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Five smart, stylish NZ homes 22 pages of kitchens + bathrooms Fired-up new furniture + lighting

Designing a new life in Arrowtown

MAGAZINE OF THE YEAR Canon Media Awards 2016

Barn-style living near Queenstown Cedar shingles and lofty ceilings in Auckland A Wellington architect's last home

Forecast 2016 16 pages of hot new furniture from Milan + NYC


Released in April at the Milan Eurocucina exhibition, the new “Principia� kitchen designed by Antonio Citterio for Arclinea became an instant hit with the world wide Architectural and Design audience. Principia is all about natural materials, innovative production technologies, artisan details and cooking philosophies all merged together. It is all about function and ritual where the kitchen becomes architecture. The kitchen, being Increasingly at the heart of the home, shifts from its role as the focal point in the house, to become a main player in the development of the interior.


99 The Strand, Parnell, Auckland | 134 Victoria Street, Christchurch | www.matisse.co.nz Auckland | +64 9 302 2284

|

Christchurch

+64 3 366 0623

| E design@matisse.co.nz

matisse where design becomes art


SEE WHAT YOU CAN SEE The way a shadow falls. The way light bounces. The colour of rock. The unfaltering straightness of a line. The delicate beauty of a curve. The strong and noble angle. Noticing what isn’t. Savouring every detail. Seeing what others cannot. Seeing through someone else’s eyes.

A LT / H O M E 11 / 5 D P S

THERE IS MUCH TO INSPIRE US WHEN WE LOOK AROUND.


PROUD SPONSORS OF HOME OF THE YEAR When you know where to look for inspiration, you can find it with Altherm Window Systems.

altherm.co.nz


OPEN 7 DAYS | (09) 309-3766 | KINGLIVING.COM 535 Parnell Road, Parnell, Auckland 1052


The awarding-winning sofa that can change with you. Built on King Living’s superior steel frame that’s guaranteed for 25 years, the secret to Jasper’s success is it’s incredible versatility. Floating platforms and flexible shelving mean you can rearrange this sumptuous sofa into any number of stylish configurations in seconds – even a heavenly guest bed for two. Jasper really is the one sofa designed for comfort on every occasion.


SIT BOY Design your own

Mix and match the colours and materials of the Baker Stool’s seat, legs and foot ring to create your perfect perch.

www.imo.co.nz


Contents FRESH THINKING

84.

96.

110.

124.

138.

SHINE ON

SOLID STATE

TRANS TASMAN

COUNTRY STRONG

GENERATION SONG

“UFO” by Michael O’Sullivan in Arrowtown

A west Auckland homestead by Fearon Hay

Tulia Wilson and Neha Belton’s Sydney pad

A classical retreat in the Wakatipu Basin by Bureaux

Architect Jon Craig and his last Wellington home

110

124

96

138

84

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 11


FORECAST 2016 Your guide to the latest global developments in furniture, lighting and design, p.67.

ART & DESIGN 21. DESIGN DISCOVERIES

78

50

50. BATHROOMS

Pieces worth having

Refined designs and must-have accessories

26. NEWS & VIEWS

58. HALL OF FAME

&Tradition arrives, plus a sustainable living talkfest

Douglas Lloyd Jenkins closes the door on a 10-year project

28. ART & CULTURE

60. CUT AND PASTE

South American art and a Franco-New Zealand collab

A styled shoot featuring tactile wall coverings

30. FRESH IDEAS

162. FAVOURITE BUILDING

Sarjeant Gallery’s upgrade and new rainwear by Okewa

32. CITY HIGH LIFE

Liam Bowden covets Carlile House in Auckland

Luxury apartment living in central Auckland

34. KITCHENS Six designs, plus new trends and essentials 21

60

EXTRAS 82. DESIGN AWARDS Enter HOME’s furniture Design Awards

149. SUBSCRIBE TO HOME Never miss an issue

150. STYLE SAFARI 28

12 / HOME NEW ZEALAND

34

Join our exclusive design tour in Auckland

152. UPDATES AND SNAPSHOTS Home of the Year 2016 celebrations and our Auckland Style Safari

154. KITCHEN DAY Tickets are on sale for this exclusive event


Concept Eccentric Magic

This year at Milan Moooi unveiled their collection, including 22 new pieces, in beautiful compositions placed inside a mysteriously dark and seductive ballroom. Emerging designer Umut Yamac presented the Perch Light. This family of lights celebrates the beauty and poetry of a bird perched on a branch, rocking darkness away when set in motion.

Watch for the full Moooi collection, due in our Auckland and Wellington showrooms later this year. Mike Thorburn Managing Director, ECC


Get the latest online homemagazine.co.nz @homenewzealand @_jeremyhansen facebook.com/homenewzealand instagram.com/homenewzealand

Photography / Mark Smith

EDITOR’S LETTER

Top left Inside an Arrowtown home by Michael O’Sullivan, photographed by Patrick Reynolds. See more on p.84. Top right A home near Queenstown by Bureaux, photographed by Simon Devitt. See more on p.124. Above left In west Auckland, Fearon Hay designed a home of recycled timber and concrete. Photograph by Simon Wilson. See more on p.96. Above right Wellington architect Jon Craig’s last home. Photograph by Paul McCredie. For more, see p.138.

I often think, does the world need another chair? (Or table, or lamp, or whatever). I become smug at the thought of my ascetic, non-materialist self being so much more evolved than all those slaves to shopping. And then I browse our special Forecast 2016 section in this issue (it’s on p.67), full of coverage of the Milan and New York Design Weeks, and see so many things I want. It turns out I’m not ascetic at all – it’s just that limited funds and a small apartment have led me to believe that this is the case. What I always remind myself is that we don’t have to own things to appreciate them. The best aspect of these annual events is the provocative power of all the imaginations that fuel them. Anything that prompts us to stop and think, to re-evaluate old certainties – do I like this, or don’t I? What is this designer trying to tell me? – has already proved its value. To this end, in this issue we’re inviting New Zealand designers to submit their entries to our annual furniture and homeware Design Awards, generously sponsored by Fisher & Paykel (entry details are on p.82). We hope you’ll find their work in our next issue just as inspiring as the international offerings in this one. The home on our cover also presents people with a do-I-or-don’t-I-like-this conundrum. Designed by architect Michael O’Sullivan for Arrowtown residents Tim Hamilton (who built the home himself) and Ingrid Vink, the galvanised-steel-clad design was dubbed “the UFO” by some locals. The region’s tight building restrictions meant the odds were stacked against it getting built at all. But after Tim and Ingrid talked to each of their neighbours about the home and showed them Michael’s model of it, they all decided to embrace this shiny stranger in their midst. It shows how, with open minds and a little generosity, good design can be made welcome to challenge people’s thinking anywhere. Jeremy Hansen

Good news: the week before this issue went to press, HOME picked up the Magazine of the Year title at the Canon Media Awards. Naturally, we’re thrilled. I’d like to quote the citation by the judges, former Listener editor Finlay Macdonald and Sydney-based journalist (and former Metro editor) Lauren Quaintance, in full, because it not only flatters us, but you, our readers, too. “This was a category dominated by titles that are generally very good at what they set out to do,” the awards citation said. “The winner stood out for its editorial cohesion, attention to quality and detail, innovative design and genuine multi-media strategy. It also showed that circulation and revenue growth can be achieved without compromising its own high standards or its obvious respect for the readership’s intelligence and loyalty. Modern and relevant in every sense, a thoroughly deserving winner.” We were chuffed with that, and are very grateful to all of you for your support in making it possible to do what we do.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 15


Editor Jeremy Hansen Art Director Arch MacDonnell Inhouse Design Senior Designer Sarah Gladwell Inhouse Design Senior Stylist/Designer Catherine Wilkinson Stylist/Designer Shani Luckman Editorial Assistant Fiona Williams On our cover, Tim Hamilton, Ingrid Vink and their children Bram and Nina outside their Arrowtown home by Michael O’Sullivan of Bull O’Sullivan Architects. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds. For more, see p.84.

Editorial Office Bauer Media Group Shed 12 City Works Depot 90 Wellesley St Auckland, New Zealand homenewzealand@ bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2739 Postal address HOME magazine Bauer Media Group Private Bag 92512 Wellesley Street Auckland 1141 New Zealand

Contributors Michelle Backhouse Jo Bates Alan Bertenshaw Valeria Carbonaro-Laws Gregg Crimp Annabel Davidson Sam Eichblatt Emma Fox Derwin Sam Haughton Amelia Holmes Penny Lewis Douglas Lloyd Jenkins Claire McCall Alex McLeod Henry Oliver Daron Parton David Robinson Mike Thorburn

Photographers Emily Andrews Simon Devitt Nick Hughes Paul McCredie Evie MacKay Jackie Meiring Toaki Okano Patrick Reynolds Simon Wilson

Chief Executive Officer Paul Dykzeul

Printer Webstar

Publisher Brendon Hill

Distributor Netlink Distribution Company

Commercial Director Paul Gardiner Marketing Manager Martine Skinner Commercial Sales Manager Liezl Hipkins-Stear lhipkins@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2873 Classified Advertising Kim Chapman classifieds@xtra.co.nz +64 7 578 3646 Advertising Account Manager Nicola Saunders nsaunders@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 366 5345 Financial Business Analyst Ferozza Patel Group Production Manager Lisa Sloane Production Co-ordinator Clare Pike Advertising Auckland Liezl Hipkins-Stear lhipkins@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2873

HOME is subject to copyright in its entirety and the contents may not be reproduced in any form, either in whole or in part, without written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved in material accepted for publication, unless initially specified otherwise. All letters and other material forwarded to the magazine will be assumed intended for publication unless clearly labeled “not for publication”. We welcome submissions of homes that architects or owners would like to be considered for publication. Opinions expressed in HOME New Zealand are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of Bauer Media Group. No responsibility is accepted for unsolicited material. ABC average net circulation, January-December 2015: 12,163 copies. ISSN 1178-4148

Subscription Enquiries magshop.co.nz/home 0800 MAGSHOP or 0800 624 746 magshop@magshop.co.nz +64 9 308 2721 (tel) Bulk/Corporate Subscriptions corporates@magshop.co.nz +64 9 308 2700

Sydney Rachel McLean rmclean@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2760

Dusk falls at an Arrowtown home by Michael O’Sullivan. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds. For more, see p.84.

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L U X U R Y

R U G S

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CONTRIBUTORS

EMMA FOX DERWIN

PENNY LEWIS

SAM EICHBLATT

The design lecturer and founder of Wellingtonbased studio Well-Groomed-Fox reports on Milan Design Week (p.67).

The freelance writer compiled our special section on kitchen and bathroom design in this issue (p.34).

Our New York correspondent checked out NYCxDESIGN for Forecast, our special report on the latest global design developments (p.70).

People have described Milan as being a bit flat, design-wise, in recent years (especially postGFC). Has it now got its groove back? Yes. There’s a new way of thinking emerging around slow design. Rather than over-saturating the market with huge collections of new work each April, slow design is a trend emerging from large producers to individual studios and young design talent. This year, the concept was articulated by a revelling in design authenticity, both in original and reissued pieces and in the design process. So, yes, Milan has most certainly reclaimed its groove.

After all your years writing about design, do you think you now know the elements required for successful kitchen and bathroom spaces? I’ve learned that the beauty of successful kitchen and bathroom spaces is more than skin deep. The most visually breathtaking design in the world isn’t much chop if it’s not fit for purpose. I have a friend whose new kitchen has a fundamental flaw: she can’t open the dishwasher and cutlery drawer at the same time, thanks to the way they’re configured. It drives her crazy.

How would you describe the American aesthetic at these shows when compared to their European counterparts? The US is developing a new confidence in product and furniture design that it has lacked. The shows are very mixed, and poised between the old and new, the latter being the Brooklyn aesthetic, which includes contemporary designers who have dug into formerly underrated parts of American design heritage, like the midcentury modern movement, Shaker or Donald Judd-in-Marfa-style minimalism. It’s become such an enduring and exportable cultural phenomenon globally – everywhere today is “the new Brooklyn”, which is shorthand for people doing things on their own terms, in places they can afford the rent. But, it’s also far more responsive to how we live now, in smaller spaces, with smaller families or single, being more mobile, but still with a need for honest, tangible objects with solidity and meaning.

You showed your own ‘Cloak’ cabinet in Milan, which recently won a prize at the Interieur Biennale in Belgium. Congratulations! What difference does an award like this make in marketing the cabinet in New Zealand and abroad? Thanks – I’m pretty proud given the calibre of the jury! The ‘Cloak’ cabinet is inspired by locality and the challenges that being a designer in New Zealand represents – this led to investigations into flat-pack furniture design. The cabinet explores principles of “clothing” an object or furniture by replacing hard material and traditional doors with textile-based magnetic ‘cloaks’. These ‘cloaks’ are made from a composite textile I developed specifically for the cabinet. Winning an award like this certainly helps build the credibility of the concept. I’m looking forward to exhibiting the ‘Cloak’ shelf in London in September.

How can we make kitchens and bathrooms as immune to fads as possible? If you’re wanting something timeless, it’s probably best to stick to neutral colours and materials. But where’s the fun in that? Our new cobalt-blue ‘KV1’ kitchen mixer is by Arne Jacobsen for Vola. A certain magazine editor has made a comment about it being a “novelty tap”. We shall see. You’ve just moved into your new home, designed by Neville Price. What’s it like, and how are you enjoying it? We are getting there. The build was one of the most stressful things we have ever done and we are still recovering. The front of the house is fairly conservative as we live in a heritage area. Inside, it’s a mix of concrete and timber, with plenty of skylights and roof trusses, in the 70s style that we like. Business at the front and party at the back – sounds like a mullet haircut!

There’s an obsession with fashion design in the US, but Americans buy their furniture at places that never name their designers. Why? It’s hard to generalise, because the country is so massive and culturally varied, but maybe it’s because brands are so pervasive here. Individual designers don’t have the same power as a big brand. People can trust big brands but not their own taste because the idea of America making something that’s seen as cool or chic for the rest of the world isn’t quite part of the story it tells itself (yet).

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DESIGN

CHOSEN ONES 04

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COMPLEMENT A ROOM WITH HAND-CRAFTED ACCESSORIES.

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01—‘Basic’ tote by Baggu, $240 from Let Liv, letliv.co.nz 02­—‘MC’ table by Shinsaku Miyamoto for Ritzwell, $18,905 from ECC, ecc.co.nz 03—Vase, $165 from Flotsam & Jetsam,

flotsamandjetsam.co.nz 04—Rug by All the Way to Paris for &Tradition, $7362 from Design Denmark, designdenmark.co.nz 05—‘Antik’ tray by Tine K Home, $545 from ECC, ecc.co.nz 06—‘B9’ chair by Thonet, $364 from Thonet, thonet.co.nz 07—‘Line’ floor lamp by Douglas and Bec, $1325 from Douglas and Bec, douglasandbec.com 08—Serving spoon by Houston Design Co, $50 from Douglas and Bec, douglasandbec.com 09—Mongolian lamb’s-wool cushion, $299 from French Country Collections, frenchcountry.co.nz. Edited by Amelia Holmes.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 21


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NINE EASY PIECES THERE’S BEAUTY IN THE CLASSIC SIMPLICITY OF THESE DESIGN FINDS.

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01—‘Shiraz’ rug, $950 from The Vitrine, inthevitrine.com 02—‘Wind Bell’ by Nousaku, $135 from The Shelter, theshelter.co.nz 03— Persian cushion, $425 from Flotsam & Jetsam,

flotsamandjetsam.co.nz 04—‘Bellevue AJ3’ lamp by Arne Jacobsen for &Tradition, $1359 from Design Denmark, designdenmark.co.nz 05—‘Cog’ key ring by Tom Dixon, $85 from Simon James Concept Store, store.simonjamesdesign.com 06—‘Terra’ dinner plate by Robert Gordon, $42 from Father Rabbit, fatherrabbit.com 07—‘Randaccio’ mirror by Gio Ponti for Gubi, $1780 from Cult Design, cultdesign.co.nz 08—Bamboo basket by Hay Studios for Hay, $101 from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz 09—‘Tulip’ chair, $385 from Flotsam & Jetsam, flotsamandjetsam.co.nz. Edited by Amelia Holmes.

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LENNON sofa by Cameron Foggo Auckland: 19 Earle St, Parnell | 09 309 0500 | auckland@backhousenz.com Wellington: 12 Kaiwharawhara Rd | 04 499 8847 | wellington@backhousenz.com

backhousenz.com


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TAKE IT UP A NOTCH CAREFULLY CRAFTED AND COVETABLE PIECES TO ELEVATE YOUR SPACE.

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01—Vintage gym mat, $1500 from The Vitrine, inthevitrine.com 02—‘Untitled 2014’ artwork by Brendan Huntly, $6000 from Bowerbank Ninow, bowerbankninow.com 03—Jug by Tim Grocott for Taus Ceramic, $130 from Precinct35, precinct35.co.nz 04—Side table, $129 from French Country Collections, frenchcountry.co.nz 05—‘Uncino’ chair

by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for Mattiazzi, $2035 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com 06—Tape cutter, $150 from The Shelter, theshelter.co.nz 07—‘Shepards Delight’ throw, $165 from French Country Collections, frenchcountry.co.nz 08—‘Sophie’ mirror by Jean-Francois Merillou, $821 from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz 09—‘A5 Memobottle’ water carrier by Jesse Leeworthy and Jonathan Byrt, $38.85 from Simon James Concept Store, store.simonjamesdesign.com. Edited by Amelia Holmes.

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D:04

THEN AND NOW

A DANISH FURNITURE BRAND WITH HERITAGE AND CONTEMPORARY WARES LANDS IN NEW ZEALAND.

Danish design firm &tradition is now represented in New Zealand by Aucklandbased Dawson & Co. The firm was established in 2010 but draws from a library of furniture and lighting designs dating back to the 1930s. These include the Arne Jacobsen and Flemming Lassen-designed ‘Mayor’ sofa (top right), created in 1939 for Denmark’s Søllerød City Hall, which the duo also designed. Other classic designers in the &tradition stable include Jørn Utzon and Verner Panton, who happily co-exist with contemporary stars such as Jaime Hayon, Benjamin Hubert, Copenhagen’s Norm Architects, and Space Copenhagen, the design duo behind the interiors of Noma restaurant, and who also created the handsome ‘Fly’ sofa (right). Dawson & Co 115 The Strand, Auckland 09 476 1121 dawsonandco.co.nz

D:05

SERIOUS SUSTAINABILITY

THE NEW ZEALAND GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL’S UPCOMING CONFAB HAS INSPIRATION APLENTY.

The New Zealand Green Building Council’s 2016 Sustainable Housing Summit is bringing world-leading architects and urbanists to Auckland on June 15 and Christchurch on June 17 to press the case for quality, affordable sustainable housing that prevents sprawl. “It’s an opportunity to look at the wider picture and decide what kind of homes and communities we want to live in,” says Alex Cutler, the council’s chief executive. Speakers include Vancouverite Andrea Reimer, who will speak about her city’s leadership in urban sustainability, Melbourne architect James Nightingale, who will discuss using architects as developers of affordable apartments, and Kristian Edwards of Norway’s Snøhetta Architects, who will talk via video link about their ZEB Pilot House (pictured), a net positive-energy house. nzgbc.org.nz/shsummit16

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^Conditions apply. Go to mazda.co.nz/mazdacare for more information.


