Page 1

SUPPORTING STUDENT LEARNING AT HILLFIELD STRATHALLAN COLLEGE JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL


1

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL


CONTENTS Purpose and Rationale

3

HSC’s Mission and Ideals

3

HSC’s Guiding Educational Principles

4

Duty to Accommodate

5

Identification for Students with Learning Disabilities

5

Importance of Parent/guardian/Guardian Partnership & Communication Universal Design for Learning

10

Intervention Team Approaches for Supporting Learners

11

Roles & Responsibilities in Supporting Student Learning

12

Learning Services at HSC

16

Wellness Supports at HSC

17

College Counsellor

18

HSC Individual Learning Plans (ILP)

21

Student Success Plans (SSP)

22

Identified Learning Challenges & Available Accommodations

23

Student Behaviour and HSC Code of Conduct

27

Accommodations and Modifications

28

Assistive Learning Technologies at HSC

29

Academic Support Programs

29

External Paraprofessional Supports

30

Supporting English Language Learners at HSC

31

Enriched Learning Opportunities at HSC

32

HSC Policy on External Tutors

32

Transitioning between HSC School Divisions

33

Communication Protocols when Questions Arise

35

Contact Information

36

9

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

2


3

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE

HSC’S MISSION AND IDEALS

The Supporting Student Learning at Hillfield Strathallan College document brings together all of the policies, processes, and structures that exist across the College to support student learning. It provides both current and prospective students and parent/ guardians/guardians with explicit details regarding the many efforts that HSC makes to ensure that all of our students are provided with ample support and opportunity to achieve their very best within our learning environment. The document highlights the areas of support that are consistent across the College and seeks to clarify areas where our support processes are different between the four school divisions that comprise our school community. Finally, the document outlines the learning boundaries that HSC is capable of supporting, detailing what types of learning supports the College is able to provide and identifying those learning supports that we are unable to offer because they extend beyond the scope of HSC’s program.

The College’s mission statement is Learn with Joy. Live with Purpose.

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

The core mission at Hillfield Strathallan College is to develop joyful and engaged students who live life with purpose. The best learning happens when students are happy to come to school, have opportunities to follow their passions, and participate in deep learning experiences that challenge them. Joyful, engaged students develop strong relationships with their peers and with the caring adults who spark and support their learning both inside the classroom and beyond. Their journey at HSC prepares students to live with purpose – to understand their world, inspire, lead, act, and make a difference in their own unique ways.


As defined by the student body at HSC, the following are the ideals which our community believes are essential in developing well-rounded leaders who possess a genuine sense of purpose: A) • • • • •

Integrity We are honest not only with our peers and colleagues, but with ourselves We stand up for what we believe in We take responsibility for our actions We are true to our word We allow actions to speak louder than words

B) • • • •

Respect We understand the importance of being humble We think beyond ourselves through empathy and kindness We are courteous and compassionate We find a sense of worth and value in others and in ourselves

C) Community • We build friendships through inclusivity and the celebration of individual differences • We foster positive relationships at HSC and beyond our gates D) • • • •

Determination We are committed and optimistic We encourage individuals to strive for their own excellence We persevere when faced with adversity We learn from our missteps

E) • • •

Individuality We inspire individuals to express and pursue their own unique passions We are creative We are confident in who we are and who we will become

HSC’S GUIDING EDUCATIONAL PRINCIPLES At HSC, we believe that the best learning occurs: • With an understanding of ourselves as learners; • With each other, and from each other; • With a blend of challenge and support; • With an expectation, and the encouragement needed, to lead; • With excellence honoured and demonstrated • Through creativity and an entrepreneurial spirit to think critically; • With resiliency in mind and body; • With an awareness of, and engagement in, global, cultural, economic, social, and environmental issues JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

4


DUTY TO ACCOMMODATE Human rights law and policy establish that all educational providers have a duty to accommodate students with disabilities to the point of undue hardship. Hillfield Strathallan College recognizes and understands that in order to have the opportunity to access education equally, students with disabilities may require various forms of accommodation to their learning programs. As such, HSC is committed to accommodating the needs of students with disabilities in a way that responds to a student’s unique circumstances. In accordance with the Ontario Human Rights Code, Hillfield Strathallan College will accommodate the needs of students with disabilities to allow them access to educational services equally, unless to do so would cause undue hardship to HSC to implement. While HSC does not have a special education department, through our Student Success and Learning Services programs, the College is able to provide selected accommodations aimed at assisting students with special learning needs to develop their individual potential and experience success within our defined academic programs. These accommodations may include: extra support in the classroom, adaptive technology, learning materials in alternative formats, extended test times, alternate testing environments, and assistance from specialized professionals (namely, psychologists, psychometrists, social workers, 5

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

counsellors, educational assistants, speech and language pathologists, sign language interpreters, mobility instructors, and other professionals and paraprofessionals trained to work with students with specific needs). It is important to note that while HSC is able to enact various accommodations for identified students, the College does not modify or remove academic program requirements based upon special need. At the secondary school level, this may mean that a student is better suited for enrolment in an open or applied level course when, despite their accommodations, they are unable to meet the full course requirements of an academic level course. In these situations, the student and his/ her parent/guardians will receive additional academic counselling from the Student Success Centre in the Senior School so they can better understand the longer-term academic pathway consequences that arise when students take credit courses below the academic level. For more information on accommodation versus modification, please see “Distinguishing between Accommodations and Modifications� on page 28.


IDENTIFICATION AND DOCUMENTATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES Students and parent/guardians/ requesting accommodation for a learning disability are responsible for providing the appropriate documentation to the College during the admission process or immediately following a diagnosis, whichever happens first. The College may not be able to provide supports to students who do not inform the school of their special needs and/ or do not provide the appropriate documentation and assessment information, either at the time of admission to HSC or at any point following their admission to the school. Documentation of any disability must come from a qualified practitioner who is certified in diagnosing and treating a student’s particular disability. In the vast majority of cases, a standard medical note from a family doctor does not meet the requirement for documentation.

