Longwood Magazine 2018 Summer

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CLAS

ON THE COVER

HotelWeyanoke's rooftop lounge, Catbird, is one of Farmville's most popular places to see and be seen. Story on Page 28. Photo by Alec Hosterman/Courtesy of HotelWeyanoke

COVERSTORY

I

28j Historic to Hip

HotelWeyanoke is reborn as a downtown Farmville destination

FEATURES

[2J LargerThan Life

Longwood studentTodd Miller made his life count-but the real story is the impact he made after his death

� More than Meets

L:..::J the Eye

Providing students an avenue to creativity is just one of the many benefits of art education

[![]

O&A: Agent of Change

A fresh approach and a deep appreciation of Longwood are yielding results for Admissions Dean Jason Faulk

When It Rains, It Pours

The Class of 2018 is brimming with citizen leaders embarking on bright futures

DEPARTMENTS

3 OnPoint

New one-stop shop for student services, banner year for scholarship fundraising, update on newest Joan of Arc statue, and more

34 LongwoodCalendar

36 lnPrint

37 LancerUpdate

New basketball coaches, recordbreaking lacrosse season (Page 38), fighting human trafficking, and more

41 AlumniNews

Joan of Arc Celebration,Welcome to the City events, Day After Graduation podcast, and more

48 EndPaper

Scholarships are life-changing (opposite page) Mega Reunion 2018 drew hundreds to campus for a weekend of fun for students who couldn't otherwise at Longwood and in Farmville. afford college

9

President Reveley leads theway to the undergraduatecommencement ceremony.

SUMMER 2018

Publisher Longwood University FoundationInc. Michael Lewandowski, President Editor Sabrina Brown Creative Director DavidWhaley Associate Editors

GinaCaldwell, Matthew McWilliams Sports Editor

ChrisCook Photographer

CourtneyVogel

Contributors

Kent Booty, DIA, Patrick Folliard,Ted Hodges '85, Meridith DeAvilaKhan, Alison Fallecker, MikeKropf'14,Alec Hosterman, Ellie Miller, Kevin Napier '18,Justin Pope, Emily JunePullen, MartinRadigan, ElizabethSeaborn, DavidRobinson,JasonSnyder, LaurieSoriano, LaurenWhittington

Advisory Board

RyanCatherwood, Larissa Fergeson,Courtney Hodges, VictoriaKindon, David Locascio,Justin Pope, BennieWaller'90

Board of Visitors

Marianne MoffatRadcliff'92,Rector,Richmond

Eileen MathesAnderson'83, GlenAllen

Katharine McKeown Bond '98, Mechanicsville

Katherine Elam Busser, Goochland

MichaelA. Evans, Mechanicsville

Steven P. Gould, Danville

David H. HallockJr., Richmond

Eric Hansen, Lynchburg

Colleen McCrinkMargiloff'97, Rye, N.Y.

Nadine Marsh-Carter,Richmond

Larry I.Palmer,Richmond

Polly H.Raible'91,Midlothian

RicshawnAdkinsRoane,GreatFalls

LuciaAnna"Pia"Trigiani,Alexandria

Editorialofficesfor Longwoodmagazinearemaintained atthe Officeof University MarketingandCommunications, Longwood University, 201 HighStreet, Farmville,VA23909.

Telephone:434.395.2020;email: browncs2@longwood.edu.

Comments, letters andcontributionsareencouraged.

Printedonrecycledstockscontaining100% post-consumerwaste. Nostatefundswereusedtoprintthispublication.

Torequestthis magazineinalternateformat!largeprint, braille, audio,etc.),pleasecontact Longwood Disability Resources, 434.395.2391;TRS: 711.

Published July 2018

FROM THE PRESIDENT

So much sets Longwoodapart-our traditions, our beautiful campus and our sense of community, to namejust a few. During these challenging times in our nation, something else distinctive that pervades here has increasingly caught my eye: civility.

With shouting and personal insults the coin of the realm on cableTV and social media, it is easy to despair about incivility. Here at Longwood, we certainly have a range of opinions and even disputes. Our student body mirrors the diversity of viewpoints in the Commonwealth and nation, and not infrequently their views and even core principles are challenged by those around them.

That's a big part of what college is about. And yet, with only the very rarest exceptions, civility prevails at Longwood in these encounters. Students ask tough questions and debate, but the starting point is almost always respect for the dignity and place in our community of all of their fellow students. In the class I teach each fall on the U.S. presidency, even when difficult political topics come up, respectful dialogue prevails. Like any college campus, we have controversies and issues about which students feel strongly-perhaps more than our share given how intensely we encourage our students to be citizen leaders. But even in cases of great passion, in my experience, Longwood students listen to one another, treat one another with respect, and work through the institutions of campus life such as student government or student publications to have their concerns heard and addressed.

One reason civility prevails at Longwood is that it must-we all live and work closely together. Residential college campuses like Longwood are the most diverse communities in which many of our students will ever live. Sadly, they're one of the few remaining places in American life where citizens regularly encounter people with views different from their own-face-to-face, not just through social media.That's one reason I believe residential colleges like Longwood must endure:They are an essential training ground for democracy.The graduates of such institutions will have to play a leading role to help bind up the wounds of our current era.

But I believe the civility that prevails at Longwood and which our students carry into the world goes further, and its sources run deeper. It emanates from a culture of civil student leadership, established through the generations and visible in numerous student organizations starting with the SGA. It follows from a tone set by faculty, coaches and our student affairs staff-something in our institutional DNA-that is by no means universal or even common at other institutions.

Going forward, civility will be front and center in bold, intentional and truly unique new ways in Longwood's classrooms.The new Brock Experiences will cultivate civility by introducing students in person to a broad range of stakeholders involved in difficult civic challenges ranging from the environment to immigration to the arts. Later this summer, the incoming Class of 2022 will be the first to experience Longwood's new Civitae core curriculum, which explicitly ties our citizen leadership mission to our academic enterprise for the first time. Civitae courses are currently being rolled out by every discipline at the university, but a key common ingredient-and something our students will think deeply about at virtually every step along their path to graduationis nurturing civility.

I hope it makes you proud, as it does me, to see Longwood as a beacon and an example for others to follow.

longwood A MAGAZINE FORALUMNI AND FRIENDS OF LONGWOOD UNIVERSITY
2 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE

One-Stop Shop

Newly.,opened Brock Hall brings together essential academic support services

I]

Beginning next semester, a Longwood student who needs help organizing a big paper, needs to meet with an academic coach and needs to add a class will no longerhaveto visitmultiplebuildings on opposite ends ofcampus.

Brock Hall, a new 25,000square-foot building located between Greenwood Library and Lankford Hall, is the home of Longwood's newstudentsuccess center. It is a hub for essential academicsupportservices, includingthe Center forAcademic Success, Writing Center, Office ofthe Registrar,Office ofFinancial Aid, Disability Resources, and First Year Experience and Family Programs, as well asthe office ofthe associate vice

president for enrollment management and student success.

The building is named for Joan Perry Brock '64 and her late husband, Macon Brock, who have been among Longwood's most dedicated supporters. Brock attended the grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the building in May and was joined by her two daughters as well as some ofher longtime Longwood friends.

"This building, with all ofits facilities for how to approach learning processes from many different ways, is going to be used and appreciated by so many students, helping themto attain their maximum potential," she said.

----l•JIIPOINTI
(CLOCKWISE FROM LOWER LEFT) Brock Hall is located between Greenwood Library and Lankford Hall. The interior was designed with student collaboration and learning styles in mind. Joan Perry Brock '64, (second from left), the building's namesake, was joined by her daughters, Kathryn Brock Everett (left) and Christy BrockMiele, and PresidentW.Taylor Reveley IV at the opening ceremonies. Etched glass surrounds several spaces downstairs, providing both light and privacy. (INSET)Visitors explore the building after the ribbon-cutting ceremony.
SUMMER 2018 I 3

Latinis back after 40 years

Afternearly40years,Latinisbackat Longwood,withthefirstcoursescheduled tobeofferedthisfall.

Astapleofliberalartscurriculaacross theworld,Latinprovidesnotonlyadeeper understandingoftheEnglishlanguagebut alsoisarigorousadditiontothecourse catalogthatholdsappealforstudents.

"Therearestillagoodmanystudentsin Virginia,maybemorethaninotherstates, whostudyLatininhighschool;'said Dr.McRaeAmoss,aprofessorofFrenchand 19th-centuryFrenchculturewhohastaken onthechallengeofreintroducingLatin.

"Thepurposeofthisinitiativeistopermit studentswhohavehadLatininhighschool tocontinuewiththelanguageandcomplete requirementsforgraduationhereatLongwood.Oncewegetthisofftheground,we'll offertwocoursesperacademic year:' EventhoughsomemaynotseetherelevanceofstudyingLatininthe21stcentury, Amosshasnodoubts.

"AtleasthalfoftheEnglishvocabulary, afterall,comesfromLatineitherdirectly orindirectly;'saidthe27-yearveteranofthe Longwoodfaculty."Sohavingaworking knowledgeofthelanguageandtheroots andmeaningsofwordscanmakesomeone amuchmoreeffectiveandeloquentcommunicator,nomattertheirprofession:'

It's a Match

As alumniandfriends step up, Longwood meets a challengeand raises $11 millionfor students

I]

'Tmreadytotakethefield,"the anonymousdonortoldCourtney Hodges,Longwood'svicepresident forinstitutionaladvancement,onemorning lastDecember."ButIneedteammates."

Thatwashowthechallengewaslaidout: afundraisingblitzwithagame-changingprize atitsconclusion-a$5millionpledgeforstudentscholarships.Buttherewasabigcatch. Thegiftwasintheformofachallengematch. Toreceiveit,Longwoodwouldhavetoraise another$5millionforscholarshipsonits own-anddoitbyJuly1.

Sureenough,Longwoodalumniandfriends steppedup,investingnearly$6milliontomeet thechallenge.

Withthechallengematch-announced shortlybefoi;ethismagazinewenttopressnearly$11millionhasbeenaddedtoscholarshipcoffers.That'sanamountofstudent scholarshipsraisedinsixmonthschatat previousratesofgivingwouldhavetaken morethanadecade.

"Ouralumniandfriendsshowedonceagain whatmakesLongwoodsuchaspecialplace," Hodgessaid."Everyoneplayedabigpart. Infact,alumnifomeverydecadesincethe 1930scontributed-asymbolicachievement."

Thedecadewiththemostdonorswasthe 1960s,whosealumnaegaveatotalof$1.9milliontoscholarshipsoverthepastsixmonths.

Longwoodhasreachednewheightsinthe lastfiveyears:Applicationsareatanall-time high,andtheincomingfreshmanclasswillbe amongthemostaccomplishedinuniversity history.Thenextstepisbecomingmore competitivewithscholarshipavailability.

"Weputtogetherthemostcompetitive scholarshippackageswecan,andtheability tobeflexibleandoffermoremoneywillonly

helpaswebuildournextfreshmanclass," saidDeanofAdmissionsJasonFaulk.

Evenapartfromthematchinggift,35new scholarshipswereendowedduringthechallenge,includingonessupportingtheCormier HonorsCollege,studyabroad,student-athletes, academicexcellenceandfinancialaid;and nearlythatmanywereaddedto-increasing theannualawardamount.

InJune,whenHodgescalledthedonortolet herknowLongwoodhadmetthechallenge,the donorofferedcongratulations-andpermission

'Infact, alumni from every decade since the 1930s contributeda symbolic achievement.'

torevealheridentity:philand1ropistandlongtimeLongwoodbenefactorJoanPerryBrock'64.

ItwasjustafewdaysafterBrockhaddeliveredarivetingaddressatLongwood'sgraduate commencementceremony.

"Whatyouwillfindisthatyouwillsoonbe unabletoimaginelifewithoutbeinginvolved, withoutpitchingin,"Brocktoldthegraduates. "Itwillbecomepartofyourcellularmakeup. Andwhenyougetromyage,you'llcometorealizethatsuccessismeasurednotbythesizeof yourbankaccountortheZIPcodeyoulivein orthecaryoudrive.Therealyardstickiswhat yougiveofyourself,thehelpyouprovide,the loveyouspread."-MathewMcV(liffimns

formerSGAPresidentKevinNapierrecounts theeffectscholarshipshCldonhisLongwood cClreer 011 Page48.

ONPOINT
Dr. McRae Amoss has taken on the challenge of reintroducing Latin to the Longwood curriculum.
4 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE
Joan Perry Brock '64, shown here giving the address at graduate commencement, challenged her fellow alumni to give $5 million for scholarships in six months. They exceeded her challenge by $1 million.

Birds ofa Feather

Coaching groups to pair faculty and staff with students who share a common interest

I]Thefirstdaysandweeksofcollege canbeamongthemoststressful II': forfreshmen.

Hundredsofquestionsremaintobeanswered: WillImakefriends?WillIgetthesupportIneed frommyprofessorstoexcelintheclassroom? HowwillIfindtherightorganizationstojoin?

Oftenstudentsareessentiallyontheirown whentryingtofindtheseanswers.ArLongwood,theOfficeofStudentSuccessisimplementinganinnovativeapproachthataddresses manyoftheseconcernsandprovidesthekind ofmentoringfromfacultyandstaffthathasbecomeoneofLongwood'strademarks.

Theapproach:creatingcoachinggroups thatwillpairgroupsofstudentswithafaculty orstaffmemberwhosharesasimilarinterest. Thegroupswillmeetregularlytotalkabout academicwork,planactivitiesaroundtheir commoninterestandeasethetransitionto collegelife.Theinterestswillbeasvariedas themembersoftheincomingclass,with groupsbuiltaroundtopicsincludingrunning, gaming,politicsandevenLegos.

"Wetookalookatthemostsuccessful first-yearprogramsinthecountryandcom-

paredthemtoours,"saidDr.EmilyHeady, seniordirectorofstudentsuccessandretention. "Ourcurrentapproachwashittingonsomeof theelementsthatwewereseekingburfellshort onsomeothermeasurements.Sowedevised thisprogramcharcombinesthetraditional mentorshipthatwasahallmarkoftheold modelwithputtingstudentsingroupsbased oncommoninterests."

Universitiesthathaveadoptedsimilarapproacheshavefoundenormoussuccessleading toincreasedretentionandreportsofincreased studenthappinessandsatisfaction.

"Weknowfromyearsofexperiencethatstudentswhohavepositiveexperiencestheirfreshmanyears,especiallywhenthoseimportant socialexperiencesarepairedwiththekindof accesstofacultythatLongwoodhasbeen knownfor,aremoresuccessfulacademically andgraduateonrimemorethantheirpeers," saidHeady."Thar'sreallywhatwearetryingto accomplish:gettingstudentsthesupportand peergroupstheyneedtobesuccessfulwhileat Longwood."

Morethan60coachinggroupswillbeledby Longwoodfacultyandstaffthisfall.

"Small Talk"

overheard on the Longwood campus

J11s it harderto make it as a woman writer?Yes. Is it harderto make itas a person ofcolor?Yes. Therewill beopportunities opened to you becauseofthosethings, butdo they counteractthe everydayweight of all oftheseotherthings? No'.'

Saladin Ahmed novelist and comics writer, bicentenary celebration ofMary Shelley's Frankenstein, February 2018

"Novels are not just about something, they have to haveother layers ofvoicing, of coloration, of metaphor that makethe novel real and alive and special:'

Chang-rae Lee author and Stanford University professor, Dos Passos Prize for Literature award ceremony,March 2018

ONE DAY, 600+ RESEARCH PROJECTS

During the 2017-18 academic year, more than 600 Longwood students were hard atwork studying everything from the morphology of bacterial magneticcrystalstoAndrew Jackson and the nullification crisis. Their research was showcased in the second annual Spring Symposium for Research and Creative Inquiry. Longwood didn't hold classes that day so students, faculty, staffand interested community members could learn about all the research being done on campus."We take undergraduate researchvery seriously at Longwood-there aren't many universities outthere where students have the kind of accessto faculty that our students enjoy from day one," said Dr. Amorette Barber, biology professor and coordinator of the symposium.

11Longwood taught me how to think critically, synthesize ideas, and write good sentenceswhich are life skills, not college skills:'

Dr. Robert Northington '03 research assistant professor at the University of Maine Climate Change Institute, Spring Symposium for Research and Creative Inquiry, April 2018

ONPOINT
SUMMER 2018 I 5

Under Construction

Longwood breaks groundfor admissions,academic buildings

llIn2015,Longwoodunveiledanew comprehensivecampusMasterPlan ,, forthecomingdecade.Here'san updateontheprogressoftwonoteworthy projectsincludedintheplan.

Admissions building

Firstimpressionsaresaidtolastforever andthat'sespeciallytrueforcollegevisits byprospectivestudentsandtheirfamilies. AtLongwood,theadmissionsoffice-most oftenthefirststopforprospectivestudentshasbeeninless-than-adequatespacesforthe pastfiveyears,fromacrampedhouseoff campustoatucked-awayhallwayinLancaster Hall.Butin18months,thatproblemwill besolvedwhenadmissionsstaffmoveinto astunningnewbuildingdirectlyacross HighStreetfromRuffnerHall,withviews ofLongwood'smostrecognizedbuilding andnewiconicgateway.

Theproject,whichwasdesignedwiththe goalofpreservingasmuchgreenspaceaspossible,alsoincludesamonumenttoFarmville's consequentialroleinthedevelopmentof

Americandemocracyanditscivilrightshistory,whichwillstandatthecornerofHigh andRandolphstreets.

"Thiswillreallybethefrontdoorofcampus,"saidDeanfAdmissionsJasonFaulk. "WeoftensaythatLongwoodsellsitself, andthisbuildingwilldoubledownonthat idea.We'llhaveabig,newbuildingchat lookslikeaseamlesspartofthehistoricpart ofcampus,butwillalsofeatureamodern interiorthatwillsetLongwoodapartfrom otheruniversities."

GroundbrokeonthenewadmissionsbuildinginMayandisexpectedtobecompleted bysummer2019.

Academic building

Thelasenewacademicbuildingoncampus, theCenterforCommunicationStudies andTheater,openednearlyadecadeago. Intheinterveningyears,Longwood'sundergraduateenrollmenthasgrownby10percent, andseveralnewareasofstudyhavebeen added,resultinginsqueezedclassroom andresearchspace.

Inresponse,Longwoodisconstructing anewclassicallystyled,four-storyacademic buildingcharwillbelocateddirectlybehind FrenchHall,wheremanyalumniremember tenniscourts.Thebuildingwillbehometo undergraduateresearchefforts,including alargeresearchspaceforgrowingprograms inhealth,athletictrainingandrecreation, andneurosciencestudies.Cutting-edgeclassroomsandotherlearningspaces,aswellas asizeablenumberoffacultyoffices,willalso belocatedinthebuilding.

"AsCivitae-thenewcorecurriculumisintegratedintocampus,weareexcitedthat theintegrativelearningaspectthatformsits foundationwillhaveatruehomeinthisnew building,"saidDr.LarissaFergeson,interim provostandvicepresidentforacademicaffairs."Facultyandstaffhaveneededmore spacetocontinueboththeirimportantwork andprovidemoreopportunitiesforcollaborationwithstudents.We'reexcitedcoseework startonthebuildingandlookforwardtothe workwewilldowithinitswalls."

Groundwillbreakonthenewacademicbuildingthismonth.It'sexpectedtoopenin2020.

