Statenormalsch192122stat

Page 1

BULLETIN OF THE

STATE

NORMAL SCHOOL/^r WOMEN FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

Vol. VII.

N"o. 4.

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY

June,

192]__

Catalogue 1921-1922

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1914, at the post Farmville, Virginia, under the act of August 24, 1912.

office

at



Digitized by the Internet Archive in

LYRASIS

2011 with funding from

IVIembers and Sloan Foundation

http://www.archive.org/details/statenormalsch192122stat



BULLETIN OF THE

STATE

NORMAL SCHOOL^r WOMEN FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

Vol. VII, No. 4

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY

CATALOGUE 1921-1922

published by

The State Noemal School Foe Women Faemville, Vieginia 1921

June, 1921



TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE Important Notice

5

Calendar

8

Schedule Appointments

9

Virginia Normal School Board

10

Faculty

11

Standing Committees

16

Business Department

17

OflScers of

Student Organizations

18

20

Class Gifts

General Information: History of the School

21

Purpose

22

Location

22

Buildings

22

A Word

23

to Division Superintendents

Discipline

23

Student Government Association

24

Religious Life of the School

24

Young Women's Christian Association Virginia Normal League Cunningham Memorial Loan Fund State Loan Fund

Alumna

Association

Library and Reading-Room Literary and Debating Societies

Pi

Kappa Omega

Society

Student Publications

25

25 27

29 27

28 28

29 30

State Scholarships

30

Expenses

30

Entrance Requirements and Classifications

32

Accedited Schools

33

Courses and Certificates

34

Records of Students Instrumental Music

36

36


Table of Contents CouESES OF Study:

page

Course I Course II Course III Course IV Course V

37

38

40 42

44

Depabtments of Insteuction: Biology

Chemistry and Physics

'.

45

49

Drawing

50

Education English

53

Geography Handwriting History and Social Sciences Home Economics

68

Industrial Arts

79

Latin

81

Mathematics Modern Languages Music Physical Education Reading

84

63 71

72 75

88 92

96 99

Training School: Faculty

100

Organization

100

Juvenile Library

101

Training School Announcement

101

List of Students

102

Recapitulation

115


:

IMPORTAlsTT NOTICE (Concerning Differentiation of Courses in State N"ormal Schools for

The Virginia

Women.)

Board invites careful attention which were adopted bv the Board

jSTormal School

to the following resolutions

April 12, 1919, and which are of very great importance to the future development of the K^ormal Schools. Resolved, That the most fundamental work of the State

Normal Schools and

their most important function

teachers for the elementary schools.

be

made

Ample

is

to train

provision must

for this training and proper facilities therefor

must

be provided before any of the appropriation from the State or

revenues from the schools can be used for any other purposes.

Be

it

further resolved, That the increased

demand

in the

State for teachers of high school subjects, for teachers in special

departments and for rural supervisors should be met by the State Normal Schools as far as possible without interfering with their primary function. Resolved, That in order to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort

and

to contribute to the

most economic use of public

funds, the work of training high school and special teachers and

hereby arranged in accordance with a plan work which will make it unnecessary for each one of the State Normal Schools to carry the heavy burden

rural supervisors

is

of differentiation of

of a large

number

of special courses paralleling similar courses

in other schools.

The work common

to all of the schools will be as follows

1.

Two-year courses for the training of elementary teachers.

2.

Modification of the two-year course to meet the needs of

students

who may

desire to pursue

any one of the special four-


:

Important Notice

6

year courses assigned to the several normal schools as outlined below. These modified two-year courses are the same as the courses of similar length now being offered at the normal schools, it not being the intention of the Normal School Board to interfere with the present catalogTied two-year course.

Such

modified two-year courses at whatever normal school taken will

be credited as the first two years of the special four-year course assigned to any one of the normals. In this way students will have preserved their appropriate credits.

In accordance with

this plan every school is assigned a spe-

but every other school

cific subject,

is

given the liberty of

of-

This

ar-

fering the present two-year course in that subject.

rangement is preserved in order that young women may go from one normal for advanced work in a special subject or subjects to another normal without suffering inconvenience or loss of credits. The only exception to this arrangement is found in the case of the commercial course which will be offered in its entirety at Fredericksburg.

The is

differentiated

work

of advanced grade leading to degrees

assigned to the particular schools as follows

To Farmville

a four-year course for the training of high

school teachers.

To Harrisonburg teachers in

a

four-year course for the training of

home economics.

To Fredericksburg

a four-year course for the training of

teachers in music, industrial arts and commercial subjects.

To Radford

a four-year course for the training of supervisors

of elementary schools

To Radford

is

education.

This

and for

specialists in rural education.

also assigned the task of extension is

a

wide

field

work

in rural

of endeavor and all of the

normal schools are expected to cooperate in the future as in the past, but under this plan the Radford Normal is given the duty to study the needs of and give general direction to rural extension work.

In view of the fact that all of the normals have heretofore been allowed to offer four-year courses for the training of high


Important school teachers,

who have

it

InTotice

would be an apparent hardship on students

entered these courses not to allow some period in

which readjustment can be made. The operation of this resolution will, therefore, become effective July 1, 1921. In the meantime no normal school will accept new students for the third and fourth years in any special department other than that assigned to it by this resolution.


CALENDAR —"Wednesday,

September 14 Wednesday, December 21,

1921-

Fall term begins.

ISToon

— Christmas

Holiday

begins.

1922

—Wednesday, January 4—Winter term Wednesday, March 22 — Spring term April 17 — Easter Monday Holiday. June — Close

begins.

begins.

5

of Session.

Note The Dormitory will not be open for new students until Tuesday, All former students are required to come on Monday, Septem13. ber 12, in order that they may have their rooms assigned to them before the new students arrive, and have their schedules made before the new students are classified. All Second year students who expect to teach in the Training School must report to the Director of the Training School not later than September 14. :

September

Dormitory room will not be reserved for former students later than the morning of Tuesday, September 13, except in cases of special arrangement.


:

SCHEDULE APPOINTMENTS Wednesday, September 14:

—Auditorium—All second, and students who are teach in the 11:00 — Auditorium — All second, and fourth-year students who take academic work the —Room F—All the above whose schedules were not the morning. 2 —Room E —Tenth grade 4 —Room E—Eleventh grade 9 :00

third,

to

f ourtii-year

fall.

third,

are to

in

fall.

2 :30

finished in

:30

students.

:00

students.

Thursday, September 15 9 :00

2 :30

—Auditorium—All year —Room F—All students not first

students.

yet scheduled.

Friday, September 16: 8 :30

A

fine of

made on

—Regular

class

work

begins.

$1.00 will be charged each student

time.

who does not have her schedules


VIRGINIA

NORMAL SCHOOL BOARD

V. R. Shackelford, President

W.

Locker, Vice-President

C.

Robert K. Brock, Secretary-Auditor

Westmoreland Davis, Governor

of Virginia

(ex officio)

Harris Hart, Superintendent Instruction (ex

of Public

officio)

V. R. Shackelford Merritt T. Cooke W. C. Locker A. G. Preston R. S. Chamberlayne, Jr E. O. Larrick Geo. L. Taylor Dr. H. M. DeJarnette Miss Belle Webb S. James Turlington George M. Warren

Orange, Va. Norfolk, Va.

Richmond, Va. Amsterdam, Va. Phenix, Va.

Middletown, Va. Big Stone Gap, Va. Fredericksburg, Va. Prince George, Va.

Accomac, Va. Bristol, Va.

STANDING COMMITTEES

—Messrs.

Executive Committee

L. Taylor, R. S. Chamberlayne, Jr.,

Finance Committee Messrs. DeJarnette, and A. G. Preston. Course of Study Com,mittee Belle

Webb.

V. R. Shackelford,

W.

C. Locker, Geo.

and Harris Hart. R.

—W.

H. M.

S.

Chamberlayne,

C.

Locker, Harris Hart, and Miss

Jr.,

Dr.


FACULTY J. L.

JAEMAN,

LL.

D., President.

University of Virginia, 1886-1889

MARY BARLOW,

Ph.

;

LL. D. Hampden-Sidney College.

B.,

Physical Education. Posse Normal School of Gymnastics. Boston, Mass., Graduate Emerson College of Oratory, Boston, Mass. Ph. B. Kee Mar College Hagerstown, Md. Summer Courses, Columbia University.

Graduate

;

;

LEON

E.

BELL,

B. A.,

M.

A.,

Psychology and Education. B. A. Northwestern University Graduate Student in Psychology, Education, and Philosophy, University of Chicago and Boston University M. A and Master's Diploma in Education, Teachers College, Columbia University. ;

;

ADA RANDOLPH BIERBOWER, Rural Education. Graduate State Normal School for Women, Farmville, Va., 1913 Course University of Virginia, 1914.

THELMA

Summer

;

W. BLANTON,

Secretary to the Director of the Training School and Asistant in First Grade.

Graduate of State Normal School for Women, B'armville, Va.. 1913. G. H.

BRETNALL,

B. A.,

M.

A.,

Biology. B. A. Cornell College, 1896; M. A. Cornell College, 1897: Graduate Student University of Chicago, 1901-'02 Summer Courses, 1905-'06-'07-'10-'16. ;

LULU CURME BRETNALL,

B. A., Ph. B., Lit. B.,

Assistant in English. B. A. Cincinnati Wesleyan College Ph. B. Cornell College Lit. B. Twin Valley College Graduate Delsarte School of Expression Graduate Student, University of Chicago, 1900-'01. ;

;

;

;

VIRGINIA BUGG, Assistant in History. Student State Normal School for Women, Farmville, Va. Summer Course at Cornell University, 1909, and at Teachers College, Columbia University, ;

1919.

ALICE

E.

CARTER,

Supervisor of Fifth Grade. Graduate State Normal School for Women, Farmville, Course, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1919.

Va.,

1909

;

Summer


Faculty

12

FLEETA COOPER,

B.

S.,

Supervisor of Third Grade. Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tenn., 1919.

B. S. George

MARTHA

W. COULLING,

L.

I.,

Drawing. Peabody Normal College, 1887 Martha's Vineyard Summer School, Student under Fred H. Daniels, summer, 1900, and W. T. Bear, Chautauqua Summer School, 1894 Student in Teachers College, New York, 1895-'96 and 1903-'04 Applied Arts Summer School, Chicago, 1908. L.

I.

1888

;

;

;

;

M.

BOYD COYNER,

B. A.,

M.

A.,

History of Education. B. A. Concordia College, 1908; M. A. University of Virginia. 1911; Student, Columbia University, 1914-'15.

MABEL LOUISE CULKIN,

B.

Graduate

S.,

Kindergarten Education. B. S. Teachers College, Columbia University, N. Y. Student at University of Minnesota Graduate State Normal School, Oswego, N. Y. ;

;

EMMA

ZELIE DIETRICH,

B. A.,

Geography. B. A. Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, 1920 versity, 1912, and Summer School, Miami

FLORENCE

;

Summer Courses, Wooster UniUniversity, Oxford, Ohio, 1915.

EISELE,

L.

Librarian.

Graduate Carnegie Library School, Atlanta, Ga., 1917.

EDWIN JOHN

FETTIG,

B. S. E.,

Chemistry and Physics. B. S. E. (Chemical Engineering), University of Michigan, 1913.

JAMES

M.

GRAINGER,

B. A.,

M.

A.,

M.

A.,

English. B. A. University of Cincinnati

E.

;

University of North Carolina.

MYRTLE GRENELS, Supervisor in Eighth and Ninth Grades. Graduate State Normal School for Women, Farmville, Course, Columbia University, 1917.

MARY BURNS HAYNES,

B.

Va.,

1908

;

Summer

S.,

Supervisor of Fourth Grade and Primary Methods. B. S. George Peabody College for Teachers, 1918 Summer Courses, University of Tennessee Graduate Shelbyville Female College, Shelbyville, Tenn. ;

;

BESSIE

H.

JETER,

Associate in

B.

S.,

Home

Economics.

Graduate of Georgia Normal and Industrial College B. S. Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, 1916 Graduate Student, Columbia ;

;

University.


;

Faculty

MARY PHILLIPA

JONES,

B.

13

S.,

Supervisor of First Grade and Primary Methods. Graduate of State Normal B. S. Columbia University Ala. Graduate of Cook County Normal School, Chicago.

Florence,

College,

;

;

J.

M. LEAR,

M.

B. A.,

A.,

History and Social Sciences. and M. A. Kandolph-Macon College, Ashland. Va. Student at Leipsic University, 1903-'05 Summer Course at Chicago University, 1910 Summer Courses at Columbia University, 1912-'13. B. A.

;

;

;

LILA LONDON, Mathematics. Graduate High School, Roanoke. Va.

Course in Surveying, Roanoke ColSalem, Va. Special Student in Mathematics under Dr. William M. Thornton, University of Virginia Summer Course at Knoxville, Tenn., 1903, and Cornell University, 1909. Student George Peabody College for Teachers, lege,

;

;

;

Nashville, Tenn., 1918-'19.

WILHELMINA PALESKE LONDON, Associate in English.

Summer Courses

University of Virginia, Cornell University, and Pea-

in English,

Teachers College, Columbia University, New York Student George body College for Teachers, Nashville, Tenn., 1917-'18. ;

HAZEL BERNICE MILLICAN, Industrial Arts.

Graduate of New Brunswick Normal School

in Industrial Arts, 1915 Sumof Science of the Atlantic Provinces Fredricton, 1911, and Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, 1912 Summer Course, Halifax Technology, 1918 at Prince of Wales College, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, 1914, and Gorham, Maine, 1920. ;

mer School

;

CHRISTINE

E.

MUNOZ,

Mitsic.

Graduate High School, Cranford, N. J. Student of Mollenhauer Conservatory of Music, Brooklyn, N. Y. German Conservatory of Music, New York City New England Conservatory of Music, Boston, Mass. Summer Courses, Potsdam, N. Y. Chautauqua, N. Y. Teachers College, New York. ;

;

;

;

;

;

MINNIE

V. RICE, Latin.

Graduate Farmville College Summer Course at Harvard University at Columbia University, 1911. ;

mer Course

RACHEL

C.

;

Sum-

ROBINSON,

Supervisor of Second Grade. Graduate of Colorado Teachers College Summer Course at University of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania State College University of Chicago. ;

;

;

MARY ADAMS SAVEDGE, Supervisor in Eighth and Ninth Grades. Graduate State Normal School for Women, Farmville, George Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tenn. University of Virginia.

Va. ;

;

Student at

Summer

Course,


Faculty

14

ILMA VON SCHILLING, Supervisor of Sixth and Seventh Grades.

Summer Courses, University of VirCourse, Teachers College, Columbia University,

Student Stuart Hall, Staunton, Va. ginia, 1905-'06-'07

Summer

;

;

1910.

KATHERINE

L.

SCOTT,

B.

M.

S.,

A.,

Associ<ite in English. B. S. George Peabody College for Teachers, 1917 M. A. George Peabody College for Teachers, 1920 Summer Courses at University of Tennessee and ;

;

Columbia University.

ESTELLE SMITHEY,

B. A.,

Modern Languages. Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Va. Diploma of L' Alliance PranParis, 1899 Student at the Sorbonne, Paris, 1904-'05 Summer Courses at Columbia University, 1913 and 1914.

B. A.

;

caise,

1

;

;

EDNA NORTON SPEAR,

B. L.

and B.

I.

E.,

Reading. B. L.

I.

Emerson College

B. E. Boston University.

;

MARGARET McNAIRY STEELE,

B. A.,

Biblical History. B. A. University of Tennessee Summer Course National Training School of Young Women's Christian Association, 1920. ;

FLORENCE HAMER STUBBS,

B.

S.,

^

Rural Education. Peabody College for Teachers Summer Courses University Winthrop College University of Virginia.

B. S. George

Tennessee

CARRIE

;

;

TALIAFERRO,

B.

of

;

B.

S.,

Associate in Mathematics. B. S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1915 i5chool for Women, Farmville, Va., 1899 Student ;

;

1907-'08

W.

F.

;

Summer

Graduate State Normal at

Cornell

University,

Course, Cornell University, 1904.

TIDYMAN, M.

A., Ph. D., Education and Director of Training School.

M. A. Columbia University, 1914

SARAH BOYD TUCKER,

L.

I.,

;

Ph. D.

B. A.,

New York M.

University, 1915.

A.,

Associate in History and Social Sciences. L.

I.,

B. A.

Winthrop

College, 1903

mer Courses at Chicago

KATHARINE TUPPER, Home

B.

;

M. A. Columbia University, 1910 Sum1913, and at Columbia Universitv ' ;

University,

1916 and 1919. S.,

Economics.

Diploma, Ontario Ladies' College, Whitby, Canada, 1910 College, Columbia University, 1912. Substituting for Miss Wheeler.

;

B.

S.

Teachers


Faculty

15

MARGARET LAWSON WAINWRIGHT, Assistant in Kindergarten. Graduate State Normal School for Women, Farmville, Va. ^

LEOLA WHEELER,

B. A.,

Reading. A. Smith College Graduate of Emerson College of Oratory Graduate Student at Emerson College of Oratory, 1911. B.

:

ANNIE ALVIS, Student Assistant in Library and in Writing.

MERLE

DAVIS, Student Assistant in Lihr'ary.

MILDRED DICKENSON, Student Assistant in English.

MARY DINWIDDIE, Student Assistant in Writing.

HELEN DRAPER, Student Assistant in French.

MARY

FINCH, Student Assistant in English.

ESTHER KLINE, Student Assistant in Library.

MARY

LINDSAY, Student Assistant in Physical Education.

EDITH MARSHALL, Student Assistant in Library.

PARKE MORRIS, Student Assistant in Music.

KATHERINE STALLARD, Student Assistant in Chemistry.

CARRIE SPRADLIN, Student Assistant in English.

JENNIE

M. TABB, Secretary to the President, and Registrar.

MAUD

K.

TALIAFERRO,

Postmistress and Manager of Supply Room. ^

On

leave of absence.

;

Post-


Faculty

16

STAlSTDHs^G

COMMITTEES

Committee on Schedule of Recitation Miss Coulling, Miss Bugg, Miss Dierbower, Miss Dietrich, Mr. Coyner, and Miss Savedge.

Comm,ittee on Course of Study Dr. Jarman, Miss Lila London, Mr. Grainger, Mr. Lear, Miss Coulling, Miss Stubbs, Miss Dietrich, Miss Culkin, Miss Tupper, Dr. Tidyman, and Mr. Bretnall.

Comm,ittee on Classification Miss Rice, Miss Smithey, Miss London, Miss Taliaferro, Miss Willie London, and Miss Tucker.

Lila

Committee on Training School Course of Study Dr. Tidyman, Mr. Grainger, Miss Dietrich, Miss Haynes, and Miss von Schilling. Committee on Entertainments Munoz, and Miss Barlow.

—Miss

Coulling,

Miss

Spear,

Miss

—Mr. Grainger, Miss Tucker, and Dr. Tidyman. Committee on Bulletins —Dr. Tidyman, Miss Lila London, Mr. Grainger, Committee on Library

Miss Stubbs, Miss Cooper, and Miss Blanton.

—Mr.

Committee on Annual

Lear,

Miss

Coulling,

and Miss Willie

London.

Mr.

Committee on Literary Societies Mr. Grainger, Mr. Lear, Miss Spear, Bell, Mrs. Bretnall, and Miss Barlow. Committee on School Paper

—Mr.

Grainger, Mr. Lear, and Miss Scott.

Committee on Averaging Grades Miss Coulling, Miss Lila London, Miss Savage, Miss Blanton, Miss Robinson, and Miss Grenels.

Advisory Committee to Professional Students Dr. Tidyman, Mr. Lear, Miss Culkin, Miss Taliaferro, Mr. Grainger, Miss Smithey, Miss Scott, Miss Stubbs, and Mr. Bell.

Committee on Athletics Miss Barlow, Cooper, Mr. Lear, and Dr. Tidyman.

Miss

Willie

London,

Miss


BUSINESS

DEPARTMENT

Mr. B. M.

cox

Business Maruiger

Miss

WINNIE HINER

Clerk to Business Manager

HOME

DEPARTMEIs^T

Miss MARY Head of

WHITE COX the

FRANCES

Miss

Home

B.

SHELTON

Assistant Head of the

Miss

Home

HOUSTON BLACKWELL

Assistant in

Mrs. Assistant

Home Department

J. D.

m

WALKER

Home Department

Mrs. W. L. BLANTON Night Matron Mrs. BESSIE CAMPER Housekeeper

Mrs.

JAMISON

ALICE PEERY

Assistant Housekeeper

Mrs. LILLIAN V. NUNN Supervisor of Laundry Dr. SUSAN A. PRICE Resident Physician

MARY LANCASTER BROWN

^Miss

Trained Nurse =

Miss

MARY JOHNSON

Assistant in Infirmary

Miss

MARGARET McNAIRY STEELE

Y.

W.

C. A.

Resigned March 10, 1921. Appointed March 10, 1921.

General Secretary


OFFICERS OF STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS Executive Committee of Student Government Association

Katherine Stallakd Lily Thobnhill Louise Brewer

President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer First Year Representative

Elizabeth Woodward Kate Trent

Young Women's Christian Association Elizabeth McClung Dorothy Schaefer Anna Vries Ella Jinkins Helen Draper Miss Margaret Steele

President Vice-President Corresponding and Recording Secretary Treasurer Undergraduate Field Representative General Secretary

Pi Kappa Omega Society (Honorary)

Katherine Stallard

President

Argus Literary Society

Parke Morris

President

Athenian Literary Society

Reva Graves

President

Cunningham Literary Society Harriett Purdy

President

Pierian Literary Society

Grace Beard

President Jefferson Debating Society

Delma Van Sickler

President

Ruffner Debating Society

Elizabeth Meredith

President Glee Cluh

Evelyn Barnes

President

Orchestra

Lily Thobnhill

President Athletic Association

Delma Van Sickler

President


Officees of Studeis^t Oegaistizations

19

Rotunda {Paper) Mildred Dickinson Virginia Anderson

Editor-in-Chief

Business Manager

Tirginian

lOLA Johnson Susie Booker

Editor-in-Chief

Business Manager Class Organizations

Kathebine Stallard Mary Lindsay Elizabeth Mobing Christine Shields

President Fourth President Third President Second President First

Year Year Year Year

Class Class Class Class


:

CLASS GIFTS For some years

it

has been the custom of the graduating class

to leave with the school a parting gift, as a token of their love

and

The following

loyalty.

sulted

from

this beautiful

is

a

list

of the gifts

which have

re-

custom

— Bible for Auditorium. —Reading stand for Auditorium. January, 1905— Statue (Venus de Milo). June, 1905— Statue (Winged Victory). January, 1906 — Statue (Urania).

Class of January, 1904 Class of June, 1904 Class of Class of

Class of

—Statue

Class of June, 1906

Class of January, 1907 Class of June, 1907

— Picture

— Statue

Class of 1908

(Minerva Justiniana).

—Picture

(Aurora).

(Dance

of the

Muses).

(Diana Robing).

—Picture (Carot Landscape). — Flag for dome Main Building.

Class of January, 1909 Class of June, 1909

of

Class of 1910

for

Normal League.

Class of

for

Normal League.

Class of

—$140.00 1911 — $140.00 1912 —$100.00

Class of

1913— $100.00

for books for Infirmary.

for pictures for Training School.

Class of

— Statue (Jeanne D'Arc). Training 1915—$100.00 pictures 1916—Portrait President Jarman.

Class of

1917— $150.00

Class of 1914 Class of

for

School.

of

diverted to Belgian Relief Fund.

—$185.00 diverted to Student Friendship War Fund. —$150 diverted to United War Work Campaign. 1920— Statue (Appeal to the Great Spirit).

Class of 1918 Class of 1919 Class of

for


GENERAL INFORMATION HiSTOKY OF THE ScHOOL

The

first

Legislature to assemble after the adoption of the

post-helium Constitution established, July 11, 1870, a system

For twelve years or more the conduct of was entrusted to such teaching force as was found ready at hand. In this experimental period nothing was more fully demonstrated than that, if the returns were to be in any wise commensurate with the cost and the high mission of the system, some provision must be made for a reliable source of supply of teachers fitted by education and training for their work. To meet this demand the Legislature, in March, 1884, passed an act establishing a State Female Normal School. In October of the same year this school was opened, buildings, of public schools.

these schools

already in use for school purposes, having been procured in the town of Farmville. One hundred ten students were enrolled the first session.