D:06

GREAT SOUTHERN LAND

A GRAND SURVEY OF SOUTH AMERICAN ART ARRIVES IN AUCKLAND.

Auckland Art Gallery’s latest show, Space to Dream: Recent Art from South America, features work by 41 artists and collectives from six nations: Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia and Uruguay. Luckily, the show doesn’t attempt to be encyclopedic, but groups the works under seven unifying themes, including “revolution”, “change makers” and “horizons and possibilities”. Curated by Auckland Art Gallery’s Zara Stanhope and Santiago-based Beatriz Bustos Oyanedel, the exhibition is the first in-depth show of South American art in Australasia. The breadth of work, from Alfredo Jaar’s ‘America’, to installations by Ernesto Neto (top), Maria Nepomunceno (right) and Máximo Corvalán-Pincheira (far right) is majestic, and will reward repeat visits. On show until September 18. Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Ta¯maki Cnr Kitchener and Wellesley Streets, Auckland aucklandartgallery.com

D:07

CROSSING CULTURES

A FRANCO-NEW ZEALAND COLLABORATION ON A NEW WAR MEMORIAL FOR WELLINGTON.

The French government is developing a unique collaborative project for a memorial that will open in Wellington’s Pukeahu National War Memorial Park in 2018. A symposium in France last year invited French and New Zealand artists, writers and architects to visit memorial sites (including Douaumont Ossuary and Cemetery, top left and bottom left, and battlefields in Hénin-Beaumont, top right and bottom right) and to create a brief for the Wellington memorial. Now the French government has called for entries to an architectural competition to design a memorial that responds to that brief. Entries for the Wellington memorial’s design close on June 30, are allowed to come from any country, so long as each team includes a New Zealand architect. frenchmemorialatpukeahu.org

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CONTEMPORARY RUGS OF DISTINCTION

09 377 3068 | 70 Stanley Street, Parnell, Auckland | www.sourcemondial.c o.nz


D:08

MODERN CLASSIC

ONE OF THE COUNTRY’S MOST VENERABLE ART GALLERIES PLANS AN ELEGANT EXPANSION.

It has been a long time coming, but Whanganui’s beautiful Sarjeant Gallery is on the home stretch of fundraising for a $34-million strengthening and expansion project designed by Warren & Mahoney. The original Oamaru stone building was designed by Donald Hosie, who was killed at the battle of Passchendaele in 1917 and didn’t get to see the neo-classical gallery open in 1919. Warren & Mahoney’s plans involve the construction of a new northern wing connected to the original gallery by a bridge, as well as storage for the institution’s 8000-piece collection. The Sarjeant, which has occupied a temporary home on Whanganui’s Taupo Quay after the original building was identified as an earthquake risk in 2012, hopes to move in by 2019 to celebrate the gallery’s centenary. Sarjeant Gallery Te Whare o Rehua 38 Taupo Quay, Whanganui sarjeant.org.nz

D:09

MAKING A SPLASH

TWO WELLINGTONIANS ESTABLISH A CHIC RAINWEAR LABEL.

As winter sets in, it’s good to know that a design-minded, New Zealand-made rainwear range is now available. Okewa Rainwear is the brainchild of Wellington husband-and-wife duo Nick and Nevada Leckie, who wanted to arrive at work in wet weather without looking disheveled. Nick is an architect and Nevada is a fashion design graduate; their brand name translates as “large grey raincloud” in Maori, but also sounds a bit Japanese, which is apt considering they import fabric from mills in Japan and Korea. The couple still works at their day jobs a few days a week, but their Kickstarter-funded business is growing. Their five women’s styles and three-piece men’s range are available online, as well as at a Wellington pop-up at 148 Lambton Quay until June 10, and will be stocked in Auckland at The Shelter from June 15. okewarainwear.com

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D:10

CITY HIGH A LUXURIOUS NEW DEVELOPMENT MAKES CENTRAL AUCKLAND APARTMENTS DESIRABLE AGAIN.

Anti-density NIMBYs would have you believe that you have to be a little desperate to want to live in an apartment, but a new Auckland development seems to be disproving that. Apartment living in the country’s biggest city has, until now, mostly been associated with the word ‘shoebox’. But The International, a luxurious new apartment building being developed by Sanctuary Group that is due to be constructed near the University of Auckland campus on Princes Street, is aimed squarely at the upper end of the market. Jasmax architects have come up with a scheme to re-use the bones of the octagonal 1980s building – until recently, it served as Fonterra’s global headquarters – and apply a white lattice exoskeleton that squares up the building by creating generous, airy conservatories on its edges. The 88 apartments in the 17-floor building start from more than $800,000 for onebedroom spaces and rise through two- and three-bedroom offerings to much higher prices for the penthouse suites. As well as having the city on their doorsteps – the Britomart area is just down the hill – residents will also have access to shared amenities including a private wine cellar and tasting room, a private dining room, cinema and concierge service. The International’s interiors are being designed by Rufus Knight, whose work on the Lonely lingerie stores has featured in this magazine. Knight will bring his paredback sensibility to the building’s public spaces and to individual apartments on request. The rate at which the apartments are selling shows demand for quality city pads is escalating. “It certainly seems there is a significant appetite for high-quality apartments with connection to green space, water views, and indoor-outdoor living,” Knight says. “The building seems to appeal to people who understand that high-density living doesn’t have to mean compromising their expectations.” Let’s hope the densitydone-well message spreads throughout the city – at all levels of the market.

theinternational.co.nz

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Profoundly inspired by the past but reconceived from a modern perspective. Timothy Oulton is an authentic brand with the deepest integrity and a passion to deliver the extraordinary using time honoured traditional techniques producing uniquely authentic collections.

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KITCHENS

ESSENTIAL IMPLEMENTS

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SIT, STIR, BREW, CHOP: WE HAVE SOMETHING AT HAND FOR EVERY KITCHEN TASK.

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01—‘Coloured Cut Light’ by Katie Brown, $850 from Katie Brown, katiebrownglass.co.nz 02—Coasters, $39.90 from Citta Design, cittadesign.com 03—‘Brew’ stove top

espresso maker by Tom Dixon, $370 from Simon James Concept Store and ECC, store.simonjamesdesign.com and ECC.co.nz 04—‘Dine’ napkin, $12.90 from Citta Design, cittadesign.com 05—‘Slim Crosseye’ encaustic tile, $125 per square metre from Gallery 4, gallery4.co.nz 06—‘Mini’ bowls, $58 (for a set of five) from Tessuti, tessuti.co.nz 07—‘Octagon’ chopping block, $65 from Douglas and Bec, douglasandbec.com 08—Tasting spoons $89 (set of eight), from Tessuti, tessuti.co.nz 09­—‘Coma’ wood stool by Josep Llusca for Enea, $466 from UFL, ufl.co.nz. Edited by Catherine Wilkinson and Shani Luckman.

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09


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TASTEMAKER, TASKMASTER CERAMIC, METAL, STONE: A SELECTION OF DURABLE KITCHEN TOOLS THAT LAST.

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01—Espresso maker by The Little Guy, $999 from Milly’s Kitchen, millyskitchen.co.nz 02—‘Cylinder’ salt

and pepper shakers by Ladies and Gentlemen, $95 from Douglas and Bec, douglasandbec.com 03— Handmade grater, $95 from Everyday Needs, everyday-needs.com 04—Coffee percolator by Gidon Bing, $110 from Gidon Bing, gidonbingceramics.com 05—‘Sifo Bianco’ tile in White Ivory, $99.50 per square metre from Tile Space, tiles.co.nz 06— Frying pan, $57 from The Foxes Den, thefoxesden.co.nz 07—Trivet by Nanbu Tekki, $55 from An Astute Assembly, aaaselect.co.nz 08—Kitchen scissors by Hay Studios for Hay, $21.95 from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz 09­—‘Pk Bowl’ by Poul Kjærholm for Architectmade, $400 from Mr Bigglesworthy, mrbigglesworthy.co.nz. Edited by Catherine Wilkinson and Shani Luckman.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 36


Great kitchens don’t just happen... they happen by design Kitchens by Design www.kitchensbydesign.co.nz Phone: (09) 379 3084 Showroom: 7 Melrose Street, Newmarket


K:01

KITCHENS

SMALL AND ELEGANT

ALTHOUGH PETITE, THIS KITCHEN DOESN’T SCRIMP ON STYLE

Architect . . . . . . . . . . . Sayes Studio Photography . . . . Simon Wilson Location . . . . . . . . . . . Auckland Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To maximise space within the 116-square-metre home.

You designed this kitchen in your own compact home with an equally compact budget. How did you make it as good as you could? HENRI SAYES It’s a fallacy that a good kitchen has to be large. If anything, a small kitchen has a significant advantage in that everything is right at hand, although you don’t want anything to be fussy. Paring things back and not overcomplicating the design, the materials or the storage is key to making it function well and look elegant. It’s a very simple plan – two benches with some careful consideration of a few key details. Simplicity is its strength. What were the greatest economies and where did you splurge? The greatest economy is that the kitchen is quite small – but appropriate for the size of the house. We used economical materials in interesting ways – an oversized pegboard door, generic square tiles on the bench front and splashback, with a change in orientation over the rangehood. We used a great joiner for the cabinetry and sliding pantry door, but fitted the pantry with proprietary adjustable shelving. Things that you touch are also worth a splurge – Greg O’Flaherty at Katalog did a custom matt-black chrome finish on the handles. We also specified a 300mm two-zone induction cooktop alongside a 450mm Gas on Glass Cooktop by Fisher & Paykel, which was a bit of a splurge, but the flexibility and functionality made it one of the best-value choices. In general terms, what makes a good kitchen for you? A good kitchen is one with a good cook in it. It has to be a space which feels lovely to be in, with good light and a good relationship to the surrounding spaces. It’s about getting a mix between the pragmatic and the poetic. Appliances All by Fisher & Paykel: 600mm single DishDrawer; two-zone induction cooktop and one burner Gas on Glass Cooktop; 600mm built-in oven; 600mm built-in integrated rangehood; 635mm ActiveSmart fridge. Benchtops Formica HPL on 36mm beech plywood Cabinetmaker Leslie AJ & Co Cupboard and drawer hardware Katalog Tapware Metrix.

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Opposite page Architect Henri Sayes of Sayes Studio in the compact kitchen of his own Auckland home. Far left Sayes economised on some materials, such as generic square tiles and a peg-board pantry door. Left Above the Fisher & Paykel 600mm built-in oven, the Fisher & Paykel cooktop is a combination of a twozone induction cooktop and Gas on Glass. Above The kitchen flows easily into the home’s dining and living areas.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 39


K:02

FORM AND FUNCTION

A FAMILY KITCHEN BY SONJA HAWKINS DOES ALL-DAY DUTY.

Designer . . . . . . . . . . . Sonja Hawkins Photography . . . . Simon Devitt Location . . . . . . . . . . . Auckland Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interior designer Sonja Hawkins designed her own family kitchen in a home by Pattersons. What was your design starting point? SONJA HAWKINS The general feel of the house is semi-industrial. I wanted a bit of a café feel, as we love our coffee and had purchased the beautiful La Marzocco espresso machine. The kitchen is the hub of the home, so the trick was to make it warm and inviting. You’ve used a range of materials – what’s the key to a successful balance? It’s about materials working together and textures are key. For example, with the busy-ness of the travertine on the floor, the benchtop needed to be quieter. Why did you opt for glass over walls to separate kitchen and scullery? The kitchen lacks morning sun, so the glass allowed light from the east to filter through. It was also key to the aesthetic. You designed the kitchen to be multifunctional – how does it work in practice? Kitchens, and all rooms for that matter, need to be multifunctional. This space is pivotal to the operations of the home. It’s one big gathering space for eating, meeting, drinking coffee. I love spaces that visually challenge functionality, but they should be functional to the user. What are your thoughts on benchtops? Beauty, practicality or both? Aesthetics are always important, but not at the expense of practicality. I’m a busy mother of four, so there’s no time to polish the silver. You can have both practicality and beauty. But never ugly!

Benchtops Leathered black granite from Italian Stone Cabinetry Soaped-oak by Bremich Cabinetmakers Custom splashback and scullery tiles ‘D’ tiles imported from Holland Dishwasher Miele Fridge Subzero Flooring Travertine from SCE Internal hardware Blum and Bremich Kitchen stools Bentwood from Cemac Interiors Lighting ‘Caravaggio’ pendants by Cecilie Manz for Lightyears from Cult; downlights from ECC Oven and cooktop Wolf gas cooktop; Miele ovens Rangehood Qasair integrated with custom-steel surround Tapware Vola from Metrix.

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K:03

MODERN TRADITION

A NEW KITCHEN IN A RENOVATED VILLA PROVIDES CONTEMPORARY STYLE WITH A NOD TO THE PAST.

Architect . . . . . . . . . . . Julian Guthrie Architecture Photography . . . . Patrick Reynolds Location . . . . . . . . . . . Auckland Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To design a new kitchen in a villa extension that combines contemporary lines with character.

What did you want to achieve with this kitchen? HOMEOWNER The kitchen in our previous house was very white. We wanted something that was a bit more of a statement, with a salute to older styles, such as the beveled edges on the drawers and a marble island benchtop. JULIAN GUTHRIE The black Corian with its beveled edges is reminiscent of Bakelite door hardware.

How did you organise the appliances? We keep small appliances in the butler’s pantry. I always had wall ovens growing up, so I wanted them in this kitchen. It’s very handy having two ovens the same, stacked on top of one another. These have doors that open from the side, rather than lift up. There is a DishDrawer in the island (which is on legs), with a dishwasher in the butler’s pantry.

What else was important for you? I’ve always fought for storage and this is my dream kitchen in that regard. We have a butler’s pantry, which can be closed off with a cavity slider, although we usually just leave it open. It includes a wine fridge and cellar shelving. There would have been more storage dedicated to wine, but I put my foot down and said we needed more shelves for the pantry. There are tall pull-out units for oils and spices and also for glasses. There is a lot of shelving in the butler’s pantry for crockery, with seldom-used items stored higher up.

Artwork Karl Maughn Benchtops Carrara marble selected for maximum sheet size and grey mottle; stainless steel features in the scullery Cabinets Lower cabinets are solid black Corian with beveled-edge detail; poplar-ply cabinets feature in the scullery Dishwasher Fisher & Paykel integrated DishDrawer Flooring Solid oak with dark oil finish Fridge Ariston Hob Gaggenau from Kouzina Joinery Johannes Erren Cabinetmakers Kitchen stools Tolix ‘H’ stools by Xavier Pauchard Lighting Downlights and pendant from Inlite Ovens Gaggenau from Kouzina Splashback Tiles from European Ceramics Tapware Stainless pillar mount by Perrin & Rowe from In Residence. Dining chairs ‘Catifa’ chairs by Lievore Altherr Molina for Arper from UFL. Rug Source Mondial Flooring American oak with WOCA oil from Design Denmark. Dining table Studio Italia

HOMEOWNER

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 41


K:04

CITY STYLE

AN INDUSTRIAL-STYLE KITCHEN FITS RIGHT INTO THIS HOME.

Architect . . . . . . . . . . A  ndrea Bell and Andrew Kissell Photography . . . . Simon Devitt Location . . . . . . . . . . . Auckland Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A simple and robust kitchen in keeping with the industrial feel of the house.

How did you choose the material palette? ANDREA BELL We wanted an industrial feel, so the benchtops are 6mm-thick mild steel. The cabinetry against the concrete wall is Trans-Tex, which is used on truck decks. It’s a rich, dark brown that gives warmth to the space. The Trans-Tex cabinetry carries through to the laundry to connect and extend both spaces. On the island, the steel benchtop folds down at the ends and has simple dressed pine plywood to the drawer and cupboard faces, as well as the island recess. We used pine ply for the cabinetry and as wall and ceiling linings in other parts of the house, so it all links together. What was the design starting point? It needed to have a dialogue with the rest of the building. We wanted tall storage against the concrete wall and a large island that everyone could gather around, as they always do. What were the essentials you couldn’t do without? Soft-close hinges and drawer slides, the double-door fridge, a quiet dishwasher and a large oven.

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What do you need to consider when designing a busy space such as a kitchen when you have young children? We try to encourage the children to stay out of the kitchen when we are cooking and it’s a toyfree zone. They inevitably end up around your feet so a decent amount of space between work surfaces is important – 1.1m is good, 1.2m is ideal. Another big thing was to prevent them opening drawers and cupboards. We hate those safety-drawer latches as you are forever undoing and doing them back up, hence holes instead of handles. They are reasonably difficult for a little one to work out how to pull open, but they do learn eventually! Benchtops 6mm mild steel Cabinetry 8mm Trans-Tex 220 in dark brown large mesh with exposed plywood edges; 17mm untreated radiata decorative SC-grade plywood with exposed ply edges Dishwasher Asko D5454 in stainless steel Flooring Polished concrete Fridge Smeg side-by-side stainless steel 618 Litre Fridge/Freezer Internal hardware Blum soft-close hinges and drawer slides Lighting Brass bayonets with LED dolly bulbs Oven and cooktop Smeg 90cm stainless-steel freestanding oven Tapware ‘Tara Classic’ by Dornbracht, Metrix single-lever mixer with brushed nickel finish.


K:05

CLEAN AND COMFORTABLE

A KITCHEN BY IMO DOES HEAVY DUTY DAILY FOR AN AUCKLAND FAMILY.

Designer . . . . . . . . . . . I MO, in a home by Paterson Architecture Collective and Glamuzina Architects Photography . . . . Jackie Meiring Location . . . . . . . . . . . Auckland Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . For a family kitchen in a new home that opens easily to the outdoors.

What was the starting point for your kitchen’s overall aesthetic? MICHELLE DOWD, OWNER We wanted the design to be sympathetic with the overall design of the house – functional, clean lines and a comfortable, hardworking kitchen. We walked into IMO one afternoon and there it was. We were particularly keen to use marble for the benchtop and anything other than MDF for the cabinetry. What was the hardest thing to choose and what was the easiest? The hardest thing to find was a kitchen that we actually liked. The easiest was connecting with people who shared a similar aesthetic and who made the process fun. What other storage do you have in this kitchen? There is lots of storage on the other side of the island for platters, glasses, cook books and phone leads. There are also power points under the bench on the island – Phil [Michelle’s husband] was insistent about having power there for small appliances like the mixer or for charging laptops

and phones. Oven trays are kept in a tall cupboard to the right of the oven and under the sink on the island bench there are tall units for rubbish and recycling. What are you enjoying most about the kitchen? Functionality and the clean lines. It has truly created a fabulous hub for our family and friends.

Benchtops Carrara marble from Granite Pacifica; stainless steel from IMO Cabinets Steel and laminate from IMO Dishwasher Miele Flooring Black-stained strand board Fridge Electrolux Integrated separate fridge and freezer Internal hardware Steel and birch from IMO Kitchen stools ‘Baker’ stools by IMO; ‘Clipper’ stools by Yasu Sasamoto Lighting design and supply Inlite Lights Delta Light Tuba downlight and track from Inlite Oven and cooktop Fisher & Paykel Rangehood Bosch Splashback stainless steel Tapware Black Gooseneck by Meir from The Kitchen Hub Wall unit on splashback Frost system from Katalog.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 43


K:06

SIMPLICITY FROM COMPLEXITY

AN AUCKLAND HOME MAKES KITCHEN DESIGN LOOK SIMPLE.