For a learning disability, a psychological or psycho-educational assessment is required. The assessment must be completed and signed by a registered psychologist or registered psychological associate. The assessment must include an assessment of : • cognitive functioning • academic functioning • an assessment and identification of the specific information processing deficits that are present to constitute a learning disorder (LD) • social-emotional functioning, • a diagnostic statement confirming the learning disability. Associated test scores should be included in the report, along with a recommendation section that the trained professional conducting the assessment would encourage HSC to consider when determining the appropriate accommodations and supports for the student’s learning. JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

6


Given that only a current psychoeducational assessment can provide the most accurate recommendations which are best aligned with a student’s current level of learning abilities, HSC strongly recommends that psycho-educational assessments be no more than three years old. In cases where an assessment is more than three years old, the College will request that parent/guardians have their child reassessed so that new information and recommendations can be shared which enable the school to be better informed and equipped to manage the student’s current learning needs. In cases where parent/guardians refuse to have their child reassessed and/or opt not to share relevant information regarding a student’s learning abilities with the College, HSC’s ability to best meet the student’s specific and current learning needs is subsequently compromised and, as such, the student may not be able to receive all of the appropriate accommodations. For parent/guardians and students who wish to have academic accommodations continue into their years of post-secondary study, it is imperative that the student has a valid educational assessment completed within the two years prior to their entry into a post-secondary institution. Documentation of medical or physical exceptionalities must be provided by the student’s doctor and must include a statement of diagnosis outlining the nature of the exceptionality or illness; a summary 7

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

of the symptoms including severity, duration and intensity; a description of expected progress or stability of the exceptionality; and a summary of how the exceptionality might impact the student’s ability to take part in the Hillfield Strathallan College program. For mental disorders, documentation must include the following: a statement of the nature of the disability, including the DSM-V diagnosis; a summary of symptoms, including severity, duration and intensity; a description of expected progress or stability of the impact of the disability; and how the disability might affect the student’s ability to take part in the Hillfield Strathallan College program. In order for a student in need of a temporary therapeutic support to receive reasonable accommodation, he/she must be under the care of a qualified medical practitioner and be receiving treatment to address his/her difficulties. Documentation should explain the disability or illness, including the presenting symptoms, their severity, and the expected duration of the disability or illness. A statement regarding how the disability or illness will impact the student’s ability to participate in the Hillfield Strathallan College program is also required. Based upon the circumstances, temporary supports may be provided, at the discretion of Hillfield Strathallan College, while the student is receiving treatment. Such supports will be reassessed on a regular basis and may be modified or discontinued depending on individual circumstances.


All documentation should be sent directly to the appropriate school division’s Learning Services Specialist and/or the appropriate School Principal. The documentation will be reviewed by the administration and selected trained designates (e.g. College nurse, College Counsellor, Learning Services Specialist) for interpretation and in preparation for the creation of an HSC Individual Learning Plan (ILP) which will outline the accommodations and learning supports that HSC is able to provide for the student. In all situations where sensitive and private information regarding a student is being shared, HSC will abide by its privacy policies and the relevant privacy legislation to protect this entrusted information.

As such, any information shared with the College related to the private medical, physical, socialemotional, mental health or cognitive abilities of a student will be held in the strictest confidence. Only the necessary details will be shared with the educators who need to be aware of a student’s situation in order to provide that student with the necessary supports and accommodations. Any documentation that the parent/ guardians share with the school regarding a student’s situation will be appropriately stored, either in a locked location in an administrator’s office or in the student’s Ontario Student Record (OSR), which is governed by an equally stringent set of Ministry of Education mandated access regulations.

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

8


IMPORTANCE OF PARENT/GUARDIAN PARTNERSHIP & COMMUNICATION Hillfield Strathallan College is committed to working collaboratively with parent/guardians. Developing respectful relationships between home and school aids in ensuring that open, honest, two-way communication remains the norm at HSC. The College believes strongly that students are best supported when the student, parent/guardian, teacher, and school administration are all working together. Clearly defined and transparent/guardian learning outcomes can only be

9

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

realized when all parties are operating with the same set of facts and information is being mutually shared. As such, HSC expects that parent/guardians will make every effort to share important information with the school. In return, the College is committed to ensuring that our students and parent/guardians are kept well informed and that they are included in all of the key decisions related to the student’s learning at HSC.


UNIVERSAL DESIGN FOR LEARNING Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a research-based framework that addresses learner diversity at the beginning of the curricular design and planning effort. Using UDL to design both academic goals and curriculum opens the potential to dramatically change how we teach, how students engage in learning, and how we measure what students learn. Using UDL principles allows us to embed flexibility into all aspects of instruction from the outset of the learning process, rather than trying to retro-fit a rigid curriculum, set of instructional materials, or test for each student who happens to learn in a different way. Universal Design for Learning helps HSC teachers to meet the challenge of teaching a diverse group of individual learners by promoting flexible instructional materials, differentiated pedagogical techniques, and varied assessment strategies. The goal of UDL is to present school subjects in a manner that allows all learners to access the curricular information, while also allowing learners different ways to demonstrate their knowledge. By applying the following principles of Universal Design for Learning, HSC teachers are able to be more innovative in their practice and create genuine learning outcomes which are more aligned with a student’s individual interests and passions.

• Representation: UDL offers students the opportunity to access curricular information in more than one format. For example, textbooks are primarily visual; but, by providing other non-text sources such as audio, video and hands-on learning activities, in addition to the textbook source, students are able to access the material in whichever way is best suited to their individual learning style. • Action and expression: UDL provides students with more than one way to interact with curricular materials and demonstrate what they have learned. For example, teachers can measure and assess the level of a student’s learning using pencil-and-paper tests, oral presentations, via classroom observation, or via group projects, etc. By providing students with a choice in how they demonstrate their learning, teachers will have a much better opportunity to observe and quantify the actual learning that has taken place. • Engagement: UDL looks for different ways to motivate students. Allowing students to have choice in what they learn, how they learn it, and cocreating assignments that feel relevant to their lives are some examples of how teachers can sustain students interest.

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

10


INTERVENTION TEAM APPROACHES FOR SUPPORTING LEARNERS Hillfield Strathallan College believes in the adage that “it takes a village to raise a child”. As such, when students encounter challenges and/ or require specific supports and accommodations for their learning, a number of different professionals within a school division and across the College come together in a teamlike fashion to discuss the student’s situation, brainstorm support mechanisms, and determine an action plan aimed at supporting the individual needs of the learner. While each school division at HSC has its own system for facilitating its intervention team work, all of the intervention teams across the College operate under the premise of meeting individual student needs. Those needs may come to the attention of the intervention team based upon a student’s performance, or via a concern expressed by a parent/ guardian, or from a classroom teacher who brings the concerns forward to the intervention team via the “noticing a student” process. Once the student’s concerns are

11

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

known by the intervention team, the group then meets to discuss the student and share insights as to how best to support the individual. In each of the four HSC school divisions, the intervention team comprises the Learning Services Specialist, selected members of the Student Success team, various members of the school’s administrative leadership team (Vice Principals and/or the Principal), and any teachers who are central to the student’s learning program (home form teacher or tutorial leader). In addition, the College Counsellor and the College Nurse may also be a member of a school’s intervention team. In the case of an international student, the ESL Coordinator would also join the intervention discussions. Finally, in the event that a student has suffered a concussion and is under HSC’s “return to learn” protocols, the individual responsible for coordinating return to learn in the respective school division may also attend intervention team meetings.


ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES IN SUPPORTING STUDENT LEARNING AT HSC To provide parent/guardians with a better understanding of the various roles and responsibilities that come into play at HSC when we support student learning, the following information details the individuals who are involved in the process: The HSC Student (age & stage dependent) • Understands the academic accommodations that are being provided and uses these accommodations in support of his/her learning needs (e.g., individualized teaching and assessment strategies, human support, individualized equipment); • Demonstrates an understanding of his/her Individual Learning Plan (ILP) and works actively to achieve the stated goals and expectations within that plan; • Monitors his/her progress towards goals and maintains awareness of how grades and/or marks will be generated for report cards (as age appropriate); • Considers the information in the ILP when developing and reviewing his or her annual education plan (in Grades 9–12). The HSC Parent/Guardian • Provides up-to-date information about their child as it relates to the child’s learning (e.g., recent assessment reports); • Provides important information that will assist in the development and implementation of their child’s educational program (e.g., the talents and skills their child demonstrates in the home and community; their child’s likes, dislikes, learning styles, interests, and reactions to various situations); • Reinforces and extend the educational efforts of the teachers, Learning Services Specialist, and the school by providing opportunities for their child to practice and maintain skills in the home; • Provides feedback to the Learning Services Specialist on the child’s transfer of skills from school to the home and the broader community setting; • Maintains open communication with the school and supports the homeschool partnership. The Classroom Teacher • Ensures that they are knowledgeable about, and supportive of, the Learning Services programs within their respective schools and across the College; • Knows which of the students they teach require learning service supports and apply the required accommodations, strategies, and provisions (as per ILP mandates);

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

12


• Acts as an advocate for their student’s academic and learning needs, calling upon additional supports from tutorial leaders/home form teachers and School Leadership Teams as required; • Provides additional out-of-class academic support as a standard of practice, ensuring that additional help schedules are clearly communicated to students and parent/guardians; • Follows the “noticing a student” process (as identified by their respective school) when they identify that a student is struggling with his/her academic program; • Collaborates with Learning Service faculty and School Leadership Teams for parent/guardian communications regarding potential student learning challenges, assessment, and evaluation; • Attends professional development sessions geared to enhancing their practice when it comes to supporting identified learners; • Applies best practices in terms of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), differentiated learning, personalized learning, assessment, and evaluation as outlined by HSC’s Guiding Educational Principles and instructive professional documents such as Growing Success, 2010. The Tutorial Leader/Home Form Teacher • Beyond all of the responsibilities included above for classroom teachers, the home form teacher (M2/PK2 through Grade 7) or tutorial leader (Grades 8 through 12) is also responsible for providing additional pastoral care for any students who may be struggling. That may involve additional communications and meetings with parent/guardians, coordinating work schedules for the student across multiple subject areas, or attending intervention team meetings to provide insight into a student’s progress.

13

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL


The Learning Services Specialist • Is a key member of the intervention and/or student success team in his/ her school; • In coordination with the School Leadership Team, establishes, monitors, and supports best practices for providing learning accommodations to students with ILPs; • Develops Individual Learning Plans (ILPs) for those students who have a medically identified learning exceptionality based upon official documentation (i.e., psychoeducational assessment); • In coordination with school administration and school intervention team, develops, monitors and supports Student Success Plans (SSPs) for non-identified students who require academic support due to various temporary external reasons (e.g., acute or chronic medical issues, socialemotional challenges, extended school absence, etc.); • Collaborates with and supports other HSC Learning Services faculty to ensure best practice is in action at HSC to support students across the whole College; • Provides consultation, in-service and training/support for classrooms teachers to ensure effective implementation of the required academic accommodations and support strategies for students (e.g., examples of Universal Design best practices); • Provides learning support for students individually, in small groups and in the regular classroom settings to enable students to address obstacles to their learning; • In consultation with the School Leadership Team, facilitates meetings with teachers and parent/guardians to enhance the shared understanding of a student’s learning needs and further strengthen the home-school partnership; • Acts as liaison in consultation with school administration with external professionals for assessments and debriefing; • In coordination with the School Leadership Teams, plans, coordinates, and facilitates the transition meetings for students moving from Grade4/ M9 into Grade 5 and Grade 8 into Grade 9, including classroom teachers and school administration in these meetings; • Ensures that ongoing, timely communication with parent/guardians occurs regarding students who are identified, on a student success plan, or who have been flagged via the noticing a student process. Individual School Intervention Teams & Student Success Faculty • Provides on-going review and monitoring of student progress within their respective schools with the aim of identifying Student Success Plans (SSPs) for non-identified learners and providing feedback regarding the progress of identified learners who have official HSC ILPs.

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

14


The HSC College Counsellor • The College Counsellor is an essential member of the intervention team in all four divisions of the College. The Counsellor attends intervention team meetings and provides detailed information regarding the socialemotional well-being of students as required. School Principals & School Leadership Teams • Ensure the implementation of the learning services policies and protocols within their schools, adhering to College-wide expectations while also managing any school-specific aspects of their Learning Services programs; • Encourage classroom teachers to be the first line of support and advocacy for their students; • Educate and support classroom teachers in understanding the role they play in supporting students; • Assist the Learning Services faculty in monitoring the number of students who access student success services; • Monitor the completion of the HSC ILPs within the agreed timelines, signing each ILP to establish a binding agreement between the College and the family; • Support the Learning Services faculty to ensure that all students receive the supports that are outlined in the ILP; • Ensure student success strategies are included as an important part of staff learning and professional development. Deputy Head of College • Collaborates with the HSC Learning Services Team (Learning Services Specialists & College Counselor) and the Academic Team to develop the statement of philosophy for Learning Services at HSC; • Collaborates with the HSC Learning Services Team and the Academic Team to develop policies and protocols for Learning Services at HSC; • Ensures consistency in all aspects of the Learning Services program at the College level, allowing for age/stage differences that may exist between the four schools; • Collaborates with the HSC Learning Services Team to establish a “recommended list” of psychologists and service providers; • Supports PD & training facilitated by the HSC Learning Services Team; • Leads intervention discussions with Learning Services faculty and School Principals when there are students who are encountering significant learning challenges that require exceptional supports extending beyond the standard ILP at HSC.

