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Searching 8

– engelsk for ungdomstrinnet

Searching kjennetegnes ved ∏ et rikt utvalg av muntlige og skriftlige tekster som gir elevene mulighet til å utvikle bred tekst- og kulturkompetanse ∏ mange autentiske tekster, noen skrevet av ungdom ∏ autentiske lyttetekster i hvert kapittel som gjør elevene kjent med dagligtale ∏ varierte arbeidsoppgaver som legger vekt på utvikling av muntlig og skriftlig språkkompetanse

∏ klare kompetansemål og evalueringsspørsmål i hvert kapittel, slik at elevene kan følge sin egen progresjon og vurdere om målene er nådd Tilleggsheftet Read and Write møter behovet for enda enklere tekster og oppgaver på ungdomstrinnet. Heftet er tilpasset elever som trenger å bedre sin leseforståelse. Searching 8 består av ∏ Learner’s Book ∏ Teacher’s Resource File ∏ Read and Write, aktivitetshefte ∏ CD-er ∏ nettsted www.gyldendal.no/searching

bokmål isbn 978-82-05-33583-7

anne-brit fenner geir nordal-pedersen

∏ tilpasset opplæring gjennom tekster med flere vanskegrader og oppgaver der elevene kan foreta valg ut fra interesse, behov og eget språknivå

Searching 8

Searching gir elevene et spennende møte med den engelskspråklige verden og ivaretar elevenes ulike behov og individuelle forutsetninger.

learner’s book

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anne-brit fenner og geir nordal-pedersen learner’s book engelsk for ungdomstrinnet

Searching


Contents 1 Travel 6 • words and expressions about travelling • how to talk and write about travelling • how to use adjectives • how to write informal letters 2 In and out of School 32 • words and expressions about school and education • some facts about the English school system • how to talk about being young • how to use the verb in the simple present tense • how to read and write poems 3 The Land Down Under 56 • facts about Australia • about the Australian Aboriginals • how to draw graphs and charts • about differences between Australian and British English • how to use it/there correctly • how to write information texts 4 Through the Year 80 • about holidays and celebrations in different countries • how to compare Norwegian celebrations with celebrations in other countries • pronouns and how to use them • how to use adjectives to compare things • how to write cards and diaries 5 London 106 • facts about London • what you can do if you visit London • how to get around in London – especially by Underground • what it may be like to live in a big city • about crime in big cities • numerals • how to ask and give directions • how to design a poster


6 Storytelling 130 • to understand stories that we listen to • how to tell stories and fairy tales • how to use the past tense of the verb • how to write stories and fairy tales 7 Comics and Cartoons 154 • about comics and cartoons • how to describe people • how to work with pictures • how to use question words • how to write interviews 8 Home of Skyscrapers 172 • facts about New York City • what it is like to live in New York • about fast food • how to express your opinion • how to write arguments 9 Holy Island and the Vikings 188 • about a period in history shared by England and Norway • about the first Viking raid on England • about the Vikings • about Norse mythology • about wildlife and seabirds in Britain • how to use adverbs • to write better texts by varied sentence connection Individual Reading 210 Second versions of texts 211 Reading to enjoy 244 Focus on Language 269 Lydskrift (Phonemic script) 296 Wordlist 297


the th h e land down under


the land down under In this chapter we will focus on learning Ω facts about Australia Ω about the Australian Aboriginals Ω how to draw graphs and charts Ω about differences between Australian and British English Ω how to use it/there correctly Ω how to write information texts

3 What do you know about Australia? Draw a mind map with 8–10 words.


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A

A. What Do You Know about Australia? task 1 Look at the pictures A to F. The texts you will hear are numbered from 1 to 6. Write the numbers in your rough book and match the letters to them.

D


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B

C

task 2 Choose one of the pictures and try to ďŹ nd out more about it. Write a short text or prepare a short talk which you can present to the rest of the class.

E

F

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B. Early Australian History 1

2

more than 40,000 years ago the Aboriginals came to Australia from Asia. In 1600, still nobody in Europe knew about the continent.

In 1606 the first European explored the west coast of Australia. It was Willem Jansz, a Dutch sea captain. Other Dutchmen followed. They called the continent New Holland.