Architect . . . . . . . . . . . A  nthony Hoete, WHAT_architecture Photography . . . . Patrick Reynolds Location . . . . . . . . . . . Auckland Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . London-based architect Anthony Hoete designed this home for his friends, engineers Michael Pervan and Amy Oding.

A finalist in the Home of the Year 2016, this home has a carefully calculated asymmetry. How does the kitchen fit in with that? ANTHONY HOETE : The ‘Villameter’ is an interpretation of the traditional villa to the street. Out the back, it is also a modern villa to the garden, with its non-façade wall of bi-folding doors. This extrusion between traditional and modern produced the geometry of the house. Inside, the living-room wall is just a TV cabinet jump-scaled to be more wall and less furniture. It’s the same for the kitchen on the other side of the open-plan living space. This is also a response to the owner’s particular way of pared-back, streamlined simplicity. It’s complicated to make simplicity look this good. Was part of the success the fact your clients are engineers and you all have an appreciation for fine details? The clients have an empathy for ‘apparently’ simple details which are, ironically, not so easy to achieve in practice. Any tips for choosing timber veneer for kitchen cabinets? Seal them. I would

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recommend Carver AquaHit, an Italian nontoxic water-based product. As good as any polyurethane – I know from the knockedover wine glasses on our office ply furniture. The consent process for the house took 10 years. What changes in kitchen design have you seen in that time? Kitchens in New Zealand are both internal and external. Next time we will be able to wheel the peninsula kitchen component outside. Technological advances today can provide for ‘plug-in’ plumbing. Benchtop and splashback Honed Statuarietto marble Cabinets Cabinetry design by WHAT_ architecture, built by MMi using Tasmanian oak veneer from Bestwood Dishwasher Fisher & Paykel DishDrawers Flooring Tasmanian oak from Herman Pacific, installed by Wood Floor Solutions Fridge Miele Internal hardware Blum Lighting Klik fluorescents integrated with halogen downlights; Brightlight recessed LED strip lights from JA Russell Oven and cooktop Miele gas cooktop, oven and combi-microwave/oven Tapware ‘Pan’ by Zucchetti from Robertson Bathware. Table ‘Soul’ table by Nonn from Simon James Design. Chairs ‘Hal’ chairs by Jasper Morrison for Vitra from Matisse.


K:07

HOME + STUDIO ITALIA

IN THE DETAILS

STUDIO ITALIA’S JOANNA HOEFT REPORTS ON NEW DEVELOPMENTS FOLLOWING THE WORLD’S BIGGEST KITCHENS EVENT IN MILAN.

STUDIO ITALIA studioitalia.co.nz

The 42nd EuroCucina in Milan was full of inspiration this year, particularly at the Varenna exhibition, which was clean and sophisticated with refined details, as well as new combinations of gorgeous materials and finishes including Italian walnut, fumed glass, ceramic benchtops and brass, bronze or liquid-metal details.

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Varenna released three new designs at EuroCucina. The ‘Trail’ kitchen is an exciting project by Carlo Colombo, with beautiful handles that can be positioned at the centre or far end of the cabinetry, and with worktops as slender as 6mm. The ‘Phoenix’ kitchen by CR&S Varenna is fascinating with its pure and essential lines – a sleek design sensibility offset with the warmth of timber and with storage of some items behind glass.

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Meanwhile, the ‘Arthena’ range by CR&S Varenna is based on the principle of a kitchen consisting of combined furniture components. It has a beautiful cabinetry edge detail that acts as a frame for door panels, and no handles.

01 The ‘Trail’ kitchen by Carlo Colombo for Varenna. 02 The ‘Phoenix’ kitchen by CR&S Varenna features the warmth of timber cabinets. 03 A drawer detail from the ‘Arthena’ kitchen by CR&S Varenna. 04 The ‘Arthena’ kitchen, available exclusively from Studio Italia, is based on the principle of the kitchen being made up of furniture components.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 45


K:08

HOME + KITCHENS BY DESIGN

NEW DIRECTIONS

THE TEAM AT KITCHENS BY DESIGN HAVE THEIR EYES ON THE LATEST KITCHEN DEVELOPMENTS.

KITCHENS BY DESIGN kitchensbydesign.co.nz

New décor trends in kitchens include large-format ceramics with intricate patterns or designs. We’re also seeing lots of glass cabinetry for display and for creating brighter spaces. That said, we are also noticing a continued desire for the pure, pared-back simplicity of Scandinavian styling.

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As well as considering different aesthetic directions to take, the need for spatial planning and flow within the kitchen remain crucial to its success. As busy, productive spaces, the design needs to facilitate maximum ease of use. Storage is a key component, as the preference to stay clutter-free means most appliances, crockery and culinary tools are kept in cupboards and drawers. Giving careful consideration to the purchase of every product and how it will look on its own and gel with the rest of the house are also key.

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01 Kitchens by Design worked traditional detailing, such as pressed tin in the splashback and soft veining in the benchtop, into this classic-style kitchen. 02 This ‘contemporary-international’ style reveals sleek, minimalist lines. 03 Contrasting benchtops, textures, materials and finishes are the hallmarks of the ‘contemporary-urban’ style.

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K:09

HOME + BLUM

NOW AND THEN NICOLA CHAN FROM KITCHEN HARDWARE SPECIALISTS BLUM LOOKS AT THE LATEST KITCHEN DEVELOPMENTS FROM MILAN.

BLUM blum.co.nz

A different type of kitchen was on display at EuroCucina this year: crafted, refined and looking more like fitted furniture than functional space. The kitchen is truly becoming an integral part of living domains. Ovens and fridges were integrated or hidden behind large cabinets. Handles had all but disappeared. Simple, organic materials concealed high-end technology and bespoke storage zones. There were also hints of the 1970s in bronze smoked-glass cabinets, matte walnut veneers and pops of dusky pink, mustard or emerald.

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Arclinea’s ‘Principia’ kitchen was a fine example of the kitchen-as-furniture trend, with standout features including freestanding glass-front oak crockery and glassware cupboards. Arclinea experimented with opulent detailing such as Calacatta gold marble benchtops, rangehoods in Champagne-coloured stainless steel, chestnut-clad walls and oak serveries.

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01 A ‘Soho’ kitchen by Italian manufacturer Doimo. 02 A wall of open shelving dominates in the ‘Look’ kitchen by Snaidero. 03 The ‘Principia’ kitchen by Antonio Citterio for Arclinea is the anti-kitchen, looking more like an assemblage of hand-crafted furniture. 04 This kitchen by Arclinea has a Calacatta gold marble benchtop, gold sink and tap, chestnut-clad walls and a solid oak servery. 05 Industrial-style open shelving with thick steel profiles and framework were a strong feature in powder-coated matt black, as well gold and brass.

Bronzes, copper, golds, rose golds, brass and matte black steel dominated, en masse or in refined details. While there’s something confident about these metallics, many kitchens preferred being hidden away. The ‘Way’ kitchen by Snaidero could conceal almost all its functional aspects behind retractable doors. There was also plenty of large, open shelving, much of it rendered in industrial style – thick steel frames were a strong feature of many kitchens. They were mostly powder-coated in matte black, but were also done in gold or brass tones. Island showbacks were also left open as a place for display.

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K:10

01 A kitchen by Boffi. 02 The ‘Sipario’ kitchen by Makio Hasuike & Co for Aran Cucine. 03 The ‘DUO’ sink and benchtop in Corian® Cirrus White by Rowson Kitchens & Joinery. 04 The ‘Floo’ kitchen by Karim Rashid for Rational is in Corian® Glacier White. Rational is represented in New Zealand by Palazzo Kitchens & Appliances. 05 This kitchen by Evelyn McNamara features Corian® Deep Nocturne.

HOME + CORIAN

DESIGN DIRECTIONS

FOLLOWING TRIPS TO MILAN AND LONDON, NICKY DUGGAN FROM EVOLUTION OF SURFACES REPORTS ON KEY KITCHEN DESIGN TRENDS.

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CORIAN 0800 CORIAN | 0800 267 426 corian.co.nz

Colour is becoming more important in kitchens. While palettes continue to be neutral, they’re shifting to deeper, darker hues. Grey and black-based trends continue, and deep browns are starting to reappear. Solid colours – often muddy naturals such as olive greens and teal blues – were used as accents and highlighted with shots of rose-gold muted copper or brass. Some kitchens use benchtop materials on drawer and cupboard fronts, creating a monolithic aesthetic leavened with clever illumination. Deep Corian® colours such as Lava Rock, Deep Nocturne and Deep Night Sky can deliver this look. The hero component in Milan was the sink – oversized and, in some cases, sitting proud from the benchtop. Most are made from the same material as the benchtop – this new aesthetic can be achieved with a Corian® DUO sink, which is available in the top-selling colours and patterns, coupled with stainless steel to seamlessly integrate into your Corian® benchtop.

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The standout kitchen at EuroCucina was ‘Floo’ by Karim Rashid for Rational, which features DuPont™ Glacier White Corian®. A continuous radius detail also functions as a handle. The sculptural white ‘monobloc’ proves that white-on-white, coupled with incredible design, will always be a winner. With appropriate local nuances, there is virtually no gap between trends seen at EuroCucina and what New Zealand’s top designers are creating.

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FRESH BY

/WHERE BATHROOMS, LAUNDRIES & TILES COME TOGETHER BEAUTIFULLY/ CHRISTCHURCH /86 WIGRAM ROAD /T 03 343 0969 AUCKLAND /4-8 ACE PLACE, KINGSLAND /T 09 309 9109

BATHCO.CO.NZ


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BATHROOMS

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ACCESSORISE ALL AREAS MUST-HAVES AND LITTLE REFINEMENTS TO FEATURE IN THE SMALLEST ROOM.

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01—‘Plain Hex’ encaustic tiles by Gallery 4, $145 per square metre from Gallery 4, gallery4.co.nz 02—‘Sound-Rack’ shelving by Ludovica + Roberto Palomba for Kartell, $980 from Backhouse, backhousenz.com 03—‘Glaze’ basin by Inbani, POA from Matisse, matisse.co.nz 04­—Roll holder, $79 from Father Rabbit, fatherrabbit.com 05—Lothantique soap, $9 from Tessuti, tessuti.co.nz 06—‘Living’ mirror, $289 from BoConcept, boconcept.com 07—Eco Max sisal body brush, $39.90 from Father Rabbit, fatherrabbit.com 08—‘Willow Weave’ bath towel by Mungo, $69 from Everyday Needs, everyday-needs.com. Edited by Catherine Wilkinson and Shani Luckman.

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BACK TO BASICS GO AU NATUREL IN NEUTRAL BATHROOM TONES AND MATERIALS. 05

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01—Lens box by Thomas Jenkins for Wrong for Hay, from $130 from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz 02—‘Market’ basket by Fog Linen, $36 from Father Rabbit, fatherrabbit.com 03—‘Pepe’ mirror by Studio Pepe for Menu, $968 from Simon James, store.simonjamesdesign.com 04­—Towel bar by Fog Linen, $35 from Father Rabbit, fatherrabbit.com 05—‘In-Out’ marble bath by Benedini Associati for Agape, POA from Matisse, matisse.co.nz 06—Tessere Bianco wall tile, $139.50 per square metre from Tile Space, tiles.co.nz 07—‘Axor Citterio’ tap by Antonio Citterio for Hansgrohe, POA from Matisse, matisse.co.nz 08—‘Cialda’ bath sheet by Citta Design, $44.90 from Citta Design, cittadesign.com.

Edited by Catherine Wilkinson and Shani Luckman.

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B:03

COUNTRY STRONG

A QUEENSTOWN RETREAT MIXES LUXE WITH RUSTIC ELEMENTS.

Designer . . . . . . . . . . . Maggie Carroll and Jessica Barter, Bureaux Photography . . . . Simon Devitt Location . . . . . . . . . . . Queenstown Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To create an ensuite in keeping with its rural aspect.

How would you describe the style of the house? [You can see more of the house on p.96] MAGGIE CARROLL It has a restrained exterior, with reclaimed ironbark lintels, copper flashings and storm shutters, which take their cues from the alpine and rural vernacular. Designed as a small retreat for an Auckland couple, the house has ample overflow space in the sunny gabled lofts for visiting friends. This project has an old-fashioned charm and warmth that will only improve as it weathers and is lived in. Were there any constraints you needed to consider for this bathroom? I think the biggest constraint was around privacy versus daylight, as the bathroom windows face south to the forecourt. We had shutters installed to address this. Using different-shaped tiles from the same marble is a subtle and elegant way to provide interest and detail. You’ve used marble for the basin, too? Yes, we had the marble basin custom-made by Italian Stone in Auckland. What else is custom-made in the bathroom? The French oak cabinets are by Steves Joinery, in the same oak as the floorboards. Did you source everything in New Zealand? No, the heated towel rail is from Hydrotherm in Melbourne. It runs off the hot-water system, like a radiator, so it’s old-school, the real deal.

Basin Custom-made in marble from Italian Stone Basin tapware Paini Cox from Metrix Bath Spazio Casa Cabinetry French oak by Steves Joinery Shower hardware Halliday + Baillie Shower tapware Dornbracht from Metrix Tiles Wall and floor tiles in Carrara marble from Designsource Towel rail Hydrotherm Vanity Custom-made in French oak by Steves Joinery WC and bidet Starck 2 series from Metrix.

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B:04

ANGLE POISE

THREE SMALL BATHROOMS BRING COLOUR TO AN OTHERWISE MONOCHROMATIC HOME.

Designer . . . . . . . . . . . Anthony Hoete, WHAT_architecture Photography . . . . Patrick Reynolds Location . . . . . . . . . . . Auckland Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To design a main en suite that retained the angular flavour of the home.

There are three bathrooms in this house. All feature Bisazza tiles, but they are all different in feel and scale from each other. How have you achieved this? ANTHONY HOETE They each have their own design intention but share a common lack of windows. Unless it’s for a view, a window in a bathroom is not necessary. After all, this is the most private, intimate space in a house. The master ensuite is pearl white, the blue bathroom is a literal reference to the sky and we thought it necessary to provide a surprise from the monochrome nature of the house, with its black exterior and white interior. The guest bathroom was designed as a ‘headboard’ behind the bed. Pink is the counterpoint of blue. The guest bathroom’s flooring – a poured rubberised product that gives a seamless effect – isn’t normally used in residential applications. Can you tell us more about it? It’s typically a commercial application, but a poured-rubber floor means no water infiltration issues, and it has an acoustic

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dampening property. The main ensuite is the most generous in size of the three bathrooms. Often ensuites can feel cramped, but not in this case. For me, the bath, not the bed, is the most blissful space of a house. I fall asleep in a bath and wake up with the Sunday papers drenched. A bathroom, while internalised, should have space. How have you catered for storage? In the main bathroom, an entire wall is considered as storage. This creates a deep reveal on entry.

Wall and floor tiles ‘GL01’ Pearlescent White Gloss mosaics by Bisazza Basin GSI from Robertson Bathware Tapware Zucchetti Pan from Robertson Bathware Vanity cabinetry Designed by WHAT_ architecture, built by MMi Bath ‘IOS’ by Victoria + Albert from Robertson Bathware Towel rail Heirloom Studio from Chesters WC ‘Sfera 54’ by Catalano Roll holder Frost from Katalog Skylight Customised Adlux with rain sensor Lighting Klik recessed fluorescents and Capri downlights from Matisse.


Far left One of the three bathrooms is lined in blue Bizazza mosaic tiles. Left The downstairs guest bathroom features pink tiles and a rubberised floor covering. Right In the ensuite of the main bedroom, there is plenty of concealed storage and only select items on display. Each of the bathrooms is windowless, with skylights allowing natural light.

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B:05

HARD CHOICES A GENEROUS ENSUITE WITH AN INDUSTRIAL EDGE.

Designer . . . . . . . . . . . Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell Photography . . . . Simon Devitt Location . . . . . . . . . . . Auckland Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To create an ensuite in keeping with the home’s industrial aesthetic. How difficult was it to achieve the melding of industrial-warehouse materiality? ANDREA BELL It was incredibly easy and something that really interests us – transforming a raw, rough industrial space into something luxurious with a few simple touches. Or taking something quite ordinary like a brass hose tap and celebrating it. The ensuite opens at each end onto your bedroom. What was the rationale? We wanted the bed to ‘float’ within the bedroom – the doors slide away into the wall to give that effect. We wanted ensuite access from both sides of the bed and to take advantage of the fantastic view you get standing in the shower and from the bath. What storage is there? We have in-wall storage (1.8m high and 105mm deep) behind dressed pine plywood doors at either end of the mirror. What fitting or fixture did you buy first? Before the ensuite was designed we bought the wall-hung basins and taps from Metrix. Their simple form appealed, as well as the way water disappears into a slot. They also have space to put things down, which is important with no vanity. The simple form of the taps in a brushed-nickel finish fit the home’s industrial aesthetic.

Basin Alape wall-hung basins from Metrix Basin tapware Paini Pixel single-lever Mixer in brushed nickel from Metrix Bath Natural stone from VCBC Bath tapware Methven 15mm hose tap Cabinetmakers Construct Group Lighting Brass bayonets with a halogen dolly bulb Showerhead Paini 300mm in brushed nickel from Metrix Tiles Cafe Nero Matt 300mm x 600mm from European Ceramics Towel rail Radiant heated RTR04 304 stainless steel towel rail WC VCBC Flow wall-hung pan with softclose seat and in-wall cistern.

56 / HOME NEW ZEALAND

Tell us about the shower hardware. We designed the shower curtain rail and had it fabricated in mild steel, which will patina over time. The water supply pipes to the showerhead are exposed copper, with brass hose taps instead of a mixer. We used a similar idea for the bath. It was cost effective and gave us a little leeway in working with the concrete wall.


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A GRACEFUL AGE

A COMPACT BATHROOM WITH RECYCLED ELEMENTS HAS A VINTAGE FLAVOUR.

Designer . . . . . . . . . . . Lance and Nicola Herbst, Herbst Architects Photography . . . . Patrick Reynolds Location . . . . . . . . . . . Coromandel Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To create the main bathroom in keeping with the home’s compact spaces and worn aesthetic. The home won this year’s Home of the Year award. With the bathroom, how did you approach the clients’ request for “cracked, rusted, scratched and bashed” elements? NICOLA HERBST With enthusiasm – it’s like a breath of fresh air to have a brief which is contrary to your usual design approach. Were there any challenges? Getting the copper junctions in the shower correct took more care than usual. Was there a particular element or material that was the starting point or inspiration? At the outset we were given a pail, which was from one of our client’s grandmothers, as the basin. Otherwise, the design was consistent with the approach to all the other spaces – recycled linings and aged materials; a palette with a warm, rich patina. What else did the clients source? LANCE HERBST: The copper pipe for the towel rail; the light fittings which are new, but have had the paint stripped off to reveal the cast-aluminium casing; old brass taps for the basin and shower; and recycled rimu for the wall linings and vanity timber. An easier route would have been to specify an old cast-iron clawfoot bath with a shower, but you designed a beautiful copper-panelled shower. What was the rationale behind that? NICOLA: The bath is to be positioned outside the bathroom among the ferns to take maximum advantage of starry nights and cool air. The shower is for everyday bathing.