ONPOINT l •
(LEFT,TOP AND BOTTOM)The new admissions building will be located directly across High Street from Ruffner Hall. (RIGHT) A new classically styled, four-story building will provide space for undergraduate research efforts, as well as cutting-edge classrooms and faculty offices.
6 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE

OCT. 26 IS THE BIG DAY

Longwood'slong-anticipatedUpchurchUniversityCenterisnearingcompletion,withthegrand openingsetforOct.26. ItisLongwood'slargestnonresidentialbuildingandislocatedattheheart ofthehistoriccampus.Avarietyofactivitiesisbeingplannedforthenewbuilding'sbigday.Keepan eyeonlongwood.edufordetailsincomingmonths."TheUpchurchUniversityCenterwillimpactthe livesofthestudentsbygivingthemplacestomeet,eatandsocializeliketheyhavenothadbefore onthiscampus,"saidSusanSullivan,directoroftheuniversitycenterandstudentactivities. "Thisbuildingisgoingtobesimplyamazing. Itwillgive ustheflexibilitytodreambig." TheNormanH.andElsieStosselUpchurchUniversityCenterisnamedforElsieStossel Upchurch'43,whoin2012committed$4milliontotheproject.

ThirdJoanofArc statue coming to campus

stuck,and,withthegiftof"Joanieonthe Srony"bytheClassof1914andasubsequentpurchasein 1927ofAnnaHyatt Huntingron'ss�'atuequicklynicknamed "JoanieonthePony,"JoanofArcbecame anirreplaceablepartofcampus.

Justmorethanacenturyafterthefirst statuearrivedoncampus,theMasterPlan envisionedLongwoodinstallinganew likenessofJoanofArcintributetoher enduringlegacyoncampus,andnow thatvisionisclosetobecomingareality.

Thenewcastbronzesculpture,which willanchorthesouthernendofBrockCommons,isbyrenownedScottishneoclassical sculptorAlexanderStoddart.

"Small Talk"

Aroundtheturnofthe20thcentury,popular LongwoodEnglishprofessorJ.M.Grainger suggestedthatJoanofArc,the 15th-century Frenchheroine,wouldbeagoodchoiceasan inspirationalfigureforstudents.Theidea

ThefigureofJoanofArcisholdingaflagwhichsheissaidtohavepreferredtoa sword-anddressedintraditionalmilitary armoroftheperiod.Shewillbesurrounded byalimestoneexedrathatincludesabench andtreesthatframeherstatelyfigure.

Constructionontheexedraisongoing, andtheJoanofArcstatueisexpectedtobe installedbymid-August.

J1TheMotonspiritexistsineachofus.Itteachesus torightawrong,tofillagap,tosupportprogress insociety,togenerateforwardmomentum. Mostofallit'saspiritthatcreatesarippleeffect thatcreatesatsunamiofchange:•

Nadine Marsh-Carter CEO of theChildren's Home Society ofVirginia, MotonCommunity Banquet, March 2018

11WhenIwasgrowingup,theytoldussunlight isthebestdisinfectant.Ourjobasreporters istoliftuptherockandtoshowyouwhat's underneath It'snotourjobtothrowthe rockatyou:·

Susan Glasser NewYorkercolumnist and former Politico chief international affairs columnist, President's Lecture Series, April 2018

JExerciseisoneofthefountainsofyouth. Theresearchhasshownthat15minutes [ofexercise]adaycanincreaseyourlifespan byfourtofiveyears:·

Dr. Diane Langemo clinician researcher and medical consultant, Simkins Lecture, April 2018

• • commongood:'

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam UndergraduateCommencement,May 2018

IIFindacareerthatfulfillsyou,andwork likeyoumeanit-never coast:'

Joan Brock '64 philanthropist, GraduateCommencement,May 2018

Assembly and finishing of the new sculpture is under way after casting in the studio ofScottish sculptor Alexander Stoddart.
ONPOINT
overheard on the Longwood campus
SUMMER 2018 I 7

Book set inAppalachia to be focus of events for 2019 NEA Big Read

Longwood has received a $15,000 grant from the National EndowmentfortheArts to host an NEA Big Read in Farmville and Prince Edward County next year.

Beginning April 6, the four-week Heart of Virginia Reads, as it will be known locally, will focus SouthsideVirginia's attention on author Ron Rash's celebrated work Burning Bright, a series of unforgettable stories set in Appalachia. Planned HOV Reads events include book discussions, film screenings, music performances, an author keynote at Longwood, and workshops and other activities at Hampden-Sydney College.

,\�, 'I.,. / ARTWORKS.

NEA BIG READ MID WEST

All events will be free and open to the public; a full schedule will be released later in the year.

A national initiative ofthe National Endowment for theArts in partnership with Arts Midwest, the NEA Big Read seeks to broaden our understanding of our world, our communities and ourselves through the joy ofsharing a good book. Longwood, the lead organization in the community grant-other partners include Prince Edward County Public Schools, the Central Virginia Regional Library system and Hampden-Sydney-is one of 79 nonprofit organizations to receive an NEA Big Read grant to host a community reading program in the next year.

"We are so excited to engage with the larger community on this project;' said Brent Roberts, dean of Longwood's Greenwood Library. "The stories in Burning Bright are gripping, but they are also a springboard into discussions ofAppalachian culture, history, food and music.There's something in there for everyone-and the grant allows us to lead those discussions on our common cultural interests:'

DAY OF GIVING EXCEEDS GOAL

Longwood's 2018 Day of Giving exceeded its goal of 1,790 gifts by more than 65 percent, with atotal tally of 2,976 gifts from alumni, students, parents, faculty, staff and other friends of the university. Atotal of $268,000 was raised to benefit student financial aid, academic departments, the performing arts and othercauses. Longwood's next annual Day ofGiving is setfor March 27, 2019.

Virginia House speaker tells SGA that public serviceisstilla noble calling

Findanissueyouarepassionateabout, volunteeronacampaignorforacandidate youbelievein,becomeanactiveleader inthelocalcommunityandreadaJoe ofbooks.

ThosewerethefourpiecesofadviceVirginiaHouseofDelegatesSpeakerKirkCox impartedromembersoftheLongwoodStudentGovernmentAssociationasheencouragedchemtopursuepublicservice.

InhisremarksattheSGA'send-of-the-year banquetinMay,Coxfocusedonrerurning civilitytopoliticaldiscourseandrheimportanceofyoungergenerationsbecoming involvedinthelegislativeandpolitical process.TheRepublicanspeaker,alongtime educaroraswellaslegislativeleader,asked

srudenrstoconsideracareerinpublic service,whichhesaidisstillanobleand courageouscalling,especiallyinVirginia's citizenlegislature.

"Ireallywouldchallengeyoucogetinvolvedintheprocess,"Coxsaid."You'vegottentremendoustrainingandexperienceas citizenleaders,andwereallyneedyou.Ifyour generationdoesn'tstepuptorakeupaleadershiprole,we'renotgoingtohavetheleaders thatweneed.Ihopeyouwillbeoneof choseleaders."

Cox,whoseoldestsongraduatedfrom Longwoodin20I4,wasintroducedbySGA PresidentKevinNapier'18,whosaidhehas knownCoxsincehewasinelementaryschool. Napierisakinesiologymajor.

ONPOINT
8 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE
GAVE If.}fl29% FRIENDS
ALUMNI
□ STUDENTS &ru 'W16% FACULTY &STAFF ��� 13% PARENTS
WHO
32%8
10%
Del. Kirk Cox spoke to members of the Longwood Student Government Association inMay.

Longwood student Todd Miller made his life count-but the real story is the impact he made after his death

9
FE

IN VIRGINIA BEACH . there is an 8-year-old boy who doesn't know why his middle name is Todd.

Heknowsthathisdadhasascaronhisstomach.Heknowshisdadwassickonce-really sick-butthenhegotbetter.Buthedoesn't knowhowthatstoryconnectstohisownmiddlename.Notyet,becausesometimesit'sdifficulttoexplainthingslikeliverfailureand organtransplantstochildren.

Butsoon,he'llknow.Andhe'llunderstand thenwhyhe'sbeingraisedthewayheis.School comesfirst,becausehismiddlenameisTodd. Givegenerously,becausehismiddlenameis Todd.Cherishdeeplytimewithfamily,because hismiddlenameisTodd.

He'llalsolearnabouttheToddDavisMiller RugbyMemorialScholarshipandtheLongwoodstudentswhoarechosentoreceiveit everyyearbecausetheyputschoolfirst,and givegenerouslyoftheirtime,andmentor youngerstudents.

Andthat'sbecauseofapopularandgenerous rugbyplayer,arareon-fieldcollision,anunfathomablydifficultdecisionbyaheartbroken mother,andthefriendshipthatblossomedbetweenherandthemanwhoselifeToddsaved.

A routine tackle

In2008,Longwood'srugbyteampracticed andplayedacFirstAvenueField,aspottucked awayinaresidentialneighborhoodcalled TheAvenuesjustwestofcampus.

ThegameonMarch1,2008,wasagainst afamiliarin-statefoe:VMI.TheKeydetswere nomatchfortheLancers,whojumpedoutto aleadanddidn'tlookback.Toddstartedand playedwell-typicalfortheseniorwhohad becomesomethingofanolderbrothertomany oftheyoungerplayershecalled"rookies."

At25,Toddwassevenyearsolderchanmany ofhisteammates.He'dstartedatLongwoodas avoicemajorat18,thendroppedout,onlyto returnseveralyearslatertofinishhisdegreethistimeinbusinessadministration.Those yearsgavehimperspective,andhisteammates talkabouthowhewouldmakesurefreshman playersgoctoclassontime,keepthemsafe (andongoodbehavior)atpartiesandalways havehisdooropentolistenorhelpwitha problem.Hewastheirmentor,theirnorthstar.

Towardtheendofthematchthaccool springday,Toddwentinforaroutinetackle andaftertheplay,headdown,walkedoff

FirstAvenueField.

AsToddwalkedtothesideline,EllieMiller didn'tthinktwice.Hersonwasagrownman6-foot-3and215pounds-whohadtakenand doledoutmany,manyhitsjustlikethisone.

Hewasjustcomingofftolethis"rookies"get someplayingtimebeforecheendofthegame. ThenToddcollapsed.

Whenhiseyesclosedonchesideline,they neveropenedagain.Aweeklacer,ToddMiller diedinaroomonthe11thfloorofcheMedical CollegeofVirginiaHospitalinRichmond. Buehislastace-theonehismotherknew hewouldhavewanted-savedalifeandleft alegacythatwillstretchformanylifetimes.

wantedtodosomething.

Dr.JohnGraham,acomputerscience professorandthelongtimecoachandchampionoftherugbyteam,proposedanannual tournamenttoraisemoneytoonedayendow ascholarship.Theyneeded$25,000-acall fundraisinggoalwhenyou'rerelyingonprofits fromT-shirtsandconcessions-butitwas astart.Anditcametogetherquickly:Thefirst rournamentwasheldayearlater.

Thetournamenteventuallyfalteredbecause ofweatherandschedulingissueswithother clubteams,butthefundsteadilygrewand scholarshipswereawardedforafewyearsfrom theoperatingmoney,butthegoalcontinued

'It's a real honor to receive this scholarship. The name Todd Miller is still legendary for Longwood rugby players-we all know his story... .'
-BRIDGETT DUNN '19

Touched by an angel

Sixtymilesawayandthreedayslater,merchant marinerJoeLeake,36,camedownwithwhat seemedlikecheflu.

"ThenextmorningIcouldn'tgetoutof bed,"hesaid."MywifewasinIraq,somy motherhadtocomeovertoputmysononche schoolbus.Irememberhertellingmetogoto thehospital,butIwassostubbornIwouldn't go.Ithoughtic\vasjustthestomachflu."

Butbychenextmorning,Leakeknewitwas morethanavirus.Hemanagedtoopenche frontdoorandcall911beforehepassedout.

Aweeklater,hewokeupinahospitalbed with54staplesacrosshisabdomenandTodd Miller'sliverinsidehim.

Ensuring Todd's legacy

Asrugbyhiesgo,theonechatToddMillerwas injuredfromwasn'tabnormallyhard.Before concussionprotocolsandbroadawarenessof chronictraumaticencephalopathy,coaches calledhitslikethese"stingers."Enoughtorattle yourcage,butnotenoughtocausedeepconcern.There'sacultureoftoughnessamong rugbyplayersandcoaches,whoonlyrecently havestartedrespondingcopossiblehead traumainamoresystematicway.

AlmostassoonasToddMillerdied,people

cobeanendowedscholarship-onechatwould lastinperpetuity.

JoeLeakeandhisfamilyundersroodhowimportantitwas-notonlytoEllieMiller(Miss Ellie, always Miss Ellie, to Joe) but also to them-coensurethatTodd'slegacywastohelp people in perpetuity. Very quietly they began contributingtothefund,andfornearlyadecade it grew until it hit chat important $25,000 thresholdinearly2018.

Magically,atthesametime,thetournament foundnewlife.AformerLongwoodrugger nowintheU.S.MarineCorps,Maj.Jason Dempsey'06,spearheadeditsphoenixlikerise fromcheasheschisApril,andEllieMilleragain madethetriptoseeit.Theteamstillplays matchesatFirstAvenueField-buttheTodd MillerrournamentwasheldatLancerParkandshewasthere,allsmiles,watchingoverche Lancerteamthewayhersondidadecadeago.

Thenewlyendowedscholarshiphonoring hersonwasgivenforthefirsttimethatdayasitwillbeeveryyear-rotworugbyplayers whogaveitallonthepitch, thewayTodddid.

JeanCarlo"JC"Siles'20andBridgett

Dunn'19eachreceivedascholarshipfrom EllieMiller.Siles,apsychologymajor,is amemberofPsiChi,chepsychologyhonor society,whileDunn,thewomen'srugby captainandformermatchsecretaryofthe

10 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE

team,isaliberalstudiesmajor•

"It'sarealhonorcoreceivethisscholarship," saidDunn."ThenameToddMillerisstilllegendaryforLongwoodrugbyplayers-weall knowhisstory-andcomeethismotherand hearabouthimasapersonwasreallyspecial. Ifeelveryhumbledcoreceiveascholarship namedafterTodd."

From heartbreaking loss, friendship

In2008,stillrecoveringinVirginiaBeach, JoeLeakecouldn'tstophimself.leonlycook afewInternetsearchescopiecetogetherwho savedhislife:a6-3,215-poundmanwhofell intoacomaduringarugbygameandwasBown byhelicoptercothesamehospitalLeal<ewokeup in.Andthoughit'srecommendedchattransplantrecipientsandfamilymemberswaitayear comakecontact,hecouldn'twaitchatlong.

"IhadcotalkcoTodd'smotherandsay thankyou,"hesaid."Ifeltsomovedcodochat, anditcouldn'twait."

Sixmonthsafterthetransplant,Joecameco aLongwoodrugbygameatFirstAvenueField, carryingadozenredroses.

ThefirstthingEllieremembersishowsimilarthetwomenlooked.Bochcall,bothwith shavedheads,bothwithwide,infectioussmiles, bothcollegeathletes.

DoctorshadcoldJoe'smothertwothings onSunday,March9,2008:Hersonhadabout 12hourscolive,andtherewasal-in-1,000 chancechataliverwouldcomeavailable. Theimplicationwasunavoidable:Joeneeded amiracle.

AndhegotonewhenEllieMillermadethe difficultdecisioncocakehersonofflifesupport. Butchatchoicehadconsequencesneitherone couldpredict.Joefoundabestfriendinchat samewoman.Ellie,forherpart,foundarenewedsenseofhopeassheandJoebecame closerandthefamilyofthemanwhowas walkingarow1dwithherson'sliverbegan quieclyaddingtothemeagerscholarship fundinherson'sname.

"Oncewegotstarted,wecouldn'tstop talking,"Leakesaid.'Tmnormallyapretty quietperson,buttherewassomethingabout MissElliechatwassofamiliar.Shestarted talkingaboutToddandIstartedtalkingabout myfan1ily,andwefoundoutchatwereally... likedeachocher."

AsJoecamecoknowmoreaboutTodd, themorehewasimpressed.

"IneededsomeonelikeToddinmylife," saidtheshootingguardwhobouncedbetween OldDominion,HamptonandFlorida

InternacionalplayingNCMbasketballin college."Iwasn'tabadkid,butIenjoyed thesocialaspectofcollegemaybealittlemore thanIshouldhave.Ifl'dhadaguylikeTodd around,he'clhavekeptmestraight.Those studentshecouchedatLongwoodshouldbe forevergratefultheyhadhimintheirlives."

Life after death

ThatliverdidmorethansaveJoe'slife,co hearJoecellic.

Hisfamer,JoeLeakeSr.,alsoamerchant marine,wasworkinginRussiawhenheheard hissonwasdeathlyill.lecookhimdayscogee home-leapfroggingfromKorea to Japanco LosAngelescoChicagocoRichmond.Hethought hewasreturningcohisson'sfuneral.

"IfJoehadn'treceivedchatliver,hismother wouldn'thavesurvivedit,"saidLeakeSr."And Iwouldn'thavemygrandchild.Ormyson. IhaveallofchatbecauseToddMillerandhis mothergavesogenerouslycomyfamily."

Joe'soldersonwasinsecondgradewhen hisfatherwokeupinMCVwithanewliver.

"HehasAsperger's[syndrome]andwas inaself-containedclass,chat'showbadhe wasdoinginschool,"saidLeake."ThisJune, 10yearsaftermytransplant,hehasgraduated highschoolfullymainstreamed,witha3.0 grade-pointaverage,andisbeingrecruited to wrestleincollege.That'sbecauseof Todd.OnceIstartedlearningaboutTodd, IsaidIwantmysoncobelikethatman. Hecanbeanathlete,buthe'sgoing to be astudent-athlete.He'sgoing to begenerous coafault.He'sgoing to knowhowimportant familyis."

And,ofcourse,choselessonsarebeingtaught to Joe'syoungerson,ChristopherToddDavis Leake,anathletelikehisdadandTodd,born ayearafterhisfather'soperation.Oneday he'llknowwhy.@

(ABOVE) Margaret Leake (left), Longwood PresidentW.TaylorReveleyIV,Joe Leake Jr. and Joe Leake Sr. look on as Ellie Miller makes theTodd Davis Miller Memorial Scholarship official. (RIGHT) Joe Leake, whose lifewassaved by a liver transplant, and Ellie Miller, the mother of the Longwood student who donated the organ, have developed a special friendship.
SUMMER2018I11

the Eye

Art education provides not only an avenue to creativity but also a refuge from anxiety, a portal to new ways of learning and a source of self-esteem

Carli Hanback remembers the moment she realized the impact she cou ld make as an art teacher.

Shewasstudentteachingthisspring,andher first-gradersweredraggingplasticforksthrough painttocreatetextureontheirpaintingsof apandabear.

"Thisonelittlegirl'sfacelitupwithexcitementwhenIcoldthemtomaketheirpanda intosomethingspecial,"saidHanback'18.

Whentheywerefinished,thestudent's smileradiatedassheaskedifshecouldtake ithometoshowherfamily.Herpandawas wearingabowtieandhadverybrightblue eyes.Itwasn'tuntillaterinthedaythatHanbacklearnedfromanotherteacherthatthegirl's 5-year-oldbrotherhadtragicallydiedlastyear. Hehadblueeyes,and,inhislastschoolpicture,hewaswearingabowtie.

"Thatprojectreallymadeadifferenceto herand,insomeway,createdaspecialconnectionbetweenherandherlittlebrother,"said Hanback,whograduatedinMayandwill beginteachingartthisfallatLandstown HighSchoolinVirginiaBeach.'Thar'swhen IknewIcouldmakeadifference."