3

4

In 1768 Captain James Cook left England on a three-year expedition to the Pacific. He landed in Botany Bay on the east coast of Australia in 1770, and claimed the whole region for Great Britain.

18 years later, on 26 January 1788, the first settlers arrived. This day is called Australia Day. These settlers were criminals. They were sent to Australia because the prisons in England were full.

Word Power Aboriginal – australsk urbeboer explore – utforske Dutch – hollandsk the Pacific – Stillehavet claim – kreve settler – nybygger prison – fengsel


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5

6

The criminals were treated like slaves. There were soldiers to guard them and they had to work hard. Some of them tried to escape, but there were not many places to go. In 1852 the transportation of criminals to Australia was stopped.

In 1797 the merino sheep was brought to Australia, and only ten years later the first shipment of wool was sent to England. Today there are about 180 million sheep in Australia.

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James Cook (1728–1779) is sometimes called the Father of Australia. He was an English sea captain who went on three expeditions to the South Pacific. On his first voyage he went to Australia. He also sailed to Tahiti, New Zealand and Hawaii. On his third voyage he was killed by natives in Hawaii.

task 3

Word Power

Work in groups

treat – behandle

Each group member thinks of a country and writes a sentence about it without writing its name. Give the sentence to your partner sitting to the right and ask him or her to write one more sentence about the same country. Repeat this until everyone in the group has written something about each of the countries. When you have finished, give the sentences to another group. They have to guess which countries you have written about.

guard – passe på escape – flykte, unnslippe transportation – transport shipment – skipslast


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C. Down under What?

E Q UATO R

The seasons in Australia are the opposite of those in Norway:

spring

September–November

summer

December–February

autumn

March–May

winter

June–August


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D. It’s Bigger than You Think

Word Power

Look at the map. Did you know that Australia was this big? In fact Australia is the smallest continent and one of the largest countries on earth.

continent – one of the seven main areas of land on the Earth: Asia, Africa, Antarctica, Australia, Europe, North America and South America.

Here are some facts:

Australia

Europe

task 4

area

7 687 000 sq.km

10 525 000 sq.km

population

20 million

730 million

population density

2.6 per sq.km

69 per sq.km

Use an encyclopedia or the Internet and find the same information about Norway, Great Britain and the USA. Draw charts or graphs to compare Australia with these three countries.

PIE CHART

LINE CHART 250

X Y

200

B

A B

BAR CHART

48% 52%

250

200

A

48% 52%

150

150

100

100

50

50

0

A

B

C

D

E

F

0

A

B

C

D

E

F


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E. The Aboriginal People

Word Power population – befolkning due to – på grunn av abuse – misbruk violent – voldelig poison – forgifte condition – forhold improve – forbedre law – lov increase – øke unemployed – arbeidsløs

the first australians were the Aboriginals. They came from Asia to Australia more than 40 000 years ago. When Captain Cook arrived in 1770 the Aboriginal population was about 500 000. But it fell quickly due to illness, alcoholic abuse and violent conflicts. The Aboriginals were peaceful people and lived by hunting kangaroos, fishing, and collecting various plants. The colonists treated them very badly. They had to live in special areas called reservations, or start working on the new farms or sheep stations. Many were hunted like animals and poisoned by settlers. By the early 1920s the Aboriginal population was down to 60 000. Today conditions for the Aboriginals are improving, and there are laws that give them the right to own their traditional land. The population has increased, and there are now about 260 000 Aboriginals in Australia. More than half of them live in cities and towns, but many still live like they have always done. Many Aboriginals are poor and have little education. They are often unemployed and live in slum-like areas.

task 5 Choose one of the following tasks and write a short text. A Look at the pictures. What do they tell you about the Aboriginals? B Write five sentences which contain facts about the Aboriginal people. C What do you know about the first European settlers in Australia?


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F. The Dreamtime The Dreamtime is the creation myth of the Aboriginals. They believe that their ancestors had magical powers and that they wandered about the Earth as humans, animals and plants, shaping the landscape. Everything was created from the same source, and everything could change into something else. A plant could become an animal, an animal a landform, a landform a man or a woman. Thus the Aboriginals believe that people, animals, birds and fish are related to each other. The word Aboriginal means the people who were here from the beginning.