15

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL


LEARNING SERVICES AT HSC Hillfield Strathallan College takes great pride in its Learning Services programs and recognizes that these programs play a central role in ensuring that all of the students at HSC have a rich source of support to draw upon when they encounter challenges with their learning. Each of the four school divisions across the College has a Learning Services Specialist who coordinates the Learning Services programs within their respective schools. While there may be minor differences between the four programs due to age and stage reasons, the following core tenets related to learning services remain consistent across the College: • There will be cohesion in approach, policy and services across the College so that faculty, parent/guardians and students will know what to expect from learning services within their own school and between grade/ school transitions; • Learning services should aspire to build equity rather than equality (i.e., within policy limits, HSC aims to provide each student with what they need, rather than aiming to treat all students equally or the same); • Learning services will be inclusive in nature and will include ongoing individual support systems as well as dedicated user-fee programs (e.g., GOAL, speech pathology etc.);

• Support provided to students by teachers, learning services faculty, and administration will occur through a highly collaborative, team-based approach; • All support services at HSC function much more effectively when there is a strong homeschool partnership founded in clear, honest, two-way communication; • Over the course of a student’s HSC educational journey, academic supports will evolve in an age/stage appropriate fashion; • Learning services will be delivered in a positive, proactive, individualized, empathetic, and transparent fashion; • In an age and stage supported fashion, learning services strives to develop self-advocacy skills within all students, helping them to acquire the most effective strategies to manage their own unique learning needs and better understand their own learning style/preference.

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

16


WELLNESS SUPPORTS AT HSC At Hillfield Strathallan College, we believe in educating the whole child, and a major component of that task requires the College to pay close attention to the wellness dimension of a student’s life and school experiences. Wellness is a term that speaks to an individual’s positive sense of self, spirit and belonging that is achieved when their cognitive, emotional, social and physical needs are being met. A student’s level of wellness depends on many factors, from the nature of their social and family interactions to their emotional, spiritual, physical and mental health. At HSC, we know that positive childhood experiences, physical and emotional safety, and the support

17

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

of caring adults not only help to shape the day-to-day morale of students, but these factors also help students to develop a positive sense of self and resiliency. As such, HSC actively incorporates a wide variety of opportunities into its school life programs that are geared towards developing and promoting student wellness. Examples of our wellness programs include: Girl Power (Early Education Schools), Wellness Committee (Middle School), Resiliency Group (Middle School), and the Wellness Club (Senior School). For further information regarding additional wellness programs and support for students across the College, please speak directly to the appropriate school personnel.


COLLEGE COUNSELLOR The social and emotional well-being of a student is central to his or her abilities to successfully perform in an academic learning environment and to be fully engaged in the schooling experience. At Hillfield Strathallan College, students and their parent/guardian are able to access psychoeducational counselling, consultation, support, and psychotherapy through the College Counsellor. The College Counsellor at HSC is not qualified to make any diagnosis nor provide treatment outside the realm of his/ her professional expertise. Psychoeducational Counselling Psychoeducational counselling between students and the HSC College Counsellor involves the explicit teaching of the social and emotional skills required for students to develop resiliency and optimal well-being. Some examples of areas that can be supported through psychoeducational counselling include managing test-taking anxiety, resolving social conflicts, self-regulation, and the effective management of one’s emotional state. These skills and strategies are developed via role play, repetition, and various targeted activities geared towards meeting the student’s particular needs. During the psychoeducational counselling process, the College Counsellor monitors the growth and development of the specific target skills and works alongside teachers and other administrators who are

actively involved in the promotion of the student’s specific social and emotional needs. This inclusive approach to counselling provides a highly effective “wrap-around” model of support. Typically, the duration of psychoeducational counselling includes up to ten (10) one-onone sessions between the student and the College Counsellor. That said, each individual’s needs are different and, as such, the total number of counselling sessions may vary depending on the situation and needs. At any point during the counselling process, the College also reserves the right to conclude its counselling services and/or refer the student on to outside professional services, if the College Counsellor deems that to do so would be in the best interests of the student or if the required care is of a duration and nature which are greater than HSC can realistically support. Consultation Services The College Counsellor is available on an as-needed basis to offer advice to parents/guardians and students regarding social, emotional, and learning concerns. Furthermore, the Counsellor is available to make recommendations, directing students and parents/guardians to possible community organizations for service. Parents/guardians wishing to access the College Counsellor for consultation purposes simply need to call or email them. JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

18


Support In situations where a student is under the care of an outside professional who has enacted a plan of support for that student, the College Counsellor is available to act as a liaison between that outside professional, the student, and the school. In these cases, the College Counsellor will monitor the student while he/she is at school and will provide support as directed by the outside professional.

It is important for students and parents/guardians to recognize that the scope, scale, and nature of a support plan may change over time. The specific accommodations, supports, and strategies outlined in the initial support plan are reviewed by the College on both a short-term basis (every few months) and over the long-term (year-over-year as the student progresses through the grade levels). The College reserves the right, This shared-care model is ideal for in consultation with the student ensuring that all of the individuals and parent/guardian, to add and/ working for the betterment of or remove any accommodation or the student are aligned and that support strategy to a student’s planned communication is clear and transparent support in order to ensure that the between all parties. For a shared-care plan remains aligned to the student’s approach to occur, the parents/guardians current level of need. and/or student (over the age of 16) must provide written consent allowing for Psychotherapy the shared disclosure of information between the College Counsellor and As a Registered Psychotherapist, the the outside professional. College Counsellor is able to provide psychotherapy services. Psychotherapy In those situations where the student is the use of psychological methods, is not yet under the care of an outside particularly those based upon professional, the College Counsellor regular therapeutic interactions may be able to provide short-term, inbetween the Counsellor and student, house support services for the student. to help the student change and The scope and duration of this support overcome problems in desired ways. is at the discretion of the College Psychotherapy aims to improve an Counsellor and, as such, it is the individual's well-being and mental responsibility of the College Counsellor health as it works to resolve or mitigate to make recommendations to the troublesome behaviors, beliefs, student and his/her parent/guardian compulsions, thoughts, or emotions; regarding outside support when the and to improve the individual’s ability student’s needs exceed the College’s to build healthy relationships and capacity for in-house support. These develop appropriate social skills. recommendations should not be In situations where this level of mistaken as a diagnosis, as making a specialized service is required, diagnosis is beyond the scope of the the College Counsellor will assess College Counsellor’s expertise. the suitability of specific cases to 19

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL


determine whether psychotherapy, at school, delivered through the College Counsellor, is in the student’s best interest. The College reserves the right to exclude any student from receiving specific psychotherapy services based upon the assessment of that student’s needs by the College Counsellor. If that assessment points to the fact that a student’s needs are beyond the realm of expertise of HSC’s College Counsellor, the Counsellor may recommend outside psychotherapy services to the student and his/her parent/guardians. In making this assessment, the College Counsellor is not making a diagnosis; rather, the College Counsellor is acknowledging the limits of his/ her expertise and is offering an alternative avenue through which the student may access treatment. Process for Accessing College Counselling Services Students and families inquiring about the need to access the services of the HSC College Counsellor should

make direct contact with the College Counsellor via email, telephone, or a pre-arranged face-to-face meeting. The College Counsellor will gather all of the relevant information related to the student’s needs and identify an initial plan of action to support the student. That plan may or may not involve other school personnel, family members, or outside professionals. In situations where other parties are actively involved in the action plan, the student must consent to the involvement of these additional individuals. If the student is under the age of 16, that student’s parent/ guardians must provide the College Counsellor with their prior verbal or written consent to allow their child to meet with the College Counsellor. In the event that a student and his/ her parent/guardians are entering into psychotherapy or formalized counselling services with the College Counsellor, written consent must be provided via HSC’s Statement of Understanding.

