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Great design is a product of technological advancement and economics.The new Steelia ™ “physical vapour deposition” technology released from Arclinea converts stainless steel into scratch and chemical resistant door and panel surfaces available in four stunning JVSV\YMHZ[ÄUPZOLZ)YVUaL*OHTWHNUL:[LLSHUK)SHJR[YHUZMVYTPUN`V\YRP[JOLUPU[VHYLZPSPLU[JSLHUHUKOLHS[O`VIQLJ[VM beauty and extroadinary design


90 Years 1925 - 2015

99 The Strand, Parnell, Auckland | 134 Victoria Street, Christchurch Auckland +64 9 302 2284

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Christchurch +64 3 366 0623

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| www.matisse.co.nz

E design@matisse.co.nz

where design becomes art


SEE WHAT YOU CAN SEE THERE IS MUCH TO INSPIRE US WHEN WE LOOK AROUND. The way a shadow falls. The way light bounces. The colour of rock. The unfaltering straightness of a line. The delicate beauty of a curve. The strong and noble angle. Noticing what isn’t. Savouring every detail. Seeing what others cannot. Seeing through someone else’s eyes.


Proud sponsors of Home of the Year Lectures and Home of the Year 2016 When you know where to look for inspiration, you can ďŹ nd it. Visit altherm.co.nz and see what you can see.


Love the thought of a sofa that feels as good as it looks. You’ll love the thought that’s gone into stunning Neo. Built on King Living’s superior steel and alloy frame, backed by a 25 year warranty, this contemporary take on mid-century elegance was crowned ‘Best of the Best’ at the Australian Furniture of the Year Awards. With adjustable arm cushions and backrests that can individually recline thanks to TouchGlide® Technology. Neo offers unparalleled levels of comfort. In fact the only time you’ll want to get up is to look at it.

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2016 HOME OF THE YEAR LECTURE

Tom Kundig

H E AR TH E WOR LD -R EN OWN ED ARCHITECT SPEAK ABOUT HIS REMARK AB LE WORK ON HIS F I R S T- E V E R N E W Z E A L A N D V I S I T.


Seattle-based architect Tom Kundig is visiting New Zealand to serve as the international member of our Home of the Year jury. Don’t miss the opportunity to hear this world-renowned designer discuss his innovative work.

AUCKLAND

Tuesday January 26, 6.30pm WELLINGTON

Wednesday January 27, 6.30pm Above Tom Kundig designed six of these ‘Rolling Huts’ for a field in Washington state. Left ‘Outpost’ is an artist’s live/ work studio by Tom Kundig with a walled garden in rural Idaho. Below ‘Studhorse’ is a home designed by Tom Kundig in Washington state. It won a 2015 Housing Award from the American Institute of Architects.

$25 (Students and subscribers $20) Venue details and tickets at: eventopia.co/tomkundigauckland eventopia.co/tomkundigwellington

Tom Kundig grew up in the US’s Pacific Northwest in awe of the region’s mountainous landscapes. The son of an architect, he read science and car magazines, studied biology and physics, and later became an avid mountain climber. He studied architecture because he says it “allowed me to have a foot in both places – the technical realm and the poetic realm – and in that magical intersection between the two”. He says the rigours of mountain climbing taught him to appreciate the spiritual moments that arise from dangerous situations, and he emphasises the relevance of that in his work today. He now works on small cabins and larger buildings, believing the principles that inform his thoughtful homes apply equally to bigger projects. He has won 18 National Design Awards from the American Institute of Architects.

For information, please contact Fiona Williams at HOME, 09 308 2739 or fwilliams@bauermedia.co.nz


DULUX 2016 COLOUR FORECAST BIO F RA GILIT Y Bio Fragility takes its colour cues from natural and living matter – flesh tones, lichen, moss and stone inuence the subtle hues of the palette which are derived from chalky brittle elements rather than soft textures. To view more from the Dulux 2016 Colour Forecast visit dulux.co.nz/colour

Dulux, Dulux Colours of New Zealand and Worth doing, worth Dulux are registered trade marks of DuluxGroup (Australia) Pty Ltd.


BEST BACHES

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SLOW SUMMERS ON RAKINO

CLIFFTOP SEA AND SOLIDITY

A HUT TO KEEP THINGS SIMPLE

LIVING LARGE IN THE BAY

A BEACH NOT A SUBURB

An island getaway by Malcolm Walker shoots for simplicity

Julian Guthrie designs for sun and storms at Muriwai

A shed at Puketui by Richard Naish is a hiker’s haven

A retreat by Pete Bossley embraces its Bay of Islands site

Gerald Parsonson transforms a 60s Kapiti Coast bach

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HOME NEW ZEALAND / 15


ART & DESIGN 25. DESIGN DISCOVERIES Fresh finds for your home and great gift inspiration

30. NEW SPACES Eighthirty’s café in Auckland and Lonely in Wellington

32. DIVERSE ART FORMS 55

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A new exhibition of contemporary art and a book praising local churches

34. ANNUAL AWARDS The NZ Institute of Architects picks the year’s best buildings

36. POETRY IN MOTION Introducing Tom Kundig, superb Seattle architect

38. A LITTLE SOMETHING Douglas Lloyd Jenkins examines the art of giving

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56. FULL IMMERSION A pool house by Herbst Architects

62. WATER WORLD A pavilion and pool by Pattersons

66. PURE SHORES Fearon Hay creates a dreamy tropical paradise in an urban backyard

70. LIFE AQUATIC Noel Lane Architects sinks a Northland pool into superb natural surrounds

74. LIGHT FANTASTIC Cool aquatic hues reflect a 70s design aesthetic

141. CLEVER KITCHENS Architects and designers lend their smarts to five impressive kitchens

40. THE PERFECT PEW

162. FAVOURITE BUILDING

Our picks of the best bar stools on the market now

Charles Walker admires a towering 90’s Auckland icon

EXTRAS 50. DESIGNS FOR LIFE

117. STYLE SAFARI

Four contemporary homes

On tour in Christchurch

46. A LIFE SOURCE IN THE CITY

150. SUBSCRIBE TO HOME

Celebrating sustainability with Lincoln University

A year’s worth of design

93. HOME OF THE YEAR 62

16 / HOME NEW ZEALAND

74

Enter the 2016 Home of the Year award


Inspired by the Italian landscape, the Costes Collection features natural wood with a rough-textured pickled teak finish. Pickling is a process that brushes the wood, lending it a cosy elegant vintage appeal. The large round table fitted with in-built lazy susan and Costes dining chairs all exhibit geometric lines softened by rounded corners,

harmonious proportions and curved backs on the chairs. Come in and see this range in our Auckland showroom now. Mike Thorburn Managing Director, ECC

www.ecc.co.nz Since 1909

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TAILORING Embracing courageous at the iconic Athfield House, Wellington

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Strong lines, a bold outlook, and meticulous attention to detail. As with the best menswear, the best architecture combines all these qualities - and more - to produce something greater. Ian Athfield’s house in Wellington is a unique achievement. Described by some as “part family home, part office, almost a village”, it exudes a timeless confidence that is as fresh today as when it first graced its towering Khandallah hilltop in 1965.

2015/16

Since 1987 we’ve aspired to this attitude when we design the Working Style Collection; every single aspect is critical for achieving the right look. The weight of the cloth, the perfect lapel, the collar just so. And each choice balances the classic with the contemporary, enabling you to express yourself, imprint your own inimitable style on your wardrobe. And create exactly the right impression with clothes destined to become lifelong friends.

Working Style Heritage Series 02 Spring - Summer 2015/16


Get the latest online homestolove.co.nz/home @homenewzealand @_jeremyhansen facebook.com/homenewzealand instagram.com/homenewzealand

Photography / Mark Smith

EDITOR’S LETTER

Top left The Sol Duc cabin in Washington state by Tom Kundig, who will visit New Zealand in January as the international member of our Home of the Year jury. For more, see p.36. Top right A Coromandel holiday home by Richard Naish of RTA Studio, p.106. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds. Above left A Bay of Islands home by Bossley Architects, p.118. Photograph by Simon Devitt. Above right A Rakino Island getaway by Malcolm Walker, p.82. Photograph by Duncan Innes.

Some rather exciting news: In January, we’re delighted to be welcoming an enormously accomplished architect as the international member of our Home of the Year jury. Tom Kundig is based in Seattle, the region where he grew up, and is perhaps best known for the beautiful cabins he has designed in sublime landscapes in the Pacific Northwest. In his younger days he was an avid mountain climber. He says attributes a spiritual significance to the dangerous situations he sometimes faced in the mountains, and that these experiences are highly relevant to his work today. When you look at his buildings, you can see what he means. They are structures that highlight the power of landscape but also possess a strength of their own (you can see more of them on p.36). They are often built from rustic materials such as steel and concrete and have a weathered quality that suggests they’ll be around for a long time. They serve up remarkable perspectives on the landscapes they are located in, but also offer a sense of refuge. Tom doesn’t just design cabins: his oeuvre includes apartments, art galleries and high-rises in locales as diverse as Manhattan, Brazil and Korea. He has won 18 National Design Awards from the American Institute of Architects, and has just published a new book on his work. I fi rst invited Tom to come to New Zealand as our international juror in 2010 and have persisted every year since, but he’s so in demand that it’s taken until now to make it happen. Thanks to the generosity of our Home of the Year sponsors, Altherm Window Systems, Tom will be giving talks about his work in Auckland (Tuesday January 26) and Wellington (Wednesday January 27). Ticketing details are on p.12. We hope you’ll be able to join us and hear this remarkable architect reveal more about what inspires his sublime work. Jeremy Hansen

This issue is our annual celebration of the summer holidays or, more specifically, the places we like to retreat to when work is done for the year. There are some gorgeous getaways in these pages, from a Coromandel holiday home inspired by tramping huts designed by Home of the Year 2015 winner Richard Naish (p.106), to a colourful Kapiti Coast bach that has been cleverly rehabbed by Home of the Year 2001 winner Gerald Parsonson (p.130). What struck me about these homes was the clarity of vision shared by their owners and architects. Holiday homes are usually stripped back, and the pleasure their owners take in them always makes me wonder why we tend to let our full-time homes get so complicated. It’s an almost-eternal architectural question, but it feels as if some of the little holiday pads in this issue are edging ever-closer to an answer. We hope you agree, and that you have an enjoyable holiday and a very happy new year yourself.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 19


CONTRIBUTORS SAM SMITH

AIMIE CRONIN

DUNCAN INNES

HOME’s senior designer and stylist conceptualised and styled ‘Light Fantastic’ (p.74).

The Hamilton-based writer visited the Fold House by Bossley Architects (p.118).

The photographer took the shots of a Malcolm Walker bach on Rakino Island (p.82).

You worked on our styled shoot for this issue. What was the concept, and how did you go about executing it? The initial source of inspiration came from Paul Rudolph’s 70s New York apartment, which was a study in light and texture. He mixed textures of glass and translucent plastic with natural textiles and laser-cut vinyls, while playing with reflections and lighting. We took these concepts and modernised them with a summery and psychedelic twist. I wanted the glass reflections to create movement reminiscent of water while complementing the composition, and for the matte Perspex to create blurred imagery as a contrast against the reflective and hard glass surfaces. We visited the beautiful studio of The Glassworks and they lent us the incredible pieces of stained glass that defined our summer colour palette. We sourced some amazing furniture with natural and heavy textures that evoke the 70s.

You travelled up north to visit the Fold House for this issue. What did you like about it? It looked like a home that would accommodate a whole lot of friends and family and allow them to holiday in a way that is relaxed and low-key. It was grand in scale, but nothing about it felt pretentious.

You travelled to Rakino Island to photograph a bach by Malcolm Walker. What’s the island like, for the many people who haven’t been there? Rakino is great. It’s what I imagine Waiheke Island to have been like 20 years ago: a low-key, friendly island where everybody knows everybody and Land Rovers go to retire. It has a rebellious nature and, by the look of some of the cars, nobody’s too fussed about flouting a few rules and regulations!

You also art-directed our cover shoot with HOME designer Catherine Wilkinson. Did you fancy hanging out at that Herbst-designed pool pavilion a little longer? It was the perfect day, one we didn’t want to end, and it was topped off by meeting Beetle the pony. The rural setting and the beautiful design of the pool house were ideal for our summer cover. Simon [Devitt] did what he does best and perfectly captured the dreamy mood of the pavilion and the property in general. What are you planning for the summer holidays? Lots of relaxing, boating and beach time with our families and friends in Taupo and Mount Maunganui.

www.peterfell.co.nz

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What else are you working on at the moment? I’m working on some pieces for the Listener and North & South. I love that my job as a freelancer allows me to dabble in so many different areas. It keeps things interesting. What are your summer plans? And how do these match with your vision of an ideal summer holiday? I plan to spend time at the beach with my husband and my dog, which is pretty much perfect. I guess the ideal summer break would afford me more time away with family and friends and more bottles of Champagne!

How did you want to approach the shoot of this very small and simple getaway home? One of the best things about Rakino is that, as soon as you step off the ferry, it feels like you are miles away from Auckland and the stress of city life. I wanted to show that it’s an island where people come to get away and live a more pared-back way of life. Milton’s place has an amazing sea view and you instantly feel relaxed on arrival. He has done a beautiful job of building, so I hope I have captured some of the love and craftsmanship that has gone into creating this island getaway. Malcolm has designed a no-fuss, authentic bach that makes you feel at ease and cleverly caters to the needs of the client. What are you planning for your summer holidays? I’m looking forward to spending time with family and friends on Waiheke and in the Coromandel. There’ll be surfing, beers around the barbecue, hammocks and books, and late-afternoon river swims.


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Editor Jeremy Hansen A holiday home by architect Julian Guthrie at Muriwai, photographed by Patrick Reynolds. For more, see p.94.

Art Director Arch MacDonnell Inhouse Design Senior Designer Sarah Gladwell Inhouse Design Senior Designer Oliver Worsfold Inhouse Design Designer Hamish Haydon Inhouse Design On our cover, Rick Anderson and his children enjoy their pool and pool house designed by Herbst Architects at their rural home south of Auckland. Photograph by Simon Devitt. Production by Sam Smith and Catherine Wilkinson. For more, see p.56.

Chief Executive Officer Paul Dykzeul Publisher Brendon Hill Commercial Director Paul Gardiner Marketing Manager Martine Skinner Commercial Sales Manager Liezl Hipkins-Stear lhipkins@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2873 Classified Advertising Kim Chapman classifieds@xtra.co.nz +64 7 578 3646 Advertising Account Manager Nicola Saunders nsaunders@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 366 5345 Financial Business Analyst Ferozza Patel Group Production Manager Lisa Sloane Production Co-ordinator Clare Pike

Senior Stylist/Designer Sam Smith Stylist/Designer Catherine Wilkinson Editorial Assistant Fiona Williams

Editorial Office Bauer Media Group Shed 12 City Works Depot 90 Wellesley St Auckland, New Zealand homenewzealand@ bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2739 Postal address HOME magazine Bauer Media Group Private Bag 92512 Wellesley Street Auckland 1141 New Zealand Subscription Enquiries magshop.co.nz/home 0800 MAGSHOP or 0800 624 746 magshop@magshop.co.nz +64 9 308 2721 (tel) +64 9 308 2769 (fax) Bulk/Corporate Subscriptions corporates@magshop.co.nz +64 9 308 2700

Contributors Jo Bates Aimie Cronin Simon Farrell-Green Amelia Holmes Yvette Jay Janice Kumar-Ward Douglas Lloyd Jenkins Claire McCall Henry Oliver Sharon Stephenson

Photographers Simon Devitt Samuel Hartnett Duncan Innes Paul McCredie Kallan MacLeod Jackie Meiring Toaki Okano Patrick Reynolds Jeremy Toth Simon Wilson

Advertising Advertising Auckland Liezl Hipkins-Stear lhipkins@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2873 Sydney Rachel McLean rmclean@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2760

Printer Webstar Distributor Netlink Distribution Company

HOME is subject to copyright in its entirety and the contents may not be reproduced in any form, either in whole or in part, without written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved in material accepted for publication, unless initially specified otherwise. All letters and other material forwarded to the magazine will be assumed intended for publication unless clearly labeled “not for publication”. We welcome submissions of homes that architects or owners would like to be considered for publication. Opinions expressed in HOME New Zealand are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of Bauer Media Group. No responsibility is accepted for unsolicited material. ABC average net circulation, Oct 2014 to Sept 2015: 11,529 copies. ISSN 1178-4148

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SPREAD THE LOVE DESIGN DISCOVERIES FOR GIFT INSPIRATION. 05

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01—‘Marley’ rope basket by Milk & Sugar, $39 from Let Liv, letliv.co.nz 02—Cashmere tie, $185 from Doran & Doran, doran-and-doran.com 03—Petrified wood bookends, $389 from

Weekend Trader, weekendtrader.net 04—‘Osso’ chair by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for Mattiazzi, $1312 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com 05—Garden scissors, $55 from Father Rabbit, fatherrabbit.com 06—‘Pranzo’ placemat, $8.90 by Citta Design, cittadesign.com 07—American-walnut tray by Oliver Roake, $295 from Fuzzyvibes, fuzzyvibes.com 08—Felt pouch by Merchant Archive, $314 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com. Edited by Amelia Holmes.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 25


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IT’S ALL IN THE FINISH

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OBJECTS WITH SASS TO GRACE SEASONAL STOCKINGS.