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Word Power creation myth – skapelseshistorie ancestors – forfedre humans – mennesker shape – forme source – kilde landform – landformasjon related to – i slekt med


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Longer version on page 216

G. An Aboriginal Myth The aboriginal culture is the oldest in the world, but the Aboriginals had no written language so the history and culture of the tribe were passed on from father to son, mother to daughter. Today we only have fragments of their myths, legends and cave paintings. This is a myth about how the first baby was born.

Word Power tribe – stamme fragment – del, stykke cave painting – hulemaleri plain – slette

The first men and women A woman travelling north and a man on his way south met on a plain. They began to talk. The man asked, “Where are you from?” The woman answered, “From the south. Where do you come from?” “From the north. Are you alone?” “Yes.” “Then will you be my wife?” “Yes, I will be your woman.” In this way they “got married”. For the first time a man and a woman lived together. They spent their days fishing and hunting. But


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then they began to think that nobody would remember them when they died. “We have no baby,” said the woman. “If birds, animals and insects can have babies, then we should have a baby too.” The man agreed. “I shall make a baby of clay. You can nurse it.” “Yes,” she said. “You can do that, but you must place it in my body to give it life.” The man was surprised, but he had to agree that a baby made of clay would be useless unless it were alive. He dug clay and formed it into a little man. “Place it in my body,” the woman said, and he did. And, when the woman gave birth to the baby, it was alive, moving its limbs and crying. The woman put it to her breasts. “It lives!” the man said. “It is a little man. Some day he will go hunting with me. This baby is our baby, the first ever to be born of woman.” He left the mother and baby and went hunting. When he returned he looked at the baby again. He said, “Our baby has no hair!” He gathered grass and placed it on the baby’s head. “Now you look like a real boy,” he said proudly. “We shall live here and watch him grow into a man.” The woman was happy. “What shall we call our baby?” she asked. “We shall call it Yauaanamaka – Trample-the-Hair, for here I have trampled on the grass that is now our baby’s hair. In the years to come more babies will be born, more and more, until the world is full of babies. This will be their totem centre where men will trample the grass for the babies their wives will bear.”

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Word Power clay – leire

task 6 Choose one or two of the following tasks: A Write a summary of the myth. B Work in pairs and retell the story in your own words. C Practise the dialogue with a partner and perform it in front of the class. D This is an Aboriginal myth. All religions have a story of the creation of man. Write about the one you know best, for example about Adam and Eve.

nurse – stelle dig – grave limb – lem gather – samle trample – trampe flat totem centre – (religiøst) samlingssted creation – skapelse


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H. Wildlife australia has some of nature’s strangest creatures. Many of them are not found anywhere else on earth. The reason is that for millions of years Australia has been cut off from other continents. Many of the animals in Australia are marsupials, in fact, most of the world’s marsupials are found here.

“This fell out of your pocket. Always glad to help a fellow marsupial.”

Word Power marsupial – animal such as a kangaroo. Female marsupials have a pouch for carrying their babies. creature – skapning bear – bjørn claw – klo pouch – pung cub – unge burrow – underjordisk gang roomy – stor

The koala The first white settlers called the koala a native bear, but it is not a member of the bear family at all. It is a marsupial. The koala lives up in the trees, sleeping during the day and becoming more active in the evening. It is about the size of a large teddy-bear, with very strong claws for gripping trees. It eats almost a kilo of leaves a day, but only from a few special trees. The koala has a pouch which opens downwards. At birth the cub climbs into the mother’s pouch where it stays for five to six months. Then the cub takes to riding on her back. The wombat The wombat is about 1.3 metres in length and weighs more than 30 kilos. It is an excellent digger and builds a long burrow under rocks and heavy tree roots, with tunnels and roomy spaces. During hot weather, the wombat stays in its cool, damp home, but on cooler evenings it goes outside. The wombat’s food is roots, grasses, bark, leaves and vegetables. Like other marsupials, the female has a pouch.


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task 7 The texts you will hear describe three more animals which are found only in Australia. On the worksheet there are four statements about each animal which are either true or false. As you listen, tick the correct answers.

tasks 8 Choose one of the following tasks: A Write a short account of two animals which live in your district. Imagine you are going to explain to a foreigner what they look like, where you can find them and what they live on. Give as much information as possible. B Write a description of an animal. Read it aloud in class and ask the others to guess which animal you have described. 9 The koala was the model for

the popular teddy bear. Try to find out where the word “teddy bear” comes from.