Hanbackbeginshercareeratatimewhen theneedforK-12arteducationisascritical

asithaseverbeen.Withstudentsfacinghigher levelsofstressandanxiety,moreprevalentsocialandemotionaldisorders,andhome-life disruptions,theartclassroomisincreasingly arefuge-providingaspacewheremistakes areOK,creativityisencouragedandthere arenorightorwronganswers.

Atthesametime,theartcurriculumisbeing squeezedoutoftheclassroomastightbudgets forceschoolstotrimoreveneliminateit.

Thecutsdisproportionatelyhitruralandlowincomeareas,whereschooladministratorsmust focustheirlimitedresourcesonimprovingStandardsofLearning(SOL)testscoresandother factorschataffectaccreditation.Forexample,at PrinceEdwardCountyElementarySchool,art classeswererecentlycutfrom45minutesto 40minutestomakeroomformoreSOLtestprep.

Up to the challenge

Longwoodistakingtheleadinrespondingto thiscontemporarychallengethroughatwoprongedapproach.Theuniversityisadapting withthetimestopreparewell-roundedart teacherswhocansupporttheincreasingly complexacademicandemotionalneedsofstudents.Andit'sprovidingessentialartresources toSouthsideareacitizensthroughitsfree,nationallyaccreditedartmuseum.

TheneedissourgentthatLongwood'sart

educationprogramrecentlybeganrequiring arteducationstudentstotaketwospecial educationclassestobetterpreparethemto meettheneedsofalltheirstudents.Theclasses alsomakeiteasierforaspiringteacherstoget amaster'sinspecialeducation.Teachers whoaredual-licensedinarteducationand specialeducationareespeciallyattractive toemployers.

Meanwhile,theLongwoodCenterforthe VisualArts(LCVA)hasmadeititsmissionto bridgetheschoolresourcegapandprovidecreativeenrichmenttoalargeswathofSouthside residentswhodonothaveeasyaccesstonearby citiesorculturalinstitutions.InBuckingham County,whenthepreschoollostallresource classes,theLCVAsteppedintoprovide monthlyartprograming-freeofcharge.

Longwoodhaslongunderstoodthecritical roleartplaysinchilddevelopmentandthe waysitcanbeusedtoteachSOLsubjects.

Inhermorethanfourdecadesteachingart, DeborahWilkinsonFord'76,M.A.'90,said thebiggestchangehasbeenthatstudentsnow seemtobemoreinterestedinandinneedof expressingtheircreativity.Somestudentsspend multipleperiodsadayinherartclassroomat AmeliaCountyHighSchool.

"Thisartroomreallyislikearefugeforsome ofchem,"shesaid."Ihavestudentsthatlive, breathe,eatanddrinkart."

(O PPO SITE PAGE) Children from Longwood's AndyTaylor Center contemplate artwork in the Annual AreaYouth Art Exhibition at the LCVA. (RIGHT) From the youth art exhibition: Detail of Beauty and the Bird by Kayla Dixon, a 12th-grade student of DeborahWilkinson Ford '76, M.A. '90, at Amelia County High School.
SUMMER 2018 I 13

Beyond painting, drawing and papier-mache

Fordecades,Longwoodhasbeenonthefront linesofsupportingarteducation,byputting teachersinthefield,celebratingandshowcasingstudentachievement,andprovidinginnovativeoutreachthroughtheLCVA,which annuallyhoststhelargeststudentartshow inVirginia.

Askanyartteacher,andtheywillexplain thatthevalueofarteducationisfeltfarbeyond theartroom.Makingartteachesstudentsto worktogether,tosolveproblemsandtoemploy creativethinkingintheirlearning,anditoften leadstoaboostinself-esteemandconfidence. Foryoungerchildren,itprovidesopportunities tolearncolors,shapes,numbersandletters, andhelpsinthedevelopmentofmotorskills.

Wenthepre-kindergartenstudentsfrom Longwood'sAndyTaylorCenterforEarly ChildhoodDevelopmentvisitedtheLCVA totourtheAnnualAreaYouthArtExhibition thisspring,itwascleartheyweren'tjustthere toviewartwork.

MindyPierson'03,theLCVA'sschoolprogramseducator,usedtheancientEgypt-themed frontwindowdisplaytoteachavarietyof wordsandlessons-fromrecycling,tothe shapesofpyramids,tohieroglyphicsasanearly formofalphabet.Sheexplainedthatartistscan uselotsofdifferentmaterials,pointingoutthat repurposedeggcartonswereusedtomakea crocodileandpiecesofpaperhadbeenstained withcoffee.Thestudentsweremesmerized.

'Tmcurioustoseewhattheydowhenthey getbacktotheartroom,"saidoneoftheteachers.

Thisisthe20thyeartheLCVAhashosted theyouthartexhibit,whichfeaturedthework ofmorethan2,000studentsfrom44public, privateandhomeschoolsin12counties.Studentswhoseartworkisfeaturedareinvitedto attendapublicopeningreceptionwiththeir parentsandmanyschoolgroupscometotour theexhibitduringitsrun.

Egyptianscenewascreatedbystudentsat PrinceEdwardCountyElementarySchool, anditrepresentedarolereversalofsortsfor first-yearartteacherBrookeEamigh'16.

Eamigh,whohelpedtohangandorganize theyouthartworkwhensheworkedatthe LCVAasaLongwoodstudent,saidshestarted planningthewindowinDecember.Aongthe thingsthestudentsconstructedusingcardboardandrecycledmaterialswerecrocodiles,

'This art room really is a refuge. ... I have some students that live, breathe, eat and drink art.'
- Deborah Wilkinson Ford '76, M.A. '90, Amelia County High School art teacher

"It'ssoneattostandbackandwatchtheparentsshowtheirkidshowproudtheyareof themwhentheycometotheartshow,"said EmilyOverstreet'06.

Overstreet,whohastaughtartatCumberlandCountyElementarySchoolforthepast decade,isoneof19Longwoodalumniart teacherswhosestudents'artworkwasselected forthisyear'sshow.

EachyeartheLCVA'sfrontwindowdisplay duringtheyouthshowisdesignedbytheteachersandstudentsfromoneschool.Thisyear's

beetles,pyramids,anobeliskandaboatonthe NileRiver-allsubjectsthatrelatetolessonsor SOLstheyeventuallywillstudy.

"Itellmystudentsweareveryfortunateto liveinacommunitythatisencouragingusto doartandwantsustodothiswindowevery year,"shesaid."Thatisahugeopportunityto showoffyourartandtogettoseepeopleadmireyourwork."

JasiaMiles,ajuniorlastyearatAmelia CountyHighSchoolwhoseartworkwaspicked tobeamongthemostoutstandingatthisyear's

(LEFT)TheAnnualAreaYouth Art Exhibition includedthe work of morethan 2,000 students from 44 public, private and home schools in 12 counties.The students of 19 alumni art teachers were selectedto exhibit their art in the show. (RIGHT) Brooke Eamigh '16 works on a project with kindergarteners Jamarrious Eames (left) and CeriahWilliams at Prince EdwardCounty Elementary School.
14 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE

show,confirmedthathavingherworkondisplayhashelpedherconfidence-something thathastranslatedtootheraspectsofherlife. Thesoftballshortstopwasselectedtothefirstteamall-conferenceasasophomore.

'Tmreallyhardonmyself.Forpeopleto tellmeI'mreallygood,it'samazing,"shesaid.

OriginallyshowninBedfordHalland sponsoredbyCentralVirginiaAns,the youthartexhibitionbeganasawayof showcasingartworkfromPrinceEdward Countystudents.Theshowwastheideaof CencralVirginiaArtsmemberShirleyBlackwell,whoremembersorganizingthefirst exhibitionin1988.Irlaterexpandedin1998 toincludestudentsintheneighboringcounties andthenacrosstheregionundertheauspices oftheLCVA.

"Thegreatthingaboutartisthat,ifyou messup,youdoitagainormakesomething fromit,"saidKaylaDixon,aseniorlastyearat

AmeliaCountyHighSchoolwhoseworkwas featuredinthisyear'sshow."Imesseduponmy piecethatgotselectedfortheartshowwhen Iwasdoingthedesign.ButIjustputsomeink thereandmadeitlooklikesomething."

Artists who also teach Longwoodhasarichhistoryoftrainingthe bestteachers,andthesmallbutrobustarteducationprogramhascultivatedcreative,imaginativeandresourcefulartteachers,manyof whomareteachinginthecommunitiesnear Farmville.Allthreeoftheartteachersinthe CumberlandCountyschoolsystemareLongwoodalumnae,andmostofthecounciesthat borderPrinceEdwardhaveoneormorearr teacherstrainedatLongwood.

KellyNelson,whoheadsthearteducation programandalsoteachesprintmaking,ison thefrontlinesofpreparingartteachersforthe modernclassroom.Shesaidoneofthestrengths ofLongwood'sarteducationprogramisthatit isdesignedsothatartteachersarealsoartists.

Aspiringartteachersgraduatewith aBachelorofFineArtsandaconcencration inarteducation,whichrequires14extra credithours,generallyinart.Theprogram isveryinterdisciplinary.

"Oursrudencshavemoreartexperiences, whichcanbeveryimportantwhenyouare teachingart,"Nelsonsaid."Wearetrained kindoflikeajackofalltrades,soyouhave tobeabletodoalittlebitofeverything."

Thattranslatesincogreatartteacherswho canhelpstudentsofdifferentagesdevelop theircreativityandpursuethemediathey findmostrewarding.

"Youcancrossphotographyandsculpture, fabricandsurfacedesign,andallsortsofincerestingmaterialstogether,"shesaid."Ourfacultyherereallyembracesthatintermixingof materialsandartdisciplines."

Arceducationstudentsarepreparedfor theclassroomandlearninnovativeteaching methodsbytakingfundamentalsclassesin theCollegeofEducationandHumanServices. Theyalsolearndifferentwaystolinkartwith otheracademicdisciplines,suchasliterature, history,mathandscience-andtoencourage criticalchinking.

Throughtheirpracticumsandstudent teaching,arteducationstudentsputchat broadrangeofpracticalexperiencetouse. Hanbacksaidsheappreciateshowwellpreparedsheistoteachstudentsatallgrade levelsandfromdiversebackgrounds.

"Ir'sreallyimportantthatLongwoodallows ustogetintheclassroomsoearly,"shesaid.

OneoftheimportantlessonsNelson stressesinherclassesistocakethetimetotalk withstudentsandreallygettoknowthem.

Eamightookthatlessontoheart."Artclass reallyallowsyoutobuildpersonalrelationships,"shesaid."Justcakingthetimeto sitdownandlistentowhatastudenthas tosayisimportant.Alotofthesekidsdon't getchatathome."

(LEFT) KristenMosley '17 just finished her first year as the art teacher atCumberlandCountyMiddle School. She's working here with fifth-grader SandyAtwell, whose artwork Cherry Blossoms (DETAIL BELOW) was selected for the youth art exhibition. Sandy said when she's painting or drawing, 'everything else around me goes away and I just focus on the art.' (RIGHT) From the youth art exhibition: Polar Bear by RobertTrent, a fifth-grader andMosley's student.
SUMMER 2018 I 15

Partners in art education

AccreditedbytheAmerican Alliance ofMuseums, the 33,000-square-foot LCVA is the only museum ofits size andscope in the 7,000square-mileareasurrounding Prince Edward County. Known for its innovative outreach and participatoryvisual arts education, it is an important anchorandbelovedresource in the Farmville community. Each year, more than 38,000 children and adultsvisit the LCVA to viewexhibits, take classes orparticipate in workshops and lectures.

"Artis not only an essential part ofeducation, but oflife," said Emily Grabiec, the LCVA's director ofeducation and outreach. "Our role is to help foster creativity, curiosity and involvement in visual arts for residents throughout south centralVirginia."

One ofthetenets ofits mission is school education andoutreach.The LCVA offers professional developmentworkshops thatare designed for all K-12 teachers, not just arteducators. The SOLs-basedworkshops help teachersearn re-certification points aswell as learn methods

ofintegrating art into their curricula.

In addition to the preschool art program in Buckingham County, the LCVA offers two "HaveArt, Will Travel" programsfocusedon Africaand China-forlocal elementarystudents that teach SOL objectives through global lessons. Theprogramsallow the LCVA toshowcaseitsextensivecollection ofAfrican art, which includes objects representing 59 cultures from 17 countries, and its RoweCollection ofChineseArt. Lastyear, more than 550 children participated in the program.

During the summer months, the LCVA offers free dailyart workshops and previously has run an art program forat-risk fourthgraders atareaschools.

Hanback, therecentLongwoodgraduate, said the time she spent volunteering at the LCVAwas instrumental in her understanding and appreciation ofthe nontangible benefits ofart.

"Yousee allwalks oflife come in. Itwas nice to see familieswho don'thavea lot financially come and bringtheir kids to thesefreeevents,"

shesaid. "Itmeantsomuch to thekids, and theywould leavewithhandfuls ofcrafts."

When the LCVA movedto its current location in the center ofdowntown Farmville 25 yearsago, itwasviewed as both a physical and symbolic bridge between Longwood and the surrounding community. It not onlyserves as a vital art resource forchildren and teachers across SouthsideVirginia, but it also provides a fertile trainingground for aspiringart teacherslike Eamigh, Overstreetand Kristen Mosley '17, who just finished her firstyear as the art teacher at Cumberland County Middle School.

For those three alumnae, and many others, workingandvolunteeringat the LCVA nor onlygave them beneficial workexperience but also integrated them into the local art community.

"I can'tsayenough about how much the staffat the LCVA influenced me and helped me," said Mosley, who has hadher still life paintings exhibited as farawayas Chicago. 'Tmso thankful forhowtheyprepared me to be the teacher and artist that I am today."

(LEFT) DeborahWilkinsonFord '76,M.A. '90, helps 11th-grader Jasia Miles with a sculpture at Amelia County High School. Jasia's artwork BelleAme (DETAIL RIGHT) was selected for the youth art exhibition. (FAR RIGHT) From the youth art exhibition: Detail of Colorful Classmates by 10th-grader Dakota Shahan-Beaver, one of Ford's students.
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IttookOverstreet,agraphicdesignmajor,one yearworkingatagraphicdesignfirmtorealize thatsittinginfrontofacomputeralldaywasn't thecareerforher.ShecalledNelson,thearteducationprofessor,andthatconversationconvincedhertoreturntoLongwoodtobecome anartteacher.

"SometimesIcan'tbelievethisismyjoband chisiswhatI'mgettingpaidtodo,"shesaid. "It'sawonderfulfeelinggoingtoworkandlovingwhatyoudo."

Wheneversomeoneraisesthenegativeaspectsoftheeducationsystemorquestionswhy shebecameanartteacher,Overstreetexplains therearen'tmanyotherprofessionsthatareas rewardingonadailybasis.

"Thechild'sreactionwhentheyfinishthat project-that'Imadethis!'lookandthepride thattheyhaveinthemselveswhentheyare

'Art is not only an essential part of education, but of life.'
- Emily Grabiec, Director of Education and Outreach, LCVA

done-itmakesitsoworthit,"shesaid.

For42years,Fordhaswatchedmanyofher studentstransformnotjustartistically,butpersonallyaswell.

"Itmakesyouwanttocomebackevery year,"Fordsaid."IfeellikeIcan'tletthem down.IhavetocomebackbecauseIwantto seethemgrowsomemore.That'swhatdrives youtogetoutofbedeverymorning."

OneofthosestudentsisDakotaShahanBeaver,asophomorelastyear,whosaidsheuses artasaformoftherapy.Shahan-Beaverhadher arrworkfeaturedintheyouthartexhibitfor thefirsttimethisyear.

"Ihavedepressionandanxiety,soitcalms medownandhelpsrelievemystress,"shesaid. "Youcanportrayalotofemotionsthroughart. Youjusthavetohavetheimaginationforit." Yearsago,Fordsaid,herartclasseswerenot aspopulatedwithstudentswhowereserious aboutart.

"ThestudentsIhavenowaretrulymore interestedinlearningtheskillsandthetechniques,andtakeprideintheirwork,"shesaid. "Theyareinterestedingoingtoseecollegeslike Longwoodtomaybepursueartasacareer."

Eachyear,FordbringsherstudentstoFarmville tovisitcampusandtheLCVA,sometimestoview thestudentartshowandsometimestodoan artprojectwiththestaff.Sheshowsthemthe Ruffnerrotunda,andtheyeatlunchinthedining hall-whilesheregalesthemwithstoriesofhow toughDr.ElisabethFlynn'sarthistoryclasswas orhowreveredlongtimeartfacultymembers BarbaraBishopandHomerSpringerwere.

Ford'sdecisiontoretirefromteachingfull timethisyearwasbittersweet.Thestudents andthosetripstoLongwoodareamongthe thingsshewillmissthemost.

"Ihaveagooddayeveryday,"shesaid. "Alotofteacherscan'tsaythat.Youhaveto lovewhatyoudo."@

A job that satisfies and inspires
From the youth art exhibition: (ABOVE LEFT) Detail of Eye of the Tiger by Maria Olmos, an 11th-grade student of Ronda Jones '88 at Cumberland County High School. (ABOVE RIGHT) Detail of Torn Paper Se/fie by Kierra Green, a 12th-grade studentofCarley Fetty '10 at Prince Edward County High School. (LEFT) Detail of NativeAmerican Self-Portrait by KaylaWatson, a fourth-grade student of Emily Overstreet '06 at Cumberland County Elementary School.
SUMMER 2018 I 17

Agent of Change

A fresh approach, teamwork and a deep appreciation of Longwood are yielding results for Admissions

Youcanhearhimcoming fromtheothersideofBrock Commons. He'stellingastudentto callhismom.He'slaughing atajoke.He'scallingout awelcometoagroupof prospectivestudentstaking atourofcampus.

Everyuniversityhasan admissions director, but Longwood's Jason Faulk is singular in his genuine enthusiasm, vitality, pep-and his megawattsmile.

Even so,he knows allchatwill only cake him so far.

Hired 18 months ago as dean ofadmissions,

Faulk was chargedwith modernizing admissions strategies and outreach. Heembarked on awidespread transformation chat, as he approaches the conclusion ofhis first full recruitment cycle,has yielded the most accomplished freshman class in recent Longwood history. The Class of2022, entering chis fall, is on trackto includethe most-ever freshmen who graduated high schoolwith an A average.

To what does Faulk attribute chis success? le is celling chathe first mentions the can-do spirit among staff, facultyand administrators he has gotten to know. Then he talks about Longwood students themselves, who embody the characteristics at the university's heart and who truly believe in Longwood's selling points.

What's the most surprising thing about Longwood students?

They are refreshingly open. It's interesting-

at all the ocher universities where I've worked, students are generallyintimidated by administrators or faculty members, but not here. Theyare quick to open up,talkabout issues and share their opinions. And then most importantly,they'rewilling to do theworkto shape their campus the way theywant it to be. Wetalk a lot aboutstudentsbeing their own advocates in the admissions world-havingthe tools tomakethe rightchoicesfor themselves when itcomes to which college or university theywill attend. I chink a lot ofour students come in with chosetools.

What kind of student finds a home at Longwood?