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01—‘Duna’ knife, $66, fork, $28, and spoon, $28, by José Joaquim Ribeiro for Cutipol Capitol from the Studio of Tableware, the studio.co.nz 02—‘Ilboudo’ bowl by Facteur Celeste, $65 from Tessuti, shop.tessuti.co.nz 03—Socks by Ayamé, $44 from Douglas and Bec, shop.douglasandbec.com 04—‘Cube’ stapler by Tom Dixon, $145 from Simon James Concept Store, store.simonjamesdesign.com 05—‘Essential Key Bowl’ by Marble Basics, $165 from Mildred & Co, mildredandco.com 06—Vetyver Bergamot hand cream by Ingrid Starnes, $49 from ingridstarnes.com 07— Ceramic platter by Wundaire, $150 from Muck Floral, general-store.muck.co.nz 08—Pink Clay cleansing bar by Herbivore Botanicals, $29 from Father Rabbit, fatherrabbit.com. Edited by Amelia Holmes.

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REASONS FOR THE SEASON FRESH FINDS WITH JUST THE RIGHT AMOUNT OF ZING. 05

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01—‘Flux’ pouch by Deadly Ponies for Len Lye, $185 from deadlyponies.com 02—Vintage denim hat, $165 from Everyday Needs, everyday-needs.com 03—Rejuvenate

Intensive body balm by Aesop, $37 from Simon James Concept Store store.simonjamesdesign.com 04—Loo roll hook by House Doctor, $45 from Father Rabbit, fatherrabbit.com 05— Soy candle by Zakkia, $59 from Let Liv, letliv.co.nz 06—One by One design book by Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby, $68 from Everyday Needs, everyday-needs.com 07—Hand-blown glass by Monmouth Glass, $60 from Muck Floral, general-store.muck.co.nz 08— Volcanic stone door handle by Warwick Freeman, $780 from Everyday Needs, everyday-needs.com. Edited by Amelia Holmes.

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NEW BREW EIGHTHIRTY COFFEE EXPANDS WITH A SMART NEW AUCKLAND SPACE.

Auckland’s High Street was once the hippest lane in the city, but it has recently been facing competition from nearby Britomart. Eighthirty Coffee’s new flagship space on the ground floor of one of the street’s best buildings should help it get its groove back. Designed by Dominic Glamuzina of Glamuzina Architects, the interior was envisaged as an island of calm away from the bustle of the street, and features built-in seating and bold splashes of pink courtesy of a mural by Auckland artist Yolunda Hickman. Glamuzina describes the space as “Philip Glass meets Rihanna”. Interpret it your own way when you visit it for yourself. EIGHTHIRTY Ground floor, 35 High Street Auckland g-a.co.nz eighthirty.com Photography by Sam Hartnett.

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INTIMATES ENCOUNTER New Zealand fashion label Lonely has opened a Wellington flagship store to showcase its range of lingerie, swimwear and clothing. Interior designer Rufus Knight calls the store “a dialogue between soft and hard surfaces”. Polished concrete floors, sandblasted marble walls and aged brass racks are complemented by handwoven jute rugs from Nodi Rugs and linen curtains in fabric by Dominique Kieffer in the changing rooms. Knight also designed Lonely’s Auckland store, but in Wellington he says he’s gone for an even more tactile feel backed up by colours of warm grey, earthy green and the luxury of a deep purple sofa by Living Divani. LONELY 104 Victoria Street, Wellington 04 499 1566 lonelylabel.com Photography by Simon Wilson.

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01—‘Saas’ (2014) by Nicola Farquhar. 02—April Lattice’ (2006) by Barbara Tuck. 03— ‘Travelling Envelope #2’ (2012) by Nick Austin. 04—‘Terriva’ (2013) by Adrienne Vaughan.

CANVASSING OPINION A NEW EXHIBITION EXAMINES A CERTAIN LIVELINESS IN NEW ZEALAND PAINTING.

We live in an increasingly digital world, but the ancient art of painting is very obviously not dead. Auckland Art Gallery’s new exhibition, Necessary Distraction: A Painting Show, identifies a new vigour in New Zealand painting, showing more than 100 works from 20 of the medium’s liveliest contemporary exponents, including Kirstin Carlin, Saskia Leek, Nick Austin, Barbara Tuck, Nicola Farquhar, Stella Corkery, and Adrienne Vaughan. Fourteen artworks have been produced especially for the exhibition. Together, they make a powerful statement about painting’s continuing relevance.

NECESSARY DISTRACTION: A PAINTING SHOW Until 4 April 2016 aucklandartgallery.com

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PRAISE BE A NEW BOOK SHOWCASES BEAUTIFUL NEW ZEALAND CHURCH DESIGN.

“The history of our churches reflects the history of our culture – their story is the story of us,” writes architecture critic Bill McKay in Worship: A History of New Zealand Church Design (Penguin Random House, $85), the magnificent new book he’s created with photographer Jane Ussher. Despite New Zealand being a relatively irreligious country, McKay notes, our churches are special-occasion hubs for baptisms, weddings and funerals. McKay and Ussher visited 70 churches all over the country, including a 1959 gem in Le Bons Bay by Allan Mitchener (far left), the lovely 1878 Te Whare Karakia O O¯nuku, near Akaroa (above left), and the exquisite 1926 St Mary’s in Tikitiki (below left). In our opinion, there may be no more perfect Christmas gift. randomhouse.co.nz Photography by Jane Ussher.

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BUILT FORM PRESENTING NEW ZEALAND’S BEST BUILDINGS OF 2015.

The NZ Institute of Architects’ jury has toured the nation and made its decisions – and what an accomplished group of buildings they’ve picked. The winners? The Sir Ian Athfield Award for Housing went to the Lyttelton Studio Retreat by Bull O’Sullivan Architecture, which many readers might recall from our previous issue. Patterson Associates won the John Scott Award for Public Architecture for their design of the Christchurch Botanic Gardens Visitor Centre (also previously featured in HOME), while Christchurch featured again in the third major award, with the Stranges and Glendenning Hill Building Replacement by Sheppard & Rout, which received the Sir Miles Warren Award for Commercial Architecture.

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Each year the institute also awards a Gold Medal for Lifetime Achievement to a single architect; this year that went to Wellington’s Stuart Gardyne of Architecture +, whose work includes the capital’s Te Wharewaka o Po¯neke-Te Raukura, City Gallery, Conservation House and a clutch of excellent homes (two of which have been finalists in our Home of the Year award). The New Zealand Architecture Medal for the year’s best building went to the Blyth Performing Arts Centre at Hawke’s Bay’s Iona College, designed by four-time Home of the Year winners Stevens Lawson Architects. The jury described the building as “beautifully planned and executed… technical and architectural issues have been resolved masterfully”. We look forward to visiting it and the other award winners as soon as we can.

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01—The Christchurch Botanic Gardens Visitor Centre by Pattersons. Photograph by Emma Smales. 02—The Stranges and Glendenning Hill Building Replacement by Sheppard and Rout. Photograph by Peter Cui. 03—Lyttelton Studio Retreat by Bull O’Sullivan Architecture. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds. 04—Stuart Gardyne. 05—Te Wharewaka o Po¯neke-Te Raukura by Architecture +. Photograph by Paul McCredie. 06-08—The Blyth Performing Arts Centre by Stevens Lawson Architects. Photographs by Mark Smith.

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SIT BOY Design your own

Mix and match the colours and materials of the Baker Stool’s seat, legs and foot ring to create your perfect perch.

www.imo.co.nz


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PROVIDING SHELTER ANNOUNCING THE INTERNATIONAL MEMBER OF OUR 2016 HOME OF THE YEAR JURY.

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We have some great news to share with you: in January, we’re hosting Seattlebased architect Tom Kundig as the international member of our Home of the Year jury. It has been a long time coming. We’ve been asking him for five years, but it’s only now that he’s able to fit in his firstever visit to New Zealand. Kundig will join us on our Home of the Year judging tour (thanks to our sponsor, Altherm Window Systems) and give talks in Auckland (on Jan 26) and Wellington (Jan 27) about his work while he’s here. Kundig’s buildings are often inspired by the mountainous terrain of Washington state, where he grew up. In his new book, Tom Kundig: Works, he writes of the benefits of inconveniences, that “you have to get outside to get inside”, a treatise that could easily apply to a quintessential New Zealand bach. Some of his most famous buildings have been cabins of exquisite simplicity, highly crafted retreats from which to appreciate a landscape, not dominate it. Kundig doesn’t only design homes, as he believes the poetic qualities that enliven his best-known works can apply equally to other buildings. He has also designed art galleries, apartment buildings, hotels and wineries, and worked in the US, Brazil, Mexico, South Korea and Australia. He works frequently in steel and timber, and many of his buildings feature operational details, such as the glass window wall at the Chicken Point Cabin in Idaho that opens with the help of a hand-crank. The son of an architect, he has said that he chose architecture for himself because he likes having one foot in the technical realm and the other in the poetic. We hope you’ll take the time to come and hear him speak about his remarkable creations. eventopia.co/tomkundigauckland eventopia.co/tomkundigwellington

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01—The Art Stable, a mixeduse building by Tom Kundig in Seattle. 02—The Rolling Huts by Tom Kundig in Washington state. 03, 06—Outpost, a home in Idaho. 04—Tom Kundig. 05—Inside the Sol Duc Cabin in Washington state.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 37


D:10

A LITTLE SOMETHING The art of gift-giving has devolved into a seasonal deluge of generic goods. Here, our correspondent calls for courage, and whispers his own Christmas wish-list. TEXT

— Douglas Lloyd Jenkins

Summer is a time for giving, one that isn’t limited to Christmas. At some other point over the warmer months you’ll inevitably find yourself handing over a little something to a special someone. What’s more, you’ll want them to like it and remember who gave it to them. There is a plethora of birthdays between late November and early February, something to do with the amorous moments that traditionally occur in late summer. Particular attention needs to be paid to those whose birthdays come on or immediately around Christmas Day, least we appear mean. Then there are the house-warming gifts for those who will have just moved into new houses, the little thank-you presents for people with whom you stayed, or for those who took care of the children or the dog. There are the summer engagement parties, weddings and, finally, the new babies born as a result of last summer’s amorous impulses. We should all be getting better at presents. After all, this season comes around every year. And yet, like every other year, this summer will see the return of the mid-December blind panic as people snatch something/anything from shop shelves. Gift-giving is getting harder, even if you take your time, consider the recipient and plan the moment in advance. In the past, the staple present was something ‘for the home’. And herein lies the real problem of contemporary gifting. As our homes become more refined personal statements, it’s not easy for an outsider, or even a close friend or relative, to add anything that isn’t destined for TradeMe within a month or two. You only have to cast your eyes over the pages of HOME to note the disappearance of the ‘random’ object from home interiors. What have disappeared en masse are what might be called ‘social objects’ – those objects designed specifically to be used in company. They reflected different levels of formality within the home. Formality is now architectural – evident in the arrangement of objects within the home, rather than in the use of them (which is now decidedly casual). Take, for example, entertaining, that favoured summer activity. Popping in for a cup of tea or coffee is no longer likely to involve teapots, coffee pots, hot water jugs, milk jugs, sugar bowls, sugar tongs, tea strainers, cake plates, table cloths, differentiated tea or coffee

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cups or a tea tray. All of these once-common items have disappeared. The contemporary home dweller is more likely to have a glossy book of 100 Classic Teapots carefully placed on the table. Nobody at the barbecue eats corn cobs delicately held between tiny forks, or reaches for a splade. We don’t balance specifically sized luncheon plates and napkins on a knee, and even the picnic set has largely disappeared. An evening meal is unlikely to include an elaborately set table, so there go the butter dishes, cheese dishes, pickle jars and a plethora of other tabletop items. After dinner your host isn’t going to suggest ‘one for the road’ and bring out the sherry or brandy. So all those distinctive little glasses have gone. Whatever you’re drinking is unlikely to be poured from a decanter, carafe or even a jug but directly from the bottle. You won’t be offered something from a bon-bon dish, cigarette case or cigar box, or hold up a table lighter or hand around an ashtray. This is just a small sample of once-common domestic objects that have been culled in the last 20 years. The list is endless. The result of this culling of objects is that we all have fewer items in our homes designed for public consumption, fewer things to pull from a cupboard when guests arrive. What we’ve done at the same time is remove from circulation all of those smaller items that once made up the baseline of gift-giving. Very few people started adult life with a set of corn-cob forks or splades. These were the little details added over time, given as presents for engagements, weddings and as little gestures of thanks. In removing these from our lives we’ve made gift-giving all that much harder. Contemporary gifts have shifted from something for the home to something consumable for the host. This allows us to retain control over our aesthetic environment while enjoying the memory of your thanks with a bottle of wine. As enjoyable as that might be, what has been left behind is an entire history of design in domestic objects that could, with a little imagination and courage, reclaim their place on the contemporary mantelpiece or sideboard. If you want your holiday visit to be remembered in anything but a temporary haze, plunge in, remembering that perennial summer warning – look before you leap.


Douglas Lloyd Jenkins compiled his Christmas wish-list from items at Cordy’s Fine Art and Antique Auctioneers, cordys.co.nz. From far left Victorian milkglass butter dish; a cigar cutter in the form of a miniature Champagne bottle; a 1950s cigarette dispenser; a 1960s Omega Speedmaster Chronograph watch; an 18th-century sterling-silver meat skewer; an American decoy duck; an early 20thcentury New Zealand Railways refreshment rooms’ tea cup and saucer. Below A blonde oak and ash chair by Ruud Jan Kokke.

Above Douglas Lloyd Jenkins’ Christmas wish-list includes a set of pottery spice jars by New Zealand potter Len Castle, a rough-hewn tribal trough, and Pacific shells, all from Cordy’s Fine Art and Antique Auctioneers, cordys.co.nz.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 39


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BRIGHT IDEAS FROM LOW TO HIGH, YOU’LL BE WELL PLACED WITH THESE STYLISH STOOLS.

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01—Folding stool by Douglas and Bec, $289 from douglasandbec.co.nz 02—‘Edizioni Remida’ by Homage to Fortunato Depero for Zanotta, $4400 from Studio Italia, studioitalia.co.nz 03—‘Revolver H65’ stool by Leon Ransmeier by Wrong for HAY, $564 from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz 04—‘Bertoia’ bar stool by Harry Bertoia for Knoll, $1990 from Studio Italia, studioitalia.co.nz 05—‘Stanley’ stool by Faudet Harrison by Wrong for HAY, $451 from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz 06—‘Comet Sport’ bar stool by Gunilla Allard for Lammhults, $1190 from Katalog, katalog.co.nz 07—‘MC3 Osso’ stool by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for Mattiazzi, $762 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com 08—‘Radice’ stool by Sam Hecht and Industrial Facility for Mattiazzi, $913 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com 09—‘Max-Beam’ by Ludovica + Roberto Palomba for Kartell, $495 from Backhouse, backhousenz.com 10—‘Beetle’ stool by GamFratesi for Gubi, $2877 from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz. Edited by Sam Smith.

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THE NEW ZEALAND EXHIBITION

2016 VENICE ARCHITECTURE BIENNALE

C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R : C H A R L E S WA L K E R A S S O C I AT E C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R : K AT H Y WAG H O R N PA L A Z Z O B O L L A N I 2 8 M A Y ————— 2 7 N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 6 VENICE.NZIA.CO.NZ


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SHORT ORDER

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THE UNCONVENTIONAL AND ORGANIC MAKE FOR SMALL WONDERS.

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01—‘Cesar’ stool by Rodolfo Dordoni for Minotti, from $1840 each from ECC, ecc.co.nz 02—‘Bauble Drum’ table by Barbara Barry for Baker, $3324 from Cavit & Co, cavitco.com 03—‘Platner’ stool by Warren Platner for Knoll, $3900 from Studio Italia, studioitalia.co.nz 04—‘Chat’ ottoman by Nadadora Studio, from $640 from UFL, ufl.co.nz 05—‘Dama’ stool

by CR&S Poliform for Poliform, $2600 from Studio Italia, studioitalia.co.nz 06—‘Pix’ ottoman by Ichiro Iwasaki for Arper, from $917 from UFL, ufl.co.nz 07—‘Moma’ ottoman by Javier Mariscal for Vondom, $614 from UFL, ufl.co.nz 08—‘Panier’ stool by Helen Kontouris, $528 from UFL, ufl.co.nz 09—‘Hexagon’ by Steven Holl for Horm in varnished okoume, $1308 each, and Lecce limestone, $1520 each from UFL, ufl.co.nz 10—‘Bronze Bella’ stool by Muse, from the Cavit Home Collection, $3745 from Cavit & Co, cavitco.com. Edited by Sam Smith.