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I. My First Impressions of Australia Emily, a young girl from Bury St. Edmunds in England, visited Australia last winter. When she returned, we asked her what her first impressions had been. This is what she said:

Word Power jellyfish – manet spider – edderkopp snake – slange

the first thing I noticed after arriving in Australia from England (in February) was, of course, the climate. I stepped off the plane to be met with 30-degree heat and bright sunshine. Having left England with snow, wind and minus 12 degrees, I dreamed about beautiful beaches and travelling around in the perfect weather. However, my enthusiasm was quickly reduced by warnings not to swim in the sea because of deadly jellyfish, not to swim in the rivers because of the “crocs” and to be careful about dangerous spiders and snakes. The Australians do not take the threat of these dangers too seriously. In fact, their biggest worry is the sun (due to the lack of ozone above the country). It is impossible to buy a sun


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cream which is lower than factor 15. As one woman pointed out to me, it is easy to tell the Aussies from the tourists as they are the ones without the suntans! The Australians are extremely friendly and willing to help a traveller. Especially in the outback, the phrase of “G’day mate” is followed by a smile and a “Can I help?” which is quite different from the British. The food generally is delicious, and it is easy to put on weight with all the “barbies” (barbecues) and “sangers” (sandwiches). A totally unique delicacy are “Roo burgers” (kangaroo burgers) which apparently taste just like chicken. As Australians don’t spend so much time doing things indoors as we have to for a large part of the year, most young people are very sporty and enjoy cricket, soccer and Australian rules football as well as all kinds of water sports. However, Americanisation is sweeping the country and many people favour watching trashy American tv. The sheer size of Australia is hard to understand when you come from a small country like England. The hugeness of the country means that there is a great variety of scenery. From the dusty red central area around the famous Ayers Rock to the tropical rain forest of north Queensland as well as thousands of miles of fantastic, unspoilt coastlines, this really is a beautiful country. This is commonly thought by the Australians and summed up nicely by one person who told me; “You pommies must be really stupid to send all your convicts over here to a country that is far better than your own. I bet they couldn’t believe their luck!”

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Word Power outback – ødemark delicious – herlig unique – enestående apparently – tilsynelatende trashy – dårlig sheer – her: bare scenery – landskap dusty – støvete pommy – engelskmann i Australia convict – straffange

task 10 Write a short prose text or a poem about a place you would like to visit. Present the text to the class either as a short talk or as a poster with pictures.


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Longer version on page 218

J. Storm Boy by Colin Thiele Colin Thiele was born in Eudunda, South Australia, in 1920. He served in the RAAF during the Second World War. After the war he taught in high schools and colleges. He retired in 1981. Colin Thiele has published almost 80 books. Among them are The Fire in the Stone, Storm Boy and Poems in My Luggage. His work has won many awards and has been translated and published all over the world.

Word Power save – redde chick – kylling sanctuary – reservat nest – rede

Storm Boy and his father, Hideaway Tom, live alone in a hut on the beach. The only other person who lives near them is Fingerbone Bill, an Aboriginal, who becomes their friend.

How Storm Boy got his name one day some campers went down to the beach. But a storm came in from the west. The campers ran back. Suddenly one of them stopped and pointed. “Look! Look!” A boy was wandering down the beach all alone. He was happy, stopping now and then to pick up shells or talk to a bird. “He must be lost!” cried the camper. “I’ll run and save him.” But when he turned round, the boy had gone. They couldn’t find him anywhere. The campers asked for help as soon as they could get back to town: “There’s a little boy lost on the beach,” they cried. “Hurry, or we’ll be too late to save him.” But the postman smiled. “No need to worry,” he said. “That’s Hideaway’s little boy. He’s your boy in the storm.” And from then on everyone called him Storm Boy. Storm Boy saves three pelican chicks Some miles from the place where Storm Boy and his father lived, there was a bird sanctuary. No one was allowed to hurt the birds there. But one morning Storm Boy found everything in chaos. Three or four young men had gone into the sanctuary. They had found some pelican nests, and they had killed two of the big birds. After that they had kicked the eggs about until they were all broken. Then they had gone off laughing. Storm Boy looked round sadly. Then, just as he was going to run back, he heard something. Under the broken nests were three small pelicans – still alive. Storm Boy picked them up carefully and ran back to Hideaway with them.