We've worked really hard over the last 18 months to answer chat question. We all want to build freshman classes with students who will not only be successful but reallyfind a community they can be a partof. Whatwe have found is chat thethings chat we all know and love

Admissions events in the past year have attracted capacity crowds.
18 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE

aboutLongwoodarereallysharedineachclass. Thesearestudentswhoarewillingtohelp andgetinvolved.Wehavemajorcampus eventseachyearwherethousandsofprospective studentsvisitLongwoodforthefirsttime, andIhavetoworkhardtofindjobsforall thecurrentstudentswhowanttobeinvolved. AndIchinktheyarelookingforopportunities togrow.There'sadeepdesiretoworkon gettingbetteratthethingstheyaren'tyet greatat-whetherthat'sinthe classroomorsomewhereelse.

Forallthat,though,they don'tliketobepigeonholed. Ourstudentswantauniversity experiencethat'suniqueto them,nomatterwhatthey hopetoachieveorwhattheir goalsare.That'swhyIthink somenewinitiativesoncampus likechecoachinggroupsthat bringfreshmenwithsimilar interestsintoamentoringsituationwithafacultyorstaff memberarereallygoingto paydividends.They'reindividuals,andthey'rebeingtreated assuch.

At the same time, the world is changing.

Verymuchso,andtheyfeelthat intensely.Broadly,today'sstudentsareconcernedaboutthe environment,concernedabout socialjustice,concernedabout theirlives15yearsfromnow. Theywanttochangepoliticsto reflecttheirvalues,andIdon't thinkthat'satrend.It'saculture shift.Theywillbetheleadersof thefuture,andI'mexcitedto seewheretheytakeus.

wecookup.Icellthestaff:Nocevery admissionsdepartmenthasthatkindof trustandflexibility-sodon'ttakeit forgranted.

Wetookalookattheapplicationprocess andhavecriedtode-stressitasmuchas possible.Iseriouslydon'tknowwhythe worldofhighereducationmakesapplying tocollegesodifficult.Sowe'veadopted somenewcommunicationtoolsand

In an article about you when you were first hired, you said, "I immediately felt the energy of the place. My first thought was, if you get people on this campus, Longwood sells itself." Eighteen months n, do you still feel that way?

It'sevenmoretrue.We'rebeingveryintentional inbringingingroupsofstudentswhoinpast yearslikelywouldn'thavevisitedorconsideredLongwood; we'rereachingdeeperinto communities.Andmoreand moreofthesestudentsare choosingus,because,when theygethere,theyfeelthat incrediblesenseofcommunity thatweallfeeleveryday.

'We're being very intentional in bringing in groups of students who in past years likely wouldn't �ave visited or considered ..

Longwood ... And more and more of these students are choosing us, because, when they get here, they feel that incredible sense of community that we all feel every

day.'

You outlined a few goals when you came here, including trying out new ideas. What are some of the things that you have changed, and have they produced dividends?

- Jason Faulk, Dean of Admissions integratedsomenewsoftwaretostreamline theprocess.

We'vealsoreallytakenalookattheevents weputonandwhethertheyarebringingin thetypeofstudentwhoapplies,enrollsand issuccessfulatLongwood.We'veaddedevents, changedoneschatweren'tworkingsowell

andcriedtomakesurechateveryexperience prospectivestudentshavewithusispositive.

You're also a mentor to admissions staffersmany of whom are in their first professional jobs

It'safulfillingrole.Itgoesback totheoldcliche:"Payitforward."Severalpeoplehelped mewhenIwasayoungprofessional,andIwouldn'tbe whereIamtodayifitweren't forthem.Theaverageadmissionscounselorstaysinthejob threetofiveyearsbeforemovingon.Alotofthem-though notall-areLongwoodgraduates,whichmeanstheyget somevaluableworkexperience whilebeinginauniquepositiontosharetheirown experiencesofcollegewith prospectivestudents.

Are alumni part of admissions?

Yes,we'vegottenalumniinvolvedbecause I'vefoundchatanytimeyoucanconnect generationswitheachocher,there'sanauthenticitytherethatcan'tbereplicated.Soalumni areinvolvedinseveralofourregionalevents, and,throughthealumnioffice'sOneHour Changealwayspresentsitsownchallenges, butthankfullytheadmissionsstaffhasthe supportofthefacultyandadministration, whoaresurprisinglyreadytotryanything

Andfinallywe'vecriedtobuildbetter bridgeswichfaculty.

AMonthinitiative,wehavebeenabletosend prospectivestudentshandwrittennotes fromLongwoodgraduates,whichhas beenreallypowerful.®

Jason Faulk and his team have streamlined the application process to make it easier.
SUMMER 2018 11 9

en a1

The Class of 2018, brimming with talented students embarking on bright futures, finds downpour a reason to celebrate

'

ours

If ra in does mean good luck-and Longwood President W. Taylor Reveley IV declared it so at undergraduate com mencement on May 19then the Class of 2018 has it made.

The speeches were complete and about two-thirds of the graduates' names had been cal led when the skies opened up over Wheeler Mall at this year's ceremony. Unwilling to let it ruin their day, Longwood's newest al ums greeted the downpour with cheers, and those who had yet to cross the stage lined up for their moment in the spotlight, albeit at a much faster pace.

It was al most as if they wanted to prove that President Reveley was right on target with his earlier remarks about their generation, including statistics showing millennials are more optimistic about the future than Generation Xers or baby boomers.

"There is a myth that needs to be dispel led," Reveley said, referring to the 201 3 Time magazine cover story that characterized millennials as lazy and self-i nvolved. "I want to take a moment to powerfu lly disagree, especially with regard to the Lancers assembled here before us."

He went on to point out that the millennial generation is the most diverse and the best-educated in American history And Longwood millennials have the advantage of getting their higher education at a university where they Gov. Ralph Northam spoke to graduates at the undergraduate were "taught not just how to have a career but how to live ceremony. a life," Reveley added.

"The 21st century beckons ," he concluded. "Lancers, the great Class of 2018, I take profou d hope in you."

Looking at the individuals who earned the 984 bachelor's degrees and 166 graduate degrees awarded this year, it's easy to understand why Reveley is so hopeful about the future. You'll meet 23 of those individuals, a few of whom completed their requirements in August or December 2017, in the next few pages.

Among them are a biology graduate headed to the University of Chicago to begin a Ph.D. in immunology; a computer science and modern languages major set to start a job at Deutsche Bank; and a teacher excited about her Peace Corps placement in a small village in South Africa.

And there's Kate Colley, who majored in chemistry, conducted research on chemical reactions in drug design, played four years on the field hockey team and put her hat in the ring to be considered for a Rhodes Scholarship. She's been accepted to pharmacy school at VCU, well-prepared by her Longwood experience and already a bit nostalgic for it.

"I will never forget the long practices, bus trips to Ohio and tough games that I shared with some of my very best friends," said Colley, who is included in Longwood magazine online. "Longwood has brought me so much joy, both academically and athletically My advice to future graduates? Enjoy your time in Farmville while it lasts."

To read more about Commencement 2078, including remarks by Gov. Ralph Northam, who spoke at the undergraduate ceremony, and philanthropist Joan Brock '64, who spoke to students receiving graduate degrees, go to magazine. !ongwood.edu.

Olivia Zaleski

C,41)00

Majors: Computer science and modern languages with a concentration in Spanish

What's next: Analyst

Where: Deutsche Bank, Cary, North Carolina

Lab report: "Thecampus would be quiet and peaceful, but the [computer science] lab would be abuzz with activity, fingers flying over the keyboards with an intense concentration, people yelling out code. The atmosphere was great."

The wowfactor: Hiking on a glacier in Alaska, gazing at the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, standing just a few feet from the Rosetta Stone. "When I look back at my experience, I'll remember that, because of Longwood, the world was my classroom."

Couldn't have done it without: Dr Thomas Wears, mathematics faculty, and Dr Robert Marmorstein, computer science faculty. "They have an incredible energy when teaching. Through their encouragement and support I was able to grow as a student, a programmer and a person."

Meredith Puryear 4D 00

Major: Communication sciences and disorders with minors in Spanish and special education

What's next: Master of Science in speech language pathology

Where: Longwood University

A song in her heart: Meredith served as director of Pitch Perfect, one of Longwood's female a cappella groups, for 2-1/2 years. "It has been the purest form of love, support and acceptance that I have ever known."

Michaela Malboeuf

Majors: Psychology, and criminology and criminal justice

What's next: Operational support technician

Where: Federal Bureau of Investigation

Changing her world view: Michaela studied abroad in London, the Hague, Brussels and Amsterdam and met with representatives from the U.S. State Department, the International War Court and the Anne Frank house, to name a few. "This trip was ultimately the reason I choseto pursue a career in federal law enforcement."

The sound of silence: Michaela interviewed undocumented immigrants as part of a research project. "I was grateful for the opportunity to share their stories in an era where immigration is a hot topic but immigrant voices are silenced."

Couldn't have done it without: Dr Sarai Blincoe, psychology faculty. By gently pushing me out of my comfort zone, she helped me discover my passion and future career."

Spain on her brain: Studying abroad in Valencia "shaped my entire future goals," she said. "It made me realize that in my future career I want to work with children who have fluency and articulation disorders where English is their second language."

Couldn't have done it without: Dr LissaPower-deFur, communication sciences and disorders faculty. "Dr. Power-deFur has been a guiding light for me this last year of school and a constant source ofjoy" -

Major: Art education with a concentration in crafts

What's next: Art teacher

Where: Landstown High School, Virginia Beach

Free time: Carli spent much of her time at Longwood volunteering. The Big Event, Habitat for Humanity, FACES and the LCVA were on the receiving end of her devotion to helping others. Spring break redefined: As vice president of Longwood's Alternative Breaks group, she chose to spend her spring breaks doing service work in Death Valley and Everglades national parks.

Couldn't have done it without: Kelly Nelson, Kerri Cushman and Dr Terri Sabatos, art faculty. "I truly aspire to be at least half the educator that they have been for me."

Zachary Glasscock O0

Major: Theatre

What's next: Performer

Where: Theatre West Virginia, Beckley

Getting down and dirty: His first appearance on stage at Longwood was as Pigpen in You're A Good Man, Charlie Brown.

Enter, stage right: He made his directorial debut with Shrek The Musical for Farmville's Waterworks Players It was the first time Waterworks had selected a Longwood student to take charge of a production. "I fell in love with directing and hope to do it a lot more in the future."

Couldn't have done it without: Lacy Klinger, theatre faculty. "Lacy helped me get on my feet as an actor and gave the best advice during my time at Longwood."

Ashleigh Bielen

Major: Kinesiology with a concentration in exercise science

What's next: Master of Science in exercise science

Where: Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro

• A good run: On St. Patrick's Day of her senior year, Ashleigh cheered on several clients who ran a SK after training with her for six weeks. "Getting to see them accomplish their goals was one of the most rewarding feelings ever."

Twofer opportunity: Ashleigh received a scholarship to attend the National Intramural Recreational Sports Association conference in Denver, Colorado, and was offered a position as a fitness graduate assistant by MTSU while she was there. "I had never considered grad school due to costs Going to this conference was a huge stepping stone to my future."

Couldn't have done it without: Alina Cioletti, lntramurals and Campus Recreation fitness coordinator. "Alina always had confidence in me, even when I didn't have it in myself."

Brittany Bishop

Major: Master of Science in education, counselor education/ mental health counseling

What's next: Ph.D. in human sexuality-sex therapy

Where: Widener University, Chester, Pennsylvania

Eat. Sleep. Grad School.: This T-shirt that Brittany helped create as president of the Graduate Student Association says it all. "I was proud to be part of creating a community where graduate students could meet, have fun and share the experiences of our unique population."

Strictly Ballroom: Brittany hosted a GSA ballroom dancing event teaching tango and salsa to other grad students.

Tamiya Vanhook-Davis 41}0

Major: Psychology with a minor in neuroscience studies

What's next: Master of Science in occupational therapy

Where: Jefferson College of Health Sciences, Roanoke

Good news about cheating: "Most people tend not to cheat as much as you think." That was one of the findings of "Cyber Cheats," a senior seminar research project Tamiya conducted that focused on the impact of social media on academic dishonesty.

Couldn't have done it without: Dr Catherine Franssen, psychology faculty. "Dr Franssen will always be someone I hold dear to my heart."

Couldn't have done it without: Dr. Kathleen A. Mccleskey, counselor education faculty. "Dr McCleskey was an amazing teacher and was always available to help with conferences, references and anything else I needed."

A Guide to our Students' Iconic Experiences A � Honors WAthl!?tics WCollege t':":I. ti:\ AStudy � Volunteer / Internship W Phi Kappa Phi "'1 Research �Abroad V Community Service

Tristan Hobbs O0

Major: Business with a concentration in information systems and cyber security

What's next: Data analyst

Where: SEVA Technical Services, Inc., Newport News

Mister Vice President: Tristan served as executive vice president of the Student Government Association for two years. "I will always cherish helping to make positive change on campus."

The diner re-do: Tristan's fraternity helped renovate Walker's Diner, a Farmville landmark, on the Food Network show American Diner Revival. "It was really fun and rewarding to help remodel something that has been in this historic townfor so long."

Couldn't have done it without: Patti Carey, McGaughy Internship and Professional Development Center director "She always left her office door open and was ready to lend a hand, especially when was preparing for job interviews."

Patrick Gobran 00G4l)0

Major: Business with concentrations in finance and real estate and a minor in economics

What's next: Investment banking analyst

Where: Animus Capital Partners, Inc., Calgary, Alberta, Canada

The big leagues: Patrick landed an internship at Goldman Sachs , in New York City, then leveraged that experience into his job at Animus, where he provides advice on mergers and acquisitions, growth financing, capital raises and restructuring for middlemarket companies primarily in the oil field services and exploration and production sectors.

A winner in Vegas: He brought home a Best Paper award from a conference in Las Vegas for a presentation based on his senior honors research paper

Couldn't have done it without: Dr Frank Bacon, finance facu ty;1 Claire LaRoche, business law faculty; and Melinda Fowlkes, assistant business dean. "They helped me in a huge way to shape the career decisions I have made and guide me through my time at Longwood."

Halle Parker O4DO 0

Major: Communication studies with a concentration in mass media and a minor in photography

What's next: Reporter

Where: Danville Register & Bee

So much to do ... : Halle played on Longwood's Division soccer team and served two years as editor of The Rotunda, Longwood's student newspaper.

Inspired by a Gilmore Girl: During her internship at the Richmond TimesDispatch, Halle told a reporter there her inspiration came from the TV series Gilmore Girls, where one of the characters is an aspiring journalist. "Gilmore Girls didn't steer me wrong-I love this field and all that it stands for."

Couldn't have done it without: Jeff Halliday, communication studies faculty, and Michael Mergen, photography faculty. "They challenged me to develop as a leader [and] fostered my passion for all kinds of storytelling."

Geoffrey Parriott O4l)

Major: Biology with a minor in chemistry

What's next: Ph.D. in immunology

Where: University of Chicago

The knee bone's connected to ... : Tutoring fellow students in anatomy and physiology took up a lot of Geoffrey's free time. "I found it incredibly rewarding when I would hear about them doing better."

Word on professors: "Faculty are always open to putting in extra work if it will give a student an edge in the future. Everyone here wants to help you succeed."

Couldn't have done it without: Dr. Amorette Barber, biology faculty. "I worked in her lab for 2-1/2 years. She told me what we were doing and why, supported my failures and helped celebrate my successes. She helped me find what love to do."

Charleigh Kondas 0

Major: English with a concentration in rhetoric and professional writing

What's next: Master ofArts in public policy

Where: University of Alberta, Canada

More than a game: "Be your own legacy. This was the mantra our lacrosse team lived by this year Be present. Be in constant pursuit of what you can do to make this world a better place."

Charleigh credits Longwood athletics with expanding her "drive, critical thinking skills, commitment and work ethic."

Academic highlight: Charleigh received the Susan H. May Book Award, which is presented to the English student with the most outstanding academic achievements.

Couldn't have done it without: Dr. David Magill, English faculty. "Dr Magill inspired me to pursue a master's degree and pushed me to write about controversial topics."

Lauren Hyatt O 0

Major: English with a concentration in secondary education

What's next: Peace Corps

Where: South Africa

The second time around: Lauren will soon be teaching English to children in a small, rural village in South Africa, the country where she studied abroad. "Being able to travel to Africa and experience even a slice of the different culture and history helped me solidify my belief that could join the Peace Corps."

Candid camera college: "At Longwood I felt like I was in a movie sometimes, with those TV teachers who are too good to be true and say all the right things."

Couldn't have done it without: Dr. Melissa Kravetz, history faculty, and Dr. Jennifer Miskec, English faculty. "They brought me to South Africa and encouraged me to be knowledgeable and adventurous."

00

Major: Social work

What's next: Master's degree in social work

Where: George Mason University, Fairfax

Connecting with troubled teens: During an internship with United Methodist Family Services, Kate developed relationships with teenagers in a therapeutic foster care program who were struggling with PTSD, depression, severe anxiety and other challenges. "These teens had such unsteady lives at home, and this program was a safe place for them. Saying goodbye to them was more difficult than imagined."

Couldn't have done it without: Ian Danielsen, social work faculty. "He is a very kind person and is always willing to do things for others. He has written me multiple recommendation letters, and wouldn't have had the same opportunities without him."

.... II

Major: Nursing

What's next: R.N., Medical Respiratory Intensive Care Unit

Where: VCU Health System, Richmond

Caring for People: "I am passionate about nursing, caring for people and the Student Nursing Association. It made me really happy to see the impact we made on campus."

Ready, set, throw!: For Mike, a moment to remember is that brief silence just before the start of Color Wars. "I love the growing anxiety, the hush of silence waiting for the emcee to open the event as everyone is trying to plan the best way to throw the most paint-and then you get hit instead."

Couldn't have done it without: JoAnn Davis, nursing faculty. "She is my advisor, but she's more than that. She is a strong proponent of social justice and advocacy. Without meeting her, I would not be the person I am today."

Deirdre Bates 4DOGa)00

Major: M.Ed., reading, literacy and learning

What's next: Ed.D.

Where: University of Virginia

All in the family: Deirdre's daughter-in-law graduated with her this spring, and her son will follow in December Meanwhile Deirdre's daughter will enter Longwood in the fall. "We bleed blue and gray."

AKA "Momma D": "Students and even some faculty call me 'Momma D' for the years of cooking barbecue, macaroni and cheese, collards and corn bread for as many as 50 students twice a year at my home."

Couldn't have done it without: Dr. Angelica Blanchette and Dr. Wendy Snow, Reading, Literacy and Learning Program faculty. "Their unending patience and encouragement helped me find my calling."

eather Switzer a)0

Majors: Mathematics and computer science

What's next: Ph.D. in computer science

Where: College of William & Mary, Williamsburg

Madame Presidents: She got this nickname by serving as head oftwo clubs at the same time-the Math Club and the Association of Computing Machinery.

Connecting the dots: One of her research projects involved statistical analysis and creating algorithms to maximize the score in the video game SameGame. "I found that clearing the "'<' board by clicking groups one color at a time actually worked the best. It was really fun."

Couldn't have done it without: Dr. Julian Dymacek, computer science faculty. "Doing research with Dr. Dymacek is what made me decide to go to graduate school. He was always there to offer encouragement or advice when I needed it."

Lauren Bencick

Major: Business with a concentration in accounting and finance

What's next: Audit associate

Where: Baker Tilly Virchow Krause, LLP, Tyson's Corner

Taking stock of research: Lauren's research paper on the impact of 9/11 on the stock market was published by the Allied Business Academies. "Being able to conduct research and present it at an academic conference as an undergraduate student was an incredible experience."