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SEAT YOURSELF CURVED, CARVED AND QUIRKY, THESE STOOLS HAVE YOUR CREATIVE NEEDS COVERED.

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01—‘BCN’ barstool by Harry & Camila for Kristalia, $846 from Matisse, matisse.co.nz 02—‘C603’ stool by Yuzuru Yamakawa for Feelgood Designs, $785 from Backhouse,

backhousenz.com 03—‘1.3’ stool by Kihyun Kim for Zeitraum in black oak, $1895 from ECC, ecc.co.nz 04—‘Shogun’ stool, $299 from BoConcept, boconcept.co.nz 05—‘Straw’ bar stool by Osko & Deichmann for Blå Station, $650 from Katalog, katalog.co.nz 06— ‘S70-3’ bar stool by Börge Lindau & Bo Lindekrantz for Lammhults, $875 from Katalog, katalog.co.nz 07—‘ICS – Ipsilon’ by Rodrigo Torres for Poliform, $1400 from Studio Italia, studioitalia.co.nz 08—‘Kekke’ stool by Piet Boon, $4775 from ECC, ecc.co.nz 09—‘Gubi 3F’ stool by Boris Berlin and Poul Christiansen for Komplot Design, $753 from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz. Edited by Sam Smith.

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Bring your

home to life

Your home says a lot about you. What you like, how you live, and what’s important to you. Our windows and doors come in more than 50 finishes, so you can open up your home in the way that feels most ‘you’. fairviewwindows.co.nz


D:14

A LIFE SOURCE IN THE CITY At a dinner celebrating local producers, Lincoln University, HOME and Taste magazines explored what sustainability means for post-quake Christchurch.

Shop Eight is a slip of a restaurant in downtown Christchurch on New Regent Street, a pretty cobbled stretch lined with charming 1930s shop buildings. They contain intimate spaces downstairs with equally small but lofty spaces upstairs. After the earthquakes, it became a beacon for what post-quake Christchurch could be. “It was one of those streets you stumbled on,” says Shop Eight’s Liz Phelan. “It just captured my imagination.” The Shop Eight fit-out is simple, all white and timber, with furniture made in Christchurch by Rekindle with timber reclaimed from local buildings. “There’s been so much care taken to reclaim the wood and you can sense that in the space,” Phelan says. Phelan didn’t intend the restaurant to become a beacon of sustainable eating – she just wanted to create a place in the city that would serve the community. Linking that with organic, local and often foraged ingredients felt like the right thing to do. For these reasons, Lincoln University, HOME and Taste magazines recently hosted a dinner at Shop Eight, bringing together food writers, producers, winemakers and academics to celebrate the home-grown and sustainable. Guests were treated to a five-course tasting menu, in which most of the ingredients were sourced from Christchurch and Canterbury, and prepared by Shop Eight’s chef Michael Smith. “I cook as little as possible,” he says, “to increase the energy in each dish.” The meal began with chicken livers from local farmers Westwood Chickens, prepared as pâté with foraged porcini cream, nettle sauce, pickled shiitake and garden herbs. The rich, silky dish was served with an orange wine from Black Estate. It was followed by line-caught, pickled kahawai – a vastly underrated fish treated in an unusual way with sauerkraut, potatoes cooked in riesling, kombu, horseradish sauce and smoked, cured turbot roe. This was a dish of singular genius, with complex, fermented flavours that were beautifully set off by Hommage à L’Alsace riesling from Mountford Estate. Then an “earth dish” of smoked ox tongue with locally grown Jerusalem artichokes. This was followed by a dessert of gorse-flower jelly with honey cake, whipped soured cream, chamomile honey bubbles, hard-crack honey and calendula.

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Shop Eight is a lovely eatery and is also symbolic of grassroots change in post-quake Christchurch. Lin Roberts, a senior lecturer at Lincoln’s department of environmental management, says there is enormous enthusiasm for genuine sustainability for the rebuild. “People could see the opportunity for the city to be at the forefront of sustainability for the future.” While the loss of heritage architecture is tragic, the city has the opportunity to do things differently. In 2012, a group of Christchurch citizens formed the Viva Project and kicked off the design of a proposed sustainable urban village. “Cities designed in 1840, or even 1980, are not of the design you’d use today,” says Roberts. New cities should be designed with high-performing homes close to the centre and enable residents to easily flow between private, public and community spaces. Viva is still searching for an appropriate site for its village – its fi rst was slated for the proposed stadium – and grassroots support for sustainability remains high. “A significant portion of the population is ready to move into the city and live in well-designed places,” says Roberts. “They can have all the benefits of Hagley Park, the river and the city within close proximity. They are keen to live a more sustainable life and feel part of a community.” The cost of land has stymied the development of residential communities in the centre, particularly community-minded projects, and builders in Christchurch tend to remain resistant to radically improving the environmental performance of buildings. “To have a vibrant city you need people to live there,” says Roberts. “But the price of land is not feasible. If you want a range of people, not just wealthy retired people, you need the price of land to be lower.” Sustainability is crucial to Shop Eight. Better urban design would intensify the centre and preserve agricultural land on the margins, giving residents access to allotments to grow food. Roberts muses that some of the red-zoned land in the city’s east that’s unsuitable for building could be made available for allotments. “You meet and work alongside others in the natural environment. It’s a great way to grow social and community capital. It allows people to know where their food is coming from, but it’s also a social bonding thing.” For recipes, visit foodtolove.co.nz/recipes


HOME + LINCOLN UNIVERSITY

Left Food producers, writers, winemakers and academics gathered at Shop Eight in Christchurch to enjoy expertly prepared local produce and celebrate sustainability. Below left Shop Eight chef Michael Smith crafts dishes that are as close to nature as possible.

Above The pâté was an exquisite dish of foraged porcini cream, nettle sauce, pickled shiitake and garden herbs. Below Natural wines accompanied the dishes, including a dessert of gorse-flower jelly with honey cake, whipped soured cream, chamomile honey bubbles and calendula.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 47


ANZ PRESENTS

+ NEW DEVELOPMENTS

Inside the Malcolm Walkerdesigned home of Patrick Reynolds and Maria Majsa and their children. The black vessel is by Katherine Smyth, and the artwork is by John Reynolds. For more, see p.50.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 49


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DESIGNS FOR LIVING

MIXED MESSAGES ARCHITECT MARSHALL COOK’S OWN HOME IS A MASTERCLASS IN BEAUTY, DURABILITY AND DEFTLY MIXING MATERIALS.

Architect Marshall Cook has spent a lifetime thinking about how people make them-selves at home. His own house, shoehorned onto a small site in Auckland’s Freemans Bay, is an exploration of new possibilities for an extended family (and lots of regular guests) in an increasingly crowded city. “At the moment, we have three generations of our family here,” Marshall says of the home he shares with his wife Prue and an ever-changing cast of children, in-laws and grandchildren. The home presents a deft mix of materials to the street – marble, cedar, terracotta and stone – that are echoed inside. Cook envisaged his house as two pavilions, one at the front and one at the back of the section, linked by a sky-lit “virtual corridor” that expands to become an indoor-outdoor living area opening completely onto a sunny, sheltered courtyard. Each of the home’s three main spaces – the open-plan kitchen and living area, a snug book-lined sitting room and the private upstairs bedrooms – can be used independently and further divided into smaller areas as required. It is a simple design that works well for the extended family because everyone has their own private area to retreat to, but “sooner or later”, Prue says, “everyone needs to meet in the central space if they want a cup of tea.” There are many who feel that moving closer to the city only results in compromise – that liveability must be traded for the convenience of being closer to work. In this elegant, easy-going house, Marshall Cook shows how those rules need not apply.

Above The main living area opens completely onto the courtyard, adding a sense of spaciousness to the tight city site. Cedar weatherboards are used on the exterior and interior of the home.

Right The home faces the street with timber fins that allow privacy and filter sunlight.

Left A stone-clad fence frames the courtyard, while terracotta tiles clad the entry to the home.

cooksargisson.co.nz

Left Louvres impart a breezy sensibility to the guest wing, a flexible upstairs space that can also serve as a study.

Photography by Patrick Reynolds.

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DESIGNS FOR LIVING Right Architect Jack McKinney added a new living, dining and kitchen area to the back of his Kingsland villa. The roof rises to twin peaks, where clerestory windows allow the room to be filled with light.

DFL:02

FLEXIBLE BENEFITS ARCHITECT JACK MCKINNEY’S TWIN-PEAKED EXTENSION TO HIS FAMILY HOME IS NOT YOUR REGULAR VILLA RENOVATION. Left Built-in bookshelves line the sitting area of the open-plan living space.

It started small, as so many big projects do. Jack McKinney and his partner Tracy Lunjevich’s villa in the Auckland suburb of Kingsland was far from cute when they bought it – in fact, it was a bit of dog. They started, as you do, around the edges. Because they didn’t have a lot of money, they did a lot of the work themselves. “There were a few years of repairing the old house without giving much thought to transforming the space,” says McKinney. They replaced the front door and rebuilt the verandah in particularly elegant fashion – it’s plain, but the boards of the deck extend further than the posts. In fact, the verandah is the first hint that something is different behind the villa’s front door. Down a long hallway, past bedrooms and bathrooms, you pop out into a crisp, contemporary space. There are white walls, dark wooden floors, a stainless steel kitchen and a bookshelf built out of black-stained ply. The east-facing wall is filled with white, sliding timber-and-glass doors – when pushed back, they open up to a view of the studio space, with a matching twin-peaked roof and clerestory windows.

Above The simple kitchen features a stainless-steel island and grey cabinetry. McKinney designed and made the pendant light above the bench.

Despite the mix of dramatic, resolutely modern materials and the simple structure of the villa, the renovation never feels imposing. There is light, but not too much light, and there are borrowed views. The result is a house that offers contemporary living while still managing to retain the character of the original villa.

mwarchitects.co.nz

Right McKinney converted an old garage on the site to a studio bedroom. In the living area, an overhead beam continues the line of the villa’s hallway.

Photography by Patrick Reynolds.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 51


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DESIGNS FOR LIVING

PERSONAL TOUCH A RENOVATION BY MALCOLM WALKER CREATES A HIGHLY PERSONAL HOME FOR PATRICK REYNOLDS AND HIS FAMILY.

Photographer Patrick Reynolds and his wife Maria Majsa had sworn off villas before falling victim for the charms of the Auckland house they call home. Describing her first visit to the house, Maria says: “It’s like falling in love for the first time: you walk in and the feeling is there for you in the chemistry of the house.” Falling in love, of course, has never been an entirely practical emotion. For starters, the couple and their three children were never going to fit into the compact square villa. With Walker’s help, they mulled over possibilities offered by radical options but eventually chose a middle path, deciding to personalise the villa through a contemporary extension. Comprised of living, dining and kitchen areas, an upstairs main bedroom with an en suite, and a wonderfully cosy sitting room with a fireplace, the extension is very different to the original villa but deeply respectful of it. The exposed concrete walls of the addition were poured in place on site using timber framing that echoes the shapes of the villa’s weatherboards. Other touches include a mirroring of the villa’s central corridor that extends through the home’s new wing and an empathetic pitched roof. Patrick and Maria’s home is very much one that captures the spirit of its occupants, and they speak effusively about the transformative effect it has had on their lives. The addition has given Patrick and Maria the space to work from home, while the two eldest children are both in bands that regularly envelop the house in the crashes of the drum kit and the twang of electric guitars. And even in quiet periods when only the parents are at home, the house feels poised for action, eager to be brought back to life by the family’s energy.

Above The original villa form gradually breaks down as it transitions to the new wing. Here, a family space serves as library, study and music room.

Right Concrete walls for the extension were cast in-situ, with the imprints of their timber framing providing a sense of connection to the original villa.

Left Maria in the home’s kitchen, where a high clerestory window lets in late-afternoon light.

Below Walker designed new family living areas and a main bedroom at the back of the original villa.

malcolmwalker.co.nz

Photography by Patrick Reynolds.

For new developments in designs for living head to homestolove.co.nz/designsforliving

Whatever your grand plan, talk 52 / HOME NEW ZEALAND


DFL:04

DESIGNS FOR LIVING

FAMILY MATTERS

Q&A WITH ANZ MORTGAGE MANAGER, RACHEL HOLDING.

AMANDA YATES CREATES A SMART, COMPACT HOME FOR HER PARENTS THAT IS DESIGNED TO BE ENJOYED FOR GENERATIONS TO COME.

David and Christine Yates’s house on the Coromandel Peninsula is a family home in the truest sense of the word. It was designed by their architecture lecturer daughter, Amanda, for their retirement, with the knowledge that future generations of the extended family will see it as their place now and for decades down the line. “The house has been a brilliant laboratory for me to test ideas,” Amanda says. “I wouldn’t have had that opportunity with a regular client.” To design her parents’ home – which has one bedroom and living space on the lower level and a self-contained studio upstairs – Amanda drew on a formative architectural experience from her childhood: Her father, a doctor, commissioned revered architect John Scott to design a new building for his small medical practice in the late 1970s. Accordingly, Scott’s buildings inspired many features of David and Christine’s 120-squaremetre home, most notably its pivoting doors and modest material palette of concrete and strandboard. The home is anchored to the hill with a dramatically sloping concrete wall that mimics the gradient of the rock face. It’s a conscious echo of Ngamatea, one of Scott’s most famous houses.

Above The home has a studio on its upper level, and enjoys views of Maramaratotara Bay.

Right The home’s kitchen and living areas are anchored by a sloping concrete wall that reflects the angle of the terrain outside. Below Bright-green cabinetry distinguishes the kitchen island, which occupies the centre of the open-plan living space.

Amanda hopes her parents’ house will become a place where now, and in the future, all the extended family can continue to gather. More than 20 family members have been known to meet for a summer meal to celebrate the new year. While the adults were initially bemused by the internal concrete wall, the kids intuitively understood its designer’s intention to blur the interior with the rock outside. “They ran up and down it and had a great time,” Amanda says. Future generations are at home here already.

emergentecologies.net

Photography by Paul McCredie.

HOME When’s the best time to talk about financial options if someone is contemplating a renovation or new-build project? RACHEL HOLDING The earlier the better. In most cases we can work out what a customer can afford, which can indicate the scope of renovations as well as what materials and products they can use.

How can a mobile mortgage manager help establish a budgetary scope for such a project? As part of our pre-approval process we visit our customers and work with them on what they can afford to repay if it is a mortgage. We also work with other professionals such as registered valuers to ensure the final value of the property merits the work being done. Many projects encounter unforeseen costs. How do you help your clients deal with these eventualities? I encourage them to get all the costs up front before they actually sign anything with a builder. We will also work with them to ensure that they have considered the costs they may need. It is better to have more time spent up front than trying to find extra money in the middle of the work. If there are any additional costs through the build we will work with the clients to try to resolve these situations. What’s the best way for people to get in touch to tap into ANZ’s expertise? As a Mobile Mortgage Manager, I specialise in home loans. I have done many building loans from start to finish with customers, which means I have seen the good, the bad and the ugly when it comes to what can and does happen. I can come to people at a time and place that suits them so that they can have complete comfort in discussing their plans. Thinking about building a new home or renovating? Talk to ANZ, the home loan experts. They’ll walk you through the process of financing your project. Visit anz.co.nz/homeloans.

ANZ lending criteria, terms, conditions and fees apply. The Q&A material is for information purposes only. Its content is intended to be of a general nature, it does not take into account your financial situation or goals, and is not a personalised financial adviser service under the Financial Advisers Act 2008. You should seek professional advice relevant to your individual circumstances. To the extent permitted by law, ANZ does not accept any responsibility or liability arising from your use of this information.

to the home loan experts today. HOME NEW ZEALAND / 53


28 Nov 2015 –––— 28 Mar 2016 Free Entry

Stella Corkery Smoke and Butterfly 2015 courtesy of the artist and Michael Lett


P:01

COOL POOLS

A watery retreat by Herbst Architects makes outdoor living easy. TEXT

— Jeremy Hansen

PHOTOG RAPHY PRODUCTION

— Simon Devitt

— Sam Smith and

Catherine Wilkinson

It wasn’t your average architectural project. For starters, the house – large, traditional in style and beautifully made with stone and timber – already existed. Its owners, Rick and Charlotte Anderson, weren’t interested in renovating it, but in improving its relationship with the site around it. It took persistence, but eventually they persuaded architects Lance and Nicola Herbst to drive to their rural property near Auckland and take a look. Let’s be clear. The Herbsts – winners of our 2012 Home of the Year award and designers of many beautiful homes – wouldn’t normally accept a commission to design a garage and pool house, which is one way of describing what this project entailed. But the reality was much more significant: Their interventions, created by working in tandem with Rick, a landscape architect, have transformed the relationship of the home to its site, and brought clarity and coherence to the property. (The project won a 2015 national award from the NZ Institute of Architects). When they visited, the Herbsts realised that the home’s southern elevation was crying out for a courtyard – a sheltered space for arrivals and departures that would provide a smoother transition between inside and out. To create it, they designed a building facing the home that is made up of a carport, storage areas and an elegant office. All of it is rendered in lightweight cedar that provides a counterpoint to the heft of the home. Creating a courtyard by enclosing the space outside the home’s entrance makes the building feel more connected to its site. To free up usable space around the house, Rick and the Herbsts quite literally decided to remove a hill, locating the pool on the newly flat space on a symmetrical axis with the home. The Herbsts deployed the same vocabulary of slatted timber for the pool house, which is anchored by the bulk of a fireplace and chimney. Windows and screens slide back on a sunny day to make the space feel less enclosed and more like a verandah. There is a large dining table, built-in seats, and a few simple steps that lead down to the pool. All of these amenities are enthusiastically used by the family, a clear sign that these new buildings have opened up the site in just the way the Andersons and the Herbsts envisaged.