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

20


HSC INDIVIDUAL LEARNING PLANS (ILP) For an Individual Learning Plan (ILP) to be created at HSC, a student must have undergone a formal psychoeducational assessment performed by a registered psychologist, or have been diagnosed by a qualified medical professional and under that individual’s care. The full report from that assessment should be shared with the Learning Services Specialist and/or the appropriate School Principal so that an ILP can be generated which is based upon the diagnostic information and recommendations contained in the assessment. Drawing upon the information contained in the formal psychoeducational or medical assessment, a draft ILP is created by the Learning Services Specialist in the appropriate school divisions at HSC. The draft ILP is then shared with the School Principal and, once approved, the Learning Services Specialist then reviews the document with the student (if age appropriate) and parent/guardians. An ILP takes on official status at HSC once the student (if age appropriate), parent/guardians, Learning Services Specialist, and School Principal have reviewed, agreed upon, and signed the document. When the Principal’s signature is added to the document, the ILP becomes a binding agreement between the family and the College, stipulating the specific learning strategies and academic accommodations that must be

21

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

in place to support the student’s learning at HSC. In order to ensure an ILP is current and remains relevant to a student’s learning needs, HSC requires all students with ILPs to undergo subsequent psycho educational assessments at least every three years. For students in their final two years of secondary school who are planning to pursue post-secondary study, an updated psycho educational assessment needs to occur in either their Grade 11 or Grade 12 year for post-secondary institutions to be able to continue learning supports beyond HSC. Under the direction of the Learning Services Specialist, an annual review of ILPs will be conducted with the students (if age appropriate) and parent/guardians within the first four weeks of the new academic year. Should updates be required to an existing ILP based upon an updated psycho-educational assessment, the Learning Services Specialist will create a new ILP for the student which will then undergo the same approval process that took place with the original ILP (i.e., parent/guardian review and Principal sign-off). If both the parent/guardians and the school agree that there are no changes or updates required to the existing plan, then the current version of the ILP will remain in place as the binding agreement until the next review cycle.


STUDENT-SUCCESS PLANS (SSP) Situations can arise where students undergo a formal psychoeducational assessment and discover that they do not have a learning disability. When this occurs, the College is not able to put together a formal ILP (Individualized Learning Plan) that binds the school to an agreedupon documented set of academic accommodations. That said, the College does recognize that students who have not met the criteria for an identified learning disability may still require supports above and beyond the best practices of teaching that emerge from the universal

design for learning principles. In such cases, the Learning Services Specialist, in conjunction with the Intervention Team, student, and parent/guardians, will assess the student’s needs and, if appropriate, put together a Student Success Plan (SSP) to assist the student with their academic progress. This plan is not a detailed as an ILP, but it does speak to the strategies that the student and his/her teachers should employ to support learning. Student Success Plans are non-binding and are temporary in nature. They are not renewed on an annual basis.

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

22


IDENTIFIED LEARNING CHALLENGES & AVAILABLE ACCOMMODATIONS When a student has undergone a formal psychoeducational assessment conducted by a registered psychologist, or has been assessed by a trained medical professional who specializes in the diagnosis, care and treatment of students whose learning abilities have been compromised due to a medical condition, that professional will provide the family with a written report detailing the student’s learning abilities, deficits, and recommended accommodations to support that student’s learning. It is then the responsibility of the parent/guardian to share that assessment report with the Learning Services Specialist and/or School Principal. A key component of the report is a list of recommended accommodations made by the psychologist or medical professional that, in their opinion, will be beneficial to the student and his/ her learning needs. The HSC Learning Services Specialist and School Principal will review that list of recommendations and make a determination as to which suggested accommodations fall within the College’s range of serviceable abilities. While the College will strive to implement as many of the recommended accommodations related to the student’s identified learning challenge(s) as possible, there may be certain accommodations and specific learning challenges that fall outside 23

JOY PURPOSEPOTENTIAL

of the College’s scope of service and/or are not possible to offer in an academic learning environment that does not allow for curricular modification of its programs. As such, the specific types of accommodations that a student can expect to have access to at Hillfield Strathallan College may vary based upon the nature of the student’s diagnosed learning challenges and the individual needs of that student. In consultation with the student, his/her parent/guardians, and any external medical professionals or paraprofessionals, the College reserves the right to deny access to any recommended accommodation that falls outside the scope of Hillfield Strathallan College’s announced academic program and/ or any accommodations that would present undue hardship to the College to implement. At Hillfield Strathallan College, the range of student learning challenges or exceptionalities that can be appropriately supported fall within the following categories: identified learning disabilities, ADHD, mental disorders, and physical challenges.


IDENTIFIED LEARNING DISABILITY A learning disability exists when there is a significant discrepancy between a student’s academic achievement and his/her assessed intellectual ability, with clinically diagnosed deficits existing in one or more of the following areas: i) receptive language (listening & reading); ii) language processing (thinking conceptualizing, integrating); iii) expressive language (talking, spelling, writing); iv) mathematical disabilities; v) nonverbal challenges; vi) executive functioning disorder; and vii) memory and processing challenges. (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition) At HSC, students with an identified learning disability can expect access to accommodations such as: • Extra time on tests (up to double time if indicated on the assessment report) • Alternate test-taking environment (quiet, lower sensory, spaces) • Use of a Scribe • Use of Assistive Technology • Access to prepared class notes • Chunking of work • Reduction of work volume without modifying the program • Visual prompts • Oral testing • Alternate scheduling of major assignments/tests to provide a minimum of 24-48 hours between assessments

The degree of access to the accommodations listed above will be dependent on the student’s psychoeducational assessment and the College’s input as to which of these accommodations are best suited to support that student’s specific and individual learning needs. All accommodations that HSC determines to be appropriate will be listed in the student’s Individual Learning Plan (ILP). It is important for parent/guardians and students to understand and accept that it is beyond the scope and expertise of any member of faculty or staff at Hillfield Strathallan College to diagnose a learning disability of any kind. In cases where a family suspects the presence of a learning disability in their child, it is the sole responsibility of the family to seek the appropriate professional services to obtain a diagnosis and subsequent treatment plan.