Couldn't have done it without: Patti B. Carey, director, McGaughy Internship and Professional Development Center "Professor Carey truly cares about all of her students and was always willing to help." Lauren will never forget when Carey came running out of Hiner Hall waving copies of her resume. "I had an interview with an accounting firm visiting campus, and she had made one more edit to my resume and printed several new copies for me."

Tyler Chuba 4D000

Major: Business with a concentration in information systems and cyber security and a minor in computer science

What's next: Master of Science in information systems policy and management

Where: Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh

The long haul: Tyler worked in Curry as a resident technology associate, but willingly broke out of that job description during move-in. "I can't count how many fridges carried up the stairs that day, but I do remember how thankful the students and parents were for my help."

Culture shock: Studying abroad in Thailand "showed me a whole other world of culture and endless breathtaking landscapes It was the most difficult and fulfilling two weeks of my life."

Couldn't have done it without: Dr. Paul Barrett, business faculty and former dean. "Through his guidance and recommendations, was accepted to a highly competitive fellowship at Carnegie Mellon University, which then led into the graduate program."

Tatianna Griffin 04DG)4D00

Major: Anthropology with minors in history and biology

What's next: Master of Arts in anthropology with a concentration in biological anthropology

Where: University of Tennessee, Knoxville

CSI college edition: Tatianna attended a highly regarded summer program in forensic anthropology in Pennsylvania, where she gained experience in procedures including death-scene archaeology and human toxicology. "It truly made me realize that not only am I pursuing what I love, but I am pursuing what I was meant to do."

Cheer-full: She loves supporting Longwood athletics as a cheerleader

Gaining closure: Tatianna wants to work for the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency to find answers about missing military personnel.

Couldn't have done it without: Dr Brian Bates, anthropology faculty. "Dr Bates was like my 'campus Dad.' His passion for anthropology was very evident, and he was always there for me when I needed encouragement."

William Daniel Bartle OOG)4D0

Major: Political science with a concentration in pre-law and a minor in history

What's next: Juris Doctor degree

Where: Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University, Fairfax

8 minutes of fame: Danny appeared with President W. Taylor Reveley IV on an MSNBC program to talk about Longwood's hosting the 2016 Vice Presidential Debate. "I saw how students can be part of the political discourse and that our voices can be heard across the nation."

Couldn't have done it without: Dr William R. Harbour and Dr Mary Carver, political science faculty. "They helped me develop my analytical writing skills as well as supported my passion for law."

Taylor Morris

Major: Liberal studies with a concentration in elementary education

What's next: Fourth-grade teacher

Where: Meadow View Elementary, Henry County Public Schools

A planner's planner: Taylor was known as 'Miss Organized' and folks would depend on her planner for due dates. "I think it's the teacher in me."

Hometown college experience: Taylor spent one semester at Longwood in Farmville and then finished her degree closer to home at the New College Institute in Martinsville. "Longwood at NCI allowed me to be close to home and work a job while obtaining my bachelor's degree and teaching license."

Couldn't have done it without: Dr Pamela Randall, NCI program director "She was very supportive and encouraging throughout my experience at NCI. She made sure we were on the right track, molding me into the teacher am."

......... ......... 0
0

Hotel Weyanoke is reborn as a downtown Farmville destination

On a warm May evening, a few hours before the new Hotel Weyanoke's opening night reception, Ross Fickenscher and Garrett Shifflett surveyed the view from the granitetopped bar at Catbird, the hotel's rooftop lounge.

French and Ruffner Halls spread out before them on Longwood's classical campus to the south. Farmville's increasingly vibrant Main Street lay to the east, snippets ofthe Blue Ridge to the west.

Soon the venuewouldbepackedwith guests from across Virginia, sampling gourmet pizza and sipping specialty cocktails andcraft drafts from Danville's Ballad Brewing Companyanother ofthe development duo's successful historic-co-hip ventures.

The business partners whospotted Farmville as the next hot new place couldn't help but reflect on the series ofmilestones the occasion represented, not only for them but also for

Longwood and Farmville, which are enjoying the fruits ofacollege-town renaissance.

"We bet big on this project because Farmville is undergoing atransformation and we wanted to be part ofit," said Shiffiett, who with Fickenscher has been renovating, rehabbing and repurposinghist'oric properties-like converting old tobaccowarehouses intourban loftsfor a decade in Lynchburg, Richmond and otherlocations.

"There's an energy about this projectandthe community that's unlike any other that we've experienced," Fickenscher added.

The Weyanoke isn't just Farmville's first boutique hotel. It's also transforming Farmville's restaurant scene, with options ranging from gourmet coffee to artisan pizzacoupscale Italian dining.

Taken together,it's only the latest project thatis making downtown Farmville a growing destination fortourists, craftbeeraficionados, history enthusiasts and foodies.

Longwood hasbeen an importantpartnerfor theWeyanoke since the hotel's earliestyearsand university leaders played a key role in encouragingits revitalization. Notonlywill the hotel serve as aconvenient and attractive option for alumni returning to their alma mater,

it also will encourage further development projectsthat bring more visitors to the town and to campus.

"It feels like springtime in Farmvillein so manyways," Longwood PresidentW.Taylor Reveley IV said. "There's palpablemomentum and many good things happening. This hotel will be the catalyst for many more things. The vitality is real."

Making old new again

Two months before the grand opening, Fickenscher and Shifflettwere installing the original cast iron light fixtures that adorn the front doors ofthe Weyanoke. The two lanternswhichhavewelcomed guests tothe hotel since itwas built nearly acentury ago-may have some refurbished glass, buttheircharmand characteris unchanged.

Fickenscher and Shiffiett, partners in Richmond-basedAoss Ventures, specializein makingwhat is old new again. When the hotel was sold atauctionin December2012, they wereunsureofwhichdirection they would ultimately gowith the property, which then rented rooms to Longwood smdents.

Eventually they realizedthat restoring the

28 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE
I I {I .1 .t I
Business partners Garrett Shifflett (left) and Ross Fickenscher 'bet big' that the Far,nville area was ready for a project like the renovated Hotel Weyanoke, which opened for business in May. Weyanoke means 'land ofthe sassafras' in Algonquian, the language associated with theWeyanoke Indians, yvho historically inhabited a peninsula in what i� now Charles City County.

hotelandreturningittoitsoriginalusemade themostsense-adecisionchatcameafter stakeholdersfromtheFarmvillecommunity andLongwoodexpressedtheirstrongsupport, "Givenchatit'srightacrossthestreetfrom LongwoodandablockupfromMainStreet, wethoughtahotelwasmostappropriate,"said Fickenscher,"Also,theFarmvillecommunity desiredahigher-endboutiquehotelwithalot ofcharacter,soitseemedlikeanaturalfie."

TheWeyanokeisthefirsthotelprojectfor FickenscherandShifflett-anaspectthat carriedmoreriskbutalsomorereward,

In2015,theypartneredwithWilliamsburgbasedCornerstoneHospitalityandbeganthe processofreturningthehoteltoitshistoricuse, Thepartnerssoonfoundthatsecuringfinancingforahospitalityprojectinatownthesize ofFarmvilleandwithoutanationalhotelbrand associatedwithitwouldbedifficult.Therewas onepointwhenthelenderwasonthefence andFickenscherknewwhatneededtohappen: Hehadtogolookatthehotelandfeelwhat washappeninginFarmville,

"Hewenttherethenextdayandcalledme andsaid,'Youareabsolutelyright,"'Fickenschersaid,"Hewenttotheproperty,walked upontheverandaandlookedaround,and thought,'Thisisperfect."'

The70-roomrenovatedhotelopenedthis

spring-justintimetohostparents,alumni andguestsforLongwood'scommencement exercisesandMegaReunionweekend.

"TheimportanceofthisprojecttoFarmville isreallywhatsetsitapart,"Shifflettsaid. "Wedoalotofrenovationsofhistoricproperties.Butthecoolestthingtomeisthatweare bringingbacksomethingthatoriginallyhad suchimpottancetothetownofFarmville. We'venotonlyrestoredthebuildingbutits importancetothetown,aswell."

Hub of hospitality

TheWeyanokewasoriginallyconceivedasa communitydevelopmentprojectbytheFarmvilleLionsClub.Whenitfirstopenedin 1925,itwasoneofthelargestandmostregal ofthehotelsbetweenRichmondandWinstonSalem,NorthCarolina.

ItwasacatalystinturningFarmvilleinto ahubofhospitalityandapopularconvention center-whichtherenovatedhotelispoised todoagainacenturylater.

Atthehotel'sgrandopeninginMay, MayorDavidWhitus'83notedthatbetween 1926and1928thetownhosted10statewide conventions,includingthe1927LionsClub conventionattheWeyanokethatwasattended byHelenKeller.HesaidFarmvillequickly

earnedareputationforbeing"Virginia's friendlytown."

"WearestillVirginia'sfriendliesttown," Whitussaid."Andwewillagainonedaybe hostingconventionsandstatewideevents. Greatthingslieaheadforthistown."

AphotoofKeller'svisitremainsondisplayin thehotel,alongwithotherhistoricalitemsincludingoldledgersandaCurrierandIvesprint thatwereunearthedduringtherenovation. Whenthehotelopened,itwasbilledas"modern"and"strictlyfireproof"basedonitsallmasonryandsteelconstruction.Fickenscherand Shiffletttriedtokeepthehistoricfabricofthe buildingintactasmuchaspossible,savingand restoringmanyoftheoriginalcomponentsincludinglightfixtures,doors,flooring,windowsandtinceilings.

"Throughouttheyearsourappreciationhas grownstrongerforthehistoriccharacterofany building,"Fickenschersaid."legivesyouaspecialfeelingwhenyoucanpeerthroughthewindowsanddoorsandseethewavedglass."

Thehotelalsocontinuestoholdaspecial placeinthememoriesofmanyLongwood alumni,whofondlyrecallstayingatthe hotelorhavingamealtherewhichwas aspecialtreat.

WhileastudentatLongwood,LindaPalmer Barnes'67enjoyedvisitsfromhergreataunt,

(OPPOSITE)The hotel offers 70 guest rooms, ranging from standard queens to king suites. (ABOVE LEFT) Valet parking is available at the main entranceto the hotel, located on High Streetjust acrossfrom Longwood's French Hall. (ABOVE RIGHT)The Catbird rooftop lounge offersviews of campus and downtown Farmville.
SUMMER 2018 I 31

whowouldtakehershoppingatBaldwin's departmentstoreandthentolunchat theWeyanoke.

Thehoteldiningroom,withitswhite tableclothsandfinelinens,wasadestination fortheprominentcitizensofFarmvilleand thesurroundingareas.Highteawasserved intheafternoon,andpopularmenuitems includedthepearandcottagecheeseplate andliverandonions.

"LongafterIleftFarmville,mystandardfor measuringnicerestaurantswastheWeyanoke," Barnessaid."Irecalllinentableclothsandnapkins,freshflowersoneachtableandafullserviceofflatware,andAuntRuthmadesure Iknewhowtouseeachpiece."

Farmville is for food ies

Withthreeupscalerestaurantsandtherooftop lounge,theWeyanokewillonceagainbe knownasoneofthefinestdiningestablishmentsintheregion.

Guestsandlocalresidentsareravingabout thenewfoodoptions:Sassafras,acoffeeand pastryshop;Effingham'sFirstCall,anartisan pizzeria;andCampagna,anupscaleItalian restaurantandwinebaropenfordinneronly. Menuitemsfromthehotel'srestaurantscanbe broughttoCatbirdontherooftopaswell.

Thehotel'sexecutivechefisFrankParisIII, arecentfixtureintheCharlottesvilleculinary sceneandformerlyexecutivesous-chefatPrimlandResortinsouthwestVirginia.Hewas trainedintheintensiveapprenticeshipprogram atTheGreenbrier,apremierhotelandresort inWestVirginia.

JohnShideler,theWeyanoke'sgeneralmanager,formeHywasthegeneralmanagerofthe WilliamsburgInnandworkedforColonial Williamsburgfor25years.HeandhiswiferelocatedtoFarmville,andheloveshearingfrom localresidentswhenhe'satworkorwalking aroundtown.

"Wehavegottengreatguestfeedbackon thepropertyandthestaff,"hesaid. "Itellour gueststhepropertycanbegreat,butit'sthe staffthatmakeitspecial."

Cornerstoneisexperiencedindeveloping boutiquehotels,reinvestinginsmallcommunitiesandrepurposinghistoricbuildings-the hospitalitymanagementcompany'sother propertiesincludetheCraddockTerryHotel inLynchburgandtheBollingWilsonHotel inWytheville.

Thereare27roomsinthehistoricpartof theWeyanoke,withtheremainingrooms inanewresidentialwingthatalmostdoubled theoriginalsizeofthehotel.Inadditionto thehotel'sluxuriousaccommodations,

amenitiesincludevaletparking,adjoining individualrooms,largewalk-inshowers andtwoelevators.

Thehotelshowcasesseveralpartnerships withFarmville-areabusinesses.Thecoffee mugsineachroomweremadebyLongwood artprofessorAdamPaulekatMainlyClay, aMainStreetpotteryshop;thefurniturewas purchasedatGreenFront;andguestscanrent bikesprovidedbyTheOutdoorAdventure StoretogoforarideandexploreHighBridge TrailStatePark.

WiththeWeyanoke,upscalerestaurant options,twobreweries,awinebar,theMoton Museum'sadditiontotheU.S.CivilRights TrailandtheLongwoodBarnes&Noble Bookstore'sdowntownlocation,theburgeoningvibrancyandrevitalizationofdowntown Farmvilleisreal.Thetownisincreasinglybecomingaweekendgetawayspotforculture, shoppingandoutdooractivities-andisatrue embodimentofthestate'stourismmantra.

"PeoplecometoVirginiaforoutdooradventures,greatplacestoeat,shoppingandhistory, andFarmvillehasallofthosethingswelove statewideinonelocation,"saidWirtConfroy, directorofbusinessdevelopmentfortheVirginiaTourismCorporation."Farmvilleissuch awonderfulplace-it'saliveandthrivingandsoindicativeofwhyVirginiaisforLovers."@

(ABOVE LEFT)The Weyanoke logo can be found on items throughout the hotel, including bathrobes for guests. (ABOVE RIGHT) Campagna, an Italian restaurant located on the hotel's lower level, is open for dinner and available for private parties. (OPPOSITE) Effingham's First Call restaurant is known for its craft beer and artisan grilled pizzas.The restaurant's name is a nod to local history: Legend has it that the historic EffinghamTavern in Cumberland County was the site where the first patriot called for independence from Britain. Photos by Alec Hosterman/Courtesy of Hotel Weyanoke
32 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE

THROUGHAUG. 3

SummerArt Studio. 11a.m.-2p.m.MondayFriday,LongwoodCenrerforrheVisualArts. Informarion:lcva.longwood.eduor434-395-2206.

22

Alumni Event: LongwoodNightwithrhe WashingtonNationalsvs.AtlantaBraves.Gamerime, 1:35p.m.;NationalsPark.Registrationandticker information:longwood.edu/alumni/evenrs.

23-27

GlobalVillage SummerCamp: Forchildren ingrades2-7.Costs,registration,scheduleand information:longwood.edu/inrernarionalaffairs.

27

SummerWine and Brew: 5-7p.m., LongwoodCenrerforrheVisualArts. Information:lcva.longwood.edu.

28

Alumni Event: LongwoodNightwirhrheSalem RedSoxvs.Winston-SalemDash.Pregamepicnic, 5:30p.m.;gamerime,7:05p.m.;SalemMemorial Ballpark.Tickersincludeadmissiontorhepicnic andthegame.Registrationandinformarion: longwood.edu/alumni/evenrs.

29

Soccer Camp: Forgirlsages13-18Arhlerics Complex.Informationandregistration: toralcamps.com/LONGWOODwomensSOCCER.

AUGUST

11

Alumni Event: LongwoodNightwith theNorfolkTidesvs.ColumbusClippers. Pregamepicnic5:30p.m.;gamerime,7:05p.m.; HarborPark.Ticketsincludeadmissionto rhepicnicandthegame.Registrationand information:longwood.edu/alumni/evenrs.

A

LEGACY: FOLK ART IN AMERICA

AUG. 18 - NOV. 4

16

Alumni Event: WelcomerorheCity.Various locationsatoun 1dVirginia.Registrationand informarion:lohgwood.edu/alumni/evenrs.

18- Nov. 4

Exhibition:A SharedLegacy:FolkArtinAmerica. Openingreception:5p.m.Aug.17,LongwoodCenrer fortheVisualArts.Information:lcva.longwood.edu.

18- Nov. 25

Exhibition: LeUyenPharn: There'sNoSuch Thing AsLittle. LongwoodCenterfortheVisualArts. Receptionwiththeartist,5:30-8p.m.Oct.19 Information:lcva.longwood.edu.

20

Faculty Recital: FirstNightGala.7:30p.m., WygalAuditorium.Information:434-395-2504.

24

The G.A.M.E.: GreatestAthleticsMarchEver. 3p.m.,departingfromWheelerLawn.Information: 434-395-4802.

24

Field Hockey. 7p.m.,AthleticsComplex. Information:longwoodlancers.com.

24

Hearing Loss Support Group: Forthose withhearinglossandtheirfamilies.Featuringtopics likeimprovingcommunication,newhearingaid technologiesandhearingconversation.1-2p.m., LongwoodSpeech,HearingandLearningServices, 315W.ThirdSr.Information:434-395-2972.

26

Basketball Camp: Forboysingrades9-12 WillettHall.Informationandregistration: longwoodlancers.com/MBBCamps.

13

JULY
34 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE
Poodle, attributed toWilhelm Schimmel (1817-1890), pine, gesso and paint, 1875-1885, Collection of Barbara L. Gordon
SHARED
SEPT.
CONVOCATION

29

ArtAfter Dark: ComeBacktothe5&Dime, JimmyDean,JimmyDean filmpresentationandpanel discussion.6p.m.,LongwoodCenterforcheVisual Arcs.Information:lcva.longwood.edu.

30

Involvement andVolunteer Fair. 4-6p.m., locationsthroughoutcampus.Information: 434-395-2267.

SEPTEMBER

5

Accounting Job and Internship Fair I2:30-3:30p.m.,BlackwellBallroom.Information: 434-395-2066.

12

Law Enforcement Job and Internship Fair. 12:30-3:30p.m.,BlackwellBallroom.Information: 434-395-2066.

13

Convocation. Information:434-395-200I.

14-1 6

FamilyWeekend. Familiesareinvitedcocampus coshareactivitieswiththeirLongwoodsrndencs. Locationsthroughoutcampus.Information: 434-395-2694.

20

ArtAfter Dark: SacredCircleDanceWorkshop withJoanTiptonandTammyTipton-Nay.6p.m., LongwoodCenterfortheVisualArcs.Information: lcva.longwood.edu.

28

Hearing Loss Support Group: Forthose withhearinglossandtheirfamilies.Fearnringcopies likeimprovingcommunication,newhearingaid technologiesandhearingconversation.1-2p.m., LongwoodSpeech,HearingandLeamingServices, 315W.ThirdSc.Information:434-395-2972.

CHAMBERWINDS

NOV. 5

28

-29

Joan ofArc Celebration: Foralumniwhohave celebratedtheir50thclassreunion.Allalumniare invitedcohonorcheclassesof1963,1958,1953and 1948.Locationscluoughouccampus.Information andregistration:longwood.edu/alumni.

4

Alzheimer'sWalk. 5p.m.,departingfrom Lancasterfrontlawn.Information:434-395-2107.

6

Oktoberfest. Noon-IOp.m.,StubbsLawnand LancasterMall.Information:434-395-2107.