From

the outset the school has steadily grown, making necesfrom time to time, the enlargement of its accommodations. In January 1914, the Legislature changed the name of the

sary,

Normal School for Women at Farmville. In January, 1916, the Legislature granted to the Virginia

school to Stttie

ISTormal

School Board the privilege of conferring degrees in

education.

At the next meeting of the Board

this school

was

authorized to offer a four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education.

During the thirty-seven years

of

its

sent out 2,283 graduates, nearly all of

existence the school has

whom

teachers of the public schools in the State.

Of these, 7,092 matriculates. who have been graduated) have of the State school.

some knowledge

a large

have been There have been

are, or

number

(besides those

carried to the different sections

of the

methods and aims of the


—

Genekal Information

22

Purpose

The

State JSTormal School for

Women

exists as a technical

institution for the training of teachers to carry on the

popular education in the State of Virginia. in the school

is

The

work of

central idea

young women to enter the profession and accurate ideas of the various educa-

to inspire

of teaching with clear

tional problems that confront the public school teacher.

no longer deemed adequate that a teacher be proficient must be added. Hence, even in the academic work of the school, the professional idea is emphasized. Incidental instruction in methods is everywhere given in connection with the presentation of subject matter. Every department in the institution lends its assistance to the department of education in inspiring the young teachers with the loftiest ideals of what the true teacher should be, and what sort of service should be given the State. Thus, it becomes apparent that the purpose of the institution It is

in subject matter only; professional training

is

to give to the teachers of the State of Virginia the highest

professional skill possible in the training of her future citizens. LocATioisr

Farmville is a healthful and pleasant town of about three thousand inhabitants. It has good schools and five churches Baptist, Episcopal, Methodist, Presbyterian, and Lutheran. Its location on the Norfolk and Western, about midway between Lynchburg and Petersburg, puts it in communication

with

all

parts of the State.

Buildings

The main building

is

a thoroughly modern and up-to-date

brick structure, containing an auditorium, a reception hall, parlors, students' sitting-room, a library, reading-room, class-

rooms, laboratories, manual training workshop, gymnasium,

and home accommodations for five hundred Near the main building, yet entirely apart from

offices,

students. it, is

a well-

equipped infirmary, in charge of a woman physician and a trained nurse, both of whom live in the building and give their entire time to the health of the students.


Geisteeal

The Training School

a

is

Information modern

23

school building, planned

and constructed to meet the needs of a thoroughly up-to-date school and at the same time to facilitate the training of teachers.

A WoED

TO Division Supeeintendents

If the ISTormal Schools of the State are to be productive of the best results

it is

necessary for them to have the cooperation of

These superin-

the Division Superintendents of Education.

tendents should see to

that every county has

it

sentation, taking care at the

applicants as

its

just repre-

same time to recommend only such

come up fully to the requirements. They should upon the presidents of the various schools for

also call freely

any service they can render, especially with reference See page 26.

to filling

vacancies.

Discipline In the conduct of a school for young

women

about to assume

the responsibility of a serious and dignified profession like teaching, there cipline.

is

little

occasion for arbitrary, iron-clad dis-

Beyond the expectation

that the life of our students

conform to the requirements of promptness and fidelity to duty, and exhibit that gentle demeanor and considerate regard for others which characterize refined womanhood, we have few fixed rules. This does not mean, iiowever, that the girls are absolutely without restrictions. It is the duty of the head of the home and her assistants to keep in close contact with the daily life and conduct of pupils, and to provide suitable chaperonage whenever necessary. If the pupil is found to be falling off in her studies, neglecting duty, or exerting an unwholesome influence, prompt steps are taken for her amendment. A young woman who does not show some disposition to conform to high standards can hardly be considered good material for a teacher so, if one is found unresponsive to shall

;

patient endeavors to bring her to the line of duty, her con-

nection vrith the school

is

quietly severed

lowing order of the trustees:

"If,

by virtue of the foljudgment of the

in the


General Information

24 President,

making

shall at

it

any time appear that a student

is

not

proper use of the advantages which the State offers in

the State

Normal School

for

any way prejudicial to the fellow students,

it

Women,

or that her influence

is

in

interests of the institution, or of her

shall be his

duty to declare her place vacant."

Student Government Association

The purpose of the association is to preserve the student honor and to further the interest of the school as far as lies within its power. It has jurisdiction over the girls during study period and in the dining-room, and in all cases in which the good name of the student body as a whole would be involved. Decisions rendered by the Student Government Committee are subject to the approval of the President.

Religious Life of the School

While a State

institution

and hence not under denomina-

tional influence, this school realizes the importance of a life

higher than the intellectual, and the religious interests of the students are a matter of constant concern.

School

opened

is

every morning with the reading of the Scriptures, a hymn, and prayer.

The ministers

of the several denominations of the town

take part in conducting these services.

The members obtain

lists

of the faculty, at the beginning of each term^

of students of their resp^tive denominations, and

and Sunday-school There are several teachers belonging to each of the religious denominations represented in Parmville, and the students are cordially welcomed at whatever church they may attend, and are urged Attendance on church services to join Sunday-school classes. it not compulsory, but its regular observance is urged upon see that each one is invited to the church

which she

is

in the habit of attending at home.

the students as a sacred duty.

The

school endeavors to maintain high moral and Christian

standards, and to create an atmosphere of earnestness

;

for

it


General Information is

esteemed

25

be not the least important mission of the institu-

to

yonng women equipped with a steady purpose perform well and faithfully the duties that lie before them a holy purpose to make the most of themselves, that they may do most for others. tion to send out to

—

The Young Women^s Christian Association The Young Women's Christian Association aims the students

in

building them

school

up

in

to unite all

personal loyalty to Jesus

Christ,

in the knowledge of Christ through Bible

study and Christian service.

It

urges upon

its

members the

value of church membership, church loyalty, and responsibility for

some form

of church work.

acter widens its interest

The

Its

and broadens

interdenominational char-, sympathies.

its

activities of the Association are in

members.

charge of the student

They conduct evening prayers

daily, hold special

meetings weekly, urge attendance upon Sundayschool and Bible classes, and foster a spirit of interest in all matters pertaining to religion and to social welfare. A well-furnished sitting and reading room belonging to the devotional

Association affords a place for social affairs, or, better place where one can be quiet,

away from

still,

a

the hurry of school.

Every young woman attending the school is cordially invited become a member of the Young Women's Christian Association and to help it to realize its purpose through her interest and hearty support.

to

Virginia ]SI'ormal League

The Virginia IsTormal League was organized in the spring of 1899 by Dr. Robert Frazer, then president of the school. The objects of the League are twofold First, to found and maintain a loan fund for those students who would otherwise :

be unable to attend school

;

second, to conduct a free educational

bureau for students. OFFICERS

Miss M. W. Coulling Miss Harriett Purdy

President Secretary


General Information"

26

educational bureau committee

Jarman

President

Chairman

LOAN FUND COMMITTEE Chairman

Miss Estelle Smithey

FINANCE COMMITTEE Miss M. V. Rice

Chairman

The Loan Fund

is

maintained by the annual membership

dues of one dollar and by voluntary contributions from outside

aim

is

women who wish

to

by loans without interest, youngprepare for effective service as teachers. It offers a good opportunity to all who are willing to extend a helping hand to coming generations as well as to this. The sources.

Its

to help,

committee will gratefully receive any contribution, large or small, that may be sent. The League has now nearly six thousand dollars, all of which is in use. As soon as any amount is returned it is loaned out again, for the demand is greater than the Fund can supply. All requests for loans should be made by May 10, of the preceding session.

The Educational Bureau

seeks to serve as a free

medium

of communication between teachers trained and approved by

the school,

and persons who wish

to

employ

teachers.

It

engages to recommend only such as are believed to be thoroughly qualified for the

work contemplated.

County superintendents,

school trustees, and others desiring good teachers, will do well to

apply to the Bureau.

without

Full information will be furnished

cost.

The President

of the

League

will be glad to hear

from former

students of the school concerning the organization of auxiliarv

chapters in their towns or counties.

ganized

—

Eight such have been

in Bristol, Roanoke, Farmville, Danville,

or-

Richmond,

Lynchburg, Covington, and Salem. Information as to these be sent on application. Address, Virginia Normal League^ Farmville, Virginia. will


General Information

27

Cunningham Memoriae Loan Fund The Alumnae istration

who graduated during

of the school

raised a fund, intending to establish a scholarship in

and loving service to them and to the

his faithful

that the most fitting tribute that could be paid effort to give to those

who

are unable to obtain

to 1896,

memory

it

of

State, feeling

him would be

the

for themselves

the training for the work to which he devoted his

When

the admin-

of Dr. John A. Cunningham, from 1886

life.

fund amounted to $1,000 it was changed from a scholarship fund to a loan fund and placed in the hands of this

the President to be used for this purpose.

Five per

charged and properly endorsed notes proving of great assistance to some of

cent, interest is

are required.

Thus,

it is

our best students.

Those wishing to obtain

a loan

from

this

fund should apply

to the President of the school.

State Loan Fund

The State

of Virginia appropriates to this institution $800.00

annually to be used as a Loan Fund. Not more than $100.00 is loaned to any one student. The interest required is four per cent., and all notes must be properly endorsed. per session

Applications for assistance from the State Loan

Fund

should

be addressed to the President of the school.

xIlumntE Association

The Alumnae Association

all persons who have enGraduates are active members, non-graduates are associate members. Regular biennial meetings are held at the school on the Saturday preceding baccalaureate Sunday. The biennial membership fee is one dollar.

includes

rolled as students in the school.

Through the Association former students are kept in touch with the school and with each other, and loyalty is fostered by interest and service. Some of the work attempted is the holding of reunions at convenient times, as State and district teachers'


General Information

S8 meetings

;

the dissemination of school news of interest and im-

portance by means of circular letters and the newspaper, The Rotunda; the partial support of a Y. W. C. A. secretary; the

women by loans from ISTormal League and Cunningham Memorial Loan Funds special service to the aiding of worthy young

;

Farmville Normal School as opportunity arises, as the completion of the Student Building Fund the organization of local chapters in many cities and counties to strengthen and render ;

more effective the activities of the general Association. The officers for the term, June 1919 to June 1921, are: President, Miss C. B. Taliaferro, Farmville, Va.

Vice-President, ;N"ewark,

K

Mrs.

W.

J.

Norfleet,

138

Orchard

St.,

J.

Corresponding Secretary, Miss Madeline Warburton, CarVa. Recording Secretary, Miss Julia Stover, Laurinburg, IST. C. Treasurer, Miss Winnie Hiner, Farmville, Va. Organizer, Miss Pauline Camper, Salem, Va.

tersville,

Library and Reading

The

Room

students are supplied with collateral reading, reference

work, and recreative reading from a library of 9,546 classified volumes, a reference room containing encyclopedias, dictionaries,

and

atlases,

and a reading room supplied with seventeen

papers of the State, and from large

cities outside of the State,

besides one hundred and fifteen well selected departmental and

popular periodicals.

Literary and Debating Societies There are six literary and debating societies, the Argus, the Cunningham, the Pierian, the Athenian, the Jefferson, and the Ruffner. These are an important factor in the intellectual and social life of the school. They impart a strong impulse to literary work and debating, and bring the girls together at regular times for a

common

aim primarily

to

intellectual purpose.

The

literary societies

promote a real interest in literature and

to


General Information

29

afford opportunities for practice in debating.

All of the so-

attempt to develop and exercise individual talent, to arouse and encourage social instincts, and to afford practice in

cieties

organization and in parliamentary usage.

Meetings are held every week throughout the year, and a

shown in the effort to Each literary society chooses some or some writer or group of writers

spirit of friendly rivalry is

offer interest-

ing programs.

special aspect

of literature

to be studied

during the year. This study forms the basis of the literary progTams. Debates also are held at intervals. These debates develop the powers of argument, clear and logical thinking, and forceful expression. In addition to this work the societies hold special meetings, which add variety. The programs for these meetings are in a lighter vein, and afford opportunity for the exercise and encouragement of musical and histrionic talent.

Pi Kappa Omega Society (honoraey) Organized 1918 This society was organized as the result of a need faculty and students for scholarship, character,

felt by an organization in recognition of

and leadership.

The

society purposes

not only to recognize and encourage such qualities, but to con-

forms of service to the intellectual and social The standards for admission are high and life of the Campus. candidates are chosen by the faculty and by student members of the society. There are three kinds of members student, associate (faculty), and honorary (alumnse). tribute

by

definite

:

Officers for

1920-1921 President

Katherine Stallard

Helen Draper

Vice-President

Kuth Jones

Secretary

Mary Stephenson

Treasurer

Honorary Member Jennie M. Tabb


Geneeai. Information

30

Student Publications The Rotunda is a weekly newspaper published by the stuThe editorial staff is composed of students and alumnse, who are assisted by reporters from the various classes and school organizations. The paper aims, by publishing news of the dents.

keep the students, the faculty, and the alumnse inwhat is going on, and so, to draw them closer to-

school, to

formed

as to

It affords valuable experience in journalistic

gether.

those

who

participate in

The Virginian

is

its

work

to

publication.

an annual publication which

published by the Second Year

is

edited and

class.

State Scholarships

Any young

lady desiring an appointment as State student

This

should apply to the President for application blank.

when

blank,

filled

out and signed by the Division Superin-

tendent, should be returned to the President. tion

is

favorably considered, the applicant

pointment.

Every State student

If the applica-

notified of her ap-

is

required to sign a pledge

is

that she will teach in the public schools of Virginia for at least

two years

after leaving the ISTormal School.

While thus teaching

she receives pay for her services as any other teacher.

Upon

the expiration of this period she

is

required to send to

the President a statement, signed by a Division Superintendent, to the effect that she has fulfilled this pledge

;

or

satisfactory explanation of her failure to do so.

make

to

him

a

Otherwise, she

will receive a bill for her tuition.

All communications of inquiry, requests for catalogues,

made to the President or the Registrar. Young women from Virginia, not appointed

etc.,

should be students,

and applicants from other

as

State

States, are admitted as

pay

students, the charge for tuition being $30.00 per session.

Expenses

A

registration fee, payable in advance, for entire session,

$10.00.


General iNFOR^rATiox

A

medical

fee,

l^o medical fee

is

31

payable in advance, for entire session $5.00. charged students whose homes are in Farm-

ville.

Board, including furnished room, fuel, lights, laundry, bedding and towels, everything for the entire session, $207.00. Board is $207.00 for the session. It is not charged by the month, but is divided into nine payments of twenty-three dollars each.

The

first

payment

is

due the day of arrival at first day of each

All other payments are due on the

school.

Xo

succeeding month.

reduction

is

made

for absence during

the Christmas holidays nor for absence less than thirty days.

Every student

is

expected to comply strictly with this regu-

lation unless she wishes to

ments than twenty-three

make her payments

in larger instal-

dollars.

Students must come prepared to make the following payments on entrance: Registration fee

$ 10.00 5.00 23.00

Medical fee First

payment on board

$38.00

Total

The remaining payments on board are due the month, and must be paid ivhen due.

first

of each

Checks for board or tuition should not be made payable to the President, but to the student herself.

The

fees for laboratory courses are stated in connection with

the outlines of these courses.

Tuition for pay students, for the term, payable in advance, $10.00.

The above,

All

total is

expense per session for a State student, as shown for a pay student, $252.00.

$222.00

money due

;

the School should be paid to Mr. B.

M. Cox,

Business Manager, and receipts taken therefor. Kegistration fees should be paid to Mr. school, as

no student

show a receipt for

is

Cox upon

arrival at

enrolled in her classes until she can

this fee.


:

General Information

32

No diploma or certificate is granted to anyone until all sums due the school are paid, nor are students at liberty to occupy the rooms previously assigned to them until they have made the advance payment. Each student must supply her own text-books. Books will be furnished at publishers' prices, with cost of handling added. Students should come prepared to buy their books at once. The Dormitories accommodate five hundred students. For applicants in excess of this

number board

is

obtained in private

families at prices about equal to those given above.

however,

is

No

student,

allowed to board outside of the building without the

consent of the President.

Entrance Requirements and Classification The following are

the general regulations governing entrance

and classifications Graduates of accredited four-year high schools may enter any course. Upon the completion of two years they receive the diploma and upon the completion of four years they receive the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Education. Students coming from four-year high schools, having completed only fourteen units of work, are admitted and allowed to make up this back work, but in most cases it takes such students two and a half years to get the diploma. Students coming from colleges, academies, or private schools, having done the equivalent of high school work, are admitted upon trial, subject to the same conditions as high school graduates.

Holders of First Grade Certificates-^ may enter the First Year of Course II or III, and upon the completion of the year's work may receive from the Department of Public Instruction the Elementary Professional Certificate. All candidates for admission by certificate must file with the Classification Committee not later than September 1 their certificates of preparation made out on the blank furnished by the registrar. These blanks must come from some recognized insti^

See Courses and Certificates

3,

page

35.


—

General Information

33

must be made out by some member must bear the signature of the head of the They must come direct to the school from which they come. Classification Committee and not through the hands of the canThe persons filling out these blanks are didates in question. requested to make them as full, explicit, and definite as pos-

tution or accredited school, of the faculty, and

sible.

from private

Certificates of preparation

cepted.

Students thus prepared must in

examinations. student

who

tificates of

for

all

These examinations may any reason is unable to

tutors are not accases take entrance

also be taken

by any

offer satisfactory cer-

work completed.

All classification based upon certificates and diplomas from other schools inability to

is

conditional.

If at any time the student shows

do the work of any

admitted, she

is

class to

which she has been thus

assigned to a lower class at the discretion of

the teacher.

In the professional years, because of the nature of the work, no credit

is

strictly technical

given for courses completed at

other than Registered State ISTormal Schools or standard colleges.

Students

more

who

reenter school after an absence of a year or

will be admitted without examination, but they will be

expected to conform to the requirements of the later catalogue not of that under which they

first

entered.

Accredited Schools

A

four-year high school to be accredited must have at least

sixteen units of

work

as specified below,

and a teaching force

equivalent to the entire time of three teachers.

A

work in any high school subject, covering week, of at least forty minutes, during not less than thirty-six weeks, and constituting approximately a quarter of a full year's work. In other words, sixteen units will not be unit

is

a year's

five periods a

credited if done in less time than four years, nor twelve units if

done in

number

less

than three years.

!For schools in

which the

of periods given to any study, or the length of the


;

General Information

34

is below the standard here specified, the credit for such study will be reduced pro rata. In the scientific subjects two hours of laboratory instruction will be counted as the equivalent

period,

of one hour of recitation.

Of

the sixteen units offered by a four-year high school there

must be four in English, two in Mathematics, one in History, and one in Science.

Courses and Certificates This school offers five professional courses all leading to a diploma and one to a degree, as follows: Courses I, II, III, and V, and the first two years of IV, lead to a diploma, and all four years of Course IV to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education. Any student having the full diploma of the School, representing two years of professional work based on sixteen units of high school work, may take two additional years of work of college grade and receive the degree of B, S. in Education. Professional Course I prepares for kindergarten-primary; Course II, for primary Course III, for grammar grades Course IV, for high school and Course V, for the teaching of Home Economics and for demonstration work. ;

;

The

term of the First Year of Courses 1, II, III, and may have a whole term of contact with professional work before she is called upon to decide where she is best fitted to teach, and hence, which course she should elect. Course V is an exception to this rule. Students who come here knowing that they wish to specialize in Home Economics enter directly upon the first term of Course V.

IV

is

fall

the same, in order that a student

Courses II and III have two groups, preparing respectively

town or country schools. The entrance requirement for all these courses is the same; namely, a diploma from a four-year high school or the equiv-

for city and for

alent,

which must, in every

units of work.

case, represent not less

than sixteen


:

General Informatiox

85

The following- certificates are given by the Department of Public Instruction for the completion of these courses and parts thereof, as follows

C ertificate

Collegiate Professional

1.

:

The degree

of B. S.

in Education entitles the holder to the Collegiate Professional Certificate given

This certificate permits

its

is

by the Department of Public Instruction. valid for ten years and renewable for ten, and

holder to teach in the high schools and elementary

schools.

Normal Professional

2.

The diploma of the Xormal Professional Certificate

Certificate:

school entitles the holder to a

given by the Department of Public instruction. cate 3.

This

certifi-

valid for ten years and renewable for ten.

is

Elementary Professional

Certificate:

The completion

upon sixwork or the completion of the first year of Course II or III, based upon the State First Grade Certificate, entitles the holder to the Elementary Professional CerThis tificate given by the Department of Public Instruction. certificate is valid for six years and renewable for six, and of the first year of Courses I, II, III, IV, or V, based

teen units of high school

permits

its

holder to teach in the elementary schools.

Second Grade Certificate: The completion of the Fourth Year of the High School Course, plus six weeks of pro4.

fessional

work taken

at a

summer

school, entitles the student to

Second Grade Certificate given by the Department of Public Instruction. This certificate is valid for two years and renewable for two, and permits its holder to teach in the elementary a

schools. jSv'ote.

—-In the event of the student's continuing her summer

school professional work, the completion of the second entitles her to a First

Grade

seven months of successful experience, or perience, to a Provisional First tion of the third

summer

fessional Certificate.

summer

Certificate, provided she has

Grade

if she lacks

Certificate.

entitles her to the

(See 3 above.)

had

the ex-

The comple-

Elementary Pro-


Geneeal Infokmation"

36

Let it be understood that no student is counted worthy of a diploma or certificate, whatever may be the grade of her academic attainments, who has not been found uniformly dutiful and trustworthy.

Recced of Students

A

record of each student's work

is

kept in the Registrar's

office.

Reports from the various members of the Faculty are handed in every two weeks and every student

passing grade at that time

At the

close of each

is

who

is

not

making

a

notified of the fact.

term reports for the term are sent

to

parents and guardians.

The work E.

D

is

of students

is

graded as follows

:

A, B, C, D, and

the passing grade.

Insteumental Music jSTo

instrumental music

Music.

taught in the School.

Students Farmville Conservatory of For catalogue giving information as to courses in both

desiring this

work can

get

is

it

at the

vocal and instrumental music, terms,

etc.,

write

Mes. Elsa Schemmel Schmidt,

Head

of Conservatory of Music,

Farmville, Va.


;

COURSE OF STUDY COURSE

I

Leading to Teaching in Kindekgabten-Pbimary

FIRST YEAR Psychology 1, 2, English 1, 2 * Reading 1 or Writing

Drawing 'Music

1

1,

Fall

Winter

Spring

Term

Term 4

Term

5

4 1

or Industrial Arts 2, 3

1

Physical Education and Hygiene 1 * Arithmetic 1, or Geography 1, or Sociology 1.... Introduction to Elementary Education 5 Child Literature 6 Kindergarten Technics 9 '

3 2 2 3

4

3

2 2

4 4 4 3

Kindergarten -Primary Curriculum 6

4 4 3 2

Primary Methods 12 Child Study 4

Management

16

Total number of credits

22

25

23

Fall

Winter

Spring

Term

Term

Term

24

24

SECOND YEAR Teaching 27

8

Primary Methods 13

4

Kindergarten Technics 10 and Conference 28 Music 4 Literature Civics

3 3

11

2

3

5

History of Education 21 Senior Conference 25

Nature Study 4 Reading 3 ( Dramatics Hygiene 2 ^ Physical Education 2

3 )

or Economics 4 2

Total number of credits '

Those who take Reading

In the Fall take

24 Writing

in the

Winter, and vice

versa.

and 12 may be substituted for Music 1, 2, and 3 by those students who have had the required prerequisites. See page 22. ^ Physical Education in the Fall term of the First Year counts two credits everywhere else it counts one credit. * One each term. ^

Music

10,

11,


/

Course of Study

38

COUKSE

II

Leading to Teaching in Primary Grades

FIRST YEAR

PsychologY 1,2 English l", 2 ^Reading 1 or Writing

Fall

Winter

Term

Term

5

4

'

3 2 2 3

*

4

Drawing Music 1

1

1

or Industrial Arts

1

Physical Education and Hygiene 1 Arithmetic 1, Geography 1, Sociology 1 "Introduction to Education 5 or Arithmetic

3

Primary Methods 12 Arithmetic and Methods Apprentice 26 Primary Curriculum Gardening 3

Spring Terra

ABC

4 3 3

2

2

2

4

1,

Geography 1, Sociology 1 ' Music 2 and 3 or Drawing 2 and 3 or 4 Kindergarten-Primary Technics 9 Principles and Methods in Geography 2 Literature

^

2

4 2

2

5 4

5 4

5 4

4 2 5

4

7

3

Management

16 Child Literature 6

3 4

4

Total number of credits

22

25 23 23

^ In the Spring term of the First Year the class is divided into three groups, A, B, and C. Group A will teach in the Fall term of the Second Year Group in Group B the Winter term, and Group C in the Spring term. The apprentice work for each group comes in the term preceding the teaching, which causes a shifting of other subjects. Group B is made up of those students who are preparing especially for teaching in rural and village schools, hence the courses leading to this work are listed for this group. 2 Those who take Reading in the Fall take Writing in the Winter, and vice versa. ^ Physical Education in the Fall term of the First Year counts two credits ;

;

everywhere *

else it counts

one credit.

