Bulletinoflongwo1956long

Page 1

ALUMNAE NEWS

BULLETIN OF

LONGWOOD December 1956

COLLEGE Volume XLII

Number

4


Longwood College

Bulletin of

FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

ALUMNAE NUMBER Volume XLII

December, 1956

Number

4

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Published by

Page

LONGWOOD COLLEGE Message from the President

1

and

THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION Member

of

Inaugural Address of the President

The American Alumni Council Longwood

News Editorial Board:

College,

Mildred Davis. Helen Draper. Foster Gresham, Mary Clay Hiner, Meade Shackelford, and Margaret Simkins.

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE BOARD Dabney

President,

Lancaster

S.

5

Faculty and College

of the

21

.Alumnae Secretary, Tliree Others Retire

22

Alumnae Have Home On Campus

24

Class Reunions

Dr.

Pioneer in Education

Ruth Covner,

R. C. Simonini, Chairman:

Dr. Francis G. Lankford

A

2

.

Longwood College

President Emeritus. Longwood College

— Founders

Day

1956

25

.Alumnae Chapter Activities

27

Memorial Fund Established

29

Ballot

31

President

Founders Day Program

Margaret Robinson Simkins

Honor First

3

D

Baylor Apts., 1019 Anne St., Portsmouth, Va.

Wall

Farmville, Va.

Ex-president

Frances Horton

In

Memoriam

37

News

38

Class

Seeond Vice-president L.

33

Roll

]' ice-president

Dorothy Diehi

Virginia

32

Farmville. \'a.

Births

54

Marriages

55

2124 Memorial Ave., S. W., Roanoke, Va.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

Directors

Sammy

Scott

Tazewell,

\'a.

The History of Longwood College was Autumn, 1955.

reprinted from

The

Iron IV or ker,

Mary Clay Hiner

Farmville, Va.

Edith Estep Gray

Signpine, Va.

Lillian Beach

3802 Milam Drive, Alexandria,

Chairman

^^a.

Longwood of

Helen Costan, Chairman.

Standing Committees .Snack

Bar

1307

College has published the

Alumnae News

since

Because of the tremendous e.xpense involved in housing, feeding and educating 850 girls, the college does not have sufficient funds to enlarge the Alumnae News. Any material sent in by alumnae that does not appear in this issue was omitted solely because the magazine must 1941.

Oakwood

Court,

Lynchburg,

\'a.

Myrtle Dunton Curtis, Co-Chainnan. Alumnae House 3206 Noble Ave., Richmond.

Ya..

be limited to a specified

size.

Maria Bristow Starke, Co-chairman, Alumnae House Rustom, River Road, Richmond, Va.

COVER

Executive Secretary and Treasurer

Virginia

McLean Pharr

Farmville, Virginia

The

picture on the cover

is

the

Alumnae House.

Published quarterly by Longwood College, Farmville, Va. Second Class mailing privileges at Farmville, Va.


MESSAGE

FROM THE PRESIDENT

For Mrs. Lankford and for me this has been a busy and enjoyable first year at LongOur first reception for alumnae on Founder's Day was a particularly delightful occasion for us. ^^'e look forward with great pleasure to having more of you in our home wood.

for future Founder's \\'e

They

Day

receptions,

were pleased with the appropriations

made by the General Assembh' last winter. a much improved salary schedule for for a new dormitory, and for new classrooms

will enable us to put into effect this year

faculty.

We

also received appropriations

for the business education department.

completed, and

it

is

Preliminary plans for the dormitory have been

expected that construction will begin this

In the meantime,

fall.

our enrollment continues to increase, and we must make temporary housing arrangements until the new dormitory is completed. During the next two years we will also be able to advance further the renovation of our kitchen, to fireproof two stairways leading to the dormitory floors in the main building, to rewire most of the main building including improved lighting of classrooms, and to modernize the remaining old bathrooms in the main Ijuilding.

Also with funds contributed by the Alumnae Association we expect

This and other very helpful and are gratefully acknowledged. suitable floor surface in the Rotunda.

We

to install a

more

gifts of the associations will be

continue to be pleased with the high quality of student

who

seeks admission to

Longwood. The sympathetic understanding and help of alumnae have contributed greatly in directing well <|ualified high school seniors to Longwood. \\'e are proud of Longwood's reputation for high standards. With your continued help we are firmly resolved to maintain the high quality of Longwood's student bod}'. There are many more good things about your Alma ]Mater I would like to include in You will have to come for a visit and see for yourself. This we are always delighted to have you do.

this letter but space does not permit.

Sincerely F. G. L.ANKFtiRD. Jr. Presideiit

December, 1956


INAUGURAL ADDRESS of Francis G. Lankford,

Dr.

Mr. Xcwton, President Darden, Dr. Lancaster, Distin-

higher learning can have than to educate soundlv, voung

men and women

and Friends:

Guest.s, Faculty, Students,

to teach in

secondary schools.

This

is

a great occasion for

me and and

grateful to all of you

for sharing

tremendous inspiration

to be

sponsibilities with

good wishes of

the

am

I

with me.

it

deeplv It

is

a

mv new refriends whom I

launched into

In becoming president of

my

aware that among

Longwood

am

College, I

fullv

predecessors in this position have

been some of Virginia's most distinguished and beloved

Xo man

could follow in

challenged by their records of service to our

such persons as

office

and Dabney Lancaster without being

Ruffner, Jarman,

and

to this fine

beloved Commonwealth.

known Longwood College under Dr. Jarman and Dr. Lancaster. who enjoyed more

the

and alumnae.

students, faculty,

I

the challenge to carr}- forward the

men

devoted so

much

realize that

I

our countr}''s elementary and

always be true its

Longwocd,

at

history as a state college,

student preparing to teach will

find her respect

and fellow students for the profession of This very day, thousands of children in Vir-

facult}'

teaching.

sincere

work

the

of

which these

some

of the hopes

in the years that lie

my

also recognize that

damage

me

on

have for

I

tomorrow.

immediatelv ahead.

administration will be remem-

Had

their prep-

to

young minds

is

beyond estimate.

Inherent in any program for the pre]jaration of teachers

Xot

all

who

are

Indeed, the same

successful teachers. college education

in general.

admitted

secondary school graduates

have the scholastic capacity nor the personalitv

may

make

to

be said of a

Secondary schools cannot

prcp^rl}' be expected to prepare all of their graduates for

successful continuation of their education in college. as unreasonable to expect this of high

is

considered appropriate for

this occasion to set forth

will be a better place

such a program.

sure

for

aration for teaching been inadequate, then the possible

to

am

I

a sobering thought,

is

these teachers are teaching well today,

if

admin-

affection

to

America

This

College.

the princi])le of selection of those

with liumilitv

acce]it

Longwood we know that of

is

of their lives.

is

it

Longwood College I

has been throughout a

from

it

this

no college ever had presidents more respected for the work they did or

it

that

old college

;Many of you in

audience have istrations of

as

^Nlay

ginia and in other states are being taught by graduates

respect so highl}-.

educators.

President

Procession

iiauffural

:4uislied

Jr.,

would be

to

expect colleges to prepare

to continue their

For some, is

all

schools

It

as

it

of their graduates

education in university graduate study.

admissions

this principle of selection in college

in conflict with our democratic belief in equal

For those who see such

oppor-

bered far more by whatever results are achieved than bv

tunit}' for all.

the hopes expressed

remind them that the great genius. Thomas Jefferson,

this point in

a

a

today.

had been

some

elected president of

have

of your theories of education."

read between the lines

temptation to add: tical

will

some of your

It gives

me

believed

in

selective

system of education for Virginia.

Longwood a

chance

I

was sure

stronglv she

had

College.

to trv out I

could

to resist the

how imprac-

is

dominant purpose

the preparation of teachers.

function

the

1

of opportunity,

started the selective process

much

He

that

an

There

institution

of

simply

earlier

than

2th grade.

L'nquestionably, sal education as

we

in

America have accepted univer-

an essential element of Democracy.

in .\merica. as in

stop at

some

level both

achievement has

But

every other countrv in the world, formal

universal education must stop at some point.

theories are."

great satisfaction that the

imjiortant

would have

equality

would

but he proposed a

received from

was announced

I

it

'.\nd you will soon see

Longwood College no more

how

reminded of

clearly

of congratulations

letter

"And now ycu

She wrote:

is

was

former student of mine shortly after

that I

of

I

a conflict I

lieen

It

must

because the ceiling of educational

reached for

manv and

because the

tax resources of the state will not finance the continuation

Alumn.ae M.ac.azine


of formal education for all at a level be)-ond that point.

In America, we have attempted

an education

to assure

for

a level higher than most other nations of the world. would agree with the majority view in our country

all to I

that

Beyond

high school.

from systematic education in college must take

to profit

Moreover,

place.

this point, selection of those qualified

have an obligation

point of selection, the colleges

at this to

enforce a higher standard of achieve-

ment than was possible

This

education was the goal.

may

the great benefits that

when universal deny in any way

at the earlier level is

not to

accrue to hundreds of thou-

sands of individuals from informal studw ])rograms

extensive

within

training

for

Surely the night

industry,

and opportunity schools have demonstrated that most persons can continue to learn beyond high school. This is quite different, however, from saying that all of schools,

such persons are likely

demands

succeed in meeting

to be able to

of colleges

such as those represented here

today.

from realizing a goal of universal education through high In 1950, only

school.

and

1

7

}

64%

of Virginia's population 16

ears of age were enrolled in school.

The com-

25%

parative figure for the IS and 19 year age group was

We

and the extremists

arts

This debate

What should

are also a long

way from the goal of educating all who are qualified for college.

them?

to

This ques-

long before the present

in professional education.

not limited to the teaching profession.

is

be the balance between liberal and profes-

sional education

also of great concern to those

is

college curricula for the leader in business,

who plan

for the en-

gineer, for the architect, even for the professional agri-

Such debate

culturalist.

Without

good.

is

it

professional

education might become so narrowly vocational that the

uneducated specialist

And

the product.

is

the academic

might become so dissociated from

courses

us and so

around

life

with abstractions in the interest of aca-

filled

demic purity that we would be the victims again of

a sterile

medieval scholasticism.

The

teacher, as with

members

of other professions, will

member

with himself; he will be a

live

community,

will be a citizen of

as a practitioner of his

therefore,

tion,

should be remembered that we in Virginia are far

It

men

period of intense debate between the adherents of the liberal

should, with few exceptions, be the birthright of

it

every American boy and girl to have an education through

the

riculum should they find available tion has interested educated

His college educa-

profession.

must contribute

of a family; he

and nation, as well

state,

an enrichment of his

to

living as well as to the development of professional

Since the

petence.

turned

com-

we have

days of the Renaissance,

earl\'

humanities as the foundation of an educa-

to the

tion designed to equip a student to enjoy a full life.

harmonious development

The

body and morals was

of mind,

So long as these are the

the goal of the early humanists.

of those secondary graduates

accepted goals of the humanities, they are an essential

Every

part of the education of a teacher.

approximately a third of the graduates of

3'ear

Virginia high schools

who

graduating classes do not go to any college.

come much

we

until

Just as the humanities should be free to pursue their

are in the top fourth of their

we

Until

and

closer to universal high school education

much more

enroll in colleges

nearl}' all of those

purposes,

peculiar

is

as

so

must the professional courses be

pursue their practical, vocational purposes.

left free to

unwise for professional courses

therotical as

liberal college admissions.

excessiveh' professionalized.

There are some, of course, who would approve admissions

taxpayer should have the right a tax-supported

to

the

college.

to I

send his son or daughter

would remind them

taxing one man's

principle of

that

property to educate

another man's child has been accepted in our countrv since the

famous Kalamazoo decision of 1872.

world

conflict

that

it

able

among

is

available

of crucial interest to all, that the intellectually

to

ije

identified

and

a college education

it.

The claim

that our superiority in the air over to the superiority of our

is

very likely true

Korea was attributable

men who

These men were both carefully

piloted the Sabrejets.

selected

and thoroughly

Such may very well be the case

in other aspects

of the conflict that seems to be the lot of our age. ica

must not be found wanting

teachers nor of

its

ment

in the

Amer-

adequacy of

its

capacity for a full and rewarding personal

life,

and

the teacher

also needs thorough grounding in the content of his teach-

ing

However high

field.

may

attain

in

a degree of excellence a teacher

classroom, he will

the techniques of the

never teach with confidence

he has mastered the

until

content of his teaching field considerably bcn'ond the level

which he

at

is

teaching.

A\'ithout

be no enthusiasm in teaching. ing

cannot

successful.

be

confidence, there can

\\"ithout enthusiasm, teach-

Professional

education

for

teaching competence, education in the humanities for a full field,

life,

and thorough understanding

of

one's teaching

are the essential elements in an}' curriculum for the

preparation

of

teachers.

should be given

somewhat on

to

What

part

of

the

total

time

each of these elements will depend

the individual student

and on

the teaching

field.

Ever^•one in this audience must crisis that faces puljlic

ether leaders.

become

competence,

professional

for

to

lie

keenly aware of the

education in our State and which

young men and women with demon-

results

from the decisions of the Supreme Court of the

capacity to maintain high standards of achieve-

United

States.

Given a group strated

made

them even though the individual's family

income does not (jermit

trained.

Indeed in the

between East and West there can be no doubt

us

Given preparation

selective

but would maintain that a

in private colleges

is

It

become excessively

unwise for academic courses

adequately prepared for college should we think of more

it

to

in college

of

and with

December, 1956

interest in teaching,

what cur-

Nor

is

there likelv to

as to be able at this point to say

fie

any of us

how our

so wise

difficulties will


be

finally

resolved.

opportunity

It

about

is

what

the final decisions as to schools,

shall be

we

stand ready to help

will

No

those schools as effective as possible. the preparation

shall

make

graduates will teach.

its

inspiration of a devoted faculty.

because

am

Its

program

member

to be a

intend to do

One wood

my

pledge

I

mention these things

I

newcomer

a great satisfaction to the

is

it

vails.

institution for

teachers can divorce itself from the

of

schools in which

that

make

done with our public

^^^latever schools the public wall decrees

Longwood College

have,

however,

encouraging,

is

be given the electorate to

to

that I

of a family where such a spirit pre-

Longwood

respect for this

all that I

can

to

nourish

of the responsibilities which

and

spirit

it.

will have at

I

Long-

which faces every college president

will be one

This

the years immediately ahead.

in

the responsibility

is

of pre-service education

must certainly be influenced by demands the schools make of their teachers. But Longwood must stand ready, too, to help teachers and

of maintaining an able faculty.

the

been the most important responsibility of a college presi-

school officials continue their education while in service.

difficult to

This means consultant help

increases in college enrollments anticipated

means opportunity

It

and

fied

and school systems.

to schools

for graduate study for those quali-

beyond the

interested in carrying their education

means opportunitv

It also

l)achelor"s degree.

who have

for teachers

not completed a bachelor's degree to do so while

For man}' teachers who have family

continuing to teach. responsibilities,

opportunity

may

it

very

or

in,

be necessary to provide such an near,

home communities.

their

This would extend the scope of our present offering lieyond

campus

the limits of the

in Farmville.

\\'e

do not pro-

few years are certain colleges for faculty

in service.

mav

I

add, such education in service should

not be limited to jirofessional education.

!Many develop-

ments are rapidly taking place in various

fields tauglit in

public schools.

Development rapidly since

would

I

of a

cite

\\'orl(I \\'ar II.

Many

of our ablest

mathe-

But high

belongs in secondarv mathematics courses.

know and understand

this

tent before they will be willing to substitute

We

it

new

ccn-

for con-

ventional topics. .\n invaluable tradition of

I

speak of the

them liness

code.

is a

me

to

Longwood College has beI moved here last July.

since

spirit of the students

and alumnae,

toward each other, and adherence It is a thrilling sight to

.\mong

warm

sincere devotion to their college, a

to a

friend-

high moral

observe these students each

evening after dinner voluntarily walk

to

a

neighboring

church and there conduct their own vesper services.

A

LTpperclassmen take

Longwood does not suft'er alone. prompt action to make her "at home

away from home."

No

homesick freshman

we absorb

as

am

The sympathetic understanding of classmates is personally expressed. Alumnae visit the college with as much joy as if we had a winning football team. Ijelieve this spirit is

nurtured by a genuine belief in the

dignity and worth of every individual.

This

is

conspicu-

ously demonstrated in the extremely wide participation

many

activities

pression of interest

believe will be pro-

And

all colleges.

numbers

these added

do

shall

I

is

all that

I

not sacrificed

In

of students.

fact,

hopeful that our enrollment increases will not be

endanger the distinct advantages that are

present in a smaller college.

A

few weeks ago. President Puse}- of Harvard University

"The Exploring

wrote in Fortune magazine en

Education."

would

I

now

like

to

borrow

\\'orld of

his concluding

paragrajth to use in closing this paper.

In the end, then, we return again

who

educated teacher, fessional, but

who must

is,

and

has cared

done too that

also be something

The

more

—a per-

teacher's special job

to help them, with their

less for

little to

of those

minds and

find their successors. l:)e,

It is to

in all colleges

men and women whose

College contribute as

to a realization of this

be hoped

and schools

lives

and values

and our own.

devote whatever personal resources

Longwood

Scciet^

might, and has

it

will creatively touch our children's lives,

shall

wills, to

into full humanit}'.

such teachers than

IQSO there will

liy

more

I

liberally

nurture in }oung people the desire to extend them-

is to

selves,

help

the

to

of course, a competent pro-

son of exceptional quality.

ALUMNAE

student struggles alone with jxt-

sonal problems arising from illness in her family or from

in

I

fully

I

as

have

.

.

to

possibly

hope.

at

other sources.

I

and

can to see that a high quality of teaching

grow beyond competence

come very apparent

of

Present salaries will not

have our share of the increased enroll-

will

ment which faces

new mathematics has gone forward very

school teachers must

the next

demands

to the

mathematics as an example.

maticians believe that some of the new content of this field

members.

creases are absolutely necessary

vided.

so large as to

school officials in our section of the state for education

add further

Moreover, in

enable us to compete for capable men and women such as Longwood has become accustomed to on its faculty. In-

we do propose

and

to

always

particular!}-

it

discharge this responsibility now.

I

to cooperate with existing extension divi-

this has

But increasing competition makes

dent.

pose to establish an extension division of our own, but

sions in an effort to help meet the needs of teachers

Indeed

which provide an opportunitv for exand talent. It is also nurtured bv the

RECEIVE DEGREES

Alumnae who received degrees at the August Commenceof Longwood College were: Mary Tyler Baker Baber

ment

'2i\ Isabel Bilisoly '35,

Mary

Lewis ginia

'33;

Reames

'19; ".

Pruden

'24; Catherine Cre'd's

Edmunds

Parker

Harris '28; Beatrice Jours

Lola Wescott Kellam Krieg "32; Daisy Vir-

Lambert

Ragland Cole

.\ugusta

'31

;

Marion Layne Puckette

Mildred Ragsdale Jackson

Catherine W'ilbourn

Ware

'33

'35:

Dandridge

'25;

Rebecca

and Lee Wood

'19.

Alumnae Magazine


Farmville Female Seminary

in 1859.

from an old drawing. This building, completed

in

1842,

now forms

part of Ruffner

Hall, the

administration building of the college.

LONGWOOD COLLEGE A PIONEER

Longwood in public

Dr.

IN

BOTH PRIVATE AND PUBLIC EDUCATION By MEADE L. SHACKELFORD later

had been

started

inaugurated in December of 1955,

Worsham,

in 1832.

College, a pioneer first in private

education,

Lankford,

Francis G.

Jr.,

occasion he became the latest

On

president.

as

among

and presidents who have guided the was incorporated by the Legislature

institution

(now

Longwood

this

Farmville

itself

at

had

Prince

a

Edward Courthouse, now

dav school for

girls

known

as

sixteen principals institution since

of Virginia

Farmville Female Seminary Association in 1839. year history makes

and

it

as the

Its

116-

the fifth oldest educational

a college) for

women

in continuous oper-

ation in the United States.

Longwood is located in Farmville, a tobacco town Edward County, Virginia. The college had

Prince

in its

beginnings in the fourth decade of the nineteenth century,

when more than

a half million dollars

was paid

sold on the Farmville market each year.

was

the fourth largest in Virginia

have the best tobacco in the Gazeteer of 1835. of

little

led a

The

state,

for tobacco

This market

and was considered

to

according to Martin's

public education and few private schools for girls

group of public spirited citizens

to

make plans

for

a girls' school in Farmville, although a female seminary

December, 1956

...,.w.^,.><..../^ÂŁ

prosperity of the town in an era

^:n^..

<^

inscription appearing on a metal plate attached to tlie cornerstone of the first building of the Farmville Female Seminary. The building was completed in 1842 and workmen found the cornerstone while e.xcavating for a new building in 1897.

The


The at

Normal School 1884 when the

State Female

it

appeared

school

in

began as

A

institution.

a

state-operated

portion of this build-

ing was the original Farmville Fe-

male Seminary.

Immediately prior by the state, the known as Farmville

to its acquisition

school

was

College and was operated under the sponsorship of the Methodist Conference.

The property was deeded

to the State of Virginia in 1884.

Farmville Female Seminary established by a Miss

Although the Heustis school in Farmville closed before

Spence in 1833 and another female seminary established

1845, the Farmville Female Seminary, prospering at times

by the Reverend A.

and weathering storms

the

known how long persons

that

believe

Heustis in

J.

the

Heustis

second Farmville

with the

was

either school

1835, but in

it

not

is

Some

existence.

Although there were 20

this

in 1830, education for

women was

seminaries in Virginia not popular, and per-

haps was considered nothing more than a form of conspicious consumption.

Most

By 1845

nova for a brief period. twelve girls'

of the seminaries were short-

few achieved the brilliance of a super-

lived, although a

seminaries

\'irginia in 1839.

that

The Farmville Female Seminary Association The

girls'

has been in continuous

was connected

school

Female Seminary, but

been established.

fact has never

at others,

operation until the present time.

there were fewer than

had been in existence

in

Perhaps education for women would

Legislature

incorporated

the

Seminary Association on ]March

5,

Farmville 1839,

with

Female

W.

C.

James E. Venable, Thomas Flournoy, William Wilson, George Daniel, AMllis Blanton, and James B. Flourno}',

El}' as incorporators.

Three hundred shares of stock were

issued at §100 each in an effort to raise $30,000 for the erection of a building

and other items needed

to start the

school.

The Farmville Female Seminary

Association purchased

have received greater impetus had Thomas Jefferson, from

an acre of land on the heights of High

whom

Spruce Street from George Whitfield Read and his wife

Virginia received inspiration for popular education,

women

included

on March

But he wrote

in his educational plans.

14, 1818, in

answer

to a letter

from Nathaniel

Street,

west of

Charlotte for $1,400 by deed dated :May 26, 1842.

land consisted of two

lots

— 105

and 107

The

which James

Burwell, '"A plan of fem.ale education has never been a

^Madison, trustee for Josiah Chambers, had conveyed to

subject

George W. Read for $1,250 on April

of

systematic

my

occupied

contemplation with

me.

It

attention so far only as the education of

own daughters

required.''

has

my

3,

1836.

Completed in 1842, the building was described by the principal

a

decade later as "spacious and comfortable

Victorian architecture was in vogue

when

this

photograph of the State

Female Normal School was made in 1898.

sembled in

Students of the era are asin front of the

building and second floor windows. The presi-

dent of the school at this time

was

Dr. Robert Frazer.

Alumnae Magazine


The

Normal School

State Female

1909, 25 years after

in

under

opening

its

Here are

operation.

state

shown improvements and additions made by Dr. J. L. Jarman (president from 1902 until 1946) and another

change

in

architecture,

this

The dome

time to Jefifersonian.

of

^^f^lM^M

the Rotunda, in the center of the picture, has institution.

become symbolic This illustration

of the

is

from

the 1909 edition of the school year-

book, the

and

VIRGINIAN.

beauty

for

country."

workmen found and over

of

situation

surpassed

few in

by

In excavating for a new building in

the

1897,

the cornerstone of the original building,

the opening of a four-b}'-five inch hole

was a

Shortly after

completion of the building,

the

school

opened with Solomon Lee as principal and offered English,

The

Latin, Greek, French, and piano. five

months were $20

for piano,

tuition

fees

for

$15 for higher English,

$12.50 for lower English, and $5 for each foreign language,

metal plate bearing this inscription:

with board available at $8 to $10 a month.

Farmville Female Academy Built by Joint Stock

Company A

Within the hole was the back of a (the

few

exposed

letters

on

to the air)

;

it

1839

New

Testament

a newspaf>er, of which only a square

—

five, ten,

and twent}-

The beautiful now forms part of building of Longwood

and a Masonic emblem.

brick building of colonial architecture

Ruffner Hall, the administration

flourished in the next

decade as did the town of Farmville, one of the most

faded away shortly after being

inch was legible; three silver coins five cent pieces;

The Farmville Female Seminary I)

College.

prosperous in the history of Virginia.

had shipped

its

Farmville, which

tobacco in the early days by ox cart to

Richmond, or by batteau down the Appomattox River to now found itself linked to Petersburg and

Petersburg,

Lynchburg by the Southside Railroad. The population town grew from 800 in 1839 to 2,000 by 1860. During this period the Farmville Female Seminary hud a succession of principals. Mr. Lee was followed of the

An

aerial view of the I.imgwood College cinipu? today, l-mni kit In nght, ni iln i.in.L;ri>uiRl. the major buildings Student Piuilding; Tabb Hall (with the Colonnade in front) Ruli'ner Hall (with the Rotunda in the center) West and Jarman Hall (auditorium and music building). Immediately behind Ruttncr Hall are the Dining Room and nomics Building behind West Wing is Farmville Elementary School where students do practice teaching behind the ningham Hall (junior and senior dormitories), and behind Jarman Hall is Stevens Hall, the science building. :

:

December, 1956

;

:

are

a.->

ii>llo\\s:

Library: Home EcoLibrary is Cun-

\\'ing the

;


The Colonnade with

The Longwood

the Student Building in the background.

by his brother, the Reverend Lorenzo Lee, and later by

Lorenzo Coburn,

was mr.de

and he was succeeded by Benjamin

principal,

George La ^lonte, a graduate of Union College

Gould. in

In 1850 John B. Tinsley

a Northerner.

New York

Institute

Winchester,

in

Farmville

and former

joint principal of Valley

was the

principal

last

Female the

of

Female Seminary, which had an enrollment

of 94 students in 1859-60.

of

new

the

gospel,

and

College

Born

Female

and

the other stockholders in the Farmville

Seminary

Association,

school into a college.

holders secured Mr. five years of age, to

In the

decided

summer

to

expand

La Monte, an ambitious man twentymake the necessarv arrangements for

the addition of a curriculum at the college level

become the 1860, the

the

name

Female

first

president of the college.

charter of

the

the

of 1859 the stock-

was amended by the school

was chnncred

to

and

On May legislature

the

to

24,

and

Farmville

College.

Nearh' half of the members of the Board of Visitors

men

of the

day in

The college opened with a faculty of five, in addition La !Monte who taught Latin, higher mathematics, and Four members of the faculty had taught at literature. Female Seminary during

the Farmville

and the !Monte

fifth,

added

Arnaud the

to

Preot, as

staff

its

were limited to thirty in an

"Home

last year of

was a Frenchlinguist

a

At the beginning boarding students

pianist.

Optimistic in outlook, Mr. Ely, the president of the corporation,

were outstanding ministers of the

college

the remainder, prominent

to

existence,

Is

Street in Farmville.

Southside Virginia.

man La

A

House on High

President's

and

in the college

effort to give the

institution

and influence." Announcement for 1859-1860

The Annual Register and said, "The Pupils boarding

in this college, reside with the

family of the President, and

a

air

are under his guardianship.

In their evening studies they

will enjoy the benefit of his assistance

colleagues." liness

Thus was

and that of

his

atmosphere of friend-

which has characterized Longwood College through-

out the )'ears and

was

initiated the

is

as typical of the college today as

it

in the nineteenth century.

The

course

of

instruction

the intellectual, social,

was designed

and moral

faculties,

West Wing,

erectel

ministration of Dr.

to

"develop

and by im-

under the ad-

Jarman

in 1903.

Immediateh' adjacent, on the left, is Ruffner Hall, the administration building.

The

influence

sonian architecture classic

is

of Jeffer-

evident in the

beauty of this building.

Alumnae Magazine


Under

the

dome

of the

Rotunda

in

Ruffner Hall is the statue of Joan of Arc, patron saint of the college. Just inside the main entrance to the

Longwood campus,

this

also

As

its

focal point.

lobby

gathering place for students,

alumnae.

this is

most hallowed by

the spot perhaps its

is

a favorite

On

the three levels

within the Rotunda take place the traditional sings

when members

of

one class serenade those of another.

parting

a

thorough,

Christian education,

practical, fit

and

the pupil

charge of the responsible duties of phasis

vi'as

for

the

in the

faithful

dis-

scriptures,

Special

em-

life.''

placed on religious instruction, as the large

proportion of clergy on the Board of Visitors would indicate,

but the college did not become a church college until

some years

later.