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

24


ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVTY DISORDER (ADHD) According to the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM5), ADHD is characterized by a “persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity or impulsivity that is more frequent and severe than is typically observed in individuals at a comparable level of development.” It is a condition characterized by a group of symptoms centered around a person's inability to sustain focused attention on a task, avoiding such tasks, and/or being easily distracted. It may also include impulsivity and hyperactivity components in certain cases. HSC students with diagnosed ADHD can anticipate access to the following types of accommodations: • Extra time on tests (up to double time if indicated on the assessment report) • Alternate test-taking environment (quiet, lower sensory, spaces) • Use of Assistive Technology • Access to prepared class notes • Chunking of work • Reduction of work volume without modifying the program • Visual prompts • Alternate scheduling of major assignments/tests to provide a minimum of 24-48 hours between assessments

25

JOY PURPOSEPOTENTIAL

It is important for parent/guardians and students to understand and accept that it is beyond the scope and expertise of any member of faculty or staff at Hillfield Strathallan College to diagnose a learning disability of any kind. In cases where a family suspects the presence of a learning disability in their child, it is the sole responsibility of the family to seek the appropriate professional services to obtain a diagnosis and subsequent treatment plan. MENTAL DISORDERS A mental disorder is broadly defined in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as a behavioural or psychological syndrome or pattern that occurs in an individual, the consequences of which result in clinically significant distress or disability for that individual. Mental disorders reflect an underlying psychobiological dysfunction that has diagnostic validity using one or more sets of diagnostic validators, and they do not occur as a result of an expected response to common life stressors or losses. The range of mental disorders identified in DSM-V covers a significant spectrum of disorders, with each disorder having its own set of symptoms, responses, and treatments. As such, it is beyond the scope and ability of Hillfield Strathallan College to reasonably provide care, support, and programming for the full range of possible mental disorders. Instead,


HSC strives to provide support and accommodations for most individuals who have received a clinical diagnosis under one of the following six categories of mental disorder: • Anxiety Disorders • Mood Disorders • Personality Disorders • Eating Disorders • Obsessive-Compulsive & Related Disorders • Trauma and Stress-related Disorders It is important for parent/guardians and students to understand and accept that it is beyond the scope and expertise of any member of faculty or staff at Hillfield Strathallan College to diagnose a mental disorder of any kind. In cases where a family suspects the presence of a mental disorder in their child, it is the sole responsibility of the family to seek the appropriate professional services to obtain a diagnosis and subsequent treatment plan. A mental disorder is one aspect of mental health and a disorder may impact learning. Such disorders must be diagnosed by a mental health professional. Once a mental disorder has been clinically diagnosed by a qualified outside paraprofessional, the family can then share the diagnosis and treatment plan with the school, providing the College Counsellor and Intervention Team with information related to how HSC can best offer support to the student in an attempt to accommodate his/her learning needs. Ideally, a shared-care situation will

be established in these cases so that the College Counsellor has full permission to advocate and care for the student’s needs during the school day, remaining in regular two-way communication with the student, his/her parent/guardians, and the outside paraprofessional. At Hillfield Strathallan College, when looking to identify the appropriate academic accommodations to support a student with a mental disorder, we use the support guidelines that are typically considered by post-secondary institutions. These accommodations include: i) extra time on tests and exams; ii) the ability to write tests and exams in an alternate location; iii) the ability to alternately schedule major tests, assignments, and exams so that there is a minimum of 24 to 48 hours between assessments; and iv) the ability to seek occasional extensions on assignments in times of significant challenge or distress. That said, due to the unique and individual needs that are associated with mental disorders, HSC considers every set of accommodations on a case-by-case basis. PHYSICAL CHALLENGES Physical challenges that impact the learning abilities of students can take several different forms, ranging from various physical mobility issues, to sensory deficit issues (vision, hearing), to speech challenges that make standard communication difficult. At HSC, every effort is made to implement special supports within the learning environment to provide JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

26


students with a physical challenge the same opportunity for educational achievement that other same-aged pupils without exceptionalities have. When students are presented with a physical challenge, the College meets with the student, parent/ guardians, and appropriate external paraprofessionals to consider the types of supports and accommodations that could be implemented into HSC’s program to aid the student with their learning. These types of supports are considered on a case-by-case basis and, as such, HSC cannot delineate a predetermined set of specific

supports prior to reviewing each separate case. It is important for parent/guardians and students to understand and accept that it is beyond the scope and expertise of any member of faculty or staff at Hillfield Strathallan College to diagnose a physical exceptionality of any kind. In cases where a family suspects the presence of a physical exceptionality in their child, it is the sole responsibility of the family to seek the appropriate professional services to obtain a diagnosis and subsequent treatment plan.

STUDENT BEHAVIOUR AND HSC CODE OF CONDUCT While there can be a direct correlation between the presence of a learning challenge or disability and a student’s behaviour, it is important for students and parent/guardians to understand and accept that Hillfield Strathallan College has a clearly articulated Code of Conduct that all members of the HSC community must abide by at all times. This means that if a student behaves in a fashion that is outside of HSC’s Code of Conduct due to the fact that he/she is frustrated or experiencing challenges related to their learning disability, the student is still responsible and accountable for his/ her behaviours. While HSC will take into account the student’s challenges and the various circumstances surrounding 27

JOY PURPOSEPOTENTIAL

the negative behaviour, the College cannot overlook the actions and behaviours of any student, especially if those actions and behaviours impact the safety of the student, the safety of other students, or adversely affect the positive climate and culture of the school. For further information on the HSC Code of Conduct, which all families have agreed to abide by as part of the admissions status at the College, please refer to The HSC Handbook, which is linked to the College’s website. If students or parent/ guardians have any questions about the Code of Conduct or how it is applied to behavioural situations at the College, please connect with your School Principal or the Deputy Head of College.


DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN ACCOMMODATIONS AND MODIFICATIONS It is important for students and parent/guardians to understand the differences between academic accommodations and modifications, and to recognize and accept that Hillfield Strathallan College does not modify its announced academic program. This means that the College is only able to support the identified learning needs of a student through the range of academic accommodations available at HSC. In situations where a student’s identified learning needs require a program or course to be modified, HSC may no longer be able to meet that student’s learning needs. The term accommodation refers to the planned adjustment of selected teaching strategies, assessment and evaluation practices, and other supports that provide a student with an identified learning disorder the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to meet grade level expectations in a particular academic course. Accommodations set up equity by putting into place academic supports that help to circumvent the student’s learning disabilities and allow them to access curricular information and demonstrate their learning in ways that are better aligned with their specific learning needs. Accommodations do not alter any of the provincial learning expectations for the grade level or course designation and, when offered to a student, these accommodations must be documented and monitored via the student’s ILP (Individualized Learning Plan).