Each student has three chances

at this group, so gets all three before grad-

uation. = City group will take Introduction to Education, the Rural group will take one of the other three. ^ Whichever is chosen in the Winter term of the First Year is carried through to graduation. Music 10, 11, and 12 may be substituted for Music 1, 2, and 3 See page 92. by those students who have had the required prerequisites. Drawing 12, 13, and 14 may be substituted for Drawing 1, 2, and 3 by those See page 52. students who have had the required prerequisites. In the Spring term Drawing 3 is taken by Groups A and C, and Drawing 4 by Group B.


/

f

'^1

Course of Study

39

SECOND YEAR

Teaching 27 Conference 28

Primary Methods Management 16

Fall

Winter

Spring-

Term

Term

ABC

B

C

ABC

17 3

..

..

..

..

.

.

..

17 3

..

.

..

..

17 3

4

..

..

..

4

..

..

4

13

.

Civics 5

3

Child Literature 6 Arithmetic 1, Geography

Drawing

1,

Sociology

1,

.

.

4 4

and 6 or Music 5 and 6 Rural Sociology 31 and 32 ^ History and Principles of Elementarv Education 22 or Rural Teaching Problems 30 Economics 4 Nature Study 4 Hygiene 2

2 3

Apprentice 26 Free Elective Rural Observation 34 Primary Curriculum 7

5

Primary Methods 12

4 2

-

5

Physical Education 2

Gardening

Term

A

.

..

3

4 2

.

2 .

..

.

4 .

3

3 5 .

5

.

.

2 3

4

3

.

5 3

.

4 .

3

.

.

.

.

2

4

4

4

1

4

4

.

.

2

.

2

2

4 2

3

English 5 Total number of credits

1

35 27 26

^ Groups A and C take History of Education Problems. - Physical Education counts one credit.

:

.

1

23 25 23

24 24 25

Group B takes Rural Teaching


;

CoTJESE OF Study

40

COUKSE

III

Leading to Teaching in Grammar Grades

FIRST YEAR Fall

Winter

Term

Term

Spring

^

Term

A Psvchology 1 English 1, 2, 3 ^ Reading 1 or Writing

^Drawing 1, 1, 2 and Music 1, 2,

2 3 3

and

B

-C

5 1

3 or 4, or Industrial

Physical Education and Hygiene 1 Arithmetic 1, Geography 1, Sociology Grammar Grade Curriculum 8 American History 2, 3 Arithmetic and Methods 3

*

Geography and Methods

1

4

3

3

3

2 2 3

2 2 2

4

4

2 2

2 2

2

2

2 2 2

3 3 5

3 3 5

3

'3

3

Arts

4 3

3

5

5

3

Apprentice 26

3 3

Reading Methods 2 Introduction to Elementary Education 5 Gardening 3 Total nirmber of credits

4

4

22

23

26 23 26

^ In the Spring term of the First Year the class is divided into three groups, A, B, and C. Group A will teach in the Fall term of the Second Year Group B in the Winter term, and Group C in the Spring term. The apprentice work for each group comes in the term preceding the teaching, which causes a shifting of other subjects. Group B is made up of those students who are preparing especially for teaching in rural and village schools, hence the courses leading to this work are listed for this group. 2 Those who take reading in the Fall take writing in the Winter, and vice ;

versa. ^ Whichever is chosen in the Fall term of the First Year is carried through Drawing 12, 13, and 14 may be substituted for Drawing 1, 2, to graduation. and 3 by those students who have had the required prerequisites. See page 52. In the Spring term of the First Year Drawing 3 is taken by Groups A and C, and Drawing 4 by Group B. In the Second Year Industrial Arts 4 is taken by Groups A and C, and Industrial Arts 5 by Group B. * Physical Education in the Fall term of the First Year counts two credits

everywhere

else it

counts one credit.


Course of Study

41

SECOND YEAR Fall

Winter

Spring

Term

ABC

Term

ABC

ABC 19 Teaching 27 Grammar Grade Methods 14 and 15.. 4 3 Conference 28 ^ History and Principles of Elementary Education 22 or Rural Teaching Problems 30 English 8

4

4 .

Rural Sociology 31 or Economics 4 Hygiene 2 Library Methods and Child Litera-

Drawing

7 or Industrial

.

..

3

.

.

.

5

Rural Sociology 32 or Music Gardening 3

.

Nature Study 4 Physical Education Methods Rural Observation 34

Management

.

2 3

7

Apprentice 26

3 3 3

5

.

..

3

4

4

3 3

..

3

..

2 3 3

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

3

..

..

3

..

..

..

..

3 3

3 3

26 24 22

4

3

5 2 3 3

3

3

4 2

4 2

1

^Physical Education 2

19

..

..

.

..

4

5

.

16

Total number of credits

..

..

3 3

3

Arts 4 or 5

^

4 3

.

ture 7 '

17

4

.

Civics 5 째

..

Term

1 .

..

.

..

4 2

22 23 23

21 24 26

2 Whichever is chosen in the Fall term of the First Year is carried through Drawing 12. 13, and 14 may be substituted for Drawing 1, 2, to graduation. and 3 by those students who have had the required prerequisites. See page 54. * Physical Education in the Fall term of the First Year counts two credits ;

everywhere else it counts one credit. ^'in each of these cases the Rural work Groups A and C.

is

taken by Group B, the other by


:

CorKSE OF Study

42

COUESE IV Leading to Teaching in High Schools

FIRST YEAR •

English ^

Reading

1

Psychology

Drawing Music

or Writing

1

1

or Industrial Arts

1

1

1

^Physical Education and Hygiene 1 Social Problems 1 or Arithmetic 1 or Educational Psychology 3 Methods and Management 17

Geography

1

.

.

Fall

Winter

Spring

Term

Term

Term 4

4 3 5 2 2 3 4

or Apprentice

Elective

^ ^

2

3 4 4 3 or

28

Total number of credits 1

2

3

..

Major Minor *

4 3

22

4 4 4

3 or

4

22 or 23 19 or 20

The

Fall term of the First Year of all courses is the same. Reading one term, and Writing the other. Physical Education in the Fall term of the First Year counts two credits

;

everywhere

else it counts one credit. In the Spring term of the First Year the class is divided into three groups, A, B, and C. Group A will teach in the Fall term of the Second Year Group B The apprentice work in in the Winter term, and Group C in the Spring term. each group will take the place of the Elective in the term preceding the teaching. In one term Hygiene must be taken instead of an Elective, but, of course, will count five periods. Note The completion of the first two years of this course entitles the student to a diploma the completion of the four years entitles her to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education. The Diploma represents a minimum of 126 credits, the Degree 255. The Majors. Minors, and Electives may be chosen from the courses offered by The student is free to choose any Major for which the various departments. she has the required prerequisites. The Minor is subject to the approval of the Head of Department in which the student is majoring. The Electives are subject to the approval of the Classification Committee. The prerequisites to the choice of Majors and Minors in the departments requiring prerequisites are as follows *

;

:

:

:

Latin

:

Three units

Modern Languages Spanish

;

or two in

Mathematics

:

in Latin.

Three units in Latin and two in French, German, or Latin and three in French, German, or Spanish. One and one-half units in Algebra and one unit in Plane :

Geometry. In the Winter term of the First Year the schedule is so arranged that the following combinations of Majors, Minors, and Electives may be taken without conflict

MINOR

MA.IOR English History

Mathematics

.

.

.

,

French or History Geography Advanced Biology

i

ELECTIVES Rural Sociology Rural Sociology

Geography or European History

Latin

French Geography Advanced Biology

,

,

French or Mathematics... European History Latin European History Advanced Biology 'Rural Sociology Mathematics Geography or Rural Sociology


Course of Study

43

SECOND YEAR Fall

Winter

Spring

Term

Term

ABO

ABC English 3 and 9 Civics

4

5

4

4..

3

3

3..

Economics 4 Methods and Management 18

....

4....

Teaching 27

..

12

4 4

Elective or Apprentice

3 or 4 2 2

Total number of credits

4

4

4.. 3..

3....

3

4..

....

4 12

12

Major Minor

Physical Education 2

Term

ABC

4 4

4

4 4

4 3 or 4

4 4

3.. or 4 2

2

25 19 19 or 20 20 or

2

4 4

4 4

4 4

3 or

3 or

or

4 4

3..

4

4

4

2

2

2

2

19 25 19 or or

19 19 25 or or

20

20 20

20

THIRD YEAR History and Principles of Secondary Education 23 School Administration and Supervision 20 Elective in Education

.

.

Fall

iVinter

Term

Term 4

.

.

Spring Term.

4

Major Minor

4 4

4 4

4 4 4

Electives

8 3

8 o

8 3

20

20

20

Fall

(Vinter

Spring

Term 5 4

Term

Term

^

Physical Education 3

Total number of credits

FOURTH YEAR Teaching and Observation 27

Major -

^

or Electives

Minor

Physical Education 3

Total number of credits

^

-

Physical Education 3 counts no credit. Additional Teaching may count as Elective work.

12 3

21

5

5

4 12

4 12

3

3

21


CoTTRSE OF Study

44

COUKSE V Leading to Teaching

Home Economics and

Work

to Demonstration

FIRST YEAR '

^

General Chemistry 1, Physiology 5 and 6

2,

3

Fall

Winter

Spring

Term

Term

Term

5 3

5 3

5

Hygiene 2 English ^

1,

.

2,

and

Drawing and Design 10 and

Home Home ^Home ^Home ^ ^

4 3 4

3 11

Textiles Economics 1 Economics 2 Costume Design Economics 3 and 4 (Principles of Sewing) .... Economics 12 and 13 (Elementary Study of Foods 3 Physical Education and Hygiene 1 (

)

)

(

.

Total number of credits

4

4 3

.

3

4

4

2

2

22

26

)

^

5

.

3 3

21

SECOND YEAR Fall

Winter

Term

Term

ABC

ABC Home Economics

15 (Househald

Term i

4

4 4 4

3

3

4 4

4 4

9

3

4 4 3

4 3

4 4 3

4 4

4 4

..

4 4

Methods and Management 19 Home Economics 16 (Nutrition) Home Economics 14 (Advanced Study of

Foods) 5

and

4 4 4

4

4

3

3

3

1

1

1

.

..

2

2

4 4 3

4

4

3

3

3

1

1

1

..

..

..

2

2

2

(Dress-

6

making)

Home Economics 7 (Methods of Teaching Home Economics Home Economics 8 (Teaching and Ob)

servation Physical Education 2

6 2

)

=

C

3

Civics 5

Home Economics

B

Chem-

istry)

Advanced Biology 7, 8 and English 10 and 11 Rural Sociology 31 and 32

Spring

Total number of credits

.

.

2

.

..

6 2

21 22 21

25 24 24

..

6 2

20 20 21

• The periods for Laboratory work are as follows Chemistry 1, three double, two single Physiology 5. one double, two single Drawing and Design 10 and 11, one double, two single; Home Economics 1, one double, three single; Home Economics, 2, 15, and 16, two double, two single Home Economics 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, and 13, two double, one single Home Economics 14, two triple, one single All double Laboratory periods count 1. (counts 4). - Physical Education in the Fall Term of the First Year counts two credits everywhere else it counts one credit. :

;

;

;

;

;


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION BIOLOGY MB. BBETNALL, MISS STUBBS

department courses are provided as preparation for teaching biological subjects in the different gTades. Courses are also provided for those who wish to specialize in biology for high school teaching, and for those who wish some biolgical work that their high school teaching in other lines may be more

In

this

effective.

General

SciEisrcE 1.

Five periods a week, Winter term.

A

study of the matter and method of a General Science course in the high school. Recitations, demonstrations, and presentations of topics. Elective in Course IV.

Five

credits.

Text Book: Caldwell and Eikenberry's General Science supplemented with current science magazines. Hygiene Five

the grades. school

and

Five periods

2.

credits.

all

week.

Offered every term.

problems of school hygiene.

tion of school children

ment.

a

The matter and method of hygiene teaching in The teachers' care of children. Sanitation of the

Required in

Text Books

:

all

Physical examinaand the problems of physical develop-

courses.

Pyle's Personal Hygiene, and various texts

on School Hygiene.

Gaedenixg 3. Three periods a week, two single, one double. Spring term. Three credits. Home and school, vegetable, flower, and landscape gardening. A practical course for teachers in care and culture of plants for the home and school. Beautifying home and school grounds. A study of the selection and arrangement of trees, shrubbery, vines, bedding, and bordering plants, and of the selection of available native plants. Planning, planting, and culture of vegetable gardens, including a study of soils, seeds, plant propagation, weeds and insect pests, plant diseases, and the like. Practical experience in real gardening. Laboratory experiments, observation trips.

.


.

Departments of Instruction

46

References: ren's

Home and

Davis'

School Gardening; AVarGoverninent bulletins and other

Elements of Agriculture.

library references.

^sTature Study 4, Three periods a week. Offered Fall and Spring terms. Three credits. A content and method course for nature study in the primary and grammar grades. ISTature study material for the different seasons. Emphasis on common animals, birds, insects, trees, flowers. Course of study for the grades. Field and laboratory work.

References:

Comstock's

Handbook

of

Nature

Study;

Moltz's Nature Study; Scott's Nature Study and the Child, and other library references.

Physiology

5. Three periods a week, one double, two single. Three credits. The physiology of the human body with the gross and microscopic anatomy as a background. Recitations, lectures, laboratory work, and demonstrations. Required in Course Y, elective in Course IV.

Fall term.

Text Book

:

Human Body

Martin's

(Advanced Course)

Physiology single.

ology

5.

6. Three periods a week, one double and two Winter term. Three credits. A continuation of PhysiRequired in Course V, elective in Course IV,

Text Book:

Martin's

Advanced Biology

Human Body

(Advanced Course).

Four periods a week, two double, Four credits. The anatomy, physiThe relation of these ology, and ecology of the higher plants. to agTiculture, the industries, and the things of everyday life. Method of teaching this work in the high school taken up in two

single.

7.

Fall term.

connection with

all

the work.

work, demonstrations,

field

Recitations, lectures, laboratory

work.

Elective in Course IV.

Text Book: Gager's Fundamentals

of

Botany combined

with library references.

Advanced Biology double, two single. tion of

8.

Botany.

Winter term.

Advanced Biology

7.

Four periods a week, two Four credits. A continua-

Xon-flowering plants, their struc-


47

Biology

and ecology. The relation of these to human Development of the plant gTOups. Methods of teaching Bacteria and their relation to agriculture, the these subjects. industries, and the home. Recitation, lectures, laboratory work, demonstrations. Field work. Elective in Course IV. ture, physiology, life.

Gager's Fundamentals of Botany combined Text Book with library references. :

Advanced Biology

Four period a week, two 9. Zoology. Spring term. Four credits. A continuaThe principles of general tion of Advanced Biology 7 and 8. biology, heredity. The morphology and development of animal double, two single.

gTOups, their ecological relations. oratory work, demonstrations.

Lectures, recitations, lab-

Field work.

Elective in Course

IV.

Text Book

Linville and Kelly's

:

A

Text Book of General

Zoology, supplemented with library references.

Bacteriology

10. Five periods a week, three double, two Spring term. Five credits. Bacteria, their morphology and physiology. Their relation to soil, mineral deposits, industries, and human life. Technique of making cultures and the study of the same. Microscopic study of the bacteria, staining, mounting, etc. Laboratory work, recitation, and lectures. in Elective Course IV. single.

Text Book

Marshall's Microhiology.

:

Prerequisite

:

Advanced Biology

Plaxt Physiology two

single.

Fall term.

7, 8, 9.

Four periods a week, two double, Four credits. The principles of plant

11.

physiology, and the relation of these to agriculture, horticul-

and the industries.

Relation to food production Laboratory work, lectures, recitations. Elective in Course IV. ture, forestry,

and

utilization.

Text Book: Prerequisite

Clement's Plant Physiology and Ecology. :

Advanced Biology

7, 8, 9.


Departments of Instruction

48

12. Four periods a week, two double, two Winter term. Four credits. The problems of agriculture and the facts of practical agriculture and horticulture. The application of these matters to high school agriculture and

Agriculture

single.

Laboratory work,

other subjects.

Text Book Through

field

work, lectures, recita-

Elective in Course IV.

tions, reports.

Jackson

:

the Laboratory

and Daugherty's Agriculture and School Garden, supplemented by

reference work.

Prerequisites: Advanced Biology 10, and Plant Physiology 11.

Methods

7,

8,

9,

Bacteriology

in Biology 13.

Four periods a week, one double Four credits. Methods in high school biology including general science and some study of nature study and hygiene for the grades. Purpose of courses in general science, botany, zoology, and physiology. Matter and method of the courses. Laboratory methods, equipment, and procedure. Collection and preservation of animal and plant and three

single.

material.

Elective in Course IV.

Spring term.

Text Book Lloyd and Bigelow's The Teaching of Biology and the various high school texts on biology. :

Prerequisites

:

Physiology

5,

Advanced Biology

Bacteriology 10, Plant Physiology 11.

7,

8,

9,


Chemistet and Physics

49

CHEMISTRY AXD PHYSICS MR. FETTIG

In

this

department the

effort is

made

to develop the scientific

habit of thought, to teach the student to observe accurately and

make application common in her daily

of her knowledge to the facts which are

to

Chemistet

Inorganic Chemistry.

3.

2,

1,

experience.

Five periods a

week, two single, three double, throughout the year. Five credits

General and Inorganic Chemistry, emphasizing the underlying theories. Special reference to household applications. Laboratory work consisting of a study of the general reactions Spring term given to a course in qualof the various elements. each term.

Required in Course V,

itative analysis.

Test Book:

elective in

Course IV.

McPherson and Henderson's General Chem-

istry.

Laboeatory Fee

Chemistet

:

One

dollar

and

a half per term.

Organic Chemistry. Five periods a week, Five credits, each term. The fundamentals of Organic Chemistry, including a descriptive study of both aliphatic and aromatic compounds with emphasis on their applications and uses. Laboratory work consisting of a study of the typical reactions and the preparation of various compounds. Elective in Course IV. 4, 5, 6.

three single, two double, throughout the year.

Text Book: Peeeequisite

Remsen's Oragnic Chemistry. Inorganic Chemistry

:

Laboeatoet Fee

:

One

dollar

and

1.

a half per term.

Phtsics 1, 2, 3. Five periods a week throughout the year. Five credits each term. A review and extension of high school physics emphasizing mathematical development of theories together with practical applications. Elective in Course IV.

Text Book:

To be

selected.

High School Physics. Peeeequisites Trigonometry and Algebra. :

Elements of Plane


Depaktments of Instruction

50

DRAAVING MISS COULLING

The purpose

of the department

is

to develop an appreciation

of the beautiful, train the powers of observation, secure

degree of those

skill in expression,

who have

some

develop originality, and prepare

special aptitude for the subject to be teachers of

drawing.

Drawing

Two

1.

periods a week.

Two

Fall term.

credits.

Lettering, poster making, study of the theory of color with applications to definite projects, principles of balance, rhythm,

harmony, subordination applied in simple designs. Required of

all

First

Year students who do not take Indus-

trial Arts.

Drawing

2.

Two

periods a week.

Two

AYinter term.

Principles of curvilinear and rectilinear perspective

credits.

applied in the drawing of familiar objects,

still life

in line, decorative treatment in tones of gray,

composition

and in

color.

First Year, groups A, B, and C, Courses II and III.

Drawing

3.

IS^ature

credits.

Two periods a week. Spring term. Two drawing, development of design motives, appli-

cation in decorative spot, border, surface to

making of

a stencil, block printing.

First

fill

class needs,

Year groups

A ^nd

C, Courses II and III. 4. Two periods a week. Spring term. Two Course in planning and decorating the rural home and First Year group B, Courses II and III.

Drawing credits.

school.

Drawing

5

and

6.

non-teaching terms.

Two

periods a week for two terms

Drawing

5,

Fall

—the

and Winter terms.

Winter and Spring terms. Two credits each term. A course in methods and drawing for primary teachers. Different systems of drawing compared, a suggestive course out-

Drawing

6,


51

Drawijntg

lined, lesson plans

and topic plans written, practice in drawing

Blackboard drawing continued under each topic considered. and decoration. Second Year, Course II.

Reference Text Learn

to

Dra\\^ixg

Three

Sargent

:

and Miller's

How

Children

Draw. T.

Three periods

Offered every term.

a week.

Similar to Drawing 5 and

credits.

Condensed form

6.

grammar grade teachers. Second Year, Course III. Reference Text Sargent and Miller's How Children

for

:

Learn

to

Draw.

Two double periods a week. Winter term. Planned for those who wish to teach drawing in high schools. A course in methods of teaching the subject and working out of the principles in different mediums, with difDrawing Two credits.

8.

ferent problems.

Open only to Course IV students having who have had Drawing 1 or the equivalent.

Drawing

Two

9.

A

credits.

Two

special aptitude

Spring term. Study of the prin-

double periods a week.

continuation of

Drawing

8.

ciples of design with applications, historic styles studied for ap-

preciation and for the basis for original units and color.

Drawing 10. Drawing ayid- Design. Three periods a week, two single, one double. Fall term. Three credits. Lettering and poster making. Color theory with applications to be used in costume design and interior decoration, design with same applications. Planned for students specializing in Home Economics.

Text Book:

Harold Haren Browoi's Applied Drawing.

Drawing

Drawing and Design.

two

single,

tinuation of position,

11.

one double.

Drawing

10.

Three periods a week, Three credits. A conPerspective principles, still life com-

Winter term.

and landscape composition.

Text Book

:

Harold Haren Brown's Applied Draiving.


Departments of Instruction

52

Drawing Fall term.

12.

Two

Advanced Drawing. credits.

Two

periods a week.

Lettering, poster raaking, theory of

color, its intensities, values,

harmonies, application to definite Open only to those who have

needs, landscape composition.

had high school drawing or equivalent.

Drawing 13. Advanced Drawing. Two periods a week. Winter term. Two credits. A continuation of Drawing 12. Caste drawing in charcoal, still life compositions in charcoal, color.

Drawing Spring term. 13.

A

A

14.

Advanced Drawing.

Two

credits.

A

Two

continuation of

periods a week.

Drawing 12 and

course in applied design.

small fee

drawing.

is

charged

all

students

who

take any class in


:

53

Educatio:n'

1

DR.

DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATION

TIDYMAN, MR. COYNER, MR. BELL, MISS STUBBS, MISS CULKIN, MISS JONES, MISS HAYNES, MISS BIERBOWER

Preparation for teaching

is

regarded as a gradual growth in

the understanding and the control of the various elements that

enter into the teaching processes.

the teaching processes

The

learner.

is

The

basis for understanding

the student's

own experience

as

a

facts of learning obtained through introspection,

and further through the observation of children, are interpreted and systematized in the introductory psychology courses. Understanding is furthered, and some control of the teaching processes is developed through participation in the work of the Training School. This participation begins with coaching individuals and small groups of children, and assisting the regular teacher and it culminates in taking complete charge of a class ;

or a section for a considerable part of

its

work.

In general the academic work serves to interpret, evaluate, and organize the student's concrete experience and, apart from the introductory psychology courses, it is organized around what are regarded as the five main problems of teaching, as follows (1) determination of aims and values, (2) selection and organization of material, (3) presentation of material, (4) class and school management, and (5) extra school activities. The first course or gi-oup of courses serves to acquaint the teacher with the fundamental processes of education, and the place and the function of education in a democratic society the second shows the application of these aims to the selection and organization of material the third familiarizes the teacher with the accepted methods and devices for handling material the fourth gives her some insight into the methods of class management and school administration and the fifth shows her the value of making the school a vital force in the life of the community, and how this ;

;

;

;

;

may

be done.