The

students were permitted as they

are today to attend the churches of their

The Annual

Register and

evening for the reading and contemj)lation of the

and

accomplished,

own

Announcement

choice.

for

1859-60

and also

to sing

There were two academic departments preparatory and collegiate. legiate department,

ology,

the

philosophy.

history

The

of

France,

mental fac^s and truths of Christianity, and ... no pains

for the diploma,

Tabb

Hall, the

December, 1956

sophomore clormitory.

who did

botany, geology,

physi-

and Rome,

Greece

and

course of study led to a diploma con-

student

Sunday, the teachers and pupils will assemble for an hour

for the col-

chemistry,

ferring on the recipient the

Christian religion. ... In addition to public services on

the college:

of the fall session in 1860, included arithmetic, algebra,

geometry, astronomy,

a thorough and harmonious acquaintance with the funda-

impart a practical knowledge of the

in

The curriculum

which was started with the opening

said, ''The religious teachings of the college contemplate

will be spared to

sacred melodies."

not want to

title,

^listress of Art, but a

fuliill all of

and who embarked on

the requirements a

special course

of study, could obtain a certificate of proficiency.

There was a Literar^•

society in the college

Society,

]]v

which

])ulilished

jtininr .Ininiitory NNing

'-•!

a

known

Le Vert "The

as

newspaper,

L Mniiii:L;h,ini

1

l.ti

i


•1

An

1880

diploma from Farmville

was from the was operated by the

College. This diploma

^W

J-acitltti

of #armd!le C^!leE|c hare

,^trari.!eil

school

Mh

when

it

Methodist Church, with the Reverend Paul Whitehead, a IMethodist

-~>-.-^;^,lCY:)iTiyKMV. OK Pr()FIC!K\('Y

At

minister, as president.

the college, like

many

institutions in the South,

tim of the

difficult

War

this

time

educational

was a

vic-

times resulting from

Between the States and the

Reconstruction Era.

-s^si^

In the issue of December was printed which gives an insight

Laureola."

25,

phvsical

the

plant of the college at that time:

My

liberty

was received

letter

of

in

In regard

of the college:

—

entirely apart

from scenes of excitement.

Building Recitation

is

It

large,

is

in

an elevated part of the town.

The

rooms spacious and complete in

would know more lights,

to the location

even

for

boarders,

particularly, are neat

prettil\

furnished,

of

all

their

which vou

and comfortal)le,

provided

and almost everything conducive

and happiness

College

Diningroom, Parlors, Chapel, and

appointments; the rooms

nicely,

take the

I

answering some of your inquiries through

the columns of the Laureola.

A

due time and

with

fires,

to the health

Women

class in geograjili^- .a tlir State Xnniial >iliiii'l tor in 1921. As is obvious, middy blouses were an essential part of a student's wardrobe during the early 1920's.

10

and Postwar Depression

future of Farmville Female College in 1859,

to the

encountered

the

college

the

War Between

problems

faced

the

bv

b}'

York,

left

The

Preot.

local ministers

in

1861,

similar

La Monte, who was

the

a

native of

1862 and was succeeded

college survived the filled

to

and more firmly established

the college in

who

advent of

with the

difficulties

States

older

colleges in the South.

Xew

war with

the aid of

vacancies on the faculty.

In

1865 prospects of peace and prosperity prompted William P. Elam and other residents of Farmville to advertise in the

newspapers for stock

had been

during the war.

until

lost

when

1869,

of president,

end fames

of their occupants.

Difficulties

In spite of the extreme optimism of the stockholders as

Dear Cousin:

Your

Wartime

1861, a letter

into

S.

and he

W.

F.

in the college

which

Preot headed the college

Nottingham assumed the duties

in turn

was succeeded by

the Rever-

Crawlev.

The Arts and Crafts Club sometime between 1910 and 1920. The club was directed by Raymond ^^ Long, now Director of the State Department of Conservation and Development.

Alumnae Magazine


May Day

exercises for students of

Farmville

the

sometime

in

Training

School

As

the 1920's.

a lab-

oratory for practice teaching,

the

Farmville Elementary School, as it is now called, has been an important aspect of

campus

life.

from

serve

teachers

balcony,

the

attempt

youngsters

a

in

Here, as

members ob-

students and faculty

to

May Day

The post-war

student the

direct

pageant.

was

depression

in

Farmville area in the early 1870's, and July

1,

at a

1870, the stockholders decided to

property and after paying

off

proceeds amongst themselves.

swing

full

meeting held

sell

the debts, It

was not

the

in

the college

distribute until

the

several

years later that they found a buyer and on January IS,

1873, they sold the property to G.

M.

more gloomy, than

—

in fact not

economy later,

of the area continued to worsen, for

"Tobacco

is

This economic climate was not inducive

President.

of

in 1875

the sponsorship of the IMethodist Conference.

erend Mr. Whitehead,

when he turned ated

it

it

operated

a

college

over to Miss Fannie Carter,

as a girls' school

was during

the

for the next

under

The Revuntil

1882

who

oper-

two years.

This

decade when tobacco sales in Prince Edward

County were at an all time low. John C. Page of Red Bank, near Farmville, wrote, "The prospect was never

before.

sad financial

in a

condition."

of a girls' school, especially in a

by the Prince Edward County Circuit Court

is

Page wrote

known

lower than was ever

Consequently this portion of Virginia

Bickers and the

school was incorporated as the Farmville College

The

paying expenses."

fifty

Reverend Paul Whitehead, a Methodist minister became

The

portion of Virginia

at present, in this

one farmer in

women was

to the

support

day when the education

As

considered a luxury.

of public-spirited citizens of Farmville

a result, a aroup

made

a concerted

proposed normal school

effort to get the State to locate a

for the preparation of public school teachers in Farmville.

Public Education in Virginia Establishment

of

schools in Virginia vi-ood

Constitution

Thomas

Jefferson,

uniform

a

was

system

of

free

public

first

provided for by the Under-

of

1869.

Almost a century before,

in

1779, just

a

few years after he

Througli the years Longwood has maintained a position of leadership in tlie cultural life of the

community. townspeople ean

Here

Farmville

and watch a Shakespearplay being presented by the students

(Charles) Coburn Players

peared at the College each

from

December, 19S6

who apsummer

l')10 to lOJO.

11


system of public education in Virginia, no concrete achieve-

ments had been made along

this line.

In light of the new constitutional provision for public Legislature

the

education,

Superintendent of

State

first

William Henry

Dr.

elected

Ruffner of Lexington the

Public Instruction and this scholarly crusader drew up the plan for the establishment and operation of the public

During the twelve years from 1870

schools.

1882

to

he led a valiant fight to prevent the diversion of public school funds to other purposes, to create an atmosphere

and

acceptance of free schools,

of

in

main detriments Student parlors are attractively furnished. This one Hall, the sophomore dormitory.

is

^

in

Tabb

schools

He was

into

successful

undertakings but he found one of the

of these

all

get

to

operation in every county in Virginia.

improvement of public education

to the

an adequate supply of capable

in Virginia to be the lack of

teachers.

This was a problem that had plagued Virginia since wrote the Declaration of Independence, had introduced in the ^'irginia Legislature

"A

Diffusion of Knowledge."

Jefferson believed the people

were capable of decisions s\'stem

bill for the

government and would make wise

self

provided they understood

was devised

iMore General

to enable

essarv understanding.

them

the to

issues,

and

his

achieve the nec-

Virginia did not accept Jefferson's

plan because of the social and educational traditions inherited from

and not were

England

—

for the masses.

made from time

to

that education

was

it

for the elite

its

earliest

days as a commonwealth, and ironically

as evident today as

it

has been

At various times Dr. Ruffner to

at

any time in our

tried to get the Legislature

appropriate funds to establish a normal school,

man

the

responsible

normal school

in

is

history.

for the

but

establishment of the

final

Farmville was Dr. Jabez L. ]\Ionroe

Curry, eminent statesman, educator, preacher, orator, and author. States

Dr. Curry was a member of both the United and Confederate Congresses and was Minister to

Thus, although several moves

Spain under President Cleveland.

time to establish an adequate

Howard

Alabama

College in

He was

in 1866-67

Richmond College

dent of the Board of Trustees of

of the

tion

Peabody Fund the

in

for

Curry was appointed Field Agent

Dr.

years.

thirteen

President of

and was Presi-

promotion of public educa-

for the

and held that position

South in 1881

was

twenty-two years.

It

agent of the Slater

Fund

in

this

capacity and

for the education of the

that he used his boundless energy

for

an Negro as

and compelling oratory

to arouse the public to the need of universal education as

He was the inspiration Negro and white normal schools

propounded by Horace Mann.

for the establishment of in twelve states.

Dr. Curry wrote the

lishment

first

teachers

of

the

bill for the estab-

normal school for white female

passed by the Virginia Legislature in

March

1884, two years after the retirement of Dr. Ruft'ner as State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

The The

act of

of the State

vided

that

State Female

Normal School

1884 made provision for the establishment

Female Nomial School the

property

of

deeded to the State of Virginia.

in

Farmville, pro-

Farmville

the

College

be

Accordingly the Rever-

end Whitehead deeded the property of the Farmville College to the town of Farmville on April 7, and on the same date the town of Farmville deeded ginia.

On

it

to the State of Vir-

April 9 the Board of Trustees held

its

first

meeting in Richmond and elected Dr. Ruffner principal or president of the college

Board The 12

first

faculty of the State

Female Normal School

in 1884.

of Trustees.

Abingdon was

and Dr. Curry president of the

Dr. John L. Buchanan, LL.D., of

elected

vice-president

of the

Board and

Alumnae Mag.^zine


Longwood

The

Library,

College

completed in 1939, is one of the more imposing structures on camIt houses more than 74,000 pus. books and many periodicals. Exhipaintings and other forms on loan from the ^'irginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, of

bits

of art,

are displayed periodically in the Library. Also located in the Li-

brary are the audio-visual

offices

and equipment, which include a bureau of teaching materials and a regional film library.

Judge

Nathaniel

Francis

Watkins,

teacher,

of Farmville was

ratus,

could foresee

elected treasurer-secretary.

Although in

added

Legislature

the

March had appropriated

$5,000 to be used for the tablishment school,

the

of

a

funds, and

it

in

normal

school

Trustees

of

The

until

The

Board

date

six

the opening

set

weeks

later

Dr. William

State

Henrv Ruffner

schools,

be far

to get the school

specifically

trained

for

and wide

to obtain

a

Normal School opened

thereby

profession,

on October 30.

October 30, to

guide

it

work,"

their

faculty of the

at

1884,

Farmville

at

the

an eminent

with

in its initial

Dr. Ruffner later said

li^ J

raising

the

standards

and affording women

and continu-

of

the

teaching

an oppor-

in Virginia

(The

tunity for higher learning at a state institution.

Normal School was learning for

women

the

first

institution

state

establi.-hed

in

Virginia.)

of higher

By

this

time Dr. Ruffner had assembled a faculty of eight, in-

cluding himself,

]

been defeated before

work

ing mission of providing trained teachers for the public

when the Board gave the order on September 17, "All that we had then was a principal, an appropriation, a rough scheme, and an old academy building. Not a

W

set to

believed that "instructors in a normal

group of educators

that

L

man would have

appointed time on

ordered

the school to be opened.

should

human mind

high calibre that he desired.

September 17, 1884, that the

Board

He

and he sought

getting the

was not

.

.

be done than any

the building had to be repaired and

lesser

in operation.

es-

and $10,000 a year dela)'

.

A

to."

to

he started, but Dr. Ruffner

for operating expenses, there

was

nor a book, nor a piece of furniture or appa-

and more things

to

instruct

the

1 1 1

girls

who "came

'H

r 111'^'^

_J

_

'

"'^'"^

1

ffiir

1

iOii

pi Pi

The

interior of the

December, 1956

Longwood

College Library.

Dr. John .Atkinson Cunningham

Dr. Robert Frazer

13


Student teaching in the Farmville Elementary Schoo-l.

rushing in

upon us

witli

The

laughing faces."

their

following year, the catalog listed:

One

"121 students, including

88 state students, 30 pay students, and three ministers'

Of

daughters." said,

"We

have been

our students. cheerful.

the original student laody, Dr.

As

Many

culture. ...

a

of

.

.

.

actualh' availalile the

body they are

bright, intelligent, literary

and

and

social

of our students have had experience

he planned

tary course

17 or 18 years." of

of

two years

duration, which prepared teachers for the primarv grades

through the high school

level.

According

the school offered in the advanced course:

to the catalog,

During Dr. Cunningham's administration enrollment increased from

and his greatest

interest

He

velop the mind. as

much on

her

described

the history of education.

professional

training

Students in both courses

by

observing

teaching

methods and by practice teaching in the Model School operated on the campus. .\11 of these subjects were not

The 14

dining room at

Longwood

College.

as,

school

to the

was

and de-

by placing each student

resources as possible without deny-

and

her

to

One

her parents.

method

his

of

develo]:nng

of his

mind

the

"Socratic with additions of his own," and said, "I

realize

ure

to

of ten years,

but his real

250,

to

to build character

built character

own

duty

Q,i

contril)Ution

His ambition was

teaching.

ing his

received

obstacles to get the

president in 1887.

teachers

and

all

Normal School running smoothly, he turned it over to Dr. John Atkinson Cunningham, who succeeded him as

English, Latin,

physics, zoology, botany, history, arts, philosophy,

what Dr.

soon as funds for expansion were

to offer as

algebra, trigonometry, analytical geometry, geology, chemistry,

Longwood.

}ear, but they were

After Dr. Ruffner surmounted

the

two courses, an elemen-

and an advanced course, each

at

secured.

as teachers, and some of them have reached middle age.

The average age is, I think, The curriculum consisted

first

rooms

Ruffner Ijelieved student teachers should master, and what

fortunate in the character of

them have had good

A number

Ruffner

of the attractive dorniitorv

any

due

to

efficiency

him."

I

have as a teacher

He

inspired

both

is

in large

the

meas-

faculty

and

students to greater learning and such effective teaching

methods that A. D. Ma\o, of the United States Bureau

A

scene in the snack bar at Longwood.

Alumx.^e Magazine


Jarman

Named

completed

Hall,

for Dr. Joseph L.

in

1951.

Jarman,

president of the college for 44 years, the building contains an auditorium

seating

Longwood

persons.

1,235

Players productions are held here as well as numerous other college and professional performances. tion to an auditorium,

In addi-

Jarman Hall

also houses music practice rooms,

a listening room for recorded music, and a library of recordings and music.

Education gave the teacher

of

trainiiii,'

the

at

Normal

Dr. Jarman expanded the state institution from a normal school into a four-year accredited college conferring

Curry

both the B.A. and B.S. degrees in the liberal arts as well

School the highest commendation.

Upon

the death of Dr.

Cuningham

in 1897, Dr.

secured Dr. Robert Fruzer as the third president of the

Normal great

Known

School.

Dr.

integrity.

panded

the

school

and in functions. cation and

a

as a

Frazer,

man

of broad culture

and

on becoming ])resident, ex-

in

numbers of students and faculty

He

established a department of edu-

department of physical culture, and also

organized the Virginia

Normal League.

In

Frazer resigned as president to become the

1902,

Dr.

agent of

field

the General Education Board.

in

1930, the

In

1902,

Dr.

in

the Twentieth Century

and educational

out his 44 years as president of

A

scene from a

circles

Longwood

Longwood Players production

in

inaugurated an honors course

inaugurated in a Virginia state

One magazine

said this of the college,

commending being

among

the very its

Ijest

and most carefully conducted

kind and as one after which similar

no matter where located might profitably model. its courses are modern and thoroughly up-to-the-

moment". physical plant which accom-

He

gr()Ui> of

through-

of Jeft'ersonian architecture

which

Jarman

Dr.

student body of more than

College.

Hall.

An

imposing buildings

at times

1,000.

interior scene uf LonguocKl's

Jarman

December, 1956

"The American

the State Teachers College at Farmville as

Jarman enlarged the modated 300 students to a

vital factor in the public school system of Virginia.

active in church, civic,

lie

Educational Review- (of Philadelphia) takes pleasure in

All of

Joseph L. Jarman became the fourth

to

Both the faculty and students of the college

college.

Southern schools of

president of the state school, which was by that time a

was

first

received national recognition.

schools,

Expansion

He

as degrees in education.

\\'hen

has housed a Dr. Jarman

modern auditorium

in

Hall.

IS


House, which contained an auditorium with a seating capacity of 730, the Rotunda, and East

Wing were

built.

The

House on High Street, which had formerly been Dr. Cunningham's private residence, was purchased in 1908, and the Infirmary and Elementary School were conPresident's

structed in 1912.

were

first

made

Plans for a student

in 1911,

building

activities

and the building was

finally

com-

pleted in 1924 with $50,000 appropriated for that purpose state and $100,000 donated by students, faculty, alumnae and other friends of the college. This proved

by the

to

be one of the most popular projects ever initiated on

As

the campus.

the Student Building

pletion in 1923, the college suffered

when

was nearing com-

its

first

major

fire,

Wing, which contained the dining hall, However, it was kitchen, and 40 bedrooms, burned. rebuilt within a year. The junior dormitory of Cunning-

ham to

the South

Hall was constructed in 1928

at a cost of

$125,000

provide space for 136 girls and relieve the crowded

conditions on the campus.

Also in 1928, the college pur-

chased 103 -acre Longwood Estate, a part of a tract of

land thought

The traditiiinal senior capiiing ccrcnioiiy at Lonuw Here Dr. Dabiiey S. Lancaster, president from 1940

I

College. to 1955.

"caps" a senior.

wood

have contained 20,000 acres when

to

granted by the

Crown

to Peter

Johnston in 1765.

home

Estate was later the

of

and

in 1S14,

was

Long-

General Joseph E.

The

Johnston, the Confederate military figure.

house burned

it

original

the present house built in the

following year was repaired in 1929 for use as a recrea-

The Library was completed

tion center.

arrived

on

the

campus

in

the senior

wing of Cunningham Hall

in

1939, and

in 1940.

1902, he found there Ruffner

Hall with the

many

Fleming

served

as

classroom

a

of

its

House,

wings,

which

and

dormitor_v

building,

and

small science building.

a

In

1903, the Fleming House was torn down,

was erected Dr. Joseph L. Jarnian

A\'est

Wing

at the west

end of

and

Ruffner Hall. In 1905, White

Foreign language students use records and tape recordings to improve their pronunciation.

16

At the same time that the campus was being enlarged, the college

was undergoing -other changes.

In 1914 the

name of the institution was changed from Normal School to the State Normal School

the

Female

for

Women

and the Board of Trustees was replaced by the State

Normal School Board this school

established to direct the affairs of

and the female normal schools established

Harrisonburg

in 1909,

at

Fredericksburg in 1911, and Rad-

The state did not provide a liberal arts women until 1932, when the school in Fred-

ford in 1912. college for

.Actual practice on

modern

office

machines

is

possible in business

education classes at Longwood.

Alumnae

Mag.\zine


converted to jNIary Washington

ericksburg was

school became the

College

In 1924, the Farmville

of the University of Virginia.

College at Farmville

State Teachers

under the Board of Virginia Teachers Colleges, and in 1929 the college was placed directly under the jurisdiction of the State

A

Board of Education. achievements during

of Dr. Jarman's tangible

list

44 years as president cannot begin

to

portray his

vast influence over thousands of Virginians

who passed

his

through the portals of the college or his service to educaDr.

in Virginia.

tion

Simpkins, Professor

Francis B.

History at Longwood, wrote of Dr.

of

months before he

retired in

"This love and reverence

Jarman

a

few

1946:

Jarman)

(of Dr.

of the rare personality he possesses.

is

the fruit

Handsome

of coun-

tenance and possessed of a winsome smile, he inspires without sacrifice of dignity.

friendliness

man

of profound piety

behavior of others.

.

.

.

.

he

yet

He

.

.

is

.

.

.

He

is

a

quite tolerant of the

has kept

(the

it

college)

Stevens Hall, the science building, was constructed during Dr. Lancaster's administration. In addition to the various science laboratories, it houses a science museum and equipment for the recording of weather conditions.

devoted to the task of training teachers while other institutions founded for the

same purpose have been diverted

other educational activities

to

...

he has fostered an

atmosphere of gentility and good breeding often associated

entire

walk

.

He

.

he

feels that

is

training citizens, wives and mothers,

Upon

retirement of Dr. selected

of

Jarman, the State Board of

Dabney Stewart Lancaster as He had been, since 1941, State

Dr.

president of the college.

Superintendent

Public

Instruction

in

Virginia,

Dr. as the

Lancaster,

two most

endeavor, tion

to

both

Longwood as president in 1946. who rates teaching and the ministry

a prominent

is

at

the

Episcopal Church. as

and far-reaching

effective

Chairman

and

school

He

influential leader in educa-

and

college

of the State Council of

and

in

the

in

Higher Education. Virginia

the exception of twelve years

the University of

level

recently began a four year term

Higher Standards With

fields of public

Alabama, Dr. Lancaster has spent

his

many wood campus.

action scene of hockey, one of the

sports on the

Long-

of

that

the

graduates

will

"the educated man."

human

welfare depends on the kind of

become educated men depends largely

Lancaster worked ceaselessly to raise the standards of the teaching profession.

During

the period

from 1941

to 1946,

when Dr. Lan-

caster served as State Superintendent of Public Instruction,

he insisted on far more adequate appropriations by had been forthcom-

the state for the public schools than ing,

.^fter the

Denny Commission urged

semblv provided the funds.

As head

critical

and

abilitv.

shortage

in

One was

1947 which

of

qualified

-As-

of the state teachers

college in Farmville, Dr. Lancaster did

the

appropriations

Dr. Lancaster's proposal, the General

in line with

much

teachers

to alleviate

of

character

of his most far-reaching improvements a selective

admissions program

set

up

raised the level of mental ability of the

entire student body.

Lcngwood's admissions program

is

agreement with the philosophy of Thomas Jefferson

ForTual affairs such as the Junior social

December, 1956

standards of the public

so

on the quality of the public schools and teachers. Dr.

in

An

manner

in the college

on the faculty of

the

students leaving our schools, and that in turn the ability

and

hence repeated Dr. Ruffner's route of a generation before

when he came

in the

raise

Virginia

of

of these students to

as well as teachers."

Education

system

Believing that

with the aristocratic tradition of an old Commonwealth. .

trying to

life

school

Dance are important

to caminis

life.

17 '\.


Stmlents

who

in tlie

believed that,

capable

those

of

Ha

biology laboratory in Stevens

after

a

A

period of education for

further education

should

be

During

encouraged, and helped to continue.

administration

all,

major

selected,

his

was strengthened so that 30 per cent members now hold doctorates and no permanent member holds less than a master's degree. A graduate program was added and other curricula expanded so that Longwood now confers 12 degrees, nine of which are in education, two in the liberal arts, and one in medical technolog}-. The first master's degree was conferred in the summer of 1956. The college was ap])roved by the American Association of University Women in 195,5. istration the faculty

its

name once more,

obtaining the

The omission more

in

of the

request.

include

enlarged

area

of

three

of

building;

science

the

new

Lancaster submitted plans for further ex-

to

the

library,

The plans

business education

a

now

being constructed, a

house,

and

classroom

a

Dr. Lancaster retired in July 1955.

Succeeding Dr. Lancaster as president of the college was Dr.

this

Francis

G. Lankford,

teaching of mathematics.

Jr.,

noted

on the

authorit)'

Dr. Lankford holds the B.S.

degree from Randolph-Macon College and M.S. and Ph.D.

He

degrees from the L^niversity of Virginia.

academic

post-doctoral at the

])lant

Dr.

additions

Ijuilding.

activities.

Expjansion of the jihvsical

Hall,

building, a dormitory building

new name from Longwood Estate. ''teachers" made the new name the

Stevens

home economics demonstration

word

keeping with

buildings:

construction

the

pansion for the six years ending in 1962.

time from the State Teachers College to Longw'ood College,

included

Jarman Hall.

in

Jarman Hall, the auditorium and music building; and Tabb Hall, the sophomore dormitory built to replace the At the Governor's \Miite House which burned in 1949.

admin-

of the

In 1949 the college changed

music lesson on the four-manual pipe organ

during Dr. Lancaster's

work

University of Michigan, and

Beta Kapjia.

He began

is

a

member

his teaching career as

".-\lice in

a

Land

sented before the

her

court

theater at

Day

1955.

in

the

of Phi

an instruc-

Wonder"

pre-

May Uueen

and

of

outdoor amphi-

Longwood

To

has done

Board Fellow

as a General Education

Estate,

May

the right, Alice stands

between the gryphon and the mock turtle.

The May Day Festival, held is more elaborate than

every spring,

are the usual

May Day

festivities

and attracts thousands of visitors each year.

it.fl»

18

*a.-J.I...^

' X-ij.

4sC2ili«*!dB. *kti<-.-.i..^-«

Alumnae M.\gazine


h The academic ation

day

Longwood

at

1^

h

procession on gradu-

Longwood

College.

confers twelve degrees,

nine of which are in education, in the liberal arts,

and one

in

two

medi-

cal technology.

tor at

Randolph-lMacon College

Since that time

in 1927.

he has been principal of the Heathsville High School, director of research for the at the University of

Richmond City

Longwood

Upon assuming

Schools, taught

Michigan, Harvard University, the

he believed

matics at the University of Virginia for 24 years except

the

As

director of

educational

his duties, Dr.

Lankford expressed pro-

found respect for the calling of teaching.

University of Texas, and has been a professor of mathe-

for brief leaves of absence.

well ([ualified to head a college so closely tied

public school system of Virginia.

to the

Longwood

future of Virginia

He

stated that

to be a type of institution vital to

and that he expects

emjihasis on the preparation of teachers.

He

to

found

research at the University of Virginia, in addition to his

college

teaching duties, he served as a consultant for both city

group of alumnae with extraordinary affection

and county schools two-year

research

all

over Virginia,

project

on

and completed a

experimental

teaching arithmetic in elementarv schools.

methods of

He came

to

Longwood's executive leadership since 19U2. Over the mantle is a portrait of Dr. J. L. Jarnian, president from 1902 to 1946. To the left is Dr. Francis G. Lankford, who came to Longwood in Tuly 1955. To the right is Dr. Dabney S. Lancaster, president from 1946 to 1955.

tvv'o

things for wliich he

Alma Mater and tude,

fine

s|iirit.

a student

at the

especially grateful

:

a

for their

body with "a wholesome

and sense of loyalty unmatched

atti-

an}--

where."

A

Joan of Arc presented to the Joan Alpha Kappa Gamma by Sculptrcs.s Anna Hyatt HunIt stands in the tington and her husband. Milton Huntington. colonnade leading from Rnffner Hall to the Student Building. This honorary leadership fraternity was founded at Longwood hidii/c ei|uestrian statue of

Chapter

oi

in

December, 1956

is

continue

1928.

19


—

A

Student Body of High Calibre students are motivated by a tradition of cooperation, leadership, and loyalty as old

Longwood friendliness,

as the college

For

itself.

this spirit

two student organ-

Government

izations are largely responsible: the Student

Association and Alpha

Kappa Gamma,

the honorary lead-

In 1930 "The Virginian," the college yearbook, aptly

"To

our

live

at

life

make and

to leave

Farmville a

for

this

the

and for

this

to

best,

its

grow

into wider

accept the pervasive college spirit, little

we found

stronger than

honor system came into being

The

Student Government exists."

the

Joan of Arc,

for

its

Joan Chapter by the well-known sculptress, Anna Hyatt Huntington and her husband, Milton Huntington,

the Student Building.

The Rotunda, which

re-

the s}Tnbol of

is

college since

it

to

became a

Above the

to her. is

This statue serves

Alma Mater means dome of the Rotunda

statue in the

whose philosophies

a painting of four great educators

has grown with the vears, and received more and more

ferson,

During the nine years of Dr.

activities.

Lancaster's tenure, he never reversed a decision of the

bols of rest, recreation, study,

Longwood of

its

wider scope in another area, the

May

Student Council assumed the management of the

Day

Festival in 1955 for the

TKÂť

J^^^ JI^^BL

Longwood

theater on

'~

outdoor amphi-

natural

the

p

'

extrava-

ganza, presented each year in

-^^^^^ jSt

This

time.

first

known

far

is

tivities

and

May Day

attracts

fes-

thousands

The

each year.

visitors

students write, enact and di-

drama

a

rect

dance Miss Louise Clifton Walton, of Lynchburg made history when she received a M.A. Degree in Education at the end of the 195o summer This was the first session.

the ]\Iay

tion

Week

Master's Degree conferred by

the

fall

Longwood

of

perform-

Pole dance before

Queen and her

at the

many

organizations

the best

known

operate

of these

is

the

With-

Government Association

on the campus.

Probably

"Longwood Players."

Virginia.

ville,

Gamma's

Its

is

a group of buildings in

Farm-

graduates have carried Alpha

Kappa

charm and beauty on a

campus

fifteen-acre

motto, "Service through leadership," into every

state in the nation

and

into

many

foreign countries

.

.

.

wherever they make their homes.

BIBLIOGRAPHY A A

History of Prince Edzvard County by H. Clarence Bradshaw History of Education in Virginia, by Cornelius J. Heatwole The Beginnings of Public Education in Virginia, 1776-1860, by

A.

J.

Morrison

in J'irginia Before the Cii'il War, by William Arthur Maddox The Church, the State, and Education in J'irginia, by Sadie Bell

The Free School Idea

Secondary Education nott

in

J'irginia, 1845-1870,

by John

W.

