday. The property then passed into the ownership of George and Eleftheria’s only child, Vafilika Argus (known to friends and family as Koula) and her husband Angelos. By this time, the villa had been subsumed by a series of haphazard modifications that had all but obliterated its character. But Koula and Angelos were determined to keep the property in family ownership, and create something there that might honour George and Eleftheria’s memory. Angelos and Koula are property owners and occasional developers who divide their time between Wellington and Sydney. Architect Gerald Parsonson had once rented an office from them in Courtenay Place, which had led to them hiring him to design the Mitika apartment building in Oriental Bay, where Angelos and Koula live and which won a New Zealand Institute of Architects’ Regional Award in 2005. Almost a decade later in Mount Victoria, they asked Parsonson (who worked on the project with his colleague Craig Burt) if he could come up with a multi-unit proposition for the site, but his initial suggestion of a row of two-storey townhouses that wrapped around the corner fell flat. “Angelos hated it,” Parsonson says. “It was standard and mundane and really predictable.” So the architect went back to the drawing board to hatch a more ambitious plan. The Zavos Corner Apartments, as they’re known, have elegantly slotted 16 bedrooms onto a site that formerly held a single villa. The eight apartments range in size from one to three bedrooms and are placed in a Rubik’s Cube-like way around a courtyard. The majority are on a single level; each has a different floor plan, with small decks at each end of the living spaces bringing natural light and offering neighbourhood views (the ground-floor apartments have small fenced patios). The building’s cutout roof forms playfully riff on the rhythm of the neighbourhood’s heritage homes and are wrapped in corrugated steel, another nod to the older dwellings in the street. We know many of our cities need to accommodate more people, but doing this while keeping their existing residents happy can seem an impossible task. Part of the problem is that so many people believe higher-density buildings will destroy a neighbourhood’s character. Mount Victoria – an affluent suburb full of heritage homes and a fiercely protective residents’ association – is no exception. Parsonson worked hard to ensure the apartments complied with regulations: they met site coverage restrictions, didn’t break recession planes and shade the neighbours, and ticked every box in the city council’s multi-unit housing design guide. Despite this, “it was a bastard of a consent to go through,” he says. “People say, ‘not

in my backyard, mate’ and you can see why, but if [a new building] is done well, it’s different.” The irony of this opposition is that Mount Victoria’s character is partly the result of its loosely regulated origins, where homes were jammed cheek-by-jowl against one another in an almost haphazard way. And while the suburb is best known for its heritage homes, it contains a variety of homes from every era. Parsonson, who lives in the suburb, used this fact to his advantage during the consent process, pointing to medium-density buildings in the neighbourhood including a bunch of modernist concrete apartment blocks (there’s one right next door to the Zavos Corner Apartments), and some multi-unit work by Sir Ian Athfield and Roger Walker. The Zavos Corner building is actually two almost-separate structures – one that wraps around the corner containing six apartments, a smaller segment containing two additional apartments. These elements are separated by a gap allowing access to the courtyard, and connected by a “bridge” that is actually a deck for one of the apartments. Car parking is concealed in an underground garage. The corner features a digital clock at its apex, a whimsical addition that Parsonson included as a sort of civic gesture. Angelos initially balked at the expense of designing and installing it, but Koula persuaded him to go with it, and now he likes how passersby will look up to see the time or the temperature. The apartments are being rented to tenants by Angelos and Koula, who have no plans to sell them. They are undeniably finished to a high standard and, this, combined with the fact that the apartments were created to honour George and Eleftheria’s memory, has led some people to presume that the building is a money-losing enterprise. Angelos says emphatically that this isn’t the case. “Economically, it’s a viable project,” he says. “It’s true that if [I was] looking for something which gave me a bigger return we could have cut corners to reduce the cost. But we are not in that situation. We want to make sure that whatever we develop is an improvement to Wellington City.” Opposition to the apartments seems to have mostly faded away; council planners have even invited Parsonson to a multi-unit housing talkfest. “Hopefully they’re starting to embrace this sort of thing,” Parsonson says. But Ellen Blake of the Mount Victoria Residents’ Association said via email that she still believes “this development doesn’t blend in with the early 1900s character of the area at all. A well-loved mural and a public seat was lost when this was built.” The Home of the Year jury begs to differ: In our collective opinion, this project shows how density can be designed well in a character area. It’s a tribute to George and Eleftheria Zavos that we hope will have an influence far outside its neighbourhood. “We wanted to put something on the site that we can actually be proud of,” Angelos says. We think, with the help of Parsonson Architects, he and Koula have done just that.

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The Zavos Corner Apartments have elegantly slotted 16 bedrooms onto a site that was once home to a single villa. The aluminium joinery is APL’s Metro Series. The apartments were built by Field and Hall.

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Top This apartment is located on the second oor under the clock tower. The ceilings follow the pitch of the rooftop. The open-plan kitchen and living area lead to a patio. A painting by Tracy Croucher from Bowen Galleries hangs on the wall in the living area. Above Cutout roof forms are clad in corrugated steel, a nod to older dwellings in the street. Right The whimsical addition of a clock is seen as a civic gesture to the neighbourhood.

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Ground floor

DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with Gerald Parsonson of Parsonson Architects The apartments are in a neighbourhood with tough design guidelines. How did the process go? It was a bastard. Because we were knocking over a pre-1935 building, the council had the option to put us through the hoops on absolutely everything. It was expensive in terms of architects, lawyers and council costs. We were pushing for a nonnotified consent because the new building complied in every way – it was under coverage, under envelope, it satisfied the multi-unit housing design guide. The Mount Victoria Residents’ Association was consulted and they said they couldn’t support the demolition of the existing house or the new building. How did you decide what the building would look like? Quite quickly we came to this idea of abstracted frames that would contain the verandahs and decks and, in some cases, made them larger so they contained the windows of the apartment below. It almost confuses what were stratified apartments and gives them vertical presence – it’s interweaving two dwellings together instead of identifying them as one. Angelos wanted single-level apartments, so the building is a hybrid that may look like townhouses or apartments. This approach breaks the building down into smaller elements, and we were pleased this created a reference to roofscapes by Athfield and Walker, who have been busy in Mt Vic in the past. Inside, we tried to create something that was really liveable but dense. We worked hard to make sure the spaces felt open and generous but with privacy between dwellings. Now that it’s complete, what has been the reaction to the building? The opposite of what it was beforehand. Hopefully [the council] is embracing that sort of thing. I think it’s the way of the future. It’s how you create denser, sustainable cities that don’t have transport issues. Otherwise we’ll just keep building more suburbia, more motorways, more spread.