Basin Recycled copper pail Basin and shower tapware Vintage brass taps Shower lining Copper with aged patina created by Louise Purvis Towel rail Copper pipe Vanity cabinetry Recycled rimu by Kirsty Winter Wall linings Recycled rimu.

Is the house on tank water? If so, how did this affect the choice of plumbing? Yes, it is. The tank is positioned high enough to rely on gravity if there is a power outage.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 57


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GRAND ENTRANCE Most interior projects remain ever so slightly (and annoyingly) unfinished. Here, our correspondent weighs in on the joys of eventual completion.

TEXT

— ­ Douglas Lloyd Jenkins

I L L U S T R AT I O N

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— ­ Daron Parton


Most interior projects share a common characteristic: they often remain unfinished. Dedicated renovators and even casual decorators have usually lived for a time in partially completed rooms or in barely completed houses. It is the renovator’s life. In the rush to occupy a fabulous new room we often move in before things are quite done. Little unfinished bits can slip out of sight and remain forgotten until you decide to sell and the agent says, “Will you be finishing it before we go to market?” For close to a decade my partner and I have been restoring an old house in Napier. We’ve done pretty well, given what we took on. At the same time it is probably true to say that with a bit of focus we could have finished it a few years back. We have, until now, been living in an unfinished project. Don’t get me wrong: there are still plenty of little unfinished bits – and I use the word ‘little’ advisedly. There is paint that has never been scraped off glass on high windows. There is that missing piece of skirting board, and the electrical fitting that hangs out of the wall when it would be a 10-minute job to screw it in properly. But what I’m talking about here is the last of the big unfinished projects.  This is a villa, but an unusual one in that it has a non-conformist hall snaking its way through the entire house. In most villas the hall runs directly from the front door to the back in a straight line. Ours sets off that way, running for seven metres from the front door to what was once the kitchen. It then takes a 90-degree turn right and runs another eight metres through the heart of the house. It then takes another right-angle turn, this time left, to pass by the laundry and a bathroom, a short four-metre hop. Finally, it arrives at its inevitable destination – the back door.  The hall is also wide. It recalls the original use of entrance halls as a place where a guest might stand before being ushered into another part of the house.  Wide halls are great because they are excellent interior decorating projects in that they have no real function beyond providing a rapid transit route from one room to another. The rest is up to you. Narrow halls are not so much fun because, let’s face it, there’s nothing meaner than a narrow hall.  It’s easy to understand why a hall might be left until last. In an early house I renovated – a villa that had been Spanish Missioned in the heat of the Bonanza craze – the hallway was the first space to be done. The emphatic removal of walls, which had allowed the previous owners to imagine they lived in the Ponderosa, had made it necessary to first reconstruct the spine of the house. This gave visitors the sensation of arriving into a smart-looking hall, off which there were some pretty grim-looking rooms. This meant that the initial comments were usually along the lines of “wow, you did this quickly!”, or “so, you’re finished” – which eventually and inevitably were followed up with “you’ve got a long way to go”.

For close to a decade my partner and I have been restoring an old house in Napier. We’ve done pretty well, given what we took on. At the same time it is probably true to say that with a bit of focus we could have finished it a few years back. These comments seldom came from friends, especially not those in the throes of renovating themselves. As many readers will know, comments like this often come from relatives: relatives who are indoctrinated with the idea that old houses are a lot of work. Parents are particularly good at it. My own mother has been known to leave voice messages saying she needs to talk to me about something but when I ring back, mildly panicked, I’ll be told “that house of yours would look so much better if you got on with the hallway”. One smiles through gritted teeth. So is it not surprising that the provocation for getting on with the hallway has been the arrival of relatives, relatives whose houses are, and have always been, elegantly turned out and, in their own way, stylish. And, above all, finished. These are the type of relatives who only arrive for the big events and this one is definitely big: my mother-in-law is about to turn 100. What better reason to finish the hall than for a centenary?  The immense size of the hall is just one of the reasons it had lain fallow all those years. The other is it was the space that suffered most when the house was divided up into three flats some time in the 1950s. I’d had one or two goes at fixing it myself, with the idea it would save money, but the project dragged on. So, the decision was made that this most significant of significant birthdays would provide a deadline. Painters were summoned. I can almost imagine the two painters in the cab of their truck as they drove to this as-yet-unseen job, presuming it would be a breeze. That was until they stepped through the front door. Now that most unfinished of unfinished jobs is complete. It looks great. The hallway does its job and links the other rooms together as one complete house. The relatives duly noted the progress. The word ‘finished’ was even heard mentioned. This important truth established, the birthday party could proceed in a calm and orderly manner and against an elegant backdrop. Days later, still revelling in the observation that an interior job properly finished is a joy to behold, we invited a friend over to have a look. “Very nice,” she said. “I suppose you’re selling now?”

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 59


Alternative wall coverings make for a winter of perfectly rough edges.

ART DIRECTION

— Amelia Holmes

PHOTOG RAPHY

— Toaki Okano

Wall coverings, from left: ‘Shannon’ linen (shown here as photographed fabric sample), $190 a metre from Atelier, atelier. co.nz; sprayable metal wall coating from Metalier Coatings, metaliercoatings.com. Furniture, from left: ‘Fri JH4’ chair by Jaime Hayon for Fritz Hansen, $6334 from Cult, cultdesign. co.nz; ‘TS’ table by Gam Fratesi for Gubi, $2082 from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz; ‘Jana’ vase by Antonio Forteleoni for Cappellini, $780 from Matisse, matisse. co.nz. Oiled timber flooring by B&O Casa, bandocasa.com.


Wall coverings, from left: Handapplied plaster finish by Ambitec, ambitec.co.nz; terrazzo background by Terrazzo Stoneworks, terrazzo-stoneworks.com. Furniture, from left: ‘Tufty Time’ sofa by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia, $10,104 from Matisse, matisse.co.nz; vintage-wash throw, $295 from Indie Home, indiehomecollective.com; ‘Toio’ light by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni for Flos, $2675 from ECC, ecc.co.nz; Danskina rug, from $4625 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com. Timber flooring with oil finish by B&O Casa, bandocasa.com.


Wallcoverings: hand-applied plaster finishes by Ambitec, ambitec.co.nz. Furniture, from left: Vintage French locker, $2500 from The Vitrine, inthevitrine. com; ‘East 212’ rug by Danskina, from $4625 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com; Blanket by Armani Casa, $1500 from Matisse, matisse.co.nz; ‘Radice’ stool by Sam Hecht of Industrial Facility for Mattiazzi, $913 from Simon James, simonjamesdesign.com. Timber flooring with oil finish by B&O Casa, bandocasa.com.


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CBRE (Agency) Ltd Licensed Real Estate Agent (REAA 2008). Member of The Luxury Network.


Forecast 2016


Forecast 2016 Interiors are especially important at this time of year: just as we’re retreating indoors for the winter months, design weeks in New York and Milan provide provocation and inspiration to make us look afresh at our spaces and think about ways we can improve them. In this special section, our correspondents choose their favourite furniture, lighting and accessories from home and abroad in an attempt to summarise the most important global design developments. As always, we believe the best approach to interiors is to buy once and buy well – to invest in quality pieces that will last a lifetime. So don’t take these pages as an invitation to throw out everything you own all at once (although we’ll understand if you feel that way), but as a helpful guide to choosing new items that you’ll treasure for decades to come.

Emma Fox Derwin

The real spirit of Milan Design Week was in the design districts of Brera and Lambrate, where inspiring non-product spatial installations, food events, new furniture propositions and experimental brands were abundant. There was a significant shift from a purely furniture-focused event to articulating the spirit and process of design, and reveling in the day-to-day work of the designer. Highlights were at opposite extremes of the spectrum – mass-produced at one end and hand-made at the other.

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at Milan Design Week 68 . . . . . . . . . . . . David Robinson and Gregg Crimp

at Milan Design Week 70 . . . . . . . . . . . . Sam Eichblatt

at NYCxDESIGN 72 . . . . . . . . . . . . Jacu Strauss

Adventures in Amsterdam 74 . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Lockhart

Makers & Bakers in Milan 76 . . . . . . . . . . . . Valeria Carbonaro-Laws

at Milan Design Week 77 . . . . . . . . . . . . Mike Thorburn

at Milan Design Week 78 . . . . . . . . . . . . Michelle Backhouse

at Milan Design Week 79 . . . . . . . . . . . . Alan Bertenshaw

at Milan Design Week 80 . . . . . . . . . . . . Sam Haughton

on IMO’s New Zealand releases 81 . . . . . . . . . . . . Alex McLeod

on new flooring developments

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Forecast —— 2016

1 — ‘All Plastic Chair’

by Jasper Morrison for Vitra This chair appears to be a quintessential timber café chair you’d see anywhere in Europe, until a second look reveals clever subtleties of construction and that it’s plastic. 2 — Hay Collection 2016

Installation at La Pelota

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Danish powerhouse Hay produced the most sensational and large-scale exhibition: a maze of rooms to launch their 20-plus new products from a dream list of designers including Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec, Stefan Diez, Scholten & Baijings, Doshi Levien, Iskos-Berlin and Shane Schneck. 3 — ‘Herringbone’ vase

by Phil Cuttance for the Makers & Bakers exhibition curated by Ambra Medda and Katie Lockhart The visually engaging cast-concrete vase extends Cuttance’ exploration of producing quality objects using low-tech techniques. 4 — ‘Indefinite’ vase and ‘Infinite’ stool

by Erik Olovsson for Studio EO 2

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The ‘Indefinite’ vases are a series of experiments in marble and glass exploring the relationship between opaque geometric and organic transparent forms, using gravity and heat to displace the fragile with the solid. The companion ‘Infinite’ stools have a Rietveld-esque quality, the result of the designer undertaking to refine techniques through repetition, using a limited palette of pine, screen-print dye and leftover materials. 5 — ‘Envisions – Products in Process’

Exhibition curated by Simone Post, Sanne Schuurman and Iwan Pol ‘Envisions’ celebrated design processes through designed ‘objects’, as well as experiments that could be described as the products of conception for design. These works sat between the initial idea and the final object, presenting a richness and insight offered into the process and inquiry designers undertake to develop a product. 5

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6 — ‘Forest Comes Home’ installation

by Akira Minagawa for Kvadrat In celebration of his new textile collection, Minagawa presented captivating, whimsical spatial interventions reminiscent of lava-lamp globules, upholstered in his new fabrics and Kvadrat’s established range. 7 — ‘Space Frames’

by Studio Mieke Meijer ‘Space Frames’ explore architectural elements such as trusses, arcs, columns and plates, which are veiled in a fine textile cover and back-lit by a hidden light source. These objects are somehow both foreign and familiar and are used to redefine and manipulate our perceptions of different spaces.

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Forecast —— 2016

David Robinson & Gregg Crimp

This year in Milan there was less minimalism and more luxury materials and finishes with an emphasis on relaxed comfort. There were hard-edged geometric forms in brushed and polished metals paired with deep chocolate timbers, pale grey and soft violet velvets, suede, mirror-polished Carrara marble, natural fibres and brass, brass, brass. Seating was low and plush, side tables and footstools aplenty. Kitchens were dominated by monolithic islands with handle-less joinery; the dominant trend was rich natural timber, with suede-finished white-and-grey marble or brass, copper and stainless steel for work surfaces or entire units.

1 — ‘WW13’ side table

by Julian Demharter and Jonathan Radetz for Jono Concepts ‘WW13’ is an elegant and light side table reduced to its essential form. Simplified to its two main components, the solid-oak table top is braced between the powder-coated subframe. 2 — ‘Antipode’ candleholders

by Menu Elegant and functional objects – like so much of the rest of the Menu range. 1

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3 — ‘Step’

by Hanna Litwin and Romin Heide for Büro Famos, made by glassmaker Cornelius Réer in his Nuremberg workshop These mouth-blown glass vases have unique surface textures resulting from a specially developed mould-making process. 5

4 — ‘Nabucco’ table

by Roberto Lazzeroni for Poltrona Frau A marriage of marble and dark timber with subtle curves meeting sharp geometry and a shark-nose bevel. This table epitomises the design direction at the 55th Salone. 7

5 — ‘Lloyd’ cabinet

by Jean-Marie Massaud for Poltrona Frau A smart take on the sideboard/credenza. 6 — ‘Copeau’

by Hanna Litwin & Romin Heide for Büro Famos These stacking boxes include two wooden containers of different heights covered by an aluminium lid with a delicate handle.

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7 — ‘ZH One Prototype’ chair

by Zaha Hadid for Cassina The side chair gets the Zaha treatment, and becomes a sublime form that’s beautiful from every angle, and also very comfortable. 8 — ‘As if from Nowhere’

by Orla Reynolds for Orla Reynolds Studio

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An independently functioning modular bookcase which houses four dining chairs and two tables which, when placed together, form a dining table. It is intended for small living spaces and is pure genius.


Forecast —— 2016

Sam Eichblatt

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Endlessly customisable and modular products, ethical production, reworking American design heritage, art-design-fashion collaborations and surprising materials (tables made of salt, anyone?): this year’s NYCxDesign festival was a snapshot of both established directions and developing movements in interior design. 1 — Furnishing Utopia

Studios reinterpret Shaker design As the USA explores its design heritage in more depth, the Shaker movement is an obvious place to begin. Often credited as the ‘first minimalists’, timeless hand-crafted Shaker pieces are preserved at former settlements that are now museums, including the Hancock Shaker Village in Massachusetts and Mt. Lebanon Shaker Museum in New York. For this project, 11 contemporary design studios (including Ladies & Gentlemen Studio, Studio Gorm and Tom Bonamici) spent a week at the two sites developing 32 beautiful, Shaker-inspired pieces from lighting and furniture to baskets and brooms.

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2 — ‘Fade’ stools

by M-Material Designer-artist Fernando Mastrangelo has a fascination with granular materials, and has cast salt, sugar, coffee grounds and sand into his work. This year, he presented this range of refined outdoor stools with a subtle colour gradient created using industrial concrete. 3 — Cafeteria Plate

by Felt + Fat From Philadelphia’s burgeoning creative scene, ceramics studio Felt + Fat specialises in slip-cast porcelain, and regularly collaborates with restaurants and chefs – including Matt Lambert of the Musket Room in New York – to create custom tableware. All pieces are made with clay and glazes formulated and mixed in-house and cast in handmade moulds. As a result, each piece – like these sectional plates, a play on the idea of cafeteria trays – is unique.

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4 — Rugs

by Dana Haim The gentle, muted colours of ColombianAmerican artist and designer Dana Haim’s textile designs come from the all-natural dyes and materials used by the Mexican artisans with whom she collaborates. A proponent of craft preservation, Brooklynbased Haim hand-draws or paints each beautiful, minimalist Zapotec-inspired pattern, which is then translated into a tapestry by traditional craftspeople in Oaxaca using locally spun wool to create “modern heirlooms”. This collaboration economically empowers artisans, while preserving their cultural heritage. 5 — ‘Print All Over Me’

by Fort Standard, Eric Trine, Will Bryant and Erich Ginder Print All Over Me (POAM) started as a printyour-own-pattern service enabling fashion designers to upload any graphic onto plain white clothing. This year’s Sight Unseen Offsite event saw the process extended to “print-all-over furniture” to create this superbright, cheerful showcase. 6 — ‘Bookshelf’

by Norma Norma is Benjamin Critton and Heidi Korsavong, a graphic designer and interior designer respectively, who created the super-simple but aesthetically pleasing and surprisingly solid freestanding ‘Bookshelf’ as a nights-and-weekends project. The allwood (red oak) design comes flat-packed and is assembled, without hardware, from six basic components into a seemingly infinite number of scalable configurations to suit any room.

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7 — ‘Union Collection’ lighting

by Shelter Bay Toronto-based studio Shelter Bay was founded in 2015 by Sarah Cooper and Rob Southcott, and this year released a novel line of mix-and-match lighting components. There are eight modular shapes in four finishes (white, black, copper and aurora, an iridescent finish), and three socketand-cord-set colour combinations, which are sold separately and can be assembled by the user into one of dozens of different combinations.

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8 — ‘Dusen Dusen Playhouse’

by The Land of Nod & Dusen Dusen Ellen Van Dusen, doyen of super-bold prints and founder of womenswear line Dusen Dusen, this year collaborated with children’s furniture company The Land of Nod to create this tent-playhouse so that even the kids can keep their design credibility intact. 7

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True stories An Auckland-educated designer makes his mark in Amsterdam.

How do you design a hotel in the age of Airbnb? Jacu Strauss – born in South Africa, educated in Auckland, and now resident of Amsterdam – thinks he knows the answer. After doing the first stage of his architecture degree at the University of Auckland, Strauss completed his studies in London and quickly discovered he “wasn’t that keen on being your typical architect”. In some ways this was just as well, as he graduated in 2008 and there weren’t many architectural jobs around. Instead, he followed his interest in interiors and product design by working for British designer Tom Dixon, whose lights, bowls and accessories in beaten brass and other metals have, along with his furniture, achieved global renown.

the culture. It’s quite challenging.” The Pulitzer Hotel, Strauss says, had gone in a direction that didn’t highlight the beauty of the building, so he made it his mission to bring that back.

After more than four years with Dixon’s burgeoning interior design team – working on projects including restaurants for Jamie Oliver and London’s Mondrian Hotel (including its arresting Dandelyan bar,

Hotels need to deliver so much more in these days of Airbnb, when travelers have a greater range of accommodation to choose from than ever before. As 35-year-old Strauss sees it, this has given designers like him a certain sort of freedom. Consumers are increasingly design-savvy, which means there is less value in generic, international hotel blandness, and more reliance on talented designers to deliver unique experiences. To Strauss, that means “a move away from super-sleek design and materials that become a bit cold and corporate, and being braver with textures and colours”. He’s also seeing a shift away from the pervasiveness of industrial styles to a more polished, but never stuffy, sense of refined elegance.

above) – Strauss was made an offer he couldn’t refuse and is now creative director for the London-based property development and consultancy company that’s tasked with the refurbishment of the Pulitzer Hotel. “The hotel is 25 canal houses all together – some of them are 400 years old. It has just been about living and breathing the building and living in Amsterdam and understanding

In the Pulitzer Hotel, that has meant creating “a campus that we want to be much more a part of the surrounding areas than before,” he says. “Instead of a generic hotel, people want something designed for a specific context. We want to give people a real Amsterdam experience, and to imagine the history of these spaces.” The rooms are furnished with an eclectic mix that might include shelves from a local antiques market, old books, touches of whimsy and surprising injections of colour. The hotel has been opening in stages from last February, and Strauss is already working on many other of the group’s projects elsewhere. Meanwhile, his own, much-neglected home in London’s Notting Hill “looks like a storage facility”. If he ever gets time to turn his attention to it, he’ll take things slowly. He believes in research to put together “a strong story for a project that influences every decision that is made. If the story is good it gives authenticity to the interior, so the design follows more naturally.” Visitors to Amsterdam can now experience his work and decide for themselves.