Boit-

(unpublished dissertation in library of University of

Secondary Education

Bowman

from Shakespearian plays

in

J'irginia, 1870-1886,

by Raymond P. G.

(unpublished dissertation in library of L^niversity

of Virginia)

Development J.

A

of Public Schools in

L. Blair

Public Education Jl'ho's JJ'ho in

J'irginia, 1607-1952,

by Dr.

Buck

Documentary History Volume Y, by Edgar in

of Education in the Soutli Before 1S60, \\'.

Knight

the South,

by Edgar

W. Knight

Farmville Portraits, by Francis B. Simkins (un-

published, in

This

drama group has presented outstanding productions over a long period of years, ranging

of

Handbook",

initiates projects in con-

of the Student

men and women

Virginia)

publishes

nection with special events such as Founders Day.

framework

and meditation.

a proficient faculty of 75

whose home during the school year

opening of

semester,

"Student

and

W.

also

takes charge of the Orienta-

the

Jef-

and an enthusiastic student body of 900 young women

court.

The Student Council

College.

in the

and

song

in addition to

May

ing a

is

more elaborate

than the usual

of

Thomas

Curry, and Dr.

to the students as the

"^

Dell,

Estate,

M.

Between the portraits of the men are sym-

H. Ruffner.

Council.

As an example

L.

J.

1884, con-

her

all that

Horace Mann, Dr.

Col-

attended the

state institution in

Joan of Arc.

remind each student of

Longwood

women who have

lege to each of the 23,000

contributed to the founding of the college:

its

at

bronze equestrian statue of Joan of Arc presented to

governing body of the Student Government Association,

freedom in

chapter

patron saint.

the

tains a second statue of

it

1910)

(in

and the range of the Student Council, the

sponsibility

A

The

national organization.

Longwood was named

Government Associa-

stated the purpose of the Student

freedom, to

and since that time has been ex-

service

a

into

stands in the colonnade leading from Ruffner Hall to

ership fraternity on the campus.

tion:

womanly

for

panded

Longwood College

Martins Gaceteer, 1836 Richmond Enquirer, January

10,

library)

18oo

;

February

14,

1835;

May

20, 1835

to

"Dark

of the

Moon," a drama

sented last spring. is

^Much of the

in song

and dance pre-

social life of the students

The

Virginian, 1909

Minutes of Boards of Trustees, Longwood College, 1884-1914

centered in the eight national sororities, four of which Presidents'

were founded on the Longwood campus 1897, Sigma Sigma Sigma and Zeta

and Alpha Sigma Alpha at

20

:

Kappa Delta

Tau Alpha

in

in 1898,

in 1901.

The Joan Chapter of Alpha Kappa Gamma was founded Longwood in 1928 as an honorary leadership fraternity

Annual Reports, Longwood College, 1884-1914

Annual Announcement and Register, Farmville Female

College,

1859-1860 Letters from John C.

The

Page

of

Clay Bank

Chivalric Side of General Grant by son,

Harpers

Mary Lynn William-

JJ'eckly, July 10, 1909

AlUMN.AE M.4GAZINE


NEWS OF THE FACULTY AND COLLEGE by Helen Draper This past year Longwood's faculty members have con-

whose work was shown

at the

Virginia

Museum

of Fine

speeches

Richmond this fall. Dr. John W. Molnar was Guest Conductor of the .A.1IState High School Band in Charlottesville. His recent

vice-

publications include "Choral Library Procedures" in the

president of the council in charge of the college section of

Educational Music Magazine, Nov.-Dec, 1955, and ".An

tinued publishing numerous articles, attending conventions

and conferences, delivering

lectures

and making

before countless groups.

Our

president. Dr. Francis G. Lankford, Jr.,

is

the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

He

attended the organization's annual meeting in Milwaukee, Wis.,

in

.^pril,

and was chairman of

the planning

committee for the August meeting. Dr. R. C. Simonini,

Jr.,

Approach

and Mr. Foster B. Gresham,

many educa-

David Wiley was director of the stage settings for drama "The Eleventh Hour", which was given in Staunton this summer commemorating the one!Mr.

hundredth anniversary of Woodrow Wilson's

An

1956; and "Those European

Bulletin.

Dr. Francis B. Simkins presided at the annual dinner of the 21st meeting of the Southern Historical Association

at

birth.

also delivered the Stevens Lectures at

State College,

and the Walter L. Fleming Lec-

Louisiana State University.

He

has prepared

which

for publication a seventh-grade history of Virginia

article written

was

It

entitled "Students Direct

Team

Mr. Gresham serves as editor of the Virginia English

Memphis

The

Journal of Health, Physical Education and Recreation.

Dr. Simonini,

Schools" in the Virginia Journal of Education, Sept., 1955.

tures

Class," in

articles published,

States Informative Service,

He

in

Universities of Italy" in the United

department chairman, has had several

Memphis.

of Violin

by Mrs. Emily K. Landrum of the physical education department appeared in the National

tion groups on topics related to their fields.

at

Teaching

to the

Instrumentalist, Feb., 1956.

the historical

of the English department, have addressed

among them "The

Arts in

Their

Own

Learning in

Sports.''

members spent

Several faculty

summer

the

studying.

Mrs. Mildred Davis attended the Bread Loaf School of English, in Middlebury, Vermont. Miss Annie Lee Ross studied at the Colorado Springs Fine .Arts Center.

Emily Barksdale journeyed

to

Mexico

City,

Miss

where she took

several classes at the Universidad Nacional de ^Mexico,

Mrs. Kathleen G. Cover

Chapel

at

Hill,

N. C.

is

on leave of absence studying

Mrs. Cover

is

the recipient of a

has been accepted by the Virginia State Textbook Com-

grant from the Southern Fellowship Foundation, an agency

mission for the public schools.

of the Southern Universities, Inc., for the year 1956-57.

M. Johnson was

Dr. Edgar

elected first vice-president

of the Virginia Congress of Parents and Teachers for a

He was

three-year term.

Board

to

having served in in the

also reappointed to the Advisory

Student Cooperative Associations for Virginia, this capacity since 1946.

Foreign Youth

Forum

in

ginia Conference preliminary to

He

participated

Richmond and the \\rthe White House Con-

ference on Education.

Dr. IMarvin

W.

Schlegel, professor of History,

and Dr.

Other faculty members spent the summer traveling. Miss ]Mary Nichols toured in Europe with a National Council of English Teachers party. ger

made

Miss Elizabeth Bur-

a 'round-the-world trip as a conclusion to her

activities at the fifth triennial conference of the Interna-

tional Federation of in

Women's Hockey

Sydney, Australia, in June.

Associations, held

Miss Burger was the

umpire-manager of the U. S. Woman's Hockey Team. Former members of Longwood's faculty and stafi" are

Our former

Dorothy B. Schlegel, of the English department, have

also in the news.

given numerous illustrated lectures on

Lancaster, has been called to more and higher service.

fifteen

all

phases of their

months' study and travel in Europe.

Dr. ^Marvin

Schlegel participated in a program to evaluate development

Society,

Association

of

attended

the

annual meeting of the

American Geographers, held

at

McGill

Longwood's professors have been outstanding

Wide acclaim was

in

by the National Symphony Orchestra

after

Jarman Hall winning the

Orchestra's 25th Anniversary Composition Contest.

compositions.

won

the

given Dr. Walter Hartley's com-

position "Concert Overture", performed in

Hartley has

Dr.

recognition on a national scale for his Miss Janice Lemen is one of six Virginians

December, 1956

Roy

Jesson,

now

a member of the music department Richmond, returned to Longwood on

several occasions to present

Dr. Malcolm

torium. at

programs in Jarman .Audi-

Graham

is

teaching mathematics

East Carolina College, Greenville, N. C.

Miss Nancy

Chambers, former Assistant Dean of W'omen, received

University, Montreal, Canada.

arts.

S.

Higher Education by the 1956 General Assembly. Dr.

of the University of

Dr. Charles F. Lane, president of the Virginia Geographical

Dabney

In .August he was named chairman of the State Council of

of social science teaching in Virginia, planned by the Vir-

ginia Social Science Associaton.

president. Dr.

M..\.

June.

in

a

Library Science from Columbia University in

Mrs. Vera Baron Remsburg, formerly of our science

summer W. T. Hodges (Nan

department, received a scholarship for

study in

science at Harvard.

Powell),

Mrs.

former English instructor, resigned as principal of Stuart

Hall

after serving twelve years,

and

is

living in Williams-

{Coiitiinicd on l^agc 30)

21


ALUMNAE SECRETARY THREE OTHERS RETIRE Ruth Harding Covnkr Beginning and bringing

4.

Ruth Harding Co\ner,

for the past eighteen years the

devoted and beloved Secretary of the Association of Alum-

nae of Lnngwood College 1,

from that post on July

retired

1956.

was then Farmville State Teachers College. After receiving the "Full Diploma" (with all the rights, privileges and responsibilities ap])ertaining thereto) she taught neurh both elementary and high schools in Susse.x

all subjects in

County,

Norfolk and

in

Alma Mater, in Charlotte

the Training

in

School at her

in addition to serving as school supervisor

M. Boyd

Co}-ner,

Professor

of

Psycholug}-

State

at

Teachers' College, had taught Ruth Harding and several years after her graduation gave evidence of his excellent

judgment by asking her

many

Coyner's

become his wife.

to

friends feel

Coyners" charming

Longwood

offer.

home has been alumnae,

students,

Professor

she too showed

that

judgment when she accepted his

for

annual alumnae fund. Establishing the college snack bar and soda foun-

tain which have ])roved to be great assets to the college.

sound

At any rate the

a center of hospitality

faculty,

and

friends

became

it

8.

Preparing a biographical

9.

Founding

the

Alumnae

members

to the college.

Serving as advisor

11.

DuPont

cipients of

Among

her accomplishments

as

Alum-

should

Ije

mentioned these:

New

alumnae chapters located

York,

Washington on the north

Philadelphia, to

Baltimore

in

and

Atlanta in the south; from

Accomac on the Eastern Shore and from the "Northern Neck" in the east to Blacksburg in the western part of Virginia. 2.

taries

The inaugurating (in

of a system of electing class secre-

the .senior class)

for sending in

news

for the

magazine. 3.

Publishing a handbook for the guidance of local

alumnae chapters. 22

girls

who were

re-

and enthusiastic labors

will testify gladly to her untiring for the Association

But

is

it

mind and

and

for the College.

of interest to record the qualities of heart

and

enable Ruth Coyner

and

spirit that

of

all

assist in

work

those

who came

for the college.

in

combined

girls

and

to

contact with

her to

and

sincerity, all

develop in her an almost uncanny ability to faces

and

details about

Longwood

their careers.

All w'ho loved

ant".

to inspire

Personal charm, friendli-

ness, interest in the interests of others,

and

Establishing eighteen

many

to the

were

portraits

office.

Those distinguished alumnae who have served as Presi-

remember names and

Ruth Coyner has made an outstanding record

from

Nine such

dents of the Association while Ruth Coyner was secretary

in September.

1.

of alumnae.

Scholarships.

many years. The Coyner's son, Boyd, Jr., has made a splendid record at Hampden-Sydney and at the University of Virginia and became a professor of histor}- at Southwestern at Memphis

centers

file

Council.

Encouraging the giving of portraits of former fac-

10.

ulty

project

a reality.

endiuse

for

nae Secretary.

Alumnae House

Starting and nurturing the

7.

until

presented during Mrs. Coyner's term of

County.

Jarman Organ.

Establishing the class agent system for raising the

5.

6.

Hailing from Emporia, Ruth Harding attended what

a successful conclusion

to

the raising of funds for the purchase of the

Longwood

join in saying,

We

salute

Ruth Harding Coyner

"Well done, good and faithful serv-

shall all miss her but

wish for her and hers

happiness and contentment in the years ahead. Virginia McLean Pharr became the Alumnae Secretary when Ruth Coyner retired. She received her B.A. degree from Longwood in 1952, and lives with her husband, James Macon Pharr, Jr., and two small children in Farmville.

Miss Lucile Jennings is now serving as hostess in the Alumnae House where she warml}^ welcomes visitors each afternoon.

Miss Virgilia Bugg,

retired registrar,

is

the

very able assistant to the secretary.

Alumnae Magazine


Miss Nancy Foster

Miss Nancy Foster

June

retired

6,

both facult}' and students

tirement,

In her re-

1956.

who knew

Miss Foster stuck

to the job with a

relentless fervor that pulled man}- a student of to that

freshman

passing grade so coveted even by the

Her course in the novel was a anywhere. As literary adviser

weakest of them.

worthy of note

will

Independent, self-sacrificing, schol-

realize a severe loss. arly, witty, fearless.

English up

her

caliber to

The

Virginian and the College Catalogue, she served with the

same pains-taking devotion dren's Literature", her

work was noteworthv.

to

w-ere

Now

services.

prettiest streets in

logue pamphlet put

she has returned

America," as one trave-

nice to

It is

it.

know

that

Miss Foster

will fall

back in that old aristocratic

sprang.

Doubtless she will continue to study, for by nature

she

is

Being able

a student.

circle

from which she

to take off a

hearing aid

It

in August, 1956.

present she

hard

to think of the college it

it,

seems.

without Miss Bugg,

But

is

it

Longwood

she laughingly says.

in

Mrs. Cynthia

August.

that her share of

Z.

Green

what had

"Virgilia

to

do more

Not only

to be done.

will

she be missed at the College, but in the town, and in

tlie

Episcopal Church.

In the future her time will be divided among her

Hampton, her two daughters

in

sister

Richmond, and a daugh-

Lynchburg.

MISS MINER RETIRES FROM ALUMNAE SERVICE

I.

Bugg

retired

from the

staff

She had been identified with Longwood first

as a

pupil in the Training

Mary Clay

Hiner, able assistant in the

Alumnae Asso-

ciation Office for the past nine years, retired

position in Julv.

After a brief but successful teaching period

Roanoke City

Schools, she

came back

to

Alma Mater

as assistant registrar under Miss Jennie Tabb.

In 1934,

deared herself a friend.

Association

paid a deserved tribute

to

of

Collegiate

her work

as secretary of the organization,

and by inviting her

to

lay

then

to

this

work.

Registrars

has

many alumnae

both as a teacher and as

Alma Mater, and devoted her mind and and

to the College, its students,

as vice-president

tion until her retirement in 1947.

its

Hiner has given of herself untiringly

alumnae

heart steadily in that posi-

Since that time. Miss in the

Alumnae work,

keeping in touch with the Alumnae, and serving the Asso-

annual meetings.

While her work always came

her

to

In 1Q21 she became a Professor of English in

electing her first

speak on the programs of their

from

the time she entered as a student in 1902; she has en-

she was appointed registrar, and for 22 years she has loyall}-

from that

Miss Hiner's connection with the Col-

lege has extended over a period of fifty-four years,

given herself wholeheartedly and

first

with her,

former

students will recall with pleasure her interest in extra-

December, 1956

from

retired

She was ever ready

School, then as a student in college, graduating with the

Virginia

pleasant

After eight years of faithful, efficient service in several different capacities,

class of 1913.

The

officer

College have more like her.

from early childhood,

in the

an

is

know that she is still in Farmville, at her home on High Street, and she is continuing her loyal and faithful service to her Alma Mater, working in the Alumnae Oflice.

years of service in the registrar's office of

Miss

is

such a veritable part of

Registrar Leaves Staff the college,

M

in that organization.

ter in

many

the College,

in the ^^'oman's Auxiliary.

reading mystery

After

most enthusiastic "rooters" for the home team,

was sponsor of the Choral Club. and to the church, she has given her life. For some time she was a member of the choir of Johns Memorial Church, and she has alwavs been active

To

in

stories,

the

or years, also, she

and thereby shutting out distracting noises gives her an good chance for undisturbed study and for

especially

May Longwood

She and Miss Brownie Taliaferro

always on the front seats at the basketball gamei,

among

Greenwood, Mississippi, where she owns a lovely home

on '"one of the

Mrs. Cynthia Green

to

For twenty-nine years Virginia has had the benefit of

Miss Foster's scholarly

BUGG

I.

curricular activities.

that has served as class-room

Likewise as co-author of a "Syllabus on Chil-

teacher.

ViRGILIA

ciation with the

same devotion which was so

characteristic

of her service to the College.

23


)))

:

Alumnae Have

Home

On Campus by Dorothy Diehl

Who

A

Here?

lung time ago, Geu. irant. and maybe even night an alumna visiting the campus slept in the Booker bed now in the Alumnae House.

Slept

Gen. Lee

— but

<

last

"The

finest and most beautiful building on the Camwas the praise given your Alumnae House by Dr.

pus,''

William Thorpe of Princeton University during

Longwood

at

house

is

He

as a visiting professor.

also said, ''The

2

chairs

The woodwork,

paneling, chair rails and

Dr. Thorpe

is

Many

you

of

should really come back and

visit

all

— Beautiful

and dining room

Sterling silver

—bought by the

Asso-

Office

bread tray,

of the

chairs for the hall

1

crystal

for

the

hall

the

Class of '54. 7

—The

—a

memorial

to

Miss Minnie Rice

given by Miss Rice's niece, Lucy Rice English '07 and her

not,

The

chairs

chair.

pieces of furniture are a sofa, a large what-

including a gentlemen's chair and a ladies'

The

portrait

of

Mahood, formerly hung in the parlor.

24

server, 2

1

tray,

and a

bon-bon dishes,

—designed

decorated "Iron Stone" platter

and

—given by Kate

She also gave money for a fireplace

set

of

etc.

Pottery and ilower bowl

)

—given by Mary Powers

'04.

Chinese embroidered linen tea cloth and napkins

13)

—given

1

fruit basket.

b}-

Maude

Two

14)

President

—Dr.

Foster Gill '01.

tea towels

and a book belonging

William Henry Ruffner

to

—given

our

first

by the

Lexington Chapter.

parlor

has been furnished with Miss Rice's antique furniture

family.

2

Kearney

the

6

A

of "26.

the

beautiful

'09.

andirons,

of

table

11)

Perry

of

the

A

sandwich

1

—given by Class —given by Virginia

hand painted tray painted by Myrtle Dunton Curtis '16.

'23.

'04.

10)

by

pieces of silver

1/2 dozen teaspoons,

stairs,

of

5

silver candelabras

The following Nelson Hinnan '06 9)

the

in

given by Mar)' B. Nichols

Two

8)

'11.

N. C, Chapter.

the Raleigh,

made was because

—given by Ada Bierbower '03.

7

and

by Miss

—given by Mary E. Peck — given by Emily Johnson —engraved cookie plate—given

Flat silver

— A Colonial rocker now Alumnae — A framed copy "I Am The Nation" —given by Eva Hendricks Warren 4 — A framed facsimile copy Declaration Independence — given by Coca-Cola Bottling Company Farmville. —A Colonial card and two given by Lynchburg Chapter. —A chandelier —given by 2

antique silver ladle

Flat silver

so far, are:

—given

ladle belonged to her great grandmother.

5)

ciation.

3

The 6)

Alumnae House,

Chapter.

punch bowd and cups

last

soft green carpets for the hall

the office, parlor,

Phyfe, double pedestal, table and six

then and you

Alumnae.

Gifts and purchases for the 1

Alumnae

An

4)

again this year to see

progress that has been

of the generosit}- of you, the

it

has been made in furnish-

for yourself the progress that

ing the house

to visiting

visited

Crystal

by

Lila and Willie London.

'13.

The Alumnae House was open Founders Day.

A Duncan

—given

"14.

—given by the Washington

3)

an authority on architecture and head of the American Civilization Program.

room

a very large lo^•ely cr}-stal chandelier

Maria Bristow Starke

of the Federalist style of

w-ainscoting in the house are wonderful."

for the dining

1

example

a very fine

architecture.

his stay

S

Miss Rice, painted by Julia

in the Library,

is

over the mantel

9

—The Lancaster Bedroom Antique bed — given by Nellie Preston match antique bed) Reproduction bed House Fund. drawers — bought by '99.

1

(to

2)

and

the

chest of

10— Blue Room 1

)

Completely

furniture

furnished

—bought by

the

in

Alumnae

reproduction

Sheraton

Association.

(Continued on page 30)

Alumnae Magazine


CLASS REUNIONS— FOUNDERS DAY Sydnor were

Members of each class Longwood for a reunion and one reunions

The

Day, 1956.

won

v^-ere

are invited to be guests of

every five years.

The

six

no idea," he

a real success on Founder's

who

I

enthusiastic degree Class of 1926

Jarman Cup for the largest percentage of Which of the Sevens or Twos will win 1957? Your classmates will be looking for

learned to read from her class book."

Cox and Jean Boatwright were present. There were few of us present in the flesh, but many

were here in regret

Trevvett was here for the 65 th an-

Lucy Irvine Irvine

niversary of the Class of 1891.

a letter of greeting, "I shall be thinking of you on

Day," she wrote, "in gratitude

Mel Holland Jones

for the

nie

dear by-gone days."

1896 was here, and

of the Class of

There were two members

Rosalie Bland sent greetings.

from the Class of 1901

— Alice Atkinson

Hunt Armistead.

sent

Founders

Szanto and Fan-

All of these were honored guests

luncheon meeting.

at the

CLASS OF

evidenced through the

as

spirit

letters

of

which make up a large pwrtion of the book of memby Emily Johnson and helpers and pre-

ories prepared

All die earlier classes were represented at the reunion

Maude

Susie Robin-

Lettie

vou on March, 23, 1957!

celebrations.

"I had

"of having mother come without me,

said,

son Turner, Rebekah Peck, Lucy Steptoe, Selina Hindle,

the

in

Just to see Pearl Boyer Stevens recalls

there.

the story her son gave us at our previous reunion.

attendance. it

1956

sented to the Millidge boys on Founders

There were

Day Assembly.

from Louise Ford Waller, loved president; Carrie Hunter Willis, Claire Gilliam Simpson, Merletters

McDonald

tie

John, Archie Blain Campbell, Sarah Stuart

Wrenn Parham, Ruth and Blanche Shepard, May Langslow Menin, Martha Smith Reed and Sue Groves, Effie

Booker Cook. page,

There was one

ABSENTEES;

upon our enchanted would impose this

blot

as chronicler I

sentence: five years of regret for the oft'ense to

change

it

"present" in 1961.

to

them a reunion of as

I

think

and a pledge we can prom-

1906-1956—That's a long time, but when one has passed through that number of years hapThe 12 members, pily occupied, the time seems short.

the Millidge boys have already told us several times that

out of a possible 40, of the Class of 1906 present showed

not to get an invitation.

1906.

was the

in their faces that such

case.

What

a good time

Beginning on Friday evening a class dinner arranged

Howard

Bess

in the

Tea Room with

How

Jenrette as toastmistress.

our eyes

room was something new. Longwood today is not the small normal school we knew in 1906; we were overjoyed at the changes which have been made. Those present were Merle Abbitt Kirk, Louise Adams Armstrong, Steptoe Campbell Wood, Carrie Dungan, Henrietta C. Dunlap, Margaret Parish Thomas, Susan Ford popped because

a tea

Dickinson, Bess

Ada May Smith

liams, drey.

Howard

Jenrette,

CLASS OF

Virginia

Clark, Iva Pearle

—Henrietta C. Dunlap,

Nunn

Vaughan Chil-

Backward, turn backward— and the

1911.

or,

so said

Judge Stanley

Millidge, elder son of our beloved Class Sponsor! ing him, "Farmville

not

Florida.

Wil-

reporter.

amazing thing actually happened

is

Quot-

the land of the 'Fountain of Youth',

Yesterday,

in

Florida,

we were

the

old

Millidge men; today, in Farmville we are the Millidge boys again!"

Carrie Sutherlin, our beloved sponsor by

adoption, in her graciousness stretched the welcome all

the

way from

the

campus

to

great, or greater

the only thing that will keep

CLASS OF

— Irma Phillips

None

1916.

mat

110 Appomattox Street

Douglas sent a greeting being able

to the six

tis,

Ellen

CLASS OF wrote every

of the diploma class inviting

their 35th reunion, but only a

December, 1956

few were able

them

to

to attend.

Carolyn herself could not leave her mother, who has a heart condition.

gave a

Elizabeth

warm welcome

Moring Smith,

to the four

the president,

who came:

Claudine

Moring Hardaway, Lucille Chappell Jones, Beth Gannaway, and Sara Anderson Putnam.

DEGREE CLASS OF

1926.

The

highlight of the 30th

reunion of the class was the breakfast given by

Ann Smith

Longwood House on Saturday morning. Honored guests were Colonel Greene and Ann, Ann's husband and daughter, and Dr. W. D. Bowman, Olive Smith's husband. Another high moment came at dinner that evening in the College dining room, when Greene, beloved president, at

the loving cup

was awarded

to the class for the highest

Twice previously the class has Those present were Elise Anderson

Gladys Moses McAllister,

and Lucy Leake

her regrets

Carolyn Harrell, class secretary,

1921.

member

acted as class leader in the absence of all class officers.

Violet Marshall Miller

who came and

Goodwin Skinker, Olivia Newbill, and Thelma

received this award.

Goggin Rode', Penelope White West and Mary Allen

1916

Virginia Watkins

Parker Babb.

Emily, who is the cornerstone of our Washington Alumnae Chapter, mothered the idea of having the ]Millidge boys with us to its happy culmination. She also

Shaw McCue,

of the officers of the

be with them.

to

percentage of attendance.

Sallie

will be

Wallace.

Those present were Louise Bunch, Lelia Carter Thomas, Myrtle Dunton Curat not

where she hospitably shared with us her charming apartment.

magnitude, for

them from attending

Class could be present for the reunion.

the fiftieth anniversary class had!

by Carrie Dungan was enjoyed

ise

Cram, Laura Andersoti Moss, Gertrude Quinn Thomas,

Mamie Daniel

Barbee, Lucille Wright Eberwine, Ida Hill,

Mae

Marshall Edward, Cora

Helen Meeks Anthony, Sue Virginia Puckett Lush, Florence Riss Richardson, Ann Smith Greene, and Kate G. 25


Trent.

was

It

a

pleasure to have two of the associate

members present at the luncheon meeting. win and Margaret Barrett Knowles.

DIPLOM.-\ CL.\SS

OF

by Mr. T. A. McCorkle, McCorkle.

their

.\t

Mary Banks

in the

Robinson Simkins, Dorothy Rollins Pauly, and Elizabeth

CLASS OF

Chap-

Miss Burger and

celebrate.

F!ar

Mary Ouriis

Martin,

the

After

class.

" '46'" to her

CLASS OF

There were

1931.

\\"hile there

no

is

number

a goodly

of the

record of their

official

Betty we can be sure they had a good time Anderson Swope, Mabel Barksdale Xorris, Edith Coleman meetings,

;

Ann Drew, Elizabeth ButMabel Gregory Craig, Emilie Holladav, .Adele

Anderson, Annie Denit Darst, ton Lewis,

Hutchinson

\\'atkins, Olive Her,

Elizabeth Levick Beck-

ham, Lena Ma}ion Milam, Florence Moore Crothers,

-\llie

Oliver Baker, Rena Robertson, Frances Elizabeth Stephen-

son Kitchen and Evelyn West Allen.

CLASS OF

For those of us of

19.^6.

reunion in March, those few hours, all the

way back

The chant delicious ''I

I

it

was

''a

memorable

'36 who jumped Longwood for a

occasion.''

we crowded reminiscences to 19,i6.

and then

Into

that took us

filled in the years since.

unison as we i^arted on Sunday after a

in

breakfast

together

at

Longwood House, was

wouldn't have missed this for the world; I'm so glad

camel"

permanent

We

elected

secretary,

Helen Boswell Ames

along with me.

Our

to serve last

as

meeting

closed with the presentation of a beautiful engraved silver

tray to

grams

Miss Bedford our beloved honorary member. Teleof greetings for the class were received

from \\'innie

Frances Eubank and ISIary Robeson Pendleton; a special delivery letter

came from ^Margaret Clarke Hanger. Those

present were:

^Margaret Aldredge, Mattie Louise Bailey

Elam, Xancy Lee Bland Richardson, Helen Bosicell Ames,

Dorothy Deans

Alma

Elliott

Bohannon.

Evelyn

Dickerson

banquet on

the

Farrar Baab, Margaret Ferguson Motley, Ruth Gleaves.

Goggin Rode', Amanda Gray, Bessie Hart Payne, .Agnes Bondura)it Marcuson, K;!therine Harvey Xewmrn, Dora Parker Horton, Jeannette Jones Spivey, Dorothy Sallie

all

Saturday night our

of her

Red and Whites

Dove

I

dry your tears and plan

Ann

Mar\-

Esther Shevick, Caroh'n Babbitt Jones,

Mae

Jane Paulctt Taylor,

Ruby

Cardwell Coates,

Shirley Cruser AMiite.

Spradlin,

^Nlary

us,

which follows,

Those present were:

15th.

^^'aldron,

Keeton,

at the list

Xow

heart will ache.

attend our

to

of

We

hospitalitv.

you who were unable to be with

and when we take a glance

know }our

and

us by

to

^^e had a delightful evening chatting

home,

truly missed those of

E.