c hap te r 3: t h e l a n d d o w n u n d e r

Two of the baby pelicans were quite strong, but the third was sick. He was hurt and so weak that he couldn’t even hold up his head. “I don’t think he’ll live,” said Hideaway. “He’s too small and sick.” “He mustn’t die,” Storm Boy said. “He mustn’t! He mustn’t!” He placed the small bird in one of Hideaway’s scarves, and put it by the fire. All day long he watched it. Now and then he tried to give the

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Word Power quite – ganske weak – svak scarf (pl. scarves) – sjal cod-liver oil – tran


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baby bird a drop of cod-liver oil. Night came, and Storm Boy watched the sick little bird hour after hour. Then Hideaway told him to go to bed. But Storm Boy couldn’t sleep. Again and again he went to see if the baby pelican was warm enough. And in the morning it was still living. It was three days before the baby pelican was well enough to sit up and ask for food. “You’ll have to be Grandfather Pelican,” Storm Boy told Hideaway, “because their own father and mother are dead.” “Well, I can’t spend all my time catching fish for them. Look at that bird sitting up as if he owns the place.” “Oh, that’s Mr Proud,” said Storm Boy. “How do you do, Mr Proud.” Hideaway said. “And what’s your brother’s name?” “That’s Mr Ponder,” Storm Boy said. “He’s very wise.” “And what about that one?” asked Hideaway. “He’s Mr Percival. He’s been very sick.” “Welcome,” said Hideaway. “And now Grandfather Pelican must go and catch some fish.” And he went off down to his boat. And that was how Mr Proud, Mr Ponder and Mr Percival came to live with Storm Boy.

task 11 Answer the following questions: A Where do Storm Boy and his father live? B What is the name of their Aboriginal friend? C Why did the campers want to save Storm Boy? D What is a sanctuary? E How did Storm Boy find three small pelicans? Word Power proud – stolt ponder – tenke (nøye) over wise – klok

F Why did Storm Boy have to give one of the baby pelicans cod-liver oil? G What names did Storm Boy give the pelicans that he saved? H Did you like this story? Why? Why not?


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K. Waltzing Matilda Waltzing Matilda is Australia’s best known folksong. It was written in 1895 and is often regarded as the unofficial national anthem.

Once a jolly swagman camped by a billabong, Under the shade of a coolibah tree, And he sang as he watched and waited till his billy boiled, Who’ll come a-waltzing Matilda with me? chorus: Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda, Who’ll come a-waltzing Matilda with me, And he sang as he watched and waited till his billy boiled, Who’ll come a-waltzing Matilda with me? Down came a jumbuck to drink at the billabong, Up jumped the swagman and grabbed him with glee, And he sang as he shoved that jumbuck in his tucker bag, You’ll come a-waltzing Matilda with me.

Word Power matilda – sammenrullet teppe jolly – lystig, munter swagman – omreisende arbeider

(chorus) Down came the squatter mounted on his thoroughbred; Down came the troopers, one, two, three, Whose that jolly jumbuck you’ve got in your tucker bag? You’ll come a-waltzing Matilda with me. (chorus)

billabong – lite vann coolibah tree – eukalyptustre billy – kokekar jumbuck – vær (saubukk) glee – glede

Up jumped the swagman and sprang into the billabong, You’ll never catch me alive, said he, And his ghost may be heard as you pass by the billabong, Who’ll come a-waltzing Matilda with me?

tucker bag – pose for mat squatter – saueeier thoroughbred – fullblodshest troopers – ridende politi

A. B. (“Banjo”) Paterson

ghost – gjenferd


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Focus on Language Australian English Of course, the Australians speak English, but many words seem strange to an English person. While an English person would say “Good morning, how are you?”, the Aussie might greet you with “G’day mate, ’ow yer goin?”

L1 Look at the two groups of words below. Match each word from group 1 with a word from group 2.