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Eat Here Now New Zealander Katie Lockhart helps browsers take time out at Milan Design Week.

Milan Design Week, says interior designer Katie Lockhart, is “always a bit ‘don’t touch!’ Everything’s behind a rope.” A few weeks ago, however, things were a bit different – at least in the little corner of Milan on which Lockhart was able to exert her influence. The Auckland-based designer, who also happens to be a former Milanese resident (and HOME contributor), was invited to participate in a Design Week project sponsored by Airbnb and curated by her London-based friend, Ambra Medda, a design powerhouse who co-founded Design Miami and the website and online store Pamono. The duo put together an event called ‘Makers and Bakers’ at Ristorante Marta, a café and bakery in Spazio Rossana Orlandi, arguably the most important design destination in Milan. For a week, visitors to the restaurant were able to order food (made onsite by Carter Were of Auckland’s Were Bros) that they could consume at shared

tables surrounded by the work of emerging designers. These included many New Zealanders: there were teapots by Isobel Thom, bread knives by Jamie McLellan, vases by Phil Cuttance, vintage teaspoons beaten with a hammer by jeweller Karl Fritsch, and Campari glasses by Monmouth Glass. There were also tiles by the British design duo Barber & Osgerby, furniture by Italians Martino Gamper and Giacomo Moor, limestone vessels by Canadian Thom Fougere, and much more. English illustrator Zebedee Helm sat at a table drawing postcards for guests that they could slip into a postbox outside. “It was quite eclectic and very welcoming,” Lockhart says, a setup that enabled visitors to interact with design in an unselfconscious, everyday way – a tactile antidote to much of the razzmatazz of the rest of Design Week. “It was like, ‘it’s on your table, use these items’,” Lockhart says. “Without even knowing it, people were interacting with all this new design. Everyone loved it”.

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Studio Italia

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Valeria Carbonaro-Laws

It’s always exciting to witness the birth of amazing designs, many of which will become historic pieces that we will enjoy and talk about for decades. This year’s Salone del Mobile was the best I’ve ever attended, where a host of new designs were released that look like immediate classics.

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1 — ‘Mondrian’ table

by Jean-Marie Massaud for Poliform The ‘Mondrian’ tables feature a glossy, brass-like nickel base, a finish that was an important trend at Milan 2016. Available with a timber or marble top and in a range of shapes and sizes which allows for interesting groupings, the table is a complement to the Piet Mondrian-influenced new ‘Mondrian’ sofa system also released in Milan this year. 2 — ‘Avio’ sofa

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by Piero Lissoni for Knoll Piero Lissoni’s new design is a sofa with a range of beautiful marbles integrated as end tables. As Knoll begins to increase its sofa collection with a modular system, the design is the perfect addition to the range. 3 — ‘Crono’ dining chair

by Antonio Citterio for Flexform Having seen so many great designs this year, this would have to be the one that totally captured my attention. I love the softness and elegance of the chair but, still, it maintains a very strong presence.

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4 — ‘Mad Joker’ armchair

by Marcel Wanders for Poliform With an embracing wing-like back, this is a new addition to the extensive ‘Mad’ family. 5 — ‘Cala’ chair

by Doshi Levien for Kettal You couldn’t miss the ‘Cala’ chair and its oversized scoop-like back at the Kettal stand at Milan Design Week. Both the metal frame and the woven rope are available in a range of fun colours.

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Mike Thorburn

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The feeling of relaxed softness came through in Milan this year, in curved sofas and chairs and textured fabrics. The high-gloss metallics of last year have moved aside as their matte cousin, bronze, makes an appearance. Vibrant dark blues were everywhere in soft furnishings. And I noticed a trend to put everything on display in glass cabinets by designers such as Piet Boon and Glas Italia.

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1 — ‘Bolle 4’

by Giopato & Coombes Blown glass balls were everywhere in Milan and the particular elegance of this cluster, inspired by soap bubbles, caught my eye. 2 — ‘Fade’ pendant

by Tom Dixon ‘Fade’ combines beautiful form and technical execution to create a product that makes you love design. It has a mirrored finish when off and translucent sparkle when on. 3 — ‘Lady Hio’ table

by Philippe Starck & S. Schito for Glas Italia The technical challenge in producing the blown-glass legs of this table almost brought the process to a halt. Starck had high praise for the production team and the results. 5

4 — ‘Amami’ sofa

by Lorenza Bozzoli for Moooi This elegant sofa takes a rather formal look and gives it a twist of Bohemian chic with its fade-dyed tassel fringing. 5 — ‘Perch Light’

by Umut Yamac for Moooi This fun flock of birds, from a young new designer, rock on their perches. It’s quirky Moooi at its best. 6 — ‘Portofino’ table

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by Vincent Van Duysen for Paola Lenti The talented Dutch architect created this table to go with his chairs from an earlier collection. The top is natural lava stone tiles set into the black locust heartwood base.

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Backhouse Interiors

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Michelle Backhouse

The mood in Milan this year was positive and collaborative, with reinvigorated established brands and emerging brands being celebrated. There are conversations around ethical design and a new respect for the hand-crafted. And I was buoyed by how relevant our local design is in the global context.

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1 — ‘Kyoto Craft’

for PET Lamp PET Lamp links cultures and weaving traditions while addressing environmental concerns and creating better outcomes for artisans. ‘Kyoto’ are unique pieces by Japanese artisans.

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2 — ‘Multiplo’ tables

by Antonio Citterio for Kartell These elegant dining tables come in a range of sizes and colours, including a two-metrelong oval table in black marble.

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3 — Designs for children Design for children emerged as a hot trend. Kartell’s new range includes projects by Nendo (right), Piero Lissoni and Philippe Starck for a new generation. 4 — ‘Valet’ collection

by David Rockwell for Stellar Works Based in Shanghai, Stellar Works is a fresh global brand with a genuine cross-cultural approach. Rockwell explores refined materials: full-grain saddle leather, American walnut, black steel and brushed brass. 5 — ‘Remo Revisited’

by Konstantin Grcic for Plank Grcic revisited the original plywood chair with a new plastic material. 6 — ‘Cloak’ cabinet

by Emma Fox Derwin Flat-pack furniture was a key trend and this standout example has doors in a composite textile specially developed by Emma.

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Matisse

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This year’s Salone del Mobile was the greatest in its 55-year history, breaking attendance records (310,840 visitors). Leading the charge were two Italian stalwarts: Arclinea kitchens and B&B Italia, who both have the great Antonio Citterio as art director, used revolutionary new materials to create objects of beauty and desire.

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1 — ‘Principia’ kitchen

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The nanotech surfaces used by Citterio in his enticing new kitchen provide a matte, silky, abrasion-resistant, easy-clean surface that has enhanced antibacterial properties. 2 — ‘Gender’ armchair

by Patricia Urquiola for Cassina ‘Gender’ has a firm cantilever base that supports a soft, curved shape, enveloping the sitter like a comfortable sculpture. 3 — ‘Eracle’ storage units

by Antonio Citterio for Maxalto

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Minimal, sophisticated and inspired by 1950s bar units, the units are lined with melamine leather and high-tech bronzed metal fabric. 4 — ‘Edouard’ sectional seating

by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia This design has a narrower arm, making the range also suitable for everything from grand spaces to smaller apartments. 5 — ‘Utrecht’ chair

by Gerrit Rietveld for Cassina As Cassina’s new artistic director, Patricia Urquiola has created a limited edition of 100 of these classic 1935 chairs, covered in upholstery by Bertjan Pot. 6 — Sliding-door room dividers

by Giuseppe Bavuso for Rimadesio Gliding effortlessly on a ceiling-mounted rail, these doors feature an option of laminated glass embedded with gold mesh.

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IMO

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With a recently simplified product range, the next year will see us honing our processes as we strive to support our product here and in our growing export markets. Our design team continues to focus on KXN, our prefabricated kitchen modules (see more on p.43). There will be a few new additions to our muchloved ‘ABC’ range and a new, impeccably detailed modular lounge system that’s in development for arrival in late 2016.

1 — ‘Fiord’ table

by IMO Characterised by its visual lightness and architectural leg structure, the ‘Fiord’ table can be enjoyed both indoors and out. 2 — ‘ABC’ storage containers

by IMO This range of containers is designed to remove the clutter and bring order to work and living spaces.

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by IMO The ‘A2’ stool is also a step ladder, a bedside table, a footstool, a perch for the laptop or an extra seat for unexpected dinner guests. Constructed from powder-coated aluminium or ply with cross-rails in aluminium or solid oak. For use both indoors and out. 4 — ‘Armstrong’ sofa and armchairs

by IMO The inviting dimensions, soft lines and comfortable seat of the ‘Armstrong’ sofa and armchair are just calling for a sunny corner, favourite book and a cup of tea. 5 — ‘Plateau’ table

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by IMO With its generous proportions and forgiving edges, ‘Plateau’ is the perfect partner for entertaining, enjoying a lazy Sunday breakfast or spreading out the paperwork.

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Artisan Flooring

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Internationally, there’s a real trend towards warmth and opulence in both colours and textures in flooring. By integrating the finest natural fibres – including undyed wools, nettle yarns and bamboo silks – you can create incredible textures in rugs that impart an organic and informal appearance, as well as being durable and resilient. We’re also seeing darker colours in flooring, reflecting a new decadence in interiors – especially when paired with golds, silvers, copper and ivory tones. We’ve also noticed a pairing of the digital and hand-crafted to create patterns that meld the past and present and create flooring with an aged, muted and deliberately distressed appearance.

1 — ‘Japanese Fans’

by Florence Broadhurst This design draws reference to Broadhurst’s years as a travelling performer throughout Asia during the 1920s. The symmetry of this design is very elegant.

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2 — ‘Soft Melody’ in blue and gold This custom rug features feminine damasklike designs. It’s a perfect example of melding past and present. This rug sits well with modern or mid-century furniture.

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3 — ‘Horses’

by Florence Broadhurst Meticulously woven, this rug has a subtle loop pile in the horses’ manes, which brings the horses’ charge to life. 4 — Scandinavian 001 Fibres used in this rug collection are a stunning mix of luxury and practicality, with the silk lifting and lightening this subtle mix of wool and cotton. 5 — ‘Mesa Luna’ in Indigo A gorgeous mix of deep indigo wool and muted gold polyester, it can be made into a bespoke rug or fitted as carpet.

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2016

We’re looking for New Zealand’s best new furniture. WIN A $3000 APPLIANCE OF YOUR CHOICE FROM FISHER & PAYKEL.

Our Design Awards 2016, sponsored by Fisher & Paykel, seek the most exciting new furniture and objects for the home. This includes ceramics, glassware and tableware or any similar item that can be displayed and used in an interior setting. Entries are welcome from established artists and designers, as well as newcomers to the field. Entrants must submit at least five images (from a variety of angles) of the furniture or objects they have designed with a 250-word statement about the project and its designers.

SEND ENTRIES TO designawards@bauermedia.co.nz

MAIL Design Awards, HOME, Bauer Media, Private Bag 92512, Wellesley Street, Auckland 1141

COURIER Design Awards, HOME, Bauer Media, Shed 12, Cityworks Depot, 77 Cook Street, Auckland 1010 All entries must be received by 5pm on Wednesday June 15, 2016. A judging panel will choose finalists’ submissions to view in person before choosing the winner. The works of the winner and finalists will be published in our August/September 2016 issue. For terms and conditions, please see homemagazine.co.nz

The 2015 winner, ‘Torchon’ Pendant for Resident by Cheshire Architects. Photo by Toaki Okano. Styling by Sam Smith and Catherine Wilkinson.


84 A sharp, silvery home by Michael O’Sullivan in Arrowtown.

96 Fearon Hay deploy a symphony of timber in a home in rural west Auckland. 110 New Zealanders Tulia Wilson and Neha Belton renovate a modernist Sydney home.

124 Bureaux draw on barn forms for inspiration to design a Queenstown home.

138 Wellington architect Jon Craig’s last home combines modesty with touches of luxury.


TEXT

Jeremy Hansen

In Arrowtown, architect Michael O’Sullivan creates

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P H OTO G R AP H Y

Patrick Reynolds

a family home that’s unafraid of standing out.

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Five years ago, Tim Hamilton and Ingrid Vink moved from Auckland to a new life in Arrowtown. It was a leap of faith that many people contemplate while on holiday in the alpine wonderland, but very few end up actually making. Part of the plan was for the couple to build their own home. Hamilton was a builder before he retrained as a graphic designer, and had attended high school with Auckland-based architect Michael O’Sullivan, so the couple asked O’Sullivan to design them a home that Hamilton could build himself. The dwelling that resulted, with its shimmering skin of galvanised corrugated steel, is called “the UFO” by many locals. It wasn’t designed to fit in but, a little surprisingly, it has ended up doing just that. O’Sullivan was involved right from the beginning: his first official architectural duty was to fly to Arrowtown to help the couple select a site for their home. They’d visited O’Sullivan’s own Auckland family home (a finalist in this magazine’s 2009 Home of the Year award) and enjoyed its sense of warmth and comfort, as well as how the architect teased so much generosity out of a compact footprint. Site shopping in Arrowtown, O’Sullivan nixed the option of building in a new subdivision in favour of a site in a cul de sac of older homes with all-day sun and mountain views. It’s a five-minute walk to the middle of Arrowtown.

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The couple knew that their choice of architect wouldn’t result in a conventional home. Most people love the warm, heavily crafted embrace of O’Sullivan’s interiors, but his exteriors – the architect has a fondness for strong forms in aluminium or Colorsteel cladding – strike some people as too unorthodox, or somehow insufficiently homely. With that in mind, it feels like a small miracle this house was built at all. Architecture in the Wakatipu Basin is governed by tight regulations on everything from colour to site coverage. These rules are nobly aimed at protecting the quality of the natural environment, but can foster a culture of architectural conservatism that weighs on every project. Neighbours are entitled to object to what they perceive to be a new building’s adverse effects, which means barn forms and schist accents abound, but unconventional architecture is pitifully rare. (As is almost always the way, ghastly McMansions with their roofs pitched the right ways still seem to sail through the planning process.) O’Sullivan, fortunately, doesn’t tend to let potential obstacles like this weigh on his mind. He says Hamilton and Vink’s home was inspired by the huts in the Arrowtown Chinese Settlement just down the road, rudimentary shelters built in the 1880s (and now preserved) where sheets of scrap steel lean against walls of

Previous page The living room steps down from the kitchen and dining area. The kauri dining table top was sourced from Southern Demolition in Christchurch and sits on a steel frame by Site Steel in Queenstown. The triangular cedar sliding door at right was made by Mojo Joinery of Cromwell. The ‘Suita’ sofa by Antonio Citterio for Vitra is from Matisse. Above Tim Hamilton, Ingrid Vink and their friend, Suo Muy Ly, enjoy an evening in the courtyard. Right Bram, Nina, Tim and Ingrid in the street-facing courtyard, which was initially intended to be sheltered behind a fence until the family realised they enjoyed the engagement with the neighbourhood it offered.


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“The site had a lovely sense of composure, a lovely soul and calmness to it. The landscape opens up and frames the movement of the northern sun across the sky.�

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Left Bram looks down on the neighbourhood from a precipice just a short walk uphill from the home.

Below Ply walls hold built-in shelves in the sitting room. The painting is by Ingrid’s father, Maurice Middleditch. The ‘Line One’ chaise is by Bob McDonald and the ‘Radial’ table by David Moreland for Citta Design. A ‘Mr Cooper’ brass pendant by Kate Stokes for Coco Flip from Cult hangs above the dining table.

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Left As well as providing structural support, the home’s 47 bespoke pine mullions cast elegant shafts of light. On the ceiling, poplar ply sheets frame triangular skylights. Below Landscape Architect Michelle Snodgrass designed a ‘dry’ garden to suit the Central Otago climate. Bikes hang in the carport and, in the foreground, bird-feeders are strung from a tree.

stacked stone. He had marvelled at the spatial contrast of the way some of the low, tight entries in these dwellings opened up to taller spaces, and sought to emulate this sensation by squeezing the front door between two planes of leaning metal, a “moment of compression”, as O’Sullivan puts it, before a visitor enters the home’s kitchen and dining area. Hamilton and Vink were determined not to get in their architect’s way. O’Sullivan, however, was eager to consult, and not in the normal question-and-answer way: he organised a painting session on site in which he asked Hamilton and Vink to use watercolours to identify how the main elements of the home might be arranged. After that, O’Sullivan went away and built a model of how he thought the house could be realised. Then it was Hamilton and Vink’s job to ask their neighbours for consent to build it. The home wraps around its site in a boomerang shape, with all rooms facing northwest into the sun and mountain views. The sitting room is a half-level below the dining and kitchen area, while the bedroom wing extends to the west, where the children’s compact rooms (for Bram, six, and Nina, three) are separated from the hallway not with doors but with curtains, something of an O’Sullivan trademark.

The home’s shiny cladding – another reference to the Chinese miners’ huts – wasn’t chosen until late in the building process. O’Sullivan and his clients mulled over everything from copper to black bituminous membrane before choosing galvanised steel as the most appropriate and budget-friendly solution. Hamilton and Vink had already taken O’Sullivan’s model around to each of the neighbours to explain how it would look and to seek consent. The late cladding decision required revisiting most of their neighbours but, perhaps because of Hamilton and Vink’s consultative approach, not a single one of them objected. The finished house feels part-shed, part-mid-century Californian experiment. The original plan featured a fence that gave privacy from the street, but Hamilton and Vink have never gotten around to building it. Instead, they’ve found great pleasure in soaking up the morning sun at an outdoor table off the dining area in full view of their quiet street. Their presence acts as an invitation for neighbours to stop by and chat. Their striking home has been happily accepted in the neighbourhood, proving that, with the right approach, contemporary architecture can make itself at home anywhere – and that the fear it sometimes inspires is wholly misplaced.

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Tim Hamilton and Suo Muy Ly in the streetside courtyard, which catches the morning sun but offers shade on hot summer evenings. At right, O’Sullivan designed the home’s entrance to create a sense of compression before opening to the kitchen and living areas.

“It’s an odd-looking house and I think people struggled with it initially. They would drive down the street and go, what the hell is that?”

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Right The home is on a suburban site, but its slight elevation offers great mountain views. Centre A narrow hall with curtains instead of doors to the bedrooms is an O’Sullivan trademark. Far right Nina bounces on her bed in her ply-lined room.

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DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with Michael O’Sullivan of Bull O’Sullivan Architects

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Your first duty was to help your clients and friends, Tim and Ingrid, choose a site. Why this one? This was an old orchard for the township. I thought it was delightful. It had a lovely sense of composure, a lovely soul and calmness to it. The landscape opens up and frames the movement of the northern sun across the sky. The site offered strong vistas to work with, and gets great sun. This house isn’t your standard-issue Arrowtown gabled form. Why does it look like it does? It’s odd-looking and I think people struggled with it initially. They would drive down the street and go, what the hell is that? The form was driven by the pleasure of entering the huts in the Arrowtown Chinese Settlement down the road. Many of those little huts feature rudimentary stacks of stone for walls and corrugated iron on the roofs. To get into some of those small, intimate spaces, you have to duck under the threshold

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or move sideways then stand up – there’s a moment of compression and expansion, and it’s really exciting. So I tried to capture that intimacy at the entrance to this home, where angles pull back and forward to set up a sort of crevasse you enter through. The galvanised steel cladding is a reference to the huts, too. Everything else is an exercise in clarity, dividing public and private spaces and getting a variety of compression and expansion. This is an area of extreme temperature differences in summer and in winter. How does the house perform in this environment? It’s cool in summer and warm in winter. There is underfloor heating, but we angled the home to gather as much solar heat in winter. And the deep eaves keep the sun out in summer. It’s also heavily insulated.