^ The Supervisors of the TrainiDg School are members of the Department of Education, and teach the courses listed for them in this department.


:

Depaktmeis'ts of Instruction

54

in order that the work of the Department of Education may be adapted to the needs of students entering various depart-

ments of public school

and

service, differentiated courses

spe-

namely, kindergarten, primary grades, grammar grades, and high school. The work of the primary and grammar grades is further differentiated to meet the needs of students preparing for teaching in the city cialized courses are offered in four fields

:

and in the country.

The

courses offered in the Department are as follows

Elementary Educational Psychology

Five periods a 1, Five credits. The general facts and laws of human behavior, with especial reference to the principles that have a bearing upon the modes of learning and teaching. Characteristics of pupils in the several grade groups, teaching probweek.

Fall term.

lems, personal qualities that

make

for success, vocational oppor-

and professional advantages, are considered as a giiide to the intelligent selection of courses at the end of the term. Class discussion, experiments in learning, and some observation of the work in the Training School. Required of all

tunities,

students.

Text Book

:

Colvin and Bagley's

Human

Behavior.

Educational Psychology 2. Four periods a* week. Winter term. Four credits. The phenomena of child nature, its development and control. Main topics: instincts their nature, function, and control habits sense activities memory and thinking in children; individual differences. Required in Courses I and II.

—

;

Text Book:

;

;

N"orsworthy and Whitley's The Psychology of

Childhood.

Educational

Psychology

Three periods a week. Three credits (T ) a preliminaTy survey of the periods of life and their ruling tendencies; (2) the characteristics, needs, and treatment of adolescent nature, physical, intellectual, aesthetic, moral, and religious; (3) the psychology of

Winter term.

:

3.


.

Education

55

learning, including self-activity, apperception, interests, habit-

formation, individual differences as determined by heredity, sex, and environment, mental fatigue, mental hygiene. jSTo

one text book

literature bearing

Child Study Three

is

adequate, but use will be

upon 4.

the course.

made

Three periods a week.

Relation of society to childhood.

credits.

of recent

Required in Course }\ Spring term. Prenatal life

Care of infants. Mental and physical characteristics of children from infancy up to adolescence but not including it. Course especially adapted to needs of students who will conduct Mothers' Meetings in connection with kindergarten and lower grade work. Required in Course I. of child.

Text Book Tanner's The Supplementary Reading: :

Child.

Terman's

Hygiene

of

the

School Child, Government bulletins and other bulletins on Child Welfare.

Introduction

to

Elementary

Education 5. Four Eour credits.

periods a week, offered Winter and Spring terms.

Meaning and function of education, aims and values, distinctive aim and purpose of the elementary school, preliminary survey of the work of the teacher, the teacher as a leader in community activities.

Required in Courses

I, II,

and III.

Kindergarten-Primary Curriculum 6. Four periods a week for one term. Offered every term. Four credits. Origin of kindergarten and primary schools contrasting original differences in aim with present day unity of purpose. Xeeds of children as basis for present day kindergarten-primary curriculum. Critical study of subjects composing typical courses of study in light of childrens' physical and psychological requirements. Evaluation and correlation of such subjects. Required in Course I.

Text Books Dewey's The Child and The Curriculum, Dewey's School and Society. :

Supplementary Text riculum.

:

Meriam's Child Life and the Cur-

Library references.


Depaetments of Instructioj^

56

Pkimaey Cueeiculum

Four periods Four credits.

a

7.

Offered every term.

term.

week

for

one

The experience, abilities, interests, and social needs of children considered as basic ideas governing choice of subject matter for kindergarten and primary grades. Tentative courses in the fundamental school subjects planned for grades 1-4. Required in Course II.

Geammae Geade Cueeiculum Spring term.

Three

8.

Three periods a week.

Significance of the curriculum,

credits.

value of subjects, general principles controlling the selection of material, results and tendencies in the reorganization of the

methods of curriculum making.

several subjects, scientific

Re-

quired in Course III.

Kindeegaetek-Peimaey Technics

Three

9.

periods

a

Ryhthmic plays and games, singing games, simple dancing evolving from free exMethods in presenting and directing pression, folk dances. games and dances. Special attention given to the organization Winter term.

week.

of

children's

Three

credits.

simple festivals

and pageants.

Required in

Courses I and II.

Text To be selected. Supplementaey Text :

:

Johnson's Education hy Plays and

Games.

Kindeegaetex-Peimaey Technics week, one double and two single.

A

Three periods a Three credits.

10.

Fall term.

continuation of Kindergarten-Primary Technics

sion

and

selection of suitable materials to

grow^th of children.

based

upon

especial

Discus-

Methods of presentation of such materials,

psychological

principles

already

attention given to experimental

Extensive experimentation with paper in

Required in Course Library references.

textiles.

9.

promote the mental studied

work and all

with

projects.

forms, clay, and

I.

Kindeegaeten-Peimaey Technics week, one double, and two single.

11. Three periods a Winter term. Three credits.


Education

57

A

continuation of Kindergarten-Primary Technics 9 and 10. Discussion of the evolution of kindergarten theory. Intensive study of the educational value of toys, blocks, sand, and apparratus contrasted with early Froebelian and Montessorian mate-

Free cutting and tearing of paper, drawing and painting Required in Course I.

rial.

studied in connection with blackboard decoration.

Text Books

Atwood's Kindergarten Theory and Practice. Supplementary reading. :

Primaky Methods 12. Four periods a week for one term. Offered every term. Four credits. A practical course for primary teachers. General aspect of the learning process treated as basis of method. From this a development of the main types of teaching. Method in the special subjects, Arithmetic, Spelling, and Writing. The drill lesson especially emphasized. Required in Courses I and II.

Peimaey Methods Offered every term.

Four periods

13.

Four

credits.

A

a

week for one term.

continuation of Primary

Methods 12. Principles and methods involved in teaching Reading and Langiiage (and Civics?). Special emphasis given to beginning reading. Required in Courses I and II.

Grammar Grade Methods 14 and 15. Four periods a week for two terms. Methods 14, Fall term; Methods 15, Winter Term. Four credits each term. Principles, methods and devices of teaching the grammar grade subjects. Special emphasis placed upon subjects receiving least attention in the special methods courses. Fundamental principles of methods and types of procedure developed from the study and comparison of similar subjects, such as the instrumental subjects.

Re-

quired in Course III.

Management 16. Two periods a week in Course I. Two credits. Four periods a week in Courses

term. III.

Offered Winter and Spring.

of school routine

;

discipline

school laws and regulations

;

;

Four

credits.

lesson planning

;

Organization

testing

records and reports

;

Spring II and

state

;

common and

local


Departments of

58 organization

;

school support

I:!^structiox

teacher's relation to the super-

;

intendent, principal, board, and patrons

Required in Courses

I,

;

professional ethics.

II and III.

High School Methods

Management

aistd

Three

periods a week. Spring term.

credits.

Three

17.

Meaning and

function of education, aims and values, distinctive purpose and place of the high school, the work of the teacher,

community

high school curriculum, values of subjects, scienmethods in curriculum making, arrangement of courses and

activities, the tific

Required in Course IV.

subjects.

High

Methods and Management

School

periods a week.

in the high school subjects,

thinking,

flective

18. Four Types of teaching forming associations and habits, re-

Four

Fall term.

credits.

problem solving, appreciation, questioning,

supervised study, lesson planning, measuring the results of instruction, organizing class routine, discipline,

common

school

laws and regiilations, state and local educational organization, records and reports.

Required in Course IV.

Methods and Management

Four periods a week. Winter term. Four credits. Meaning and purpose of education, particular aims, the High School curriculum, values of 19.

subjects, reorganization of subjects, organization of material for

presentation, organizing and administering class routine, discipline,

teacher's

relation

to

the

community.

Required in

Course V.

School

Administration and Supervision 20. Four Fall term. Four credits. Problems in the administration and supervision of village schools, such as, organperiods a week.

ization of the teaching force cipline

;

;

supervision of instruction

;

dis-

principal's relation to the school board, teachers, pupils,

and patrons adapting the school to community needs classification and promotion of pupils; and measuring the results of instruction. Required in Course IV. ;

;

History of Education 21. Four periods a week. Spring Four credits. Course supplying background for other

term.


Education courses in education.

59

Special attention given to the educational

Rousseau and Froebel and their relation to modern educational practice. Development of primary schools and kindergartens in America. Survey of outstanding present day experiments in primary education. Required in Course I. theories of Locke,

Refekences

Parker's History of Modern Elementary Edto Montessori; Vaudavaller's Kin-

:

ucation; Boyd's

From Locke

dergarten in American Education; Dewey's Schools of To-

morrow.

HiSTOKY AND PeINCIPLES OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 22. Four periods a week. Offered Fall and Spring terms. Four credits. A course intended to summarize and organize the work of all the other courses in education. ent

content, aim, ditions.

An

education,

in

practices

in

Attention given to pres-

administration,

organization,

and method, viewed in the light of earlier conattempt made to show the relation of education

to society as a whole, in the various stages of social development.

Required in Courses II and IT I.

Text Book

:

To

be supplied.

History and Principles of Secondary Education 23. Four periods a week. Winter term. Four credits. DesigTied to acquaint the student with the general tendencies in second-

ary education, by making a critical study of them in their origin

Some comparative study made

and development.

education in other countries.

of secondary

Required in Course IV.

Spring term. Four own problems in thinking in connection with the varying problems of leading thinkers from the time of the ancient Greeks to the present, with

Ppiilosophy 24.

credits.

A

Four periods

consideration of the

a week.

student's

special reference to the current systems of thought, materialism,

idealism, pragmatism, and dualism, as represented by Hseckel

and Santayana, Course IV.

Royce,

James,

and Bergson.

Elective

in

Text Book: Roger's A Student's History of Philosophy, supplemented by histories of Windelband, Weber, Schwegler, and references to the original sources.


Departments of Instruction

60

Senior Conferences 25. Three periods a week. Spring Three credits. A systematic and practical review of courses in games, handwork, literature, and music, designed to correlate and supplement these courses. Survey of all available source material upon songs, games, and dances and literature term.

The acquainting

for children.

tions existing in the state.

Apprentice

of students with actual Required in Course I.

situa-

Work

26. Three periods a week for Course week for Course II. Offered in the term preceding the teaching term. Three or five credits. Observations, working with individual pupils and small gTOups, assist-

III,

and

five periods a

Required in Courses

ing the teacher, conferences.

II,

III

and IV.

and Observation 27. Second year of all and fourth year of Course IV. Eight periods throughout the year in Course I, one-half year in Kindergarten and one-half year in the Primary Grades 17 periods in Course II for one term; 19 periods in Course III; 12 periods in Course IV 6 periods in Course V 5 periods throughout the Fourth Year of Course IV. Credits as indicated in course of study. Teaching

courses,

;

;

;

Conference of Course IV.

28. Second year of all courses and fourth year Three periods, two double and one single. ISTo

credits.

Rural Education undertaken in response to the increasing demand are definitely trained to do the same high-class work in country schools as has been done for some time in city This work

for teachers

schools.

is

who

The aim

of the course

to give special preparation

is

for teaching graded country schools.

The improvement

of country life and education

greatest problems of our century. tion should be undertaken

work

in

To

is one of the important that its solu-

by those whose

capacities are best suited to tunities.

It is

its

interests

characteristic needs

and native and oppor-

this end, the student does not elect definitely the

Rural Education until the second term of her First


;

Education The work

Year.

61

is uniform with that of the For the remaining terms of the pro-

of the first term

other professional courses.

aim is not only to acquaint the student with methods and principles of teaching, but also to give her some knowledge of country life conditions and the interrelation between them and the work of the country school, and to aid her to adapt general principles and methods to the needs and refessional years the

sources of various types of rural schools.

Rural Teachino Problems subject matter of vital interest to

Four periods a week. Four credits. Selection of the country boy or girl, and

30.

Offered Winter and Spring terms.

methods adapted to the country school needs

;

arrangement of

matter into units centering about fundamental phases of country life, experiences, and needs methods of adapting the State Course of Study to the needs of the country child; organization and administrative problems. Required of the

subject

;

group B, Courses II and III.

References: books

;

State Course of Study; Public school Books on rural education.

Rural Sociology

text

Three periods a w^eek for one term. A constructive and apprecredits. ciative study of conditions and problems of rural communities with special emphasis upon Virginia types of communities shifting population improvement of the business side of farming especially such topics as rural credits and cooperative marketing social aspects of land and labor improvement of transportation and communication relations of the farmer to Rethe other occupational groups and to society as a whole. quired of group B, Courses II and III. 31.

Three

Offered every term.

;

;

—

;

;

;

Text Book

:

Gillett's Constructive

Rural Sociology.

References: pin's

Vogt's Introduction to Rural Sociology; GalRural Life; Current Articles and Bulletins.

Rural Sociology

Three periods a week for one term. Three credits. A constructive study of the rural institutions and agencies for social and industrial betOffered every term.

32.


Departments of Instruction

62

The community, home, church and school, comnaunity community leagues, farmers' organizafarm and home extension work, charities and corrections,

terment.

houses, libraries, clubs, tions,

Y. M. C. A. and Y.

W.

C. A. work. State and ]^ational insti-

and agencies. Rural surveys and of group B, Courses II and III. tutions

Text Book

:

References: pin's

Gillett's Constnictive

legislation.

Required

Rural Sociology.

Vogt's Introduction to Rural Sociology; Gal-

Rural Life; Current Articles and Bulletins.

Country School Management

33.

Two

periods a week.

Spring term. Two credits. A constructive study of rural school conditions and problems. Types of buildings methods of heating, lighting and ventilating; improvement of school grounds; the teacher, her mental and physical qualifications the making of daily programs with special emphasis upon combinations and grouping of classes and subjects a brief study of types of lessons and methods of teaching the common branches. Practical observation in country schools when possible. This course may be substituted for music in the Spring term of the First Year by those students who do not expect to return for the Second Year. ;

;

;

Text Book: Culter and Stone's The Rural School, Methods and Management.

Its

References: Bagley's Classroom Management; Carney's Country Life and the Country School; Books on Rural Education; Timely articles in current newspapers and magazines.

Rural Observation and Conferences 34. One period a week for Fall term and one for the Spring term. Two credits. Observation of work in nearby rural schools in company with the rural supervisor

—studying grounds,

buildings, organization

and methods of teaching. Written reports and weekly discussions of problems and standards. Required of group B, Courses II and III. of

classes,


English

63

EA^GLISH ME. GRAINGER, MISS WILLIE LONDON, MISS SCOTT, MISS BUGG, MRS. BRETNALL

The teaching

of English in the

Xormal School aims

to give

the needed practical training in the correct and effective use of

the usual forms of oral and written discourse for everyday pur-

Projects representing typical activities of school and

poses.

community

serve to motivate

life

of Literature

is

much

and appreciation of good reading and

to acquaint

best literature frequently used in the elementary schools.

The

The study

of the work.

introduced to increase the students' enjoyment

them with the and secondary

courses in methods of teaching English in

its

various branches inform the prospective teachers in regard to the aims, materials, and methods of this work.

The

actual needs and working possibilities of the students are

discovered at the beginning of each course by means of

tests,

and the work is planned to meet the most vital needs. The English Department constantly attempts to correlate its courses closely with those of other departments and seeks the active cooperation of

work

teachers in the

all

Xormal School

in

making the

effective.

English Fall term.

Oral

1.

Four

Composition.

credits.

Practical

dents to talk and write effectively.

scheduled for this class are given to a

Four work

periods to

a

week.

enable the stu-

Five periods of the time study of Library Methods.

Text Books Slater's Freshman Rhetoric, Woolley's Handhooh of Composition, Webster's Secondary School Dic:

tionary.

English

2.

in Courses

I,

Three periods a week and Y. Four periods in Course IV. Oft'ered Winter and Spring terms. Three or Four credits. A continuation of English 1. Emphasis on writing, with extensive review of English grammar in Course IV. Required of all students.

^Yritten Composition.

II, III,


Departments of Instruction

64

Four periods a week. Offered General reading in the literature every teacher should know, with intensive study of selected masterpieces and the planning of individual courses for future Supplementary work in composition as needed. Rereading.

English

quired in

Literature.

3.

Four

every term.

credits.

Courses.

all

Text Books

Smith's

:

What Can

Houston and Bonuell's Type's

Literature

Do For Me ?

of Great Literature, The Atlantic

Monthly.

English

American Literature. Four periods a week. Four credits. A rapid survey with wide readRequired trace the development of American ideals. 4,

Spring term. ings to

in Course IV.

Text Books

American LitAmerican literature,

Pattee's Century Readings in

:

erature, a standard text in the history of

The Atlantic Monthly.

English

One period a week. One credit. Individual

English Conference.

5.

fered Winter and Spring terms.

Ofin-

struction to improve the students' oral and written English in all classes and in teaching. Required in Course II.

English

Attention to individual reading.

Child Literature.

6.

fered Fall and Winter terms.

Four

Four periods credits.

a week.

Of-

Historical survey

Analysis and selection of types of Special emphasis on choice and

of literature for children.

literature suitable for children.

presentation of poetry in kindergarten and primary grades.

Dramatization. Methods and practice in story Required in Courses I and II. Given by the Kindergarten Department. Picture study.

telling.

Text Books

:

School, Bryant's

MacClintock's Literature in the Elementary

How

to

Tell Stories to Children, Extensive

supplementary reading.

English

7.

Library Methods and Child Literature. Two Offered every term. Two credits.

periods a week for one term.


EXGLISH

The aims

of this course:

to

65

acquaint students with the State

laws concerning State and district aid in securing public school libraries

;

to train

them

in the proper administration of such

libraries while teaching; to

make them

familiar with some of

the best literature for children, and to suggest methods of creating a love for such literature. Required in Course III.

Given

by the Librarian.

English

English

8.

in

the

periods a week for one term.

Grammar

Three Three

Grades.

Offered every term.

Advanced work in oral and written exposition based on the study of the principles underlying the teaching of English and their applications in the gTammar grades. Required in Second Year, Course III. credits.

Text Books

To be

:

selected.

English 9. English in the High School. Eour periods a week for one term. Offered every term. Four credits. Advanced work in oral and written exposition based on the study of the principles underlying the teaching of English and their applications in the high school. Required in Second Year, Course IV.

Text Books Hosic's Reorganization of English in Secondary Schools, Manual and Courses of Study for High Schools in Virginia, The English Jouimal. :

English

English Literature. Eour periods a week. credits. This course and English 11 and 12 taken together constitute a survey study of the national ideals in literature, beginning in the fall with the Romantic Period. Eall term.

10.

Four

Elective in Second Year, Course IV.

Text Books tion, Halleck's

English

Greenlaw and Hanford's The Great TradiEnglish Literature. :

11.

English Literature.

Four credits. The Victorian Era and recent

M^inter term.

Year, Course IV.

A

Four periods

a

week.

continuation of English

literature.

9.

Elective in Second


Departments of Instruction

66

English 11.

English Literature.

12.

Four

Spring term.

A

credits.

Four periods

a week.

continuation of English 10 and

Chronological survey of the great periods, writers, and

aspects of English literature.

Elective in Second Year, Course

IV.

Advanced Composition. Four periods a Four credits. Training in the kinds of writing and speaking which teachers need as leaders in school and community life. Elective in Third Year, Course IV.

English

week.

13.

Fall term.

Text Books

Cunliffe and Lonier's Writing of To-day,

:

The

Atlantic Monthly.

English 14. World Masterpieces in English Translation. Four periods a week. Winter term. Four credits. Each student selects one great national masterpiece for careful reading

and study and conducts the work of the class in a brief study (Alternates annually with of the most significant parts. English 15.) Elective in Third Year, Course IV.

English Winter term.

Literary

15.

Four

Four periods a week. Each student selects one of the

Types.

credits.

principal types of literature for wide reading and intensive

study and conducts the work of the class in a brief study of it. (Alternates annually with English 14.) Elective in Third Year, Course IV.

English 16. Shakespeare. Four periods a week. Spring Four credits. Six plays selected for study, with rapid

term.

reading of other significant plays, and of the peare, and standard criticism of his works.

English 17.)

:

Shakespeare's

Poems, and Sonnets,

English

Shakes-

Elective in Third Year, Course IV.

Text Books tories,

life of

Alternates with

Tragedies,

3 vols.,

Comedies,

His-

Everyman's Library.

Modern Drama. Four periods a week. Four credits. Plays by Ibsen, Shaw, Pinero, Maeterlinck, Henry Arthur Jones, and other significant draSpring term.

17.


English

67

matists of the day, studied with the aid of contemporary dra-

(Alternates with English 16.) matic criticism. Third Year, Course IV.

Text Books English week.

Copies of plays selected.

:

18.

Fall term.

English.

Elective in

The English Language. Four periods Four credits. A survey of the growth

(Alternates with English 21.)

a of

Elective in Fourth

Year, Course IV.

Text Book

:

Emerson's History of the English Language.

English 19. Literacy Criticism. Four periods a week. Winter term. Four credits. A study of the principles and methods of judging literary productions, applied in the reading of current literature. in

(Alternates with English 22.)

Elective

Fourth Year, Course IV.

Text Books: Brewster's Modem English The Atlantic Monthly.

Literary Criti-

cism,

English

Essay

20.

Writing.

Four

periods

a

week.

Spring term. Four credits. Instruction and practice in advanced composition. (Alternates with English 23.) Elective in Fourth Year, Course IV.

Text:

The Altantic Monthly.

English a week. turies.

Year.

21.

American Ideals in Four credits.

Fall term.

Literature.

XVII

(Alternates with English 18.)

and

Four periods

XVIII

Cen-

Elective in Fourth

Course IV.

Text Books:

Bronson's American Prose and American Poems, complete texts of additional works, a standard history of American literature.

English

22. American Ideals in Literature. Four periods Winter term. Four credits. XIX Century. (Alternates with English 19.) Elective in Fourth Year, Course IV.

a week.

English

22.

American Ideals in

Literature.

XX

Four periods

Spring term. Four credits. Century. (Alternates with English 20.) Elective in Fourth Year, Course IV. a week.


Departments of Instruction

68

GEOGEAPHY MISS DIETRICH

The aim

of this department

three-fold

is

:

First, to train the

student to observe closely and accurately the world in which she lives,

and by careful reasoning

about certain phenomena.

to

come

to definite conclusions

Second, through the study of the

races of mankind, their homes, industries, habits, and general

responses to physical environment, to lead her to wider sympa-

Third, thies and broader views. raphy in the public schools.

Geography

to prepare her to teach geog-

Four periods a week. Four credits. A study of the most prominent countries. Emphasis on Geographical facts that make each suitable as a home for man. Special emphasis during the last month on the study of the Holy Land. General Geography.

1.

Offered every term.

Text Book: Second

Tarr and McMurry's

"New

Geographies,"

Boole.

Geography

and Methods of Geography. Spring term. Five credits. Study made of earth's physical features, and relations of land, air, and water to life. Last half of term devoted to review of subject matter adapted to Primary Grades, and methods of teaching it. First Year, Course II. Five periods

2.

Principles

a week.

Tarr and McMurry's "New Geographies," Booh; Salisbury, Barrow, and Tower's "Modern Ge-

Text Books: First

ography."

Geography 3. Principles and Methods of Geography. Five periods a week. Winter term. Five credits. Review of fundamental principles and of subject matter taught in intermediate and grammar grades. Methods of presentation. First Year, Course III.

Text Books Tarr and McMurry's "New Geographies," Second Book; Salisbury, Barrow, and Tower's "Modern Geog:

raphy."


Geography Geography

69

Geography. Four periods a Causes of industrial proType industries studied. Comparisons of nations on gress. Especially adapted to those basis of industrial development. planning to teach Geography in the high school. Elective in Industrial

4.

Winter term.

week.

Four

credits.

Course IV.

Text

:

To

be supplied.

Geography

5. Commercial Geography. Four periods a Spring term. Four credits. A study of chief commodities of commerce transportation routes development of trade commerce of various nations. Preferably a continuation of Industrial Geography 4, but may be elected alone. Elective in Course IV.

week.

;

;

;

Geography tory.

6.

Influence of Geography on American HisWinter term. Four credits. Gea week.

Four periods

ographic conditions leading to discovery of United States

manent settlements on continent

;

;

per-

expansion from Atlantic sea-

board to Mississippi River. This course presupposes a familiarity with fundamental principles of Geography and main facts of American History and is

who plan to teach American History Third and Fourth Year students, and Open to

especially helpful to those in high schools.