9

Job, Internship and Graduate School Fair 1-4p.m.,BlackwellBallroom.Information: 434-395-2066.�

10

ArtAfter Dark:ASharedLegacygallerytalkwich Dr.TerriSabacos.6p.m.,LongwoodCenterforthe VisualArts.Information:lcva.longwood.edu.

11

Concert: WindSymphony.7:30p.m.,Jarman Auditorium.Information:434-395-2504.

17-19

Virginia Children's Book Festival. Locationsthroughoutcampus.Information: vachildrensbookfestival.com.

23

Speaker: LizChassey,directorofMadeline'sHouse. Madeline'sHouseprovidesservicesforindividuals andfamiliesexperiencingdomesticandsexualabuse. 4p.m.,HinerHall207.Information:434-395-2509.

26

Grand Opening: UpchurchUniversityCenter. Information:434-395-2944.

26

Hearing Loss Support Group: Forthose withhearinglossandtheirfamilies.Featuringtopics likeimprovingcommunicarion,newhearingaid technologiesandhearingconversation.1-2p.m., LongwoodSpeech,HearingandLearningServices, 315W.ThirdSc.Information:434-395-2972.

28

Free FamilyWorkshop: DiadelosMuertos. 10:30a.m.-12:30p.m.,MotonMuseum. Information:lcva.longwood.edu.

NOVEMBER

5

Concert: ChamberWinds.7:30p.m.,Wygal Auditorium.Information:434-395-2504.

7

Greek Lipsync: 8p.m.,JarmanAuditorium. Information:434-395-2103;tickets: longwood.edu/boxoffice.

16

Hearing Loss Support Group: Forthose withhearinglossandtheirfamilies.Featuringtopics likeimprovingcommunication,newhearingaid technologiesandhearingconversation.1-2p.m., LongwoodSpeech,HearingandLearningServices, 315W.ThirdSt.Information:434-395-2972.

Forinformation on athletics events, go to longwoodlancers.com or call 434-395-4802.

Allevents,,reji-eet111dopentothepublicunlesscosts, tickets, rl'gistmtion, etc., drenoted. Allments t1resubject toamceflationandch,mge. l'!e,ise,.,isitu,u,w.lo11g1l'Ood.edu .forupd11u·di11fimwztio11. Persons with disahilities who u,ish torunmge11cco11111wdationsor/1/ateria/inan riltemativefonmumilJ'c,zll434-/95-2391 (voice) or711 (JT).

OC TO BER
SUMMER 2018 I 35

IIOIPRINTI

books by alumni, faculty, staff and friends

A Single Blow:The Battles of Lexington and Concord and the Beginning of the American Revolution, April 19, 1775

This is the first bookinthe Emerging RevolutionaryWar Series, cofounded by Orrison.Theseries isgearedto the general public, with the goal ofsparking an interest in history. "We encourage readers to visit the sites listed in the book," said Orrison, historic site operations supervisor for Prince William County. He is vice president oftheVirginia Association ofMuseums, the author oftwo Civil War books and a contributor to the Emerging CivilWar blog. Publishedby SavasBeatie, softcover, I92pages.

Death for Beginners

This book ofpoetry, featuring "delicately powerful evocations ofthe author in communion with the dead," has been called "poignant and heartbreaking ... poetry ofconsoling wisdom and luminous originality."Another critic praised its "wisdom distilled into stunning imagery." CarrollHackett, who teaches creative writing, is the author ofseveral other books ofpoetry, mostly recentlyA LittleBlood,A LittleRain, and acollection ofstories, WhatthePotter Said. PublishedbyKelsayBooks, softcover, 60pages.

Making Room for Leadership: Power, Space and Influence

by Dr. MaryKate Morse '70, professor of leadership and spiritual formation at Portland Seminary at George Fox University

Described as "original and insightful," this is "both practical and a superb study ofthe gift ofpower for leaders." The Christianfocused bookexplores different types of power,how each can be used for good and harm, and how people gain and give leadership in group settings. Morse, who speaks on leadership at conferences and retreats in the U.S. and internationally, is lead mentor in a doctoral program at a multidenominational seminary.

PublishedInterVarsityPress, softcover, 2I5pages.

The Common Core Grammar Toolkit: Using MentorTexts toTeach the Language Standards in Grades 9-12

by Dr. Sean Ruday, associate prdfessor of English education

Ruday's seventh book, and his third GrammarToolkit book, is a guide for teaching high-school grammar in connection with literature. "It's about how authors use grammatical concepts-for example, how a relative clause is used in WutheringHeights," he said. "Merging grammar andliterature, rather than seeing chem as separate, is more meaningful for teachers and students." Ruday is co-president oftheAssembly for theTeaching ofEnglish Grammar.

PublishedbyRoutledgeEyeonEducation, hardcover, r66pages.

36 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE
Phillip S. Circ:cnwalrand RobertOrrison ' H)l\.l·,\\(ll\l) IY.ll.l\f.1.1 The l�:utksoft.c�i11gwnandC�1,,c-1rJ aridthe lkgi,ming.:>f1hl"/\mcric.m Revolution ,\pril 1,1, 1;;5 MAKINGROOM lEADERSHIP POWER, SPACE AND INFLUENCE

Gettingthe Ball Rolling

New basketballcoaches bringtheir winning waysto Longwood

llMarchandAprilwereexciting monthsforLongwood'smen'sand " women'sbasketballprograms,as bothinstallednewheadcoaches:Griff AldrichandRebeccaTillett.

Aldrichtookoverthemen'sprogramin lateMarch,andTillettsteppedintothehead coachingpositionforthewomen'sprogram threeweekslater.Thetworeceivedaformal introductiontotheLongwoodcommunity onApril26infrontofacrowdthatfilled theMartinelliBoardRoomintheMaugans AlumniCentertocapacity.

"ThisisatremendousdayforLongwood University,"LongwoodDirectorofAthletics TroyAustinsaidatthegathering,introducing thenewheadcoachingpairstandingnextto PresidentW.TaylorReveleyIV.

"We'refortunatetohavehiredtwoindividualswhonotonlyshareauniquepassion andknowledgeforthegameofbasketball butalsofordevelopingyoungpeopleand usingthegameasameanstohelpthem grow.Theirpastsuccess,bothascoaches andprofessionals,speakstotheirabilities asleadersandeducators,andwe'rethrilled tobeabletocallbothCoachAldrichand CoachTillettLancers."

BothAldrichandTillettcometoLongwood ontheheelsofnoteworthysuccessinDivision Ibasketball,witheachplayingkeyroleson theirrespectivecoachingstaffsbeforejoining theLancers.

Aldrichgarnerednationalrecognitionas amemberofthestaffof2018NCMTournamentdarlingUMBC(UniversityofMary-

land,BaltimoreCounty)Theschoolbecame ahouseholdnameafterupsettingNo.1

Virginiainhistoricfashioninthefirstround ofthetournament.AnativeofVirginia'sTidewaterarea,AldrichservedasUMBC'sdirector ofrecruitingandprogramdevelopmentfrom 2016-18andactedaschiefofstaffforhead coachRyanOdom,hiscollegeteammateat

thatwouldleadtoLongwood,parlayedadecoratedhigh-schoolcoachingcareerinVirginia intoanimpactfulfour-yeartenureonthebench attheU.S.NavalAcademy.AtNavy,sheascended toassociateheadcoachoftheprograminher lasttwoseasonsandhelpedtheMidstoan 81-47record.Inherlastseason,2017-18,Navy settheprogram'ssingle-seasonwinsrecordat

'Their past success, both as coaches and professionals, speaks to their abilities as leaders and educators ... .'

Hampden-Sydneyandsonoflegendary collegecoachDaveOdom.

SuccessatUMBCwasonlyonestop alongAldrich'sdiverse,winningcareerpath. AfterbeinginductedintoPhiBetaKappaand graduatingmagnacumlaudefromHampdenSydneyin1996,AldrichearnedaJ.D.from theUniversityofVirginiaSchoolofLaw. Fromthere,herejoinedhiscollegebasketball coach,TonyShaver,ontheHampden-Sydney benchforthe1999-2000season,helpingthe TigerstoaNo.1nationalranking. Aldrichthenembarkedonasuccessful 16-yearcareerinlawandbusiness.Herose tochieffinancialofficerforanationalenergy investmentfirmwhilealsomaintaininghis passionforcoachingbyholdingheadcoachingpositionsformorethanadecadeatthe MUlevel.

MeanwhileRebeccaTillett,alsoonapath

25-8andreachedboththePatriotLeague ChampionshipgameandtheWomen's NationalInvitationalTournament(WNIT) forthesecond-straightyear.

A1998graduateofWilliam&Maryand anativeofWilliamsburg,Tillettenjoyedsimilarsuccessasahigh-schoolheadcoach,buildingbothForestParkandOsbournParkinto girls'basketballpowerhousesinVirginia. Alongwithhercoachingsuccess,Tillettwas equallydecoratedasahigh-schoolteacher, earningrecognitionasthe2006KidBiz3000 TeacheroftheYearatOsbournParkand aSPARKAwardHeroinEducationhonor in2010atForestPark.

Sincetheirarrival,bothAldrichandTillett havebeenbusyassemblingtheircoachingstaffs, implementingtheirstyleofplayandculture amongtheirreturningstudent-athletes,and shoringuptheirrespectiverecruitingclasses.

.,om1ttuPDATEI
New head basketball coaches RebeccaTillett and GriffAldrich are preparing for their first season at Longwood.
SUMMER 2018 I 37

Lacrosse Lancer bests

2,500 Division I players inassistsper game

Therearemorethan2,500student-athletes playingDivisionIwomen'slacrosse.In2018, aLongwoodLanceraveragedmoreassists pergamethananyofthem.

LongwoodseniorattackerRileyDolan'18 foreveretchedhernameinthe NCAA record booksbyleadingthenationinassistsper gamein2018,puttinghername-andLongwood's-atopthenationalleaderboardwith aschool-record3.50pergame

Dolan,abusinessadministrationmajor, setLongwood'ssingle-seasonrecordwith63 assists in 18games,breakingthe BigSouth assistsrecordandtheLongwoodschool recordof51 setbyLaurenPrasnicki'14 in2013.

Therecord-breakingseniorcampaigncame bywayofadominantsecondhalfoftheseasonforDolan,whocaughtfireand handed out47assistsinherfinal 10games. Inawin overEastCarolinaonMarch20,shedished eightassists-alsoaschoolrecord-enroute toacareer-best11 points,thethird-highest single-gametotal inprogramhistory.

Forherefforts,DolanearnedAll-BigSouth honorsforthefirsttime in hercareerand graduatedfrom Longwoodthirdontheprogram'scareerassistslist,trailingonlyPrasnickiandNatalieSmith'01,theonlyother playerstorecord 100assistsduringtheir Lancercareers.

Academic Leaderboard

Lancerscontinuerecord-setting run in classroom

llInthefollow-uptoahistorically strongfallsemester,Longwood's morethan200student-athletes combinedtoturninanotherimpressive academicperformancechisspring.

Afterlogginga3.05grade-pointaverage infall2017thatwasLongwoodathletics' highestmarkinnearlyadecade,Longwood's

asawholeforhelpinglifeeachotherup,andour student-athletepopulationen masseforrepresentingouruniversityinsuchapositivemanner."

Thesuccesswasawidespreadeffort, as48LancersearnedDean'sListhonorsfor postingGPAsofatleast3.50,and25more receivedPresident'sLiserecognitionforholdingperfect4.0GPAs.Additionally,Long-

'To put together an academicscorecardlike theydid ... is atestament to hardwork, character andsheer grit, allqualities Longwood Universityvalues andfosters in our students.'
- TROY '.AUSTIN, ATHLETICS DIRECTOR

student-athleteshitthebookshardagainto surpassthatmarkwitha3.11 inthespring. ThatperformancegavetheLancersacombinedGPAof3.08forthe2017-18academic year,improvingonthe3.01 GPAthegroup postedin2016-17.

"It'sbeenanincredibleyearintheclassroom forourscudenc-achleces,"saidLongwoodAthleticsDirectorTroyAustin."Toput togetheranacademicscorecardliketheydid thispastfallandspring-andtoalargerextent, overchepastseveralyears-isatestamenttohardwork,characterandsheergrit, allqualitiesLongwoodUniversityvalues andfostersinourstudents.

"Noonepersoncanproduceaneffortlike chis,soIcommendthestudent-athletesindividuallyfortheirlong-termeffort,theirteams

wood'smen'steamsamassedacumulative GPAof3.02,whilethewomen'sprograms posteda3.27.

SevenofLongwood's 14programs postedteamGPAsofatleast3.0inboth semestersofwork:women'sbasketball, fieldhockey,men'sgolf,women'sgolf, women'slacrosse,women'ssoccerand softball.Fieldhockey's3.54GPAin thespringwastopsamongLongwood's women'steams,whilemen'sgolf's3.52 markwasthehighestamongLongwood's men'steams.

Graduationweekendsaw40Longwood student-athletesreceivetheirundergraduate degreesfromLongwoodandanothermen'sbasketball'sCharlesGlover'18, abusinessmajor-earnhisgraduatedegree.

LANCERUPDATE
Riley Dolan '18 had a record-breaking senior season.
38 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE
Micaela Ellis '18, a kinesiology major, played on the women's basketball team while earning her degree.

When Failure Is Success

Putting the sex trade out of business is soccer standout's ultimate goal I]

Overthepastthreeseasons,Janese Quick'18hasbeenaunifyingpresenceinthemiddleofthefieldforthe Longwoodwomen'ssoccerteam.Nowafter herstandoutplayingcareerhascometo aclose,theformerteamcaptainisjoining

adifferentteam,oneonwhichshehopesto fillasimilarlyimpactfulroleintheglobal fightagainsthumantrafficking.

ArmedwithherLongwoodundergraduate degreeandnearingthecompletionofhermaster'saswell,Quickisfulfillingayears-long passiontocombatablackmarketindustry thatshehasseenfirsthandinhernative Florida.Sheiscurrentlydoingsowith Rethreaded,anonprofitretailorganization basedinJacksonville,Florida.

Rethreadedfightshumantraffickingby providinganewpathinlifeforvictimswho escape,andQuickhasbeenapartofthat missionsinceherinternshipwiththeorganizationthispastwinter.

"Rethreadedgivesthemawholenewperspectiveonlife,"saidQuick,whostillvolunteersregularly."Theycombatthesextrade industrybygivingthevictimsanewidentity andapurposewithpracticalbusinessskillsand holistichealingforthemthroughthework."

RethreadedwasfoundedbyKristenKeenin 2012asan"upcycle"businessthatturnsdonatedclothingitemsintouniqueproducts, suchasrugs,bagsandscarves.Theorganization trainssurvivorsofhumantraffickingtorun variousaspectsofthebusinessusingaholistic modelthatprovidesasmuchpracticalbusiness trainingasitdoeslife-changingguidance.

Duringherinternship,Quickworked alongsidemanytraffickingsurvivors-turnedbusinesswomen,allowinghertoseefirsthand theeffectsofthesextradeonindividualsand thelife-changingimpactofRethreaded'shealingprogram.Theorganizationcurrentlyemploysapproximately15survivorsandboosts itsreachthroughtheworkofvolunteers,like Quick,anddonations.

"ThemoreIgotintoit,themorepassionate Ifeltabouthelpingthevictimsandadvocating forthem,"Quicksaid."Youdeveloprelationshipswiththem,andyouseehowbadlythey neededchissafetynetandthissaviorofabusiness.Themoreyoudevelopthoserelationships,themoreyouwanttogodeeperand

'The more I got into it, themore passionate Ifelt about helping the victims and advocating for them.'
- JANESE QUICK '18

reallyhelpthoseindividualswhoarestuck intheindustryrightnow,"

Quick,whoearnedherbachelor'sdegree fromLongwoodinjustthreeyears,remains involvedwithRethreaded,balancingher worktherewitl:l,thepursuitofherMBA atLongwood.

HercurrentfocusatRethreadedison wholesalemanagementandclientmanagement,twoareasthathaveallowedhertosee thelife-alteringimpacttheorganization's businessmodelprovidestosurvivors, "Ithelpedmegetanewperspectiveon howabusinesscangobeyondsimplytrying tosellaproductandreallychangelivesfor thebetter,"shesaid."Thepeoplethey've helpedwhoworkthereareallindifferent stagesoftheirrehabandhealing.Somepeople arejustafewmonthsoutofthesextrade, andsomeareyearsout.Yougettosee eachstepofthehealingprocess."

ThatQuickwouldpositivelyaffectthe livesofotherssosoonafterhertimeat Longwoodshouldcomeasnosurpriseto thosewhofollowedhersoccercareeras aLancer.Shenotonlymadeanimpacton thefieldasastartingmidfielderinher

finalthreeseasons,shealsowaselevatedto teamcaptainhersenioryear,helpingpropel Longwoodin2017roitsfirstBigSouth Championshipgameanditshighestwinning percentageintheDivisionIera.Shewas namedrotheAll-BigSouthfirstteamfor herefforts,whichcamealongsideasterling academicrecordthatincludedthreestraightyearsontheBigSouthPresidentialHonorRoll.

Nowwithhersoccercareerintherearview, Quickisturninghersightstoherburgeoning passiontocombathumantrafficking.TheinternshipandvolunteerworkatRethreaded isjustthestart.

"RightnowIwanttostayinnonprofit workandhelpthevictimshealandrecover, butIdefinitelywanttogetintothecriminal justicesidelaterinmycareer,"shesaid,"Ifeel likethehealingsideisagoodwaytogetmy feetwetintheindustry.I'deventuallyliketo takeontheexperienceofworkingwithmore difficultencounterslikevictimscoming straightoutoftheindustry,"

Regardlessofwheresheendsup,Quickhas morethanprovenshe'sagreatadditionto anyteam.-ChrisCook

LANCERUPDATE
LONGWOOD
2
Mike Kropf '14
SUMMER 2018 I 39

Longwoodalumnus named newheadcoach of cross country program

Longwood cross country has a new leader whose experience as a Lancer reaches backto his college days-and whose connections to the community reach back even further Assistant coach and Longwood alumnus DanielWooten '13was elevated to head coach in early May.Wooten served as assistant coach ofthe program during the 2017-18 year and will now take overboth the men's and women's teams. His appointmentto head coach is the continuation ofa coaching career that has seen him climb through the middleschool and high-school ranks in the Prince Edward Countyschool system and now through the collegiate ranks at his alma mater.

"Throughoutthe interview process, the things that stood out about Daniel were his detailed vision for Longwood cross country, his understanding ofthe priorities we place on the program and his unwavering desire to take the reins;' said Longwood Director ofAthleticsTroyAustin.

"Daniel has many intangiblesthatcan't betaught, ineluding an intrinsic drive to become better at all he does. I know he is excited to take over the cross country program at his alma mater, and I'm excited to see where he will lead the team:'

Wooten joined Longwood's cross country staff as an assistant coach prior to the 2017 season and immediately contributed to all aspectsofthe program. He played a key role in assembling the largest incoming freshman class in program history, which will add 14 newcomers-seven men and seven womentothe rosterthisfall.

"I would liketo say thank you to everyone at Longwood University and Longwood athletics who gave me this opportunity;' said Wooten, who also ran track and cross country at Prince Edward High School in Farmville.

"To have the chance to become a head coach at the Division I level in my own hometown and at the university I graduated from is an amazing feeling. I am looking forward to impacting the young men and women of Longwood cross country not only on the course but also in the classroom and, most importantly, continuing the Lancer way of building leaders in the community:'

One ofUs

Women'ssoccer alum is leading expandedeffort toconnect alumni with Longwoodathletics

Longwood athletics is expanding its efforts to reach out to alumni, and the person in charge ofthe new initiative has one ofthe best qualifications of all-she's an alum, and an athletics alum, herself.