The term modification refers to when changes are made to the content of the learning expectations which are different from the age and/or grade level placement of a student. As such, modifications alter the grade level expectations of the provincial curriculum. The reason that HSC is unable to offer modifications to students is that the College’s academic programs are all geared towards post-secondary preparation and, once a student reaches secondary school, if the learning expectations are significantly altered (modified) in a credit course, the integrity of that course is compromised. In other words, to modify a course means that we are effectively offering a different course that is no longer equivalent to the initial credit course.

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

28


ASSISTIVE LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES AT HSC The use of assistive technologies, both as part of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) for all students and as a way to provide targeted accommodations for identified learners, is fully embraced at HSC. Through MyHSC, our on-line learning management system, and the College’s BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) program from Grades 5 through 12, the College actively promotes the use of technology in the learning process. Teachers and IT personnel provide students and parent/guardians/guardians with training on how to take advantage of these technologies to better organize, coordinate, and leverage information

related to HSC’s curricular and cocurricular programs. The use of specialized assistive technologies may also be one of the accommodations listed in an identified student’s ILP. When this is the case, it is the responsibility of the student and his/her family to ensure that the student has the appropriate hardware and software required to operate the assistive technology. The costs for any special hardware or specific software programs are not covered by the College; rather, the family is responsible for purchasing, installing, and maintaining any specialized assistive technologies.

ACADEMIC SUPPORT PROGRAMS Above and beyond the regular academic program and standard classroom experiences, Hillfield Strathallan College offers a number of different academic support programs to assist students in their learning. While many of these programs are optional in nature, where students can elect to join in as a way to augment or reinforce their learning, some of the academic support programs at HSC are schoolmandated for selected students. In these situations, the school has recognized that the student is struggling with his/her learning or is lacking in the necessary skills for success and, as a result, places the student in a specific academic

29

JOY PURPOSEPOTENTIAL

support program in an effort to bolster their skills and bring them up to par with their learning. The nature of the academic support programs varies across the four school divisions at HSC, so it is important that students and parent/ guardians wishing to access these programs speak directly with the appropriate Learning Services Specialist and/or School Principal to learn more about the program expectations, how they operate, and how students become a part of the program.


EXTERNAL PARAPROFESSIONAL SUPPORTS While HSC is very fortunate to have a highly trained and professional faculty and staff that can offer a broad range of supports and services to our student body, there are times when the needs of a student may exceed the capacity of the in-house faculty and staff at the College. In such cases, HSC is open to considering the temporary use of outside paraprofessionals in support of the student. Examples of outside paraprofessional services that HSC has called upon in the past are occupational therapy, speech and language pathology, behavioural coaching, and psychotherapy counselling. The process for including an external paraprofessional in an HSC student’s academic support plan begins with the student (age appropriate), parent/guardians, Learning Services Specialist, College Counsellor, and School Principal meeting to discuss what specific aspects of the student’s support plan require outside intervention. If it is determined that

an external paraprofessional might be of assistance, then the College will make a determination as to whether that paraprofessional will be included in the support plan and to what degree that paraprofessional’s services will be used. Typically, when external paraprofessional services are included as part of HSC’s support plan for a student, the services are of a temporary nature, may involve student withdrawal from the standard classroom, and occur under the shared-care approach. Any costs associated with hiring an external paraprofessional must be covered by the family. If at any time the College feels that the services of the external paraprofessional are no longer in the student’s best interests or that having the external paraprofessional on campus during the school day is disruptive to programming, HSC reserves the right to conclude its working relationship with that external paraprofessional.

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

30


SUPPORTING ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS AT HSC In all four school divisions at HSC, defined programs of support are available for English Language Learners (ELL students). In the two Early Education Schools (Junior School and Montessori School), the bulk of the English language support is provided by the classroom teacher and/or the Learning Services Specialist. The acquisition of language by children in early education tends to occur in a more natural and innate fashion, meaning that specific ESL (English as a Second Language) programs are not typically required. English language learners below the age of seven or eight are best served by remaining fully integrated in the regular classroom learning environment, interacting normally with their peers, and engaging with the normal curriculum expectations. In both the Middle and Senior Schools, ELL students are tested for their English language proficiency as a part of the HSC admissions process. In situations where a student’s level of language proficiency falls below grade level requirements,

31

JOY PURPOSEPOTENTIAL

students will be required to take part in specialized ESL programs. These ESL programs are fee-based, as the costs to operate these programs occur over and above the standard HSC tuition amounts. While the nature of the ESL programs varies between Middle and Senior Schools, HSC’s ESL programs all typically involve the student being removed from both the regular English class and the regular French language class so that these times in the academic day can be reassigned for structured ESL programming. ELL students are placed in small groups according to their level of English language proficiency and a trained ESL teacher works with these students to deliver a planned ESL curriculum that is aimed at bringing the student’s oral, written, and reading comprehension skills up to the regular academic level in English. For further information regarding English Language Support programs at HSC, please contact the appropriate School Principal.


ENRICHED LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES AT HSC While HSC does not currently offer a “gifted education” program, each of the four school divisions offers a number of different specialty programs aimed at providing targeted enrichment opportunities for students who have been identified by their teachers and the administration as ready for more advanced learning opportunities. The nature of the enriched learning

programs varies across the four school divisions, so it is important that students and parent/guardians wishing to access these programs speak directly with the appropriate Learning Services Specialist and/or School Principal to learn more about the program expectations, how they operate, and how students become a part of the program.

HSC POLICY ON EXTERNAL TUTORS Hillfield Strathallan College has created a policy document related to the use of external tutors. This policy document details the College’s view on how and when tutors serve a role within the intervention process, and it provides specific guidelines as to how external tutors should be coordinating their efforts and liaising with classroom teachers and the school’s administration.

Any student or parent/guardian who is considering hiring an external tutor to provide additional academic support above and beyond the supports already offered at HSC should consult the appropriate Learning Services Specialist and School Principal prior to engaging in an agreement with the external tutor.