Lucille

Rosa Bell Sizemore, Katherine Allen, Mar-

Bell Barnes,

Harvie Cardwell, !Minnie Lee Grumpier Burger,

Louise Blane, Margaret Heuiett Moore, Glenn terson

Ann

Pat-

Marsh, Virginia Treakle Marshburn, Eleanor Bisese

Johnson, Frances Lee Stoneburner. Katherine Wright Sal-

mon,

]\Iargaret Orange, Dorothy Winslow Cole, Ruth Brooks Soyers, Dorothy Overcash, Anne Summers Lump-

Virginia

kin,

Shackelford Mclntyre,

scn. Mar}-

Mount-

Elizabeth

Rose Haivthorne L}le, Page Cook Ax-

castle L}le, ^Minnie

Ann Loving

.\rbo, Lois

Lloyd Sheppard Lewis.

Lorene Thomas Clarke, Jackie Parden Kilby, Mary Ellen

Xancy

Chapman,

Petty Peebles

McCauley

Gregorv,

Beverlv

Margaret Mclntyre Davis, .\nn Martin

Kell}',

Kinsey, Jane Philhower Young, Lillian Elliott Bondurant,

Lucie

McKenry

Baldi,

— Eleanor

dent (Bessy requests that each Virginia Treakle (Mrs. E.

Bisese Johnson, presi-

member

of the class send

W. Marshburn) Box

89.

An-

nandale, Va., a small donation to help with corresponding expenses.)

Frazier.

Anderson, ISIaude Duck Gwaltney, Margaret

and able

were surprised

I

and enjoying !Miss Burger's generous

garet

the hurdles of a busy life to get back to

a gala affair with

deeply touched with the gorgeous corsages sent

gracious advisor invited

Carhart, Margaret Petty Hinton.

class present.

The luncheon was

1946.

the Class of '46 almost 70 strong ready, willing to

Snack

Fretwell, Eloise

^'iola

'Moyer Scorgie, Virginia Richards Dofflemyer, Margaret

was welcomed

honorary member, and Mrs.

their

East Hayden,

Lillian

Bald-

West.

class

luncheon meeting

were these members: pell,

The

1926.

— Cassie

CL.A.SS

OF

1951.

how much 1906 who were

ing

jSIost of

last.

made and

it

This was our

meant

it

back,

I

first

reunion, but see-

members of the Class of know we will not let this be our to the

us could only be there for one day, but

in time

to

!Mrs. Brumfield.

—mostly

we

have lunch in the '"Rec" with Dr.

We

had fun passing pictures around

— some

McXaniee Ford, Evelyn Massey Coleman, Oliva Xewbill, Martha Nottingham Rice. Claudine O'Brien, Margaret

ture

Pollard Flippen, Mrs. X'ora B. Rawlinson, Susie Robin-

garet Robertson !Milroy, Frances Everett Brown, Shirley

son Turner, Edith Sanford Bland, Florence Sanford Lyne.

June Divers, Jean Cunningham Wilson, Iris Sutphin Wall, Betty Jones, Mary Jane Sta^isbury Peake, Jeanne Farmer Agee, Charlotte King Jones, Fran Harper,

Lelia Sanford

Shumate, Marcia H. Tick, Lottie ]Yest

McAnnally, and Ruby Blanton Wilkinson.

— "Tac" Waters

Mapp.

CLASS OF 194L

returning

of our classmates" children

Green and White's we hope.

On hand

were:

fu-

INIar-

Bloxton,

Georgia

The 14

members of the 15th reunion class were welcomed by their class man. Mr. French, and they had a great day together. They were Lou Anna Blanton X'ewton, Katherine Brewer Carter, Ruth Bryant Willis, Florence B. Brooks, Anne Cocks Vaughan, Rosa Courter Smith, Thelma Courtney Scott, Carolyn Ford Carter, Harriette Haskins Euljank. lean 26

the table

Bailey

Mason, Helen Smith

!Massie,

Frances

Cregar Thompson, Jimmy Thompson, Elsie Hauiey Burkholder, Grace

Thompson,

Jett Carter Groves,

Betsv Grave-

Peg Perry Yost, Bobbie Pollard \\"renn, Betty McRee Hodges, Dot Dunford, Katherine Terry, Ann Lynch Milly,

ler,

Patty Walker, X^^ncy Gillie

DesPortes,

Shirley

Blankenship,

x^nne

Kemp

Gravely,

presi-

Shelton,

— Betsy

dent.

Alumn.^e M.ag.azine


!

ALUMNAE CHAPTER and the executive board were

All chapter presidents

invited to the inauguration of Dr. Francis G. Lankford on

December

and the annual

12,

Council was omitted. council

siastic

We

chapter

the

made on

re])orts

excellent.

were proud of the splendid cooperation Longwood

Alumnae gave to

Despite the absence of this enthu-

beginning,

Founders Day were

meeting of the Alumnae

fall

to the effort of the Virginia State College

publicize the needs of higher education

Our alumnae held dinner meetings

for our

in

Virginia.

new

president,

Dr. Lankford, before most of the meetings of the state-

supported

colleges

Winchester,

Most of Alumnae Chapters !

in these cities

PETERSBURG— This

chapter had the distinction of

having Dr. Lankford for his

Room

Fiesta

on

a

a

to

work

fine

Longwood

Nan

of

for lunch in

Seuuird

Whitmore's

October 22. 1955, for a reorganizational

Margaret Simkins and Ruth Coyner were also

Much

new chapter

enthusiasm was shown for

Reames

:

there,

and

president, Frances Bell

Rosemary Elatn Pritchard;

Pritchett; vice-president,

Sylvia

was

the old Farmville spirit

the following officers were elected

retary,

visit

first

Through the alumnae met

present at this meeting.

and

Picardat;

sec-

Jean

treasurer,

was decided

from

this

to

award

a SI

In

area next year.

00 scholarship .\pril,

a

Nan Seward Brown. and about

number

of high

fifteen

home

of

new students entered Longwood in

the

fall.

— Sylvia

Picardat, secretary.

annual meeting was held in

February, when dues were collected and a gift was sent

Much

on Founders Day.

interest

was shown

meeting which Ruth Coyner might attend.

The

was

to contact

.\

in a spring

1956 reso-

each alumnae in this scattered area.

president attended the inauguration of Dr. Lankford.

—Pauline

Lanjord Stoner, president.

WINCHESTER— About Longwood attended

the

thirty

there.

110 registered from various places in Virginia.

spon-

money

sored a movie in the fall to raise

We

of this project

are offering two scholarships of $200 each to

girls in

1956-57.

Rose Smith, Elizabeth

Gills,

Richmond and Loulie

The

the girls.

select

she represented this

We

chapter at Dr. Lankford's inauguration.

Room

\\'e

our scholar-

for

Edna BoUck Dabney was chairman

ship.

financed a

Richmond Longwood to entertain prospective students fromthis area. The board, consisting of the officers and forty phoning chairmen, met in my home on February 25. Thirty were present \\'e made our annual contribution on Founders Day. Rosemary Howell and Nora Jones Cul-

party at the Clover

Club

in

December

for the

of

!

peper were in charge of plans for the annual spring lunch-

eon which was held

at the Ginter Park Methodist Church. Margaret Simkins, Dean Ruth Gleaves, and Olive Her

Our two

were our Farmville guests.

scholarships were

Ann Herring

presented to Jane Catherine Crawford and

Ruckman

at this time.

—Rosa

PORTSMOUTH—We

Courier Smith, president.

have not had

a

great deal of

organizational work but our teacher-alumnae have

many

contacts for good prospective students,

^^'e

made

have a

main

social

event of the year,

At our

ing for the state-supported college afterwards.

spring meeting the folowing officers were elected Jessie

Pickett

Snapp Fawcett;

Carter;

secretary,

Mary William

bution was sent on Founders

presi-

:

Betty

Jean

Calvert

Ho-

vice-president,

hannes; and treasurer, Betty Davis Edwards.

December, 1956

Portsmouth Chapter, or become a part of the Norfolk area

We made

group.

our annual contribution on Founders

—^Margaret Johnston, F.A.RMVILLE —This chapter

president. is

aiding two

A

contri-

Dav and Dorothy Overcash

Longwood

College girls this session, one with a loan from the Chapter

Loan Fund and the other with a scholarship from the Mary White Cox Scholarship Fund. From the annual $100 on Foun-

The fall meeting of the chapter was a tea given at Longwood House to honor Dr. and Mrs. Francis 115 members attended. G. Lankford, Jr. The spring meeting, our first meeting in the Alumnae House, was ders Day.

a program meeting with Dr. Lankford as speaker.

chapter members were hostesses coffee

Winchester Alumnae of

which was a dinner at the Country Club to honor Dr. and Mrs. Dabney S. Lancaster, who were attending the meet-

dent,

Ruth Coyner and many Longwood Faculty were

benefit card party the chapter contributed

PHILADELPHL\ —The

lution

October.

Both the Lankfords and the Lancasters were present, also

Day.

This was a most successful occa-

from the Petersburg-Hopewell area

Reames

student

to a

school seniors were entertained at a coffee in the

sion

alumnae attending

for

committee working on whether we shall revitalize our own

Pritchett. It

was given

when

the credit goes to the presidents of our

meeting.

tea

the Virginia Education Association meeting in

to

other of the state college alumnae or alumni

fifty

RICHMOND — A

Shore compose the committee

At most of these

Stine Cahill,

yjresident.

president enjoyed a lovely day

places:

meetings there were more Longwood Alumnae than any

Brown, about

—Martha

represent us then.

Staunton,

following

Lynchburg, Roanoke, and Wytheville.

Alumnae Chapter.

to

Richmond, Hampton, Norfolk,

the

at

Alexandria,

ACTIVITIES

was chosen

for

the

Local

Founders Day

hour given as the opening event in the .\luninae

House.

We

aided in securing rooms in town for visiting

Alumnae on Founders Day and

also participated in the

inauguration ceremonies held by the College in December for Dr. Lankford's installation.

the

Mary White Cox

officers

Blanton

for

this

year

Hanbur\-;

Pettigrew,

Mary

Jo Dearing was awarded

Scholarship for the year. are:

The new

vice-president,

Jennie

Mamie Wade Richardson Lancaster, Jane Hob-

other

Rives

first

vice-presidents,

son Chappell; and Florence Riss Richardson, treasurer.

—Mary Nichols,

president.

27


SUFFOLK-NANSEMOND—Much enthusiasm for our Alma Mater was shown

We

Longwood.

Evelyn Traylor Macon, chairman be commended for her fine

of the student committee,

and

Peanut City Inn the following

Longwood came and talked with the girls who had expressed a preference for Longwood. Three groups of these girls were sent by the alumnae for weekend visits to Longwood. Dr. Lankford gave an outline of his plans for Longwood and Mrs. Coyner brought us

were elected: president, Lucille Garden Scott; vice-

up-to-date on the progress of the alumnae at a dinner

our fall meeting.

at

written invitations to every senior girl in the Suffolk

Nansemond County high schools, and had a large number of them present. Our guest speaker, Norman O. Myers, associate professor

business education at Longwood,

of

showed lovely colored ner meeting on officers

in attending

sent

March

6, at

Moore;

president, Margaret Hewlett

Ward;

Sheffield

At our din-

slides of the College.

Nimmo

Valla

treasurer,

Margaret

secretary,

Stallings;

re-

Anne Palmer Runnels was Our chapter Alumnae Fund on Founders Day, at

Lula Windley Hart.

porter,

job on this.

In the

High

C. Glass

to E.

to

is

Dr. Boggs from

fall.

School,

given before the Alumni Rally.

The

Rucker, represented the chapter

at

president, Corinne

the inauguration of

Dr. Lankford and on Founders Day.

Five meetings were

chairman of the nominating committee.

held during the year in homes of members.

contributed to the

Day

which time Lucille Wright Eberwine was our representative.

—Madeline Gary Brown, president.

WASHINGTON— All We

Alumnae House.

Before college opened last

of furnishing the dining room.

we

fall,

Cottage would be our

are working very hard on our project

Longwood from

entertained the freshmen entering

I.

On

pective students were invited.

nae and

Students and pros-

Lee Potter in Arlington.

October 10, the alum-

their friends gathered at Hecht's Arlington store

Auditorium

for

a

Our

show.

dessert-fashion

guest

of

honor at a small dinner party at the Old Club Restaurant in Alexandria on October 19

who was

ford, Jr.,

State

supported

Mann, Delegate

in

to the Virginia

Among

area.

this

House

dent, Josephine Snead; recording secretary, C\&o

Coleman; corresponding

and

members present brought a gift which was one-dollar, and many who were unable to attend

sold for sent con-

Kennedy, Emily Johnson, and

tributions.

Jessie Brett

Mary Anna

Mottley Stapf motored to Farmville for the

During

and

the

Christmas

Longwood

students

prosjjective students at a tea in her Arlington

home.

In February, a business luncheon was held at Olmsted's

Restaurant in Washington, and plans were bridge benefit and bazaar on

March

23.

We

made

for a

sent a check

In the lovely new home of Hoge we met for a tea in May. Dr. and Mrs. Lankford and Ruth Coyner were our guests. for

$106 on Founders Day.

Joyce Townsend

An

orchid and a gift were presented to Ruth Coyner, our

retiring

alumnae

secretary.

—Mary

Anna Mottle v

Stapf,

president.

September

nae gave a picnic supper

at

new

10, 1955, several

Gladys Griffin

Timberlake

to

meet the older students from this area.

28

was

to

for the

students going to

interest outstanding

alum-

Jeter's cottage

at

project

treasurer, Elizabeth Ballagh.

Reynolds

Theresa Evans Craft;

—Corinne Rucker,

pres-

ident.

LEXINGTON— The

William Henry Ruffner Chapter

County and Lexington sent greetings and a contribution on Founders Day. Two gifts, both belongof Rockbridge

ing to our to

the

first

College

president, Dr. Ruffner, were also presented

—namely,

two towels marked "W.H.R."

and a book, "Bee Culture".

Several Rockbridge County

seniors have visited

ments made us

Longwood Our major

high school students

realize that

he

is

continuing the fine work

done by Dr. Jarman and Dr. Lancaster.

—Henrietta

C.

Dunlap, president.

NORFOLK—The Norfolk Chapter has monthly lunchfirst Saturday of each month. When H. Wamsley and Mar}' Clay Hiner were in Norfolk last

eon meetings on the J.

October serving on the President's Panel on the needs of the state supported colleges,

we entertained them with

dinner prior to the meeting which was well attended

members

Our

also attended the panel at

Granby High

;

a

most

School.

school had one of the largest groups at the meeting,

Eva McKenny Guynn, our Lankford and Mary Oivens Carhart was our Founders Day representative. The Christmas luncheon to entertain students now in Longwood and prospective students was quite

having about forty present.

president, represented us at the inauguration of Dr.

a success.

To

increase our scholarship fund, a series of

subscription bridge parties was planned.

fund sponsors two

girls

Our

scholarship

from our local high schools.

Dr.

Lankford, Ruth Coyner and Virginia Wall were our guests at the

LYNCHBURG— On

secretary,

first

vice-presi-

Dr. Lankford's enthusiasm in Longwood's future improve-

of Burgesses,

six

Inauguration of Dr. Lankford.

Layne Shearer; second

was

alumni of the

those present were:

holidays, Emily Johnson entertained

meeting the following of-

Mr. Harrison

Emily Johnson, Jessie Brett Kenned)', Mary Anna Mottley Stapf, and Sarah Mapp Messick and her husband. We had a luncheon and gift sale meeting at O'Donell's Restaurant in downtown Washington in December. Each of the twentyalso our guest.

May

Longwood in the past 3'ear. The high day of the chapter was the luncheon in February when Dr. and Mrs. Lankford, and Ruth Coyner visited us.

was Dr. Francis G. Lank-

there for the meeting of

Colleges

At the

were elected: president, Lettie Cox Laughon:

vice-president, Louise

the Washington area at an outdoor supper in the garden of Mrs.

Our Founders

a table and two chairs for the hall of the

is

Alumnae House. ficers

of us in the chapter were de-

lighted to hear that the Duvall

gift

annual spring luncheon

Yacht Club

in

Guynn, presided

at the

Norfolk County and

Our president, Eva McKenny and Jean Hogge Shackelford was in

April.

charge of general arrangements.

—Peggy White,

secretary.

HAMPTON—The an's

Hampton Chapter met at the WomClub on November 1, 1951. The president, Jacqueline

Alumnae

M.agazine


Cock Ferraro presided and Nancy Louise Bush headed the committee on arrangements. About fifty were present. In-

are planning a meeting in the early

PENINSULA—The

cluded in this number were several Peninsula Chapter

Guests from Longwood were Dr. Lankford,

members.

H. Wamsley, and Mary Clay Hiner.

J.

gave

a delightful talk,

Alumnae House,

RALEIGH, size,

Longwood House,

the Slater System,

— Jacqueline Cock

Dr. Lankford

about the progress on the

telling

Ferraro, president.

X. C.

—Our

Longwood

chapter, while

everything in connection with Longwood.

when Ruth Coyner was Coyner with a

On

gift of loyalty.

Tena Ferguson Burden and

27,

sent as our Founders

Day

Eastman Nickels

Claire

Alumnae House, and our

and coming year are:

engraved

check, the yearly

Our officers for Eastman Nickels,

Claire

Lucy Manson Sharpe,

We

in early June.

gift a sterling silver

quota contribution to the Association.

president;

iMrs.

the night of February

home

entertained the chapter at her

the past

from the

Virginia Baskerville Ligon

entertained at Claire's home.

dish for the

small in

chapter

Nena

vice-president;

to enter

and Elizabeth Walkup,

historian.

— Claire Eastman

five

at

our annual spring lunch-

At the same time we had the senior Peninsula high schools

Longwood

who

girls

are planning

and presented The Jarman

in the fall,

Memorial Scholarship of $100 to !Miss Jane Denton, of Warwick. The money for our scholarship was raised through a combined card party and Fashion Show in February. We made a loan from our Student Loan Fund, and to help rebuild the

fund our chapter sponsored the Hygeia

Skating Rink each Saturday morning.

been a good

)-ear

Mary Ann King

are

We

feel

it

has

under the leadership of Hilda Abernathy

The

Jackson, our president.

other officers for next year

Barrett,

Elsie

vice-president;

first

Wente, second vice-president; Wilma Salmon Robinson,

and Mary Helmer,

secretary;

ham,

treasurer.

—Patsy Dale Bar-

secretary.

The following

Lochridge Sexton, secretary; Tena Ferguson Burden, treasurer;

the

we entertained with an who were at home Dr. and Mrs. Lankford and Dr. and

for the holiday.

keep the

to publicize

started

new Long^vood

Christmastime

At

is

Last Novem-

Chapter

informal tea for the Longwood students

to

and we presented

in Raleigh,

Alumnae.

eon in May.

Brewer Carter entertained the

Catherine

ber,

it

is

burning in our midst and

fires

Peninsula

year's activities with a buffet supper for

Mrs. Schlegel were our guests

big in spirit; and our main aim

is

etc.

—Nancy Pierpont

fall.

Mountcastle, president.

during the year:

chapters have responded at least once Bristol, Va.-Tenn., Culpeper, Tazewell,

Appomattox, Gloucester, Martinsville, Roanoke, Staunton,

Nickels, president.

GREENSBORO,

N.

C—Last October 18, Ruth Coyner

Warrenton and Pulaski.

and Celeste Richardson Blanton attended a dinner meeting of the Greensboro

Alumnae Chapter

at the

DANVILLE CHAPTER ORGANIZES

Starmount

An

Forest Country Club, with 22 former graduates attending.

Longwood assistant dean women, entertained them overnight. Odell Smith, the president, was toastmaster. We elected the following new

ber

enthusiastic chapter beginning

8,

Virginia Potts Redhead, former

was made on Novem-

1956 when over thirty Danville alumnae gathered

in the Averett

Auditorium

for

an organizational meeting.

of

Virginia Pharr and Virginia Wall went from Farmville to

officers: president,

treasurer, Elise

Turner Franklin.

Coyner attended "College Day"

The following day Ruth at the senior

were elected

senior girls from Greensboro

showed

a real interest in attending

high school.

a contribution on

Founders Day.

and Guilford County Longwood.

We

send

—Frances Millikan Ader-

Office

in the county

Longwood

among

who have

the members.

letters

from

The young

ladies

indicated an interest in attending

are being contacted personally.

attended Founders Day. in our beautiful

We

feel that a

The

president

graduate teaching

new George Wythe High School would

be a great help in stimulating interest in the college.

Mary Lu Campbell Graham,

BALTIMORE—Due

secretary.

and

illness

The Balch

son,

'47,

Ruth Coyner was scheduled

We

to attend this

meet-

much our former fine secretarj', Esther Atkinson Jerome, who moved to Arlington. Our former president, Isabel Williamson Hoyt, has a new baby. We ing.

miss very

December, 1956

Lou

Slides

Beall Wilson Memorial

Fund

for the

purchase

Longwood College by Violetta Sprigg Wilmemory of her father. Balch Beall W'ilson

in

was the son '62,

who

of Captain

at

the

James Eveleth AMlson, West Point,

Battle of Antietam

brother, an officer in the Confederate

fought against his

Army.

Balch Beall

Wilson was born on June 26, 1873 in the Casement at Ft. Monroe, Virginia, w'here Jeft'erson Davis was kept a \'ioletta

celled.

Helen Wentz Forbecker.

established at

and death of our

chapter president's mother, our annual meeting was can-

historian,

of library books in the field of Virginia history has been

prisoner. to the

;

Memorial Fund Established

cooperated with the other state-

do not meet regularly, but we circulate

Alumnae

meeting, and the following officers Marian Heard vice-president, Lee

was planned.

supported colleges when they met here last November.

the

first

president,

of the College were shown, and a meeting for February

hold, president.

WYTHEVILLE—We

:

Robertson; secretary, Clare Davis; treasurer, Betty Jefferson;

Many

We

help out at this

Frances Millikan Aderhold; secretary-

in

He

died on December 3, 1945.

Sprigg Wilson,

her father's honor,

is

who has established the Fund now librarian at the John W.

Daniel Elementary School in New-port News.

The Balch Beall Wilson Memorial Fund is similar Goldman Memorial Fund, established in 1948 by

to the

{Continued on page 30)

29


)

MEMORIAL FUND ESTABLISHED

Antique clock

3) 11

(Continued from payc 29)

—Lee Room

—given by Bessie Carter Taylor

'04.

Furnished in memory of Jessie Whitmore Booker '04

Goldman, alumna sustained by gifts of money

It is

of

Idea

Francis

be

on commemorative Such a memorial fund

who can

Dr. Beverley Ruffin,

—antique

furniture

Booker

Lamb

12—Pink

Hall

riet

to the Librarian of the college,

up by writing

set

College.

sent

days in the lives of loved ones.

may

Longwood

Furnished in

—given by her daughter and

'28

and

Elliott

Room Memorv

Booker

Har-

son,

Jr.

of the Class of '99

explain the i>lan in detail

Your Alumnae House

to interested persons.

and a source

is

truly a credit to the College

This has

of pride to the Association.

all

been accomplished not only through your generous support

NEWS OF THE FACULTY AND COLLEGE Miss Mamie L. Newman, former home economics member of the Peabody faculty

teacher at Longwood, and

staff

members marked

was appointed Mr. H. M.

the opening of the 1956-57 session.

Head

English.

He

activities

manager a

of the College,

Miss Virginia

made

and

assistant

\A'all,

an

is

professor

associate

War

International

of

House

Rome from

his family resided in

1947-54, where he was Bureau Chief for several news-

Last year he was an instructor in English .\lso joining the

the Universit}- of Illinois. as an associate professor

English

Dr. Gardner B. Taplin,

is

Mrs. Blanche C. Badger Bobbitt,

YOUR For President teacher

ful

now

— Elsie

who

sociation,

and

Presbyterian

1955 in Europe.

ters degree at

She

received

K. McCombs, and Mr. Walter E. Urben joined the music Mademoiselle Gene-

vears,

is

Public Relations

Mr. Albert Ray Merchent.

ginia

is

McLean Pharr

college

hostess.

of

Director of

took over the position of

Other new

\A'omen;

Mrs. Vir-

Alumnae

members include Mrs. Lucille P. Bradshaw, Mrs. Nancy Lyon Purdue, and Mrs. Connie Hubbard Gills. Secretary in July.

staff

(Continued from page 21 2)

Mahoghany

Bristow Starke

30

rocker

to

match

—given

by Maria

officer

of the

Johnson,

'11,

is

on the editorial

B.A.

and regularlv entertains present and prospective

students.

She has been president several times of the

Woman's Club

of Cherrydale, vice-president of the Ar-

lington Federation of

Woman's

Clubs, and historian of

the Northern District of Virginia Federation of

Woman's

Clubs.

A

ALUMNAE HAVE HOME ON CAMPUS

member and

active

degree at George Washington M.A. at Columbia. Emily has been Washington Alumnae Chapter several

Miss

Dean The

An

her

from Mexico City

Assistant

of the Forest

University, and her

president of the

new

was organist

She spent the summer of

Public Health Dept. in Washington.

came

the

at

She

S.

vieve Laloux of Paris, and Senorita Elena Flores

Thelma Souder is Mrs. Beulah Eva

students

Church.

— Emily

nomics; and Miss Josephine Bailey, organist, Mr. James

Spanish informant.

to

Richmond.

Columbia.

of the U.

to serve as

in

National Education Association, Elsie received her mas-

staff

is

highly success-

a

is

advisor

High School Teacher's As-

for several years

For Director

The French informant

'43,

and

has been President of the League of Richmond Teachers,

geography and history; Mrs. Frances N. Gee, home eco-

department.

CANDIDATES

Stossel,

dramatics

of

Dunber,

S.

it

staff

teaches mathematics: Mr.

Mr. Gary

1957

Westhampton Junior High School

Hill

sociology;

and send

1957 Contribution.

a

twice president of the Junior

Browning.

McD.

Fill out the card furnished in the Bulletin

today with your contribution, unless you have already

at

has produced several publications on Elizabeth Barrett

Robert

famous "Farm-

ing to the working projects.

Correspondent for the European Theater

He and

the

alive

of

Chicago,

in

Help keep

and growing by acting as class agent when called upon, visiting vour Alma Mater and by givville Spirit"

has published several novels, has been the

from 1941-45. papers.

your Alma Muter down.

let

made

registrar of the College.

James R. W'ellard

and was

Dean

Bittinger, assistant professor of history to the

registrar, has been

Dr.

Education Department,

of the

to the position of

post of Assistant Dean.

ex-officio.

W'e will continue to need your help and support, don't

appointments and seventeen new faculty and

Dr. Earl R. Boggs,

and appreciation.

a vote of gratitude

Coyner, and Margaret Robinson Simkins,

March.

since 1920, retired in

Two new

They are Aiaria Bristow Starke, Chairman, Myrtle Dunton Curtis, Bessie Carter Taylor, Carrie Spencer, Ruth Harding owe them

(Continued from page 21) burg.

—We

but by the untiring efforts of the House Committee

full

series of color slides on

"Longwood

Marvin W. Schlegel, is available on request for alumnae groups. This will be accompanied by a script, and may be obtained by contacting your Alumnae Office. College,

1955-56" token by

Dr.

'14.

Alumnae Magazine


SEVENTY-THIRD FOUNDERS DAY March 23, 1956

TENTATIVE PROGRAM Friday, M.-vrch 22

P.M. and

3 to 6

P.M.

Registration for

Room

10:15 A.M.

Registration for

Room

to 9

7

—Rotunda

S.A.TURDAY, IM.^RCH 23

8:15

to

9:15 A.M.

4:00

Coffee, .\lumnae House, Farmville

10:30 A.M.

.-\luninae-Student

12:45 P.M.

Truncheon

to

—Rotunda

Program

Alumnae Chapter, Hostess

—Jarman

Auditorium

— Recreation Hall

2:00 P.M.

.\lumnae Business Meeting

5:00 P.M.

Open House

6:30 P.M.

Supper

—President's Home, Dr. and Mrs.

Lankford

— College Dining Hall Spring Concert — Jarman Auditorium

8:00 P.M.

ATTENTION— PLEASE READ CAREFULLY Longwood

happy

is

to

welcome you back on Founders

College, so

we

reunions:

'92, '97, '02, 07, '12, '17,

Send

shall house reunion classes

all reservations to the

possible by INIarch 17, 1957. slip

even

if

she

is

prices:

coming

then '32,

Alumnae

Office,

Please cancel

just for the

In addition to

will be charged.

first,

'22, '27,

if

Da}-.

l.)ue to a full

all other

alumnae who wish

'37,

'47,

'42,

Longwood

and

to return.

alumnae have voted

Each alumna all

The

following classes will hold

"52.

College, Farmville, Ya.

you can't come.

day Saturday and check

this, the

enrollment, accomodations are limited in the

is

All reservations should be

requested to return her

functions she will attend.

to pa}^ for their

A

omi

made

if

reservation

registration fee of $1.50

meals during their

stay,

at the

following

breakfast, fifty cents; lunch, sixt}' cents; and dinner, seventy-five cents.

Rooms

will be available

from

March

3 V.'Sl.. Friday.

SAVE THIS FORM! You

will

need

it

22. 1''57. until 11 A.^I.

to attend Founders

Sunday, March 24, 1957.

Day!