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First floor

Second floor


Holland Dance Festival, Feb 2016

estival F e c n a D presenftrsom the Holland direct

“…a tour de force of dance, music and light”. DANZ Magazine

BOOK NOW nzdc.org.nz/lumina-tour

Inncludinng a co-pproduction withh Hollaand Dance Festival

Chhoreeograppherrs: Maliia Joh hnssto on (W Worrld off Wearable Arts Stage Diire ecto or and d Prin nciipa al Cho ore eographer 2002-2014) Lo ouiise e Po otiki--Brrya antt (W Win nne er of the Arts Foundation Ha arrriett Frried dla and derr Resside enccy 2014) Sttep phe en Sh hro opsshirre (USA A/H Holland)

Perfoormance Datees: WHANGAREI

Wed 4 May

MAHURANGI

Fri 6 May

NAPIE ER

Sun 15 May

WELLIN NGTON

Sat 21 May

Coompposeerss: Pa add dy Frree e (P Pitcch Bla ack k) Ch hriis O’C Con nno or (Th he Ph hoe enix Foundation) Ed den n Mulho ollan nd (Winn nerr of Best Music, Tempo Da ance Fe estiiva al)

NEW PLYMOUTH Fri 27 May

photo: John McDermott Core Funder

Sustaining Partner

Major Partners

CONNECCT WITH US /nzdanceco

www w.nzdc .o org.nz


Finalist 2016 HOME OF THE YEAR

WINNER BEST SMALL HOME 2016

Deftly reinterpreting tight design constraints, a compact new Queenstown home by Anna-Marie Chin brings contemporary smarts to a gorgeous mountain setting.

TE X T

— Simon Farrell-Green

P H OTO G R AP H Y

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— David Straight


Design guidelines at the Jack’s Point development specify each home should have a gabled roof, which architect Anna-Marie Chin tweaked to create a strong modern form.

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Chin conceived a beautifully composed black-steel-clad box, which might be small at 150 square metres (including garage), but conďŹ dently asserts itself within the expansive landscape. The view north takes in Coronet Peak.

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Queenstown has that lake and those spectacular mountains and a climate that ranges from bone-chillingly cold to thrillingly hot. But any building has to deal not only with these superlatives, but with more prosaic concerns. In the case of this house by Anna-Marie Chin in the subdivision of Jack’s Point, a development around a golf course on the edge of Lake Wakatipu, the architect had to contend with a suburban context (albeit a very attractive one), unbuilt neighbouring houses and a strict set of design guidelines prescribing a gable roof and a limited material palette that included cedar, schist and copper. The upside? Spectacular views down the lake in one direction and up at the Remarkables in the other, and a client enthusiastic about twisting the rules. Tom Aveling is a young skipper of superyachts who spends the majority of the year overseas. On visits home, it was to the delights of Queenstown and Central Otago that he returned to time and time again, and so it was here he started looking for a New Zealand base. It needed to be compact and easy to look after, and hard-wearing since he planned to rent it out and loan it to friends while he wasn’t using it – in fact, you can now rent it on Airbnb. He had never considered building until he found this site and fell in love with the view. The development’s design constraints didn’t scare him. “At Jack’s Point everything is a little bit the same, but I just wanted something completely different,” he says. The site slopes gently down towards the north before falling away to a steep bank and a reserve at the bottom. There will never be another house in front but it is exposed to the prevailing westerly, and will eventually have neighbours close by on two sides. In response, Chin conceived a compact black box punctuated with carefully placed windows. She designed the obligatory gable roof, but instead of running down the middle of the building in the classic barn shape, she tweaked it so that it runs from one corner to the other, and then tipped it at one end so it follows the slope of the site, which gave her enough height to allow two storeys throughout much of the building. Chin and her team clad the house in black steel – the roof appears to run down and over the sides to wrap the entire home in its dark embrace. It is carefully and beautifully composed, with the ridges meeting seamlessly, something that’s almost impossible to achieve given all the angles. A black steel chimney rises from one corner of the house, almost like a prow, lending a sense of height and strength and adding a focal point, though it ruffled a few feathers during construction. It supports itself on its own foundation, and was lowered in by crane before the rest of the house had even begun and could be seen all over the development; perhaps it made some residents think a small factory was being built. “People either love it,” says Chin, “or they hate it. But Tom really wanted it.”