Group 1 barbie billabong billy bush dill tucker jumbuck sheila station swag

Group 2 can/tin for boiling water countryside idiot girl/woman bundle of belongings/sleeping gear barbecue food sheep pond/waterhole large sheep or cattle farm


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There/it Here are some sentences from the texts you have read about Australia: • There are about 260 000 Aboriginals in Australia today. • There are laws that give the Aboriginals the right to own their traditional land. • On the worksheet there are three statements about each animal. • There is a famous Australian song called Waltzing Matilda. • It is the smallest continent on earth. • It is easy to put on weight. • It is not a member of the bear family.

L2 How do you translate there is/there are/it is into Norwegian? How do you explain the difference between there is/there are and it is? You can read about this on page 274. If you find it difficult, you might need some practice.

L3 Fill in there is/there are/it is in these sentences: 1 In Australia … winter in July. 2 In northern Australia … warm even in the winter. 3 In the rivers … crocodiles, and in the sea … sharks. Therefore … dangerous to swim. 4 … a lack of Ozone in the atmosphere above Australia. 5 … several different tribes of Aboriginals in Australia 6 … 3983 kilometres from the Australian east coast to the west coast. 7 When … 12 o’clock in Norway, … 9 o’clock in Sidney. 8 In Australia … a marsupial called the wombat.

L4 A Write a text about Norway where you use there is/there are/it is as much as possible. B Rewrite your text by using other words instead of there is/there are/it is. You may have to change whole sentences.

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Focus on Writing Information texts In this chapter you have read texts about Australian history, about Australia today and about the Aboriginals. These are texts that give you information. Such texts can be articles, brochures, reports or leaflets. Here are some important facts to know when you write to inform.

Language • present tense (unless you write about something that has already happened) • third person (he, she, it, they) • impersonal, formal tone • no personal opinions • to the point Structure • information introducing the topic: who, what, when, where • not necessarily in the order of events • only necessary description • concentrate on one single topic Presentation You can use one or more of the following: • bullet points • pictures • headings • tables, charts and graphs


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L5 Choose one of the following tasks: A Write a text informing the reader about a group of indigenous people (the Aboriginals of Australia, the Inuits of Greenland, the Sami People of Norway, Sweden or Finland, Native Americans, etc.). B Write about a famous traveller (Captain Cook, Leiv Ericson, Christopher Columbus, Vasco da Gama, etc.).



Questions to ask yourself: C Write about Australian wildlife. D Write about one of the British colonies.

1 What are the ďŹ ve most important things I know about Australia? 2 What else would I like to know about Australia? 3 Why would I like/not like to visit Australia? 4 What kind of statistics am I able to use? 5 How have my writing skills improved?


B

Searching 8

– engelsk for ungdomstrinnet

Searching kjennetegnes ved ∏ et rikt utvalg av muntlige og skriftlige tekster som gir elevene mulighet til å utvikle bred tekst- og kulturkompetanse ∏ mange autentiske tekster, noen skrevet av ungdom ∏ autentiske lyttetekster i hvert kapittel som gjør elevene kjent med dagligtale ∏ varierte arbeidsoppgaver som legger vekt på utvikling av muntlig og skriftlig språkkompetanse

∏ klare kompetansemål og evalueringsspørsmål i hvert kapittel, slik at elevene kan følge sin egen progresjon og vurdere om målene er nådd Tilleggsheftet Read and Write møter behovet for enda enklere tekster og oppgaver på ungdomstrinnet. Heftet er tilpasset elever som trenger å bedre sin leseforståelse. Searching 8 består av ∏ Learner’s Book ∏ Teacher’s Resource File ∏ Read and Write, aktivitetshefte ∏ CD-er ∏ nettsted www.gyldendal.no/searching

bokmål isbn 978-82-05-33583-7

anne-brit fenner geir nordal-pedersen

∏ tilpasset opplæring gjennom tekster med flere vanskegrader og oppgaver der elevene kan foreta valg ut fra interesse, behov og eget språknivå

Searching 8

Searching gir elevene et spennende møte med den engelskspråklige verden og ivaretar elevenes ulike behov og individuelle forutsetninger.

learner’s book

8

anne-brit fenner og geir nordal-pedersen learner’s book engelsk for ungdomstrinnet

Searching


Searching 8