RESERVATION FORM Name_ married,

last

name

maiden,

first

Address.

n

I

shall arrive

on March

wish a room reserved

I

name

first

_Cla

"°t°^

A.M. by P.M.

n

last

in the

"i^''"

plane or

dorniitorv with

OR

D I

I

studetit in college

do not wish a room reserved as I'm visiting "

should like to attend the following

:

In case you have not contributed to

December, 1956

Coffee

tlic

1957

J"

in

,

the city

Luncheon

Alumnae Fund,

,

Tea

,

Entertainment

a pledge card

is

included for your convenience.

31


.

PLEASE FILL THIS

OUT FOR YOUR BIOGRAPHICAL

FILE

AND RETURN AT ONCE MAIDEN NAME

in full, last

name

CLASS

first.

MARRIED NAME

.ADDRESS

CHILDREN colleges attended, degree and year

year of birth 1.

PRESENT OCCUPATION.

FORMER OCCUPATION STUDY

(S).

at other institutions,

CREATIVE ^^'ORK

(literary,

CLUB AFFILIATIONS,

LEADING OFFICES INTERESTS,

including dates and degrees artistic,

scientific,

if

any

including research; use separate sheet

necessary)

if

including social, cultural, religious, civic, professional, honorary

in organizations held

by you or your husband

not accounted for elsewhere, such as travel, hobbies,

HUSBAND'S COLLEGE

etc.

(S) and class; occupation

PLEASE HELP The nominating committee would welcome vice-presidents

and one

director.

The

elected

other nominations for the three officers to be elected in 19S8,

nominating committee will make only one nomination for each major

but any nomination received in writing before July

on the

ballot.

The

election

is

namely two

1,

office,

1957, endorsed by ten alumnae in good standing, will be printed

concluded on Founders Dav.

READ "YOUR 1957 CANDIDATES" ON PAGE 30 BEFORE YOU VOTE.

BALLOT BE SURE

PRESIDENT

TO VOTE AND RETURN THE BALLOT BEFORE MARCH

(vote for one)

NOMINATING C0:MMITTEE Dorothy Overcash,

Elsie Stossel, '43,

"46,

(vote for three)

Hampden-Sydney

Richmond .

Elizabeth Moving Smith, '23, Farmville

Lou Baker Harper,

'47,

Frances Walmsley Gee,

DIRECTOR

23, 1957

Farmville

'28,

Farmville

(vote for one)

Mattie Rodgers Smith Sydnor,

Emily Johnson,

'11,

Arlington

Jackie Jardine Wall,

'~>2x,

'27,

Farmville

Farmville

Alumnae

M.^g.^^zine


HONOR ROLL

1956 Contributors for the fund year

—January through

September 1956-

— are

by

listed

HONOR ROLL

1956

1886 Carrie Brightwell Hopkins Mary Louise McKinney

of

Number

of

Julia T. Armistead

Alumnae contacted

8395

Lee Cora Rogers Brooking Parker Mary V. Brooking Savedge

Alumnae who

1506

Isabel

1887 Julia Johnson

Eggleston

18S8 Susie Campbell Hundley 1891

Lucv Irvine Irvine

Maude

F.

Trevvett

1892 Boswell Gordon Mattie Gunn Dorin

Mayo

Myrtis Spain Hall Louise Twelvetrees Hamlett lSii3

Ada Mapp Guerrant Mittie Rogers Jones Bessie McD. Turner

Wicker

Isabel

1S94

Amount Contributed To Longwood House

$7343.00

To Alumnae House To Unrestricted Fund

$2157.00

Pauline Harris Richardson Florine Hunt Fowler Janie Staples Chappell 1895

$4950.00

Jessie E.

Yelton

Cox Locke

Beulah H. Finke Horn Mnude M. Foster Gill Julia Harris Butter worth Louise Hog wood Russell S. Elizabeth Palmer Sounders Elizabeth C. Pinner Edith Steigleider Robinson Pearle Watterson Showalter Frances White Mertins 1902

Georgia M. Bryan Hutt Cora Lee Cole Smith Ethel Cole Ould Rose Lee Dexter Mary P. Farthing Carrie S. Goode Bugg Claudine L. Kizer

WiUiams Mary Sue Raney Short

Martha Marsh Lewis Frances Y. Smith

Katherine H. Stone E. Linwood Stubbs

Katherine Vaughan Farrar Mamie Wade Pettigrew

Susie Fulks

Amelia Holland Jones Mary Byrd Taylor 1897

Martha Mason Kennerly* Given in her memory by Miss Bertha Gold, Mrs. P. Hamilton, Mrs,

L.

Peterson, and Mr. Luther J. Peterson.

Cassie H.

Martha Mason Kennerly* Given in memory by Mrs. S. A. Hooker, Mr. David Hooker, and Mr. and Mrs. Patrick O. Powell.

Emma Zillah

LeCato Eichelberger

Mapp Winn

Mary Massenburg Hardy* Given in her memory by her daughter, Elsie Hardy '31. 1898

Florence Brandis Davidson Loulie Cralle Lancaster Mattie Lee Cunningham Walker Laura Harris Hines

Mears Miller Missie Mease Belle

Kathleen Riley Gage Mary W, Roberts Pritchett Genevieve Venable HoUaday 1899 Carter Vaughan Martha "Pat" T. Featherston Florence Franke Lilv

Annette Leache Gemmell Ruby Leigh Orgain Sallie

Michie Bayley Preston

Nelly C.

Lucy Wright James 1900

Margaret Goode Moore

Houpt Ida Howard Chiles Annie Pollard Bealle Ella

Elizabeth Watkins Houston 1901 Alice Atkinson Szanto

Emma

J.

Barnes

December, 1956

G. Estelle

Maude Wallace 1904

Mary Baldwin Bynuni Ella Burger Morgan Mary Lou Campbell Graham Bessie Carter Taylor Inez Clary McGeorge Marie Etheridge Bratten Jessie Finke

Mary Frances Gray Munroe A. Gertrude Griffin BiUingsley Bertha E. Harris Woodson

Mary Herbert Peake Mary Clay Hiner Fannie Hodnett Moses Martha A. Holman Rand Jemina Hurt Byrd King Eckles Carrie McGeorge Burke Bettie Murfee Ray Mary Littlepage Powers Kearney Alda Reynolds Smith Ethel Reynolds White Lottie W. Snead Grimes Scotia Starke Haggerty Carrie Sutherlin

Beulah Tiller Graves 1905

Maude Anderson Soyars Lucy Morton Brooke Jennings

Guy Davis Mary French Day Parker Sally

Edith Leigh Dickey Morris

Mary Eweil Hundley Georgie R. Gravely Katharine Grayson Reid Willie K. Hodges Booth

Mary

S.

Moore Beaman

Fannie May Pierce Ursula Tuck Buckley Frances R. Wolfe Clair

Woodruff

BugfiT

M. Robertson Jarratt A. Rogers Rvnex Elizabeth Taylor Clark

Merle Abbitt Kirk Louise Adams Armstrong Hattie Bugg Duvall Steptoe Campbell Wood Nettie Chappell Tsa

M. Compton

Nell Ingram Lizzie B. Kizer

Virginia Kent Nelson Hinman Virginia Nunn V/illiams Ada May Smith Clark

Georgiana

E.

1911

Kathleen Baldwin McDonald Pearl Berger Turnbull Pearl Bowyer Stevens

Carrie Dungan Henrietta C. Dunlap Margaret Parish Thomas Susan Ford Dickinson Mary Elaine Harris Warren Elise Holland Perkins Bess Howard Jenrette Florence L. Ingram

Stephenson

Iva Pearle Vaughan Childrey Elizabeth Verser Hobson Pauline Brooks Williamson

1903

Ruth Clendening Gaver Elmer L. Crigler Holmes Mary O. Frayser McGehee Martha M. Goggin Woodson Harriet P. Hankins Grace B. Holmes Anna C. Paxton Mary Peck Mar>' Henry Shackleford Mattox

Hall Dalton

Mary Hester Jones Alphin Mary Lackey Sterrett Willie B. Moorman Morgan Mae Northern Pearson Julia Paulett McCabe

Maud Mary

I'JIHi

Garrow

Maggie Humphries Magee Julia Johnson Davis

Lilian G. Cook Ramsay Sue B. Cook Booker Nelle Fitzpatrick Jordan

Louise Ford Waller

Man- Gladys Garnett Morris Eloise Gassman Cook

1907

Vivian Boisseau Bowles Louise Farinholt Cottrell Belle Gilliam Marshall Carrie Mason

Norfleet

Nellie Moreland

Slaven Beryl Morris Flannagan Lucy Rice English

Leonora Ryland Dew Louise Semones Fannie B. Shorter Clara Smith Stoneburner Virginia Stubblefield Hazel Marie Thompson Mattie Spencer Willis

Huey

Mary Harper White Elizabeth Haskins Selina H. Hindle

Blanton Hanbury Burrus Frazer

Virginia

Gerald ine N. Grace Belle

Fitzgerald

Graham

Emily W. Johnson

Beville

Mauzy Myers Georgeanna Ward Newby Page

Mullie

Mildred T. Price Alma Louise Taylor Fincham Lockett Walton Marshall Lois Watkins Franklin Vedah May Watson Dressier

Frances Land Chappell* Given in her memory by her husband. Mr. J. W. Chappell.

Landrum

Lucy B. Leake Sydner Myrtle Ligon Crute

NeU Maupin Rebekah Peck Lucy Phelps

Mamie Ragsdale Turner Susie Robinson Turner Kathleen Saville Mai-y

Mildred Blanton Button Alice Carter Ce rrie Caruthers Johnson Zula Cutchins

Mary Dupuy

Fmma

Farish Mattie Bell Fretwell Evelyn Hamner Chess Hardbarger

Hardy Graham

Martin Rice Antoinette Nidermaier Phipps Blanche Nidermaier Vermillion Countess Muse Bareford Mary Robertson Perkins Fletcher Kate F. Perry Florence B. Rawlings Mary Josephine Reed Johnson Lucy Robins Archer Lula Sutherlin Barksdale Virginia

Tinsley

Allen

Shaw McCue

Blanche Shepard Spencer Ruth Shepherd Forbes Lucy Steptoe

Anne

P.

Thom

Vera Tignor Sandidge Lucile Watson Rose Penelope White West Effie Belle

Wrenn Parham 1912

Sue D. Adams Davis Virginia Baskerville Ligon Sallie Blankenship Adams Jean Boatwright Goodman

Irene E. Briggs Nellie Bristow Sandidge

Agnes Burger Williams Lillie Canody Denning Leta Christian Lettie

1909

Belle

Howard Johnson

Virginia

Tressie Ola Jones Parker Pearl Justice Freeman

Hagan

Burke

Natalie

Perkinson

Etta Hope Owens

Iva Wilkerson Etheridge Elsie E. Wilson

1908 Clitra

Goggin Rode'

Sallie

Elsie

1896 Rosalie Bland

Nancy H.

$236.00

Hattie Hessie Chernault

Lola Belle Bland

Mabyn Branch Simpson Sarah Ferguson Thomas

Coppedge Dunlap Harper Emily Firth Smith

Bessie

contributed

May

Lalla

gifts.

1910 Ola Lee Abbitt Throckmorton. Florence Acree Conkling

STATISTICS Xumber

*Denotes memorial

classes.

Cox Laughon

Louise Davis Thacker Elizabeth Hawthorne Lueck Myrtle E. Huddle

Kemp McDonough Amenta Matthews CrabiU Avis

Pearl D. Matthews Laura E. Maxey Annette Penn

Frances Louise Poindexter Annie Belle Robertson Paul

Annie L. Summers Ruth A. Ward Sadler Anne Wilkinson Cox Edith Willis Reed 1913

Ora Alphin Turpin Preston Ambler Eva E. Anderson Grimes Madeline Askew Harman Etta Rose Bailey Kathleen Bar net t Fringer

33


Ada R. Bierbower Margaret Boatwright Mclntyre Florence Boston Decker

Bugg

Virgilia

Minnie Rachel Butler Albright

Chew

Sallie Bailie

Leslie

Wilson Daughtrey Antoinette Davis Schaefer Jennie Earnest Mayo Florence E. Garbee Margaret B. Garnett Trim Elsie L. Gay Wilbourn Ruth Harding Coyner Wanda Harkrader Darden Winnie Hiner Bertha M. Hunt Annie Warren Jones Starritt Nena Loch ridge Sexton Lucy Maclin Somers Alice Belle Martin Horgan Gertrude Mai-tin Welch Jennie Martin Purdum Annie R. Moss McClure Annie Lee Mvers Williams Ruth Percivall Whittle

Rex

Price

Bessie

Katheiine Ragsdale Brent Ethel Rodes Haliic Rodes Willburger Mary Sterling Smith Eileen Spaulding Soles Elsie Mildred Stull Annie Tignor Bettie Lee Vermillera Ann Woodruff Hal) 1^14 Dorothy Batten Kitchin

Martha

J.

Bill

Bowles Goodman Maria Bristow Starke Mary Bi-uce Martin Bessie Bond Bucher Pike Ida

Alice

Dadmun Murphy

Lnckey

Delph

E.

Rector

Mary Dornin Stant Irene Dunn Clark K. Ethel Fox Hirst Virginia Lee Fuller Carrie Galusha Mcllwaine Ruth Gleaves Alice M. Howison Brown

Johnson Bondurant Pearl H. Jones Meta Jordan Woods Ira McAlphin Ebeling

Nancy

Susie

L.

McCraw HJUsman

Lila Haskins

McGehee Vreeland

Juanita Manning Harper

Mary Susan Minton

Re>'noIds

Grace St.C. Moorman Eleanor Parrott Hutcheson Nellie Jordan Rogers Coi-nett Constance Rumbough Josephine C. Sherrard

Myrtle Harrison

Ruth Jamison Elizabeth

Jarman Hardy

Lillian

Hobson Smith Starke Todd

Virginia Watkins Douglas Lucile B. Woodson Nicholson 1917

Annie

Estelle

Blankinship

Florence Middleton Crockett

Moore Bondurant Agnes Murphy Lillian Obenshain Cocks Mollie

Durham

Pearson

Pugh Evans

Hat tie F. Robertson Brinkley ?4argaret M. Sinclair Gladys Tucker Rollins Mary Ellen White Hemingway Marguerite Wiatt Hoy Kate Louise Wooldridge Watkins

W, Zimmerman

Mattie

Lucy D. Allen Selma Batten Mary Berger

Miller

Carrie Bolton Tyler

Booker Dillard Elizabeth Codd Parker

Mildretl

Mary Olivia

Compton

Evelyn Dinwiddle Bass Martha E. Drumeller

Ewald Lively Francis Idear Goldman Katherine Gray Stables Eli7.abeth

K. Eugenia Harris Mary Catherine Hill Shepherd Carey Jeter Finley Christine Mackan Waike

Mary Diana Minton Pearl Moore Cosby Nellie W. Nance Perkins Oast Claiborne Perrow Louise Pruden Apperson Rebecca Ragsdale Darby Sallie

Fannie Scott Crowder Pattifc

Scott Mallory

1918

Laura Boteler Cowne Brett Kennedy

Bessie Eberwine

Garrett

Tompkins

Katharine Gilbert Josephine Gleaves Frances Azile Hancock Dallas Ann Elizabeth Harris Loving Jessie Kellam Harshaw Louie Locke Ernestine McClung Rice Lucille

Mann

Pollard

Kathleen Moorman Clara Neblett Burrier Mary M. Noel Hock Bernice Nuckols Stanley Alma L. Roberston Eutsler M. Louise Rowlett Wingo Kathleen Savillc Frances Treakle Whaley Katherine Watkins Florence Williamson Quillen

Degree 1919 Laura A. Meredith Margaret Shannon Morton Janet H. Peek Catharine Riddle

Dipiima

1919

Catherine Armstrong Watkins

Marie Adams McDermott

Main

Janice Bland Bettie Carter Bell Ruth Carwile Blake Grace Chambers Feinthel Myrtle Davis Watson Blanche Dosewell Olive Ferguson Rives Mattie Leigh Fretwell Whitlock Elvira H, Jones

1916

Louise Bunch

34

Rew Mapp

Mary Margaret Reynolds Johnson Portia L. Spencer Louise Trotter Wooten

Mary Tune Jessie Walden Walker Sanderford Annie Marie Winslow Baxter

Ridley

Degree 1921 Meile Davis Helen Draper Mary A. Stephenson

Diploma

Sallie

Barlow

Smith

1921

Sarah Rebecca Andrews Putnam Grace Bargamin Bohannon Sally Barksdale Hargiott Sue Lewis Brown Harrison Ann Armistead Bulloch Davis Myrtle Chappell McCutchen

Roy Dameron

Beth Gannaway

Jessie Spitler Mabel E. Spratley

Margaret T. Barnard Cassidy Martha King Bugg Newbill

Janie

Elinor

Lois Averill

Hov/dershell

Winnie Lewis Minor Mary Lindsey Lane Eleanor McCormick Mitchell Mildred Martin Watkins Marie Moore McClay Florence Penick Lybrook Eliza Ramsey Emory

Regis Cassidy Gannaway B. Collie Williams Viola Colonna Evelyn Coman Adair

Marnetta Souder Anna Rebecca Spitler Booton Patsy Watkins Josephine Wayts

Edith Estep Gray A. Fretwell Wilson Elf ret h Friend Shelburne Kathleen Gilliam Smith Christie Harris Katharine Krebs Kearsley Odell Lavinder Martin

Jessie

Nellie

Blanche Adams Chapman

Woods

Ruth Marsden Blanton Wood M. Kathleen Bondurant Wilson Jeannette Carney Alma Craddock Burton Lee Drumeller Vought Louis Drumeller East Tena Ferguson Burden Lucille Geddy Crutcher Marv Hester Wiedemer Ruth C. Howard Wilson Louise Layne Shearer Marion R. Linton Annie H. Loving Page D..rothy Loving McEIfresh Elizabeth Malcolm Hinternhoff

Clara Irene

Charlotte Baird Ferebee Alta Barnes Lowrv Clair Blair Hackley Irene Bi idges Mcintosh Louise Brightwell Watson Gladys Camper Moss Virginia Lee Carter Harrington Emily Clark Verliner Crawley

Maymie

Ayre

Brooke Bagley Butt

Elsie

May

L.

Katherine Ellis Hunt Katherine Field Campbell

Lucy Ackerly

Diploma 1920 Bettie Sue Bailey Barnes

Anne Tucker Bradshaw

Ward Emma Ruth Webb Watkins 1915

Ethel Gildersleeve

Mary Lancaster Wall

Russell Piggott Russell Westover

Alice

Mary

P, Nichols Florence Saville Anderson Lois T. Williams

Diploma 1923 Degree 1920

Margaret Page Massey Thelma Parker Babb Lucy Ellen Parsons Mabel L. Piince

Ruth

Blanche Jenkins Fulcher Anne Meredith Jeffers Elizabeth Moring Smith

Worsham

Ellen L. Lash Nancy E. Lewis Dixie McCabe Haii-ston Olivia Newbill

Mary

Willis

Grace Richardson Fletcher Ellen Robertson Fugate Margaret Rogers Lily Sanderson Rice Geneva Walden

Goodwin Skinker Brenda Griffin Doggett Ellen

Vemah

Wall

Gladys Owen Evans Anna Townsend Penny Myrtle Reveley Brown

Louise Fulton

Alma Thomas Mary TrevilUan Grice Mary Margaret Umberger Groseclose Elizabeth Walkup Elizabeth

Gladys Oliver Wenner Ruby Overton Brooks

Pearl Ellett Crowgey Annie Sue Fulton Clark

Lula Jones

Marian Camper Fuller Patty Dyer Sanford Theresa Evans Craft Laura Holland Bow^n

Jean Morris

Elvira W. Carr Bentley Leha R. Carter Thomas Myrtle Dunton Curtis

Daphne

Gilliam Wool Reva Graves Gregory

Carolyn L. Harrell Frances Jordan Moore Frances MacKan Adams Mildred Mitchell Holt Elizabeth Moring Smith Virginia Morrison Harper

Grace Oakes Buiton Mildred O'Brien Alvis Ruby Paulett Omohundro

Margaret D, Tray lor Dorothy Wells Greve Edna Mae Wilkinson Coralie Woolridge Thelma Yost Lehmann

Diploma

1922

Dolly Baker Harrell Mary H. Bassett Mprv Terrell Beazley

Htlen Black Gibson Lillian Bristow Trevvett Catherine Brooking Priddy Omara Daniel

Charlotte Anderson Eaton Doris C. Beale Kilmartin Gracie Betts Gwaltney

Edna Blanton Smith Genevieve Bonne well Altwegg Lucy Reid Brown Jones S. Ehzabeth Button Rosenberger Kathleen Carroll Price Pauline Chapman Ramsey Elizabeth Coleman Echols Isabel Crowder Callender Kathleen Crute Headlee Irene Dunn Clarke Susie V. Floyd LiUian Grifhn Tuner Bernice Johnson Sykes Patience Moore Britt Louise Parsons Kain Olive Payne Wilkerson Janie Potter Hanes Nina Quarles Cunningham Alice Lee Rumbough Stacy Margaret Shackelford Walker Betty Shepard Hammond Louise A. Stephenson

Elizabeth

Degree 1924 Martha Anderson Bailey Dorothv Diehl Ethel Gish Wilmoth Katherine Harper Roberta Hodgkin Casteen Pearl Matthews Belle Oliver Hart Virginia W'all Louise Wiley Mottley

Edna Mae Wilkinson Diploma

Alise Harris Rahily

Georgia Holman Putney Nettie R. NcNulty Oertly Sarah E. Moore Sue V. Puckett Lush Lucille Rash Rooke Mary Christine Reid Anderson Mary S Simmons Doris Thomas Lily Thornhill Reams Clotilda Rodes Waddell Hiden Nancy Watkins Lorena Wilcox Leath Gwendolyn Wright Kraeraer

Degree 1923

Marv George Bolen Ola Brightwell Harris

1924

Cassie Baldwin Louise Bates Chase

Reva Blankenbaker Holden Susan Feild Brown Gi-aham

Marv

E. Carrington Mabel Allen Cathey Walker Margaret Daniel Hopkins Marv Lee Folk Edith Goode Gills Marshall Greathead

Gladys Griffin Jeter L. Frances Harris Lillian A. Minkel Caroline Morrow Stovall Alice Mottley Overton Alean Mundy Johnston Alma Porter Myrtle Price Thomas Elizabeth Rothiock Blount Linda Thomasson Wilkinson Julia Tu:nbull Ellis

Degree 1925 Dorothy Askew Gayle Ruth Bartholomew Margaret Griggs Cox Eula B. Harris Mary L. Haskins Ferguson

Mary

E.

Hunt Stump

Virginia Lindsey Kathleen Morgan Hogg Mary Rives Richardson Lancaster Lucile Walton

Jean West Shields

Diploma 1925

Copelia Dixon Snead

Agnes Fulcher Tune Annie Gannaway

Walkup

Martha WeUs Catlin Mildred Woodhouse White

Elizabeth Berkeley Virginia Virginia

Ballagh G.

Burch

Burnette Williams

Cowherd Adkins

Harriet Cowles Carter Blanche Craig Garbee Elizabeth Crockett Fisher Pauline Deaver Siler Mabel Edwards Hines Nellie

Ferrell

Lucile Franklin Richardson Margaret Fuller Adams Freia Goetz Vaughan

Katherine Goode Mary Gose Pope Dorothy Hughes Harris Virginia Hunter Marshall

Nancy Ora Jeter Eva McKenney Guynn Janie Martin Kay

Alumnae Magazine


t

Alma Matthews Vaughan Ragsdale Jackson Dorothy Rawles Parker Sue E. Roper Pace Corinne Rucker Virginia Clarice Spencer Hiley Mildred

Berta A. Thompson

Margaret B. Turpin Burke Margaret Vaden Fleet Degree 1926 Anderson Cram Laura Anderson Moss Ciissie Baldwin Margaret Barrett Knowles Eleanor Bennett Ryder Elise

Bugg Hughes Audrey Chewning Roberts Elizabeth

Msmie Daniel Barbee Elizabeth Diehl Ryan Mae Marshall Edwards

Harriet R. Booker Lamb Harriett Elizabeth Brown Alice B. Carter Stone Kathrine Davis Hawthorne Evelyn V. Dulaney Cassidy

Marion Fitchett Elizabeth Hutt

Long

Martin Cora Judson Jones Marshall Margaret Lifsey Edith Virginia Moore Raine Gladys E. Oliver Wenner Marnetta Souder Georgiana Stephenson Frances Treakle Whaley Frances Walmsley Gee

Ward

Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth

Weston Yeary G. Woodson Diploma 192S

Eleanor

Amory Boyette

Anne Smith Greene Olive Smith Bowman

Burnett Martin Bertha McCoy Chappell Lane Martha C. Cooke Elder Alice Carmine Davis Wolf Miriam Feagans Victoria Gwaltney Spivey Elizabeth Haskins Helen H. Jones Davis Kathryn L. Kesler Frances Malbon White Kathleen Sanford Harrison Carolyn Sinclair Smith Florence Rose Smith Odell Smith Doris Bruce Steere Harwell

Kate G. Trent Martina Willis Lucille Wright

Elsie D. Story Blannie Tanner Bass Audrey E. White Harris

Phyllis

Ida Hill Selina Hindle

Rulh Jennings Adams Cora Helen Meeks Anthony Gladys Moses McAllister Lilian Via Nunn Sue Puckett Lush Gertude Quinn Thomas Florence Riss Richardson Elizabeth H. Roberts Mary Louise Rowlett Wingo Daisy Shafer Wilroy Fannie Shorter

Eber\vine

Diploma 1926

Amory Heptinstall Mary Banks Fretwell Mary A. Billups Virginia Blankenship McGehee Mary Alice Blanton Roberts Mildred

Degree Myron Barnes Dixon Mary Elizabeth Bowers Meredith KathiTn Bully Joy Burch ShelTey Rebecca Cocks Payne 1929

Laila Caiter Eioise Chappell Bessie Cook Durfee Lillian East Hayden

Nancy Denit Eastman Mary Oliver Ellington Thelma Garrett Mottley

Gwendolyn Edye Mitchell Bessie F. Farmer Reynolds Alice Frood Morrissette Sara Virginia Hall Kent Chestor Hufton Shackelford

Martha Henderlite Plunkett Margaret Hubbard Secly

Kathryne Landrum Smith Hallie

McCraw

Mary Owens Carhart Ruth Ponton Catherine Ryland Mary Thelma Thomas White Dorothy Weltzel Wright Degree 1927 Elsie EHzabeth AUgood Cook Alene Alphin Mann Mary E. Carrington Grace Chambers Feinthel Maude Clark Fugate Elizabeth Crute Goode Virginia Fitzpatrick Harper Harriet L. Foster Madeline Gary Brown Gilliam

Wilson

Florence Messick Clay Lavalettc Morton Wilkins Blanche Price Paulette Lucretia Province Hart

Rhodes Virginia Rucker Crigler

Lillian

Viola M. Martin Catherine Moffitt Walters

Daphne

Henderlite

Rachel

Wool

Kitty Griggs Newman Elizabeth Hopkins Wagner

Louise Pruden Apperson Louise Richardson Lacy Carrie Spencer Mildred Spindle Dorothy S(4uires Cundiff Helen Thomas

Agnes Watkins Margaret Watkins Bridgeforth Mary Wisely Watkins Diploma 1927 Leiia Darby Bain Eraser Margaret Barham Wallace Helen Costan

Sammy

Scott

Mabel Spratley Margaret Walton Gay Dee Watkins Draucker Glenna Watts Shepard Gladys E. Wilkinson Phyllis Wood Sims

Lucy

G.

Adams

Louise Barlow Gibson Eunice H. Bassett Leyland

Maiy Bernard Hamilton Beth Brockenbrough Lineweaver Elsie Clements Hanna Katherine Cooke Butler Mabel Cowand Mildred Deans Shepherd Lula J. Hammond Wells Byrdie Mae Hillsman Helen Hodges Watkins Elizabeth Lacy Helen McHenry McComb Eleanor Mallory Parker Frances Millikan Aderhold Margaret Northcross Ellis Lfctitia Penn Ballenger Margaret Pumphrey Ferguson Elva Reynolds Powell Nellie Royall Rhodes Margaret Rutherford Yancey Geneva E, Smith Degree 1930 A. Irving Armstrong

Laura Logan Hurt Elmore Evelyn Ticer Jones Welch Edith Lamphier Owings

S.

Lotts Magann Ormond Marshall Gary Ethel Miles Gibbs Mattie Rogers Smith Sydnor

Lena Somers Pennington Mary Evelyn Thurston Daughtry Mary E. Williams Powell

Annie Lee Bowden R. Alice

Hamner Woll

Mabel Hayes Thomson Leyburn Hyatt Winslow Blanche Murrell Jones

Norman O'Brien Rachel L. Royall Evelyn Traylor Macon

Lucille

Mary Jane Vaden Nancy Watkins Linda Wilkinson Bock

Diploma 1930

December, 1956

Katherine Chambers Large Sue Baylis Cross Helen Dunkley

Dorothv Bloomfield Tunstall Lois Virginia Cox Martha B. Gunter Meidling Lucille

Ingram Tu ner Leake Gottschalk

Susie Reames Beville Beryl Rogers Loulie F. Shore Irma L. Vaughan Beale Lillian L. Via

Irene

Frances Whitehead Meyer

Duvahl B. Ridgeway

Degree M, Elizabeth Anderson Swope Frances Armentrout Irwin Mabel C. Barksdale Norris Permele Byrd Cosby Verna Coleman Williams Eleanor H. Dashiell

Jane Royall Phlegar

Marguerite Massey Morton Clara E. Mistr Harriet Moomaw Leek Gay A. Richardson Hildegarde Ross

1931

Mildred F. DeHart Annie Denit Darst Catharine Diehl Lancaster Mildred Dixon Wood Elizabeth Dutton Lewis Pauline Gibb Bradshaw Beatrice A. Goode Staples Mabel P. Gregory Craig Emilie Holladay Adele Hutchinson Watkins Iska French Hutt Hoole* Given in her memory by her mother, Georgia

Bryan Hutt Her Catherine Jones Hanger Catherine McAllister Wayland Clara L. McAllister Parsons Sue G. Moomaw Buchanan Florence Moore Crothers '02

Olive T.