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Rick Anderson, his children and the family dogs at their poolhouse. The vessels on the deck are from Garden Objects (left), and ECC (right).


HOME NEW ZEALAND / 57


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COOL POOLS

on a sunny day to make the space feel less enclosed and more like a verandah.

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Left A diving board is a focus of activity at the far end of the pool. Far left The pool house features moveable cedar screens that allow light and breezes to be easily modulated. A gabion wall behind it conceals a utility shed from view.

Right A skylight illuminates the centre of the poolhouse, which features built-in furniture and a ‘Random’ pendant by Bertjan Pot for Moooi from ECC. The white ‘EOS’ outdoor chairs are by Case from Simon James Design. Below A ‘Nestrest’ chair by Daniel Pouzet and Fred Frety for Dedon hangs at the end of the pool area. Steps at right lead past gabion walls to the tennis court.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 59


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COOL POOLS

All of it is rendered in lightweight cedar that provides a counterpoint to the heft of the home.

Top The new garage and entry building also contains a cedarlined study connected to the original home by a walkway designed by the Herbsts.

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Above The study enjoys a dramatic view, taking in the river, the wetlands and the coastline a few kilometres southeast of the rural property.


Above The central space in the new garage pavilion allows storage in cupboards on either side, a view to the ridge beyond, and a shaded spot for resting a pony. Right Rather than design a fully enclosed garage, the Herbsts designed a screened carport that glows like a lantern at night. The study is located at the far end of the building. Left In the study, the lamp on the desk and the bowl on the shelf behind it are both by Tom Dixon from ECC. The objects on the desk are by Warwick Freeman from Everyday Needs.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 61


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COOL POOLS

A pool and pavilion by Pattersons on Canterbury’s Banks Peninsula is a getaway all its own. TEXT

— Jeremy Hansen

PHOTOG RAPHY

— Simon Devitt

It is a modern pool in the grounds of a historic house. The location is Annandale, a sheep and cattle station on Canterbury’s Banks Peninsula with which regular readers of this magazine might be familiar, as we have featured three properties on the farm in previous issues: the Scrubby Bay Farmhouse, the single-bedroom getaway known as Seascape, and a century-old shepherd’s cottage that has been recently restored. All these projects were the work of Pattersons, the Auckland-based architecture firm that has also designed this pool for Annandale’s historic homestead on the shores of Pigeon Bay. When it came to this project, Pattersons founder Andrew Patterson (who worked on it with his fellow director Davor Popadich) didn’t feel pressured to use the architectural language of the original homestead. “It’s at least 100 metres away and can’t be seen in the same context,” he says. “We decided to do something that was landscape-based, to base it on the logic of the site rather than with any preconceived colonial ideas.” The pool and its adjacent pavilion therefore act as an extension of the homestead’s garden, positioned high on the site to allow views of the foreshore and as much sun as possible. It is built on a platform that means a ha-ha acts as pool fencing at the front, allowing clear views from the pool seating area of the garden in front. At the back, the fencing is placed a few metres from the pavilion so as not to feel like it’s encroaching on the area. The 25-metre pool is simply lined with sealed natural concrete and has an infinity edge, but it’s the pavilion that is the real star of this ensemble. The dramatic monopitch structure, its roof constructed from fastened LVL rafters, provides generous shade for an outdoor seating area, while rising at the back to allow views of hilltops to the south. The 100-square-metre interior features a wall made of stone from the farm’s own quarry, a showering and changing area and a small gymnasium. (The Annandale homestead and all the other residences on the property are available as luxury holiday rentals). At the front, windows slide back to allow custom-made squabs to be placed on the wide sills, which work beautifully as a sunbathing spot.

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The pool has an infinity edge that allows clear views to the harbour beyond. The pavilion’s wide sills are a prime sunbathing spot.


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Below A two-way spanning LVL structure forms the pavilion’s roof, providing generous shade for an outdoor seating area.

Right The pool pavilion features concrete steps and a wall of natural stone that comes from the farm’s own quarry.

The dramatic monopitch structure provides generous shade while rising at the back to allow views of hilltops.

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Above Water from the roof is channelled into a drain via a chain standing in for a downpipe. Left The pool functions as an extension to the homestead’s large garden. Right The pavilion roof tips upwards to allow views of the Banks Peninsula hills to the south. The pool is lined in sealed natural concrete.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 65


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Fearon Hay transforms a petite Auckland back yard into a summery paradise. TEXT

— Jeremy Hansen

PHOTOG RAPHY PRODUCTION

Left A Boffi bath (with a shower and tapware also by Boffi) occupies the end of the pool and sits among nikau and karaka plantings. The ‘Dama’ table by CR&S Poliform is from Studio Italia, and the towel is from Indie Home Collective. Above Concrete steps lead from the new deck to the lawn.

— Patrick Reynolds

— Amelia Holmes

Poorly designed pools can feel as if they’ve severed a back yard in two, a lose-lose situation that results in an unpleasant sense of constriction and very little of the holiday-at-home joy such a body of water is supposed to impart. But it doesn’t have to be this way, as an Auckland pool by Jeff Fearon and Tim Hay of Fearon Hay Architects proves. In fact, the entire project was conceived as a way of improving the home’s relationship with the outdoors. “It needed unification, something that would bring it all together,” says Fearon. The home, a split-level affair designed in the 1990s, had its living areas a half-level higher than the garden, so the owners approached Fearon Hay with a request to improve the connection between the two. The duo responded with a two-point proposal: first, to build a generous new deck a couple of steps down from the home’s main living level and, second, to raise the entire back yard 1.5 metres to bring it closer to the deck. The new deck features an outdoor fireplace and seating area, and steps leading down to the newly raised lawn. The pool, Fearon says, “needed to be long, so we created these beautiful horizontal lines that all these levels connected to.” The newly raised lawn forms the retaining edge of the pool, which features white plastered walls, timber decking and dense plantings of nikau and karaka. A Boffi bath and shower fixture sit at one end of the pool, something Fearon and Hay say is a less visually cluttered alternative to a spa. The customary approach to fencing such a pool might be to choose glass balustrades, but Fearon and Hay took a different path, opting for custom-made white steel pickets. “They’re very louvre-like when you look along them, but you can see straight through them to the pool, and they’re fantastic with light and shadow” Fearon says. “Glass only dematerialises when it’s very clean and seen perpendicular with no reflection. It’s difficult to make it feel good.” Now the project is complete, the insertion of the pool and its supporting elements have brought the joy the owners sought. “It reinvented the way the house related to the site,” Fearon says.

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Left The new deck features an outdoor fireplace and a timber bench by Poliform from Studio Italia. Below The pool is fenced with custom-made white steel pickets. The black ‘Anin’ stools by David Lopez Quincoces for Living Divani are from Studio Italia, and the ‘Frank’ ottoman by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia is from Matisse. Right The Boffi bath at the pool edge is easily big enough for two. Far right The white steel pickets “are fantastic with light and shadow”, says Jeff Fearon, especially against the pool’s white plaster walls.

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long, so we created these beautiful horizontal lines that all these levels connected to.�

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A Northland pool designed to be taken in day-long doses.

Above The pool’s fencing is cleverly managed, with a wall of local stone rising to a gate next to the small pavilion.

TEXT

Below The pool faces north, backed by a well-planted hill and with views to the sea.

— Jeremy Hansen

PHOTOG RAPHY

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— Samuel Hartnett


Pool fencing requirements often make you wonder if it’s worth even bothering with a pool, given that the need to make a body of water safe will also render it unsightly. But, given the right amount of space and design smarts, anything is possible, as this Northland pool proves. It was designed by Noel Lane Architects in association with Rowe Baetens Architects. Located on a large getaway property, it feels less like an intrusion on the landscape, and more like a nature-based escape.

elevated north-facing position allows for a protected outlook to the sea shore. “We were mindful of distilling the architecture down to its very simplistic elements,” says Tom Rowe of Rowe Baetens. “We did things with care and fineness of detail and a sense of craft. The complexity was in hiding all the services – pumps, pool covers and that kind of thing. Pools have all these components, and our job was to make them look like they didn’t really exist.”

The architects were asked by their clients to design a simple shelter that enhanced enjoyment of its lovely coastal site. The ideal image of a great swimming pool evokes a sense of freedom in nature, which presented a challenge for the architects: as well as the requisite fencing, pools also come with an array of pumps and filtration equipment that must be carefully concealed.

The fencing is beautifully managed. The pool is built on a platform and surrounded by a wall of local stone. Behind the wall is a planted trench, allowing a clear view from the pool area to the shore. This fence rises on the entry side of the pool to a gate attached to the cedar-clad pavilion. (As well as a mechanical kit for the pool, the 20-square-metre pavilion contains a changing room, toilet and kitchenette, and has a built-in Louvretec shade over the outdoor seating area.) The wall continues around the back of the pool, where it is carefully concealed with new planting. “There’s no glass, there’s nothing shiny about it,” Rowe says. “Everything is patinated, and will continue to do so over time. There’s a quality in terms of tactility and endurance.”

For inspiration, the architects looked to the writing of the German architect Gottfried Semper, whose 1851 book The Four Elements of Architecture advocated an almost primitivist approach to the creation of shelter. They channelled Semper’s belief in the importance of elemental gathering places into the use of natural materials such as stone walls and a timber shelter. The pool’s thoughtful placement also reflects some of Semper’s beliefs: the hill behind provides a sense of security, while the

The 20-metre-long pool is lined not in glossy blue, but in black tiles, which not only absorb heat from the sun, but help create the sense of this being a natural place to take a plunge.

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“There’s no glass, there’s nothing shiny about it. There’s a quality in terms of tactility and endurance.”

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Above The pavilion is built on a platform surrounded by a stone wall, an elegant solution to potentially unsightly fencing.

Below Built-in Louvretec aluminium louvres allow sunlight to be modulated on the outdoor seating area adjacent to the pavilion.


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The season of sunshine is all about transparency, reflections and cool aquatic hues. STYLING

— Sam Smith and Catherine Wilkinson

PHOTOG RAPHY

— Toaki Okano

Wall colours: Resene ‘Blue Bayoux’ (left) and Resene ‘Escape’ (right), resene.co.nz. Artworks, from left: ‘Blue’ (2014) by Boyd Webb, $12,800, and ‘Larconica #2’ (2008-09) by Murray Green, $4000, both from Two Rooms Gallery, tworooms.co.nz. Accessories and furnishings, from left: ‘Only Me’ mirror (green) by Philippe Starck for Kartell, $489 from backhousenz.com; ‘Plane’ lamp by Tom Dixon, $1085 from ECC, ecc.co.nz; ‘Optic’ cube by Patrick Jouin for Kartell, $501 from Backhouse; Yellow stained glass and blue stained glass, both from The Glassworks, glassworks.co.nz; ‘Katrin’ armchair by Carlo Colombo for Arflex, from $7500 from Studio Italia, studioitalia.co.nz. ‘Tank’ floor lamp by Alexander Taylor for Established & Sons, $3927 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com. Plant and planter, $74 from Bioattic, bioattic.co.nz.


Wall colour: Resene ‘Blue Bayoux’, resene.co.nz. Artwork: ‘Untitled’ (2012) by Martin Basher, courtesy of Starkwhite Gallery, starkwhite.co.nz. Accessories and furnishings from left: ‘Fan’ chair by Tom Dixon, $4420 from ECC, ecc.co.nz; glass vessel, $975 from Mid Century Design, midcenturydesign.co.nz; blue stained glass from The Glassworks, glassworks.co.nz; ‘Bell’ table by Sebastian Herkner for Classicon, $3945 from Matisse, matisse.co.nz, with lucite grapes, $450 from Mid Century Design, midcenturydesign.co.nz; ‘Strips’ modular sofa by Cini Boeri for Arflex, from $5000 from Studio Italia, studioitalia.co.nz, with cushion by Marta Buda, $450 from martabuda.com; ‘Chimbarongo Triple’ pendant by Alvaro Catalán de Ocón for PET Lamps, $1997 from Backhouse, backhousenz.com; ‘Dalù’ lamp by Vico Magistretti for Artemide, $175 from ECC, ecc.co.nz.


Wall colours: Resene ‘Blue Bayoux’ (left) and Resene ‘Escape’, resene.co.nz. Artworks, from left: ‘Die Cuts & Derivations’ (2015) (yellow, on floor) by Peter Robinson, POA from Hopkinson Mossman, hopkinsonmossman.com; ‘Laguna Study I’ (2014) by Elizabeth Thomson, $8000 from Two Rooms Gallery, tworooms.co.nz. Accessories and furnishings, from left: ‘Solar’ lamp (on floor) by Jean-Marie Massaud for Foscarini, $1890 from ECC, ecc.co.nz; ‘Relaxer’ chair by Verner Panton, $3800 a pair from Mr Bigglesworthy, mrbigglesworthy.co.nz; yellow stained glass (behind screen) from The Glassworks, glassworks.co.nz; ‘Aha’ stool by Philippe Starck for Kartell, $194 from Backhouse, backhousenz.com; orange stained glass from The Glassworks, glassworks.co.nz; plinth painted in Resene ‘Onahau’, resene.co.nz, with drinking glasses by Monmouth Glass Studio, $55 each from Tessuti, tessuti.co.nz; ‘Copycat’ lamp by Michael Anastassiades for Flos, $1615 from ECC, ecc.co.nz; ‘Moucharabieh’ paravent screen by Jean-Marie Massaud for Poltrona Frau, $8420 from Matisse, matisse.co.nz.


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82 A Rakino Island getaway by Malcolm Walker.

130 A Kapiti Coast bach renovation by Gerald Parsonson.

94 Julian Guthrie designs a holiday home at Muriwai.

118

106 Richard Naish references tramping huts in a family bach.

Bossley Architects in the Bay of Islands.


This page The home’s interior is lined in hoop pine plywood, and features built-in window seats for taking in the view.

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Facing page Owner and builder Milton Candish and his son, James, walk to the shore at the foot of their Rakino Island site.


BEST BACHES

An island getaway by Malcolm Walker keeps things simple. TEXT

— Claire McCall

PHOTOG RAPHY PRODUCTION

— Duncan Innes

— Janice Kumar-Ward

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 83


Above Walker’s design picked up on the architectural language of Vernon Brown’s work from the 30s to the 50s.

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Right James stands on the east-facing deck of the 50-square-metre home, looking out towards The Noises.


The single road through Rakino Island in the Hauraki Gulf rises and falls in rhythm with the bite-size coves that indent the island’s coastline. Above Maori Garden Bay, where the friable loam was once farmed with kumara and yams, the homes in the Golden Heights development face east. For holidaymakers, sunrise is a gentle, luminescent alarm clock, revealing the lumpy forms of The Noises peeking out of the ocean before it creeps into the windows, turning the plywood walls of Milton Candish and Penny Harvie’s home into a golden honeycomb. When Candish, a builder, fi rst camped out here on his good friend’s patch, he was captivated by the view that swept all the way to the Colville Channel – a gap that frames Great Barrier Island in the far-off haze. “I liked that there were no shops and that the whole island was off-grid,” he says. In 1998, he paid $40,000 for the 1000-square-metre section next door. Apart from property values, little has changed in 18 years. Near the ferry wharf, a line-up of warrantless cars, their bellies brushed by buffalo grass, awaits the arrival of absent owners. The local population of permanent residents stands at 16. In keeping with island time, progress on the site was made slowly. The 50-square-metre holiday home that Candish built for his young family has been habitable for four Christmases and is an ongoing labour of love. Each weekend, Candish makes the picture a little more complete, fencing off the surrounding paddock so the sheep can’t get trapped beneath the elevated deck, or crafting a zigzag set of steps as sculptural access. Architect Malcolm Walker designed the bach next door so, in an organic process, his enthusiasm for the island meant it seemed entirely natural to help Candish with this project. Walker’s instinct was that a “genius” site needed nothing more than simplicity. His approach also allowed this home to commune with its neighbour. “We picked up on the architectural language and forms of Vernon Brown’s houses of the 30s to the 50s,” says Walker, an approach that is particularly evident in the home’s dark timber and white window frames, a signature of Brown’s. He presented the plans as hand-drawn sketches: a monopitch cabin tucked into the hillside. “It’s a porous space, a small refuge to walk through,” says Walker.