Under the roof, the house is split in two – garage and loft bedroom at street level, with the rest of the house half a level down (the house measures 150 square metres in total, including the garage). At the northern end, there’s an open-plan kitchen and living room opening to two decks that tuck in under the roof line for shelter: you are at once in the elements and protected from them. The living room is open and lofty, while the bedrooms – three, in all, with two bathrooms – are compact and cosy, tucked in under the planes of the roof. In between the two levels, there’s a light-flooded, airy staircase over which a black metal gantry and ladder gives access to the loft. Those angles are ever-present – coming down on one corner over your head in the living room, for instance, or down to the floor in the master bedroom on one corner, swooping up in the other. It’s an effect that feels like a contemporary cabin, partly thanks to the grain of its plywood lining. “Your experience inside actually has a relationship to how you experience the surroundings,” says Chin. “The thing about Jack’s Point is that it’s a big environment. Against the Remarkables, you just feel little – so that whole sense of scale is really important.” Although it isn’t large, the house has sufficient strength in its form to stand resolutely in this large landscape. Aveling and Chin agreed that the house should have interesting spaces but that they didn’t need to be large. “Tom’s very used to small spaces because he lives in them,” says Chin. “So it wasn’t about the size of the space, it was the quality of the space – and he wanted spaces that were kind of quirky as well.” Everything does double or triple duty: the kitchen bench carries on and turns into a sideboard with a window seat and loads of storage; the dining nook is modelled on the crew mess of a superyacht and takes up barely a few metres but seats six, and a loft above it is reached by a long wooden ladder. The house sleeps eight to 10 comfortably, which was crucial for rental. The plywood interior is warm, even luminescent. “It’s extremely functional,” says Aveling. “The concrete can get scraped and the ply can get knocked and it wears well. I liked the idea of having a shell and a softer interior and I just thought it looked welcoming and warm.” It is beautifully articulated with black negative detail between the sheets. Walls merge into cabinetry, and then cabinetry merges into doors – a masterful effort by builder Tony Stratford of Multiline Construction, who worked out the pattern on site. “You get more of a sense of it being cabinetry,” says Chin, “rather than a traditional house with architraves and doors. And that’s really what he was not interested in.” Now, on Aveling’s irregular visits home, he delights in a house that – perhaps not surprisingly – is renting very nicely while he’s away. “If you look back at it from the lake it fits in with everything else,” he says. “From different angles it looks like a big house, and that’s the illusion of all the twists. It’s neat.”

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Left The open-plan kitchen and living space reside at the northern end of the home. Tyler and Noah Smith from next door peek out from the loft through a sliding panel built by Steve’s Joinery of Queenstown, who made all the doors and cabinetry. In the foreground, Plumen lights hang above the kitchen island. Below A medley of Tom Dixon pendants hang from the ply-clad living room ceiling. A ‘Coromandel’ chair by Ico Traders faces the ‘Karsha’ sofa from Hunter Furniture. The joinery is APL Metro Series Thermal Heart.

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Left The main bathroom offers a view towards Lake Wakatipu from the tub. Below left The bedside tables are stools by Timothy John. Right Chin and owner Tom Aveling wanted to create interesting spaces. The dining nook is modelled on the crew mess of a superyacht and sits six people. Aveling designed the dining table, which was made by Arrowtown Engineering. Below the ‘Napier’ wall light by Astro Lighting from ECC is ‘Never Never’ by Ruben Ireland. In the kitchen, the ‘Phoenix’ stools are by Cintesi.

“Tom’s very used to small spaces because he lives in them. So it wasn’t about the size of the space, it was the quality of the space – and he wanted spaces that were kind of quirky as well.”

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Left The dipping roof creates visual interest both inside and outside the home. Noah and Tyler sit on the deck, which is sheltered by the extended roof line. Right The chimney was lowered into place by crane and its presence caused a few ruffled feathers. “People either love it or they hate it,” says Chin. Below right Strategically placed windows ensure privacy and screen out views of neighbouring homes.

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The ladder in the kitchen accesses the loft. The artwork at the end of the hall is ‘The Island’ by Dylan Silva and Georgiana Paraschiv. Middle There was enough room in the petite bathroom to include a bath. Far right Tom designed the gantry, which was made by Arrowtown Engineering, where Tyler and Noah stand.

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Ground floor 1. Deck 2. Living 3. Kitchen 4. Paving 5. Dining 6. Bathroom 7. WC 8. Bedroom 9. Entry 10. Garage 11. Entry stairs

First floor 12. Storage 13. Main bedroom 14. Ensuite 15. Study 16. Void

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DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with architect Anna-Marie Chin

14

The design rules at Jack’s Point are pretty tight. How did you get this through? The intention of the rules is that the houses relate to their site, the landscape and context. There are rules which are set so that people have parameters to work with. But you can test them if there’s another way of doing things and it fits within the process. Also, when we started there were no other houses in the street. Some of the spaces are small, but it never feels mean. How did you know it would work? We thought a lot about that – it’s all very well doing plans on the computer. While you get more of a sense of things when you draw – we do a lot of that physically – we do measurements of walls and try to get a sense of what that might feel like. You do get challenged by people.

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It seems glib to talk about boats – and yet it is reminiscent of one. We did think about how they create storage on boats – it’s really clever. They have small little spaces and dining spaces and they’re really successful. We’ve always been interested in small spaces and how you make a multi-purpose room – even in big houses.


The Baking & Making issue On sale now!


Acclaimed Seattle-based architect Tom Kundig was the international member of our 2016 Home of the Year jury. Here, he discusses the judging journey.

INTERVIEW

JEREMY HANSEN Let’s

— Jeremy Hansen

start with the winning house by Herbst Architects. What made it stand out from this strong field of contenders? TOM KUNDIG Well firstly, I was nervous about choosing it as the winner, because I was worried everyone would think we’d selected it for its use of rusticated materials like I’ve favoured in some of my projects. So I want to assure everyone that we examined the building extra carefully because of this! It is really a fantastic house on all levels. It’s a very simple house that sits correctly in the landscape. It stands on its site in this diminutive but emphatic way, and makes a statement without being large or flamboyantly geometric. It makes its appearance as you peek around curves or see it through trees. That’s really important for the way the building is experienced by people. The move of putting the box clad in rusty recycled iron on top was fascinating. That’s a move that would not be intuitive starting out on the project, but in fact it strengthens the experience of the valley. It takes away the view from the private part of the house and opens it at the public part of the house, so it’s a very interesting dialogue between public and private. Upstairs from the bedrooms there are very small, discreet, private vignette views down to the valley, then you come down to the main level and it opens up, and the space doesn’t let you down at all. Being in the living space under that high ceiling is fascinating because it opens up the view horizontally down the valley, and there’s a power in that gesture that would be lost if that upper volume was punctuated with high windows. The clients were really involved in the project – they went out and harvested some of the recycled materials, which adds energy and spirit. Buildings like this don’t happen without that sort of commitment. The architects responded with a design that was totally appropriate for these clients. The fit and finish was very much in the spirit of the homeowners – it really felt appropriate to this area of farms, but in a modern language. It felt comfortable inside and out. The clients are only just beginning to experience the house but it’s already an important part of their lives, and it might even change their lives because it’s so consistent with what they imagined their lifestyle would be – planting trees, raising animals, working their dogs, organising work projects from home. That’s important because it means the architecture works at a very human level, which is ultimately what residential architecture is about, and it does it in a very artistic way on all levels.