Margaret Nuttall Coaker Georgia R. Putney Goodman Rena M. Robertson Mary K. Rucker Evelyn Cole Simpson Frances Elizabeth Stephenson Kitchen Ida Julia Trolan Allen Evelyn W. West Allen

Lucy Lee Williams

Hardy Dorothy M. Wood Deane Irene Wilson

1931 Diploma Clare Booth Loyd Kalypso A. Costan Furniss Dorothy Goodloe Broadwater Mary Frances Harris Campbell Lelia Frances Jennings Sheffield Esther Kutz Rusmisel Pauline Lanford Stoner Margaret Lester Miller Sarah Mapp Messick Lena M. May ton Milam Ellie V. Morris Hixson

Mary

Virginia

Sanford

Reveley

Woodruth Towler Motley Patsy Watkins Imogene West Tunstall 1933 Diploma Frances Dixon Adkins Edith Hailey B ooks Louise Hartness Russell Avis Hunt Jennie Hurt Butler Beatrice Jones Lewis

Mary Alston Rush Audrey Smith Topping Anne V. Watkins Mary White Guillot 1934 Degree

Louise Bulloch English Mary Burgess Eraser Fisher Margaret Morton Garnet K. Elizabeth Gills Eva Harris Gold L. Frances Harris Mary Easley Hill Steger Frances R. Horton

Margaret F. Hunter Watson Ruth N. Jarratt Alice W. McKay Washington

Mann Maynard Marsh Jac Morton Hawkins Margaret Murry Holland Mary Berkeley Nelson

Gloria Lottie

Margaret Otten Stuart Margaret Parker Pond Edith S. Shanks Sarah Hyde Thomas Douglas Helen L. Westmoi-eland Beverly Wilkinson Powell Maria Williams 1934 Diploma

Ophelia Booker Barnes Burnlev Brockenbrough Kinney Edna V. Dawley Gibbs Elsie

Freeman

Chesta Hubbard Morrissette Sally Virginia Inge Eddins Bessie Strick Cartwright Kathryn Woodson Batte

Dana Tweedy Evans Flora Belle Williams 19^>2

1935 Degree

Degree

A. Louise Clayton Mary Lvnn Connally Lueile Floyd Hight Ruth Floyd Speer Susie V. Floyd Evelyn Gilliam Holmes

Fannie Haskins Withers Sara Hubaid Dana Ellen Earle Jones Elizabeth McCauley

Huffman

Campbell Catherine Marchant Freed Irene Meador Cleo Quisenberry Kent Catherine Ritter Zeno Doris Robertson Adkisson

Nancy Shaner

Laeta Barham Hirons Nancv Burgwm Leake Christine Childrey Chiles

Lena MacDonald Gardner Sammons Ila Harper Rickman Elizabeth B. Haskins Irving Flippen

Anne

Jessica Jones Binns

Bonnie McCoy

Mann Wilds Maude Rhodes Cox Minnie Lee Rodgers Elizabeth Vasser Pickett Katharine Walton Fontaine Mary Wicker Witcher Elizabeth

Ruth D. Hunt

Strickler

Elsie Story

Martha von Schilling Stuart Katherine Watkins Jane Witt Kisler Cora Belle Womeldorf 1932 Diploma Dallas

Maude Crews

Ann Lillaston

Mayo Beaty Dotson Degree 1928 Alyce Page Adams McLemore Hazel M. Bramm

Louise Hurt Fauber Emma Louise Pulliam Willis

Diploma 1929

Louise Duke Louise Gary Alkire Katherine Hatch Whitfield Flora Hudson .Slayton

Stella

Julia A. Feagans Ethel Irene Fenimore

E. Davis

Margaret Eley Brothers Elizabeth Eubank Davidson Virginia Ann Huntsberry Shoi ^^y Marv Ellen Johnson Garber Emiiy A. McAllister Bell Frances Newman Estes Dorothy Nuckols Dotson Mary Virginia Robinson Marion L. Sadler Josephine Sneed. Helen Ward Forrest Katherine D. White 1933 Degree

Frances E. Armistead Margaret Armtrong Ottley Fay Martin Barrow

1935 Diploma Murkland Dressier Turner

Harriet Garnett Pais Charligne Hall Chapman Vivian McCrury Hall Jones

Audrey B. Hawthorne BeBe Russell Barnes Alise Wells Stoner Alice Zeigler Blackard

1936 Degree Dorothy Billings Nancy Leigh Bland Richardson Ruby Blanton Wilkinson Agnes Bondurant Marcuson Helen Bos well Ames Berkeley G. Burch Sarah L. Canada Glover Elsie Carter Harris Mary Chenault Gillikin Margaret Clark Hanger Audrey Clements Lawrence

Omara

Daniel

Dorothy Deans Bohannon

Winnie F- Eubank Josephine Cleaves Ruth Cleaves

Amanda Gray

35


Murkland Dressier Turner

K. Eugenia Harris Bessie

Dru Hart Payne

Drainc

Williams

Eloise

Mae Hillsman Elizabeth Huse Ware Byrdie

1940

Jeannette Jones Spivey

Dorothy McNamee Fore Evelyn Massey Coleman

Agnes Murphy Olivia S. Newbill

Claudine O'Brien

Margaret Pollard Flippen Nora Berden Rawlinson Dorothy Rhodes Putney Sallie Goggin Rode* Kitty Smoot Major Elizabeth Sutton Stettner Susie Robinson Turner

Marcia Vick Susan Waldo O'Hara Tac Waters Mapp Lottie West McAnally 1936 Diploma

Evelyn Dickerson Frazier Mildred Hoge Shackelford Lucille Johnston Gertrude Levy Conn Cleo Reynolds Coleman Juanita Zeigler Stokely

Frances Alvis Hulbert Lucy S. Blackwell Jones

Hazel-Wood Burbank Thomas Anita Mildred Carrington Taylor Laura Nell Crawley Birkland

Mary Louise Cunningham Warren Martha Denny Judith Gathright Cooke Charligne Hall Chapman

Jane Hardy McCue Carolyn L. Harrell Mildred Harry Dodge Mai-y Louise Holland

Rosemary W. Howell Irene M. Kitchen Elizabeth Harris Loving Martha McCorkle Taylor Anna Maxey Boelt Margaret Northcross Ellis Jane Powell Johnson Marian Shelton Combs Mary Sue Simmons Goodrich Nancy Smith Hundley Olivia Stephenson Lennon Mildred

E.

Janice M. Bland

Isabel Williamson Eliza Wise

Mary Virginia Blankenship Cramer Cassie Boswell Habel Claire Eastman Nichols Bessie Eberwine Martha Gwaltney Everett

Martha Hamlet Davis Katherine Hurt Stahl Katherine Irby Hubbard Gertrude Manning Wilson Ruth Hunter Myers Margaret E. Pittard Chewning Marian Barclift Pond Ruth Ponton Virginia Tilman Aebersold Flora Belle WiUiams Marguerite York Rupp

Hoyt

1941

M. Alice Hoggs

Lou Anna Blanton Newton Laura Boteler Cowne Faye Brandon Cross Florence Boatwright Brooks Bernice Callis Hudson Yates Carr Garnett Rosa Courter Smith

Thelma Courtney Scott Rachael DeBerry Warren Helen Dunkley Elizabeth Garrett Rountrey Louise Hall Zirkle Nell Sue Hall Wilbourne Harriette Ann Haskins Eubank

Nancy Ora Jeter Louise Kendrick

1937 Diploma

Frances Bradshaw Bruce Hortense Connelly Brenda Doggett Garner

Ruth James Moore Ellen Skillman Knight 193S Degree Allen Westmoreland Margaret Bailey Bowors Bruce Crowell Rucker Blanche Doswell Richie Ellis Chandler Edith Hammack Nora F. Jones Culpeper

Mary Dudley

Hallie

McCraw

Carrie D.

Mahood

Minkel Grace Allen Pittard Sydnor

Lillian

Isabel

Hille

McCoy

Jean Moyer Scorgie Caralie Nelson Brown Ruth Lea Purdum Nash Virginia

Richards

Nellie Russell Shelton

Geneva Smith Doris Trimyer Gresham Helen Truitt Georgia Watson Wilkerson Elizabeth West Eunice Westbrook Martha Whelchel Plummer Mary Elizabeth White GuiUot

Louise Price Waller

Anna Crump

Shiflett

Reed

F. Rose Smith Stieffen Shaw Elise B. Turner Franklin

Gay

Margaret Turpin Burke Tuttle March Mary Vaughan Driscoll

Viola

Audrey White Harris Katherine D. White 1939

Lucy G. Adams Dorothy Adkins Young Louise Anthony McCain Bonnalyn Avery Bugg Marguerite Blackwell Seely Elizabeth Burke S. Elizabeth Button Rosenberger

1942

Rachel Abernathy Paulson

Peggy Ann Allen Cooper Virginia S. Barksdale Rotter Elizabeth L. Barlow Vera Baron Remsburg Elizabeth Boatwright Marie Cardwell Foster Mai-y Owen Carson Roberts Martha Cottrell Harwood Iva Cummings Johnson Caroline Eason Roberts Irma D. Graff Holland Jean Addison Hall Bass Myrtle Harrison Helen M. Hawkins Mary Venable Hughes Charlotte Jones Corson

Sarah Button Rex Harriet Cowles Carter Helen Costan Charlotte H. Davis McCarty Florence Garbee Lavelette Glenn Henry Marshall Greathead Thelma Houpe Foster Lenoir Hubbard Coleman

Polly Keller St. Clair Shirley McCalley King

Anne W. Kelly Bowman Elsie Landrum Catherine Maynard Pierce

Betty Peerman Coleman Louise Phillips Mancil Lula Power Muller Mary Lillian Purdum Davies V. Beverley Purkins, Schoaf Georgia Holman Putney

Fannie Putney Boykin Beverley

Sexton

Hathaway

Margaret Sinclair Marguerite Snell Trent Margaret Stallard Woolling Annie Laurie Taylor Owens Doris Thomas Elizabeth Tindall

36

Duncan

Mary McCormick Leary Viola Martin Catherine Moffitt Walters Mildred Morris Hertzberg Virginia Morris Jones

Evelyn Pankey McCorkle Elizabeth Ann Parker Stokes

Eva Reid

Lilly

Gray Zehmer

Helen Wiley Hardy Wheat Hallie Hillsman Fleetwood M. Lucille Johnston Baylis

Kunz

Margaret Mish Timberlake Leona Moomaw Janie V. Patterson Agnes Pierce Piland Etta Marsh Pilkington Adams

Alma Porter Elizabeth Reid Paradis Rosalie Rogers Talbert Alice Lee Rumbough Stacy Stella Scott Bosworth

Dawn

Shanklin Campbell Jane Lee Sink Givens Smith Shawen

Jeraldine

Elsie Stossel

Barbara Tripp Friend 1944 Lucille

Cheatham Moseley

Elizabeth Jones Clark Mildred J. Corvin Lingerfelt Barbara L. Dickenson Phillips Mildred A. Droste

Eason Mercer Dorothy Flo Wei's Johnson, Julia

Edith Gills Joscelyn Gillum Silva Sarah M. Hardy Blanton

Sue Harper Schumann Audrey B. Hawthorne Frances Lee Hawthorne Browder Mary K. Ingham Murphy Anne Leake Josephine Bishop Paxton Ruth B. Rose Brewer Romelia Say re Summerell Grace Scales Evans Jeanne Strick Moomaw Mary Tune Katherine R. Vaughan Ann Hardy Williams Helen Williamson Foresman Nancy Williamson Cole Mildred Willson Gertrude Wright Wells

Dofflemyer

Margaret Robinson Simkins Dorothy Rollins Pauly Dorothy A. Scott Mildred Frances Shaw

Nancy Wolfe Borden

Plummer Kay

Virginia

Eunice Lipscomb Louie Locke

Mary

Beatrice Barnette McArthur Grace Collins Boddie Lucy Davis Gunn

Tyler Irving

Grace Waring Putney 1937 Degree

1943 Lillian Agnew Leath Hannah Briggs Allen Julia Ethel Ay res Youngblood

Verelle

Frances Rosebro Garrett Mary Lou Shannon Delaney Julia Ellen Smith Borum Florence Thierry Leake

1945 E. Kyle Ainsworth Watson Mildred O'Brien Alvis

Mary Ann Biggs Prillaman Helen Chapman Cobbs Betsy Brooks Dillard Gomer Lillian Noble Goddin Hamilton

Anne Hamhn Parrott Dorothy Hudson Rachel Joyner Taylor Rebecca Lacy Old Lillian R. Livesay Edwards Nancye Bruce Noel Frances Gihner Patterson Lillian Alleyne Phillips Bryson Gwynn A. Roberts Morgan Lucy Manson Sharpe

Mary

Sterrett

Lipscomb

Eleanor H. Wade Tremblay Mary Paul Wallace Mary Franklin Woodward Potts 1946

Mary Spradlin Agnes Stokes Richardson

Anne Summers Lumpkin Mildred Lorene Thomas Clarke Virginia Treakle Marshbum Martha E. Watkins Mergler Katherine Wright Salmon 1947

Lucy Allen Ruth Anderson Smith Virginia Anderson Justis

Mae

Ballard Hilda Bennett Garrett

Mary Stewart Buford Peery Mary Armistead Catlett Rosa Chandler Elliott E. Lorene Claiborne Ward Betty Deuel Cock Elam Patsy Dale Barham Shirley Mae Didlake Irby Julia Edmonds

Margaret Elsie

Edith C. Bryant Grizzard

Anderson

Mary EUen Johnson Garber Geraldine Joyner West Barbara Kellam Grubbs Katharine Kearsley Williams Mary Cabell Overbey Field Doris R. Ramsey Christine Shifiet Maxey Cornelia C. Smith Goddia

Lynn Sprye Cavedo 1948

Hilda Abernathy Jackson Catharine Bickle Marjorie Ann Burns

Nancy H. Chambers Elizabeth

Lloyd

Collier

Sue Duval Davis Breeding ilkerson V. Adeline Dodd Jean Edgerton Winch Dorothy Lee Fultz Elliott Marian Hahn Sledd

W

Mary Helmer Nancy Hughes Robinson George Anne Lewis Hart Elizabeth Ogburn Anne Dudley Payne Betty Jean Snapp Fawcett Ruth B. Stephenson Harriette Sutherlin Overstreet Helen Reeves Williams White

Ruth M. Eggleston Katy Ellis Reid Ethel Irene Fenimore June Gianniny Jeffrey Louise Harr>- Bagby Shirley

Buck

Louise Bunch

Anne Marie Carmines

Ellett

Freeman

Louise Harrell Clark Anna Stuart Headlee Lambdin Audrey Jane Hudson Grinstead

1949

Nancy Ann Broughman Terry Barbara W. Brown

Ransdell

Wright

Page Cook Axson Alice Courter Burton Sue Baylis Cross Shirley N. Cruser White Dorothy L. Cummings Bailie W. Daughtrey Phyllis

Louisa Dawson

Mary Anne Dove Waldron Julia Feagans

Miriam Feagans Charlotte Baird Ferebee

Ruth Fleming Scott

Jane Philhower Young Virginia Price Perrow Virginia Shackelford Mclntyre Lois Lloyd Shepperd Lewis Mildred Louise Shiflett Toomer Florence Smith Carr

Lois K. Callahan Gwendolyn Cress Tibbs Jennie Lee Cross H. Dorothy Daniel

Carolyn Bobbitt Jones

Margaret Claiborne Viola Colonna

Beverly Peebles Kelly

N. Marian Wittkamp Coralie Woolridge

Elizabeth Burger Ella Banks Abraham Gloria Allen Kent Nellie Katharine Allen M. Ellen Bailey Mary Terrell Beazley Lucille Bell Barnes Eleanor Bisese Johnson

Alice Buck Nell Morrison

Luverta Joyner Gumskowski Rosa Hill Yonce Martha Holman LeStourgeon Ruby E. Keeton Frances Lee Stoneburner Mary Catherine Lynch Bo wen. Margaret A. Mclntyre Davis Katherine A. Maddox Thomas Ann Beaman Martin Kinsey PoUy Moore Light Rebecca Norfleet Meyer Margaret Orange Jackie Parden Kilby Jean Parry Whitaker Glenn Ann Patterson Marsh Jane Paulette Taylor

Irving

Kathryn L. Kesler Alfreda Lewis Moore Betty

Pairet

Watson

Ruby Pugh Ethel Shockley Southall Gwendolyn R. Smith Kennedy Elizabeth V. Spindler Scott Lee Staples Lambert Betty Tilson Walker Virginia Watson Price 1950

Mary Louise Alphin Hurley Mary Puckett Asher Winifred Beard Marjorie Bos wick

Michael

Alumnae Magazine


Anderson Bowles Virginia C. Bowie Brooks V. Page Bumette Johnson Anne Grace Oakes Burton

Frances Everett Brown Betsy Gravely Emily Hastings Baxter Elsie Hawley Burkholder

Dolores Duncan Smallwood Jacqueline Eagle

Charlotte

Nellie

Harris Floyd Constance Heather Poland Jean Hogge Shackelford Catherine Johnston Wilck Nancy Kibler Smith Patsy Kimbrough Pettus Willard Leeper Virginia Crumley Leeper Patsy C, Lindsev

Patricia

Helen Travnham

Ruth Walker McGhee Peggy White Sarah Wilkinson Baldwin Ann Younger

Bettie

Lou Van de Riet Baecher

Freia A. Goetz

Vaughan

Johanna

Mary Crawford Andrews Mary Lee Folk

Wanda

Betty M. Foster Dolores L. Hoback

Fay Sharon Greenland

Elizabeth Eubank Davidson L. Doll

Katharine Gilbert

Kanner

1956

June Horton McKown Dorothy Batten Kitchin Elizabeth Ann McClung Grigg

Josephine Sneed

Edna Lucille Mann Pierce Sara Mapp Messick Mildred Parker Candler

Thompson Frances Turner Widgen

Ora Mitchell Parker Jean A. Pearce Shell

Mary Jo Smith Fore

June M. Divers

Lucille

Betty Jane West

Doris R. Horne

Frances Ramsey Hunter Jean Ridenour Appich

Helen Connelly Button Jean Cunningham Wilson

i

Catherine Hamilton Dorothy Hughes Harris Peggy Hood Smith

Rachael E. Peters

Lindsey

Shahan

Elsie Holland Cux Nellie Culpeper

Eugenia Moore Elsie Rae Page Bonner Carter

Biddlecomb

Marie Ash Carr Edith Haley Brooks

Hornsby

Dorothy Toland Cooper Nell Crocker Owen Barbara Ann Moore Curling Betty Joan Davis Edwards Donnetta Devine Clark Elizabeth Durfee Coleman Dolly Baker Harrell C. Rebecca Hines Bowling Margaret Lester Miller Barbara Mitchell Dorothy Morris Nancy Nelson Joyce Pomeroy Wilma Salmon Robinson Sh rley Anne Wa rd

Betty Tyler

Walker

Jackie Jardine Wall Virginia McLean Pharr

1951

Duma

Ellen Booth Marj' C. Boswell

Helen M. Tanner Margaret O. Tavlor Barlow

Maria Jackson

Mary Maxwell Acree Cumbia Ann Burnette Younger

Edith

1955

Mary

Shelton

Collins

Wicke Tompkins

Lee Drumeller Vought Wary Denny Wilson Parr

1954

Annie M. Swann

Catherine

Frances Dunlap Powell

1952

Carol Stoops

Mildred

C. Jones

Maude

Sutherland

F.

Thomas

Nellie Garrett

Billie

Ijois

Dean

C. Short

Ann

Anne

Bobbie Wall Edwards Elizabeth Wilson East

Joan M. Moore Emma M. Moss Marie Louise Redd

Virginia

Eva McKennev Guynn Betty C. Hancock Beard Virginia Lee Hansel

Edith G. Walker Hostetter

McGhee Nancy Lee Maddox Stuart

Dorothy E. Stringfield

Blannie Tanner Bass Helen E. Castros Anne Conley Bromley Hortense Connelly Anne Marie Gray Cook

Gretna Perkins Bobbie Pollard Wrenn Corinne Rucker Lester H. Smallwood Jr. Helen C. Smith Massie Virginia Mildred Spencer Wnek Mary Jane Stansbury Peake Iris Sutphin Wall Grace Adair Thompson

Elizabeth G-

Ellen M. Porter Koolman Hattie W. Pugh Betsy Jean Robertson

1953

Peggy Dee Hoover Newhall King Jones Lillie Lankford Middleton

Margaret Farmer Newman Charlotte Flaugher Ferro Jane Gray Comerford

Nancy

Eleanor Weddle

Mildred Rassdale Jackson Beatrice Jones Lewis

Honorar>' Members Harriet Baker Houston Blackwell Mrs. Norman O. Myers

9n, TyiumDhLaiYL Kate ("Daisy") Ashley Riidolphi, Ellen

Bahh White,

Nancy Urquhart Eertlia

'96

Boykiii Harrell, '32

Braitlin'aitc

Flora Anne Bruce.

Frances Land Chappell, ent

Mary Lazeson

'!'&

Beale,

ent

'05

'07

Sarah

Jones,

I.eatlierinan

Muyskens,

Elizabeth Lewis Powers,

Alice Bland Coleman,

'01

Blanche Bonner McClintic,

Olivia Deislier, ent '09

Lucy Lee

Mildred Finney Lancaster, ent Garrett Johnson,

'15

Hannah Handctt Morgan,

Lelia

J.

Helen Jarinan

Barnett, '92 '21

Stipes,

Grace Jones Chinn, Jessie

'29

Hancs Lancaster, Harris

Lee King.

'28

'38,

'44

'30

ent '93

A'irginia

'94

U'harey McGehee, ent

Mary Moore

'89

Moore Green,

Elizabeth Helena Roberts,

Marianna Robinson Rogers.

'31, '33

Phelps, '03

SMid

'44

'00

Stonaker, '23

Alary Speight,

Mary '30

'15

'34x

'11

Elizabeth Tjirpin Williams. '10

Helen Warriner Coleman, Nannie Watkins,

Bettie

Ann

'18,

'48

'II

Mildred Boiling White, JVhiteluirst

Maud Wicker,

December, 1956

'95

'26

Daisy Szi'etnani Hughes.

Tarpley. '10

Xancy Rebecca Ogburn.

May

Chenery

Carrie Samuels Spencer, ent '87

'38

Harris, '06

Maymie Olive Myers

Harriet

Rateliffe

^h^Crazi^ Kuykendall, ent '02 Ethel

Mann Rhudy,

\'irginia

Alice Putney,

Mary Beverly

Maggie Sibley Smith,

'13

Shirley McKinney. '56x

Evelyn

'15

'18

(Mrs.) Virginia H. Ruftin. ent

Fannie Ligon,

E.

'54

Ethel Lie/on Miller, '07 'OS

Mary

Louise Price Miller,

'39

Lennie AJay Clemmer,

Lemma

'06

'9()

'31,

'40

Parsons, '14

'96

37


.

TkwA

^a&A

assignment to French ^Morocco for two Martha Alarsli Lewis years' duty '02, a widow since 1934, lives at Wicomico .

.

.

Annie Gresham Lyons '03, agent, writes from San Antonio, Texas: "1812 Daughters and DAR here in Texas have claims on me this March, but I'll get back to Alma

Church

.

.

loyal

a

.

class

A'laude 2\Iater one of these days." Wallace '03, before her retirement from teaching in Clarkston, Wash., was recognized by Delta Kappa Gamma honor society, as one of the superior teachers in her area Ella V. Moore Rector '04 is young people's organizer in her husband's church in Berkeley Springs. W. Va. Charlotte Siiead Grimes is .

.

Martha

The family

Mason of

Kennerly.

1S'.17

Martha Mason KennerU'.

of 1897, requested no flowers at funeral, but that her friends send

Class lier

her beloved Longwood College Alumnae Association. After 60 years what a tribute to her first Alma contributions

to

Mater On May 21. 1956, this distinguished and loyal alumna died at the home of her niece, Mrs. Sherman Hooker, in Tucson, Ariz. Born at Greenway Court, White Stone, Va., in 1872, she was the daughter of Capt. Joseph M. Kennerly !

and Josepha Ann Beale Kennerly. After her elementary education at home under a governess, she graduated from the State

Female Normal School, now Longwood College, in February, 1897. She taught several

years

in

\'irginia,

then

entered

Adelphi

College, Brooklyn. N. Y., and received her B.S. degree in 1903. Later she taught there under Miss Bessie Gaines. In 1913 she became a member of the

biology department at Hunter College in New York where she taught until her retirement in 1943, having been made associate professor in 1924. She received the M.A. degree from Columbia University and did further graduate study at Woods Hole and Cornell. .\lso she traveled extensively. She is survived by two nieces, Mrs. Sherman Hooker, 3210 E. Willard, Tucson. Ariz., and Mrs. John C. Digges, White Post, Va. Martha Kennerly was a great teacher, who continued to love her native \^irginia and Longwood College. She gave to the .Alumnae House a valuable original oil painting "Christ in the Tomb" by Newman and to the Morrison Memorial

Library at Longwood a copy of Campbell's History of I'irgiiiia, which had been given her by the family of Dr. J. A. Cunningham, at his death. Sara Ferguson Thomas, who would have graduated with the famous Class of 1894. sustained a broken hip several months ago, but has recovered sufficiently to get around the house in a walker, so the Bristol Herald Courier reports Bessie Lindsey Farmer '96 who has had two long hospital experiences in the last two years, writes that she will be glad to continue her work as class agent It was a disappointment not to see Mattie Lee Cunninghnm Walker '98 on Founders Day. She wrote, "Each day I kept hoping would be able to come, but my bad I knee prevented, so you see I could not trip around and enjoy the wonderful crowd as I have done for so many years." Vennie Cox Mattoon '00 spent a winter recently with her son Ray, a lieutenant .

.

colonel

38

in

the

Army,

just

before

.

.

.

his

.

quite

a

Her

last

.

.

.

.

.

.

retirement. a vivid picture of

gave

letter

her

since

traveller

Carrie Dungan '06 is president of the Farmville Branch of A.A.U.W. and vice-president of Psi Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma Louise Semones, '06, retired several years ago after teaching in Danville for 41 years ... A letter from Nellie Moreland Slaven, '07, told of her activities during the past half century and of her intentions (jf being present for the reunion of the class of 1907. She has lived in

southern Florida

.

.

.

.

Washington government in

taught

Newport News in

.

for the past 21 years, in service until 10 years ago.

Prior to that she had taught

and

.

in

Hampton

Susan Wright Danville, Arkansas, and Idaho .

.

.

Ruby Leigh Orgain,

has three daughters and two sons. The older son was an officer in World War II the other is a specialist in agricul;

.

.

.

Command who returned to the States in .August after a two-year tour in Formosa. Beryl has five grandchildren Grace Graham Beville '08 is well known in Florida for her creative writing in children's literature Alma Louise Taylor Finchani '08. of "Finch Haven" near Culpeper, is a busy grandmother, but does much community and church work .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Raleigh Nezfs and Observer

carried a lovely picture of Julia Forbes Thornton last year at the time of the presentation to the State of a renlica of the historic Norcom home, in Edenton. N. C. Julia, as honorary president general of Colonial Dames of the X\"II Century, participated presentation cerein the monies. Mary Jones .-\dams '10 is a hostess at

Southwestern

Memphis,

in

Tenn

.

.

.

Judith Savillc for several years suijerintendent of nurses in Palmerton, Pa., is now with the E.xecutive Department of Shepherd Pratt Hospital in Baltimore ... A Pittsylvania newspaper carried a well deserved tribute to Olive Myers Tarpley, at the time of her death last fall. She was active in the Danville Business and Professional \\'oman's Club, the Mt. Herman Woman's Club, and the Epsilon Chapter of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society Myrtle Steele Seay .

.

.

in the A'irginia

DAR. Carrie Bell Elbert '11, who married again after the death of her first husband, is again a widow. She lives in Redondo Beach, Calif Kathleen Saville is now living in a cottage on her home place in Rockbridge County and keeps busy writing Violet Marshall Miller, whose daughter, Mary Beatrice, is also a graduate of Longwood, is an active member of the Greensboro, N. C, Alumnae .

.

.

.

.

.

Chapter

.

.

.

Mary

.Allen

Shan'

McCue

in St.

CatherMilligan

Director of L'pper School

is

upon

Beryl Morris Flannagan Henderson, N. C. has two sons. Eric G., Jr.. an architect, and Stephen, a mechanical engineer, both in business with their father. Her daughter is married to a major in the U. S. Air

Maude Augusta new chairman of

.