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a r t i s t s e b e l s d r e a m e r s

Ernesto Neto Just like drops in time, nothing (installation detail) 2002 Collection: Art Gallery of New South Wales Purchased with assistance from Clayton Utz 2002 ŠErnesto Neto

On now until 18 Sep

Become a Member and see the exhibition for free. Principal partner

Major partners

Supporting partners


TEXT

Henry Oliver

A hilltop home by Fearon Hay in rural

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P H OTO G R AP H Y

P R O D U C TI O N

Simon Wilson

Amelia Holmes

west Auckland balances heft and finesse.

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Previous page A fire warms one of the home’s living areas, where interior designer Juliet Lloyd sits. The ‘Soft Dream’ sofa by Antonio Citterio for Flexform and ‘Extrasoft’ ottoman by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani are both from Studio Italia, as are the ‘Anin’ stools by David Lopez Quincoces for Living Divani. The throw by Armani Casa is from Matisse and the rug is from Nodi Rugs. A ‘Jana’ vase by Antonio Forteleoni for Cappellini from Matisse sits on the mantle next to a bowl from Everyday Needs.

Top Views are carefully framed, offering restrained glimpses through timber slats, windows and between the home’s structures.

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Above Roof shingles are a surprising feature on a modern architectural home, yet feel apt and comfortable on this semi-rural homestead.

Right Architects Fearon Hay worked with a patchwork of different timbers that the owner had collected well before the house was built. As well as the brazier, there’s a fireplace outside and two indoors.

In the rolling green foothills of the Waitakere ranges, where west Auckland’s suburbs transition into rainforest, is a new homestead by Fearon Hay Architects. It’s a large, rural home, combining luxurious texture and rugged utility, rustic comfort and subtle precision; where a young family grows their own vegetables, makes their own wine, and raises and slaughters their own livestock. “It’s a working house, not just a place they go to sleep in,” says Fearon Hay partner Tim Hay. “So they had to have that functionality, but it also had to be exciting. They came to us to be surprised and to have something from a design point of view they didn’t quite understand.” The house sits on top of a hill, centred around a courtyard which slopes down to the north towards a barely visible neighbour and then up through Oratia Valley. It’s spacious in a homely way, with large rooms and a high, barn-like ceiling. There are multiple bedrooms and living spaces. It would easily accommodate six people or more but feels full with the four already there. To the south of the house is a workshop with a winery, spa room and games room, looking down towards a vineyard (11 rows of chardonnay), an extensive vegetable garden and paddocks which house sheep, pigs, cows and chickens that are butchered on-site when possible. It’s a picturesque view of semi-rural life with the grapes and the livestock and the produce, but the house doesn’t show it off. You only see a sweep of the ‘working’ side of the house from the workspaces. In the main house, it’s framed in restrained glimpses, through timber slats or between structures. “People go, ‘Why doesn’t the kitchen have the view?’” the owner says. “But people who live with an amazing view, after a few years, they just don’t see it.” He’s happy with the view out to the home’s large lawn.


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These photos The kitchen, dining and living areas occupy the centre of the home’s main pavilion. Throughout the home, rich, hefty materials – including floorboards of recycled timber – are juxtaposed with soft, delicate details.

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The house is anchored by the modern, industrial-luxe concrete blocks often featured in Fearon Hay buildings, but is softened and darkened by a wide-ranging palette of timber, collected by the owner for the seven years before construction began. There are old beams, slats and floorboards from churches, woolsheds or sourced from other collectors, some still bearing Ports of Auckland stamps from well into last century. The owner, who collaborated on the build, spent weeks de-nailing the timber which was also used by Roko Furniture Makers to furnish the house. “We thought we could build him a house that actually curates the timber collection,” says Hay. “There was a patchwork of different timbers and we thought about how to bring them all together tonally so that it wouldn’t end up a mess. We embraced that idea and extended it. We said, ‘We’ll have timber shutters, we’ll have timber cladding and timber floors. We’ll have a timber roof’.” This thinking led Fearon Hay to the shingle roofs, a feature that is both surprising on a modern architectural home and familiarly comfortable on a semi-rural homestead. “Something that we love in our work is lines

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and the strength and power of the form,” says Hay. “The roof allowed us to develop a strong sense of continuity between the buildings. The weight of a single common material – timber – could bind it with its strength.” Much of the house, inside and out, is clad in totara, giving the concrete-based home a richness and warmth. “There are not many totara houses so it has a sense of extravagance at one level, but when you understand the history of how he’s found it and worked it as a craftsman, you see it’s not just a rich embellishment, it’s something that he’s passionate about,” says Hay. But despite all the vintage timber and industrial concrete – perfect for dirty boots and large dogs – the house has a delicate sense of refinement, particularly in its slatted shutters, which can be closed to make interior spaces warm and intimate or opened up to allow the light that moves from north to west, brightening the airy space. “The timber, while it can be used to create solidity and warmth and mass, can also be incredibly fine and that is the tension we enjoyed playing with,” says Jeff Fearon. “While there are some very large and quite

Above Both inside and out, much of the house is clad in totara, a warm counterpoint to the concrete used throughout.


Above Vintage timber and concrete help give the property a brooding quality, “like a Vincent Ward movie,” Hay says.

“The timber, while it can be used to create solidity and warmth and mass, can also be incredibly fine and that is the tension we enjoyed playing with. While there are some very large and quite rustic elements, there is a fineness and lightness to the enclosure and layering of it.”

rustic elements, there is a fineness and a lightness to the enclosure and layering of it.” The house is heavy and rich in material, texturally deep. It has a heavy, brooding quality (“Like a Vincent Ward movie,” says Hay), with a modern refinement and proportion. There’s steel throughout, but it’s subtle, adding to the home’s precision rather than its rusticism. It’s a home of balance – in texture, weight, light and use. It may be a working home, but it’s also a social one. The owner describes most of the spaces by referencing how they work socially, from late drinks with friends to Christmas with a lamb on a spit for 35 people. There are two fireplaces indoors, one outside, a brazier, a cookhouse and a pizza oven. “It’s not uncommon for three fires to be going at once, especially if we’ve got people over,” he says. “And people turn up all the time.” And that’s not about to change. “We’re not leaving,” the owner says. “This is us – we did a lot of the design around having two teenage boys. This house has been a labour of love. It still is. There are still things to finish, but I’ll get there. And you can see that in 100 years, it’s still going to be here.”

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“The roof allowed us to develop a strong sense of continuity between the buildings. The weight of a single common material – timber – could bind it with its strength.”

Left The ‘Tio’ bar stools and ‘Tio’ dining chairs by MassProductions are from Simon James Design. The ‘MC’ walnut dining table by Shinsaku Miyamoto for Ritzwell is from ECC. Right The brick-based brazier sits on verdant lawn between the pool and the kitchen, dining and living area.

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Beyond a stand of native trees in the foreground, a line of gum trees cuts a swathe through the valley, with forestry pine growing on a hill crest in the distance.


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Ground floor 1. Workshop 2. Pool 3. Games room 4. Bathroom 5. Carport 6. Entrance 7. Living 8. Dining 9. Kitchen 10. Scullery 11. Bathroom 12. Winter lounge 13. Bedroom 14. Bedroom 15. Bedroom 16. Bathroom

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DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with Jeff Fearon and Tim Hay of Fearon Hay

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There are multiple wood treatments employed at once throughout the house – from the floorboards up to the shingled roof – how did you come to employ such a varied palette? TIM HAY The client had been collecting vintage timber for years, stockpiling from different parts of the country – large beams, pallets of native timbers – and he had a massive supply of totara. We thought we could build him a house that actually curates the timber collection. So there’s a patchwork of these different timbers and what we thought about is how to bring them all together tonally so it doesn’t end up as a mess. JEFF FEARON The timber, while it can be used to create solidity and warmth and mass, can

also be incredibly fine and that is the tension we enjoyed playing with, and certainly enjoyed the result. While there are some very large and quite rustic elements, there is a fineness and a lightness to the enclosure and layering of it. Is that how you arrived at the shingle roof? TIM HAY The roof is part of a translation of a palette of timber. The idea came to us early on: with such a strong mix of timbers, how can we use the timber as a roof? The roofs are the most dominant elements in terms of the forms of the buildings. So it allowed us to develop a strong sense of continuity between the different buildings.


Every book has an author. Every film has a director. Every painting has an artist. Every dance has a choreographer. Every play has a playwright. Every symphony has a composer. Every building has an architect. Every exhibition has a curator. Every poem has a poet. Every sculpture has a sculptor.

Pai mutunga te mahi hoahoa whare Matagofie tusa ma le tomai tau(le) ata-tusia fa’avae o le ‘a’ai けんちく は じゅうよう

‘Oku mahu‘inga ‘a e Lēsoni ‘Akitekí L’architecture, c’est important 建筑学很重要 With acknowledgements to the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada

. . . Architecture matters


TEXT

Annabel Davidson

New Zealanders Neha Belton and Tulia Wilson bring

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P H OTO G R AP H Y

Evie Mackay

fresh new focus to their modernist Sydney pad.

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Previous page The 1960s house in Woollahra, Sydney, nestles against a seven-metre-high face of sandstone and rock. Tulia Wilson walks towards her daughter, Hero, who swings in the hammock over the pool. Right Despite an extensive search, Wilson and Belton haven’t been able to establish the identity of the home’s original architect. Far right A pendant light by Tom Dixon hangs above the Minotti table and ‘DS1025 Terrazza’ lounge suite designed in 1973 by Ubald Klug for de Sede. The painting is by Gemma Smith. A column sculpture by Judy Darragh and brass cobra lamp by Angelo Lelli stand next to the fireplace.

When Neha Belton and Tulia Wilson found the house they wanted to buy in Woollahra, Sydney, after 18 months of searching, they had just discovered Tulia was pregnant with their second child. Having already looked at hundreds of beautiful yet predictable Victorian terrace houses, it was something of a surprise that the property they ended up purchasing was a 1960s house of concrete slab, brick and steel that they both describe as “an ugly duckling we knew could be a swan”. They also describe it as “the worst house on the best street”. “We fell in love with it because it reminded us of the Hollywood Hills,” says Tulia, a New Zealand-born designer and consultant who was formerly creative director at Zambesi, then fashion director of Ksubi, before hitting pause for a brief hiatus to raise daughter Hero, five, and son Fox, now two. “We were drawn to the light in the house. While the spaces were confusing, it had floor-to-ceiling windows everywhere, and many rooms opened out to terraces. Oh, and it had a pool!” The Hollywood Hills reference isn’t surprising when you know the couple, whose combined style always has an element of the retro and offbeat. Neha is just as likely to turn up in a knitted poncho found in a thrift shop as he is some weird, futuristic Japanese label no one has heard of. Tulia is generally more elegantly dressed,

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but almost always accessorises her clothes with crazy and dramatic footwear choices, such as fur-lined Celine Birkenstocks or a pair of staggeringly high heels of the jolie laide variety – a term that could also be applied to the home they fell in love with. This is the first major residential project the couple have embarked on together, drawing on their previous design experience working on the interiors of retail stores. The most dramatic and imposing feature of the property is a seven-metre-high sandstone rock face that the house has been nestled against. This part of Woollahra was only developed in the 1960s because it had previously been considered too steep to build on, but a forward-thinking council encouraged young modernist architects to experiment in the area, and this home was one of many interesting results. The main problem Tulia and Neha faced is that time (and previous owners) hadn’t been kind to the property. When they got their hands on it, the house had suffered undignified embellishments from almost all the preceding decades: pelmets and cornices, elaborate skirting boards, and a bizarre variety of floor coverings including faux marble, faux parquet and linoleum, a tableau that differed from room to room. The only solution was to strip the house back to the barest of bones. Just six weeks of renovations before they moved in involved the


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The Hollywood Hills reference isn’t surprising when you know the couple, whose style always has an element of the retro and offbeat.

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Left Neha stands before a painting by Michael Parekowhai while Tulia sits with Hero (far left) and Fox on chairs by Marcel Breuer. The dining table is by Alias. A ‘Zig Zag’ chair by Gerrit Rietveld for Cassina sits below an artwork by John Reynolds. An artwork by Gemma Smith hangs at right. The ‘Copacabana’ chairs on the patio are by Mathieu Matégot for Gubi. Below A ‘Callimaco’ lamp by Ettore Sottsass for Artemide stands tall behind the sofa. A Lucite cube and Rosenthal sculpture sit on the Minotti coffee table, and a vintage Navajo rug decorates the floor.

reconfiguration of the interior and stripping of redundant features. Under the floor coverings, they found poured aggregate floors which they decided to polish because they looked so spectacular, especially when partially covered by their collection of Persian and Moroccan rugs and Australian sheepskins, all in a variety of tones and textures. The walls throughout the house were plastered and painted white, but warmth was added with American walnut wardrobes in the bedrooms, and cabinetry in the kitchen that is tempered with white marble benchtops. The kitchen, which was relocated in the first stages of the renovation, opens out to an upper terrace that overlooks the pool. Neha, a textile trader, keen collector of unusual vintage furniture, and avid gardener, was responsible for the extensive landscaping on the property. False brick walls had been erected to hide the Sydney sandstone, but under Neha’s direction these were knocked down to reveal the property’s natural features, and a multitude of sympathetic planting now highlights the undulations of the site. The swimming pool was reshaped, and the garden separated into private terraced areas which cascade down the hill. Inside, Neha’s more Brutalist tendencies are balanced with Tulia’s softer, more eclectic use of textures. Concrete stairs are inlaid with brass strip detailing, and the brass balustrade is wrapped in tan leather. The bathrooms were completely gutted and rebuilt as all-white spaces with a focus on textural interplay of Italian glass tiles, Marc Newson-designed fixtures, and an ensuite featuring a freestanding circular Italian stone bath.

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A ‘Potence’ lamp by Jean Prouvé for Vitra leans over the Minotti bed where Wolfie the cat sits. The painting is by Seraphine Pick. A ply table and chairs by Charles and Ray Eames sit by the open door. A ‘Butterfly’ stool by Sori Yanagi is stacked with books and a sculpture by Rachel Walters sits on the ‘Kompact’ cork stool by Tomahawk Studios.

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Much time and focus was spent on making the home feel like a warm sanctuary, which is in contrast with the hard lines of the architecture. The pieces the couple have collected over the years soften the more austere parts of the house.

Right The concrete stairs are inlaid with brass strip detailing and the rail of the brass balustrade is wrapped in tan leather. The painting at the top left of the door frame is by Peter Robinson. Below is an artwork by Fiona Connor. ‘Rangitoto’, the Perspex floor sculpture, is by Carin Wilson. Next to it is an antique Persian rug. Far right Outside, where extensive sandstone is a feature, is an oak bench by Tom Dixon.

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Art and craft play a strong part in inspiring the couple, particularly sculpture and ceramics. Much of this is by progressive New Zealand and Australian artists such as Rachel Walters, Sarah Smuts-Kennedy and Huseyin Sami. The art is interspersed with antique ceramics and glass, and a large-scale macramé wall-hanging brought back from Palm Springs, a textural juxtaposition to the hard architectural elements of the home. Much time and focus was spent on making the home feel like a warm sanctuary, which is in contrast with the hard lines of the architecture. Again, careers in the textile industry proved invaluable. The pieces they’ve collected over the years soften the more austere parts of the house. A warm tan leather ‘DS 1025 Terrazza’

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lounge suite by Ubald Klug for de Sede is the focal point for entertainment. An unpredictable mix of Moroccan and Navajo rugs, antique French cane furniture, African masks, and ceramic sculptures punctuate the mid-century interior. Lighting was carefully considered to create areas of intimacy, and standard, wall and table lamps replace built-in lighting. In summer, life is focused around the pool and windows and doors are thrown open to allow the breeze to flow through. In winter, good thermal mass helps keep the home warm, and evenings are spent around the fireplace. “You spend a lot of time at home when you have young children,” says Neha, “but there’s no place in Sydney I would rather be.”


Above American walnut cabinetry in the kitchen is paired with a marble benchtop and splashback. ‘Tulip’ chairs by Eero Saarinen sit at the ‘Screw’ table by Tom Dixon. Right The white walls in the children’s room are tempered with blonde wood, a large floor rug and a giant blackboard on the wardrobe doors. Left American walnut doors conceal the wardrobe in Tulia and Neha’s bedroom. Far left The home opens to the outdoors on several levels, which works well in the steamy Sydney summers. The poolside concrete ‘Garden’ chairs are by Willy Guhl. Inside is a lounge chair and ottoman by Charles and Ray Eames and an ‘Egg’ chair by Arne Jacobsen for Fritz Hansen.

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Right The kitchen and main living area are located on the home’s second level. Far right A rain shower sits above the Italian stone bath with tapware by Marc Newson.

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DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with Tulia Wilson

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First floor

Do you know who designed the home? We don’t – I searched plans and council archives but to no avail. We know it was built in 1965 and that this part of the street was opened up to The Sydney School architects to encourage innovative building on the steep hillside. Other houses in the street are by Ken Woolley and Michael Dysart, so the house is in good company. It’s unusual to find this style amid the 19th-century homes of the area, but they do exist, and many are very well-loved and preserved. What did you change about the layout to make the house sing? We relocated the upstairs so that the kitchen, dining and main living were on the same level, which made for user-friendly flow. As the heart of a family home, we wanted it to open to the outdoors to enjoy the long Sydney summers. We created a grand master bedroom and ensuite by knocking down a dividing wall, and reconfigured the downstairs areas

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into versatile bedroom and living areas that flow to the pool. Outside, we restored the upper terraces to their original shape and to re-expose the sandstone cliff which had been covered in brick, Italianate terracotta and planting. We essentially re-oriented the outlook of the house to north-west from east. You are now back in Auckland. What brings you back and what are you working on? Neha was formulating ideas for a new business venture and Hero, our daughter, was about to start school but, for me, the decision came about when my father gave me a copy of Marae Te Tatau Pounamu by Muru, Robin and Sam Walters. It made me realise I didn’t want my children to grow up without a strong understanding of their Maori heritage, without a sense of being a New Zealander or without our extended family. This, combined with the fact that we owned an amazing property in Auckland that was just crying out for some attention.


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Jeremy Hansen

A rural retreat in the Wakatipu Basin by

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P H OTO G R AP H Y

Simon Devitt

Bureaux combines modernity with rusticity.