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JH Let’s talk about the finalists, a really diverse bunch. The first house we visited was by Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell, their family home in a light-industrial part of Auckland. TK I knew that this was going to be a good project to visit and I was not disappointed at all. I think it works on so many levels that are important to the future of architecture, which is to find those forgotten places that are relatively close to the CBD that people don’t consider residential neighbourhoods and densify the city. At a social level, I thought the building was terrific. There was a very skilled flow which is always important to a residential project. How does a family use this place, and do they flow through the building? How does the floor plan work between the public realm of the street and the private realm of the garden? At a conceptual level, it was very strong. Volumetric proportions were very skilfully done, the management of openness and privacy as you went through the building. All in all, I thought it was a terrific project. JH The home designed by Stevens Lawson Architects isn’t nearly as urban, but it’s still constrained by a very narrow site. What did you respond to most strongly in this house? TK This was a very interesting project. It reminded me of the Eel Houses of Kyoto – a series of buildings stretched down a long and narrow property, defining inner courtyards and light wells as you proceed from the street to the private garden. It was skilfully done, beautifully manipulated, a house you could imagine living in as a single person or as a couple or a family. It was very peaceful, very meditative, and I thought it worked on all levels. A very successful project.

The Villameter by Anthony Hoete also faced different constraints – heritage restrictions and vociferous opposition. TK I loved this house. We didn’t meet the architect, but we met the clients, and I could immediately recognise that this was an architect that listened to his clients. And it was a difficult project for them, a difficult bureaucratic process, so I have some deep sympathy. I thought the architect delivered a building in the spirit of the neighbourhood, and the perseverance and strength of the clients to get it built is worth noting. I felt it was a terrific example of how clients can influence the architecture and how an architect can sympathetically design a building to that influence. JH


Top row, from left Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell’s home; a home by AnnaMarie Chin; the winning home by Herbst Architects. Middle row, from left A home by Stevens Lawson; the Villameter by Anthony Hoete; inside Zavos Corner Apartments. Bottom row, from let HOME editor Jeremy Hansen (far left) with jury members Tom Kundig and Stuart Gardyne; Tom in the winning house.

In Wellington, we visited the Zavos Corner Apartments, a multi-unit project by Parsonson Architects. TK I think this is an important project because it’s a multi-unit project in a town that’s filling in some of the less-dense areas with more density. I’m going to be supportive of any project which looks at densifying an area, but doing so in a sensitive way is particularly difficult in a historic neighbourhood. Those are the issues we’re all looking at – how do you change the density of a beloved neighbourhood for a current sort of population condition? There’s no way we can ignore it. The only place for the city to grow would be out, and I think that’s in the wrong direction. So we explore the idea of densifying a neighbourhood in a way that’s sensitive to the existing fabric. I think this project explores that idea, tests that idea and does it in a way that’s not just a series of row houses. Instead, what we have here is more of a Rubik’s Cube where the rooms not only shape an interior courtyard but they shape it in a way that develops a different floor plan for every unit. That’s difficult to do architecturally, but it makes it really interesting for JH

the residents. Each of their apartments is different from their neighbours’, but they can still feel part of a little community of apartment units. JH Then

we headed south to Queenstown, where we visited a house by Anna-Marie Chin. TK This was skilfully done. This is clearly an architect working at the top level. Not only was it a good response to the client’s brief – who in this case spends a lot of time on a boat and imagined the house as a very efficient boat-like layout – but it is a piece of architecture that unfolds effectively to the landscape. In a suburban subdivision, it skilfully shapes views without revealing the neighbours. A series of larger conceptual moves led to a series of smaller, more difficult relationships inside the building and they were all beautifully resolved: how you moved through the building, how you experienced the building, how you stayed in certain parts. For me it was a learning experience because I was able to see how successfully you could manipulate a variety of spaces in a geometry that responded to its environment in such a successful way.

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Surveying 21 years of our Home of the Year award

Winner Patrick Clifford and the Architectus team designed his Auckland home

Winner Twin townhouses in Grey Lynn, Auckland, by Felicity Wallace

Winner A Bay of Islands holiday retreat by Pete Bossley of Bossley Architects

Winner Gerrad Hall designed his own home in Ponsonby, Auckland

Finalists — A Waiheke Island house by Malcolm Taylor and Pete Bossley of Jasmax — A Northland bach by Mardy Brown of Salmond Architects — An Auckland house designed by Pete Bossley — A Wellington renovation by Richard Middleton of Novak and Middleton Architects

Finalists — Patrick Clifford of Architectus designed this house in Te Horo — A beachfront home north of Auckland by Richard Dodd — A Wellington renovation by Chris Kelly of Architecture Workshop — A Wellington renovation by Tim Nees of New Work Studio — Graham Allen’s Lyttelton house

Finalists — An Auckland home by Steve McCracken of Warren and Mahoney — The Wellington home of Tim Nees from New Work Studio — A house in Wellington by Stuart Gardyne of Architecture + — Marshall Cook designed this house in Freemans Bay, Auckland — Colin Pilbrow’s Akaroa house

Finalists — Barbara Webster renovated this Wellington house by Allan Wild — Jane Aimer of Scarlet Architects designed houses for her extended family in Auckland — An Auckland house by Amanda Hyde de Kretser — A Waiheke Island holiday house by Patrick Clifford of Architectus

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Winner A Northland house by Jeff Fearon and Tim Hay of Fearon Hay Architects

Winner Gerald Parsonson of Parsonson Architects’ own Kapiti Coast retreat

Winner A Remuera, Auckland, home by Stevens Lawson Architects

Winner Ken Crosson of Crosson Clarke Carnachan’s Coromandel holiday home

Finalists — A Lake Tarawera house by Fred Stevens of Architecture Aotearoa — An Auckland house designed by Marshall Cook — A Wairarapa bach by Stuart Gardyne of Architecture + — The ‘Music Box’ in Wellington by Gerald Melling and Allan Morse of Melling Morse Architects