.

the

is

Junior .American citizens

ine's

of

.

Rogers McLean

After

Washington

economics

tural

for

nine years after leaving Farmville. touring the West in 1916, she was called to Washington to work for "uncle Sam", and did efficient work in the War Risk Dept. until her retirement several years ago. She still resides in

'99

in

Richmond

.

.

.

Effie

her retirement from her position with the Pennsylvania Railroad moved back to her old home in Cape Charles Iva JVilkersoii Etheridge had the misfortune of breaking her hip more than a year ago, but is now able to get about on crutches. Edith Willis Reed '12 is president of the National Commission of Children's Work for the Methodist Church Mr. Hill Sandidge, vice-president of Richmond's Central National Bank, is Nellie Bristoiv Sandidge's son. -Ada Bierbower '13. retiring elementary supervisor of Nottoway County, was recognized in June as Blackstone's "Woman of the Year." She is now living in Farmville across the street from the .

.

.

.

Alumnae House

PTA

.

.

.

.

.

The Clarke School

Charlottesville celebrated the school's 2Sth anniversary in May and at the same time honored Florence Buford who has been principal of the school ever since it opened its doors Blanche McClintic, who died after a lingering illness last year, was one of the most beloved teachers in the Covington schools. The Covington I'irginian concluded an editorial on her passing with this paragraph "The parents and grandparents of our school children give honor to her memory and are grateful that they too were among the fortunate number who started their school days under the guidance of 'Miss Blanche' "... Annie Moss McClure teaches fifth grade in one of rapidly Hempstead, L. I.'s growing schools. Her oldest son, John, is working in Kansas with juvenile delinquents. Her younger son is in the Army. in

.

.

.

:

Lenuna

Garrett

away on September sympathy

to

Johnson,

'IS.

passed

The class extends her family. Her two daugh15.

Alumnae Magazine


—

:

ters,

ton

Beth Johnson Wright '44, and WinsJoIduoh Biggs, '53, are graduates

Longwood.

of

Callie Bolton Tyler is a world traveler. Last summer she visited most of the European countries and the Holy Land Elizabeth Jarrett, who has taught . . in many Christian Workers' schools .

throughout Methodism, is now giving full time as consultant to churches wishing program of to develop an expanding Christian Education The Daily Press in January carried an excellent picture of Blanche Adams Chapman and a long article about her interest in research and her authorship of valuable Virginia gene.

.

.

alogies.

Margaret Barnard Cassidy

makes

'16

a charming hostess in Edmarton Guest House, her home near Endless Caverns

Evelyn Goodiviu Skinker is librarian Marine Corps School at Quantico To Thelma Parker Babb. the Class of 1916 extends sympathy on the death of her husband, Livingston H. Babb, of

.

.

.

in

.

.

Ivor

.

.

carried

.

The Tiincs-Dispalch

recently of Ruth picture outgoing president of the Vir-

a

Jamison,

.

Home Economics Association Louise Fletcher is doing associational missionary work in Scott County, with headquarters at Gate City Brenda Doggett and her husband live Griffin alone on a farm in Isle of Wight, she writes, but haven't much time to be lonely, for their four married children live near enough for tlie nine grandchildren to spend much time with them Aurelia Kayton Porter is hospital director, Barney Convalescent Hospital, in Dayton, Ohio, and also a member of civic and church boards in her city Lelia Rebecca Carter Thomas has been .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

clerk

for

W

N &

the

.

.

Crestview School author of an

;

.

.

.

DAR

—

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

and auditors. Katharine Gilbert '18, Grace Richardson Fletcher '19x, and ilildred Ra;isdalc Jackson '25 attended the summer session at Longwood Frances Azile Hancock Dallas is a teller in a Richmond bank .

.

.

.

.

.

Clara AU'blctt Rurrier writes "We are wintering in Richmond and it's good to :

December, 19S6

Bernice Nuckols grade teacher at .

.

Richmond. She

in

the

is

"All

entitled

article

Aboard for Antarctica," of The Instructor.

June issue

in the

To Kate Co.r Bond, the Class of 1919 extends sympathy on the death of her husband, Ivan F. Bond Myrtle ReveIcy Brown, loyal class agent as always, found time this year to write each classmate, even though it had to be done "enroute on the Super Chief to California, seeking a little sun and change for a not too well husband." Anna Penny Willis is interested in writing. Many of her poems, short stories, and articles have been published, and one of her plays has been produced in major networks Catherine Riddle, who was in a bad automobile accident last summer, writes that she is about as good as new again. Bessie Mead's 16-year-old daughter is living with Catherine while her mother and father are in Japan where he is in charge of Fukuoka Army Hospital. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Rash Rooke

Lucille

member

'22 is an active Highland Park Woman's

of the

Club, Garden Club. Citizen's Association, and the Country Club of \'irginia Sarah Stubblefield has the enviable record of having taught 29 years and missed only one day. She has taught in the Methodist Sunday School for almost as many years Nancy Reed Quarles '57, daughter of Nancy Crisinan Quarles. was maid of honor to Queen Shenandoah XXIX at the Apple Blossom Festival in Winchester in April. Her father, super.

.

.

.

.

.

intendent of the city schools, has been the author and narrator of the festival's

Pageant

annual

Spring

of

time

since

Lilliam Griffin Turner

formerly a homemaker and church '23.

teacher, is now school worker in Smithfield To Mary Tyler Baker Baber, the Class of 1923 extends sympathy on the death of her husband, a prominent civic leader in .

Cumberland County

.

.

Margaret Glenn

.

.

,

Van Huss,

of Elizabethton, Tenn., has 17 and 13. Her husband died in 1954 Maria Sterrett Swecker's daughter received last year's National Geographic Society award for her essay on conservation. Margaret Hubbard Seely '29 and family, after 30 months in Japan, now live in Wahoo, Neb., where Colonel Seely is commanding oflncer of the Ordnance plant Lillian Rhodes, who "has lived ail over the United States," has settled down in Fairmont, W'. Va.. built a house, and doesn't think she will move again. She is art chairman at Fairmont State College .'\lma Hunt, executive secretary of the Woman's Missionary Union, Baptist Church, writes of her work "My territory covers 24 states so I have This wide and wonderful contacts past summer I was sent to the Baptist

two

.

:

"By some

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

World

Alliance meeting in London and the opportunity to visit mission points in Europe and the Near East." Audrey Frank Birdsall's son Gilbert was a special guest at a recognition dinner at the National 4-H Club Congress held

given

.

.

Chicago Leyland is in

teacher,

last fall

club

.

.

.

Eunice Basseit

mother of two and church worker

the

.

sons, .

.

.

Elva Reynolds Powell, who was teacher of the year for her county in 1953, had to give up her regular work that very year for a very serious operation. .She

miracle,

am

I

able to

do most of the things I've always done, even substitute teaching." Evelyn Thompson Law and her daughter have recently returned from a summer in Europe. They visited England and the .

Continent.

Her

son

.

.

at Aledical College

is

Richmond Roberta Skipwith Self lives in Montgomery, Ala. We trust that her son who was ill in March has entire-

ini

.

.

.

ly recovered former missionary .

.

is(

now

Joy Burch

.

nurse

infirmary

Shetfey,

Belgian Congo,

in the

Lynchburg

at

College.

Esther Kut:: Rusmisel '31 is active in the Woman's the community church, Club, and Boy Scouts in Great Neck, L. I. She has a daughter 16 and a son Frances Elizabeth Stephenson 10 Kitchen is bank teller and secretary in Wakefield Mabel Barksdale Norris, formerly "forelady" with E. I. duPont Co.. has returned to her first love teaching Jane Brou'ii West, we are glad to know, is able to lead a normal life, after several years' invalidism from and two polio. husband, her Jane, daughters and a son are living in Lombard, III, where he is associated with a Dorothy Goodlarge steel corporation he Broadwater, of Middleboro, Ky.. was unable to attend her 25th reunion in March on account of the illness of her daughter Caroline, but she and her husband later brought their children to see .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Alma Maters. Longwood, and William and Mary. Lois Cox '3i has returned to the Maryland School for the Blind in Overlea. Martha Md.. to be its principal Guntcr Meidling, formerly engaged in

their

.

.

.

Research at Aberdeen Proving

Ballistic

teaching at home again in Katie Kidd Austin has recently been appointed Elementary Supervisor in Buckingham County Margaret G. Brown is reading consultant with Allyn and Bacon, with headquarters Irene Leake Gottsin Dallas, Texas chalk lives just seven minutes from Times is

Lynchburg

.

.

.

.

.

.

Square

in

.

.

.

Hoboken. N.

J.

Elizabeth Glenn Cockrell '34

sons, .

.

writes

Ground,

1936.

Railway for 10

she is also correspondent for the Crewe Chronicle Ellen Lash is a member of the Executive Committee of the Virginia Association of English Teachers. Hattie Robertson Brinkley '17 has held offices in most of the church and community organizations in which she has worked garden club, Chapter, hospital board, and the Woman's Society in her church \n article on Southside ^^irginia's scientific tobacco growing and curing, written by Lee DrumcUcr \'ought was published in the March Bulletin of the Virginia Geographic Society Louise Gibson Sterrett, postmistress at Rockbridge Baths, was one of the 11 alumnae who joined the group that went to New York in June on the Blue and Gray Clipper Theater Train Kate Louise Ji'ooldridc/e Watkins before her marriage taught in the Roanoke schools, and in the summer worked in Home Mission fields for her church. Slie has a son and a daughter, both graduates of the University of Rochester Gladys Tucker Rollins is president of the Charleston. W. Va., Chai)ter of UDC, officer in the Iris Garden Club, and member of other community and civic clubs. She has three sons, the oldest a junior partner in his father's company of accountants

years

.

charming

ginia

.

be back in \'irginia." Stanley is a fourth

is

active

community aflfairs in Kilmarnock. She Betsey Wilkinson has two sons Darden was pictured in the Roanoke in

.

U'orld Nezvs

.

.

over the caption Educational Fundamentals. Betsey was reading to her first graders while they were taking their Dorothy daily 30-minutes rest period Eubank Allen, husband Dr. J. P. Allen, and daughter Patsy went to Switzerland last year where he has served as visiting professor at the theological seminary at Nancy Harrison McRuschlikon Laughlin's husband, Sam. is head of the science department at Woodberry Forest and director of Camp Briar Hills in the summer .. Maria D. Williams received her M.S. degree at the University of Florida in August. Alaude Rhodes Cox. '35. is working as

Fourth

R

last fall

added

to

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

secretary at Smithfield High School. She has three children: Herbert. 13. Nancy. Jessica Jones 10. and Robert. 8. Binns, homemaker. mother of two sons, .

.

.

substitute teacher, worker in civic and religious groups, is one of the outstanding citizens of Glen Allen.

Cleo Reynolds Coleman. '38, has two Brenda Lou 7 and Bruce 4 Margaret Lee Bailey Bowers of ArlingBecky 4 ton also has two children The class of 1938 extends and John 1 children

.

:

.

.

:

.

.

.

39


sympathy to Elizabeth Harris Miller on the death of her husband, Robert Morton Ritchie Miller, in February, 1956. Ellis Chandler is a busy housewife and substitute teacher in Lawrenceville. She .

.

.

has two daughters, Judy and Mary Anne Grace Allen Pittard Sydnor reports "a wonderful trip last August through New England and up the St. Lawrence." .

.

.

June 1905 Edith Dickey (Mrs. John R. Morris) 834 Locust Ave., Charlottesville, Va. (Mrs. J. Secretary: Clair Woodruff Luckin Bugg) Farmville, Va. Lucy Brooke Jennings of Chevy Chase, D. C, is making plans to be at the Lucy Alumnae Meeting in 1960 President:

.

.

.

Simpson retired in 1953 48 years of service in teaching. Since her retirement she has been called to teach mathematics in the College of William and Mary and V.P.I, evening schools. Lucy's daughter Helen teaches English in Blair Junior High School in Norfolk Alice Paidett Creyke writes very interestingly of her sons, Geoffrey a lawyer in Washington, D. C. Jr., and Dick, a producer of instructional films Ellen Lee for Esquire and Coronet Wilson, our politically minded member, has a lawyer son living in Roanoke Mary Eivell Hundley keeps young by working with the youth of her community Myra Howard spoke on Friendship with South American Countries at the Round Dozen Club in Pulaski recently after

Alaiison

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Davis teaches Spanish at the University Zula Cutchins calls herAlabama self an old maid in her letter, which proves to me that she has not lost her sense of humor. She spends some of her spare "Miss Issie" time writing poetry as Isabelle Harrison was lovingly called at St. Christopher's School in Richmond, where for 27 years, she was receptionist, secretary, registrar, and "pal" of thousands of boys, retired last year and is living in Richmond Minnie Blanton Button and Martha Blanton still live in Farmville and are fortunate to be able to keep in touch with our Alma Mater. Minnie carries on the work of her late husband in the insurance business. Martha of

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Randolph Chapter, DAR The class was saddened to hear of the death of Lennie May Clemmer in May. for Judith

.

.

.

.

.

Antown library Nidermaier Phipps is a past president of the Clintwood Senior Woman's Club. She is at present District Chairlibrarian in the

is

man

.

of the Federation

Minnie Blanton (Mrs. H. E. Button Jr.) Farmville, Va.

President:

Secretary: Blanche Nidermaier (Mrs. C. E. A^ermillion) Box 183, Dublin, Va.

seems that 13 has been a lucky number for our class of 13, for after 47 years we are all still living and approaching our fiftieth anniversary. I do hope at that time we can have a complete reunion, which will be a wonderful experience Happy Wilder is still a popular teacher in the South Boston school, and someone identified her as "the girl with the beautiful name". Katherine Pennyhacker Wright, our class treasurer, still has her home in \\'aynesboro, and spends her winters in Broadway Lucy Robins Archer and her husband live at his old home place, "Malvern" on the James River, near Richmond. She enjoys her church work. She writes that she often sees Miss Eloise Harrison, under whom It

.

.

.

.

.

.

she studied at

40

Longwood

.

.

.

.

.

Margaret

.

Loan Funds,

the

teaches an adult Bible class in the Presbyterian Church. She ow-ns and operates the Dickenson County Hospital since the death of her husband. Dr. R. L. Phipps, in 1951 As for me, the only spectacular thing I ever did was to mother a beautiful daughter who now has a son who is the joy of my life. (Editor's note: Mrs. Vermillion celebrated her 45th wedding anniversary in July and does extensive church work in Dublin.) .

.

.

1914

Diploma

1921

President: Elizabeth Moring (Mrs. W. E. Smith) Farmville, Va. Secretary: Carolyn L. Harrell, 113 3Sth

Newport News, Va. Sarah Andrezvs Putnam was kind enough to write me about Founders Day. She enjoyed her week-end stay with her St.,

daughter, Anne Price White, then a freshman. In addition to her daughter, she has a son, Jack, who is making a career of the Navy. She makes her home in Arlington and is a research analyst for the Defense Department Only about five members of our class were present on Founders Daj'. Elizabeth iloring Smith is in and out of the College frequently keeping up with its activities. Beth Gannaway is still teaching and conducting European tours during the summer months. Lucille Chappell Jones who has two children and two grandchildren lives on a farm in Prince Edward. .

:

River Road, Richmond, \"a. Kathleen Browning Holland, who lives in Bethesda, Md., lost her husband about two years ago. We extend our deepest sympathy to her Susan Minton ^NIcReynolds' husband had the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity conferred upon him recently by Randolph Macon College Josephine Sherrard has just completed 20 years of nursing at the .

.

.

.

.

.

Crippled Childrens' Hospital in Richmond Evelyn Purccll Davis and her husband Judge Davis of Charleston, W. Va., .

.

.

issued invitations in June to the marriage of their daughter, Staige, to Lt. WilLeli.i. liam Nolley of Richmond Kabler Boggs lives in Little Rock. Ark., and is the wife of Dr. Marion Boggs, pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church Annie Irene D-unn Clarke is there completing her 42nd year of teaching this Lila year. She has two grandchildren McGehee Vreeland writes from Charlotte, N. C, "My days are full. I find tutoring very interesting and am eternally grateful .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

for the training I got at Longwood ... cherish every hour at the College" .

.

I .

Mary Margaret Uniberger Groseclose, we are happy to report, has recovered from two serious eye operations

.

.

.

Marie

Jones Elcan's son, Cleveland, is editor of the /roil. Worker Magazine, which published the history of Longwood last year Anne Stone Stewart's daughter Barbara was married recently to a young Lutheran minister ... A Charlotte, N. C, newspaper carried this note about IMarie O'Neill's husband that her classmates .

.

.

"The Charlotte be interested in Boys' Qioir \\-as founded and has been supervised for many years by James P. McAIillan. The Choir has often been re-

w-ill

:

.

.

Myrtle Chappell McCutchen lives in Santa Clara, Calif., and is doing work and substitute teaching. Caralie Woolridge has taught in Norfolk since 1921. After attending several colleges,

DAR

she received a B.S. at Longwood in 1948. She teaches in the Walter H. Taylor School and is superintendent of the Primary Department in her church school. Mary Nichols whom we counted a member of our class for two years was in Europe for the summer. Grace Oakcs

away suddenly

Burton's husband passed

President and Acting Secretary Maria Bristow (Mrs. T. J. Starke) "Rustom",

.

January 1909

.

Dorothea Buck Latin American Fund, and the Mary Macon Student Loan Fund and also Scholarship Fund for teaching of the mentally handicapped child. She

were delighted to have a newsy from Betsey Lemon Davis. She

married Charles Jones Davis, of Rocky Mount, Va., in 1909. Betsey has six children, two daughters who attended Longwood College, Catherine 'ii, now Mrs. William C. Sumner of Roanoke, and Betsey '45x, now Mrs. Jackson Betts of Kenbridge; four sons, and 17 grandchildren. She is hoping that one of her six granddaughters will come to Longwood Clair Woodruff Bugg has just had a paper, "The Marriage of Pocahontas", published in the July and August numbers of the Norfolk and l!^estern Manazine. This story was written

.

toinette

We

.

letter

.

ferred to as the most professional organization of its kind in this section of the country."

in

Our sympathy

July.

is

extended to

She is the author of a book of poems which is to be published in a revised edition in November, and teaches in

her.

Danville.

Jane Bacon Lacy's husband is Greek and Latin Professor in Catholic University of America and a writer. His book, "Pearl of Great Price", an account conversion to the Catholic faith, published some years ago. Jane writes "We have three children. The eldest boy is a businessman in Kansas City in a construction firm founded by his grandfather. Our second boy has just completed his first year at Catholic University. Our daughter who is in the Convent of the Sisters of Notre Dame in Cleveland, has just received the habit of the order and the white veil of a novice. It is a teaching order so she is keeping the family tradition. For the four consecutive years of her high school work, she won a medal in the National Latin Contest" Reva Graves Gregory is a member of UDC, DAR, \\'oman's Club, of

his

was

:

.

.

and

.

and

W.S.C.S..

an

officer

in

most

of these organizations, besides being the Among those organist in her cliurch serving on the state level this year in the Business and Professional Woman's Club will be Audrey Glenn Mustoe. of .

.

.

Anna Vries Carter is Newsoms Elementary School.

Hot Springs principal of

.

.

.

She has two sons, one with a Master's degree from the University of North Carolina and the other a senior in high school

.

When

.

.

the

president

of the

Corporation in Richmond, Ind.. died in 1952, he left the management of his business to his wife, Ann Bullock Davis. Ann also has a gracious home,

Davis

two small 180 acres

boys, .

.

.

and manages a farm of Moore and her

Ida Saville

Alumnae Magazine


Cleveland, Tenn. He. live in formerly agricultural missionary to India, has been and continues prominent in

husband

V.P.I, projects.

wood

Alildred Hall Clark is principal of the Urbanna Elementary School and lives at Wake Ringgold Front Aliller is in the Philippines where she is teach-

Diploma 1924 :

ville,

\'a.

.

.

.

.

.

Last

year

she taught on Okinawa. She visited New Zealand, Tasmania, Java, and Bali this summer Winnie Sutherland, who holds a ALA. degree from the University of Virginia, is supervisor of secondary schools in Fairfax County Doris Cochran Klotz has been elected president of the Southside District V.F.W.C. As for me, I have been most active in community projects. have one son ing

President Nancy Lyne ( Mrs. Garrett A. Taylor) "Old Waverly", Gordons-

.

.

winter.

this

.

.

.

Ruth Winer

Secretary:

Morton

(Mrs.

B. Brown) Standard Furniture Company, Strawberry St., Cape Charles, V'a.,

Louise Bates Chase lives in Scarsdale, N. Y., substitutes in the Westchester County schools, and is writing a children's education program for TV or radio Elizabeth Rothrock Blount .

.

.

and husband live in Arlington. He with the Department of Agriculture ;

is

his

win trophies at the National Dahlia Shows in Washington. They have lived in many cities, but are settled in Arlington now. One child, a son with a Master's degree, is married Reva Blankenbaker Holden is a grandmother and lives in Passiac, N. J., with her son. One of her daughters is in the Air Force. Reva is at present a reporter for the Aletropolitan School Study Council. She has travelled in the U. S. and Canada Doris Crocker Warthen, with her three daughters and husband, never has a dull moment. She is a member of the PTA, Garden Club, Woman's Club and her church in Lynchburg. Her husband has published Longwood's yearbook for many years Mary Friend Best, her doctor husband, and son live in the state of Texas and love it there Elizabeth Paylor Hart of Farmviile holds offices in her church and teaches a Sunday School class. Her home is two doors from where Miss Munoz and dahlias Capitol

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Harriett once lived. Remember? Her son attends R.P.I, in Richmond Etta Sazi'yer Hart, also of Farmviile has a son, Charles Willard, Jr. He is a medical writer for a pharmaceutical company in Philadelphia Isabel Bilisoly Pruden received her B.S. degree from Longwood .

.

.

.

.

.

summer. She her husband teaches. She stated this

lives

in

and

with

two

Portsmouth sons and

Elizabeth Brady

tliat

married her brother and lives in Louisiana Ruby Walton Gentry teaches and lives in Warwick. She vacationed with her husband and daughter in Maine. She wrote that Kathleen Smith Baker lives .

.

.

Newport News,

in

Tnrnbull Ellis has a very busy Living in Wilmington, Del., she is

Julia life.

in the SPCA, Red Cross, and Community Chest. She is president of the Immanual Church Guild and works

active

on the "A Day ject to pairs.

raise

She

and Doris

in

New

Old

money

the

for

Castle" pro-

church

re-

Mary Tnrnbull Harding Cochran Klotz each fall when sees

she journeys to Emporia for quail shooting W'ith her husband, who works for the duPont Company Alary Piercy .

Abercrombie

.

.

Appalachia is active in church work, garden club, music club. Woman's Club, A.L.A., and the Girl Scouts. She and her husband have one grandchild,

of

their

only

daughter's

son

Gladys Griffin Jeter teaches in Lynchburg. She received a B.S. degree from Lynchburg College in 1954 She has been commuting to the L^niversity of Virginia each summer for a ALE. degree. Her daughter .-Knn is a junior at Long.

.

.

.

.

.

We

who graduated from William and Mary and worked towards a Alaster's degree at the L'niversity of Connecticut where he met his wife, an honor graduate. He ser\-ed two years in the Armed Forces and was an instructor while at Camp Gordon Over here on the Eastern Shore I meet three of our classmates. Alice Disharoon Elliott, whose husband is a retired captain, has three children and recently purchased a home in Onancock. Alabel Cathey Walters and her husband built a beautiful home in Exmore. Their son is in the Armed Forces. Lelia Ackiss Charnock lives just outside of Cape Charles in her new home with her husband and three children and is teaching again at .

.

—

.

.

.

Halifax counties, Ruth Jennings Adams married and is now a calculator operator and clerk in her husband's tobacco auction warehouse in South Boston. She lives in nearby Clover Peggy Lou St^^arnes .

.

.

Senter resumed teaching in Salem after the death of her husband in 1954. She has two children Peggy Gene, a college :

sophomore

who wants

research, and

to do scientific a high school senior

Bill,

.

Cheriton.

.

.

.

.

? Selina Hindle retired in 1953 after 42 years of public service. She is now making some of her dreams come true enjoying church and garden club work, and looking after her little home. She says the latchstring is always out for any members of the class who might be After teaching French in Amelia and English for 14 years in Amelia and

class

.

December, 1956

Degree 1926

Ann Smith (Airs. James F. Greene) 2808 Alarion Road, Country Club Hills, Camp Hill, Pa. Secretary: Olive Smith (Mrs. Warren D. Bowman) Bridgewater, Va. President:

Elizabeth Roberts passed away on Alay 1956, at her home in Bridgetown. Elizabeth, a most loved and respected member of her class, was one of the most faithful members of the group, always ready and willing to do more than her part. She attended all of the Alumnae meetings of her chapter and acted as secretary to the chapter for a number of years. She had many friends among her business associates, and in her church group. She was administrative assistant in military personnel. Office of Quartermaster General, Department of the Army. 22,

Eleanor Bennett Ryder has been teaching the third grade for the past few years in Norfolk. Her husband is a chemist for the Royster Guano Company. Son Douglas graduated from William and Alary in '52 and is in advertising work in San Francisco. Daughter Eleanor will graduate from Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, in instrumental music next Mary Booker lives in Southyear east Washington. She is busy buying a house and working for the Government in the office of the Quartermaster General Ida Hill has completed of the Army 31 years of teaching mathematics and science. 19 years of which were at Deal Junior High, Washington, D. C. .She was elected to Alpha Delta Kappa Honor Sorority for teachers in Alay and is recording secretary of her chapter. Recently, she and her sister received appointments to a Chemistry-Physics Teacher National Institute sponsored by the Science Foundation and held at American LTniversity. As part of this program, she worked with research scientists in Polymers at the National Bureau of Stand.

.

.

.

.

.

ards.

Who

Ann Smith Colonel

James

Greene, '2<>. with her family: F. Greene. William. James, Jr.,

and

.

.

in

Ann

Ann Smith Greene had two weddings

.

Jim, Jr., on August 25, on October 6. Those of us atended the reunion wish to thank for the lovely breakfast she planned

the family

and

who Ann

:

Billy,

Bessie Longwood House Gordon Jones writes she is having a time

for us at

.

keeping up with Farmviile soil .

.

herself .

on

.

.

dear

old

Sue Puckett Lush

is

chairman of councils of the Virginia Congress of Parents and Teachers. She and her husband and daughter, Rhoda, who graduates from high school next June, plan to fly to Panama, w'here Dr. Lush interned, and visit Thelma IVoolfolk Alonogan. Thelma has lived in the Canal Zone for 20 years and writes she is up to her neck in Girl Scout work, chairman of \'olunteer Services for the Canal Zone Chapter of the Red Cross, and completing a Gray Lady assignment recruiting and training 25 Gray Ladies and nine Gray Alen for a mental hospital. These workers, as well as the patients, are of West Indian or Panamanian backstate

round. The Gray Men are the first in the history of the Chapter. She has two ilaughters, Elizabeth 17, and Kay 15 .Audrey Chc^cning Roberts, we are grateful to report, has entirely recovered from her serious operation a year ago. •

.

.

.

We

extend our sympathy to Kate Trent whose mother died recently after a long illness at the Southside Hospital in Farmviile. Bugg Hughes' daughter Elizabeth is a sophomore at the LTniversity Texas studying to be a speech therapist.

Alartha has the record for teaching in our

of

41


Duncan Giddens keeps

busy

quite

sub-

stituting in the Suffolk schools, taking an active part in church activities and

traveling with her husband. They came to see me on their 20th wedding anni-

versary Margaret Mackascy Parker and her husband Gilbert celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary this year. They still live in Petersburg Annie Gris Mclnlosh Boxley is the publisher of the Louisa County newspaper, Tlie Central I'irginian Evelyn Thurston Daughtry .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

has left the teaching profession since her father's death. She is now secretary and treasurer of his company Caroll .

White's

Cromivell

from \',E.S. and ington and Lee.

is

son. Jay, graduated a freshman at Wash-

grand letter from Liz Scott Southall. She has three children, Eliza 17, Lucy and \'alentine S. Her husband is 14, Commonwealth's Attorney in Amelia where they have lived for 18 years Marion Grimes Hemingway still lives in Norfolk where her husband is in the a

and Lucy Susan,

.

junior high in Dallas is director of elementary education for Gloucester, Mass. She and her mother have just bought an ndorahle old Cape Cod house. Come on, girls, let's go! She says they can look down on 13, is in

.

.

.

Martina Willis

Lobster Cove, a mecca for artists, where, by the way, Lilian Nunn spent two summers studying under the famous painter Romona. Lilian lives in Denver, but as art consultant in the Rocky Mountain area for her firm, she spends much of her time traveling. She writes "I get home to Denver every third week end by plane ... I was on the plane just ahead of the one that was exploded by bombs a :

few

minutes

number

after

Denver.

left

it

My

wasn't up !" Mamie Daniel Barbee is a substitute teacher in the Richmond schools. She has three children, a son and two daughters, one of whom, Betty Sue, is a sophomore at Longwood Florence Riss Richardson is assistant in the Treasurer's Ortice at Longwood and has been taking some work in the graduate program recently launched at our Alina ^Iater Another of our just

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

West is Hattye Blankenship who teaches home economics in Gallup. X. Mex. She came home to Norton this summer and renewed many FarmviUe

class in the

She keeps in touch with Clara TJioiiipson Caulk in St. Michaels. Md. Olive Smith Bowman has been

acquaintances. .