Second Year students upon the consent of the Head of the Department. to

Text Books

:

Semple's Influence of Geography on Amer-

ican History; Brigham's Geographic Influences in American History.

Geography

7.

Influence of Geography on American HisSpring term. Four credits. A

Four periods a week. continuation of Geography 6. tory.

Purchase of Louisiana Territory and expansion beyond the Rockies. A detailed study is made of Geographic influences on Civil War. Development of United States into a world power.

Text Books

:

Semple's Influence of Geography on Amer-

ican History; Brigham's Geographic Influences in American History.


Departments of Instruction

70

Geography

Any

term.

Political Geography.

8.

Four

A study

credits.

Four periods

a week.

of elements of strength or of

weakness, economic status, international relations, and probable future of the leading nations of the world, lectures and reports

on outside reading.

A

Open

to

Third and Fourth Year students.

helpful course for students of European History.

with Geography

Geography

Any

Human

9.

Four

term.

Alternates

Offered upon sufficient demand.

9.

credits.

Geography. Four periods a week. The study of the relation of geo-

gTaphic environment to human activity. A few special problems studied to illustrate the influence of geographic conditions

upon human dents.

progress.

Open

to

Third and Fourth Year stu8. Offered upon sufficient

Alternates with Geography

demand.

Text Book:

Human

Hunting'ton Geography.

Geography

and

Cushing's

Principles

of

Biblical Geography. Three periods a Three credits. As full a study as time permits of Palestine and neighboring districts. Present day conditions compared with those of Bible times. Purpose: better acquaintance with location of places and people mentioned in Bible. Offered upon sufficient demand.

week.

Any

10.

term.

Text Books

:

The Bible and Library

references.


Handwriting

Y1

HA^^D WRITING MISS DINWIDDIE, MISS ALVIS

—

The work in handwriting aims first, to make good writers, and second, to prepare students for efficient teaching of handwriting. Direct, specific, tested methods of teaching, coupled with the ability to write well, can alone produce the desired results. The following course, then, has the twofold aim of making good writers and preparing good teachers of writing. The muscular movement method, adopted by the State Board of Education for use in the schools of the State, is taught in this course.

Three periods a week for one term. Offered Three credits. Definite instruction on handling material, posture, movement, the me-

Handwriting.

Fall and Winter terms.

and

drills

chanics

of

writing,

etc.

;

the

psychology

of

handwriting,

adapting methods to the physical and mental development of the child, the place of formal drills, motivation of writing,

standards of excellence in handwriting, the technique of class instruction, the physiology

and hygiene of writing, measuring

the results with the scales of Locker and Ayres, and the correlation of handwriting instruction with other written

the curriculum.

work

in


Departments of Instkuction

Y2

HISTOKY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES MR. LEAB, MISS TUCKER, MISS BUGG

The

courses offered in this department besides being intended

prepare the students to teach a definite part of the curriculum of the public schools are intended also to acquaint them with

to

the organization of society of

comjDonent parts,

its

may

not only

member

its

—

its

structure, the interrelationship

more important

institutions

—

so that

the student be able to play a proper role as a

of society but that she

may

be better able to prepare

others to play such a part.

Sociology

1.

fered every term.

Four periods a week. OfThe influence of heredity and

Social Problems.

Four

credits.

environment, social and physical, on group behavior

;

the origin

and development of social institutions existing pathological conditions, causes, and suggested remedies. ;

Text

Book:

Burch

and

Patterson's

American

Social

Problems.

History 2. American History. Three periods a week. Winter term. Three credits. European background, discovery and settlement, effect of new conditions on old world institutions strife between nationalism and sectionalism, French and English rivalry, growth of democracy in England and America, ;

Tievolution,

European

new government, America's and the war of 1812.

relationship

to

the

conflict

History 3. American History. Three periods a week. Spring term. Three credits. A continuation of History 2. The development of the west, industrial revolution, canals, railroads, slavery and secession, reconstruction, big business, labor organizations.

Economics week.

4.

Elementary Economics. Three periods a Three credits. An elementary

Offered every term.


History and Social Sciences course in economics, relationship of wealth and welfare, factors of production, problem of distribution, need of socialistic rather

than individualistic point of view.

Text Book

To

:

he selected.

Civics 5. Three periods a week. Offered every term. Three credits. I^eed of government, its origin, development, and present organization modern reforms such as referendum, initiative, and commission form of city government current events. Required in all Courses. ;

:

;

Text Book History

Magruder's American Govemnient.

:

Ancient

6.

Four

Winter term.

History.

credits.

Four

Prehistoric

periods

man

a

week.

in contrast with

man

to-day; contributions made to our civilization by Egypt, Babylon, Phoenecia, Greece, and Eome. Elective in First Year, Course IV.

Text Book

To

:

be selected.

History 7. Medieval History. Four periods a week. Spring term. Four credits. The Holy Roman Empire, the Papacy, Renaissance, Reformation, origin of the modern in European States. Elective in First Year, Course lY.

Text Book History week.

To be

:

selected.

Modern European History. Four periods a Four credits. The French Revolution; the

8.

Fall term.

Industrial Revolution; ISTapoleonic wars, struggle between au-

tocracy and democracy, unification of Italy, formation of the

German Empire, modern commercialism,

the

World

^Yar.

Elective in Second Year, Course lY.

Text Book

:

To

be selected.

History 9. English History. Four periods a week. Winter term. Four credits. Emphasis on the connection between English and American history. Elective in Second Year, Course lY.


Departments of Instruction

74

History a week.

Year

Advanced Americmi History. Four periods Four credits. Open to Third and Fourth

10.

Fall term.

students.

Text Book

To be

:

selected.

History

11. Advanced American History. Four periods a Winter term. Four credits. A continuation of History week. 10. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

Text Book

Same

:

Economics week.

Year

as for

History 10.

Advanced Economics. Four periods a Spring term. Four credits. Open to Third and Fourth 12.

students.

Text Book

Carver's Principles of Political Economy.

:

Sociology 13. Four

Fall term.

Advanced Sociology. Four periods a week. Open to Third and Fourth Year stu-

credits.

dents.

Text Book

:

Hayes's Introduction

to

the

Study

of Soci-

ology.

Sociology 14. Advanced Sociology. Four periods a week. Winter term. Four credits. A continuation of Sociology 13. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

Text Book:

Same

as for Sociology 13.


Home Economics

75

HOME ECO^TOMICS MISS TUPPER, MISS JETER

The general aim

Home

teach

ing

in~

of this department

Economics in the public

is

to train students to

schools, to give

some

train-

the scientific administration of the home, and to pre-

pare students to become dietitians and institutional managers.

Home Economics

Four periods a week. One Four credits. A study of texconsidered from the raw state to the finished product.

tile fibers,

Simple

tests,

Textiles.

1.

Eall term.

double, three single.

such as could be used in the home,

made

to detect

adulterations.

Text Book

Woolman and McGowan's

:

Home Economics Two

week.

The

Textiles.

Costume Design.

2.

double, two single.

Four periods a Four credits.

Spring term.

application of the principles of design to the entire cos-

tume.

A

study of

line,

form, and color in their relation to the

individual, and the study of the suitability of design to terials

and

Text Book

Izor's

:

Home Economics

Costume Design and House Planning.

3 and 4.

periods a week for two terms.

and Spring terms. stitches,

ma-

articles of clothing.

Four

Three Principles of Sewing. Two double, one single. Winter

credits to each term.

The study

of

seams, materials, and trimming, suitable for under-

wear and simple

Text Book nish their own

:

dresses.

Baldt's Clothing for

Women.

Students fur-

material.

Home Economics

and

Three periods Fall and Spring terms. Three credits each term. The making of a wool dress and an afternoon silk dress. Typical garments made for children of different ages. Both drafted and commercial pat5

a week for two terms.

6.

Two

Dressmaking.

double, one single.

terns used.

Text Book: own materials.

Fale's Dressmaking.

Students furnish their


Departments of Instruction

76

Home Economics nomics. terms.

Methods

7.

of

Teaching

Home

Eco-

One period a week for two terms. Fall and Winter One credit each term. Methods of presentation of the

subject, courses of study,

Text Books: Teaching of

and

Cooley,

Home

Winchell,

Sphor

and applied. and

Marshall's

Economics.

Home Economics periods a week.

text books studied

Teaching

8.

Offered every term.

and

Observation.

Six credits.

Six

Students

are required to do teaching work and make observations in the grade of the training school and high school departments, where, under joint direction of their instructors and the supervisor,

they have actual practice in the kind of work that will be expected of them as teachers of Home Economics.

Home Economics

9. Advanced Dressmaking. Three double, one single. Fall term.

periods a week.

Four Four

made of soft materials. Each student designmaking her own pattern to suit the design. Students furnish their own materials. Elective in Third Year,

credits.

Dresses

ing her dress, and

Course IV.

Home Economics 10. House Plannifig and Furnishing. Four periods a week. Two double, two single. Winter term. Four credits. The house and its construction, furnishings, decorations, and care. The study of house materials, colors, furnishings, the selection and arrangement of furharmony in niture, etc.

Elective in Fourth Year, Course IV.

Home Economics Winter term.

Four

11.

Four double periods for The making and covering of renovation of materials. One Fall

Millinery.

credits.

frames, trimmings, and the

made, and two Spring hats one a street hat, the other Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Elecin Third or Fourth Year, Course IV.

street hat

;

a dress hat.

tive

Home Economics 12 and 13. Elementary Study of Foods. Three periods a week for two terms. Two double, one single.


Ho:me Economics

Four

Winter and Spring terms.

77

credits each term.

A

study of

the composition of foods, the principles underlying their prep-

manufacture and

aration, the sources,

cost of foods

;

and the

preparing, planning, and serving of meals.

Text Book

:

To

be selected.

One

Laboratory Fee:

dollar per term.

Home Economics 14. Advanced Study of Foods. Three Two triple, one single. Fall term. Four credits. A continuation of Home Economics 12 and 13. A periods a week.

more advanced study

of foods, with special emphasis on food

preservation and table service.

Text Book

To

:

Home Economics

Prerequisite: Laboratory Fee

Home

One

:

dollar

Economics

Two

periods a week. credits.

be selected.

A

15. single,

12 and 13.

and a half per term.

Household two double.

Chemistry. Fall term.

Four Four

study and application of the principles of chemistry home such as ventilation, lighting, heat-

to the problems of the

;

and foods.

ing, water, metals, fuels,

Special emphasis placed

on the chemistry of food.

Text Book

Vultes's Household Chemistry.

:

Home Economics Two

Nutrition. Four periods a week. Winter and Spring terms. Four The presentation of the fundamental principles of

two

double,

credits.

16.

single.

human nutrition, the application of these principles to the feeding of individuals and families under varying physiological, economic, and social conditions. Text Book

:

To

Prerequisites:

be selected.

Home Economics

Home Economics term.

Four

periods.

17.

Four

study of the position of

15.

Household Management.

Spring This course consists of the as an economic factor in the

credits.

woman


Departments of Instruction

78 social world.

home

of waste,

are discussed.

The

question of buying, budgets, systematic care

ideals, division of labor, efficiency,

and economy,

Elective in Course IV.

Home Economics

Home

Nursing. Winter term. study of the care of the sick in the home when the service of a professional nurse is not required of the equipment and care of the sick room and of aids in emergencies and accidents.

Two

periods a week.

18.

Two

credits.

A

;

;

Home Economics 19. Two double,

ods a week.

Demonstration CooJcery. Four peritwo single periods. Fall term. Four

The study and practice in demonstrating the various cooking processes as a preparation for presenting before comcredits.

munity or organizations, the problem of cookery and the value of various foods.

Home Economics Course.)

20.

Child Study.

(See Kindergarten


Tndustktat> Arts

79

INDUSTRIAL ARTS MISS MILLICAN

The

courses offered iu Industrial Arts, aim to

i;ivo a

general

understanding and insight into the fundamental processes of typical modern industries and to equip the student with sufficient technique and ahility in the use of tools and materials to teach the subject in elementary grades. ;

The

materials for laboratory work are selected from the large

units of industry such as foods, textiles, wood, chiy, reed,

raffia,

paper, cardboard, and earth products.

Industkial Arts a week, one double

A

1.

Genend

and one

Two Two

Iitduslrial Arts.

single.

Fall term.

periods credits.

general survey of industry, typical industries, and operations

of each.

Readings, discussions and laboratory work iu paper,

cardboard, basketry, clay, and color, showing relation to industries

and other courses in curriculum.

Text Book:

T. B. Kidner's Educational Handivork.

Laboratory Fee:

One

dollar per term.

Industrial Arts 2. Two periods a week, one double and Winter term. Two credits. Problems in Indus-

one single. trial

Arts for

schools,

grammar

grades,

observation in the

organization

training school.

in

elementary

Handwork

in

paper, cardboard construction, basketry, weaving, wood, tools,

and elementary drafting.

Text Book:

Bonser's Industvml Art.

Laboratory Fee

:

One

dollar per term.

Industrial Arts 3. Two })eriods a week, one double and sigle. Spring term. Two credits. A continuation of

one

Industrial Arts 2 with study of typical

modern

industries

and

processes of manufacturing.

Text Book:

Bonnie Snow and Frochlich's Industrial Arts.

Laboratory Fee

:

One

dollar per term.


Departments of

80

Instructioin"

Industrial Arts 4. Three periods a week, two double, one Fall and Winter terms. Three credits. A continuation of Industrial Arts 1, 2, and 3. A methods course in Industrial single.

Arts for the

Grammar

Industrial Arts

Text Book

up

:

gTades, with a study of the history of

to the present time.

Gowan and Wheatley's Occupation. One dollar per term.

Laboratory Fee

:

Industrial Arts 5. Spring term.

Three periods a week, two double, one Three credits. A course similar to Industrial Arts 5, but differentiated to meet the needs of students specializing in Rural work. Study of woods, tool prosingle.

mending furniture, carving, weaving, Text Book Same as for Industrial Arts 4. Laboratory Fee One dollar per term.

cesses, joints,

etc.

:

:

Industrial Arts 6. Industrial Arts in High School. Three periods a week, two double and one single. Winter term. Three credits. Practical problems for high school pupils in Avood, pottery, mechanical drawing, book-binding, lettering, etc.

Lectures,

readings,

discussions,

and

various industries and manufactures.

Text Books

visits

to

the plants

of

Elective in Course IV.

Dervey's Schools of Tomorrow.

Laboratory Fee:

Two

dollars per term.

Industrial Arts 7. Industrial Arts in High Schools. Four periods a week, three double and one single. Spring term. Four credits. A continuation of Industrial Arts 6. Elective in Course IV.

Industrial Arts one single.

A

Four periods a week, three double and Four credits. Industrial Arts 6 and 7. For those students 8.

Offered Winter and Spring terms.

continuation of

wishing to specialize in Industrial Arts. subdivisions

of

each,

returns, hazards.

tory of oration.

Continued study of

required, wage Shop work, designing, period furniture, hisIndustrial Arts and mechanical drawing. Interior Dec-

industries,

Elective in Course IV.

Laboratory Fee:

Two

dollars.

training


;

Latix

81

LATIN MISS RICE

two years in Latin is planned to prepare first and second years of the high The course mapped out in the third and fourth jears schools. is intended for students who wish preparation for teaching four

The work

of the

first

teachers of Latin for the

years of Latin. Lati]>t 1.

Winter term.

Four periods a week. Intensive Study of Ccesar. Four credits. Personality and career of Csesar, and as geography of Gaul sen-

significance of his conquests, his writings as history literature

;

Roman

military system

tence structure and

word order

;

;

;

drill in the

building of a vo-

cabulary; practice in sight reading.

Peerequisites

:

tive in First Year,

Three high school units in Course IV.

Text Book: Cwsar's Gallic D'Ooge's Composition, Part 1.

TT'ars;

].atin.

Bennett's

Elec-

Grammar;

Latin 2. Intensive Study of Ccesar. Four periods a week. Spring term. Four credits. Continuation of Latin 1. Elective in First Year, Course lY. Latin 3. Teaching of Latin. Four periods Four credits. Review of pronunciation

term.

of the syntax of cases, moods, and tenses

order

;

simple sentence

structure

;

;

a week. ;

Fall

rapid survey

principles of Latin

methods of presentation

proper emphasis upon geography, ancient life, and historical connections use of maps, pictures, and various classroom helps. ;

Elective in Second Year, Course lY.

Text Books: Primus Annus; Andrew's The Private Life of the Romans.

Prceceptor; John-

ston's

Latin

4.

^Vinter term.

Intensive Study of Cicero. Four periods a week. Four credits. Brief history of the last century

of the republic

;

personality and career of Cicero

;

comparison


; ;;

Departments of Ixstruction

82

between Csesar and Cicero; typical structure of a Koman oration; practice in sight reading. Elective in Second Year, Course IV.

Books

Text Latin

Orations;

Cicero's

:

D'Ooge's Composition, Part

Orammar

Bennett's

2.

Four periods a week. Roman mythology and religion

Intensive Study of Virgil.

5.

Four

Spring term.

credits.

the Augustan age; life of Virgil and the effect of environment

upon

and literary art Roman Epic poetry and essays on Virgil from standard Elective in Second Year, Course IV.

his poetic genius

study of the hexameter works.

Text Books

;

;

Virgil's Z^neid; Fairbank's

:

Mythology of

Greece and Borne; Glover's Studies in Virgil.

Latin

Four Life and Literature of the Bomans. Fall term. Four credits. Roman life as seen

6.

periods a week. in

Roman

factor in

literature; life

modern

guage and Course IV.

its

and literature of the Romans

as a

civilization; brief history of the Latin lan-

relation to English.

Elective in Third Year,

Text Books Peck and Arrowsmith's Boman Life in Latin Prose and Verse; Duff's A Literary History of Borne. :

Latin T. Boman History. Four credits. Elective

term.

Text Books

:

Livy,

Composition, Part

Book

Four periods

Winter a week. Third Year, Course IV.

in 1

;

Bennett's

Grammar; D'Ooge's

1.

Latin 8. Boman History. Four periods a week. Spring Four credits. A continuation of Latin 7. Elective in

term.

Third Year, Course IV.

Text Books

:

Livy, Books

XXI

and

XXII

;

Bennett's

Grammar.

Latin 9. Four

term.

Essays of Cicero. credits.

Text Books:

Four periods

a week.

Fall

Elective in Fourth Year, Course IV.

Price's

De Amicitia; Moore's De

Senectate.


Latix

83

Latin 10. Writings of Horace. Four periods a week. Elective in Fourth Year, Four credits. Winter term. Course IV.

Text Book Latin

11.

Spring term. IV.

Moore's Odes atid Epistles of Horace.

:

Writings of Horace.

Four

Text Book: Horace.

credits.

Four periods

a

week.

Elective in Fourth Year, Course

Moore's Satires and

De

Arte

Poetlca

of


^_

Departments of Instruction

84

MATHEMATICS MISS LILA LONDON, MISS TALIAFERRO

This department offers courses in arithmetic, algebra, geom-

and calculus, and method courses a method plane geometry in the secondary course in teaching algebra and schools, a course in the history of mathematics for degree students majoring in mathematics, and a course in thrift and the making of personal and household budgets. All work in the department is given with a full appreciation of the need for vitilization in all school work and the effort is made everywhere etry, trigonometry, analytics

in teaching arithmetic in

to link

the elementary schools,

up the work with the demands

Mathematics

of real

life.

Four periods a week. OfNot a review of grade arithmetic, but an advanced course given from a more personal point of view. Emphasis upon the arithmetic required for personal 1.

Arithmetic.

Four

fered every term.

credits.

and bonds and cash paylaws of thrift and to the

finance, such as conducting business at a bank, stocks

means

as

ments,

making

of investments, comparison of time

etc.

Special attention given to

of personal and household budgets.

Text Books: (To be

Supplied.)

References Government :

Mathematics

Bulletins on Thrift.

Arithmetic and Primary Methods. Five Winter term. Five credits. Arithmetic reviewed from the point of view of the primary teacher. The development of numbers, and of the characteristic principles of 2.

periods a week.

the

Hindoo Arabic system

discussed.

Material available for

classroom use listed with emphasis upon the importance of linking up number work with life experiences and school room activities.

outlined

A and

tentative course of study for the first four grades definite

methods of classroom procedure sug-


Mathematics Illustrations of the use of standard tests taken

gested.

the

work

Course

85

of

the

Training

School.

Required,

First

from Year,

II.

Text Books: Klapper's The Teaching of Arithmetic; Brown and Coffman's Hoiv to Teach Arithmetic. References J. W. A. Young's The Teaching of MathDavid Eugene Smith's The Teaching of Elementary :

einatics;

Mathematics; and other library references.

Mathematics 3. Arithmetic and Grammar Grade Methods. Five periods a week. Spring term. Five credits. A review of the subject matter of arithmetic from the point of view of the grammar grade teacher, with emphasis upon the arithmetic needed bv the average citizen rather than the special

worker, and upon the choice of subject matter from real life

and in accordance with modem business customs. Emphasis placed upon the importance of arithmetic as a tool Some discussion of general methods applied to arithsubject. situations

metic, such as the analytic approach to problems, the inductive

establishing of principles and rules, the use of the laboratory

method

and of the project method, in such topics as have been definitely worked out in the Training School. The function of the drill lesson and laws governing the same. A tentative course of study outlined and requirein teaching measures,

ments of an ideal course discussed. Course III.

Text Books References

Same Same

:

:

as for as for

Required, First Year,

Mathematics

Mathematics

2. 2.

Mathematics 4. College Algebra I. Four periods a week. Winter term. Four credits. A review of high school algebra, chiefly from the teacher's viewpoint, followed by the usual topics of college work oral and written reports from required reading. Elective in First Year, Course IV. ;

Text Book:

Fite's College Algebra.

One and one-half units of algebra and plane Students majoring in Mathematics who have not already had Arithmetic 1, must take it as an elective during Prerequisite

geometry.

their course.

:


Departments of Instruction

86

Mathematics

Spring term.

ematics

4.

Four

A

credits.

II.

Four periods

a

continuation of Math-

Elective in First Year, Course IV.

Mathematics ematics.

Algebra

College

5.

week.

Methods

6.

High School MathFall term. Four credits.

of Teaching

Four periods a week.

Reasons for teaching the different branches of mathematics, a brief history of their development, correlation with other subjects, the subject

matter to be offered, a study of the presenta-

tion of typical parts, observation, supplementary study of zines

maga-

and reference books.

Elective in Second Year, Course IV.

W.

A. Young's The Teaching of Math-

Text Books:

J.

ematics; David Eugene Smith's The Teaching of Geometry.

Mathematics

Four

Winter term.

credits.

The usual

inal exercises with applications etry.

Four periods a week.

Solid Geometry.

7.

;

propositions and orig-

parallel review of plane

geom-

Elective in Second Year, Course IV.

Text Book

Wells and Hart's Solid Geometry.

:

Mathematics

Trigonometry.

8.

Four

Spring term.

credits.

damental principles,

field

Four periods

week.

work with improvised instruments

nature of the subject.

stress the practical

a

Students led to discover the funto

Elective in Second

Year, Course IV.

Text Book

:

Mathematics term.

Four

Palmer and Leigh's Plane Trigonometry.

Text Book

:

Mathematics

Analytics.

9.

credits.

Four periods a week.

Fall

Elective in Third Year, Course IV.

Smith and Gale's Neiv Analytic Geometry. 10.

Analytics.

Four

periods

a

week.

Winter term. Four credits. A continuation of Mathematics Elective in Third Year, Course IV.

9.


Mathematics Mathematics

References

:

Four periods

History of Mathematics.

11.

Spring term. Course IV.

a week.

87

Four

credits.

Elective in Third Year,

Histories of Mathematics and other library

material.

Mathematics Four

term.

12.

credits.

Calculus.

Four periods

a week.

Principles and applications.

Fall

Elective in

Fourth Year, Course IV.

Text Book

:

Mathematics

Davis's 13.

The Calculus.

Calculus.

Four

tive in

Fourth Year, Course IV.

credits.

Mathematics term. 13.

Four

14.

credits.

Four periods

A continuation

term.

Calculus.

A

a week.

of Mathematics 12.

Four periods

a week.

Winter Elec-

Spring

continuation of Mathematics 12 and

Elective in Fourth Year, Course IV.