Finalists — The Christchurch home of David Hill of Wilson & Hill — A house in Horowhenua by Ken Davis of Custance Associates — Nicholas Stevens designed this house in inner-city Auckland — A house in the Bay of Plenty designed by Jack Manning

Finalists — A Peka Peka bach by Christopher Kelly of Architecture Workshop — Andrew Lister designed this Auckland house — A Christchurch house by Thom Craig — The ‘Sky Box’ in Wellington by Gerald Melling and Allan Morse of Melling Morse Architects

Finalists — Simon Carnachan’s own renovated home in Auckland — An Auckland house designed by Charles Allison — A house on a Tasman Bay headland by Hugh Tennent

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 161


Winner A Bay of Islands holiday retreat by Pete Bossley of Bossley Architects

Winner A house in the King Country by Mitchell and Stout Architects

Winner A Wellington house by Hugh Tennent of Tennent and Brown Architects

Winner An Auckland family home by Stevens Lawson Architects

Finalists — A Wairarapa house (with poetic wrap) by Stuart Gardyne of Architecture + — An Auckland house by Jeff Fearon and Tim Hay of Fearon Hay — The ‘Samurai’ house in Upper Hutt by Gerald Melling and Allan Morse of Melling Morse Architects — A Peka Peka bach by Gerald Parsonson

Finalists — A Waikato house by Nicholas Stevens and Gary Lawson of Stevens Lawson Architects — A Mangawhai Heads house by Dave Strachan of Strachan Group Architects — A Wanaka house by Paul Clarke of Crosson Clarke Carnachan — Artist Michael Shepherd’s Auckland home and studio by Stevens Lawson

Finalists — A house in Grey Lynn, Auckland, by Malcolm Walker — A Coromandel holiday house by Mitchell and Stout Architects — The Wedge in Wellington by Gerald Melling and Allan Morse of Melling Morse Architects — A Wellington house by Michael Melville and Adam Ellis

Finalists — A Wairarapa house by Christopher Kelly of Architecture Workshop — A home on Great Barrier Island by Lance and Nicola Herbst of Herbst Architects — A house in Westmere, Auckland, by Pete Bossley of Bossley Architects — A family home in Arrowtown by Max Wild

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Winner The ‘Signal Box’ house in Masterton by Melling Morse Architects

Winner A home on Waiheke Island by Mitchell and Stout Architects

Winner ‘Te Kaitaka’, a retreat on Lake Wanaka by Stevens Lawson Architects

Winner A home by Michael O’Sullivan of Bull O’Sullivan at Karekare, West Auckland

Finalists — Marshall Cook’s own home in Freemans Bay, Auckland — Twin houses in Auckland by Lindley Naismith, Jane Aimer and Mike Dowsett of Scarlet Architects — A Great Barrier home by Jeff Fearon and Tim Hay of Fearon Hay Architects — An Auckland home by Pete Bossley and Andrea Bell of Bossley Architects

Finalists — A Hawke’s Bay home by Nicholas Stevens and Gary Lawson of Stevens Lawson Architects — Michael O’Sullivan’s family home in Mangere Bridge, Auckland — A house in Glendowie, Auckland, by Andrea Bell of Bossley Architects — A Hawke’s Bay holiday home by Gerald Parsonson of Parsonson Architects

Finalists — David Mitchell and Julie Stout of Mitchell & Stout Architects’ own Auckland home — A Waiheke home by Daniel Marshall — An Arrowtown home by Kerr Ritchie Architects — An Auckland home by Stevens Lawson Architects — Another Waiheke Island home by Daniel Marshall

Finalists — Richard Naish of RTA Studio’s own Auckland home — An Awhitu Peninsula home by Marshall Cook of Cook, Sargisson and Pirie Architects — A family home in Remuera, Auckland, by Daniel Marshall — The ‘Garden Shed’ house in Wellington by Melling Morse Architects

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 163


Winner A holiday home at Piha by Lance and Nicola Herbst of Herbst Architects

Winner A Waiheke Island clifftop home by Stevens Lawson Architects

Winner Twin cabins on the Kaipara Harbour by Nat Cheshire of Cheshire Architects

Winner The E-Type House by Richard Naish of RTA Studio

Finalists — A home overlooking an estuary near Tauranga by Warren and Mahoney — The ‘Hut on Sleds’ by architect Ken Crosson on the Coromandel Peninsula — A home in Wellington’s Ohariu Valley by Alistair Luke — A Coromandel bach by Strachan Group Architects and Unitec’s Studio 19

Finalists — A Tasman Bay home by Tennent and Brown Architects — A renovation by Herriot + Melhuish of a mid-century home by Ernest Kalnins — A Whanganui home by Patch Work Architecture — The Auckland home of Jane Priest of Lochore Priest — A home near Wanaka by Glamuzina Paterson

Finalists — The Scrubby Bay house on Banks Peninsula by Pattersons — A holiday home at Whangarei Heads by Herbst Architects — Andrew Simpson of Wiredog Architecture’s own Wellington home — A Wanaka house by Lovell and O’Connell Architects — A clifftop home on Waiheke Island by Wendy Shacklock and Paul Clarke

Finalists — A Makorori Beach home by Jeremy Smith of Irving Smith Jack — A home in the heart of Waikato by Pattersons — The Rammed Earth House in Wanaka by Assembly Architects — A home in Epsom, Auckland, by Stevens Lawson Architects — The Titirangi Red House in west Auckland by Ken Crosson

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Which architects have designed the most winners and finalists?

How many of the winners and finalists are architects’ own homes?

Stevens Lawson Architects

Winner A Coromandel retreat by Lance and Nicola Herbst of Herbst Architects

21% Architects’ own homes

Bossley Architects

79% Designed for clients Melling Morse Architecture How well-represented are women architects among the winning and finalist projects?