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Walker’s instinct was that a “genius” site needed nothing more than simplicity. “It’s a porous space, a small refuge to walk through,” he says.

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Left The dining area includes a built-in window seat and simple bookshelves.

Above Milton and James play a game on the window seat in the living area.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 87


Below The simple kitchen has one strip of stainless steel work surface. On Candish’s first attempt to achieve the duck-egg blue cabinetry, the outcome was “an unusual peppermint green”. The Peter Haythornthwaite fire box, with a copper heat shield behind it, keeps the open-plan area warm.

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Clockwise from top left A built-in side table supplements the storage in the bed base; a nifty pop-top room contains built-in beds; the ladder leads to the lofty sleep space that looks over the roof to the sea; the shower screen echoes the deck balustrades.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 89


The bach may appear unpretentious, but its planning is far from basic. Within the compact footprint, every inch is actively explored. A utilitarian zone accessed from the back deck contains the shower and loo as well as a separate pantry and generous chest freezer. At the front of the home, the living area and main bedroom face the sea. Storage is slipped beneath window seats along with pull-out trays where visitors can perch a cup of coffee or a book. There are no couches or coffee tables. Fun is part of this thoughtful functionality. Walker incorporated a jaunty pop-top room that is accessed by a ladder and contains built-in day beds which add to the ‘sleeps’ quota. While the humble shape of the dwelling is akin to many others on the island, the combination of Walker’s refined design and Candish’s meticulous handiwork ensures this tiny house rises above its stature. Externally, paired doubles of posts are “a Malcolmism” that lift the roof to the sky while chunky, pa-like railings march in crisp formation around a deck that steps in and out to follow the line of the interior. The junctions that make up the structural jigsaw are celebrated in many ways. “Having this house is like owning a boat; all year round it is exposed to winds, and everything has to stand up to the harsh elements. I love to see the fixings,” says Candish. So 14-guage purlin screws, rather than nails, drive in the 150mm deck railings; stainless-steel braces in cross formation reinforce the decking roof and Candish even had some copper end caps custom-made for the

Right The sloping site offered the opportunity to tuck another room on the bach’s lower level. Candish calls the room a tool shed, while his partner Penny Harvie calls it her yoga room. Far right Candish worked to island time on his build, travelling to Rakino over many weekends to work on the house.

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handrails. “They cost $2 each, they’re folded like little ashtrays and protect the end grain from water getting in which can split the timber.” Painstaking hours were spent crafting the spacers and strips that create a pallet-like platform to the deck – a technique which gives the illusion of a home that hovers above the ground. Internally, hoop-pine ply wall linings are glued and screwed as another bracing element. The kitchen, with just one small but workable stainless bench, features duck-egg blue cabinetry that speaks of another era. “It was repainted as my fi rst attempt came out an unusual peppermint green,” explains Candish. A patient practitioner, he rounded the corners on all the cabinet doors by hand. He likes the fact that this softens the aesthetic, and gives it a crafted quality. “Everything in town is so slick.” On a hunk of water-locked land where the population is sparse, self-sufficiency is a given. Louvre windows ensure healthy air flow, the septic tank is shared with the neighbouring property and four solar panels and a battery bank provide enough energy for this life less ordinary. Building here has been an unhurried, careful affair. And, while the well-known cheese advert reminds us that “good things take time”, measured progress over years also allows us the time to appreciate the journey. “When I have my head down cutting a bit of wood, I’ll look up and out over the row of olive trees to see someone snorkelling or fishing in the bay. I never get tired of it,” says Candish.


Below Walker describes the home as “a porous space, a small refuge to walk through”. The paired posts that stand sentinel around the building are a “Malcolmism” used in many of his designs.

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DESIGN NOTEBOOK

People talk about the importance of paring back holiday homes. How did you do it here? Tony Watkins once said a holiday house celebrates what you’ve got; a bach celebrates what you don’t need. Rakino is an island of basics – that’s why you go there. It’s a very satisfying thing to strip life back. I admire people who can do that. Happy to help! You don’t need much as shelter, but it’s important to do it carefully and well. You can’t fudge it. Careful thought is the key to affordable and simple housing. What made you refer to Vernon Brown’s black-and-white homes from the 30s

to the 50s in these designs? The job we did next door used a similar approach. It seemed to suit something simple, almost nostalgic but with a twist. You collaborated with Milton, who built the home. How important is an empathetic builder? Compatibility might be a better word. We’re all in it together (including the owner) so if you don’t get on or agree, you’re all wasting each other’s time. It’s hard work being a builder, it’s hard work being an architect (and it’s not easy being the owner) but when you have understanding between everyone there’s nothing more satisfying.

Q&A with Malcolm Walker of Malcolm Walker Architects

4. 5. 6. 7.

Deck Entry hall Loft

M


HOME OF THE YEAR 2016 CALL FOR ENTRIES In 2016, our prestigious Home of the Year award turns 21. In addition to the Supreme Award (which carries a prize of $15,000), we’re now expanding the programme to include four new sub-categories.

Right The twin cabins in Kaipara by Nat Cheshire of Cheshire Architects won the 2014 Home of the Year award. Photograph by Darryl Ward. Below Richard Naish of RTA Studio designed the E-Type House, his family home, which won the 2015 Home of the Year award. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.

Award entries are due by 5pm, Thursday 10 December, 2015. For full terms and conditions of entry, visit homestolove.co.nz/homeoftheyear or contact homenewzealand@bauermedia.co.nz

Left The 2013 Home of the Year, the Headland House on Waiheke Island by Stevens Lawson Architects. Photograph by Mark Smith. Below Stevens Lawson Architects also designed Te Kaitaka, the 2010 Home of the Year in Wanaka. Photograph by Mark Smith.

S U P R E M E AWA R D

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HOME

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HOME OF THE YEAR 2016

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 93


This page Projected forward to launch into the dramatic views from its clifftop site, the house is also designed to reveal visual surprises, such as the cut-out section of the roof above the deck. Right Architect Julian Guthrie sits in a corner of the home he designed at Muriwai, on the west coast of Auckland.

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BEST BACHES

A design by Julian Guthrie sits rock-solid in sunshine and storms. TEXT

— Simon Farrell-Green

PHOTOG RAPHY PRODUCTION

— Patrick Reynolds

— Yvette Jay

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The 300mm concrete walls of the living pavilion were poured on site and retain the imprint of their timber framing. The home was designed in an L shape to shelter its north-facing courtyard from the westerly winds. it was built by Boyd Cox Construction. The three bedrooms are contained in the timber volume at right.

On t he cliff a b ove t he sout her n end of Auckland’s Muriwai Beach, a line of houses overlooks the world-famous gannet colony and Oaia Island, where hundreds of seals come ashore to give birth each year. From up here, the beach stretches away into the surf-hazed distance along the coast. The sunsets are spectacular, and so are the storms. The home on these pages, designed by Julian Guthrie for an Auckland couple who spend a few days here every week, had a long gestation period. Back in 2006, Guthrie was living down the road, and was introduced to his clients not long after they bought their land. They asked him to design a house for their clifftop site, but then the global fi nancial crisis hit and the project went on hold; the owners were uncertain about the wisdom of investing such a large amount of money in a beach property. Then they saw a house in this magazine’s December 2012/January 2013 issue that Guthrie had designed at Sandy Bay on Waiheke Island, which prompted them to reconsider their unrealised Muriwai design. The house Guthrie had designed on Waiheke was smaller and simpler than the original plan for their Muriwai site, and they liked that. “This sort of grew from that project,” says Guthrie. “But it’s such a different environment, so it’s quite a different response.” Where the Sandy Bay house sat on a sheltered piece of land overlooking a picturesque little cove, the Muriwai house sits on a clifftop. The fi rst thing Guthrie did was move the house as far forward on the section as he could so it almost felt as if it was grasping at the view. The owners had driven up here and sat on the roof of their jeep looking over the ocean, but the view from the finished house – three metres up in the air – is still much better than they expected. On this exposed site, Guthrie wanted solidity, and

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 97


The dining table and ‘Hawk’ chairs are by Simon James for Resident. The ‘Box System’ side tables (at left and right) by M Catalano & I Marelli for Mater are from Cult. The ‘Cross’ side table by Matthew Hilton for Case (at far end of sofa) is from Simon James. The tui cushion is by The Stitchsmith. The ‘CH25’ chair by Hans Wegner for Carl Hansen + Son is from Cult. ‘Alburni’ tables by Lucidi Pevere for Ligne Roset from Domo sit on a ‘Volcano’ rug from Source Mondial. The artwork on the shelving (top left) is by Michael Hight. The pair of works on the bottom shelf are by Emily Siddell. The large work at right is by Kathy Barber.

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Far left Timber panels create detail in the hallway that leads to the bedrooms. The panels offer a westward view and break up what would otherwise be an exposed space. Left Set deep into the concrete, a window creates a lightbox into the kitchen. To its left is a piece by Tjumoo Tjapanangka. The ‘Baker’ stools are by IMO. A small pantry area is concealed behind the white door. Below Viewed from below, only the top of the house is visible on the edge of the steep hill.

Above The grain of timber moulds that contained the poured concrete are revealed in the kitchen and living area. On the top shelf, the art works to the right of the waka hoe by Harry Wikaira are by Melissa Nungarrayi Larry, Gracie Napangardi Johnson and Phyllis Nappurrurla Williams.

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Left The roof line extends over the deck and the living area spills into this space, which is enclosed by glass screens. ‘Albert Circus’ stools by Martino Gamper dot the deck and are reflected in the glazing. The ‘Butterfly’ chairs are from Alfresco InExterior Living. Right The impressive concrete buttress meets the ground in a deliberately solid way, anchoring the home in a site exposed to extreme weather. The concrete expanse also serves as an effective thermal sink.

“It’s this big concrete buttress to the southern side and then the rest of the house hangs delicately off it.” he created it by designing a massive 300mm-thick concrete wall that was poured on site. The concrete was left rough and textural, so you can still see the grain of the timber moulds. It meets the ground in a solid, deliberate way, anchoring the home’s living area and acting as a thermal sink as well. “It’s this big concrete buttress to the southern side,” says Guthrie, “and then the rest of the house hangs delicately off it.” In fact, as you approach the house, it looks much larger than its 130 square metres, thanks to its hollow, L-shaped plan around a north-facing courtyard. The mass of the house shelters the courtyard from the wind on two sides, and the deck is enclosed by glass screens on another. The home’s roof line extends over the deck, and the living area spills onto it, but that concrete wall is ever-present, holding the weather at bay. Even the glassy end of the house feels secure: the owners can stand at the end of the living room, noses up to the glass, and not feel a thing – a far cry from their previous house down the road, where the front window would bend and flex alarmingly in a big storm. There is a simple, long living room: the kitchen is clad in rough-sawn cedar boards that echo the exterior, and raw steel. The kitchen bench tapers to become a long shelf that runs along the living room wall. A low

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window beneath it is a visual surprise. “You’re in the building but looking through its layers,” says Julian. “For a little house, that’s magical.” The bedrooms are reached up a hallway and a short flight of stairs. They’re compact spaces that feel as if they are burrowing into the hill, stepping gradually away from the courtyard so that each gets a view as well as privacy. “You still feel quite private, even though it’s a small house,” says co-owner Liz Smith. “There’s always somewhere to go.” There’s no plasterboard inside – instead, Guthrie opted for painted tongue-and-groove plywood panels, which have been beautifully detailed around corners. They add texture and materiality to what are, otherwise, very simple little rooms, an approach that was delightful at Sandy Bay and works just as well here. The ensuite is mostly glass and metal, plus a bit of timber, but it has a 3.5m stud and the light spills down the black tiles from a skylight set into the roof, giving it a cathedral-like quality. Those careful enclosures and windows break up the mass of the house, and connect it to the outside, casting shadows and offering glimpses of the landscape. A line of timber screens outside the glass in the hallway lead to the bedrooms, offering a view westwards without turning the hall into an exposed space. Back in the living space, there’s a beautiful square window set into the concrete above the butler’s pantry, through which the light drops down into the living space over folded steel and timber. Recently, one of the owners was standing down at the gannet colony, looking up at her house, and as she did so she realised she could see through that big, high window, past the concrete and out up though the house – to a perfectly framed piece of blue sky. It’s another thoughtful moment in a house with plenty of them, an absorbing perch from which to take in the arresting views.


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This is a dramatic but exposed site. Is that why you decided on the anchoring concrete wall? Yes. The wall provides both a physical and metaphorical buttress to the southerly winds, counterbalancing the extensive glass of the rest of the living room. It also creates a thermal storage mass to absorb and release heat, making the home more thermally comfortable year round.

DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with architect Julian Guthrie

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The owners initially had a bigger house in mind, but in the end asked for a smaller, three-bedroom, 130-square-metre design. It’s turned out to be exactly what they wanted, hasn’t it? It has. The global financial crisis paused the initial project, and allowed time for our clients to reconsider their requirements. They wanted to prioritise the quality of the home in terms of both

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Deck Living Dining Kitchen Entry Main bedroom Ensuite Bedroom Bathroom Laundry Gallery hall Terrace Driveway

Above left The home is full of visual surprises and pleasures, including the roof line which appears graduated as you ascend the steps past the bedrooms. Above centre Hunkered into the hillside, the bedrooms offer cosseted spaces, yet still provide connection to the outdoors. The throw and cushion are from Atelier. Above right The 3.5metre stud height in the ensuite adds drama and bathes the interior of timber, glass and metal in an abundance of light.

design aspects and build quality, in preference to larger, but otherwise poorer, spaces. Is it a lesson for clients who think they need more space? Space is experienced as both a volume and expansiveness of outlook, rather than square metreage. Efficient use of space also can create a home that feels larger than many homes with a greater footprint. We certainly steer our clients to consider quality of space over quantity. What are your favourite aspects of the house? I am thrilled by the rich variety of experiences that the house invokes within a relatively compact area. It is dramatically open at the cliff edge, and yet hunkered into the hill within the bedrooms, both a fortress and a pavilion at the same time.


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the TV built into the book shelving and the wine fridge all combine to give a feeling of intimacy, warmth and comfort. Contrasting this, the kitchen is defined by the use of high-gloss lacquer and Miele wall ovens. The island benchtop is slim, with no overhang, which gives a minimalist appearance. Corian® has been used which ensures there are no joins and delivers a totally seamless aesthetic. The subtle veining of the Corian® Venaro White softens the impact while complementing the dark oak cabinetry and black sinks. When the sun streams in across the kitchen benchtop, the light picks up the translucent properties of the veining in the Corian®. This stunning kitchen would be comfortably at home in both an urban or sophisticated coastal house. To see this kitchen yourself, visit Kouzina, 155 The Strand, Parnell.


This photo The holiday home is Inspired by the economy of trampers’ huts and farm sheds. It was built by Mackenzie Construction of Thames. Right A raised platform down the hill from the house allows views over the valley.

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BEST BACHES

Richard Naish gets back to basics with a rustic red getaway shed. TEXT

— Henry Oliver

PHOTOG RAPHY

— Patrick Reynolds

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Above The view over Coromandel’s Puketui Valley. Right The home’s pioneer-red corrugated exterior is a direct reference to its influences: Trampers’ huts are brightly painted to be visible in poor weather, while barns were often stained red, as this stain was most successful at protecting them from rot and corrosion.

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For experienced and adventurous trampers, the ones who weave their own paths through forests, across ranges and along hidden streams, the tramping hut is laden with meaning. It is shelter and rest, warmth and nourishment, solitary reflection and social bonding. It offers everything one needs for the night and nothing more. The tramping huts that dot New Zealand’s national parks were the basis for the design of a new Coromandel holiday house by Richard Naish and RTA Studio. The house is long and thin: 150 square metres of corrugated iron and plywood that stretches across a north-facing hillside in the Puketui Valley, south of Tairua. It sits high on a five-hectare site, most of which is covered in dense, regenerating native bush. Its three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and combined living space sit end-onend with no hallway connecting them. Each wing of the house is covered deck space with rolling

garage doors as two of the walls. The east wing has a bath and a view down the valley, while the west wing has a view up to the undulating hills and dramatic sunsets. The owners, an Auckland-based couple, bought the land a decade ago, spending a few days a year on the property to keep the gorse in check. By the time they were ready to make the leap and build something there, years of visiting the site had convinced them to discard the catalogues of prefab and by-the-book homes, and to engage a collaborator who could extract something personal and meaningful from their modest budget. One of the owners grew up in New Plymouth, spending his school holidays working on his uncle’s dairy farm. Now an avid tramper and active member of tramping clubs and associations, he has spent much of his spare time forging paths through dense bush from one isolated hut to another. He talks about tramping like it’s his

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The owners engaged Naish to extract something personal and meaningful from their modest budget, essentially reinventing the trampers’ hut as a family holiday home. The American ash dining table and benches were custom made by Wood Cellar.