;;

Departments of Instruction

88

MODERN" LANGUAGES MISS SMITHEY

The work

of the courses in

and Second Years

is

Modern Languages

for the First

designed to give students wishing to teach

in the junior high schools of the State a

more thorough mastery

of the langTiage studied especially with respect to pronunciation,

grammar, and oral expression. The work of the Third and Fourth Years

is designed to meet who, having completed the work of the the needs of students equivalent, wish First and Second Years, or its to qualify themhigh schools of the selves to teach in the accredited four-year

State.

The department

courses

offers

in

French,

Spanish,

and

German.

French French credits.

of

1.

simple texts

phonics.

Four periods a

Critical study of

Winter term.

Four

;

and written reproduction

oral

;

w^eek.

grammar and pronunciation reading ;

dictation

Elective in First Year, Course IV.

The work

of this

term

is

the basis for the courses offered in

the First and Second Years.

Prerequisites Three units of Latin and two units of French, or two units of Latin and three of French. :

French credits.

2.

Four periods

This course

is

a

week.

Spring term.

Four

a continuation of the work of French

1.

Elective in First Year, Course IV.

French

Four periods a week. Fall term. Four credits. French principles of Modern Language teaching; methods of instruction; organization and presentation of 3.

The teaching

of

subject matter.

Text Books:

;

Elective in Second Year, Course IV.

Gouin's The Art of Learning and Studying Languages ; Bahlsen's The Teaching of Modern Languages Breal's The Teaching of Modern Languages in Secondary Schools; Report of Committee of Twelve.


Modern Languages French

89

Four periods a week. ^Yillter term. Four Reading extensively and intensively of intermediate texts dictation oral and written reproduction. Elective in Second Year, Course IV. -4.

credits.

;

;

Texts

:

Selected according to the needs of the class.

French credits.

5. Four periods a week. Spring term. Four The work of this term is a continuation of the work of

French 4 in order to give as much intermediate reading as possible in the Second Year. Elective in Second Year, Course IV.

French

An

Four periods

6.

a week.

Fall term.

Four

credits.

outline study of French Literature with special reference to

the origin of lang-uage and literature.

Elective in Third Year,

Course IV,

Text Book

Doumic's L'Histoire de

:

la Litterature

Fran-

gaise.

French

Four periods

week. Winter term. Four Century with special reference to the work of Moliere. Selected plays and letters from this period. Elective in Third Year, Course IV. credits.

French credits.

7.

Literature of the

Four periods

8.

The

a

XVII

Spring term. Four Century. Selected Elective in Third Year, Course IV. a

week.

classic writers of the

plays from the period.

XVII

French 9. Four periods a week. Fall term. Four credits. The Romantic Movement in French Literature with special reference to the work of Victor Hugo. Elective in Fourth Year, Course IV.

French credits. lyrics.

10. Four periods a week. Winter term. Four Study of the writers of the XIX Century. Plays and Elective in Fourth Year, Course IV.

Text Book

French credits.

A

:

11.

To be

selected.

Four periods

a

week.

study of Rostand and his work.

Year, Course IV.

Spring term.

Four

Elective in Fourth


Departments of

90

iNSTBucTioisr

Spanish Spanish credits.

A

Four periods a week.

1.

critical

study of

Winter term.

grammar and pronunciation

Four ;

read-

ing of simple texts; dictation; oral and written reproduction;

Elective in First Year, Course IV.

phonics.

This course Years.

is

the basis for the

Peekequisites

:

work

and Second

in the First

Three units of Latin and two units of

Spanish, or three units of Spanish and two units of Latin,

Spanish

Four periods a week.

2.

Spring term.

A

Four

continuation of the work of Spanish 1 reading of simple texts oral and written reproduction dictation. Eleccredits.

;

;

;

tive in First Year,

Text Books

Course IV. Selected according to the needs of the stu-

:

dents.

Spanish 3. Four periods a week. Fall term. Four credits. Reading of Spanish texts suitable for Second Year high school classes; the study of the principles of Modern Language instruction. Elective in Second Year, Course IV.

Text Books:

The same

as for

French

3.

-i. Four periods a week. Winter term. Four The reading of plays and stories of intermediate grade

Spanish credits.

with reference to teaching in secondary schools. Second Year, Course IV.

Texts

Selected to suit the needs of the students.

:

Spanish credits.

Elective in

Four periods a week.

5.

Spring term.

Four

Selected readings in prose and poetry for classes in

secondary schools.

Elective in Second Year, Course IV.

Spanish 6. Four periods a week. Fall term. Four credits. Outline course in Spanish literature as a basis for further study of some of the great Spanish writers. Elective in Third Year, Course IV.

Text Book

:

To be

selected.


Modern Langtjages Spanish

A

credits.

Four periods

7.

a

week.

continuation of Spanish

6.

91

Winter term.

Four

Elective in Third Year,

Course IV.

Text Book

To be

:

Four

selected.

Spring term. Four credits. and lyrics of medium and advanced difficulty. Extensive and intensive reading. Elective in Third Year, Course IV.

Spanish

8.

The reading

Spanish

9,

periods.

of plays, stories,

10,

11, will follow the general

courses outlined for the French

9, 10, 11.

method

of the

Elective in Fourth

Year, Course IV.

German Courses in

German

similar to those in French and Spanish

will be given should there be a

demand

for them.

Note A beginner's course in French and Spanish is given for the benefit of students in Course IV who wish a Modern Language as an elective and who have not had the necessary prerequisites for the regular worit in this department. This class meets five times a weeli throughout the year. As an elective chosen by First and Second Year students it receives full credit, chosen by Third and Fourth Year students two-thirds credit is allowed. If full credit is desired, onethird more work must be done in the form of outside assignments. :


Departments of Instruction

92

MUSIC MISS MUNOZ

The

general aim of this department

tellectual, aesthetic,

and

is

to emphasize the in-

social values of music, to

broaden the

popular conception of the function of music in the public school, and to prepare students to teach it. The department provides for two classes of students: those who have had no music and those who have had either two years of high school music, or

years voice culture, and

two years study of piano forte and two to prepare to supervise music

who wish

in the public schools.

Those students who have had no music take in the First Year Music 1, 2, and 3, followed in the Second Year by ]\Iusic 4 or Music 5 and 6, or Music 7, differentiated method courses adapted to the needs of Kindergarten, Primary and Grammar Grade teachers. Those who have had the prerequisites mentioned above, take in their First Year Music 10, 11, and 12, followed in the Second Year by Music 13 and 14. Students who have had the prerequisites and do not wish to take Advanced Music must take a substitute.

Music 1. Two periods a week. Fall term. The beginning of a four-term course in Courses of a five-term course in Courses II

students

who have had no

music.

Two I

credits.

and III and

and IV, provided for those Sight-singing, observation,

and analysis of songs used as a basis for the study of the rudiments of Music. Continued work in voice and ear training. Required of all students.

Text Book:

Ripley and Tapper's Harmonic Primer.

Music 2. Two periods a week. Winter term. Two credits. Voice training, ear training, music reading, part singing, the writing of symbols used to represent the time and tune of music. First Year Courses I, II, and III.

Text Book

:

Seifort's Choice Songs,

Book

II.


Music Music

A

Two

3.

3

is

Music

Same

:

Two

4.

2.

practically the

the elementary school.

Text Book

The

Spring term. Two credits. subject matter of Music 2

work

of the first seven grades of

periods a week.

continuation of Miisic

and Music

93

First Year, Courses as for

Music

periods a week.

I, II,

and III.

2,

Fall term.

Two

credits,

A continuation of Music

1,2, and 3 for those students who wish to teach in the Kindergarten and First Grade. Special atten-

games songs, their vital reand activities. Second Year,

tion given to tonal and rhythmic lation

Course

to

the

interest

child's

;

I.

Music

5

and

Two Two

6.

non-teaching terms.

periods a week for two terms credits each term.

Music

— the

5 offered

Fall and Winter; Music 6 offered Winter and Spring.

A

con-

and 3 for those students who are preparing to teach in the Primary Grades. A study of the music of the first four grades, the child voice, song interpretation and simple part songs. Outlines for grade work and programs for special days discussed. Second Year, Course II. tinuation of Music

1, 2,

Music 7. Two periods a week for one term. Offered Winter and Spring terms. Two credits. A continuation of Music 1, 2, and 3 for those students who wish to teach in the intermediate and grammar gTades. Methods based on those used in the Training School from the fourth through the eighth grades. Special study of the classification and use of voices for part singing. Lessons in the theory and practice of teaching part songs.

A

lined.

Second Year, Course III.

tentative course adaptable to the average school out-

Text Book Music term.

10.

Two

:

Kix's

Manual

of Music.

Advanced Music.

planned for those

Two

periods a week.

Fall

The beginning of a five-term students who wish to prepare for the

course

credits.

super-

vision of public school music.

Text Book: Broealsonen's Harmony; James Bates's Voice Culture for Children; Harmonic Series, Book III.


;

Departments of Instbuction

94

Music

and 3, or the equivalent, or two years study of piano forte and two years voice culture.

Peerequisite

Music

1, 2,

Two

Advanced Music.

11.

Two

term.

:

A

ficult part-singing;

periods a week.

Winter

More

dif-

melody writing on one-part form; and

ele-

credits.

continuation of Music 10.

mentary harmonic analysis, consisting of the singing of triads and chords of the seventh in all positions and inversions, also the recognizing and writing of them. Modulation introduced and analysis of song carried along with this work.

Music

Two

Advanced Music.

12.

Two

term.

A

credits.

periods a week.

Spring

continuation of Music 10 and 11.

The

application of general educational principles to the teaching of

music.

A

music teaching with Do and Movable a complete course of study for public schools from brief history of public school

discussions as to relative merits of the Fixed

Systems

;

kindergarten to high school given

;

practical applications of this

course of study to the various conditions in ungraded, graded,

and city schools made;

definite plans of

work

outlined, subject

matter systematized, and methods of procedure suggested.

Advanced Music. Two periods a week 13, Fall term; Mu^ic 14, Winter term. Two credits each term. A continuation of Music 10, 11 and 12 for students who wish to teach music in the high school. Study

Music 13 and

for

two terms.

14.

Music

of music through the Victrola

boy voice and the conorganization of the orchestra and a knowl-

voice culture in group

ducting of choruses

edge of

its

;

work

instruments

;

;

;

special study of the

classification of voices

a study of suitable songs, operettas

and cantatas for special occasions.

A

Glee Club, composed of from

fifty to seventy-five

members

by the director of music from the classes and best singers of the student body, receives weekly training in two, three and four part singing. Public recitals are given once or selected

twice a vear.


Music

95

A Violin Class for begiiuiers is open to all students. General foundation work in correct bowing and tone production is taught. Those students wishing more advanced work are given the opportunity of taking private lessons at a nominal fee. Adapted to the needs of these students is an orchestra. Its practical work and high standards offer fine opportunity for study and experience, especially valuable in ensemble playing.

One period each week is devoted community singing.

l)ody in

to training the entire student


Departments of Instkuction

96

PHYSICAL EDUCATION MISS BARLOW

This department through the supervision of gymnastics, athand play activities, aims to train in the formation of

letics,

health habits, and by placing emphasis on the theory and methods of physical education to prepare students to teach

physical training in the grades according to state requirements.

In order to accomplish this two-fold purpose, a physical and medical examination all

is

given every student upon entrance and

are required to take some

form of physical training through-

out the four years. Athletics

is

an important part of the work under the direction

There are interschool games in basket-ball limited to the normal schools of the state and interclass contests in all the highly organized games culminating in a Field Day Program and the awarding of a cup to the winning class each year. This department also directs the May Festival and "Senior Dances" in the Spring. of an active Athletic Association.

Physical Education 1. Physical Training and Hygiene. Three periods a week, Fall term. Two periods a week. Winter and Spring terms. Two credits Fall term. One credit Winter and Spring terms. One period Fall term is given to Personal Hygiene or the health education of the teacher, including talks on posture and posture tests two periods throughout year to practice in free standing exercises based on the Swedish "Days Order," simple march tactics, setting up drills, mimetic exercises, folk dances, schoolroom and playgTOund games with emphasis placed on presentation field hockey, tennis, basket-ball, and volley ball, Fall and Winter baseball, tennis, track, and field events, Spring, out of door when weather permits. jSTotebook required. ;

;

;

Note A regular Gymnasium suit, consisting of full black bloomers, black all-white middy, and three-quarter cut white tennis shoes, is required for all practice work. These may be purchased in Farmville. :

tie,


Physical, Education

97

Physical Education 2. Supervision of Play and RecreaTwo periods a week throughout Second Year. One credit

tion.

each term.

First Academic Teem.

Playground Supervision.

Consid-

eration of the play movement, the theory and psychological

and problems relating to the administration of Day Programs, games and individual contests and practice in coaching basket-ball.

basis of play

school playgrounds, organization of Field

Text to be supplied.

Second Academic Term.

Dancing and Pageantry.

Study

of educational value of folk dancing; practice in folk, sesthetic,

and gymnastic dancing; instruction in pantomime and practice in working up plays and festivals for different occasions.

Teaching Term. tunity

is

criticism

Teaching

Physical

Training.

Oppor-

given in this class for practice teaching with helpful

from students and

teacher.

Education

Physical

Supervised

3.

Recreation.

No

Three hours a week of some form of health activity such as walking, gymnastic dancing, play, or athletics are required of Third and Fourth Year students unless they are electcredit.

ing a special course in physical education.

Physical

Education

periods a week.

4,

Winter term.

Primary Technics

Games ayid Dances. Three One credit. (See Kindergarten

I.)

Physical Education

5. Methods in Teaching Physical Three periods a week, Fall term. Three credits. Required in Course III, elective in Courses IV and V. Brief

Training.

history of physical education children,

;

discussion of the posture of school

and the prevention and correction of postural

defects.

Instruction in the technique of teaching formal gymnastics,

march

tactics,

Text

:

games, and dances.

Bowen's Elementary School Gymnastics.


Departments of Instruction

98

Physical Education 6. Special Advanced Course. Three Winter term. Three credits. (With two

periods a week.

periods practice teaching or coaching athletics, will count four credits.

Open to third and fourth year students interested in preparing themselves for special work in physical education. Consists of advanced physical training material and methods of presentations, including corrective gymnastics,

of exercise.

Prerequisite:

Physical Education

1, 2, 5.

and physiology


Reading

! >

READi:^G ^MISS WHEELER,

=

MISS SPEAK

The aim of the reading department is to equip the student with the power of keen analysis and the ability to extract thought from the printed page. The pupil is led to a further realization of the

meaning and beauty of

literature

by training

in adequate vocal expression of the best literature.

Reading periods

a

Aims

credits.

Foundation

1.

week.

Offered

Three Three

In Reading. and Winter terms.

Course

Fall

to give the student distinct articulation, correct

pronunciation, freedom and ease in speaking before a group,

and power in

critical analysis.

Text Book Reading

:

2.

Spring term.

Julius Ccesar.

Reading Methods. Three periods a week. Three credits. A study of the problems involved

in the teaching of reading.

Practice teaching before the

class.

Pieces of literature chosen and taught the class as models.

Text Book

:

Briggs and Coffman's Reading in the Public

Schools.

Reading

3.

Three

term.

Dramatics.

credits.

A

Three periods a week.

Spring

study of the educational value of dra-

matic presentations in the grades. Dramatization of suitable stories. Lectures and practical experience in stage mechanics and directing plays.

A

dramatic club, composed of twenty-five or thirty members,

chosen from the student body by the process of "trying out," gives opportunity for developing special dramatic talent.

standard plays are presented each year.

'

^

On

leave of absence. Substituting for Miss Wheeler.

Two


TRAINING SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 1

L. Jarman F. TiDYMAN

Jos.

W.

Mary Savedge

FACULTY

President Director and Principal Supervisor of Eighth and Ninth Grade English

Myrtle Grenels, Supervisor of Eighth and Ninth Grade History and Geography Supervisor of Sixth and Seventh Grades Supervisor of Fifth Grade Supervisor of Fourth Grade Fleeta Cooper Supervisor of Third Grade Rachel Robinson Supervisor of Second Grade Mary Philippa Jones Supervisor of First Grade Mabel Culkin Supervisor of Kindergarten Assistant in Kindergarten Margaret Wainwright Thelma Blanton Secretary to Director and Assistant in First Grade

Ilma von Schilling Alice Carter Mary B. Haynes

"OnGANIZATIOlSr

The Training School

consists of a kindergarten, seven ele-

mentary grades, and four high school grades and enrolls about 425 pupils. Any resident, or non-resident child boarding in Farmville may enter, upon the approval of the Training School ;

The Training School is in charge of a Director, Heads of Departments. A supervisor directs the work of a grade, outside of the special subjects, in

authorities.

Supervisors, and all of

the kindergarten and elementary grades. the departmental plan of supervision

is

In the high school, followed, and as a rule

each supervisor has charge of a single subject.

who

Head

The

Director,

Department of Education, divides his time between supervision and conducting classes in the i^ormal School, and helps to link up theory and practice. The Training is

also

of the

School enables the students to study the problems of teaching at first

hand, and to gain some experience in the instruction and

' Heads of Departments, whose subjects are represented in the Training School, are also members of the Training School Faculty, and supervise those subjects in the Eighth and Ninth Grades not taken care of by the Special Super-

visors. - Detailed phases of organization are covered on Relationships in the Training School."

in

the "Report of the Committee


Training School Department

101

management

Students are placed in complete of children. charge of a grade only after they have become familiar with the subject-matter and methods of handling the subjects that they

and after they have demonstrated their and manage children, through working with individuals and small groups of children, and otherwise asEvery effort is made to get the stusisting the class teacher. dents into the work in which they will probably be most successful, and arrangements are so made that the students who are are going to teach

;

ability to teach

teaching

Xo

may

student

be practically free for this work. is

allowed to graduate, however proficient she

may

be in the academic branches, until she has demonstrated that she is

qualified to teach.

Juvenile Library For the convenience of teachers and children the Training School contains a small library of Q4:S books, half a dozen magazines,

and a daily newspaper.

The

library

is

conducted by a

student teacher, under the direction of the librarian,

who

co-

operates closely with the supervisors and teachers in conducting

the work in reading and literature.

The children

are

en-

couraged to read widely and to select good books. They are allowed to take books out freely, and to go there for necessary reference work. Each grade draws upon the library freely for miscellaneous reading material.

The Xormal School

library, also, is

open to pupils of the

high school.

Training School Announcement

The Training School publishes the Training School Announcement, an annual bulletin stating its purposes, plans, and achievements. The current number is devoted to the work of the high school, and gives a detailed outline of the high school course of study. State

formal

Copies

may

be obtained from the Eegistrar,

School, Earmville, Virginia.


OF STUDENTS

LIST Name

County or City

Adams, Dorothy Rose

(4

H

Prince George Farmville

S)

Agee, Inez Lavert (1 Pr) Alexander, Dorothy Wyatt, (IPr) Alexander, Julia Adelene (1 Pr) Norfolk Allen, Anna Ruth, (1 Pr) Lunenburg Allen, Eunice (3 Charlotte S) Allen, Gladys Virginia (1 Pr) Petersburg Alvis, Annie Harvey (3 Pr) Appomattox Accomac Ames. Grace Elizabeth (1 Pr) Amonette, Adriana Rucker (1 Pr) ....Amherst Anderson, Alice Irene (2 Pr) Farmville Anderson, Claudia (2 H S) Farmville Anderson, Elise (3 H S) Farmville Anderson, Eliza (4 H S) Charlotte Anderson, Fannie Elizabeth (1 Pr).... Halifax Anderson, Virginia Venable 1 Pr) ....Farmville Andrews. Edley Elizabeth (2 Pr) Lynchburg Andrews, Sarah Rebecca (2 Pr) Bedford Anglea, Celeste (4 Farmville S) Apperson, Elizabeth Davis (2 S)..iSrew Kent Armbrister, Nina Belle (2 Pr) Wythe Armstrong, Christine Haines (1 Pr) -Farmville Armstrong, Jennie (3 H S) Farmville Arvin, Iva Eugenia (4 H S) Lunenburg Asher, Julia lantha (1 Pr) Campbell Asher, Marian Cecil (3 S) Campbell Atkins, Earle Griggs (H S) Henry Nottoway Atkinson, Margaret M. (1 Pr) Isle of Wight Atwill, Margaret Coke (1 Pr) Culpeper Aylor, Pearl Virginia (4 H S)

H

(

H

608 Buffalo

Bacon, Jane Overton (2 Pr) Badgett, Bessie (1 Pr) Bagley, Bessie Burdette (2 Pr) Bailey, Eleanor Louise (2 S)

H H

Bailey, Grace Hannah (4 S) Bailey, Hilda Parsons (1 Pr) Bailey, Maude Mallory (3 S)

H

Baker, Dolly Madison (1 Pr) Baker, Florence Williams (1 Pr) Baldwin, Hilda Osborne (1 Pr) Baldwin, Marie Elizabeth (2 Pr) Baltz, Dorothy E. (1 Pr) Baptist, Agnes Morton (IPr) Sethelle (2 Pr)

Rockbridge Farmville

Lunenburg Amherst Buckingham Surry

Buckingham Cumberland Southampton Buckingham Appomattox

St.

Blakely, Ga. 129 College Place

Kenbridge Wylliesburg 235 Halifax St. Spout Spring Pungoteague Madison Heights Serpell Heights 510 Buffalo St. 510 Buffalo St. Charlotte C. H.

Houston 510 Buffalo St. 1125 Wise St.

Evanston 521

H

H

Barclift,

Address Savedge

Main

St.

Tunstall

Max Meadows 108 First Ave. 108 First Ave.

Meherrin Brookneal, R. D. Brookneal, R. D.

Ridgeway Burkeville Smithfield Mitchells

Lexington 513

S.

Main

St.

Kenbridge

Waugh Farmville,

R

4

Wakefield Farmville,

R

4

Columbia Capron Curdsville

Pamplin Princess Anne, Md.

Albemarle Norfolk

Ivy Depot

Norview


Students Name

103

County or City

Bargamin, Grace (2 Pr) Barker, Lorena Florence (1 Pr) Barksdale, Frances Mills (1 Pr) Barksdale, Sallie Phipps (2 Pr) Barnes, Etta Louise (1 Pr) Barnes, Evehii Watkins (2 Pr)

H S) H S) H S)

Barnes, Lucille Audrey (4 Barnes, Sarah Shelton (3

Address

Petersburg.. ..1118 Pittsylvania

W. Washington

Charlotte

Roanoke Amelia Amelia Richmond

St.

Ringgold Saxe 15

Elm

Ave., S. W. C. H.

Amelia Amelia 3039

C.

H.