Mitchell & Stout Architects

Fearon Hay Architects

12% Designed by male/ female partnerships

Parsonson Architects

8% Designed by women Architectus

80% Designed by men

Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects

How many of the winners and finalists are second/holiday homes as opposed to primary residences?

Tennent Brown Architects

Herbst Architects 30% Second homes 0

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Finalist

Where are the winners and finalists from the past 21 years located?

Northland 8 Great Barrier Island 2 Auckland 38 Waikato 2 Lake Tarawera 1 King Country 1

Waiheke Island 7 Coromandel 5 Tauranga 1 Bay of Plenty 1 Gisborne 1 Hawke’s Bay 2

Whanganui/Horowhenua 2 Kapiti Coast 4 Nelson/Tasman 2

Finalists — An Auckland home by Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell — The Zavos Corner Apartments in Wellington by Parsonson Architects — The Villameter, Auckland, by Anthony Hoete of WHAT_Architecture — An Auckland home by Stevens Lawson Architects — A home in Queenstown by AnnaMarie Chin

Wairarapa 4 Wellington 15

Christchurch 6

Central Otago 8

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 165


FORMING PARTNERSHIPS WITH ARCHITECTS TO PUSH THE BOUNDARIES OF DESIGN.

Support for innovation and excellence were the reasons Altherm Windows Systems chose to embark on its sponsorship of HOME magazine’s Home of the Year award six years ago. The brand has always had high visibility at the top end of New Zealand architecture. After Altherm’s launch more than 45 years ago it was increasingly specified on some of New Zealand’s finest homes, including a modernist gem: the iconic Brake house in Titirangi, which was designed by Ron Sang in 1976. Altherm’s inclusion in the Brake house – arguably the most examined house in modern New Zealand architecture – saw its use in tall, floorto-ceiling window and door treatments. Sang created a series of pavilions lifted out of the native bush in a unique expression of a modern New Zealand home that sits elegantly in native forest. Altherm’s early commitment to a toolbox that allowed designers to express architectural creativity in an ambitious way has seen the company’s products included in significant works of architecture ever since, including in many winners and finalists in the Home of the Year award. The frequency of homes containing Altherm products in the annual award shortlist persuaded the brand to become the competition sponsor in 2011 and formalise its association. In this role, it also sponsors the visits of international members of the Home of the Year jury. Most years the visitors have been prominent overseas architects who have spoken at wellattended lectures in Auckland and other centres. This year, noted American architect Tom Kundig participated in the awards. His designs for residential projects in the vast rural spaces of the

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American Northwest have attracted an international following, and blend innovation with a strong sense of respect for location and environment. His talk in Queenstown to a capacity audience resonated with the attendees, whose raw Central Otago landscape bears a strong resemblance to Kundig’s cold-climate, big-sky locations. Other international guest jury members who have been sponsored by Altherm over the years have included British Stirling Prize-winner Amanda Levete, Philadelphia-based architect James Timberlake, and Cathleen McGuigan, editor-in-chief of Architectural Record, America’s leading architecture publication. The Altherm range has expanded dramatically in the decades since the company was founded, always keeping pace with designer demands for products that enhance scale, special features, weathertightness and energy efficiency. It is significant that this year marks the 21st anniversary of the Home of the Year Award, as the inaugural year of 1995 also marked an important stage in the evolution of Altherm. In April of that year the brand was acquired by APL Window Solutions, New Zealand’s largest window systems company. APL’s extensive technical, product development and marketing resources were aligned behind the Altherm network and led to a steady expansion in its capabilities and popularity. A steady release of high-performance products enlarged the product palette to which the designers had access. This easing of constraints, and the design of smart new features, have enabled architects to head off in bold design directions. Visit altherm.co.nz for information.


ADVERTISING PROMOTION / HOME + ALTHERM WINDOW SYSTEMS

Left Ron Sang’s iconic 1976 design in Titirangi features Altherm’s floor-to-ceiling doors and windows. Below Richard Naish of RTA Studio designed the 2015 Home of the Year. Named the ‘E-Type’ house and located in Grey Lynn, Auckland, it features Altherm’s Metro Series windows and doors. Below left This holiday home in Piha, west of Auckland, was designed by Herbst Architects and features Altherm windows and doors throughout. The beachside home won the 2012 Home of the Year award.

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A day of design store tours and expert brieďŹ ngs guided by HOME editor Jeremy Hansen

F RIDAY MAY 20

T IC K ETS

$85

H OW TO B O O K Book your tickets online at eventopia.co/stylesafari2016. Each ticket costs $85 and includes lunch and our all-day Style Safari experience. For information, contact Liezl Hipkins-Stear on 09 308 2783 or lhipkins@bauermedia.co.nz

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style safari PRESENTS

2016


HOME’s Style Safari is an exclusive day-long set of briefings on the latest design trends and releases from the Milan Furniture Fair, guided by HOME editor Jeremy Hansen. The day commences at 9am and includes five design briefings at Auckland’s most important design stores, finishing around 5pm. Lunch is included. Numbers on the Style Safari are limited to 50, so reserve your tickets now.

O U R G U E S T S PE AKER S

Valeria Carbonaro-Laws

Greg McLeod

STUDI O I TALIA

ARTISAN FLOORING

We visit the beautiful Studio Italia showroom and hear about the most exciting releases from Milan.

Artisan Flooring’s director on flooring trends and his firm’s international ranges of artisanal rugs.

Sam Haughton

Michelle Backhouse

IM O

BAC KHOU SE IN T E R IOR S

The New Zealand design firm on their process, prefab kitchens and new furniture releases.

Backhouse Interiors will be back from Milan with new products from Kartell and other prestige brands.

Mike Thorburn E CC ECC’s chief will give a comprehensive rundown of the latest developments at the Milan Furniture Fair.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 169


Subscribe to B E I N TO W I N O N E O F 2 5 D O U B L E PA S S E S T O T H E RESENE ARCHITECTURE A N D D E S I G N F I L M F E S T I VA L .