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Right Each wing of the house features an enclosed deck with roller doors that open to the elements. The eastern deck has a bath from Clawfoot Baths and tapware by Perrin & Rowe in bare brass from In Residence. A cutout in the corrugated cladding opens as a window and awning to reveal valley views. Below Roller doors also feature on a covered deck at the heart of the house that connects the living area with two of the bedrooms. Bottom There is no hallway in the home, so one of the bedrooms is separated from the circulation space with curtains.

Right In the bedrooms, furnishing and storage, such as the shelving by Lundia, are deliberately pared back and humble in nature.

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religion and the huts like they’re his church. And, after long days on his feet followed by the solace found in tiny huts, he wanted nothing more than a hut of his own. “It’s the simplicity,” he tells me, as we gaze out over the valley from the benches around the dining table. “Most of them are single rooms, a bit of stainless steel bench – the materials are tried-and-true, a lot of plywood, and clad in corrugated iron. It’s the robustness. These tramping huts have survived 50, 60 years or more. They get the occasional lick of paint and not much else.” The farm shed was another influence, he says, recalling his teenage workplace – though their new holiday home needed enough of the comforts of modernity to ensure his partner and their teenage daughter would want to be there, too. “He was interested in the utilitarian feel,” Richard Naish recalls of their first meeting. “And the nostalgia and character of that tramping-hut building type. But

he also said they were adventurous and wanted to do something creative and responsive.” Naish was intrigued by the idea of reinventing a tramping hut as a family holiday home, seeing it as an opportunity to add his playful twist to a form he hadn’t worked with before. “When you look at it front-on, it has this low-slung, gable, shed-like elevation,” he says, “but it’s just a really thin slice of a shed, only four-and-a-half metres wide. But because of the pure elevation and where we’ve pitched it, the house can look like a 40 or 50 metre-long shed.” In the spirit of the huts and sheds that served as inspiration, the house had a tight budget, so the utilitarian form is reflected in the choice of materials. “Every decision that we made was somehow tempered by a budgetary constraint, but also by a nostalgic overlay of the tramping hut,” Naish says. “A tramping hut has the bare necessities to enable the minimum functionality required at the end of a day’s tramping. A kitchen sink and a fire to keep you warm

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and something to sleep on. So the house is a little bit of a glamping version of that.” The home’s corrugated cladding is pioneer red, visible all the way up the valley, appearing bright red in full sun and a deep crimson when the cloud creeps in. The red points to both its influences: tramping huts are rendered in bright colours to be visible from a distance in bad weather; barns are traditionally red because the stain was the best way to protect wood from rot and corrosion. Down the hill from the house is a raised, square platform, as wide as the house. It looks odd, like it was left over from a previous build, but offers a more direct relationship with the valley, what Naish calls an “architectural experience without a building”. When he fi rst visited the site with the owners, they stood on the grassy hillside, looking at the hills across the valley and The Pinnacles in the distance. “We kind of want it like this,” the owner

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told Naish, referring to the square platform. “But with a roof over it.” If you sit in certain rooms, facing certain directions, you could be fooled into thinking you were sitting in a comfortable modern bach, but turn your head and you’ll see that the owners got what they wanted: a paddock with a roof over it, a family tramping hut, an elegant shed. The house floats on wooden foundations without steps down to the paddock at the front. The grass is thick and rough, long enough to move in the wind, sprinkled with dandelions and stubborn gorse. The owners are enamoured. While his partner is surprised by how much she loves the house, he feels as if it’s the culmination of his life up to this point; a feeling he’s ambivalent about. He doesn’t want culmination to equal stasis. Although he feels at home in their hut, the tramper must keep going.


“Every decision that we made was somehow tempered by a budgetary constraint, but also by a nostalgic overlay of the tramping hut.�

Left The house sits on wooden foundations on the five-hectare site, without steps leading to the paddock.

Above On the central covered deck, the fireplace by Fires by Design provides warmth in all weathers.

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DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with Richard Naish of RTA Studio With land becoming more expensive, are you getting more proposals for utilitarian houses on tight budgets? Not too many, actually. We tend to say no if the budget’s too small, but there was just something about this one. It wasn’t about profitability, it was about an opportunity to do something exciting. It was the idea that the client wanted to really push the utilitarian, austere aesthetic. Every now and then you’ve got to prove to yourself that you can design cost-effective small buildings that aren’t necessarily for the rich and famous. When you take on a tight-budget job, is there an expectation you’ll have more creative control than you might otherwise? What attracts us to projects are ones that build on our body of work. We’ve got an interest in buildings that have a relevant contextual relationship – whether it’s urban, rural, coastal, or future-focused – so if a project is an opportunity for us to build on our thinking or add another string to our bow in the direction that we’re heading, then we’ll jump at it. And this one did. It’s not every day that someone comes to you with a quirky idea and an intelligent approach to achieving it.

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Verandah Bedroom Bathroom Living room Kitchen and dining Laundry

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Above right The compact bathroom features framing on the shower wall that is used to store and display bathroom essentials.

Above left “It’s not every day that someone comes to you with a quirky idea,” says Naish, of pushing the utilitarian aesthetic.

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DESIGN INSPIRATION OUR GUIDED TOUR OF THE LATEST KITCHEN DESIGN DEVELOPMENTS.

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In October, HOME editor Jeremy Hansen took a select group of readers on our Christchurch Style Safari, a guided tour of the city’s best design stores that included briefi ngs on the latest interior design trends. Our enthusiastic group of design fans started the day at BoConcept’s new Christchurch store, where they browsed new furniture and homeware and got the lowdown in the Danish design fi rm’s new releases. Then our group travelled to ECC’s Christchurch showroom, where Debbie Quy gave a presentation on the latest design developments from Milan, and the smart new lighting and furniture arrivals in the fi rm’s store. After a delicious lunch at King of Snake, our Style Safari guests visited a special pop-up space created by the team from New Zealand design fi rm IMO above Coffee Supreme’s new headquarters, where Sam Haughton and Hannah Brodie talked through their prefabricated kitchen system and new furniture ranges. The day ended with champagne and a detailed talk on new and reissued furniture classics, kitchen and lighting designs at Matisse’s spacious Christchurch showroom. We’ll be running more Style Safaris in Auckland and Christchurch next year. If you’re keen on joining us on our days of exclusive design briefi ngs, keep an eye on the magazine and our Facebook and Twitter feeds for information about our 2016 events.

01 Style Safari guests at the first briefing at BoConcept’s Christchurch showroom. 02 ‘Moulds’ lights by Jan Plechác and Henry Wielgus for Lasvit at Matisse. 03 One of IMO’s prefabricated kitchens. 04 Furniture at BoConcept. 05 Guests at ECC’s Christchurch showroom. 06 A vessel by Tom Dixon at ECC.

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This page By breaking the dwelling into different volumes, Bossley’s design persuades residents to “move outside to go back in again” and embrace the outdoors.

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Right A lawn between the buildings forms a gathering space and provides an unmediated connection with the ocean at the foot of the property.


BEST BACHES

A holiday home in the Bay of Islands creates an easy relationship of land to sea. TEXT

— Aimie Cronin

PHOTOG RAPHY

— Simon Devitt

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The Fold House spreads out like a girl on a towel at the foot of the water. It hides at the bottom of a winding descent, past forks in the road, past security gates, a long and sprawling place set on impossibly green grass. On arrival, you see it in the same way you might if you slowly opened your eyes from sleep to find something totally silent and encompassing right there in front of you. It sits just south of Russell in the Bay of Islands and takes three hours and 20 minutes to reach by car from Auckland, or a 45-minute ride by helicopter. I took the former. I imagine that it’s commonplace to arrive and swear at its size. When the project manager Scott Sinel greets me, he agrees it’s a lot to take in, all 1200 square metres of A-grade holiday home. “Bossley has excelled himself, I think,” says Sinel, who talks about architect Pete Bossley’s houses in the area as though they are as common as Audis in a private-school car park. One home not far from here won this magazine’s Home of the Year award in 1998, and another in the Bay of Islands took the title in 2004. Sinel nods to the latest, the reason I’m here. “This was a mind-fuck to build, it really was,” he says. “It’s a pretty stunning piece of work. I’ve been building all my life but I’ve not seen anything like this.” And he takes me on a tour with great pride and delight. He’s proudest of the roof, the spaces, the quality of the natural light and the pool, which was constructed in a single concrete pour to ensure movement didn’t affect the glass strip on top of the long concrete wall. Back in Auckland, architect Peter Sisam, who worked with Bossley on the house, says the pool was a concept dreamed up early on so that from certain areas of the house, the body of water could be seen through the strip of glass that fences it. Sisam remembers the first time he came to the site: “We literally sat on the grass and took a breath.” He and Bossley discussed the project with the clients – it would take 38 months to build and reach completion, to become a place to host family and friends with plenty of grass to play cricket.

Right The home’s slender, folded roof ducks lower over the main living area. Behind it at left, a sheltered outdoor dining area still has sea views through the building.

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When I visited Bossley’s Auckland office to talk to him about the house, he produced drawings and a model. The idea from the start was to break large spaces into smaller elements, “so people will move outside to go back in again and it’s more like being on holiday”. Having three separate structures meant it was easier to engage with the contours of the land, and the changing roof pitches further illuminate that feeling of an undulating, poetic landscape. Bossley pointed to the bitumen-based sheet roofing that looks like origami. We counted its folds and reached 28. Inside, the ceiling is made of European poplar plywood. The builders crafted the junction of each angle and fold of the ceiling to meticulously follow the exterior roof folds. Because the

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ceiling is so beautiful, Bossley insisted there would be no downlights and, apart from utilitarian spaces, such as the kitchen work surface, the whole place is lit by uplights. At night it glows. He says the roof has a life of its own, its delicacy being his highlight. “It bends and folds – it doesn’t necessarily relate to the walls underneath and that’s a very deliberate thing. The appearance of having landed softly like a dried leaf, just floating in, just sitting there, the way the light bounces off that ceiling, is really beautiful,” says Bossley. The layout of the house is also unexpected. Instead of a long rectangular building at the water’s edge to cash in on the view, the bedrooms are slotted down to the back of the site and each has a different glimpse of the


Left The folds of the building’s roof are carefully reflected on the ceiling inside. The ‘Andersen Line’ sofa and ‘Jensen’ armchair by Rodolfo Dordoni for Minotti are from ECC. Cast glass bowls by Ann Robinson sit on cabinetry by Kitchen Trendz. The flooring throughout the home is American oak. Above right The front of the house faces the ocean and contains the living, dining and kitchen areas, as well as the main bedroom suite. Right The folded roof is mostly hidden from view on the winding road that leads to the holiday home. Below The pool, seen from the living area, was achieved in a single concrete pour. The water appears as a strip of bright blue through its glass casing. ‘Musa’ dining chairs by Antonio Citterio for Maxalto from Matisse sit at the dining table, and above are ‘H20 Sospensione’ pendant lights by Viabizzuno from Inlite.

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Architect Pete Bossley insisted that no downlight would mar the elegant complexity of the ceiling. As a result, uplights lend a glowing effect at night.

“The appearance of it having landed softly like a dried leaf, just floating in, just sitting there, the way the light bounces of that ceiling, is really beautiful.”

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landscape. Bossley says the relationship to land and sea changes as you move around the house and “it makes the house a lot richer and more interesting to live in”. It also means there is no dead space out the back, and the grassy area between the middle of the buildings is enlivened by its own views of the sea. In Bossley’s office, there’s a small diagram of walled gardens. “For the Persians, the word paradise actually means walled garden,” he says. Next to it, he’s drawn deconstructed versions that capture a New Zealand spirit – our desire to live in open spaces and utilise the landscape, while at the same time creating a sense of encampment. The Fold House does just this. The journey between each building was designed with the idea of the casualness of camping, of bare feet on the grass, of loose boundaries between inside and out. Bossley says some people get it, while some don’t. “Some say, ‘Well aren’t you going to get wet going from here to here?’ And I say, ‘Well, yeah’.” He laughs. “Some people don’t get the camping reference because they’ve obviously never stayed in a tent or a caravan.” There is something magical about opening a tent on a brilliant morning – waking to an intake of thick air, the desperate reach for the zip, poking your head out. Then damp grass, the closeness of water. It’s kind of astonishing that a house this grand in scale can have anything in common with summer holidays in a tent. Its opposition to present design theories around small-scale housing is striking when you arrive and when you think about it afterwards (a beach house for godssakes!), but not when you’re there. It’s easy to picture the doors flung open on a perfect day, games of cricket, people with their beach towels spread out at the foot of the water and, afterwards, sand from the beach travelling from their feet through the house.

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Left Water laps the Bay of Islands shoreline down at the edge of the home’s immaculately kept lawn.

Below Bossley and Sisam designed the house as an encampment to retain a feeling of connection to the outdoors.

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DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with architect Pete Bossley (photographed at right with Peter Sisam).

The trend these days seems to be for small houses. This isn’t one of them. I think small houses are great. The ability to live in smaller houses is something that is coming upon us, certainly in urban situations, and I’m all for it. Then again, people’s requirements are different. The clients have a generous attitude and lots of people come to stay at once, so I don’t have any kind of value judgement on it in that regard. I also think that a lot of what is lauded for being small in terms of saving the planet is actually kind of champagne austerity and what we are looking at are houses where the square metre costs are huge, so there’s less of it, maybe, but it’s still a pretty extravagant building. I always play devil’s advocate on this one. But it’s a bach! Nobody’s built a bach in this country for decades. It’s a nostalgic notion that we call something a bach when it’s obviously not. These are full-on houses. A bach used to be built from borrowed materials off someone else’s land, no insulation, no views, because the windows are too small and someone had torn the last page out of the Agatha Christie novel on the bookshelf. They were damp and uncomfortable, but wonderful because it was a kind of expression in a democratic society in a way that nothing else was. I think it’s an interesting subject. I don’t have any sense of righteousness that small is the only option. What do you like most about the project? The delicacy of the roof. The appearance of it having landed softly like a dried leaf. I think we pulled that off. It could have become quite clunky if we weren’t careful, but we managed to keep it quite slender. The way the light bounces off the ceiling is really beautiful.

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Top left Peter Sisam and Pete Bossley of Bossley Architects. Left In order to avoid a clunky result, Bossley paid careful attention to the roof line and its delicacy. “I think we pulled that off,” he says.


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This page The beach house is a renovation of and extension to a bach that owners Rob and Helen Goldblatt and their children had been visiting (and meaning to spruce up) for 30 years before contacting architect Gerald Parsonson. Far right A ďŹ sherman at a Kapiti Coast inlet.

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TEXT

— Sharon Stephenson

PHOTOG RAPHY

— Paul McCredie

BEST BACHES

rald Parsonson ear-decrepit bach.

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As invitations go, it wasn’t the most enticing. Rob and Helen Goldblatt were told by friends that the ugliest house on a Kapiti Coast beach was for sale – and that they should take a look. Eventually, they did so. Fast forward a little over 30 years, and they still own the property – although now, thanks to a recent renovation by Parsonson Architects, their old two-storey bach has been dramatically improved. “We like to take our time,” jokes Helen. When they purchased the property, the couple would spend summers there with their three now-adult children. “We practically lived here in summer but hardly ever came in July and August, because there was no insulation and it was freezing,” says Rob. They contemplated tearing it down and starting again, but spent the last three decades never quite summoning the motivation to do so. In 2012, realising that the 75-square-metre 1960s dwelling was about to fall down around them, and wanting to spend much more time there in their retirement, the couple (a maths professor and a teacher educator) finally took the plunge. It was clear they needed someone with a powerful vision to transform the home. Enter Wellington architect Gerald Parsonson of Parsonson Architects, who already knew the coast well. His own holiday home at Paraparaumu won

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this magazine’s 2001 Home of the Year award, and he has designed a string of others in the area since. Rob and Helen had seen a few of them. “We liked his open, casual and unpretentious approach,” Rob says. Adds Helen: “Gerald’s baches make the most of the views and location but, most importantly, they look like baches.” When he visited the old bach, Parsonson realised he had his work cut out. “So many of last century’s houses were built with no consideration to their environs, so you end up with these suburban-style dwellings plonked next to the sea. The aim with Rob and Helen’s bach was to anchor it in its coastal setting, to use natural materials to create a relaxed home that family and friends love to visit,” he says. To keep the budget under control, the configuration of the lower floor was left largely intact, although the two bedrooms and bathroom were insulated and new fittings and fixtures were added. A west-facing room which once housed the poky kitchen has morphed into Helen’s sewing room. The interior stairs were stripped of their original carpet and their risers daubed in ‘Parsonson Red Haring’, a bright red hue created by Resene in response to Parsonson’s request for a red like he’d found on a brochure advertising a Keith Haring exhibition. Up the red steps is where

Above To conserve space, the dining table, where Helen sits, also serves as a kitchen benchtop. The dolly bulbs in chrome holders above the table are by Parsonson Architects. The main bedroom is behind the door, which is painted in Resene ‘Tia Maria’ – a ibrant addition to the palette of Resene ‘Kumutoto’ and Resene ‘Crisp Green’ in the kitchen.