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

32


TRANSITIONING BETWEEN HSC SCHOOL DIVISIONS One of the greatest benefits of attending Hillfield Strathallan College is that our students have the ability to participate in a seamless academic journey that begins as a toddler and culminates 16 years later when they graduate as a Grade 12 student. When one institution is charged with overseeing the care and development of a child over this extended period of time, the degree to which the school and its teachers become familiar with the individual needs, skills, and passions of a student is remarkable. Over time, the College is able to develop deep and meaningful relationships with students and their families as we work together to support the overall development of the student. As students move from grade to grade, or make the transition from one school division to the next, the knowledge and understanding about a child’s individual learning needs and preferences are able to move forward with them and be managed by teachers who are already attuned to the individual student. As part of the intervention support process in each school, the Learning Services Specialist, Student Success faculty, and school administrators are constantly reviewing and monitoring the progress of students and determining in a proactive fashion where future hurdles and challenges may lie as the student moves forward through the grade levels. When concerns come to light through the intervention team 33

JOY PURPOSEPOTENTIAL

process, students and parent/ guardians are consulted and brought into discussions as to how best to support the student. These discussions often play a major role in instigating an update to a student’s existing ILP (Individual Learning Plan) or SSP (Student Support Plan) as the school strives to remain current with its specific student support strategies. At those times when a student is transitioning from one school division to the next (i.e., Montessori 9/Grade 4 into Grade 5 or Grade 8 into Grade 9), the College requires intervention team members from both school divisions to meet and discuss student transitions, ensuring that existing support plans are adjusted or maintained to assist the student as they move onto the next stage of their HSC educational journey. These crossschool intervention meetings begin in November of the year prior to a student making the transition to the next HSC school division, and they typically wrap up in mid-January so that the School Principals and/ or their designates can reach out to families and update them regarding any concerns prior to HSC’s reenrolment process launch in late January. It is important for students and parent/guardians who are making the transition from Middle School (Grade 8) into Senior School (Grade 9) to recognize that there are some key differences in the academic program requirements at the secondary school level. These


differences are due to the fact that, as a Ministry-inspected independent school, Hillfield Strathallan College must follow the Ministry-mandated regulations related to the granting of credits. For those students with existing ILP’s who are transitioning from Grade 8 into Grade 9 at HSC, it is especially important that the parent/guardians and the student are fully aware of the differing supports that are in place between what the student may have been receiving in the Middle School versus the learning supports that are available in the Senior School. For families in this situation, the College will make contact in late November or early December of the student’s Grade 8 year and arrange for a special transition meeting to review and discuss the range of learning services and accommodations that exist in HSC’s Senior School. This meeting will involve: i) the student (as appropriate); ii) the parent/guardians; iii) the Learning Service Specialists from both the Middle and Senior Schools; and

iv) Administrators from either, or both, the Middle and Senior School Leadership teams. Should a parent/ guardian wish to include a Middle School teacher who has extensive knowledge about their child’s learning needs, and has worked successfully with that student in their classroom, the parent/guardian may request that that teacher joins in on the transition meeting. To ensure that students and parent/ guardians are fully aware of the program requirements in HSC’s high school, the College annually updates and publishes the Hillfield Strathallan College Senior School Academic Calendar and links it to the school’s website for all current and prospective families to review (www.hsc.on.ca/ ssacademiccalendar.) If after reviewing this documents students and/or parent/guardians still have further questions or wish to discuss any element of the Senior School’s academic program, they should get in touch with either the Vice Principal, Academic in the Senior School or the Senior School Principal.

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

34


COMMUNICATION PROTOCOLS WHEN QUESTIONS ARISE While HSC has done its best to ensure that we have provided our families with a rich source of information, whether that be through the Resource Board in MyHSC, parent/guardian information nights, the school’s website, or via documents such as Supporting Student Learning at Hillfield Strathallan College, we appreciate that further questions and/or concerns may still arise over the course of the school year. When this happens, it is essential that the parent/guardian does not “sit on” his/her question or concern; rather, they are encouraged to reach out to the appropriate school personnel to seek clarification and/or share their concern in a respectful fashion.

35

JOY PURPOSEPOTENTIAL

Typically, it is best to direct your question or concern to the individual with whom it is most closely related. In other words, if the question is curricular or deals with a daily classroom practice, the parent/ guardian would reach out to the individual subject teacher. In cases where the question is more general and applies across several classes, the parent/guardian would reach out to their child’s home form teacher or tutorial leader for clarification. If the concerns or questions are related to a school-wide issue, contacting either the Vice Principal or Principal would be appropriate. In the event that a parent/guardian is unsure as to where to initiate the conversation, the parent/guardian should contact the school’s administrative assistant for clarification and redirection.


CONTACT INFORMATION Below is the contact information for the faculty and staff that play key roles in supporting learning in each of the four school divisions at HSC. Parent/ guardians and students should feel comfortable reaching out to them when they have questions or concerns related to the College’s student support efforts. MONTESSORI SCHOOL Learning Services Specialist

Ms. Erica Otaguro

erica.otaguro@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 306

Vice Principal

Mrs. Erica Fraser

erica.fraser@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 289

Principal

Ms. Danielle Hourigan

danielle.houigan@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 138

JUNIOR SCHOOL Learning Services Specialist & Vice Principal

Mrs. Kelly Bent

kelly.bent@hsc.on.ca

Principal

Mrs. Shailau Spivak

shailau.spivak@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 172

MIDDLE SCHOOL Learning Services Specialist

Mrs. Tracy Espinola

tracy.espanola@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 127

Learning Services Specialist

Ms. Sarah McArthur

sarah.mcarthur@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 127

Vice Principal, Academic

Mr. Adrian Hoad-Reddick

adrian.hoadreddick@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 146

Principal

Mr. Martin Ward-Doran

martin.warddoran@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 183

SENIOR SCHOOL Learning Services Specialist

Mr. Nicholas Timms

nicholas.timms@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 198

Director of Student Success

Mrs. Linda Kemp

linda.kemp@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 180

Vice Principal, Academic

Mr. William Peat

william.peat@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 121

Principal

Mr. Rick Kunc

rick.kunc@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 273

COLLEGE-WIDE College Nurse

Ms. Sage Kavander

sage.kavander@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 197

College Counsellor

Dr. Gina Ranger

gina.ranger@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 187

Deputy Head of College

Mr. Bob Neibert

bob.neibert@hsc.on.ca

Ext. 167

JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

36


37

JOY PURPOSEPOTENTIAL


JOYPURPOSEPOTENTIAL

38


Hillfield Strathallan College Supporting Student Learning

RESPECT. INTEGRITY.

Hillfield Strathallan College 299 Fennell Avenue West Hamilton, ON L9C 1G3 Phone: 905-389-1367 Fax: 905-389-6366 hsc.on.ca

COMMUNITY. INDIVIDUALITY. DETERMINATION. Our core mission is to develop joyful and engaged students who live life with purpose. The best learning happens when students are happy to come to school, have opportunities to follow their passions, and participate in deep learning experiences that challenge them. Joyful, engaged students develop strong relationships with their peers and with the caring adults who spark and support their learning both inside the classroom and beyond. Their journey at HSC prepares students to live with purpose—to understand their world, inspire, lead, act, and make a difference in their own unique ways.

Profile for Hillfield Strathallan College

Support Student Learning  

Support Student Learning