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There is comfort in classicism, a sense of relief in not striving for the new. Here in the middle of the Wakatipu Basin, about 20 minutes’ drive from Queenstown, an Auckland-based product designer wanted to create a home to which he and his partner will eventually move full-time. The world of design is always focused on the next new thing, but he wanted his southern getaway to be the antithesis: a place designed for nothing more than relaxation, a home that didn’t look as if it had anything to prove. “I was looking for a timeless piece,” he says. “As much as I admire the new thing, I wanted something that you couldn’t really date.” Funny he should say that, because when it came to choosing an architect, it was the new thing to which

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he gravitated: a small firm called Bureaux, which had just been established by its 30-something directors, Maggie Carroll and Jessica Barter. Before they went into business together, Carroll had worked at Fearon Hay Architects and Barter had her own design firm. They joined forces after deciding that combining Carroll’s “super-minimal” aesthetic with Barter’s more exuberant approach might yield interesting results. There are many architects to whom the owner could have turned for timeless classicism, people who devised the perfect recipe of roof pitch and room volume decades ago and have been refining it ever since. The owner knows many such veterans personally, but says, “I liked the fact Maggie and Jess were the new crowd coming


Previous page The owner wanted the new residence, located in the Bendemeer Estate, to be a romantic echo of the simple farm buildings of his youth. “He’s very aesthetically sensitive and was aware of what would look appropriate in this environment,” says architect Jessica Barter.

Left The “telephone box” addition to the main pavilion allows a gradual entry to the home. Below The home is broken into different structures to minimise its bulk, with a short walk outside to reach the guest quarters and garage at right.

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The home’s kitchen, dining and living area occupies a single lofty volume, and is overlooked by a mezzanine study that also contains a spare bed. The ‘Tolomeo’ floor lamp is by Michele de Lucci and Giancarlo Fassina for Artemide from ECC. 128 / HOME NEW ZEALAND


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through.” It was Carroll and Barter’s first completed commission for a stand-alone home. The home’s owner grew up in rural Hawke’s Bay and wanted his new residence to be a romantic echo of the simple farm buildings of his youth. “He had a black cottage in his mind,” Barter says. “He’s very aesthetically sensitive and was aware of what would look appropriate in this environment. And it needed to be a sanctuary for him, a place of retreat.” That partly explains why the home isn’t a gigantic Queenstown trophy pad: at 315 square metres (including the double garage), and with one straightforward living area and three bedrooms, it isn’t tiny, but is still relatively modest compared to many of the mansions in the area. “He didn’t want anything that was ostentatious,” Carroll says. “It doesn’t scream ‘look at me’.” Without discipline and budget constraints, the owner says, “you could wind up with two people in their mid60s with 500 square metres, and to me that’s ridiculous. I’m almost a bit embarrassed it’s this big.” If this five-year-old home looks conventional on some levels, its design process was anything but. The client’s approach to the architects was: “I’m this annoying person, I think I know what I want, will you work with me?” he says. Carroll and Barter, who founded their firm “to be really receptive to what the client needs and wants”,

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happily agreed. So the owner developed a ritual that involved booking the duo’s time for an afternoon, turning up with a bottle of Champagne, and spending the following hours around the office table working through the home’s design intricacies. “It came together really quickly,” he says. This process revealed some of the owner’s other, slightly whimsical desires: he insisted the roof pitch be 45 degrees, “like a Monopoly house” (or as Carroll describes it, “a cottage out of a nursery rhyme”), which was a little steeper than the architects initially envisaged. He asked for a concealed door leading to the main bedroom, so Carroll and Barter designed one that’s hidden in a section of the living room’s steel bookcase. His other stipulations were more straightforward challenges to the predictable status quo. He wanted the home broken into separate elements to minimise its bulk, and wasn’t bothered by the short walk outside to reach the guest room or the garage, with its upstairs workshop where he creates beautiful radio-controlled model aeroplanes. Rather than the conventional response of a row of enormous glass sliding doors facing the view from the living area, Carroll and Barter designed three pairs of timber-framed doors on the home’s northern elevation, a gesture that means the

Above left Part of the bookcase is a concealed door that leads to the main bedroom. The shelving was fabricated by Stephen Brookbanks from Object Support. Above, far left The French oak floorboards were beaten with chains to give them an aged appearance. The blue artwork is by Mervyn Williams. Right The kitchen is tucked under the mezzanine level and features marble tiles from Designsource on the splashback.


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Left Like the rest of the home, the lofty ceiling in the sleeping space on the mezzanine level is lined with whitewashed Oregon. Right The owner creates his beautifully made radio-controlled model aeroplanes in the workshop above the garage. Below right The main bedroom is tucked away off the living room with northerly views through glassand-timber doors. The ensuite bathroom is located behind the wall at left.

“Normally people want to tick every box so the house provides everything they think they’re going to need for 20 years. This was really about keeping things simple.”

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“He didn’t want anything that was ostentatious,” Carroll says. “It doesn’t scream ‘look at me’.”

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Above Rather than the conventional approach – a swathe of sliding glass doors – the architects designed three sets of timber doors that frame the views, as well as providing the interior with a sense of retreat from the landscape. Left The owner grew up in rural Hawke’s Bay and wanted his home to echo the simple farm buildings of his youth.

interior offers beautifully framed views of the landscape as well as a real sense of retreat from it. The owner was also clear that nothing was to feel too precious. He and the architects even coined a word, “bocarty”, to describe the slightly scuffed feeling they wanted for the interior. He insisted that no downlights punctuate the lofty ceilings lined in whitewashed Oregon timber, while the French oak floorboards were literally beaten with chains before they were installed. Nor was there any agonising over the creation of indoor-outdoor space: you’re simply inside or you’re out. The building volumes are arranged to provide a sense of enclosure to the gravel courtyard, and a “telephone

box” addition to the main pavilion allows for a more gradual entry to the home. But there is no front deck or complex pergola. One day, the owner says, the trees he’s planted will provide shade. An equally simple binary applies to the way the owner and his partner regard their lives, currently divided between city and country, north and south. They may live in Auckland half the month, the owner says, but the house on these pages “is our home”. He and his partner sold their Auckland residence to build this house, and now rent a “small and miserable” city apartment, a place that makes the pleasure of spending time down south even greater. “I just can’t wait to live here full time,” he says.

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Right The home is a relatively discreet presence in the landscape. Far right The farmhouse feel is echoed throughout the home.

Ground floor 1. Entry 2. Living 3. Dining 4. Kitchen 5. Laundry 6. WC 7. Main bedroom 8. Ensuite 9. Garage 10. Bedroom 11. Bathroom

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DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with Jessica Barter and Maggie Carroll of Bureaux

This is the first project by your firm, Bureaux, that’s been published in HOME. How would you describe your approach? JESSICA BARTER We’re a six-year-old boutique firm that offers a complete service – we’re architects who can design a building and follow that through to interiors and furnishings, right down to linen and crockery, if that’s what our clients want. It’s the whole package that blends architecture and interior design. MAGGIE CARROLL We don’t have an aesthetic that’s set in stone – we’re really interested in how people live, and so we’re very receptive to our clients’ needs and wants. How would you describe this home? JB [The owner] had a black cottage in his mind. He’s very aesthetically sensitive and was aware of what would look appropriate. It needed to be a sanctuary, a retreat. It wasn’t your typical four-bedroom, two-living-room brief. There are no superfluous spaces.

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The client didn’t want anything that was ostentatious. The house just lightly sits there. It doesn’t scream, ‘look at me!’ The footprint isn’t that big [315 square metres, including the double garage], but it feels very lofty. MC

You’re young, contemporary architects. How did you enjoy designing this classical home? JB We enjoy anything that’s a fresh take on things we’ve been thinking about. It’s the sort of house that makes you want to sit there with a bottle of wine and a book – you don’t feel like you’re being demanded to do anything. MC It was very much a collaborative approach. JB And there was a restraint to it – normally people want to tick every box so the house provides everything they think they’re going to need for 20 years. This was really about keeping things simple.


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TEXT

Claire McCall

Wellington architect Jon Craig created his last home it with a spirit of optimism for the years ahead. 138 / HOME NEW ZEALAND


P H OTO G R AP H Y

Paul McCredie

in a street dotted with his earlier designs, and infused If only he could have enjoyed it for longer. HOME NEW ZEALAND / 139


The curlicue tendrils of the creeper that edges up the perimeter wall of the last home Jon Craig designed soften the raw heft of the concrete block. To humanise the strong architectural idea was one of the architect’s trademarks, and it is no different here. In this place, he makes reference to his international heroes: the low-slung courtyard houses of Danish architect Jørn Utzon (who designed the Sydney Opera House); floating carport roofs like those on the Californian houses of master modernist Richard Neutra; the intimate entryways favoured by Frank Lloyd Wright. An architect’s legacy is irrefutable. Bricks and mortar tell no lies, but they can never articulate the full story. Jon, who died unexpectedly in August last year at the age of 73, had a hand in a landmark or two. Craig Craig Moller (CCM), the firm he found with Gordon Moller, designed substantial civic buildings such as the

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Sky Tower, Wellington Airport and Wellington Hospital. Yet the stature of these structures is quietly matched by a collection of houses in the Pinehaven enclave he called home. Here, in this cocoon of beech forest on the slopes of Wellington’s Hutt Valley, is the original home Jon designed for his family. He and his wife Judy lived in the Arts and Crafts-inspired dwelling for 43 years, and raised their children David and Virginia there. Its neighbour is a Roger Walker design that Jon extended in the 1980s for the owners, who became lifelong friends. Just to the north is a green weatherboard house where Jon’s father-in-law, known as Grandad Stewart (Stewart MacKenzie) still lives, aged 100. Three years ago, Jon finished the design of a new house in the same neighbourhood that he had been working on with Judy before her death in 2011. It is undeniably a descendant of the other dwellings in the


Previous page and left Next to the ‘PH’ lamp by Louis Poulsen is a ‘Provence’ bowl by Per Lütken for Holmegaard, and a vase by Alvar Aalto for Iittala. The landscape above the Kartell trolley is by Gerda Leenards. The etching above the ‘PH’ lamp is ‘Maps, Islands & Pathways’ by Virginia Craig. The ‘Dialogo’ dining chairs are by Afra and Tobia Scarpa for B&B Italia. A ‘Bertoia Diamond’ chair by Harry Bertoia for Knoll sits at the foot of the library. Calacatta Borghini marble surrounds the fireplace.

Below Architect Jon Craig drew plans for an L-shaped footprint around a rectangle of lawn and clad the home in rough-sawn board with chunky battens that exude rustic modesty. The single-level home encompasses 198 square metres, which includes the garage and attic storage. An admirer of Jørn Utzon’s work, Jon designed his home in the courtyard style that Utzon favoured in his residential designs.

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The house is surrounded by nature on the slopes of Pinehaven in Wellington’s Hutt Valley. Jon’s daughter Virginia Craig remembers her father belting out Frank Sinatra songs on the piano that sits in a corner of the living room. A lounger and ottoman by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller sits next to a ‘Le Bambole’ sofa by Mario Bellini for B&B Italia. The sculpture is by Wallace Sutherland.

street. It is also a multi-generational project in that Jon’s son David, who runs his own Wellington architecture studio, Craig & Coltart Architects, also worked on its design. David recognises the links between his original childhood home and his father’s last creation, which recently won a NZ Institute of Architects’ regional award. “The new house uses many of the same principles, just with an alternative palette of materials and pushing things in a more modernist direction,” he says. Jon’s daughter Virginia Craig, an artist and interior designer, finds comfort in such familiarity. “This house has a less-sombre feel and, because it’s on a single level, you get a sense of the whole of it at once.” Jon employed some classic devices in the design of the 198-square-metre house (a measurement that includes the garage and an attic storage area). He hand-drew the plans for an L-shaped footprint around a rectangle of lawn, and clad the home in rough-sawn boards with chunky battens that exude a rustic modesty. The ceiling in the entrance drops low past the front door and then, just beyond, a skylight void rises 3.5 metres. “He’s played with contraction and expansion of space in the extreme,” says David. There are other surprises. To the left of the front door, a shiny Citroën C5 draws the eye like an artwork: the garage, tiled in Cotto d’Este porcelain, and with underfloor heating, is no utilitarian utopia for tinkering, but a gallery with a gleaming black vehicle as its sculptural centrepiece. “Dad used a glass slider for the internal entry so he could see his car from the dining room,” explains Virginia. It’s the kind of indulgence her father felt he’d earned by this stage of his career. Inside the garage, the walls are memory holders for photographs of global adventures. One year it was a trip around the Greek islands on a charter yacht; another image depicts the fins of the World Trade Centre, taken on a family holiday. When it came to planning, Jon was a believer in ‘divide and conquer’, deftly separating living spaces while retaining a sense of openness. Built-in cabinetry with a blade wall separates the dining and kitchen areas from the living room. A fireplace against a wall of Calacatta Borghini marble, used in buildings such as Rome’s Duomo, is another focus. The cocktail bar where Jon would mix a Manhattan while entertaining, ever keeping one eye on his beloved Citroën, provides another punctuation mark. He loved architecture but embraced music, art and literature with no less devotion, and made sure his new home was designed for these activities. Virginia remembers him belting out Frank Sinatra songs at the piano into the wee hours.

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“He wanted the house to be a peaceful and cosy environment that embraced the surrounding native bush and provided for family visits. Given it was his last house, he indulged.�

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Below left Jon designed the Cotto d’Este-tiled garage with underfloor heating as a gallery for his Citroën C5. A view of the car can be enjoyed from the dining table. The wall hanging above the drinks cabinet is by family friend Judy Patience. Below The quilt is ‘Unveiled’ by Katherine Morrison and is handcrafted from two sheets, a blanket and blanket pieces. The landscape above the Kartell trolley is by Simon McInytre.

The bookshelves are as high and wide as the livingroom wall itself, with National Geographic magazines taking top spot. And while Jon had a handle on the historical, he also welcomed the advantages of cutting-edge technology. The home’s flat-tray roof is lined with 104 square metres of laminated solar strips, an Austrian system that can deliver more than 45kWh of energy per day in summer. “Dad dreamt of a low-energy, low-maintenance home and of one day going off-grid,” says David. A centralised remote control flummoxed Virginia when she stayed over once, but her Dad used it effortlessly, sometimes to keep his nightly date with Max Keiser on RT, an award-winning international subscription news service broadcast from Moscow. Tragically, Jon only got to enjoy his new home for 10 months before his death. For David and Virginia, who

packed up the house to prepare it for sale after their father’s passing, the most daunting task was clearing the attic. Along with some 100,000 photographic slides, there were keepsakes and heirlooms held dear by their parents: a jar of toy soldiers, a bronze business plaque that belonged to Jon’s father (also an architect); a copy of Meccano Magazine from 1934. A corner of the room in a bay overlooking the street was where Jon liked to work. A sketch of the renovations for Virginia’s Auckland home was discovered unfinished on the drawing board. The treasures and mementoes of a family history may have been removed but here on the hillside, the house will remain, albeit with a new owner. Next door, Grandad Stewart has just planted a row of broad beans. He hopes they’ll thrive against the sun-kissed backbone of that perfect block wall.

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Left The bookshelves are built as high and wide as the living-room wall. A band of National Geographic magazines lines the top shelf. The Charlie Chaplin marionette next to the ladder is by Michelangeli from Orvieto, Italy. Jon designed the coffee table. Top right Calacatta Borghini marble also features in the kitchen. A pot by Copco sits on the benchtop and an Alessi espresso maker sits on the stove. Outside, an ‘Origami’ light by Ramón Esteve for Vibia hangs above the table. Right Jon enjoyed playing with the contraction and expansion of space, separating living areas while retaining a sense of openness.

“Although this is more of a modernist house than the Arts and Crafts family home I grew up in, their fundamentals are the same.”

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DESIGN NOTEBOOK Q&A with architect David Craig of Craig & Coltart

You designed this home with your father. Was this the first time you’d worked together, and how did the process go? While it wasn’t the first time we had worked together, it was one of only a few projects we teamed up on after Dad’s retirement. I never worked for his firm, CCM, other than in university holidays, because I wanted to forge my own way, and eventually formed Craig & Coltart Architects with my friend, Matt Coltart. In retirement, [Dad] sometimes joined us for a project for his friends or other connections. His final home turned out to be the last project we would do together. I feel all the more privileged to have done that particular one with him now. Dad sketched all his ideas for the house with Mum before she passed away, planning the home around their needs and drawing all his great interior perspectives to get a feel for the spaces. We gave feedback on sketches and technical advice. He would sketch his idea of the details, we would work them up and he would feed back with other ideas – like a conversation using drawings. We introduced

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him to some of the specialist contractors we had experience with and also worked their techniques into the detailing. It was a rigorous process that resulted in a finely detailed building.

lessons I learnt from Dad was creating spaces with human scale. He was a master at creating cosy and intimate spaces and loved playing around with the compression and expansion of spaces.

What did he want the house to be? He wanted the house to be a peaceful and cosy environment that embraced the surrounding native bush and provided for family visits. Given it was his last house, he indulged, using materials like the honed Calacatta marble and creating a view of his favourite car from the dining table. With older age in mind it had to be one-level, luxurious and low-maintenance. However, he couldn’t resist putting a studio into the roof space. He was open and excited to be introduced to new technologies such as the PV laminate solar system on the roof and even a robotic lawn mower that saved him effort, but not time, because he loved watching it.

The kitchen, dining and living areas all sit within one very large room and he subtly managed to keep them all feeling intimate using carefully placed narrow full-height walls and joinery pieces as divisions.

You grew up just down the road in a house by your father. Do you see many connections between the two homes? Although this is more of a modernist house than the Arts and Crafts family home I grew up in, their fundamentals are the same. They are both courtyard houses that drew influence from one of Dad’s heroes, Jørn Utzon, and his courtyard-style homes. In common with the original house, the main bedroom looks across the lawn, the living areas connect with the bush, and the spaces feel intimate, even though they are very lightly coloured compared to the rich timber interior of the original home. One of the biggest

How did your dad feel about his new house when it was complete? He relished its luxuriousness and it gave him the opportunity to develop the way he engaged with the bush. He absolutely loved the bush and this house opened the view to the entire tree canopy as you arrived in the living area. He had met a new partner, was happy again, and ready for an exciting new stage in his life. I think the new home symbolised this and that became a big part of the enjoyment for him. He was a social person and loved sharing the experience of it with his family and friends.

Right Jon Craig


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CITTA DESIGN

The founder of Dawson & Co reports on his firm’s latest European furniture acquisitions and new design directions.

Source Mondial’s managing director will brief our guests on the latest trends in flooring and the rise of custom-made artisanal rugs.

The Matisse co-founder reports on the latest from Milan Design Week and new arrivals in the Matisse showroom.

One of Australia’s leading furniture design firms presents its range of high-quality contemporary furniture at its Auckland showroom.

Citta Design’s lead furniture designer will brief our guests on the New Zealand firm’s new ranges of furniture and accessories.

Angus Dawson

MATISSE

David Moreland

HOW TO BOOK Book your tickets online at eventopia.co/stylesafari2016. Each ticket costs $85 and includes lunch and our all-day Style Safari experience. For information, contact Liezl Hipkins-Stear, 09 308 2873 or lhipkins@bauermedia.co.nz

SOURCE MONDIAL CARPET | RUGS | SISAL

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 151


STYLE SAFARI CHECKING OUT THE LATEST FURNITURE RELEASES IN AUCKLAND’S BEST SHOWROOMS.