Above Rob enjoys a quiet reading spot on the sofa in the living area. The door behind him is painted Resene ‘Tom Thumb’. The original rimu floorboards work in with the okoume plywood walls. Timber from the old weatherboards has been re-purposed as architraving. The window seat and joinery are by Parsonson Architects, with squabs by Thonet. Parsonson sourced the chair and sofa by Børge Mogensen from The Vintage Shop in Auckland. Left Parsonson says he has a natural affinity for 50s modernism, relating the colour palette to the playful tones of older baches. Far left The risers on the stairs that lead to the upper level are painted in Resene ‘Parsonson Red Haring’, a custom shade.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 133


Right The kitchen window takes a snapshot of the Akatarawas. Below In its former incarnation, the home was too cold to inhabit in winter. Now that it’s renovated and insulated, the Goldblatts spend more time here throughout the year. The main bedroom was one of the rooms added to the original structure. It opens off the kitchen, allowing Rob and Helen to use only the top floor of the home when no guests are staying. The wardrobe doors are painted in Resene ‘Bluff’.

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“I have a natural affinity with 50s modernism, so the tones here relate to the more playful colours of older baches.”

Right Three small windows formerly provided glimpses of the sea. Now, with its 35-square-metre extension and decking, the house opens itself up to the coast. The exterior paint colours are Resene ‘Parsonson Kaitoke Green’ (left) and Resene ‘Sushi’.

the real transformation has occurred. The upper level once housed a small sitting room with three modest windows that provided a glimpse of the sea. The space has been extended by 35 square metres to create what Parsonson calls a ‘pavilion’, featuring an openplan kitchen and living area, and an adjacent main bedroom, a response to Rob and Helen’s desire for an apartment-like space that can be closed off from the rest of the building. Despite a relatively modest footprint, the area feels spacious. A new kitchen table does double-duty as a bench, reducing the need for acres of counter-tops. And a carefully placed kitchen window means that whoever’s on dish-washing duty gets to rest their eyes on the Akatarawas which, in winter, are blanketed in snow. The less-is-more approach also works well in the living room, where the original rimu floorboards complement okoume plywood walls, as well as architraves which have been re-purposed from the home’s original weatherboards. Parsonson also designed the minimalist wall lights, crafted from squares of aluminium. A bright orange door separates the main bedroom and the living area, and contrasts with the blue and green palette used elsewhere, including the exterior. Although Parsonson loathes the idea of a signature colour,

the jewel tones are reminiscent of a nearby bach he designed, and which featured in this magazine in 2012. “I have a natural affinity with 50s modernism,” he says, “so the tones here relate to the more playful colours of older baches, helping distinguish the house from the cream, grey and beige of modern suburban transplants. The colours also have a strong relationship to the trees, sky and sea.” Underneath the pavilion, a nine-square-metre storage locker corrals the tents, fishing gear and general paraphernalia of beach life. Storage was lacking in the previous home, so this feels like a luxury. Parsonson’s suggestion to build dual decks has won favour with Rob and Helen, who say it’s the perfect solution to the region’s sometimes fickle weather. “When the norwesterly blows on the beach-facing deck, we can retreat to the sheltered street-facing deck, but still enjoy sea views,” Rob says. “The street-facing deck also gets great morning sun, so it’s a fantastic spot for breakfast.” Viewed from the beach, Rob and Helen’s bach looks as though it has always been there. “Our previous place looked like a bus shelter dumped onto the sand, but the new building sits low and snug within the dunes and is totally in keeping with its environment,” says Helen.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 135


Built-in furniture and shelving as well as sea views help lend the compact upper floor living area a sense of generosity. Parsonson Architects designed the minimalist wall lights (one is shown at right) – crown silvered bulbs on aluminium plates.

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Right The industry’s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 137


138 / HOME NEW ZEALAND


Left The Goldblatts says they’re glad to have gone ahead with Parsonson’s suggestion to build two decks, ensuring there’s almost always somewhere sheltered to sit outdoors.

Below The home’s east-facing deck catches the morning light, while external stairs allow access to both decks. The configuration of the existing home’s lower level was left largely intact.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 139


What are key considerations when designing a house next to the sea? It’s important for a building to add positively to the spirit of a place as well as being a casual, relaxed and fun place to be. That doesn’t mean a boring suburban house or a slick, corporate edifice sitting on a sand dune. At a practical level, it’s important to use robust and non-corrosive materials.

DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with Gerald Parsonson of Parsonson Architects

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Deck Living Kitchen and dining Bathroom Bedroom Laundry Sewing room Storage

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Right A glimpse of the internal stairwell from the living area. Far right Looking past the dining table into the main bedroom beyond.

How can good design minimise the impact of the notorious winds in Wellington and on the Kapiti Coast? It’s often windy and sunny at the same time, particularly in spring, and on the west coast the wind comes from the same direction as the view. There are several strategies: use well-placed layers of planting to filter and direct wind over the outside living spaces,

use exterior slatted fences and structures to do the same, or plan the house with both west and east outside living spaces, with doors connecting both sides. When windy and sunny, you can sit on the east side, sheltered from the wind and in the sun, and still see through the house to the west views. Planting or slatted screening on the north and south ends of the house can stop wind whipping around to the east side. What do you think every bach needs? An outside shower, an easy connection from inside to out, comfortable places to sit in and out of the sun and wind, and places to hole up with a good book. Parts of a house can be separated by the outside. Plan things to be robust and easy care. Less is often more. And it’s easy to play with colour in a bach.


PRESENTS


K:01

KITCHENS

AN EASY AESTHETIC AN OLD VILLA IS REWORKED TO SUPPORT MODERN FAMILY COOKING AND DINING.

KITCHEN 01

LOCATION

Family home

Auckland

DESIGNER

BRIEF

Morgan Cronin, Cronin Kitchens

To achieve a modern kitchen with a relaxed feel in a waterfront villa.

PHOTOGRAPHY

Kallan MacLeod

How does the kitchen relate to the rest of the home? MORGAN CRONIN This kitchen is in an old kauri waterfront villa that has undergone a major refurbishment, part of which involved moving walls within the existing kitchen space for a scullery and opening up the kitchen to the living room, sunlight and beach views. I wanted to achieve a look that suited an urban beach house; the kitchen has a very relaxed feel about it and this continues throughout the home. What design difficulties did you contend with? Although the kitchen now looks generous, one of the challenges was that the rear wall wasn't wide in proportion to the home’s size. It needed to house the oven tower, hob area, fridge and scullery entrance. The space has visually gained in proportion by making the hob and extractor area as wide as possible. Horizontal slats below the hob exaggerate the lineal proportions. To achieve a modern kitchen with a relaxed feel, I minimised materials and contrasted the modern, sharp-looking stainless steel with natural-looking driftwood-like slats that shroud the island. The uniformity is dishevelled by using rough-sawn French oak slats that are individual in height as well as thickness. What design aspects are you most pleased with? Although beautifully crafted to perfection, the rough-sawn French oak slats give a rough aesthetic.

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Appliances Sub-Zero fridge over freezer with internal ice-maker. Liebherr integrated underbench fridge. Gaggenau single ovens. Miele induction hob, extractor and fully integrated dishwasher. Benchtops Corian in ‘White Jasmine’ by Designer Benchtops from Evolution of Surfaces. Cabinetry and fi nishes Satinfinish stainless-steel sheet for extractor canopy by Precision Laser cutters. Oven tower and fridge over-cupboard fronts clad in satin-finish stainless steel by SJ Crosbie Stainless Steel. Cladding Island and cookingarea drawer in slatted band-sawn French oak from BBS Timbers, stained white with a clear matte. Hardware Blum hinges and HK Lift mechanism by Blum. ‘Intivo’ drawers in ‘Terra’ black by Blum. Lighting 'Dome' pendants in pistachio from Mud Australia and LED strip lights by Brightlight. Sink k Sergio double stainlesssteel sink. Stools ‘Spoon’ stools by Antonio Citterio with Toan Nguyen for Kartell. Tapware ‘Elio’ by Dornbracht.


K:02

DARKNESS AND LIGHT AN ARCHITECT CREATES HER OWN MULTIFUNCTIONAL AND LESS-THAN-TYPICAL SPACE.

KITCHEN 02

LOCATION

Holiday home

Waiheke Island

ARCHITECT

BRIEF

Evelyn McNamara, EMA Architects

To create a multifunctional space at the centre of the home.

PHOTOGRAPHY

Jeremy Toth

How did you manage the budget, yet achieve a quality result? EVELYN MCNAMARA I worked hard on detail to reduce unnecessary costs, without compromising the overall aesthetic. I used two lines of recessed handles instead of three – the bottom and middle drawers open from the same handle. This saves money and looks great as the lines are cleaner. Strandboard was a cost-effective way to create texture – I used wet-area Strandboard with a black stain and clear waterproof sealer. You chose a free-standing ‘Pi’ table by Roderick Fry for this space. How did you want it to relate to the kitchen and room? It was one of the fi rst components selected and a key part of the design. The table acts as a surface to prepare and present drinks and nibbles when socialising with larger groups or informally, and doubles as a dining table for four to six people. The table can rotate to sit half inside, half outside the space – a great way to integrate kitchen and dining areas into a small space.

Appliances All by Fisher & Paykel: Gas on Glass cooktop, ActiveSmart fridge, Nine Function Pyrolytic Built-In Oven and Integrated DishDrawer. Bar stools ‘Detroit Wire' bar stools from Cintesi. Benchtop and island bench 20mm Corian in 'Deep Nocturne' by Topline Benches from Evolution of Surfaces. Cabinetry y Strandboard with black stain and clear seal from Fabulous Kitchens. Dining chairs ‘Johnny Wire' chairs from Cintesi. Flooring Marine-grade ply in Resene ‘Black White’ polyurethane. Lighting 'Tuba' track lighting from Inlite. LED strip lights from Fabulous Kitchens. Splashback k Toughened ‘Etchlite’ glass from Metro Glasstech in Resene ‘All Black’. Table ‘Pi’ table by Roderick Fry for Moaroom from David Trubridge and Backhouse Interiors. Tapware ‘Vola’ tap by Arne Jacobsen from Metrix.

What did you want from your design? I wanted the kitchen to sit comfortably in the living area without looking like a typical kitchen. I feel this has worked well with texture and an all-black palette. The kitchen is the hub of this home; it's where you enter on arrival and it interacts directly with the living and deck areas.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 143


K:03

KITCHENS

144 / HOME NEW ZEALAND


THOROUGHLY ENTERTAINED AN ELEGANT ITALIAN KITCHEN WITH A SMART SCULLERY DOUBLES AS COMMAND CENTRE IN THE HEART OF A NEW FAMILY HOME.

KITCHEN 03

LOCATION

Family home

Auckland

DESIGNER

BRIEF

Joanna Hoeft, Studio Italia

A kitchen hub at the heart of adjacent living areas.

PHOTOGRAPHY

Jackie Meiring

What did you want from this design? VALERIA CARBONARO-LAWS, OWNER The kitchen connects all adjacent areas and is the space where we spend most of our time together as a family or with friends. We asked for a dark, moody kitchen with an organic feel. We fell in love with the proposed mix of elements and materials, such as the slate slab for the main island and Spessart oak for our breakfast table. One of my requests was to have the cooktop on the island so I could see and be part of family life.

This page The artwork on the kitchen wall is by Rob Tucker; the bust on the slate benchtop is by Olivier Duhamel. Left The home was designed by architect Cameron Pollock. The aged fir 'Shanghai' dining table is by Pietro Arosio for EmmeBi and the 'Eva' dining chairs are by Ora Ito for Zanotta, both from Studio Italia. The light above the table is a 'Y Chandelier' by Douglas and Bec. The painting at the end of the table is by Sheyne Tuffery. Left, below Valeria CarbonaroLaws describes the oak-topped breakfast area as "brilliant". The stools at the counter are 'ICS – Ipsilon’ by Rodrigo Torres for Poliform from Studio Italia. The scullery can be seen in the background.

How does the Varenna kitchen by Poliform suit your needs? We are informal people and like to entertain casually, so we wanted a space that was functional and catered to our lifestyle. At the same time it had to be gorgeous. We spend a lot of time around the breakfast table, which faces west and we enjoy sunsets over our Italian-inspired courtyard. The tall cabinetry gives us incredible storage that we've further customised with internal accessories. The layout is unconventional with the fridge and scullery away from the main work area. How does this work? We instantly loved Joanna's kitchen layout. It's so fresh. Having our breakfast table as part of the kitchen but not in it is brilliant – I don't like bar stools in the space where you cook. It has created a new area to live in. It's a good size but feels compact when you are cooking and everything is within easy reach.

Kitchen Varenna kitchen by Poliform from Studio Italia. Appliances Fisher & Paykel fridge. Miele induction cooktop, oven, coffee machine and plate warmer. Benchtop Slate from Artedomus. Cabinetry y Varenna by Poliform from Studio Italia. Splashback k Bronze mosaic tiles (in scullery) from Artedomus. Tapware Astra Walker.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 145


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K:04

AN OPEN HOME BOSSLEY ARCHITECTS WORKS WITH A REMARKABLE SETTING TO CREATE A HIGHSPEC KITCHEN WITH A RELAXED ATTITUDE.

KITCHEN 04

LOCATION

Holiday home

Bay of Islands

ARCHITECTS

BRIEF

Pete Bossley and Peter Sisam, Bossley Architects

A relaxed kitchen that connects with the surrounding internal and external spaces.

PHOTOGRAPHY

Simon Devitt

What was the design intention for the kitchen in this holiday home? PETER SISAM We wanted it to be a relaxed space where people come together to prepare meals while still being part of beach-holiday life. Because it's at the top end of a flow of space that steps down towards the living room, it gets a great overview of the internal and external areas, while still being part of the action. The elevated space includes cabinetry that acts as furnishing in the open area – is this to achieve seamlessness in an open living space? The kitchen is located in a large volume that also contains the dining and living areas that step down the site to follow the contour. The cabinetry creates intimate spaces under the folded roof while still being part of the larger volume. What design aspects are you most pleased with? The connection of the kitchen to the site. Expansive windows connect it to the water, while high-level glazing provides glimpses of the bush-clad hills of the valley. The kitchen is part of its surroundings, rather than a superimposed element, as kitchens often can be. How did you achieve a balance of task lighting with uplighting? Uplighting is used throughout the house to allow the house to glow at night. A suspended light extrusion over the kitchen bench provides both up and task lighting. This allows the kitchen to glow while also providing task lighting when required.

Appliances Miele hob and ovens from Kitchen Things. Subzero fridge from Kouzina. Benchtop German composite stone by SCE Stone & Design. Cabinetry y Stained American oak veneer by Kitchen Trendz, Whangarei. Dining chairs ‘Musa’ by Antonio Citterio for Maxalto from Matisse. Dining table 'Heta' oak table by Andrew Lowe for Lowe Furniture from Hub Furniture, Australia. Flooring American oak by CTC Timber Floors. Hardware Blum. Lighting ‘H20 Sospensione’ pendant lights by Viabizzuno from Inlite. Splashback k Back-painted glass. Sinks 'Kubus' from Franke. Tapware Dornbracht from Metrix.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 147


K:05

KITCHENS

SMALL WONDER JULIAN GUTHRIE LENDS MASTERFUL TOUCHES OF DRAMA TO A CLIFFTOP HOME.

KITCHEN 05

LOCATION

Coastal home

Muriwai

ARCHITECT

BRIEF

Julian Guthrie with Lindon Harris of Johannes Erren Cabinetmakers

A social kitchen to enable interaction with guests and for the views to be enjoyed while cooking.

PHOTOGRAPHY

Patrick Reynolds

The cabinetry cleverly bleeds into the room. How was this achieved without it becoming intrusive? JULIAN GUTHRIE The design tapers the depth of the cabinets required at the kitchen, narrowing toward the living area, which corresponds with the taper of the ceiling line. The materials and details are evocative of a bookcase more than a kitchen. What's the design focus in this clifftop setting? The kitchen overlooks the indoor and outdoor living spaces, and captures the ocean view beyond. The materials follow the home's exterior, which in turn relate to the black-sand beach and bush. With two walls of glass, we had just one wall for the kitchen, display and media in the living area, and wanted to keep the concrete wall highly visible. I like the way the varied textures and finishes provide visual interest and how they are a part of the overall architecture of the building. I also love the high eastern window (see p.101) set deep into the concrete wall to capture the sunrise, and the bunker scullery space below it. Was it difficult to integrate the extractor? It had to be engineered to recess into the depth of the concrete wall and ducted down below the floor away from the prevailing winds that buffet the wall.

148 / HOME NEW ZEALAND

Appliances Integrated Fisher & Paykel fridge-freezer. Miele oven, cooktop and integrated dishwasher. Cabinetry Cedar panelling and floating shelves by Johannes Erren Cabinetmakers. Extractor Parmco. Hardware Blum. Island benchtop Stone in leathered-finish ‘Absolute Black’ from Granite Workshop. Mild steel, hot-rolled and waxed steel from Design Production. Sink ‘Iron’ sink by Ikon Commercial. Bar stools 'Baker' stools by IMO in solid oak with raw aluminium foot ring.