Monument

Ave. Sutherlin

Halifax Farmville Barrow, Grace Winn (2 S. Main St. ..Henry Preston Bassett, Mary Henrian (1 Pr) Baumgardner, Jean Chalmers IPr) ..Bristol, Tenn 638 Alabama St. Charles Town, W. V., Beard, Anna Grace (4 Pr) 535 E. Washington St. Hanover Beazley, Mary Terrell (2 Pr) Beaverdam Beckham, Evelyn Pleasants (2 H S) ..Farmville 505 High St. Farmville Bell, Elizabeth (1 H S) Farmville Roanoke 1115 Patterson Ave. Bell, Elsie Gladys (1 Pr) Surry Berryman, Mary Anne (1 Pr) Surry, R. D. Portsmouth Bidgood, Martha Nash (IPr) 720 Linden Ave. Black, Helen Leftwich (1 Pr) Kingsport, Tenn. (

H

Powhatan Blanton, Edna Young (4 S) Ballsville Blanton, Eloise Brightwell (2 S) ..Cumberland Guinea Mills Blasingame, Virginia Carter (3 Pr).. Hanover Ashland Bedford Bocock, Mary Clark (2 Pr) Thaxton Culpeper Bolen, Mary George (2 Pr) Culpeper, R. I. Southampton Bolton, Marv Leigh (4 S) Branchville Booker, Harriet Rotertson (1 S) ..Farmville 311 St. George St. Powhatan Booker, Imogene (1 Pr) Sunny Side Appomattox Booker, Marie Susie (2 Pr) Tower Hill Roanoke Bouldin, Virginia (2 Pr) 450 Walnut Hill Charlotte BowmaU; Ellen Virginia (3 Randolph S) Lynchburg Bovd, Mary Hamilton (1 Pr) 14 Parkmont Apts. Farmville Brandt, Viola Catherine (1 H S) 321 Virginia St. Bristol Brewer, Louise (2 Pr) 220 Johnson St. Nansemond Briggs, Alma Curtis (1 Pr) Whaleyville Richmond Bristow, Kathleen Kerr (2 Pr) 1013 Barton Ave. Richmond Bristow, Lillian Evans (2 Pr) 1013 Barton Ave. Middlesex Bristow, Lillian Marie (4 S) Amburg Elizabeth City, N. C, 709 N. Road St. Brite, Clarrene Augusta (1 Pr) Brooking, Anne Catherine (1 Pr) Orange Somerset Southampton Brooks, Eleanor Keene (1 Pr) Courtland Brown, Hester Peebles (1 Pr) Prince George Disputanta Brown, Lucy Reid (4 Rappahannock Woodville S) Brown, Sue Lewis (2 Pr) Henry Martinsville Browning, Mildred Berkeley (Sp) Orange Orange Bryant, Jettie Estelle (1 Pr) Pittsylvania Spring Garden Bryant, Mary Hall (2 Nelson Bryant S) Buchanan, Carrie Belle (3 Lunenburg Victoria S) Bugg, Mary Elizabeth (3 Farmville 701 High St. S) Bulloch, Anne Armistead (2 Pr) Prince Edward Farmville, R. D. Bunch, Rebecca (1 Pr) Edenton, N. C. Bundick, Lena Mae (1 Pr) Accomac Assawoman Burford, Kathleen Dameron (3 S) ..Amherst Waugh

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

H H

H


Students

104

Address

County or City

Jslame

Burger, Evelyn Virginia (1 H S) Burrow, Lelia Peebles (2 Pr) Burrow, Mary Sue (1 Pr) Burwell, Mary Moore (1 Pr) Butler, Hilah Anne (1 Pr)

Farmville Prince George Prince George Franklin

Richmond

Norfolk Emily Sinclair (1 Pr) Mecklenburg Myrtle Lee (1 Pr) Orange Camper, Ethel Marian (2 Pr) Halifax Canada, Annie Louise (4 H S) Surry Carlson, Ellen Sofia (2 Pr) Asheville, N. C Carr, Edith Puryear (2 Pr) Roanoke Carter, Hazel Frances (1 Pr) Halifax Carter, Margaret Dozier (1 Pr) Charlotte Carwile, Grace Brown (2 Pr) ChafRn, Elizabeth Josephine (1 Pr).. Halifax Halifax ChafEn, Elizabeth Melvina (IPr) Dinwiddle Chambers, Mary Aileen (2 Pr) Chappell, Elizabeth Janette (1 Pr). -Prince Edward Charlotte Chappell, Grace Caroline (2 Pr) Calcott,

605 Virginia St. Disputanta Disputanta Taylor's Store 1808 Barton Ave. 201 Maple Ave.

LaCrosse Orange Lennig Claremont

Callis,

Chappell, Lucile (2 Pr) Chappell, Myrtle (2 Pr)

Prince Prince

Cheatham. Pauline Hughes

(1

Pr) ....Franklin

Cheshire, Lucy Anne (1 Pr) Clark, Annie Mary (1 Pr) Clarke, Julia Ljiderwood (1 Pr)

Claud, Eula Margarette (1 Pr) Claud, Mary Lois (2 Pr) Claytor, Virginia Evelyn (1 Pr) Clayvell, Sarah Hasel (1 Pr) Clingenpeel, Flora Tice (2 Pr) Clopton, Eliza Turpin (2 Pr) Cobb, Clara Bliss (1 Pr) Cobb, Frances Allen (3 S) Cobb, Margaret Jane (1 Pr) Cofer, Ethel Juanita (1 Pr) Cogbill, Carolyn (1 Pr) Cole, Katherine Fleming (1 Pr) Coleman, Eva Montague (1 Pr) Collins, Janie Belle (1 Pr)

H

Coman, Kathryn Oakey (IPr) Connor, Annie Marguerite (1 Pr) Conwell, Johnnie Blanche (2 Pr) Cooke, Annie Louise (4 H S) Cox, Ruth Amandus (3 S).. Coyner, Phyllis Eugenia (4 S) Craddock, Helen Broaddus (IPr)

H

Cralle,

Martha Katherine

Edward Edward

H

(2 Pr)

135 Furman Ave. 1028 Patterson Ave.

Houston Madisonville Scottsburg Scottsburg

Dinwiddle Meherrin, R. D.

Drakes Branch Meherrin Meherrin Wirtz

Henry

Martinsville Claudville

Patrick Elizabeth City,

Hampton, Stop 50, R. 4 Southampton Drewryville Southampton Drewryville King and Queen West Point Middlesex

Deltaville

Henry Rappahannock Farmville Farmville Surrv Isle "of

Wight

Petersburg

Roanoke Dinwiddle Sussex

Lynchburg Buckingham Southampton Southampton Farmville

Augusta Nelson

Nottoway

Crawley, Elizabeth Haile (1 Pr) Pittsylvania Crawley, Jane Madison (3 H S) Farmville Crawley, Margaret Fennell (2 H S) ....Farmville

Martinsville

Washington 401 401

Spruce St. Spruce St. Wakefield Ivor, R. 3

244 Lawrence 629 7th Ave., S.

St.

W.

DeWltt Stony Creek 622 Madison St.

Dillwyn Capron

Newsoms 303 Buffalo

St.

Waynesboro Lovington Blackstone

Chatham 318 Randolph St. 318 Randolph St.


Students Name

Daly, Lula Anderson Dameron, Elinor Roy

(1

Dameron, Merle Anne

(1

Omara

Address

County or City

Montgomery Crenshaw, Elizabeth Rice (2 Pr) Crenshaw, Lavonia Elouise (1 Pr) Farmville Crenshaw, Lillian Marie (3 H S) Crisman, Nancv Katherine (1 Pr) ....Winchester Isle of Wight Crocker, Clara 'Daniel (2 Pr) Crute, Elizabeth Marshall (2 H S) ....Farmville Cumberland Crute, Kathleen Gordon (1 Pr) Norfolk Culpepper, Nina June (1 Pr) Mecklenburg Cutts, Ruth Morris (2 Pr)

Daniel,

105

(1

Danville

Pr)

Lynchburg Northumberland

(2 Pr)

Pr)

Cambria Dora, Ala. 4th St. 807

Braddock

St. Ivor, R. 3 209 High St.

S.

Farmville, R.

1004 N. Main St. 1317 Harrison St.

Mila Keysville

Charlotte

Pr)

1

Portsmouth, R. 2 Chase City

Franklin Southampton Darden, Pattie Lee (2 Pr) Pamplin Appomattox Davis, Annie Merle (4 Pr) Halifax Paces Davis, Eliza Bruce (1 Pr) Bristol, Tenn 262 Alabama St. Davis, Frances Louise (1 Pr) Elizabeth City, N. C, R. 1 Davis, Gracie Beulah (1 Pr) Halifax Paces Davis, Kate Nicholson (1 Pr) Farmville 309 Beech St. Davis, Margaret Louise (3 H S) Albemarle, N. C. Denning, Erdene (1 Pr) Essex Tappahannock Derieux, Mary Dobyns (2 Pr) Donora, S. C. Derring, Thelma Rives (4 H S) Charlotte Di'akes Branch Dickerson. Myrtle Louise (2 Pr) Dickinson, Mildred Watkins (3 Pr ....Nottowav Blackstone Farmville 401 High St. Diehl, Dorothy Nevin (1 Pr) Farmville Diehl, Elizabeth Kready (3 H S) 401 High St. Franklin Dinwiddie, Mary (Sp) Hendricks' Store Halifax Dixon, Copelia (1 Pr) Vernon Hill )

Dodl, Marie Margret (1

Dodson, Fannie Estelle

H (1

S)

Cumberland

Pr)

Pittsylvania Farmville

H

Dow, Naomi Elizabeth (3 S) Doyle, Louise (2 Pr) Draper, Ruth Elizabeth (1 Pr) Draper, Sarah Helen (4 Pr) Drewry, Bertha Hope (1 Pr) Dugger, Virginia Smith (J G) Dungan, Josephine Lee (1 Pr) Dunn, Lucile (1 Pr) Dyer, Janie (Sp) Dyer, Pattie Benton (4 H S)

H

Easley, Ellen Celestial (4 S) Easley, Mary Lucy (2 Pr) Edmunds, Bettie Atkinson (1 Pr) Elder, Sue Bettie (4 S) Eley, Emily Hill (1 Pr) Ellington, Lillian (3 S) Elliott, Mary Louise (4 S) Elliott, Mary Virginia (2 Pr) Elmore, Aro (2 S)

H

H

H

H

Farmville,

Southampton Brunswick

Smyth Southampton Pulaski Pulaski Pittsylvania Pittsylvania

Dinwiddie Campbell Southampton Prince Edward Charlotte Caroline Farmville

4

McKenney

Dinwiddie Charlottesville Charlottesville

R.

Ringgold Farmville 1005 1005

High St. High St. Capron

Meredithville

Seven Mile Ford

Capron Delton Delton

Chatham Sandy Level

McKenney Brookneal Franklin Rice Phenix Bowling Green Farmville


Students

106

Name

County or City Address King and Queen Shanghai Amherst Pedlar Mills Nelson Lovingston Amelia Amelia C. H. Nelson Lovingston Bristol, Tenn Pr) 1217 Windsor Ave. Brunswick Brunswick

Eubank, Elsie Salome (4 H S) Eubank, Margaret Louise (1 Pr) Evans, Annie Taliaferro (2 Pr) Evans, Frances Irving (1 Pr) Evans, Katie Virginia (1 Pr) Everett, Cleo Ashby (1 Ezell, Alice (4 S)

H

Fallwell, Eugenia Marshall (Sp) Felts, Gladys Wesley (3 S) Felts, Thelma Virginia (4 S)

Farmville

H

Southampton Southampton H Mecklenburg Finch, Elizabeth Boyd (1 Pr) Mecklenburg Finch, Mary Douglas (3 Pr) Northampton Fitchett, Loda Wise (1 Pr) Fitchett, Myrtice Winifred (1 Pr) —.Northampton Fitzgerald, Helen H. (4 H S) Flemming, Elizabeth (Tr Sch) Flemming, Minnie Lee (1 Pr)..

H

Flippen, Isabel Allison (3 S) Flippo, Mary Virginia (IPr) Forbes, Lelia Pettice (1 Pr) Forbes, Mary Venable (4 S) Forbes, Wahnette (1 S)... Forestal, Madeline Rowena (J G)

H

H

Portsmouth Norfolk

Cumberland Rockbridge

Buckingham Cumberland

400 Virginia

St.

Capron Capron Boydton Chase City Townsend Townsend Princess Anne, Md. Sussex Apts. Portsmouth, R. 2 Cartersville Fairfield

Sheppards Farmville, R. D. Beckley, W. Va.

Prince George,

1 Brown Ave., City Point Nelson Fortune, Cecil Dorothy (2 Arrington S) Fortune, Cornelia Lucinda (2 S). .Nelson Arrington Foster, Anna Guthrie (2 Pr) Prince Edward.. ..Darlington Heights Foster, Katherine Estelle (4 S) ....Farmville 531 Pine St. Fowlkes, Nannie Irene (2 Pr) Pittsylvania Chatham Middlesex Fox, Lucile Lee (2 Pr) Deltaville Portsmouth French, Margaret Strange (2 Pr) 201 North St. Fretwell, Bernice Frances (3 S) ..Farmville First Ave. Alleghany Friend, Mary Bruce (3 S) Covington Amherst Fulcher, Susie Agnes (1 Pr). Sandidges Orange Fullerton, Margaret Claire (1 Pr) Orange Fuqua, Ruth (1 Pr) Bluefield, W. Va.

H

H

H

H

H

H

Gable, Catherine Alice (3 S) Gannaway, Alice Cabell (Sp)

Gannaway, Annie Mercer (1 Pr) Gannaway, Mary Elizabeth (1 Pr) Garland, 'Mary Freear (1 Pr) Garner, Garnett,

Mary Elizabeth Edna Gertrude

...Albemarle

Pulaski

Farmville

Draper Guinea Mills Draper 205 High St.

Farmville

Garysburg, N. C. Ill Bridge St.

Buckingham ....Pulaski

(2 Pr)

H

S) (4 (2 Pr)

Covesville

Garrett, Pattie Frances Gates, Ella Susan (2 Pr)

Cumberland

Gay, Dorothy Virginia (1 Pr) Gibbs, Virginia Eldred (2Pr).. Gibson, Justine (2 Pr) Gibson, Sarah Ethelyn (4 H S) Gilbert, Barbara Frances (2 H S)

Greensville

Prince

Edward

Tamworth Rice

Emporia

Brunswick Lawrenceville Halifax Clover Prince Edward ....Darlington Heights Maybeury, W. Va.


Students

107 Address

County or City

Name

Gilchrist, Annie Claudia (1 Pr) Giles, Margaret Ann (1 Pr) Gill, Nellie Ivonia (1 Pr) Gilliam, Daphne (2 Pr) S) Gilliam, Ernestine (4 S) Gilliam, Janie F. (3

H H

Gilmer, Louise Cabell (1 Pr) S) Gish, Ethel May (3 Glenn, Audrey May (2 Pr) Glenn, Frances Ethel (2 Pr) Glenn, Kate Elizabeth (1 Pr) Glenn, Mattie Louise (1 Pr) Glenn, Maude (2 Pr) S) Goode, Hazel Hudson (3 Goode, Ruby Preston (1 Pr)

H

Columbia, S. C Ljmcliburg

May

(3

H

S)

Goodwyn, Julia Frances (IPr) Gott, Kate Lillian (1 Pr) Graves, Reva Willis (2 Pr)

St. St.

Northumberland ....Wicomico Church ...Prince

Edward

Prince Edward Charlotte

Lynchburg Lynchburg Prince Edward Prince Edward Prince Edward Prince Edward Prince Edward

H

Goodwin, Golda

928 King 613 Gum

Lunenburg Southampton Pulaski

Lynchburg Newport News

Farmville. R. D. Prospect

Phenix 228 Norfolk Ave. 481 Rivermont Ave. Prospect Prospect Prospect Prospect Prospect Maybeury, W. Va. Maybeury, W. Va. R. I. Branchville

Victoria,

Dublin 2229 Park Ave. 1115 22d St. Signpine 605 Buffalo St. Beech St. 317 W. 34th St. 103 Bridge St. Ontario Ontario Oceana 12 Old St.

Gray, Gladys Boothe (1 Pr) Gloucester Gray, Marv Esther (1 Pr) Farmville Gray, Sallie Mae (1 Pr) Farmville S) Graybill, Frances (3 Greathead, Eleanor Robinson (4HS) ..Norfolk Farmville Gregg, Helen McQueen (2 H S) Lunenburg Gregory, Ella Stokes (3 H S) Lunenburg Gregory, Lou McCargo (2 Pr) Princess Anne Gresham, Hattie Evelena (4 Pr) Petersburg Gresham, Mary Aurelia (2 H S) Nansemond Chuckatuck Griffin, Lillian Virginia (4 H S) Isle of Wight Windsor Griffin, Martha Violet (2 Pr) Isle of Wight Windsor Griffin, Mildred Elizabeth (1 Pr) Southampton Branchville S) Grizzard, Ethel Mauzy (3 Prince Edward.. ..Darlington Heights Gropp, Christine (4 H S) Boiling Guthrie, Louzanie Elizabeth (2 H S) -Buckingham

H

H

H

S) Guthrie, Martha (4 S) Guthrie, Mary Eliza (4 Guthrie, Virginia Louise (1 Pr)

H

Buckingham Buckingham Cumberland

Haddon, -Jane Summerfield (2 Pr) ....Dinwiddle Albemarle Haden, Lelia Wilson (1 Pr) Hall, Frances Mary (1 Pr) Hall, Mildred Lee (2 Pr)

Isle of

Wight

Norfolk Prince Edward

Hamilton, Catherine (4 H S) Hammond, Mary Sue (2 Pr) Brunswick Bedford Hancock, Emma Lee (3 H S) Hancock, Katherine Gilmer (2 Pr) ....Albemarle Hardaway, Katherine Louise (3HS) ..Lynchburg Hardin, Virginia Ramsay (1 Pr) Surry Hardy, Henrietta (1 Pr) Sussex Hardy, Nellie Vernon (3 H S) Lunenburg Hargrave, Cecil Scott (2 Pr) Dinwiddle

Guinea Mills Boiling

Sunny Side Dinwiddle Crozet Isle of

Wight

Mercer Apts.

Pamplin Meredithville

Huddleston Scottsville

1534 Rivermont Ave. Spring Grove Stony Creek Victoria Dinwiddle


Students

108

Name

County or City Dinwiddie Newport News Portsmouth Mecklenburg Lunenburg Harris, Dorothy Hardy (4 H S) Hargrave, Leona Adelaide (2 Pr) Harrell, Carolyn Louise (2 Pr) Harrell, Edith (4 Pr) Harris, Christie May (1 Pr)

Address Dinwiddle Ill 33d St. 1054 Holladay St. South Hill Kenbridge Brim, N. C.

Patrick Hatcher, Mary Louise (1 Pr) Dinwiddie McKenney Havens, Sarah Virginia (1 Pr) Dinwiddie Church Road Hawks, Edna Eugenia (1 Pr) Dinwiddie Church Road Hawks, Sarah Pauline (2 Pr) Lunenburg Hawthorne, Cornelia Hite (1 Pr) Gary Suffolk Box 118 Hayes, Lillian Elizabeth (1 Pr) Northumberland Reedville Haynie, Florence Anne (1 Pr) Northumberland Hayne, Hilda Elizabeth (1 Pr) Reedville Roanoke 102 Oxford St., Va. Hts. Helm, Otey Brooke (2 Pr) Henderson, Judith Garnett (1 Pr) ....Nelson Roseland Goochland Henley, Sallie James (2 H S) Manakin Hines, Vera Winnie (1 Pr) Sussex Wakefield

Hodgkin, Roberta Day (IPr) Hoglund, Alma E. (1 Pr) Hoglund, Myrtle A. (1 Pr) Holden, Eileen Vesta (1 Pr)

Fauquier Mecklenburg Mecklenburg

Mamie Lou (2 Pr) Hollowell, Mary Agnes (1 Pr)

Suffolk

Holland,

Holman, Georgia Louise

Pr) Horton, Erma Christine (2 Pr) Howell, Lucye Bernice (J G) Howk, Bertha Katherine (3 H S) Hudson, Mary Elizabeth (2 H S) Hughes, Sara Venable (2 Pr) Hunt, Helen Wvche (2 Pr) Hunt, Mary Elizabeth (4 H S) Hutcheson, Anne Clifford (2 Pr) Hutchison, Lillian Hoyle (3 H S) Irby, Jacqueline (4 Irving, Lucy Taylor

H

(1

Lee

Norfolk

Cumberland

Nansemond Southampton Norfolk Kenilworth, D. C

H H

H

Jolliffe,

Mary Sue

(4

H

Cartersville

Whaleyville Courtland 407 Raleigh Ave. 4401 Ord St.

Ashland

Greensville

Emporia

Farmville

Mecklenburg Prince William

Farmville

Jarman, Helen Amanda (2 Pr) Rockingham Jarman, Helen Reeves (3 H S) Farmville Jeffries, Georgia Turpin (3 H S) Chesterfield Jefferson, Mary Augusta (2 Pr) Amelia Jennings, MildredAlexandria (4HS) ..Culpeper Jennings, Pauline Mary (4 S) Jennings, Ruth Bunyan (3 S) Jeter, Mary Pattie (4 S) Jett, Dora'Ficklin (2 Pr) Jinkins, Ella Beryl (2 Pr)

Pennington Gap S. Broad St. Portsmouth, R. 3

Hanover

Nottoway

S) (2 Pr)

Warrenton Boydton Boydton

Culpeper Halifax

Powhatan Halifax

308 Virginia

St.

Boydton

Haymarket Blackstone, R. 1 1001 High St.

Elkton 609 High St. Midlothian Amelia C. H. Mitchells Mitchells

Republican Grove Belona South Boston

Hanover

Ashland 205

2d

S)

Charlottesville

H

Buckingham Powhatan

Farmville, R. D.

Columbus, Ga Norfolk

1129 Fifth Ave. Gilmerton

Johns, Frances Bailey (3 S) Johnson, Bernice Lester (4 S) Johnson, Earline (2 Pr) Johnson, lola Virginia (2 Pr)

H

S.

St.

Ballsville


Students Name Johnson, Reba Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones,

County or City (1

Ellen Minor (2 Pr) Julia EthehTi (2 Pr) S) Laura Louise (2

Kanak, Christine Louise (3 H Kane, Sara Ann (2 Pr) Kayton, Myrtle Marie (4 H S) Kernodle, Ruth Emma (2 Pr) Kie, Sallie Temple (1 Pr) King, Marion (3HS) Kinney, Alice Carrie (3 H S) Kline, Esther Marguerite (3 Pr)

Anna Geneva (1

(4

H

Sheppards Sheppards

(2 Pr) ....Tazewell

S)

Pr)

Tazewell LaCrosse

Mecklenburg

Richmond Stuart Isle of Wight

)

Knott, Exie Belle

Tazewell Clifton Forge

Buckingham Buckingham

:

H

Ruth Higginbotham

Address

Tazewell Alleghany

Pr)

Zelda Ida (1 Pr) Jordan, Frances Rieley (2 Pr) Joyner, lone Deans (1 Pr Judson, Harriet James (1 Pr)

Klise,

109

West Ave. Windsor

Hall,

Farmville S)....

Pine

Prince George

Prince George Gate City

Scott

Farmville Prince Edward

Newport News Culpeper

S.

Albemarle Lackey, Gladvs Starke (2 H S) Albemarle Lackey, Willie Drucilla (3 H S) Mecklenburg Lambert, Theresa Farrar (1 Pr) Accomac Lang, Stella Marie (2 Pr) Lankford, Margaret Campbell (2 Pr) ..Lynchburg Isle of Wight Latimer, Erma (4 S) Roanoke Lavinder, Ruth Alden (2 Pr)

H

Lawson, Margaret Munford (J G) ....Middlesex Rockbridge Leckey, Ashley Elhart (1 Pr) Rockingham Leebrick, Margaret Shaw (1 Pr) Campbell Lewis, Minnie Kathryn (2 Pr) Farmville Lindsey, Mary Elizabeth (3 Pr) Farmville Lindsey, Virginia (4 S) Farmville Lipscomb, Rebekah Banks (IPr) Rockbridge Loyall, Willis Elizabeth (1 Pr) Williamsburg Luck, Rena Burgess (1 Pr) Lytton, Margaret Gertrude (1 Pr) ....Norfolk

H

McArdle, Nell Isabel (1 Pr) Norfolk Northumberland McCarty, Lavonia Muse (1 Pr) McClun'g, Elizabeth Campbell (4 Pr) ..Lexington

Main

St.

...Hampden Sidney 227 49th St. Raccoon Ford

Appomattox Alleghany Portsmouth Dinwiddle

St.

Vera Covington 243 Maryland Ave.

Church Road Covesville Covesville South Hill

Temperanceville 1414 Church St. Carrollton 1013 Dale Ave., S. E. Looklies

Murat Elkton Lynchburg, R. 1 Bridge St. Bridge St. 314 Randolph St. Lexington Williamsburg 416 New York Ave. ".

123

West ISth St. Ottoman 2 White St. Pamplin 928 King St.

Prince Edward (1 Pr) McDuffie, Margaret Agnes (1 Pr) Columbia, S. C McGinley, Ruby Paulette (J G) Pulaski 115 5th St., N. W. Mcllhany, Margaret Lucile (2 Pr) ....Bluefield, W. Va...839 Princeton Ave. Mclllwaine, Lucy A. P. (1 Pr) Petersburg.. ..410 W. Washington St. McKelway, Ruth Morrison (1 Pr) Washington, D. C 2071 Park Road MacKan, Frances Hoskins (2 Pr) Norfolk 515 Boissevain Ave. McNamee, Vera Elizabeth (2 208 Second Ave. S) ....Farmville McNamee, Voila Louise (4 Farmville 208 Second Ave. S)

McDearmon, Elaine

H

H

McNeil, Elmira Jane

(1

Pr)

Dickinson

Dante


Students

110

County or City

Name McNulty, Nettie Reid

Pr) Marshall, Edith May (1 Pr) S) Martin, Janie Elizabeth (3 Martin, Veta (4 H S) Mason, Min Mac (1 Pr) Mason, Thelma Marjorie (2 Pr) Matthews, Alma (3 H S) Mawyer, Nannie Lou (1 Pr) Mayiiard, Fannie Belle (1 Pr) (1

H

Mays, Lucille Jefferson (4 H S) Mears, Margaret Rose (2 Pr) Meredith, Maria Doswell (2 Pr)

Charlottesville....408

Address Altamont Circle

Bedford Farmville Farmville

Bedford, R. 1 530 Main St. 530 Main St.