Our Style Safari 2016 programme kicked off in May in Auckland with a tour of some of the city’s best showrooms, guided by HOME editor Jeremy Hansen. The itinerary began with a visit to Backhouse Interiors’ Parnell showroom, where Michelle Backhouse gave a briefing on the latest from April’s Milan Design Week and their firm’s collaborations with New Zealand designers.

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Next, our 50 guests visited IMO to hear about the New Zealand design firm’s range of prefab kitchens and furniture. After lunch at Cafe Hanoi, the group watched a presentation by interior designer Alex McLeod on the latest directions in flooring at Artisan Collective. ECC’s Mike Thorburn then gave a talk on the design developments he was most excited by at Milan Design Week. The day finished with nibbles and prosecco at Studio Italia’s showroom, where Valeria Carbonaro-Laws and Joanna Hoeft showed the latest in Italian furniture and contemporary kitchens.

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It was a day full of invaluable design information. Our next Style Safari is an introduction to exciting new showrooms and brands, and will be held in Auckland on Friday 26 August. We’d love it if you could join us. For ticketing information, see the previous page. And to find out more about our upcoming Auckland Kitchen Day, a series of briefings on the latest kitchen trends, turn the page. And Christchurch, we’ll announce details of your Style Safari in our next issue. homemagazine.co.nz

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01­­—Our Style Safari guests after the presentation in IMO’s Auckland showroom. 02—Studio Italia hosted a presentation of the latest furniture and kitchen designs from Milan. 03—At ECC, Mike Thorburn showed Style Safari guests his favourite finds from the Milan Furniture Fair. 04­­—Listening to Michelle Backhouse at Backhouse Interiors’ Parnell showroom. 05­—A briefing on the latest flooring trends at Artisan Collective. 06­—Browsing lighting options at ECC on our Style Safari visit. Photography­by Rebekah Robinson

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152 / HOME NEW ZEALAND


HOME OF THE YEAR CELEBRATING THE BEST NEW ZEALAND HOMES

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The announcement of HOME’s Home of the Year awards was a night full of fascinating architecture in a building that wasn’t bad itself: Fearon Hay’s Wintergarden at Auckland’s Northern Club. The awards, sponsored by Altherm Window Systems, were given to architects Anna-Marie Chin for the Best Small Home, Andrew Kissell and Andrea Bell for the Best City Home, Parsonson Architects for the Best Multi-Unit project, and to Lance and Nicola Herbst for their design of the 2016 Home of the Year, a beautiful building clad in rusted metal on a Coromandel farm.

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This was a richly varied group of buildings that shared a bracing sense of innovation and a commitment to gutsy architectural statements. It was also a fine way for the Home of the Year award to celebrate its 21st birthday. We look forward to seeing what architects are dreaming up for next year’s awards.

04 01­­—The ‘Best City Home’ award went to architects Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell for their own home in Auckland. 02—Anna-Marie Chin’s design in Queenstown won the ‘Best Small Home’ award. 03—The Home of the Year 2016 in Coromandel was designed by Herbst Architects. 04­­—Parsonson Architects won the ‘Best MultiUnit Residential’ award for this Wellington development. 05­­— Shane Walden and Rochelle Taylor of Altherm, with HOME editor Jeremy Hansen, and winners Nicola and Lance Herbst. 06­­—The awards were held at the Northern Club in Auckland.

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homemagazine.co.nz altherm.co.nz

Photography­by Rebekah Robinson

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HOME NEW ZEALAND / 153


FRIDAY 2 SEPTEMBER

$85

Thanks to our principal sponsor, Blum.

A day of design briefings and expert advice on the latest kitchen innovations guided by HOME editor Jeremy Hansen.

+ PRESENT

kitchen day 2016

154 / HOME NEW ZEALAND


HOME’s Kitchen Day is an exclusive series of briefings on the latest developments in kitchen design, full of expert advice on how to best utilise the home’s most important space. Get up-to-date in a day with the newest information on materials, hardware, appliances, ergonomics and trends. Numbers are limited to 50, so book your tickets now.

OUR GUEST SPEAKERS

Sophie Beets

Mark Elmore FISHER & PAYKEL

EVOLUTION OF SURFACES

Nicky Duggan

Joanna Hoeft STUDIO ITALIA

KITCHENS BY DESIGN

Blum’s expert on new drawer and hardware technology and designing an efficient, ergonomic kitchen.

Fisher & Paykel’s head of design discusses leading-edge technology and design innovations.

The kitchen design expert reports back on the latest design developments from Milan’s EuroCucina.

The designer presents her take on the latest European kitchen design materials and trends.

The kitchen designer discusses how to best assess your options when designing your kitchen.

BLUM

Shane George

HOW TO BOOK Book your tickets online at eventopia.co/kitchenday2016. Each ticket costs $85 and includes lunch and our all-day kitchen design experience. For information, contact Liezl Hipkins-Stear on 09 308 2873 or lhipkins@bauermedia.co.nz.

HOME NEW ZEALAND / 155


LIGHT FANTASTIC

Consider ambience, convenience and energy efficiency when investing in your ideal lighting plan – then illuminate your home with these design finds.

mat mcmillan Mat Macmillan recycles off-cuts of plywood, sliced and sometimes coloured, to create lamps that are unique, contemporary and add texture to a space. Hand crafted, the iO range adds lasting beauty and originality to your home, office or commercial space. www.thecleverdesignstore.com

The FLUID pendant lamp is inspired by a resting drop of water. The lamp's round shape is enhanced by its frosted matte glass surface and perfectly matches its warm cosy light. The lamp can be hung as a single feature over a table or mixed in clusters with other small and large FLUID lamps to create the desired ambience. Available in two sizes: Small 23cm $430 / Large 42cm $645

Lightplan Ltd

esso Home

LUTE pendant is a classic style pendant made out of mouth-blown glass, the top part is a metallic copper or metallic platinum plating and the glass comes with colour options of clear, smoke or blue.

The Clava aluminium shade is small and stylish with a retro feel. A series of small symmetric holes in the base create a stunning effect when lit. Group for maximum impact in dining rooms and kitchens. The Clava comes in matt white, brushed copper, brushed brass, and polished steel. View now at Esso Home.

www.lightplan.co.nz Ph (09) 623 7207

www.bauhaus.co.nz

www.essohome.co.nz Ph (09) 379 5582

ambiance interiors energYmad Lightplan Ltd NICE is a minimalist pendant made of copper, polished aluminium or matt black aluminium; it comes with a colour-matched cable, with an option of recessed or surfacemounted base. The warm white dimmable LED light is de-glared by an optical lens offering a great task or ambient light. www.lightplan.co.nz Ph (09) 623 7207

LEDs by Ecobulb We have the only LED downlight available in New Zealand with a Lifetime Warranty. Improve your lighting without re-gibbing, plastering or painting – we have a fantastic no mess & no fuss solution. Homeowners can call us to make an appointment on 0800 101 206 or sign up now for a chance to win our $5,000 travel prize. http://switch2.ecobulb.co.nz/travel-prize

Amongst the large range of lighting at Ambiance is this contemporary chandelier “Nuage” from France. Nuage translates as Cloud, it is ultra-light and the shades seem to float in the air. A very versatile chandelier that can be personalised to any shape or varied height. Create a unique solution for your space by selecting from the various shade sizes and colours combined with numerous cord colour options. Showroom at 16 Railway St Newmarket. www.ambhome.com

Light Fantastic Showcase

Clark Bardsley design Clark Bardsley creates high-quality contemporary work, with a materialsfocused, observation-led approach to objects and spaces. One of a range of highly unique lamps, the Cloud is hand crafted using industrial methods and materials and will make a bold statement in contemporary spaces. www.thecleverdesignstore.com

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

muuto


designtree muuto UNDER THE BELL is a large lamp that creates a new space within a space whether hung over the dining table, lounge, bedroom or entrance way. Its eye-catching design can also help to absorb noise and improve the acoustics in large rooms. Made from recycled plastic felt, it adds a strong statement to any setting.

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

Designed by Iskos-Berlin / Grey or Black 82cm $1295

The Designtree mission is to create beautiful experiences through objects that are wellmade and well-loved. They are designed to age gracefully so people can develop rewarding and lasting relationships with them. The Nectar is one of a range of conceptual lamps that are beautifully crafted with respect to the environment. www.thecleverdesignstore.com

Lightplan Ltd

david trubridge

CAPELLA is a softly rounded pendant made of quality metalized polycarbonate exterior which is available in black, white, copper and silver. The honeycomb diffuser on the bottom is a feature in itself and gives a nice diffused light.

Belle offers various lighting options due to the effect the finish has on the shade’s light output; the black stain or caramel limits the amount of light creating a moody environment, whilst the natural option glows like a lantern. Belle is made from bamboo plywood and sent as a kitset.

www.lightplan.co.nz Ph (09) 623 7207

www.davidtrubridge.com Ph (06) 650 0204

www.bauhaus.co.nz

sØKtas mr ralph Mr Ralph have such a passion and expertise for all things lighting. It is our obsession to keep sourcing the most gorgeous things, and offer them to you at affordable prices. We have moved to a lovely big warehouse space in Paeroa. 2a Seymour Street, Paeroa. Open every Sunday from 10-4pm. (Open from 29th May). www.mrralph.co.nz

“VØLT” by Oliver Höglund. Molten hot glass shaped and blown by hand to create a warped teardrop design to dress an original filament bulb. The filaments shine and refract off the contours of the “VØLT to give a unique one-of-akind design. From $495. Visit www.soktas.co for more information or email info@soktas.co www.soktas.co

muuto Katie Brown One-off hand-blown lighting. Katie Brown has established a unique range of designs by joining together contrasting elements, form and colour. Discuss your requirements. Katie Brown Lighting 3 Rutland Street, Wanganui www.katiebrownglass.co.nz Ph 027 482 9944

AMBIT is a timeless and versatile pendant with a strong character. The lamp shade is made with old brazier traditions, press spun by hand, polished and, finally, hand-painted. The AMBIT pendant comes in five different colours and has a whitepainted inside which adds a delicate contrast while also ensuring that maximum light is emitted from the lamp. One Size 40cm $595 www.bauhaus.co.nz


advertising promotion

ecodure Wood Flooring is the most sought-after floor covering in today’s homes. Revered for its natural appearance and warmth underfoot…..wood is durable, beautiful and timeless.

Bamboo / Wooden Specialist

For superior quality and affordable wood flooring, look no further than the exclusive range of Ecodure Oak & Bamboo Flooring. Contact us for the best advice and personal service available. Showroom and direct sales:

Unit B, 4 Titoki Place, Albany, Auckland Ph (09) 489 3602 www.ecodureflooring.co.nz

mC tiles and distribution Ltd Tile

For winter ‘16 MC Tiles are introducing METAL STYLE. An innovative Specialist collection of porcelain tiles from Italy that emphasizes the concept of “worn metal” as a stylistic and directional look for the home. On walls or floor the three finishes, Calamine, Revival and Corten can enhance any environment. METAL STYLE is the choice for clients that want to stand out from the crowd and express their personality as trendsetters not followers. Push the boundaries and get in touch for a quote or your nearest stockist. ALBANY SHOWROOM: Tawa Trade Centre, Shop 5, 2 Tawa Drive, Albany, Auckland HOWICK SHOWROOM: 198 Moore Street Howick, Auckland

the ivy House

Just shorn Rug Specialist

RUGS & CUSTOM RUGS HALL RUNNERS INDOOR OUTDOOR RUGS The Ivy House is New Zealand's stockist of Armadillo&Co rugs, beautiful hand woven rugs combining aesthetics with ethics. The collection includes a wide range of standard sized rugs, with opportunities to custom design your rug or hall runner. 238 Jervois Road, Herne Bay, Auckland Ph (09) 360 8986 theivyhouse.co.nz

From our farms to your floors.

Carpet Specialist

It all starts on the farm. It’s only natural that the lush, beautiful countryside of New Zealand is home to the world’s finest strong wool that is the foundation for our collection of luxurious and uniquely designed Just Shorn™ carpets and rugs. Our farmers respect their land as a renewable resource, so that the premier source for the world’s finest and all natural wool will be available for generations to come. After taking Just Shorn to the world, New Zealand’s home grown wool carpets are now available locally. Beautiful. Natural. Sustainable and family friendly. To view the Just Shorn New Zealand range visit www.justshorn.co.nz Just Shorn is distributed in New Zealand by Harrisons Carpet One www.harrisonscarpets.co.nz

Flooring Specialist showcase

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

Ph 0800 002 005 www.mctiles.co.nz


advertising promotion

WATERWARE LTD High street style and quality for inspired Kiwi homes on realistic budgets. Select your own combination from iStone’s suite of basins, cabinets, tops and mirrors from a constantly evolving catalogue full of interesting colours and textures. Ph (09) 273 9191 info@waterware.co.nz www.waterware.co.nz

Mardeco

Auckland, Hastings, Queenstown Freephone 0508 550 550 www.agaliving.co.nz

ESSE Range Cookers & Stoves ESSE range cookers and stoves have been made with pride in Britain for more than 160 years. Every model is carefully hand crafted to offer quality, integrity and longevity. Available in a range of classic and contemporary colours to suit any kitchen.

The M-Series range of sliding door hardware by Mardeco represents a new age of flush pull handles and privacy locks for timber and aluminium sliding doors. Packed with innovation and sophistication, these sleek, modern handles represent simplicity through Microscopically glass is very rough, it’s this rough surface that gives the uncompromising design. disolved minerals that are carried in water somewhere toinhold to Designed Newon Zealand, the perfectly represents as the water evaporates after your shower. EvenM-Series if you squeegee your what Mardeco is all about ... unprotected shower glass you can’t remove all the water. quality, design and good service.

Glass is a difficult to clean surface, we have all been there with our impossible to clean shower glass!

Ph 0800 479 762 www.esse.com

Other glass protections are temporary and eitherwww.m-series.co.nz “fill” the glass and leave it as a smoother surface or cover the existing glass surface with a water repellant layer that may last a few weeks, a few months or maybe a few years To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

or ne.

The AGA City60 has two ovens and a single large hotplate. It is made from cast iron and employs radiant heat cooking technology, meaning food tastes so much better. Choose from 14 beautiful colours, when you order an Aga City60.

M-series Privacy Lock. Excitingly Different.

y

s

FL BONE

Diamond Fusion does both PERMANENTLY with its world leading, internationally patented system. No other glass protection comes close in durability and lifespan. Diamond Fusion easyClean NZ ltd is part of the worlds largest surface protection group, so a true global product. Great partners, superior solutions and customer care are what we pride ourselves on.

www.diamondfusion.co.nz

0800 72 78 Glass sales@diamondfusion.co.nz Easy To66Clean

Microscopically, glass is very rough and it’s this rough surface that gives the dissolved minerals that are carried in water somewhere to hold on to as the water evaporates after your shower. Diamond Fusion becomes part of the glass, Diamond fusion makes the glass a very smooth and very water repellent surface PERMANENTLY with its world-leading, internationally patented two-layer system. No other glass protection comes close in durability and lifespan. Diamond Fusion easyClean NZ Ltd is part of the world’s largest surface protection group, so it is a true global product. Great partners, superior solutions and customer care are what we pride ourselves on. Diamond Fusion makes any glass better – shower glass, exterior windows, glass balustrades, shop fronts, automotive and marine. Ph 0800 66 72 78 sales@diamondfusion.co.nz www.diamondfusion.co.nz

Nicola Cumming Kitchens Every good home deserves a great kitchen. When I have gained an understanding of how you use your home, I then design your new kitchen to suit your lifestyle and your home’s character. As an Independent Kitchen Designer, I can design, build and manage your project through to completion or assist you with design only. Whether you have a clear vision for your project or don’t know where to start, I can help. Call me. Let’s talk about creating your dream kitchen. Auckland and Bay of Plenty. Ph 021 805 981 I 0800 NCDESIGN (623 374) nicola@kitchendesigner.net.nz www.kitchendesigner.net.nz

Kitchen & Bathroom Designers showcase


SOURCE

SNANLOEW!

With more than 15 years of building experience and an established reputation with an excellent team of qualified subcontractors, Bungalow & Villa Renovation Specialists have the expert knowledge to turn your building dream into reality.

O

www.bungalowvilla.co.nz

Phone (09) 629 0366/ 021 270 1388

WINNER 2015 CREATIVE EXCELLENCE AWARD FOR THE MOST INNOVATIVE KITCHEN Visit our display kitchen at: PO Box 28-700, Remuera Phone (09) 813 6192 www.croninkitchens.co.nz

155 The Strand, Parnell.

Add style and warmth to your home with a Warmington fire

Call us TODAY for up to $1000 free accessories! * Terms & conditions apply

mykitchenmakeover.co.nz 0800 696 253

Visit our Auckland Fires by Design showroom at 47 Sir William Ave, East Tamaki Ph: 09 271 0891 Or visit our website: www.warmington.co.nz

We have a quality range of wood and gas fires, woodburners and outdoor fires designed and manufactured here in NZ, and all from one convenient location.

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

SAME KITCHEN BEFORE

New kitchen? How about a makeover instead?


SOURCE

concrete blush w w w. c o n c r e t e b l u s h . c o m

World-renowned art glass by glass artists Ola & Marie Hรถglund Creators of New Zealand art glass since 1982 52 Lansdowne Rd, Richmond, 20 mins from NELSON NELSON

0800 ARTWOOD artwoodfurniture.co.nz

1767 Luggate-Cromwell Rd, 50 mins from QUEENSTOWN CENTRAL OTAGO (from 1 December) Ph 03 544 6500

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

www.hoglundartglass.com


MY FAVOURITE BUILDING Liam Bowden, creative director of luxury leather accessories house Deadly Ponies, covets a neglected Auckland building as a creative space.

“I’ve always driven past Carlile House [in Richmond Road, Grey Lynn] and been drawn to it. I look at it and dream of what could be. It was Auckland’s first purpose-built orphanage, constructed in 1866, and it remained one for decades. It hasn’t had anything done to it or been inhabited for about 80 years and is in desperate need of repairs and earthquake strengthening. “The building has been owned by the United Church of Tonga for more than 30 years and, with council negotiations at a standstill, the future of this beautiful building is in jeopardy. My dream, albeit a pipe-dream, is to one PHOTOG RAPHY

162 / HOME NEW ZEALAND

day turn this monumental space into the Deadly Ponies workroom, with separate rooms dedicated to the variety of crafts that encompasses our brand ethos. “In terms of the architecture that I like, the older the better. I have an aversion to creating something new when there’s so much beauty in old. I look at a building like Carlile House and can imagine the hundreds of hours of someone’s work that have gone into making every element. Haunted or not, it’s the workmanship that makes it such an interesting building to me. It’s something that should be cherished and not perish.” — Simon Devitt


AWA R D

W I N N I N G

R E S I DE NT I A L

&

COM M E RC I A L

I N T ER I O R S

POWERSURGE.CO.NZ


Kitchen Collection Athena. High Quality System

HOME NZ June/July 2016  

Our fresh thinking issue features five smart and stylish NZ homes.

HOME NZ June/July 2016  

Our fresh thinking issue features five smart and stylish NZ homes.