Now in its fifth year, the Resene Architecture and Design Film Festival is screening nationwide from May to July in Auckland, Wellington, Dunedin and Christchurch. Subscribe to HOME for your chance to win one of 25 double passes to the festival. With an outstanding line-up, this year’s festival will showcase leading international documentaries about architecture and design. Don’t miss out on this calendar highlight – a must for design enthusiasts. For more information, see p.46 and visit rialto.co.nz.

170 / HOME NEW ZEALAND

Subscribe securely online at www.magshop.co.nz/ home/M1604HAE Phone 0800 MAGSHOP (0800 624 746) and quote M1604HAE This offer is valid for delivery in New Zealand before 6 June, 2016, to subscribers quoting M1604HAE by phone or online at magshop.co.nz/home/ M1604HAE . This subscription offer cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer. Once processed, all subscriptions are non-refundable. Rates include GST and postage. Please allow six weeks for delivery of your first magazine. For overseas subscription rates, visit magshop.co.nz. For full terms and conditions, refer to magshop.co.nz.


Strange & Familiar: Architecture on Fogo Island is one of many great ďŹ lms in the Resene Architecture and Design Film Festival.

$49 FOR 6 ISSUES / 1 YEAR SAVE 25% $95 FOR 12 ISSUES / 2 YEARS SAVE 27% OFFER ENDS 6 JUNE 2016

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 171


Because we love Auckland, we want it to be better. Because the best schools aren’t good enough and the worst ones need a revolution. Because the politicians get it wrong and so do the academics and the lawyers and the cops and the artists and the banks. Not always, but too often, so things need to be said. Exposed. Argued. Laughed at. Because there are so many good things to eat, and wear, and see and hear and be a part of (and sometimes they’re not as good as they should be either, which also needs to be said). Because we cherish so many of the people of this city, and we want to tell you about them and show them to you. Because of all this: Isn't it time you picked up a copy of the latest Metro magazine? On sale now.


Stay a while... Luxury hot spots showcase

Stay at the Nice Hotel

The Boathouse

Stay and relax with us. We’re a boutique hotel and restaurant offering sophisticated comfort and award-winning dining in the heart of New Plymouth.

Absolute over-the-water luxury in the Bay of Islands. Located at Opua, the marine centre of the Bay, The Boathouse consists of two luxury apartments each with a spacious deck and views over the Veronica Channel to Paihia and beyond.

Built in 1870, New Plymouth’s oldest wooden building has been lovingly restored and filled with an eclectic range of art and furnishings by owner and host Terry Parkes. Each luxury room has its own unique identity and decadent style. Choose from our Executive Rooms, Suites or Villas.

The apartments are fully self-contained, each with a large living area, modern kitchen, separate laundry room and climate control. There is free wifi, Sky TV and a private telephone. The fully furnished balconies are both equipped with a gas barbecue.

Discover some of our hidden surprises – like the tropical garden deck, art collection or the library that offers a book swap and complimentary tipple while you read.

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

www.nicehotel.co.nz I info@nicehotel.co.nz 71 Brougham Street, New Plymouth I Ph (06) 758 6423

Beechy Street, Opua I Ph (09) 402 6800

Riverrun winter indulgence Stay somewhere special this winter! Uniquely handcrafted accommodation with all the services of a small boutique hotel, Riverrun lodge provides a relaxed retreat adjacent to Lake Wanaka resort, with spectacular mountain views, riverside trails and a private rural setting. We offer individual design, fine food and wine and warm hospitality. The lodge is a perfect base to enjoy Wanaka, ski, hike, kayak, bike or simply relax. Our rooms enjoy views of both Treble Cone and Cardrona alpine resorts and we are happy to help you plan an exceptional winter holiday. Contact us for three, five and seven-night rates and availability over the June-September ski season.

www.riverrun.co.nz | adventure@riverrun.co.nz | Ph (03) 443 9049


ADVERTISING PROMOTION

Homewood Stoves Our heirloom cooking stoves are hand crafted to last a lifetime. Made here in New Zealand from solid cast iron, a wood stove from Homewood will heat your home, provide your family with hot water and cook your food – so you can be truly self reliant.

Ph (09) 436 0333 info@homewoodstoves.co.nz www.homewoodstoves.co.nz

Pyroclassic Fires For more than 30 years, Pyroclassic Fires has been making wood fires which lead the market in efficiency and clean air excellence. With a high-performing wetback option, cooktop and a range of 100-plus colours, the Pyroclassic IV is a game changer.

Ph 0800 479 762 www.pyroclassic.co.nz

Outdoor Concepts Conveniently add warmth to your outdoor settings with Heatscope heaters – green technology inspired by the sun. Elegant, sleek and long-lasting, the radiant heater of the next generation, Heatscope transforms indoor and outdoor areas into cosy, pleasant environments. Heatscope stands for efficient heating solutions that create comfortable temperatures while generating very little red light. The Heatscope Vision emits only 15-20% of the light of a traditional infrared heater, at the same time providing increased efficiency and energy savings of up to 30%. Effective heating solutions for people who appreciate quality and design. Developed and made in Germany.

Ph: 0800 266 206 www.outdoorconcepts.co.nz 77 The Strand, Parnell, Auckland

The Outdoor Heating Specialists

Designed by Peter Haythornthwaite and made in New Zealand. With its simple shape and inbuilt technology, the Studio is perfect for both traditional and contemporary interiors. It can be used for cooking, add warmth and atmosphere to a home, heat water, and it complies with the strict emission standards now in place throughout New Zealand. The Studio is available in a wide range of colours, with an oven model and the unique OH-AH – both ideal for holiday homes and farm cottages.

Comfortplus Central Heating Underfloor or radiator central heating gently spreads warmth evenly throughout your entire home without hot and cold drafts or circulating dust. - Gas, Diesel, Wood boilers or air to water heat pumps. - Constant temperature day and night. - No interior compromise. - Multi-task domestic hot water production and or pool heating. - Free system design and estimate.