Pearisburg

Giles

Norfolk

Lunenburg Nelson Surry Norfolk

Wakefield, R. 2

424 Raleigh Ave. Melfa, R. D.

Gouldin

Hawks

1124

Forest Depot Victoria Pulaski

Crewe Rice 416 Virginia St.

Appomattox Miller School Collierstown Virgilina

610 Oak

Clarkton

Chatham Nathalie Forks of Buffalo 2310 Park Ave.

H

Nelson, Virginia Anne (2 Pr) Newaom, Lila Virginia (1 Pr) Nichols, Mary (2 Pr) Noel, Grace Ernestine (3 S) Noel, Lillian (1 H S)

Mecklenburg

H

H S) H S) H S)

Noell, Addie Annie (4 Noell, Virginia Etta (2 Norfleet, Helen Wood (3

Northington,

Mary Sue

Nunn, Lillian Via (3 Nunn, Louise Virginia

Pr)

(1

H (2

S)

H

S)

302

"lecklenburg Farmville i'^armville

Oakea, Annie Grace (2 Pr) Obenshain, Sallie Page (2 Pr) O'Brien, Mildred Eva (J G)

Appomattox

Ogburn, Alma Haynie (3 H S) Ogden, Elizabeth Morton (4 H S)

Farmville Bedford

Pittsylvania Botetourt

St.

Waverly Nelson

Newport News

Amelia

Home

LaCrosse

Sussex

Petersburg Farmville Farmville Franklin Franklin

St.

Phenix

H

Mecklenburg

St.

Michaux

H

Nash, Susie Roberta (1 Pr) Neblett, Mabel Warren (1 Pr)

St.

Kenbridge Adial

Accomac Hanover

Meredith, Martha Elizabeth (2 Pr) ....Petersburg Michaux, Frances Anderson (2 H S).. Powhatan Bedford Miller, Florence (4 H S) Lunenburg Mitchell, Mildred Virginia (2 Pr) Pulaski ....: Moore, Sarah Elizabeth (2 Pr) Morgan, Frances Elizabeth (1 H S).. Nottoway Prince Edward Moring, Claudine Hudson (2 Pr) Farmville Moring, Mary Elizabeth (2 Pr) Apjjomattox Moris, Bettie (1 Pr) Albemarle Morris, Parke (Sp) Rockbridge Morison, V. Julia Ellen (2 Pr) Halifax Morrow, Caroline (3 H S) S).. Farmville Morton, Lavalette Edmunds (1 (Charlotte S) Morton, Sara Tilden (2 C'harlotte Mosteller, Eva Irene (J G) Pittsylvania S) Motley, Rebecca Agnes (4 Myers, James Amanda (4 H S) Halifax Amherst Myers, Ella Minnie (1 Pr) Lvnchburg Myers, Ruth Hunter (2 Pr) Richmond Myers, Sarah Evelyn (3 S)

H

W. 33d

231

1219 23d St.

227

St.

Andrew

St.

533 Main St. 533 Main St. Boone Mill Boone Mill Jetersville

LaCrosse 205 Spruce St. 205 Spruce St.

Whitmell Buchanan Appomattox 101 Bridge St.

Coleman Falls


Students Name O'lSTeal,

Charlotte Rose

Ormond, Margaret (2 Owen, Bertha Gladys Pair, Dora Pannill,

James

(3

County or City Amelia

H

S)

Goldsboro, N. C

(1

Pr).

Bristol

H

S)

Hairston (1 Pr) Parker, Antoinette Allen (Sp). Parker, May Ellen (2 Pr) Parrish, Melba Alice (1 Pr) Patton, Helen Elizabeth (1 Pr).. Paulett, Ida Mae (1 Pr) Paulett, Ruby Luree (2 Pr) Payne, Mary Ida (1 Pr) Payne, Olive ]\Iatilda (4 H S) Pearsall, Sadie Elizabeth (1 Pr) Peele, India Virginia (4 H S) Perrow, Carlynne (3 H S) Phillips, Ruth Mattie (1 H S) Phillips, Vivian May (1 H S)

H H

Graham

(4 S) S) Pond, Martha Elizabeth (2 Ponton, Alice Brown (2 Pr) S) Poole, Lillian Ethel (4

H

Pope, Virginia Louise (1 Pr) Porter, Sarah Maude (2 Pr) Powell, Helen Eunice (4 S)

H

Powers, Eva Rutter Presson, Alice Price, Viola

Mae

Myrtle

Address Amelia C. H.

Pr)

(1

Amy

Pilcher, Irene

111

Greensville

Pair's Store

Henry Southampton

Martinsville

iSTansemond

H

Richmond Nansemond Fauquier Farmville Farmville Fauquier Isle of

Wight

Charlotte Halifax

Southampton Portsmouth

Mathews Cumberland Sussex

Prince, Inez Carroll (1 Pr) Pruden, Eva Tapelle (2 Pr)

Suffolk

Pruden, Ida Mary (1 Pr) Pruden, Mary Cephas (2 Pr)

Portsmouth

H

Puckett, Gay (1 S) Puckett, Sue Virginia (1 Pr) Pugh, Bessie Nowlin (2 Pr) Purdy, Harriett Cazenove (4 Pr) Putney, Elia Blanche (1 S)

H

Ramsey, Nannie Stuart (1 Pr) Rankin, Caroline Virginia (1 Pr) Rash, Lucille Katherine (1 Pr) Reese, Mabel, (4 H S)

Franklin Whaleyville Clayton, N. C.

Norfolk Edgewater Drive^ Farmville 309 St. George St. Albemarle Scottsville Prince Edward ....Darlington Heights Prince Edward ....Darlington Heights

Norfolk Surrv

(2 Pr) (2 Pr) S) (3

312 Virginia St. 513 Moore St.

Suffolk Chesterfield Chesterfield

Charlotte

Brunswick Farmville Charlotte Farmville

Nottoway Franklin

..702

Griffin

Ave.

Myrtle

Remington 417 Virginia 417 Virginia

St. St.

Midland Smithfield

Ontario Buffalo Junction

Drewryville 203 Washington St.

Susan Northwest Dendron Farmville, R. D. Jarratt Box 194 160 Maryland Ave. Box 194

Winterpock Winterpock Evergreen Lawrenceville 520 S. Main St. Charlotte C. H. 502 Buffalo St. Blackstone Taylor's Store Gordonsville

Reid, Mary Christine (1 Pr).. Orange Chatham Reynolds, Maggie Perdonia (1 Pr) ....Pittsylvania Rice, Mary Ritchie (2 Pr) Farmville 213 Venable St. 806 High St. Richardson, Hettie Alice (2 Pr) Farmville 806 High St. Richardson, Louise Marshall (2HS) ..Farmville Serpell Heights Richardson, Nannie Lillian ( 1 S) ..Farmville Covington Ricks, Virginia Marie (1 Pr) Alleghany Roberts, Helen Pauline (4 Prince Edward.. ..Darlington Heights S) Spout Spring Robertson, Nellie Moore (2 Pr) Appomattox

H

H


Students

112

County or City

'Name

Petersburg Rogerson, Helen Jackson (1 Pr) Eountrey, Florence Elizabeth (2 Pr) ..Norfolk Bristol, Tenn Rucker, Harriet Louise (1 Pr)

Rudd, Lillie Emma (3 H S) Rush, Bess Gertrude (2 Pr) Ryan, Eva (4 H S)

Address 130

718 Alabama

Mecklenburg

Cullen

White Stone 1107 Jackson St.

H

Murat Murat 110.5 .Jackson St.

H

H H

H

H

H

Randolph St. Amelia C. H. Deltaville Saltville Guinea Mills

Guinea Mils 1620 Elwood Ave. Republican Grove Disputanta

White Marsh Road Naxera Virgilina

Ashland LaCrosse Farmville

Main St. Box 210 Sandy Level Hampden-Sidney

519

H

H

Steger, Frances (2 S) Steger, Margaret (2 Pr)

Farmville Farmville

A,

Temperanceville 415 2d St. Pleasant View Victoria

H

H

S.

C... Route

H H H

H

St.

Mitchells

St.

(

St.

South Hill Winchester

Frederick Culpeper

Prince Edward John, Manie Virginia (2 Pr) Sanders, Jeannette Spriggs (1 Pr) ....Lancaster Lynchburg Saunders, Virginia Welby (2 Pr) Rockbridge Saville, Florence Jane (.3 S) Rockbridge Saville, Ida (2 Pr) Schaefer, Dorothy Christine (2 Pr) ..Lynchburg S) -Farmville Schmidt, Louise Rosa Agnes 1 Amelia Scott, Clara Teresa (1 Pr) Middlese.x; Scott, Louise (2 Pr) Smyth Scott, Susie Virginia (1 Pr) Shepard, Bettie Guthrie (4 S) Buckingham Shepard, Fannie Louise (3 Buckingham S) Shields, Christine (1 Pr) Louisville, Ky Shotwell, Erna Fleetwood (4 S)---Halifax Simmons, Mary Smith (1 Pr) Prince George Simmons, Virginia G. W. (2 S) ....Suffolk Sinclair, Lila Wiatt (2 Pr) Gloucester Sizemore, VirginiaKatherine (4HS) ..Halifax Skillman, Helen A. (2 Pr) Hanover Smelley, Bernice Hamilton (1 Pr) ....Mecklenlmrg Smith, Clara Elizabeth (1 Pr) Cvimberland Smith, Ellen Harriet (2 Farmville S) Smith, Frances Lee (1 Pr) Washington, D. Smith, Grace (1 Pr) Pittsylvania Smith, Janie Frances (4 S).' Prince Edward Smith, Lena Florence (4 S) Accomac Smith, Lucy Booker (2 Farmville S) Smith, Maude Victoria (1 Pr) Amherst Smith, Nettie Virginia (1 Pr) Lunenburg Smith, Rose Velma (4 Accomac S) Smith, Theo (2 Pr) Prince Edward Snead, Martha Virginia (1 Pr) Cumberland Somers, Mrs. Mildred L. (2 Pr) Accomac South, Lucile Huntington (3 S) ....Norfolk Speight, Evelyn Hope (2 Pr) Southampton Spencer, Carrie Flournoy (1 Pr) Farmville Spradlin, Bertha (1 Pr) Bedford Spradlin, Carrie (3 Pr) Bedford Squire, Emma Cora (2 Pr) Greensville Squire, Grace Darling (1 Pr) Portsmouth Stallard, Ella Katharine (4 Pr) Staton, Zelia Williams (3 S) Amherst Steger, Elizabeth (4 S) Farmville

Wythe

Sub Station 13

Horsey Hampden-Sidney Cartersville

Bloxom 314

Mowbray Arch Ivor

Farmville Stewartsville Stewartsville

Emporia 1030 Prentis Ave.

Ky. Sandidges Bridge St. Bridge St. Bridge St.

Fairfield,


Students Name

113

County or City

H

S).. Norfolk Stephenson, Harriet Louise (3 Stephenson, Mary Augusta (4 Pr) ....Sussex .Stone, Lucile Arnold (1 Pr) Campbell Story, Lizzie Irma (1 Pr) Southampton Stott, Mary Lee (1 Pr) Isle of Wight Strother, Virginia Margaret (2 S) ..Warren Stubblefield, Sarah Belle (1 Pr) Gloucester Sutherland, Mary Stith (1 Pr) Dinwiddie Sutton, Marie Garnett (2 Pr) Amherst Swanson, Josephine Harriet (1 Pr) ..Pittsylvania Swoope, Helen Forrest (4 H S) Botetourt

Address 211

W.

17th

St.

Wakefield

Rustburg Capron Smithfield

H

Linden Cash Church Road Sandidges Danville, R. 6

Lick

Run

Taliaferro, Mary Venable (3 H S) ....L^Tiehburg 1000 Federal St. Thomas, Doris Clayton (1 Pr) Farmville, R. 3 Prince Edward Thomas, Helen Annette (1 Pr) Lancaster Ottoman Thomas, Margaret Eleanora (4HS) ..Lancaster Morattico Thomas, Olga McClain (J G) Morattico Lancaster Thompson, Elizabeth W. (1 Pr) Fauquier Warrenton Thompson, Kathryn Isabel (2 Pr) Fauquier Warrenton Thorne, Gladys Irene (1 Pr) Zuni Isle of Wight Thornhill, Lily Bibb (2 Pr) Lynchburg 2110 Rivermont Ave. Thrift, Mary Virginia (2 Pr) Dinwiddie Dinwiddie Timberlake, Pauline Estill (1 Pr) Orange Orange Tomlinson, Ethel Mae (3 H S) Bedford Big Island, R. 1 Towles, Willie Louise (1 Pr) Merry Point Lancaster

Travis, Lillian Beatrice (1 Pr) Isle of Wight Traylor, Margaret Denmeade (2 Pr) ..Richmond Treakle, Anna Belle (1 Pr) Lancaster Trent, E. C. Page (1 Pr) Buckingham Trent, Katherine Gannaway (1 Pr) ..Buckingham Trent, Mildred Jackson (2 Pr) Appomattox Trevilian, Edith Virginia (3 S)....King and Queen Trevilian, Helen (2 Pr) Gloucester Trotter, Virginia Elizabeth (2 Pr) ....Brunswick

Smithfield

3303 Semmes Ave. W^hite Stone Dillwyn Dillwyn

Appomattox

H

Pleasant View -..-

Ford — Church Road Ingram Ingram

Tucker, Katherine Elizabeth (4HS) -Dinwiddie Tucker, Marion Foster (1 Pr) Dinwiddie Tune, Annie Davis (J G) Halifax Tune, Louise Crews (2 Pr) Halifa.x Turner, Ellen Olivia (1 Pr) Southampton

Upton, Lucile Samuel (4

H

S)

Farmville

Ark

Lawrenceville

Courtland 402 Virginia

St.

Van

Sickler, Delma Neal (2 Pr) .Roanoke....721 Va. Ave., Va. Heights Amelia C. H. Vaughan, Elizabeth McKee (1 Pr).. Amelia. Vaughan, Mary Walters (1 Pr) Amherst Amherst

Farmville

Venable, Jacqueline (2 Pr)

Von

Schilling, Sarah Vries, Anna (2 Pr)

Peek (3

H

Waddell, Clotilda Rodes (1 Pr) Wade, Virgie Elizabeth (2 Pr)

406 Buff'alo St.

Hampton

S) -.Elizabeth City

Petersburg Charlottesville

Southampton

105

S.

South

St.

Charlottesville Franklin, R. 1


Students

114

Name County or City Walker, Etta Belle (1 Pr) Greensville Walker, Lorie Mae (2 Pr) Bedford Wall, Virginia Langhorne (1 Pr) Farmville Ward, Kathryn Cecile (1 Pr) Roanoke Watkins, Agiies Venable (2 H S) Farmville Watkins, Elizabeth Eifert (2 H S) ....Farmville Watkins, Emma Louise (2 Pr) Isle of Wight Watkins, Nancy Southall (1 Pr) Farmville Wayne, Edith Lyle (4 H S) Prince Edward Weatherford, Agnes Penelope (1 Pr).. Halifax Weaver, Virginia Hinkel (1 Pr) Orange Webb, Ruth Bennett (1 Pr) Petersburg Webster, Eleanor (1 Pr Columbus, Ga Welch, Jenilee Edna (3 H S) Norfolk )

H H

Address

Emporia Bedford 403 High St.

916 Roanoke St. 710 High St. 214 First Ave.

Windsor 214 First Ave.

Pamplin Vernon Hill Liberty Mills 1442 Halifax St. 1228 Fifth Ave. 1068 38th St. Farmville, R. D. Farmville, R. D.

Welchlin, Edna Louise (1 Cumberland S) Welchlin, Lena Mildred (1 Cumberland S) Wells, Addle Mae (2 Pr) Boydton Mecklenburg Wells, Dorothy Chatman (2 Pr) Farmville 401 Chambers St. West, Margaret Brooks (1 Pr) Norfolk Hickory White, Ola Gladys (2 Wicomico Gloucester S) White, Mary Virginia (1 Pr) Princess Anne, Md. Whitehead, Madelon (2 Switchback, W. Va. S) Whitehead, Rose Carmel (4 -.Switchback, W. Va. S) Whitehurst, Thelma Christine 1 Pr) ..Norfolk Hickory Whitescarver, Imogen Edwina Roanoke Salem (1 Pr) Whitlock, Constance Elizalieth 2 Pr) ..Powhatan Tobaceoville Wilcox, Lorena Gladys (1 Pr) Waverly Surry W^ilkerson, Bettie (1 Farmville Serpell Heights S) Wilkinson, Edna Mae (2 Pr) Holdcroft Charles City — Wilkinson, Marion Coppedge 1 Pr) ..Bedford 426 Bedford Ave. Willan, Ruth Estelle (2 Pr) Norfolk 612 W. 29th St. Williams, Elizabeth Douglas (2 Pr) ..Hanover Ashland Williams, Lillian Boisseau Disputanta 1 Pr) ....Prince George W^illiams, Lois Toomer (2 Pr) Portsmouth 207 Washington St. Williams, Martha Ann (1 Pr) Clover Halifax Williamson, Edith Irene (J G) Clifton Forge Alleghany Willis, Martina Alice (3 Serpell Heights Farmville S) Willis, Mattie Spencer (Sp) Farmville 407 High St. Wilroy, Margaret Frances (1 Pr) ....Southampton Boykins Wilson, Mary Cornelia (2 H S) Evergreen Charlotte Wilson, Mary Elizabeth (1 Pr) Farmville, R. 1 Cumberland Wilson, Violetta Sprigg (2 Pr) Newport News, 53d St. and River Rd. Wimbish, R. Spottswood (4 Nathalie Halifax S) Winder, Mildred Leigh (3 H S) Chincoteague Accomac Winn, Margueritte (3 Skipwith Mecklenburg S) Wood, Nancy Turner (Sp) Norfolk 351 Onley Road Woods, Mary Florence (1 Pr) Albemarle Covesville Woodward, Elizabeth Carlisle (2 Pr) ..Alleghany Clifton Forge Woolfolk, Helen Goodwin (2 Pr) Thornhill Orange Woolridge, Coralie McElroy (2 Pr) ..Middlesex Amburg Worrell, Barta (2 Pr) Prince George, 303 N. 2d St., Hopewell

H

H

H (

(

H

(

(

H

H

H


Students Name

115

County or City

Address Lovingston 334 Fairfax Ave. Lovingston

Wright, Celestia Virginia (2 Pr) Wright, Gwendolyn (1 Pr) Wright, Mary Louise (1 Pr)

Nelson Norfolk Nelson

Thelma Jane (2 Pr) Young, Pearle (2 Pr) Young, Ruby (2 H S)

Roanoke, 210 Westover Ave., Ghent Serpell Heights Farmville Serpell Heights Farmville

Yost,

Ida Belle

Zeigler,

(2

H

S)

Cumberland

Farmville, R. D.

RECAPITULATION Total Total Total Total

Department in High School Department in Training School Department number receiving instruction in

451 200 335 986

in Professional

this school

Total number of graduates

2,283

Letters in parentheses following names of students indicate class, as Note (J G) .January Graduate; (4 Pr.) Fourth Year Professional; (3 Pr.) Third Year Professional; (2 Pr. ) Second Year Professional; (1 Pr. ) First I'ear Professional Class; (4 S) Fourth Year High School; (3 S) Third Year High School; (2 S) Second Year High School; (1 S) First Year High School Class; (Sp.) Special Course. :

:

H

H

H

H

Students in the Third and Fourth Years of the Professional Course have completed the two-year course required for graduation (diploma), and are now Degree of Bachelor of Science in Education.

in line for the


1921

1922

JAISUARY

JANUARY

JTJLY

nnnnm

[s3g[^g[^[ft][s3

[s3S53SS[f3[13

[l][2]3]aD[5]S]B]

10 Tl

m^Emmmmm 2i [I5"i6l7 18^19'20 122:23 24 25 26 27 28

13 14 15]16| [9 10 11 12 [1§;17 18 19 20 21 22 ;i7 18, 19 20:21,22: 23! 13 14! 151

23 24 25 26 27 28 29

!12

l24!^iM^(28i!2a^

annnnnm \

9"T0

;i6

11

T2

I3;il4!j5l

17[18j.l^20;[2lill

[23l^i2|i6j|22|2iig

Dozinnn s[3i]nnnnn

gggzanaaa SEDnnnnn FEBRUARY

JULY

n

FEBRUARY

AUGUST

AUGUST [13S[^SSE[Sa]

E[2][3ja][I][6] [6]S][I]r9ll0j^'i2^ [Tr8l^~:Wll'ri2|!T3l J3]!l4]il5 16 17 18 19 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

f5l[F^r8^^IO^^ [eJErs^fTro^iTll]

I20]i21]^23i^^^6^ ;2l^2;21^25;2i;27i

il9j^lij22:23jl24i!25:

mmnnunn mmmmnnn nnnnnn

n ms nm D n MARCH

SEPTEMBER

[s3S[^Sifhj|W][s3

®[7]®j]ao]aEa2]

ffiascassao]

[27':2^29:3C!;'3lO[I]

[pl9'^^-^g3l|24l r2^'26 27'28|i[3gn

APRIL

OCTOBER

|Su||Mo||TuHWe|lThi|FrHSa|

|s3g[^g[^[W][s3

22

23J 24:|2i;2i

nnp ^L2i;^^[24

li

25

MARCH

SEPTEMBER

[sir|W[Tir]}Wfe|pfh1[FV|[S^

[s^SI^SllElISS

ra[6][7]®S]ao^ffi]

m[2]

!lOHll[l?[il[l4ill5l[l6] [l§'^[2r:22;i23'|?'25"' [i7i[i8lfl9^ 20 21 22^11

[I3:541^15!16]1Z^[181[19]

|a 21

p

12 'is'MlS 16 17:18 13:14 15 16 17 18

nana nuonn M3 i6:27,L28:29'3a:3r[Z'

16 27 ^29 31

APRIL

OCTOBER

[2][3]ffl[5][6][7][8]

nnnnnnm [2][3]fflS][6][SS

[8][9][1P 'il ,12 13,14]

agipri2ii3iiSl5^^ r9i(iol[iril2'l3i^P

[Tl'10lfTllfl2i'l3'rai:5l

[17 18:ia20"§l 22 23i 16' 17 18 19

[2I 25 26;

21^^ 30

nannnn MAY

Ml 2425

26^

(l5ipT7 18 19 2(JU] [pl7^'1819 20 21^2^ f^i 2324 25 26 27 li i23'^"25 2(^27 [2829;

20 :2i: 22 27 28j 2_9:

^30^Pl_P_]

NOVEMBER

MAY

NOVEMBER

[S^WfrillfWelJThirFVlfS^

[SiI]lMo|]Tu||We||Th||Fr||Sa|

[siI]S[^®!Th][W][s3

[i]g][3]a][5]

[isileiTfira

WW^Zl]

13^14115^ l6l|Tri8'[T9l

[2f 23 24! 25; 26 27: 28 20; 21 22 23

JUNE

24 25 26

l4ll5'l6'^18l!l9lS0l :2li22 23 24:25'26;^2^

nnmras aH[6][7]s[9]ap]

[12]I5114,151T6^17'I8]

[li[2i[2l]^22''23j^l5l [l8l[l9i;Mi2r^2|[23][24]

[2f'^'27:r28'r29][30l[31]

[i2'ii3

fi9

Wis^le IT18]

20;21 22 23 ,24

In

lii2^i30j^:3ij[i]Qn

nnnnnn nnnnriz]

DECEMBER

|SuHMo|[TVri|m|iTh|!Fr|iSa| |Su|iMo|[Tu||Vfe||Th|iFr|rS^

[5][3][7^[8ir9niQ][iE

iTiX'i:i'io"^TTi:i2;^.'

JUNE I

DECEMBER

Su llMoliTu ||^fTh][FnfS^ |Su|iMo||Tu[|We||Th||Fr|[S^

nnnnm[2][3] S[5][6]HfflS]10] [3][BE[6]r7i^r9] P[r2lplS4]35^56][17| 18][li[2i[2l]ll!2|!24l

nnnann nnnnnnn

!!




Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.