"It will be my mission to engage and unite all the different components ofLongwood athletics' past, presentand future," said former Longwood women's soccer player Kylie Dyer '14, who has rejoined Lancer athletics as the assistant director for athletics engagement. "This includes honoring all the people who haveserved our department and helped make it what it is today, informing our constituents aboutwhat is currently happening on campus and ultimately building a long-lasting foundation ofsupporters that will launch Longwood athletics into future success."

In her new role, Dyer will serve as a point ofcontact forLongwood alumni, enhancing connections with the Longwood communiry

through outreach and coordination ofoffcampus alumni events. Among her first initiatives is an on-campus celebration ofthe 25-year anniversary ofthe Longwood women's soccer program, which played its inaugural season in 1994 and is coming offits first appearance in the Big South Championship game in 2017.

Dyer graduated summacumlaude from Longwood with a degree in political science while playing all fouryears on the women's soccer team. She joined the Longwood admissions staffin 2015 and in threeyearsworked her way up to lead admissions counselor.

Dyer and her familyhave longstanding connections to both Longwood and the Farmville community. Herfather,Todd Dyer '93, and mother, Cassie Mullinex Dyer '92, wereLongwood student-athletes. Herfatherplayed on the men's soccer team, while her motherwas a member ofthe women's basketball team. Todd Dyer founded the Longwood women's soccer program and has been its head coach in the 25 years since.

AND THE AWARD GOES TO ...

awards, go to magazine.longwood.edu.

LANCERUPDATE
DanielWooten '13
40 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE
Kylie Dyer '14 Longwood Director ofAthleticsTroyAustin (center) congratulates Athlete of theYear award winners Amadeo Blasco '20 (left), a business major, and SydneyWallace '19, a kinesiology major, at this year's StudentAthlete Awards Banquet. Blasco's sport is tennis; Wallace plays on the women's soccer team. For more about the banquet and a complete list of

HealthAssurance

Alumnus leads growthof charitable medical clinic that provides safety net for those without insurance

JohnDevaney'92,CEOofthecharitable CapeFearClinicinWilmington,NorthCarolina,hatestootinghisownhorn-especially whenitcomestotalkingaboutthemany honorshe'sreceived.Thosehonorsinclude beingrecognizedasthe2017HealthCare ExecutiveoftheYearinthe GreaterWilmington Businessjournal's HealthCare Heroesawards. Underhiseight-yearstewardship,the CapeFearClinichasgrownfromserving 700to 1,700adults,allofwhomareun-or underinsuredandhaveincomesofnomore

Person ofInterest

than200percentofFederalPovertyGuidelines. Duringchatsameperiod,theclinic'sannualbudgethasincreasedfrom$300,000to $1.5 million,fundingthemedical,pharmacy andmentalhealthservicesprovidedonsite. Patientsareaskedtopay$3pervisit,butno oneisturnedawayduetoinabilitytopay. Theclinic'sbudgetcomesfromfoundation support,grantsandindividualdonations.

"Therealityischat, untilweasasociety valuehealthcareforall,wewillalwaysneed placeslikechisclinic,"Devaneysaid.Cape FearClinicisnotadrop-inclinic,headded. Itservesasthebottomofthesafetynet, providingcontinuing,comprehensivecare forbothU.S.citizensandchosewhoare undocumented.

"Ifwecouldn'thelp them,they'dbeatthe ER.CapeFearClinicprovideseverythingthe patientneedsfor$500ayear,"saidDevaney. "Theaverageemergencyroomvisitis$2,500. Themajorityofthoseweservehaveoneor

twojobs.Thosewhodon'tworkaregenerally toosicktobeemployed."

Thetopjobatacharitableclinicwasn't exacclyDevaney'sdreamjobwhenhegraduatedfromLongwoodwithadegreeinsociology. "Ifyou'dcoldmeincollegechatoneday I'dberunningacharitableclinic,I'dhave neverbelieved ir-buchereIam,"hesaid.

Devaneyinitiallypursuedanactingcareerin Washington,D.C.,butaseriouscaraccident haltedhisfuturetreadingtheboards.Without healthinsuranceandnomoneyinthebank, Devaneyneededajobquickly,sohetookajob asofficemanagerattheWhitman-Walker ClinicofNorcheihVirginia.Tohissurprise,he lovedthejobandstayedon.Nineyearslacerhe wastheclinic'sdirector,overseeingtheoperationsofthelargestHIV/AIDSclinicinVirginia.

Healsopreviouslywasavicepresidentfor ahumanservicesandhealthcareconsulting firmanddirectorofoperationsfortheLegal AidSocietyoftheDistrictofColumbia. "Idon'thaveanM.A.oraPh.D.,burwhat Idohaveismorethan25yearsofexperience onthejob,andIlearnedalotatLongwood," saidDevaney."AvarietyofleadershippositionsinfraternitiesandtheateratLongwood preparedmeformycareer.

"Mygoalistomakethingsbetterfor patients,staffandvolunteers,"added Devaney."Everyday,Igotoworktoensure chatmedicalandotherprofessionalsare availabletohelpourpatients. I'mnotselling widgetsorjustmakingmoney-Igettoeffect changeinpeople'slives.That'swhyIdoit."

Joan ofArc Celebration setfor Sept. 28-29

ThesecondJoanofArcCelebrationformembersoftheGoldSociety-alumniwhohave celebratedtheir50thclassreunion-willbe heldSept.28-29.Whiletheeventwillhonor milestonesfortheclassesof1963,1958,1953 and1948,membersofeveryclassfrom 1967 andbeforeareinvitedtoattend.

Theweekendwillprovideuniqueopportunitiestospendtimewithclassmates,have teaatthehistoricFarmvilleTrainStation, singwithcurrentstudentsintheRotunda andenjoyfamily-styledininginBlackwell.

Ifyouwouldliketohelpformyourclass's outreachcommittee,callthealumniofficeat 434-395-2044oremailreunion@longwood.edu. Additionaldetailsandregistrationareat longwood.edu/alumni.

-.11a11NEws
John Devaney '92 has been CEO of the charitable Cape Fear Clinic inWilmington, North Carolina, for eight years. The Joan ofArc Celebration promises family-style dining in Blackwell Hall as enjoyed by generations of Longwood alumnae.
SUMMER 2018 I 41

Fun forAll

MegaReuniondrawshundredsfor livemusicanddancing, exploring downtown and slinging red and green paint

IJMega Reunion 2018 brought togetherhundreds ofalumni-includ,. ing for the first time many ofthe newest members ofchat group, the about-tograduace Class of2018-to celebrate old and new friendships and enjoy a fun and relaxing weekend on campus

The event, dubbed Mega Reunion because ofits scope (all alumni are invited back to celebrate with others from their decade), began in 2017 to great fanfare. The vision is to bring

alumni together when campus is at its most beautiful and energetic.

"I haven't been back on campus since my 45threunion five years ago," saidAlice Collier Cochran '68, "and Longwood seems to have gotten even more beautiful than I remember. There was an incredible sense ofenergy and communityon campus. Having all the differentgenerationstogether was such a wonderful atmosphere, and I genuinely didn't want to leave Farmville."

0

0

ALUMNINEWS
The 1960s and 1970s reception provided a chance to reconnect with friends and lookthrough Longwood yearbooks. @ Fireworks lit the night sky following a full day offun at the Stubbs Festival. @) Alumni started the day offright with early morningyogaon Wheeler Lawn. E) Whatcouldbe better than getting a foot massage while catchingup with friends? Members of the Class of 2008 join the class paradetoWheeler Lawn. © Itwas the red classes vs. thegreenclassesforanotherepic paint battle!
42 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE
@ TheLancer Family Picnic under the bigtop provided a chanceto catch up with friends and reminisce about life at Longwood.

Career servicesteam welcomes new assistant director

KyleHodgeshasbeennamedassistant directorforcampuscareerengagementin theOfficeofAlumniandCareerServices.

Hodgeswillprovideone-on-onecareer coachingtostudentsandalumni,deliver presentationstoclassesandorganizations, andorganizecareerprogramming.

AnativeofFarmville,Hodgesearned herundergraduatedegreefromLynchburg CollegeandherM.Ed.inhighereducation fromtheUniversityofSouthCarolina, whereshegainedexperienceincareer development,first-yearprogramming, admissions,orientationandadvising.

"Weareincrediblyexcitedtowelcome KyletotheLongwoodfamily;'saidBryan Rose'11,directorofcareerservices."Her workwithstudentsandalumniwillhelp uscontinuetobuildonthestrengthof theprogramswehaveinplace:'

Summer baseball series hitsit out of the park with excursionin Norfolk

HeadouttoHarborParkinNorfolkthis AugusttoenjoyAmerica'spastimewith fellowLancers.JointhefunonSaturday, Aug.11,towatchtheNorfolkTidestakeon theColumbusClippers.Thepregame picnicbeginsat5:30p.m.;thegame startsat7:05p.m.

Tickets,whichincludeadmissiontothe picnicandthegame,are$30foradults and$20forchildrenunder18.Register atlongwood.edu/alumni.

ClassNotes

1960s

Dr. BettyWeaver '67, M.A. '73, retiredinJanuary2017afterI7 yearsasschooladminisrrarorat NewLifeChristianAcademyin Farmville.ShepreviouslywasCEO oftheSouthCentralPrivateIndustryCouncil(1983-2000),ajobtrainingplannerwiththeVirginia EmploymentCommission(197883),asocialworkerforPrinceEdwardCounty(l973-78)anda teacherarPrinceEdwardAcademy (1967-73).Anordainedminister whohaspublishedthreeinspirationalbooksandpreachedinmore than50churches,shehasaDoctor ofMinistrydegreefromTrinity SeminaryinIndianaandaMaster ofDivinityfromUnitedTheologicalSeminaryinSaud,Carolina. Sheremainsassociatepastorar NewLifeChurch(whichrunsthe academy),wheresheoverseesrhe localmissionsprogram.Weaver, alifelongFarmvilleresident,celebratedherretirementwithatrip toNiagaraFallsinJuly2017and earlierchisyearvisitedIreland andOregon.

Margaret "Peggy" Jones

Crews '69, M.S. '80, isthecoordinarorofKidsKollege,asummer enrichmentprograminSouth BostonsponsoredbytheParsonsBruceArtAssociation.Crewsretiredin2008afterteachinghistory, EnglishandwritingatCluster SpringsElementaryinHalifax Countyfor3�years.SheisacoauthorofAn ArchitecturalHistoryof Halifax County, Virginia, published in2016

1970s

Dr. MaryKate Morse '70, professorofleadershipandspiritual formationatPortlandSeminaryat GeorgeFoxUniversity,wasselected topresentrhe2018BeaneLecture atWilliamPennUniversityin April.Morsehastaughrfor30 yearsatPortlandSeminary,where sheistheleadmentorintheDoctorofMinistryforLeadershipand SpiritualFormationProgram.She hasheldseveraladministrativepositionsattheuniversity,including seminaryassociatedeananduniversitydirectorofstrategicplanning.AQuakerminisrerwhohas plantedtwochurchesandwritten twobooks(seePage36),shespeaks atconferencesandretreatsinthe

U.S.andinternationally,inadditiontoservingasachurchconsultantandacoachforpastors.Shehas adoctoratefromGonzagaUniversityandrwomaster'sdegreesfom whatisnowPortlandSeminary,a multidenominarionalChristian seminarywithQuakerroots.

Cindy Jamison Fulks '71, an artistwholivesinLaGrange,Georgia,hasacurrentexhibitionatStudio114attheLaGrangeArc Museum. TheLaGrangeLandscape SeriesExhibition, whichopened April13andrunsthroughAug.30, features10ofheroilpaintings. Fulks'workscanbefoundin Chick-fil-A'scorporateofficein Atlanta,theRirz-CarlronReynolds plantationnearAtlanta,WellSrar WestGeorgiaHospitalinLaGrange,andprivatehomesand businesses.Inadditionroherarr career,shehassoldrealestate formanyyears.Previouslyshe taughtschoolandhadacalligraphybusiness.

1980s

Barbara Clark Cole '85 raughr ArrConnectionforages8-12in rhisyear'sKidsKollege,asummer enrichmentprograminSouth BostonsponsoredbytheParsonsBruceArrAssociation.Cole,who hasamaster'sdegreefromLynchburgCollege,isanarcteacherat HalifaxCountyMiddleSchool. Shealsohastaughtspecialeducationandsecondandthirdgrades, allwiththeHalifaxschools.Cole playsmandolininaGospelgroup, RiverCreek,andplayedtheorgan atherchurchfor15years.

1990s

Helen Dennis Burgess '91, aK-5specialeducationteacherat BrookwoodElementaryinGrovetown,Georgia,wasrecentlyacceptedintotheMasterofArtsin teachingprogramarAugusta University,whichshewillbegin rhisfall.ShewasaTideIruror andsubsrirnteteacherforrhe SrreersboroCitySchoolsinOhio from2002-15Sheismarriedto Dr. James Burgess '92 (see Page47).

GregTsigaridas '94 appearedin theAprilproductionofGaslightby theWaterworksPlayers,acommunitycheatergroupinFarmville. AseniorcomputersystemsengineerinLongwood'sInformation TechnologyServices,heplayedthe roleofJackManningham.Tsigaridas,whohasworkedatLongwood sincegraduating,hasappearedin 15WaterworksPlayersproductions,beginningwith SouthPacific in2012

Sean Ward '95 waspromotedto directorofresidemialconstruction forEagleConstructioninMarch. Wardoverseesproductionforallof Eagle'sresidentialcommunitiesin Richmond'sWestEnd.Hehas workedforthecompanysince 2005.

Dr. BrendaToone Palmore '96 waspromotedtovicepresidentfor practicemanagementandbusiness developrnemarVCUHealthCommunityMemorialHospira!(CMH)

ContinuedonPage46

She Did the Math

Emily Spady '13, M.S '15, asixth-grademarhreacheratGrafton MiddleSchoolinYorktown,washerschool'sMathTeacheroftheYear for2017-18."Emilyworkstirelesslyforallsrudents,"saidhermencorteacher,BobNealy,whonominatedherfortheaward.Alsoduringthe pastschoolyear,Spadywastheonlyteacherfromherschoolchosenby rheprincipaltoparricipareinadivisionwideK-12mathrestructuring iniriarive.Sheisherschool'scheerleadingcoachandhasledhersquad rothreeconsecutiveBayRiversDistrictchampionships.

ALUMNINEWS
KyleHodges
44 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE

His life, his music, his dream

'"T "orsomeversionofit"-choughheoccasion: , allygoessolo.Ifyou'relookingforaliveshow, you'llfindthemplayingprimarilyinthe D.C.areaandthemid-Atlanticregionof theEaseCoast.

Healsohostsandruns"The9"Songwriter Series,atouringshowthatfeaturesashiftinglineupofninesolosinger-songwriters. FoundedbyTrawickin2008,"The9" performsmonthlyaroundtheD.C.area, includinganannualholidayshowatthe KennedyCenter."Thegoalistogetmore songwritersinfrontofmorepeopleandinto bettervenues,"hesaid.

Trawick,whocuthischopsonthesaxophoneandpiano,gothookedonguitarat 13afterdiscoveringhisdad'soldsix-stringin acloset.Hequicklyalsofellinlovewith songwriting.

''I'vealwayslikedputtingpoetrytomusic. Iwasneverinterestedinplayingcoversof otherpeople'ssongs,whichmademeunpopularatparties,"hesaidwithasmile.

OneofTrawick'sfiveoriginalsongson Riverwash, ''AllThePlacesThatI'veBeen," wonSongoftheYearhonorsattheWashingtonAreaMusicAwardsin2014.TheEPalso includestheband'sversionoftheOasishit

"Wonderwall." (Fortheuninitiated,anEPorextendedplayCD/record-hasmore tracksthanasinglebutnotenoughto qualifyasanLP-longplay.)

WhenhewasatLongwood,Trawick

Adecadeafter quittinghisdayjob, singer/songwriter continuestomovehiscareer forward onhis ownterms formedaband,WoodburnRoad,that performedmostlyinFarmville,aswellasin RichmondandNorthernVirginia.Aftergraduating,hebeganplayingatopenmiesand formedtheJustinTrawickGroup.Hehas

IJIfJustinTrawick'04hadwritten asongabouthis36thbirthday, hemighthave titledit,''ATough ActtoFollow."

OnJan. 26,2018,justafewdaysafterhe turned36, thesinger-songwriterwasfeatured inaglowingstoryinthe WashingtonPost.

Person ofInterest

Thatevening,heandhisband,JustinTrawick andTheCommonGood,experiencedtheir firstadvanceticketsellout,and,totopitall off,theycelebratedthereleaseoftheirfirst EP, TheRiverwashEP

"Wesold275ticketstothePearlStreet Warehouse,whichhasaseatingcapacity of200-thefirst timewe'veeversoldout ashowaheadoftime,"saidTrawick.

"The WashingtonPostarticlewashuge, bothforchatshowandmycareer. It'sbeen likeagreatjobreference."

Trawickpl�ysacousticguitarandisthe band'sleadvocalist.Withanuprightbass, mandolinandfiddlealsointhemix,the groupiswell-suitedtothe''Americana"genre.

livedstrictlyontheincomefromhismusic sincewalkingawayfromhislastdayjobin 2008. (Hewasanaccountmanagerfor

'I'vealways liked putting poetry to music. Iwasnever interested in playing covers of other people's songs, which made me unpopular at parties.'

- JUSTINTRAWICK '04

Trawickhasrecentlyembraced,topositivereviews.ThePostarticlesaidit"letshispersonal storytellingandsongwritingshinethrough."

''Americanaincludesbluegrass,country,folk andold-timemusic.WeusetraditionalAmericanainstrumentationandbendthegenreto fitamodern,uniquesoundthatwe'vecultivatedoverthepast12years,"hesaid.

ALeesburgnativewholivesinArlington, Trawickusuallyperformswithhisfullband

SoundExchange,acompanythatcollects anddistributesdigitalperformanceroyalties onbehalfofrecordingartistsandmaster rightsowners.)

'TmlovingthelifeI'mliving,"saidTrawick.'TmproudchatI'mpayingmyrenton whatI'vecreated,butmoreimportant,I'm doingwhatIwant,whatIlove. I'mnotgoing tosomeoneelse'sjobandlivingtheirdream; I'mlivingmyowndream."-KentBooty

I I I J ALUMNINEWS
JustinTrawick '04 (center) and his band,TheCommon Good, are attracting attention on theEastCoast with their unique take on Americana music.
SUMMER 2018 I 45

Welcome to the City events help newcomers

Longwood'snewestgraduatesmovingto Virginia'sthreelargestmetroareascanfasttracktheirwaytonewfriendsinthealumni family-andthescoopontheirnewneighborhoods-thisAugust.

WelcometotheCityeventsaredesigned tobringtogetherLongwoodalumnialready establishedintheareaandthecities'newest residents-Longwood'sClassof2018.Thisyear's eventswillbeheldonThursday,Aug.16, throughoutthestate.

Visitlongwood.edu/alumniformore informationandtoregister.

Oct. 9 career fair is open to alumni

Alumniwhoareseekingjobsorrecruiting employeesareinvitedtoattendacareer fairinBlackwellBallroomonTuesday, Oct.9.TheeventishostedbytheOffice ofAlumniandCareerServicesandwill beheldoncampus.Formoreinformation, contactKatieTrammell,assistantdirector ofcampusemployerengagement,at brankleykd@longwood.eduor434-395-2066.