Ph (09) 273 9191 info@waterware.co.nz www.waterware.co.nz/comfortplus

Available nationwide. Visit www.warmington.co.nz to find your nearest retailer, or phone the office: (09) 273 9227.

Home Heating & Insulation Showcase

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

Studio Fires


ADVERTISING PROMOTION

ballara bulman chin | bbc architects ballara bulman chin | bbc architects have a diverse team working out of the historic Shed 21 building on the Wellington waterfront. We recently showcased our '45 Degree House' on episode five of the inaugural series of Grand Designs NZ. The design demonstrated our studio ethos: constraints can only enhance design opportunity.

DLA Architects We think of ourselves and our team as creative and expert individuals who care passionately about producing and delivering great architecture. We are small enough to take care of your modest residential renovation and big enough to design, document and deliver multi-million dollar, state-of-the-art industrial facilities with the inhouse expertise to cater for all projects in between. At DLA Architects we like to get the job done and we get a kick out of creating innovative solutions for our clients.

Using this philosophy, we have completed projects from Northland to Otago, and are particularly adept at working with small and steep sites. We enjoy working with people; the idiosyncrasies they bring, the collaborative process, and the joy of working in architecture, where the creative process is realised into a real, inhabitable place.

And that's it, nothing fluffy, just a good old-fashioned top-notch architectural service.

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

Ph (04) 381 3085 admin@dla.co.nz www.dla.co.nz

Studio 104, 28 Waterloo Quay, Wellington, 6140 Ph (04) 473 9777 info@bbcarchitects.co.nz

Matt Brew Architect Matt Brew Architect is a practice creating unique, timeless and carefullycrafted residences and interiors. Implementing a contextual design process, the practice delivers bespoke projects that are designed in response to the specific site and individual client needs. Visit mattbrewarchitect.com for more details and to view an extensive range of residential and commercial projects.

Considered spaces At Stufkens + Chambers we go beyond replicating styles and conventional approaches. Through research and drawing inspiration from the landscape with its textures and light, we create spaces that sit elegantly within their environment. We seek clarity and functionality with the element of delight in all our work, ambitiously striving to exceed your expectations.

Ph 027 443 5005 mjbrew@me.com www.mattbrewarchitect.com

Tauranga | Christchurch | Auckland Ph (07) 571 8086 info@scarchitects.co.nz www.scarchitects.co.nz

Architects Showcase


SOURCE

Readership: 98,000* Circulation: 12,163** WINNER 2015 CREATIVE EXCELLENCE AWARD FOR THE MOST INNOVATIVE KITCHEN

PO Box 28-700, Remuera Phone (09) 813 6192 www.croninkitchens.co.nz

www.bungalowvilla.co.nz Phone (09) 629 0366/021 270 1388

EXCITINGLY DIFFERENT

* Nielsen CMI Jan-Dec 15 ** NZ Audit Bureau of Circulations Jan-Dec 15

Visit our display kitchen at:

To advertise your product in the Urban Living Directory

155 The Strand, Parnell.

Ph: 07 578 3646 | Mob: 021 673 133 Email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

contact: Kim Chapman

0800 820 840 www.mardeco.co.nz

create the ultimate outdoor room

locarno.co.nz

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

With more than 15 years of building experience and an established reputation with an excellent team of qualified subcontractors, Bungalow & Villa Renovation Specialists have the expert knowledge to turn your building dream into reality.


SOURCE

c on crete b l u s h

S C A N D I N AV I A N & M I N I M A L I S T

www.concreteblush.com

World-renowned art glass by glass artists Ola & Marie Hรถglund Creators of New Zealand art glass since 1982 52 Lansdowne Rd, Richmond, 20 mins from NELSON NELSON

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

Armadillo&Co Rugs I Coco Flip I Hem 238 Jervois Road, Herne Bay, Auckland www.theivyhouse.co.nz

1767 Luggate-Cromwell Rd, 50 mins from QUEENSTOWN CENTRAL OTAGO (from 1 December) 804 7454 Ph 027

www.hoglundartglass.com


MY FAVOURITE BUILDING Wellington architect Stuart Gardyne, the local member of the Home of the Year 2016 jury, loves the modernist purity of Christchurch’s College House.

“Architecture is foremost about creating space and Christchurch’s College House does this much better than most. Designed by Warren and Mahoney and completed in 1964, it’s a mature work by what was, at the time, a young practice. The quad is the star. In the finest tradition, it organises the site. It is well-proportioned and surrounded by buildings, the tallest of which is the chapel, which projects into the quad, suspended above its edge. A single large deciduous tree creates asymmetry that ensures the space is enlivened and avoids being predictable. The chapel is a fabulous, elegant space with careful detailing and controlled natural light. Sadly, post-earthquakes,

PHOTOG RAPHY

178 / HOME NEW ZEALAND

it has been boarded up awaiting funds for base isolation. The library nearby, also designed by Warren and Mahoney, seems from another time. A simple modern exterior gives no hint of its dark Gothic interior dominated by paired diagonal trusses. The students’ bedrooms are in three-storey buildings that run down the sides of the quad: five rooms per floor, 15 per building, the right number to create a community and avoid being institutional. One of the best things about College House is that hundreds of students each year get to live in and experience architecture of the highest quality. Well done, Warren and Mahoney.”

— Kate Claridge


AWA R D

W I N N I N G

R E S I D E N T I A L

&

CO M M E RC I A L

I N T E R I O R S

POWERSURGE.CO.NZ


DULUX 2016 COLOUR FORECAST F U T U RE PA ST Future Past takes its cues from steampunk merging with modern design – creating a new version of the old. Deep and decadent traditional hues are made modern with the addition of mustard, pink and purple. To view more from the Dulux 2016 Colour Forecast visit dulux.co.nz/colour

Dulux, Dulux Colours of New Zealand and Worth doing, worth Dulux are registered trade marks of DuluxGroup (Australia) Pty Ltd.

HOME NZ April/May 2016  

Our Home of the Year issue features New Zealand's six best new homes.

HOME NZ April/May 2016  

Our Home of the Year issue features New Zealand's six best new homes.