HOME + FISHER & PAYKEL

INNOVATIVE DESIGN WHY FISHER & PAYKEL’S AWARD-WINNING APPLIANCES ARE DESIGNED TO MATCH.

As an expression of personal style, as well as a place for family and friends to gather, the kitchen is the dynamic focal point for contemporary living. As a result, the need for beautiful kitchen appliances has become more important than ever. Responding to the desire for refined design coupled with high-end technology, Fisher & Paykel continues to lead the industry with award-winning kitchen products. Their latest innovative design – the new ActiveSmart™ Slide-in Fridge – won a leading industry award for setting new benchmarks in design, quality and value, taking a Gold Pin at the Best Design Awards 2015. Fisher & Paykel’s Head of Design, Mark Elmore, says the company is honoured to be recognised for the family-sized fridge, which fits flush with surrounding cabinetry to provide a smooth, clean look, and boasting just 4mm gaps. “Through our work with designers and architects around the world, it became apparent that there are few refrigeration platforms within reach that suit the minimalistic design of modern kitchens. We’re very proud of this new product,” says Elmore. Says Cathy Veninga, chief executive of the Designers’ Institute of New Zealand: “The Slide-In Fridge is a beautiful example of what can be achieved by taking an in-depth approach to an obvious issue.” Another exceptional product is Fisher & Paykel’s new Wine Cabinet range, which boasts sophisticated, practical design and a stable wine storage environment. Allowing prized wines to be displayed, the range provides optimal storage that reduces exposure to UV light, temperature fluctuations and movement. Five models are available, from an under-bench model through to a large 144-bottle capacity free-standing unit. For more information, visit fisherpaykel.com.

MY FOOD BAG AND FISHER & PAYKEL Fisher & Paykel has teamed up with My Food Bag – from now until 29 February 2016, if you spend $4000 or more on qualifying Fisher & Paykel kitchen appliances, including one cooking appliance, at participating retailers, you can claim online to receive a bonus $500 My Food Bag voucher or hamper (determined by delivery location). For details and terms and conditions, visit fisherpaykel.co.nz/myfoodbag

Top Fisher & Paykel’s new ActiveSmart™ Slide-in fridge won a 2015 Best Design Awards’ Gold Pin. Middle ActiveSmart™ Slide-in fridge models including the 900x1900mm cavity installation option (far right). Above left Fisher & Paykel’s new Wine Cabinet range matches seamlessly with the ActiveSmart™ fridge. Above right Fisher & Paykel have teamed up with My Food Bag; details at right.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 149


This clifftop home (p.94) in Muriwai, west of Auckland, was designed by architect Julian Guthrie. Photography by Patrick Reynolds.

150 / HOME NEW ZEALAND


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NO CORD NO HASSLE WITH THE EXCEPTIONAL DESIGN AND VERSATILITY WE’VE COME TO EXPECT, DYSON HAS PERFECTED CORDLESS INNOVATION

Hauling bulky vacuum cleaners around the home is a thing of the past because the Dyson V6 Absolute cordless vacuum is free to go anywhere in your house. It’s small, impressively powerful and expertly balanced for lightweight floor-to-ceiling cleaning. If you have carpet, hard floors, or both, it comes complete with two Dyson-engineered cleaner heads. The soft-roller cleaner head gives hard floors the ideal clean, lifting large debris and fine dust simultaneously as you vacuum. To get deep into the carpet pile for an efficient clean, attach the direct-drive cleaner head. And pets – not a problem. Utilise the direct-drive cleaner head for removing cat or dog hair from your carpets, or that hard-to-shift pet hair is easily lifted by a mini-motorised tool that attaches directly to the body,

converting the Dyson V6 Absolute into a powerful hand-held vacuum. Storage is made easy. The Dyson V6 Absolute comes with a docking station that stores and charges the vacuum so it’s always ready to use. The docking station also holds the two included accessories, a crevice tool and a combination accessory tool. Simply attach either tool to the end of the wand for that easy up-top cleaning. If you’re looking for a highperformance clean for your home, you’ll recognise Dyson engineering means advanced technology that delivers an exceptional user experience and results. As well as superior performance, quality and assurance are also synonymous with the Dyson brand.


PROMOTION

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It converts into a powerful hand-held vacuum to lift dirt, dust and pet hair, making the Dyson V6 Absolute perfect for upholstery, the stairs or the car. And there’s no messy bin emptying, just press the button to dispose of dirt quickly and hygienically.

Boasting two specialist cleaner heads, the direct-drive head gets deep into the carpet pile to remove dust, dirt and pet hair, while the soft-roller cleaner head lifts fine dust and large debris simultaneously from hard floors.

Expertly balanced for lightweight floor-to-ceiling cleaning, the Dyson V6 Absolute can get to those hard-to-reach places – that means cleaning up top, down below and in between is easy.

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ADVERTISING PROMOTION

ESSE Range Cookers & Stoves ESSE range cookers and stoves have been made with pride in Britain for more than 160 years. Every model is carefully hand crafted to offer quality, integrity and longevity. Available in a range of classic and contemporary colours to suit any kitchen. Ph 0800 479 762 www.esse.com

di Rosa – Pressed Tin Panels Pressed tin panels are a lovely alternative to use for a kitchen splashback, feature wall, ceiling, front of kitchen island or shop bar, up to dado height in a hallway or bathroom. For a modern or traditional look, use Pressed Tin Panels to make a statement.

Ingrid Geldof Design Winners of more than 37 design awards.

Ph (07) 888 9900 www.dirosa.co.nz

With more than 40 years specialising in spatial planning and joinery design in New Zealand, Ingrid Geldof Design creates beautifully comfortable spaces. We develop new-home plan assessments and detail joinery design, while working closely with your architect. We also have expertise in renovations of existing spaces – creating homes that are highly functional and gorgeous to live in. If you want to be efficient in your home design, look no further then IGD. Ph (03) 377 2557

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

Ecodure The beauty of a wood floor. Ecodure Oak Flooring has it all: it is beautiful, elegant, timeless, durable, easy to maintain, affordable and because it is an engineered board, it is structurally robust. Every Ecodure Oak Floor has a unique signature, with its colour tones and grain characteristics as individual as a fingerprint. The natural grain within the oak enhanced by either a clear finish or with a choice of stain. Ecodure Bamboo is a sustainable, durable, dent and scratch resistant, easy to maintain, cost-effective choice of flooring. Available in a range of beautiful, earthy tones. Contact us for the best advice and personal service available. Showroom and direct sales: Unit B, 4 Titoki Place, Albany, Auckland Ph (09) 489 3602 www.ecodureflooring.co.nz

Nicola Cumming Design Every good home deserves a great kitchen. When I have gained an understanding of how you use your home, I then design your new kitchen to suit your lifestyle and your home’s character. As an Independent Kitchen Designer, I can design, build and manage your project through to completion or assist you with design only. Whether you have a clear vision for your project or don’t know where to start, I can help. Call me. Let’s talk about creating your dream kitchen. Auckland and Bay of Plenty. Ph 021 805 981 I 0800 NCDESIGN (623 374) nicola@kitchendesigner.net.nz

Kitchen Designers showcase


To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

Stay a while... Luxury hot spots showcase

Camp Estate

Grand Mercure Nelson Monaco

Camp Estate at Larnach Castle is perched high on the Otago Peninsula. This luxury accommodation is a short walk to one of the world’s most dramatic views and is just 500m from Larnach Castle. Without the light pollution of a city stay, this property is a perfect opportunity to witness Dunedin’s famous night sky. It’s only a 30-minute drive to the famous Otago wildlife attractions and 20 minutes back to the city. The rooms are decorated in a neo-classical style, each room has its own fireplace and laptops are provided in all the rooms. In the morning, hosts Michael and Lisa cook a splendid breakfast and there is an option to enjoy dinner at Larnach Castle, country-house style.

Indulge in a Romance Getaway at the Grand Mercure Nelson Monaco on the sunny peninsula of Monaco, Nelson. The package includes one night accommodation for two people in a private one-bedroom cottage with four poster bed, spa bath and fireplace. Relax and enjoy chocolates and a bottle of wine, with breakfast for two included. The Romance Getaway starts from $280, includes GST (two people). Subject to availability.

www.campestate.co.nz

www.monacoresort.co.nz | hotel@monacoresort.co.nz Ph (03) 547 8233

The Beach House

Treghan Luxury Retreat

The Beach House provides luxury accommodation in New Zealand’s beautiful Bay of Islands. The house is blessed with spectacular views of Hauai Bay and Oke Bay, making it the perfect holiday retreat, wedding venue or luxury family holiday hideaway. There is access to two fantastic beaches, (Hauai Bay, 3 minutes walk and Oke Bay, 5 minutes), that are sheltered, great for swimming, fishing and rock hopping! The Beach House welcomes visitors to our country and fellow New Zealanders keen on immersing themselves in our incredible natural surrounds. For holiday lettings, romantic wedding venues or as a conference venue consider the Beach House, Bay of Islands.

Treghan Retreat offers luxury accommodation in the Bay of Islands. Situated in a picturesque setting, award-winning Treghan is perfect for a relaxing holiday, romantic getaway or a golf retreat – all within walking distance of Kerikeri. Serenity is paramount. Our three beautifully appointed guesthouses are designed to give you the freedom to enjoy your stay in utmost tranquility. Your space is your own, with secluded living and spacious decks. An ideal luxury retreat for busy people.

125 Rawhiti Rd, Rawhiti | www.beachhousebayofislands.com

394B Kerikeri Road, Kerikeri 0230, Bay of Islands www.treghan.co.nz | info@treghan.co.nz | (09) 407 1311


Outdoor obsessions showcase Sundance Spas

URBAN + BEACH

50 Lunn Ave, Mt Wellington, Auckland 09 215 8736 info@sundancespas.co.nz www.sundancespas.co.nz

LIFESTYLE FURNITURE 31 Constellation Drive, Mairangi Bay. 09 479 9577 372-376 Broadway, Newmarket. 09 372 376 www.urban-beach.co.nz

We have an exclusive outdoor range - The Rio Outdoor Dining Set which is both modern and stylish. A combination of two materials, white aluminium and teak, create a stunning, lightweight and extremely durable outdoor set. Visit our website or showrooms for the full range. Open 7 days, 10am-5pm. Buy direct from the importer.

STONESET NZ

Louvretec

0800 70 8000 sales@stonesetnz.co.nz www.stonesetnz.co.nz

09 415 4949 info@louvretec.co.nz www.louvretec.co.nz

StoneSet NZ is the established market leader in resin-bound paving and offer a range of products suitable for creating attractive, durable and porous paving.

Achieve an upmarket, fully adjustable outdoor room with Louvretec. The combination of our opening roof with either mesh or PVC blinds, sliders or shutters means you can control your environment. Add style to your home and more room to relax and entertain. Create the ultimate outdoor room with Louvretec. Available nationwide.

Our resin-bound paving solutions offer a design flexibility that no other type of paving can match.

Outdoor Concepts

Fires by Design

77 The Strand, Parnell, Auckland 0800 266 206 www.outdoorconcepts.co.nz

47 Sir William Ave, East Tamaki 09 273 9227 www.warmington.co.nz

Innovative and distinctive, Sebios Garden fireplaces and wood storage elements are original Dutch designs that are designed, manufactured and assembled in house. The Sebios collection has been extensively tested for good combustion, deformation and expansion and features stable, well concealed, adjustable feet, open-back wood storage area, double rear and side walls. Every fireplace develops its own colour and character.

Outdoor fires provide both heat and ambience throughout the year. Nothing beats sitting around an outdoor fire. Fires are available in wood or gas, stainless steel, flueless and traditional bricked fires. The Nouveau is fitted with barbecue hot plate and grill, and optional pizza oven. Available from authorised retailers nationwide, or visit our Auckland showroom.

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

Designed for luxury. Engineered for efficiency. Established in California in 1979, Sundance Spas has been recognised internationally with more awards than any other spa company. Visit us to find out why.


SOURCE

www.lavaglass.co.nz With more than 15 years of building experience and an established reputation with an excellent team of qualified subcontractors, Bungalow & Villa Renovation Specialists have the expert knowledge to turn your building dream into reality.

Lava Glass is the home of the Lynden Over art glass collection. At Lava Glass in Taupo you can watch the mesmerising art of glass blowing in action and visit the spectacular and nationally recognised sculpture garden. Lava Glass Garden

GENUINE MID-CENTURY INDUSTRIAL LIGHTING Ph 06 878 0166 www.boudi.co.nz

www.bungalowvilla.co.nz Phone (09) 629 0366/ 021 270 1388

ROBOTIC POOL CLEANER Wall climbing robotic pool cleaner with remote control and caddy cart. Enjoy more time in your pool than cleaning it Spend less money on water bills Improve water quality ReduceZRUNORDGRQ\RXU¿OWUDWLRQV\VWHP

$1794.00 incl GST www.iancoombes.co.nz CHCH (03) 348 2072 WGTN (04) 568 3521 AKLD (09) 579 6500

ARCHITECTURALLY DESIGNED, QUALITY BUILT & AFFORDABLE MYPAD.NET.NZ / 0800 4 MYPAD

This Chr Christmas, surprise the special p people in yo y your ur life f with h a ttruly ruly l unique uniique Kiwi gift!

Baywicks wine

The perfect present for friends, family, staff, f workmates or clients.

cellars

Ord Order der Gift Packs of Denheath’s Famous Custard C Squares or Dessert Squares.

• RedRak wine racking Baywick’s premium California redwood racking for your wine cellar

• WineGrid metal racking • Cellar design • Wine Guardian cellar coolers

Ph/fax (03) 545 6517 • Email: baywicks@xtra.co.nz www.baywicks.com

• Delivered overnight to the door from just $44.35 Inc P&P

ORDER NOW online at

www.denheath.co.nz Custard Squares

or freephone 0800 336 432.

Custard E-Squares

Cheesecakes Squares

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

TAKE A BIG BITE OF


SOURCE

CONVENIENT,, EASY ECO CO FRIENDLY

indoor/outdoor r/outdoor pet lawn For indoors & out Great for boats, apartments, home, balconies...anywhere Anti-bacterial free-draining grass Easy to clean 2 SIZES FOR DOGS SMALL & LARGE NZ Made

New Zealand realist painter www.richardshanksart.com

World-renowned art glass by glass artists Ola & Marie Hรถglund Creators of New Zealand art glass since 1982 52 Lansdowne Rd, Richmond NELSON 1767 Luggate-Cromwell Rd, CENTRAL OTAGO 027 804 7454

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

www.hoglundartglass.com

www.furrkids.co.nz Ph 021 669 280 sales@furrkids.co.nz

RUGS & CUSTOM RUGS HALL RUNNERS INDOOR OUTDOOR RUGS

The Ivy House is New Zealand's stockist of Armadillo & Co rugs, beautiful hand-woven rugs combining aesthetics with ethics. The collection includes a wide range of standard sized rugs, with opportunities to custom design your rug or hall runner. 238 Jervois Road, Herne Bay, Auckland | 09 360 8986 I theivyhouse.co.nz

WINNER 2015 CREATIVE EXCELLENCE AWARD FOR THE MOST INNOVATIVE KITCHEN Visit our display kitchen at: PO Box 28-700, Remuera Phone (09) 813 6192 www.croninkitchens.co.nz

155 The Strand, Parnell.


MY FAVOURITE BUILDING Charles Walker, the creative director of New Zealand’s entry to the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale, admires a 1990s Auckland icon.

“Not many tall buildings have won New Zealand architecture awards. In 1992, 151 Queen Street was a controversial choice. Stylish, slim, bronzed and slick, it reflected merchant bank Fay Richwhite’s desire for an icon of entrepreneurial flair (and, perhaps, greed and ambition – all good Auckland values). Designed during a period most architects would like to forget, the building retains a confident, ostentatious urbanity still rarely seen in this country. Designer Dino Burattini (1933-2000)

PHOTOG RAPHY

162 / HOME NEW ZEALAND

was an Italian refugee who arrived in Australia in 1950 and set up his own firm in 1985. The design resembles Burattini’s sleek 36-storey State Bank in Martin Place, Sydney. The theatrical crystal canopy over the entrance was the first suspended frameless glass assembly in New Zealand. The tall vertical bays in the faceted curtain wall are playfully, yet precisely detailed to terminate in stepped projections that evoke a kind of post-modern Charles Rennie Mackintosh.”

— Jackie Meiring


AWAR D

W INNIN G

RESIDENTIAL

&

COMMERC IAL

INTERIORS

POWERSURGE.CO.NZ


Profile for HOME NZ

HOME NZ December 2015 / January 2016  

Our Summer issue visits five modest and magnificent holiday homes.

HOME NZ December 2015 / January 2016  

Our Summer issue visits five modest and magnificent holiday homes.

Profile for home_nz