DAYafter GRADUATION Podcast chartsjourneys of wide-ranging alumni

Thesecondseasonoftheweeklypodcast DayAfterGraduationlaunchedinthespring. ProducedbytheOfficeofAlumniandCareer Services,theseriesfeaturesuniquemoments andpersonalreflectionsofLongwoodalumni andfriendsastheynavigatetheconflictsof post-collegelifeandchartapathtosuccess. EpisodesfromseasonsoneandtwoareavailableoniTunes,Stitcher,Soundcloudandat longwood.edu/podcast.

Newepisodesinclude"TalesfromEastern Europe"featuringBrianPlum'02andThomas Moran'83;and"BigFish,SmallPond"featuringCarnivalCruiseshipperformerKatelyn Stillman'08.

Ifyouhaveastorytoshare,eitherabout yourselfofsomeoneelse,emailcareer @longwood.edu.

ClassNotes

ContinuedfromPage44

inSouthHillinMarch.Shehas administrativeoversightoftheoperationssideofallCMHphysician practicesandhospital-basedphysicianservices.Palmore,whowas borninthehospital,hasworked forVCUHealthCMHsince1999. ShehasadoctoratefromtheMedicalUniversityofSouthCarolina andanMBAfromAveretrUniversity.

2000s

Lindsay Mottley '01, M.S. '02, principalofBettieWeaverElementaryinChesterfieldCounty,receivedtheAdministratorofthe YearAwardfromtheVirginiaAssociationofSchoolLibrariansinNovember20]7,recognizingher supportofliteracy.Mottleywas commendedfortheawardbythe VirginiaHouseofDelegatesin HouseResolutionNo.89,adopted chisFebruary.Shebeganhercareer asaspecialeducationteacherin HanoverCountyShehasbeen principalatBenieWeaversince July2014Shewilltransitionin January2019cofoundingprincipal ofOldHundredElementaryin Chesterfield,settoopenin September2019.

Laura Ellis '02 joinedHHHunt Homes,thehomebuildingdivision ofHHHuncCorp.,asanonline salesadviserinMarch2017Ellis, wholivesinHanoverCounty, workedinsalesandmarketingfor RyanHomes,from2002-17 ..

Jamie Erickson Orrison '02 hasbeentheaquaticsmanagerfor PrinceWilliamCountysince2012 Sheoverseesalleightofchat county'saquaticfacilities(twowaterparks,twoindoorrecreation centersandfouroutdoorcommunityswimmingpools).Shehas workedfulltimeforPrince Williamsince2003.Aformer competitiveswimmer(sheswam onLongwood'sclubswimteamher firsttwoyears),sheisalifeguard instructortrainer.Sheismarriedco Rob Orrison '98 (seehislatest bookonPage36).

Dr. AvettaWhite'02 earneda Ph.D.inhighereducationfrom MorganSeateUniversityinMay. Alicensedprofessionalcounselor andanationalcertifiedcounselor, shehasworkedintheOfficeof CounselingandDisabilityServices attheUniversityoftheDistrictof

Columbiaformorethan12years. Shehasamaster'sdegreefrom ArgosyUniversity.

The Rev. Marvin Bowman '04 wasinscalledaspastorofBechel GroveBaptistChurch,inthe CloverareaofHalifaxCounty, inMarch.Bowmanalsoispastor ofSecondBaptistChurchin Clarksville,apositionhehasheld foreightyears,andteachescivics andeconomicsatHalifaxCounty MiddleSchool.Hiswife, Rose Jones Bowman '02, M.S. '04, teachesmathinthespecialeducationprogramatHalifaxCounty HighSchool.

Matt Daniel '04 wasnamedvice presidentofglobalservicesfor ABODAbyRESIDE,aleaderin globalhousingservices,inMarch. PreviouslyhewasseniorvicepresidentofsalesforRegencyCorporate Livinganddirectorofsupply chain,Americas,forBridgeStreec GlobalHospitality.Heholdsche CertifiedCorporateHousing Providercertification.

Larry "Trey" Deal Ill '05, amemberofLongwood'sgolfteamasa student,playedgolfprofessionally forseveralyearsandnowisanaccountmanagerwithCoca-ColalivinginOrangeCounty.Heplayed intournamentswiththeProfessionalGolfers'Associationsystem inVirginiaandtheCarolinas.

Christie GintherArcher, M.S. '06,wasnamedaccountexecutive forVirginiaforTroxellCommunications,anationalleaderineducationaltechnologyandcollaboration solutions,inFebruary.Shewasa teacherandlibrarymediaspecialist for10yearsinPrinceGeorge County,whereshelives,thenin BrunswickCountyforfiveyears.

Dr. Laura Hebert '06, graduate licensureineducationaladministration,wasnamedprincipalof TwinsburgHighSchoolinOhio inAprilandwillbeginherduties July30.Heberthasbeenprincipal ofLloydC.BirdHighinChesterfieldCountysince2011andtaught for20yearsinVirginiaandher nativeOhio.

Barbara Lenhardt, MBA '08, assumedthenewlycreatedposition ofgeneralmanageranddeputy chiefofretailatcheNational GalleryofArcinWashington, D.C.,inFebruary.Shehadbeen directorofretailoperationsatthe

JohnF.KennedyCenterforthe PerformingArcsfornearlysix years.Previouslyshealsoheldretail positionsattheCrystalBridges MuseumofAmericanArcandrhe VirginiaMuseumofFineArts.

Sara Bonovitch Shell '08 was promotedtopublicrelationsmanagerforSpaceFloridainDecember 2017ShehadbeenpublicrelationscoordinatorsinceSeptember 2015forSpaceFlorida,thestate's aerospaceandspaceportdevelopmentauthority,locatedatthe KennedySpaceCenter.Before joiningtheagency,shewasacommunitynewsreporterwiththe Sun-SentinelnewspaperinFore Lauderdalefortwoyears.Shell, whohasamaster'sdegreefrom VirginiaCommonwealthUniversity,

ContinuedonPage47

CharlotteJonesBlaylock'51(right) andherfreshmanroommate, AnnNorfleetTaylor

Freshman roommates still close 71 years later

Morethan70yearsafterbecoming closefriendswhenroomingtogetherduringtheirfreshmanyear, Charlotte Jones Blaylock '51 andAnnNorfleetTaylorstillkeep intouch.Sincesharingatriple roominWhiteHouseHallin 1947-48-andnumerousdouble daces-theyhaveremainedclose throughvisits,phonecallsandat leastonen1inireunion,avacation gee-togetherwitheightotherLongwoodfiendsatarentedbeach houseinFlorida,wherethey roomedtogetheragain.(Blaylock hasanendedseveralotherminireunionswithLongwoodfriends.) Taylor,alifelongVirginiaBeach resident,attendedBlaylock'ssecond weddingand80thbirthdayparty, andBlaylock,aSalemnativewho haslivedintheBaltimoreareasince 1960,attendedtheweddingofTaylor'sdaughter."MomandAnnare reallygoodbuddies.It'samazing they'vestayedintouchsowell," saidBlaylock'sson,FrankGreenbaum."Theymusthavereally hititoff."

ALUMNINEWS
46ILONGWOODMAGAZINE

ClassNotes

ContinuedfromPage46

isworkplacecampaignchairfor UnitedWayofBrevard.

Emily James Powers '09 and herhusband,MatthewPowers,are theparentsofKatherineJames Powers,bornNov.7,2017.Emily andMatthewweremarriedNov. 23,2013.Shewaspreviously humanresourcesmanagerat ParhamHealthcareandRehabilitationCenterinRichmond;heisa naturalgastransportationanalyst atDominionPowerinRichmond.

Lindsay Reese '09, aphysician assistant,joinedtheHarrisFamily PracticeinLaurinburg,NorthCarolina,earlierthisyear.Reese,who hasamaster'sdegreefromEastern VirginiaMedicalSchool,alsohas workedasacertifiedathletictrainer withteenageathletesandatanurgentcarefacility.

LaurenWood '09 wasnamedsupervisorofBensleyRecreation CenterinChesterfieldCountyin April.Shepreviouslywasactivities directoratHanover(County) Health&RehabilitationCenter. BeforethatsheworkedinIsleof WightCountyforsevenyears,first asarecreationspecialistandthen asfairandeventscoordinator.

2010s

Judy Deichman, M.S. '10, schoollibrarianatNottoway MiddleSchoolinCrewe,isthe recipientofthe2018American AssociationofSchoolLibrarians' (AASL)InnovativeReadingGrant. SponsoredbyCapstone,the $2,500grantsupportstheplanningandimplementationof auniqueprogramforchildren thatencouragesreading,especially withstrugglingreaders.Deichman's programistheNottowayBookA-WaySummerBookmobile. Sheplanstoenticereaderswith activitiesandbookstiedto aweeklythemesuchas"Minecrafr Mania,""PopsiclePalooza"and "PamperYourPets."AASLaward winnerswererecognizedinJune duringtheannualconferenceof theAmericanLibraryAssociation, adivisionofAASL.

Sara Kidd '10 wasappointedan assistantdistrictattorneyinthe Charlotte/Mecklenburg(North Carolina)DistrictAttorney'sOffice inApril.Shegraduated cum Laude

fromCampbellUniversitySchool ofLawinMay2017andpassed theNorthCarolinaBarExamin Julythatyear.

CharlotteTrant '11 playedBella ManninghamintheAprilproductionofGaslightbytheWaterworks Players,acommunitytheatergroup inFarmville.Trant,themusic teacheratBuckinghamCounty ElementaryandPrimaryschools, appearedinherthirdWaterworks show, TheIllusion, inJune.

Paige Reitz '13 presented aspokenessayaboutherpersonal experiencerecoveringfromselfharmatashowinAprilsponsored byThisIsMyBrave,amental healthadvocacyorganization, attheSterlingcampusofNorthern VirginiaCommunityCollege. Reitz,whohasamaster'sdegree fromtheUniversityofHouston, isasocialworkerlivingin Leesburg.

MaryKnott Branzelle'89 (left)andher sister,Betty KnottSpiers'88, withtheir mother,Virginia Sutherland Knott'54

3rd-generation alumna namedtop teacher for Dinwiddie schools

Betty Knott Spiers '88, athirdgenerationalumnaandoneo'r threesiblingstoattendLongwood, isherschoolsystem'stopteacher. Spiers,aninstructionaltechnology resourceteacher(ITRT)atDinwiddieCountyHighSchool,was honoredinMayastheDinwiddie PublicSchoolDivisionTeacherof theYearfor2019Hermother, Virginia Sutherland Knott '54, andbothofherlategrandmothers, Maude Clay Sutherland '56 and Mary Virginia Thrift '21, alsotaughtinDinwiddie.InSpiers' senioryearatLongwood,hersister, Mary Knott Branzelle '89, and oneofherbrothers, Raymond Knott '91, alsowereoncampus, duringwhichtimeallthreelived inCurry.Spiers,whohasamaster's fromVirginiaTech,hastaught inhernativeDinwiddieCounty for28years.Shehasbeenan ITRTthepast15years,after spendingthefirsthalfofher careerasanelementaryteacher.

Amy Moore '14 wasmarried May26toJustinWilkins.She isaspeech-languagepathologistat VCUHealthCommunityMemorialHospitalinSouthHill.

Kelsey Pardue '14 washiredas thegirlsdirectorofplayerdevelopmentfortheVirginiaSoccerAssociationinApril.Shehascoachedat St.BonaventureUniversityandon theclublevelfortheBethesdaSoccerClubandtheRichmondKickers.Astandoutmidfielderat Longwood,sheplayedprofessionallywiththeWashingtonSpiritfor twoyears.

Ashlynn Kaufman Kolmer '15 and Cameron Kolmer '15 are theparentsofRaelynnMichele Kolmer,whowasbornMay18 andweighed8pounds7ounces. AshlynnandCameronweremarriedinSeptember2016.Heisa VirginiaBeachpoliceofficer;sheis Dr.James Burgess'92

Chemistry professor delevelops newtest to identifythose at riskfor diabetes

Dr. James Burgess '92, aprofessorofmedicallaboratoryscience, hasbeenrecognizedforhisworkin advancingresearchanddeveloping personalizedpatientdiagnosticsby inclusioninthelatesteditionof MarquisWho'sWho,acollection ofshortbiographiesofnotableindividuals.SinceJanuary2016, BurgesshaschairedAugustaUniversity'sDepartmentofMedical, Laboratory,ImagingandRadiologicSciences,wherehefacilitates researchandoverseesthreeprofessionalprograms.Hispersonalresearchincludesidentifyinga reliablepredictorofchildrenatrisk forhighcholesterolthroughtheuse ofelectrodes("atinywiresmaller thanahumanhair"),anongoing project.Ifsuccessful,the"human sensingplatform"forcholesterol andalsobloodlessglucosescreening thatBurgesshasdevelopedmay helppredictpeoplewhohave, orareatriskfor,highcholesterol ordiabetes."You'dbeablecotest bysimplycouchinginsideaperson'scheekwithadisposable, handheldsensor."

apretrialprobationofficerwith thatcity.

Josh Reimers '15 and Kristen Scampoli '15 weremarriedSept. 30,2017Thecouple,wholivein Williamsburg,metintheHealth andFitnessCenterduringthe springsemesteroftheirfreshman yearandstarteddatingthatsummer.Heisaphysicaltherapyassistant;sheisaregisterednurse.

TimothyHale'87(left),TomDeWitt '80andCol.JasonCraft'89

2 alumni speak at defense meeting

AnAprilmeetingoftheSmalland EmergingContractorsAdvisory Forum(SECAF)heldatTysons

CornerwasaminireunionofLongwoodROTCalumni.Thekeynote speakerswere Col. Jason Craft '89 and Timothy Hale '87, aretiredArmylieutenantcolonel. Theywereintroducedby Tom DeWitt '80, presidentandCEO ofSNVC,whotaughtbothinthe ROTCprogram.Inthemeeting, whichfocusedontheDepartment ofDefense'smodernizationprocess, Craft,directorofArmyaviation programsandassistantsecretaryof theArmyforacquisitions,logistics andtechnology,recountedhisexperiencesasprogrammanagerof theMine-ResistantAmbushProtectedvehicle,theArmy'sprimary vehicleforcarryingsoldiersinto combat.Hale,productdirectorfor acquisitions,logisticsandtechnologyenterprisesystemsandservices, spokeonthefutureofArmybusinesssystemsandtheirmigration toacloud-baseddatacenter.

Send us your classnotes

Ifyouhaveanynewsfromyour professionalorpersonallife,we'dlove tohearaboutit.Pleaseemailthedetailsto alumni@longwood.edu.Remembertogive usyourfullname,theyearyougraduated andthedegreeyoureceived.

ALUMNINEWS
SUMMER 2018 I 47

To Get a College Degree-or Not?

For students who can't afford college, scholarships aretheanswer tooneof life'smostpainful questions

NelsonMandelaoncesaid,"Education isthemostpowerfulweaponwhich youcanusetochangetheworld."

AtLongwood,welearnthat,ascitizenleaders,weareexpectedtodoourparttomakethe worldabetterplace.Thepotentialimpactof eachnewclassofgraduates-armedwith everythingtheylearnedatLongwoodinside andoutsidetheclassroom-isenormous.

ThroughoutmyfouryearsatLongwood, Ihavebeenblessedtoreceivefinancialassistancefromseveralscholarships.Eachonehas aspecialplaceinmyheart.

TheHerbertR.BlackwellScholarshipgained specialmeaningformewhenDr.KenPerkins, whowasthentheprovost,calledmeintohis officetoletmeknowIhadbeenselected.Iwill neverforgethislookingmeintheeyesandsaying, "Ithinkwearegoingto seebigthingsfromyou,Kevin."

Wedon'thavetolookbackveryfartosee howLongwoodalumnihavebeenresponsible forpositivechangeintheircommunities,inthe businessworld,inresearchlabs,inthemilitary, inthelivesofchildrenandinsomanyotherways.

Butweshouldneverforgetonecriticalelementinchisscenario: scholarships.Thisisnot anexaggeration;itisreality Iknowmany Longwoodstudents,myselfincluded,who wouldnothavebeenabletocompletetheir educationwithoutthehelpofgenerousdonors.

TheDabneyStewartLancasterScholarshipisnearand deartomyheartbecause,at myfirstBetheOnescholarshipbanquet,IhadthepleasureofmeetingMaryTabb JohnstonSchubert'72,the granddaughterofformer LongwoodpresidentDr.DabneyStewartLancaster.Mrs. SchubertandItalkedonand onaboutthehistoryofLong' woodandhowproudshe "wastobeanalumnaofsuch awonderfulinstitution.

TheHullScholarsExcellenceinEducationScholarshipwasthefirstLongwood scholarshipIreceived.Itis arenewablescholarshipand isthemainreasonthatIwill graduatewithoutanycollege debt.Iknowhowluckythatmakesme. Mostemotionalforme,however,isthe ShaneT.AdcockMemorialScholarship,which IreceivedthisFebruary.Thescholarshipwas createdinmemoryofCapt.ShaneAdcock'03, whodiedonOct. 11,2006,inHawija,Iraq, afterbeinginjuredbyenemygrenadefire. OnOct. 15,2015,inthefallofmysophomore yearandalmostnineyearstothedayafter Capt.Adcock'sdeath,IenlistedintheVirginia ArmyNationalGuard,inspiredbyhisexample

andhissacrifice.BeingintheNationalGuard hasgivenmeevenmorerespectforwhatour nation'ssoldiersarefightingforoverseas.Atthis year'sscholarshipbanquet,Ifinallygottomeet Capt.Adcock'sparentsandsharewiththem howmuchthescholarshipmeanstome.

Forme,andforothersI!mow,receiving ascholarshipismorethanjustfinancialaid. Ithasadominoeffect,openingopportunities forustoimmerseourselvesinlife-changing acnv1nes.

IfIhadnotreceivedmyscholarships,there isnotellinghowdifferentmycollegeexperiencewouldhavebeen.Imightnothavebeen abletoenlistintheVirginiaArmyNational Guard,workasaninternfortheDeanof StudentsLarryRobertson'90orconduct researchwithseveralfaculty membersinthe kinesiologydepartment.

OvermylastfouryearsatLongwood,Ihave beenonajourney,strivingtobecomethebest possiblecitizenleaderthatIcouldbe.Theterm citizenleadershiphasmanydifferentmeanings tomanydifferentpeople.Tome,citizenleadershipmeansservingotherswithoutexpecting anythinginreturn,acceptingeveryonedespite differences,workingwithotherstoadvancesociety,lookingforthepositivesinallsituations, refrainingfromboastingevenifyouhaveaccomplishedsomethinggreat,findingwaysto connectwithpeers,lendingahelpinghand whenyouseesomeoneinneed,andbeing agenuinelyhonestandkindindividual.

ItrulybelievethatthescholarshipsIhave beenawardedhavegivenmetheopportunity to growtremendouslyonmypathtobecoming thecitizenleaderthatIstrivetobe.Myhope forthefutureistogivebacktotheplacethat gavemesomuch LongwoodUniversity. �

EndPaper
48 I LONGWOOD MAGAZINE
Kevin Napier '18, a kinesiology major, served as president of the Student Government Association during his senior year a position that includes the responsibility of representing hisfellowstudents on Longwood's Board of Visitors. Napier (center) is pictured herewith Maris andVera Adcock, the parents of Shane Adcock '03.

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