.

.

part-time instructor in mathematics

and Bridgewater College, for the past five j'ears and is taking graduate work to renew her teachers certificate. violin

at

Son, Warren, Jr., is a physician at the Indian Hospital, Zuni, N. Mex. Daughter Helen is married and has a baby son.

Ruth

is

a

sophomore, majoring

college

music, and Jean is a junior in high school with leanings toward the nursingprofession.

in

Diploma President:

Leigh) Secretary:

1927

Mebane Hunt (Mrs. William address

unknown.

Wallace 514 22nd Va.

St..

\'irginia Beach,

Sara Doll Burgess lives in Hickory, N. C, where her husband is a C.P.;\. Their son Arthur is in junior high, and Betty is a college sophomore Mary .

42

.

.

.

estate business. Her son Billy 22. back at the University of Virginia after serving two years in the Army. Peyton, her 16-year-old daughter, is a junior at Maury High. Marion teaches second grade at The Ferebee School Louise (inry Alkire's older son Gary is a first classman (senior) at the Naval Academy. Bill is 16 and a junior at Baltimore Polytechnic. Louise and her husband celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary this year Sara Cross Squires is living in Alexandria where David is a real estate broker. Sally, 18, graduated from St. Agnes in June with athletic honors and is a college freshtnan. Emily, 15, is a is

.

.

.

.

.

sophomore there and quite a nice pianist. Sara is president of the Hunting Creek Garden Club and enjoj's membership in the (iarden Club of Virginia Living in Farmville gives Kitty Hatch Whitfield the opportunity of a close contact with the College girls. It really keeps her young She is a very active alumna and has been a second mother to my daughter Julia Grey, who loves Longwood with the same devotion all of us did. Remember '57 is our 30th year. Let's return for Founders Day and re-live the memories of yester year .

.

.

I

Ritter)

:

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

1932 President:

Henrietta Cornwell (Mrs. F.

Win-

Greystone Terrace,

chester, Va.

Secretary

Nancy Shaner

:

(

Mrs. M. P.

Strickler) Oceana, \'a. Let's renew interest with the celebration of our 25th anniversary in March of 1957! Frances Barrell Stallings .

.

.

writes that "There isn't anything very interesting about me. I have three children, two boys and a girl. The two older children are in school but David is only 2. ^ly time is all filled up with household duties and Sunday school and church work" Kathryn Claud Stewart has been married for 18 years; and has two daughters, Kay 16 and Betty 14. She belongs to the .

.

.

Suffolk-Nansemond Alumnae Chapter, and enjoys talking about Farmville at least twice a year. She sees Charlotte Mutehins Roberts quite often. Charlotte has one daughter who is attending college, and she has gone back to teachin,g Kathryn Claud writes of the passing of one of our classmates. Nancy Boykin Harrell, Kathryn's She first cousin. died in the sjiring, leaving her husband and three children, ages 18, 14, and 7. Nancy, with her winning smile and vivacious personality, was loved by us all. Our deepest sympathy is extended her family Ellen Earl Jones Huffman keeps busy, she writes, with Girl Scout Council work. Woman's Club, and church work. Her daughter "Ginger" is now 13 Helen Ward Forrest of the Diploma class is a teacher at Fort Monroe Post School. In her home county, she is a member of the official board of Trinity Methodist Church, and of the Poquoson School Board. She has two sons, Fayette and Clinton ^[ary Ellen Johnson Garber's husband, for five consecutive terms a member of the Richmond City Council, is the newly elected mayor of that city. Alary Ellen received her degree from Longwood in 1947. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Degree is this news from the Ethel LaBoyteaux is a Gray Lady at McGuire's \'eterans' Hospital in RichMoffett Beall. Moffett .(rjiimond strong Beall's daughter, now a sophomore at Swarthmore was awarded the Peaslee Scholarship last year for a year's study at the University of Aix-Marseille in France. Her fluent knowledge of French made her eligible for this honor Mary E. Carrington, who has recovered from the serious heart condition that kept her out of school for so many weeks last year, is again teaching mathematics in the high school in Durham, N. C. She is Worthy Chaplain in the White Shrine, a step above the Eastern Star in Masonic interests. Mildred Spindle, teacher and guidance counselor in the Alexandria schools, is an active member of the North \"irginia Langnage Arts Association and Northern Virginia Guidance and Personnel Workei-s.

There

class

.

Peggv Barham (Mrs. D. O.

.

real

.

M.

She and her husband

Jimny live in Boykins, but spend their summer weekends at their cottage at Sand Bridge near A'irginia Beach ... I had

Cora Helen Meeks Anthony, '26. and her husband, Mark, with their children. Frances

Claiborne Hall. Stuait. Va. home of Mabel Barksdale Norris, '31

.

.

.

.

1936 President:

Itasca

Mapp) 87 Post Secretary: son Ames

Waters (Mrs. H. W. St., Warwick, \'a.

Helen Boswell )

Smithfield,

(Airs.

Hanger

Alargaret Clarke

where her husband

J.

Wil-

^'a. is

in

Maine

a major in the Air

is

Mary Taylor and Harry Jr. are Kathleen Ranson a full-time received her AI. A. degree at George Peabody College in 1941 and her doctorForce. 11,

Her

Sara

8,

four children,

Betsy job .

6, .

.

University of Alissouri in 1952. associate professor of education and supervisor of elementary education in Central Alissouri State College. Last summer she took a trin around the world. In 1952 she went to South Ameriate at

She

is

tlie

now

Alumnae Magazine


!

!

in 1953, to Europe and the Middle East. In 19S1 slie represented Longwood College at the inauguration of Dr. \\'oodward at Central College of Fayette, AIo.

ca,

,

Lucy Potter Kirks

.

.

Washing-

lives in

ton where her husband is a lawyer. They have a young lady 9, with platinum blonde pig-tails to her waist and "a oneman demolition squad" who was 3 on Kitty Woodson Batte Halloween and her husband have recenth' bought a house in Alexandria. Kitty has gone back to teaching in a church nursery school .

.

.

.

.

,

.

.

Pa.,

lives

in

her 5-year-old son

lost

.

.

.

.

Tom

.

.

Newport News and is She has two precious children, David 5 and Linda 4 Florence Sanford Lyne is living just out of Richmond. She is kept on the run with a son at V.P.L and another around Lelia Sanford Shumate, her busS band, and three sons, 12. 2. and 4 months

Hartman

lives

teaching

again.

in

.

.

.

.

Standardsville teaching in La Plata.

are living

O'Brien

in

is

.

.

.

Claudine

Md

Dot Deans Bohannon, who lives in ,\ltaShe vista. was down for the reunion. has three children, Rebecca, .A^lvah III, and Dorothy, and hardly looks a day older Jeanette Jones Spivey came all the way from Harrington Park, N. J., to be with us. She and her husband have just bought a new home. Jeanette has two children, Barbara 17 and Woody and is church organist and piano 13, Martha Nottingham Rice teacher was busy as a bee carting all of us around Founders Day week-end. She came up in a brand-new station wagon. She lives in Richmond with her husband and two .

.

children

.

.

.

.

Marion Vniberfier Hoffman

.

has been in Montevideo, L^rugiiay for the past two or three years. Her husband is in the Navy. She lost her little girl while there but she has two sons and a

new baby

girl

to

help

fill

She was due back

Doris

in

empty

the the

.

.

Bessie

teaching

is

Norfolk

in

Hart Payne who

lives

in

is teaching again after taking Lottie time out to rear three children ]]'est McAnally has a full hapiiy life with her many activities in Richmond. .

.

.

Her husband practices dentistry there Ruby Blanton Wilkerson lives in Richmond and has the cutest little 3-year-old ..

is

lives in

as petite

and, to

.

.

my

.

Claudia Harteaching in Newport News knowledge, has one daughter

Newport News

per Sturm

.

Margaret Farrar and cute as ever. She

you've ever seen

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

a member of the State Advisory ComThe Times-Herald mittee for Hi-Y in the early summer carried an interesting group picture, Gertrude Le'i'v Conn was presenting the Newport News Chapter Scholarship to Wirtley Anne Raine for 1956 while Dr. and Mrs. .

.

.

Lankford looked on ... .\ bit of news from the home front am happy and content living in our new home, "Whispering Pines" on Cypress River just out of Smithfield. After working 16 years as

assistant

dental I

am

in

my

enjoying

my

husband's ofifice "retirement" to the son. Wilson, Jr.. is

extent. Our a student at Hampden-Sydney. A trip last fall encircling the United States, the northern part of Mexico and the soutlicrn part of Canada convinced me that I can prod Wilson further than Virgin.ia Beach on vacation. fullest

1937

Mary Bowles

President'

Powell

(Airs. R. C. 1636 Mt. \'ernon .Avenue.

Jr.)

Petersburg, Va.

Secretary: Lucy Charles C. Epes

Warwick, is

our

bi.g

Moseley

P. Jr.

news

for the '37ers this time

anniversary

reunion

—come

\'irginia Founders Day in March Tihnan .Aebersold who taught for ei.ght years after her graduation, keeps busy now with her home, her three children, and her work in tlie Women of the Church and in the hospital auxiliary Katherine Milby Fincham last year received a law degree from George Washington University and passed the State Bar. She is one of Virginia's experts Rebecca Glenn Schutlz is on taxes .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

executive secretary of the Red Cross in .Antia her home city, Muncie, Tnd. Hastings Burrell of the Diploma class .

.

.

.

lives in

Orange where

lier

husband Dick

instructor in mathematics and head football coach at Woodbury Forrest is

.

Meet me

at

Longwood

in

.

.

March

December, 1956

1939 President:

the chest last January, but has

in

\'era

Ebel

(Mrs.

.

.

.

.

made

a complete recovery. Frankie Bryan Finch skis and skates with her husband, her daughter 12 and her son 7 during the long winther months in Minnesota. She directs the Junior Choir in her church, teaches modern dance to teenagers at the YWC.\ and belongs to a performing modern dance group along with her daughter. They have recently purchased a building site with a lake and are planning their new home Juanita Carson Ritch, whose husband is a commander in the Navy, is now .

.

.

.

located

.A.rlington

in

bought a home. Elsie

where

they

Their son

13

is

.

.

liave .

.

.

Dodd Sindles new modern

did substitute teaching in a school last year. She was vice-president of her woman's club and joined the .A.AUW'. \\'ith her husband Hal, she flew to Phoeni.x, .Ariz., for a vacation in March .Ann Dugger Mcintosh has four children and a successful career as a journalist in KingsVera Ebel Elmore enjoys tree, S. C. occasional camping trips with her family. Her children are Ann 9. Bobby 7, and Fanny Maj' Putney Boykins, John 4 Elizabeth Tindall Duncan, and Elizabeth Burke attended the luncheon of the Richmond Chapter of the Longwood Alumnae. Elizabeth Burke is teaching at Patrick Henry School in Richmond. Elizabeth Duncan is vice-president of her garden club, on the board of directors of the PT.A, is active in church work, and has time to enjoy her two boys. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Miriam Fieklcn Howell has

R.

B.

a daughter

family traveled fmm Waynesville, N. C, to spend a weekend with Louise Bryan Ballard in Cornelia, 12 and a son

\^a.

20th

.

CMrs.

507 River Road,

)

.

.

.

.

is

Mrs. Nora Berden Rawlinson came Lansing, Mich., for all the way from the reunion. You may be sure a royal welcome was accorded her. She leads a busy lift as teacher and homemaker. She has seven sons and daughters all of them college graduates before she came to Longwood for her degree. Later she received her Master's degree from .

.

.

every year to serve as an effective class Winnie agent. She has four children Frances Eubank, in addition to active club and school work, has been appointed

The

Coates

.

.

.

Pan-Hellenic Association, church circle, and garden club. Peggy Yonng Roper taught her oldest son last year Doris Adkins Pritchard has a son 13 and a daughter 11 Lillian Anderson, Nicklos has a daughter 2^ and lives on Long Island. N. Y. Jacqueline Seal Grove's husband is an attorney in Washington. They have a son 14 and a daughter 10, and are remodeling an old farm house on five acres near Vienna. Their son was accidentally shot .

C. active

Evelyn Masscy Ridge Sanatarium Coleman, busy housewife, finds time

States

Chatham

Baab

.

Juanita Zeigler Stokeley has moved her new home in Preston Woods, Kingsport. Tenn. Alice Zeigler Blackard '32 is her near neighbor Mary .Adeline Chcrnault Gilliken teaches foods and works in the drug room in the Blue

.

last April.

girl

.

Roanoke Rapids, N.

.

.

.

.

Daniel

AAUW,

PT.A., her

visiting Billie and Nat Omara is principal of the elementary

Hawaii

Dorothy Adkins Young has three boys but manages to participate 6, and 2

9,

in the

.

.

.

.

.

.

into

teaching in Richmond. She could not be with us for the reunion due to illness Margaret Pollard in the family Flippen is living in Crewe where her Nell Boszivll liusband is a minister

.

.

Drive,

.

Margaret

Cox who

Hiirtt

is

spot.

.

Lawn

Willow

Acting Secretary: Sara Button (Mrs. G. L. Rex, Jr.) 1505 Greenleaf Lane, Charlottesville, Va.

Evelyn Dickerson Frazier is in church and civic work in her community. She has two sons. Hancock and Edward

in March as a result of polio. She has a daughter 4 and a son 9 who have been a great confort to her during these recent months. Please know that our thoughts Cleaves are with you, ^Margaret

.

.

.

Elmore) 907 Richmond, Va.

.

.

school in

Middleton,

.

.

Billy

Wilkinson Knighton lives in Salem. She has a son 5 and fears that people will think he is her grandson

,

the University of Michigan "Tac" IVatcrs Mapp is so slender and "willowy" that she must be the envy of her two teen-age daughters. She lives in Warwick and has found time to take up her teaching career again Majorie Booton is still working in the art field in Washington and, unless I miss my guess, is having as much fun as anyone in the Class of '36 Chubby Gray '36 and Emilie HoUaday spent the summ.er in

8.

Her

Mildred at the end of June Gentry Gibson has been working as a Theresa bookkeeper in Charlottesville Graff Jamison stays busy in Roanoke with her two boys and many acti\ ities. Nancy Gray Perdue spent a month in Florida this summer with her family. Her girls. Holly and Linda, are 9. Nancy won second place in the ^'-Pres. Cup Golf Tournament at Hidden ^'alley Country Club. She is secretary of the PT.A and publicity chairman for the southwest district of the ^'irginia Federation Sarah Hayes Arniof Garden Clubs istead's husband. Bob, was sworn in as a circuit judge last spring. They have two children and live in Williamsburg Virginia Irby Smith and her husband are very active in a newly organized Charlottesville. in Church Methodist "Ginny" is treasurer of the WSCS. She has been doing substitute teaching, is chairman of the Troop Committee for her Ga.,

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

43


sandwich

daughter's

Brownie troop and helped Albemarle Girl Scout Day Camp this year Margaret Motley

to

on the

involving

Adams

since

staff of the

.

.

11,

.

.

.

of leaders for the Girl

Scouts.

1940 Powell

Tane

President:

Box

Johnson)

328,

(Mrs.

Wytheville,

R.

E.

\'a.

Secretary: Helen Reiff (Mrs. David A. Scott) 207 Latimer Aveime, Wilmington 4, Del.

.-Xcting

.

.

activities

Myra Smith

Ferguson

enjoyed

her

recent visit to Farmville with Harriette Haskins Eubank so much that she thinks we should all try to return for our reunion in 1960. (We think that's a good In May, Myra, Harriette, idea too!) Sudie Dunton Brothers, and "Sis" Sturgis

.

.

ing so

much time due

She and her

sister

to her bad back. sights in their vacation in

saw the

New York City on June. "Moo" says it feels a little funny to teach the seventh grade children of girls with whom she went to school. Frances DeBerry Tindall is teaching in the primary grades in Scottsville. FlazelWood Burbank Thomas, in addition to caring for her baby girl, still finds time to keep house, sew, help Bruce build an addition to her home, bake her own bread, and act as secretarj' to the Philadelphia Alumnae Chapter. Rosemary Howell is still teaching at Hermitage High School, near Richmond, and as she 12 is a home economics teacher, it's a months' job. Rosemary writes that she is already look-ing forward to our ne.xt reunion. Sara Kecsce Hiltzheimer has moved to Danville where her husband, Fitz, has been sent by his insurance company. They are very happy there, and Sara plans to do her bit to relieve the teacher shortage by being an elementary school librarian this fall.

.

.

.

.

and also a trainer

.

.

.

.

between many

.

.

.

2.

in

May as Chairman of the Albemarle Day Camp Committee for the Girl Scouts. I am vice-president of the Council Board

conducts training for board members on the Albemarle Girl Scout Council Board. She is very active in church and civic organizations in Charlottesville and recently joined a garden club. Her daughter, Patsy, is 12 Catherine Mayiiard Pierce has two sons and is superintendent of one of the Sunday School departments in her church Nellie Putney Casteen has two daughters and teaches at Deep Creek High School in Norfolk County Ruth Read Blackman and her doctor husband live in a home on the grounds of Blue Ridge Sanatorium. They have a son 2 Beverly Sexton Hathaway has moved into a new home on the outskirts of Bristol, Tenn. Margaret Stallard Woolling took over a teaching job for the last si.x weeks of school in the spring of 1956 for a teacher who had an accident. She also managed to keep up with her house, her two girls, 13 and 8, and their many pets Frances Steed Edwards and her husband, Doug, have bought a home in Takoma Park, Md. They have .

and

it

our three daughters aged 13, I have been particularly busy

two boys, 10 and 7, and a little girl and a new baby boy. They are up

PTA, and

their ears in Scouts,

4.

to other civic

organizations. Frances suffered a badly broken leg before her baby was born last spring, but is was on the mend when she wrote She chats with Alarguerite Blackwell Seely on the telephone occasionally. ^Marguerite is doing substitute teaching and her daughter is now in kindergarten ... In the summer of 195.S Frances and Doug had a reunion with Pattie Bounds Sellers and her husband, along with some other Longwood Alum.

nae

and

.

.

husbands,

\'irginia Beach.

at

They

Pine

Tree

Inn,

talked so long they

held up closing hour.

Jane Saunders McMurran and her husband have done over a house on the river near Warwick. They have one son Mary SuUenhurger Richardson and Bruce added a son to their family of four girls last year (September, 1955) and bought a home just outside of Charlottesville "Dibbs" Tyree Balboni in San .A.ntonio, Texas, is a busy mama with Betty 5!^, Nancy I'j, and baby Laura Lee Marjorie ]]'icks Jones has a daughter who is a sophomore in high school and a son in junior high "Bunny" Yoncc Hunter has just completed her third term as president of the Eagle Rock Garden Club and two years as publicity chairman of Shenandoah District. She is secretary of so .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

many

.

.

organizations she has a time keeping minutes straight. .All this plus various committees, church organizations, bridge clubs, and two boys keep her plenty busy Katherine Habel has been appointed home demonstration agent for Prince Edward County The^Class of 19,39 extends its deepest sympathy to Virginia Read Turner Yelverton on the death of her 15-year-old son Hugh, III, on August 19, 1956, in an .automobile accident Ruth hliU Bailey's husband. Rev. E. Purnell Bailey, was awarded the degree of Doctor of Divinity by Randolph-Macon College last spring. He preached the baccabureate sermon at Longwood in June, 1956 ... It has been so wonderful to hear from so many of my classmates that writing this letter has really been fun even though I have had .

.

Crockett, with their husbands and children had a reunion of their suite of '40 at Myra's home and talked their heads off! Elizabeth Kent Willis writes that she, her husband who is a design engineer for the H.A.C.A. at Langley Field, and their three sons are an e.xtremely happy and lucky family whose days are occupied with Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, and good scouts

and

!

her

Mary Lou Cunningham Warren husband are building a home

Yorktown. In addition to caring her new baby daughter, Elizabeth Scales DeShazo occasionally finds time to accompany her husband to Washington and Baltimore to see the Yanks Lorana Moomaw wrote a play ball nice, chatty letter, and we're so happy to hear that she was able to teach a whole year without absence after missnear for

.

44

.

x40. of Japan, with Key. Tajima, and their children, Kazuko, Aiko, and Nobuko

Fumi ^yakallama Tajima,

Fumi JJ'akayaina Tajima wrote a fascinating letter of her work with her pastor husband in the suburbs of Kobe, Japan. In addition to caring for three children, she is helping to raise money for a new building for their little congregation of 35 which has, nevertheless, tripled in the past year.

Helen Riss

McDowell was awarded

a

!

.

.

.

"Suite-mates of 1940" Harriette Ilasl\-inn Eubank, Myra Smith Ferguson. Sudie Diuiton Brothers, and Mary Catherine Sturyis Crockett

.

University of Virginia for having completed all work for Doctor of Education degree e.xcept the dissertaShe is supervising principal of the tion. .Allendale Elementary School. Josie Lee Cogsdale Taylor enjoys taking care of her four kiddies, but has time for little else except church and school activities, lean Clarke Fuller accompanied her hus-

certificate

at

band to Florida, and Astoria in connection

later to the Waldorfon trips he won in

New York

with his business. This is tenth year teaching at Fielddale High School. Marian Harden Park and her family planned to vacation in New Mexico and Colorado this year. She states that they love living in Nocona, Texas, where her husband is a Baptist minister. -Mice Burroughs Hope writes that the

.

Jean's

Children

of

.Tosie

Lee Cogxdale Taylor,

'40

new bedroom which her husband and the

Alumn.^e Magazine


;

!

arts and crafts at Camp Glen Laurel, Little Switzerland, N. C. Bill Stone Burchard lives in Alassachusetts. She and her husband have three

Plummer taught

has been running after Ginnie Lynn, our jet-propelled 2-year-old! I sew most of our dresses and there's little time left. In March, Dave accepted a position with the engineering department of the duPont

Company

.

1941 Lea Davis Nash

Purdum (Mrs. Ruth Culpeper,

Bo.x 367,

)

^a.

^-^i&l^ Sons

of

Alice Burroughs Hope, '41.) Chris, Robin, and Mark

two older boys added

:

home

Caralie

mond

Brown

St.,

Larry,

B.

both scholastic and extra-curricular lines. Agnes Crockett Jacoby, who taught home economics at Rural Retreat last year, plans to open a kindergarten at her home Wytheville this fall. Jane Po'well in Johnson says that this has been a healthy, busy, but far more newsworthy year for her. Jane ran into Mary Catherine Sturgis Crockett with her two cute children in Newport News. "Sis" and her doctor husband are now living in Norfolk where he is with the U. S. Public Health

(Mrs. RayW. Franklin

4100

)

Tem

Harriette Haskins 146 Jr.)

:

Elmore Eubank, Wythe Parkway, Hampton, (Airs.

is

activity. She is justifiably proud of young Rob's achievements at school, along

Nelson

Richmond, Ya.

Secretary Pro

her pride and joy (along with the boys!) Olivia Stephenson Lennon is a busy pastor's wife at Clover. Laura Nell Craii.:lc-y Birkland belongs to her local Woman's Club and does church work as assistant organist and with the choir. Her daughter 2 manages to fill the rest of her time In spite of Isabel Williamson Hoyt's four children, she manages to do some Mother's Club work at St. Paul's School where her children attend, Junior League volunteer work, and some community to their

J.

Nelson Brown, our Class Secretary, who has kept us all informed of the activities of our classmates for the past 15 years. She has done a wonderful job and we are sorry she had to give it up. I am going to try to carry on her good work with help from all of you. Alary Hille McCoy received her Alaster's degree in home economics from the University of Wisconsin in June. She is now back in Blacksburg at her job with the Extension. Naucy Fulton Harpaster of Broadmoor in Shrevesport, La., and is in his fourth year there. The cliurch is engaged in a $230,000 educational annex. They also are having the pleasure of living in a brand new par-

back's

husband

A'lethodist

is

Church

sonage with their two children, Nancy 9J4 and Fran 5. Caralie Xelson Brown's husband, Rev. Raymond B. Brown, minister for the Tabernacle Baptist Church has been elected president of the Alinisters Association of Richmond. Caralie is superintendent of the Young People's Department of their church Living in Warwick is Effie Grant Hoyle and family of three girls and a boy Georgia Watson \\'ilkerson has a 300-acre farm three miles northeast of Farmville. She and her husband have a son 10. Georgia is home demonstration agent for the \'irginia Extension Service in Cumberland County. Still on the move is Pat Gihson Stuart's husband. Pat and the children are leaving Florida shortly for New York. From there they will sail to the Mediterranean area for three months of ship following Ruth WinsiL-ad A'laloney has moved back to Warwick from Austin, Texas. Her husband is associated with the N.A.C.A. at Langley Air Force Base. They have two boys and a girl. Laura Boteler Cowne has been teaching in Fredericksburg since the death of her husband in 1954. She and her mother-in-law, Effie Boteler Cowne '01 visited the Alumnae House in July while returning home from Fort Brag.g, N. C, after a visit This bit of news will put us "local girls" to shame. Jean itoyer Scorgie attended our reunion from Pittsburgh, Pa., leaving husband and four children behind. Dorothy Rollins Pauley .

.

.

Jack, and

'40,

Jim

Martha Meade Hardazcay Agnew just go along. I cook, wash, mind Jimmy, hang up clothes, put away clothes, put on clothes, patch knees, weed Service. reports,

"We

a few flowers, and stay outside as much time as is left" don't blame her for that, for she and Perk have such a lovely home, "Inverness", outside of Burkeville. As for me and mine, after reading of the noteworthy activities of the rest of you, I feel asliamed to report tliat my only activity of the past year !

December. 1956

We

.

.

.

.

.

.

Stuart,

\'a.

Let's give a vote of thanks to Caralie

.

Sons of Martha Meade Hardaway Acrnew.

schools are Jack Cock Ferraro and Susie Pearl Crocker Jones, Jack teaches social studies and science in the George Wythe Junior High School in Hampton. Susie Pearl teaches in the elementary grades in Warwick Beverly Blair Henkel is clerk at Churchland Elementary School. Her son Bob is in second grade. Anna George Dashiell and her family have moved into a new home. Anna is teaching in elementary school in Portsmouth. Last summer was a busj' one for Libby West. She chaperoned two students at the National Association of Student .

Secretary:

came from

.

Falls,

Ohio

.

.

Convention

.

Toledo,

at

Ohio,

where a student and she were responsible a discussion group. Libby sponsors both the council at Cradock High and the Tri C Federation of Student Councils. She has also had a very interesting trip to Pennsylvania, New York, and Canada Rachael DcBerry Warren deserves an "A" for effort for trying to attend our class reunion. She and her husband got as far as Blackstone to leave their 2-year-old daughter with her tnother when her husband was taken ill with the measles and the mumps, thus making it necessary for them to return to Portsmouth at once Bert .1/fLaughlin Johnson has her fifth son. They for

.

.

.

.

.

.

are living in Florida. Alargo Gerlaugh has been promoted from the fourth grade to the fifth grade teaching in Alartinsville Louise Painter Stultz is now living in Danville. One of Richmond's newcomers is "Boo" Barham Sion. She and her husband have three boys. Alartha Smith White and her husband have had their third boy. They live in Richmond also Louise Hall Zirkle of Knoxville, Tenn., her husband George, two daughters and a son stopped by and picked up her twin sister Nell Hall Wilburne and her two children and all vacationed together .

.

.

.

.

.

—

at

Daytona Beach,

Fla. Louise

and George

are building a new home. She has just been elected president of the Akima Club (formerly a Junior Woman's Club). Add to this a trip to the American .Academy of Pediatrics in Houston. Te.xas, with a stop over to see New Orleans that just about finished up a very busy

and interesting summer ... I have been so busy helping plan a new home, getting the builders started, taking care of my two, Ellen 10 and Julian III 7 plus .getting information together for the Bulletin that I haven't had time for anything else. Our new house is supposed to be finished in time for Santa Claus so I will tell you more about it next year.

1942

Dodson Katherine Alarv (Mrs. C. N. P'lyler) Gatesville, N. C.

President:

Acting Secretarv Alartv Roberts (Airs. A. AI. Edwards) 2919 Yorkshire Blvd., Louisville 5, Ky. :

.

.

.

Elizabeth Garrett Rountrey and husband had a lovely vacation in Florida this summer Kay PhilHt^s Coenen has increased her family to four two boys .

Council

.

.

Chagrin

.

children. Each summer thej' visit relatives in Newport News. Teaching in our local

.

President: Ruth Lea

.

—

One pleasant surprise as a result of the inquiries was a telephone call from

and two girls now and a seaplane. Kay lives on Hampton Creek in Hampton, and her husband has recently acquired

Nancy Najf Austin on her way through Louisville to Roanoke in July. Nancy

seaplane in wliich he flies his family all over the countryside and even as far Alartha Whelehel as New York City

and dau.ghter

a

.

.

.

and Billy and their two sons 8 and 5 3 moved from Alemphis to Frances Louis last January St. Rosebro Garrett visited Roanoke in June. .

.

.

45


Irma Graff Holland had a luncheon for her with May Winn Webb, Jane En.gleby Haynie, Sara Clinc Dabney, Mary Lou Shannon Delaney, and Nell Hurt attending. May has three boys and teaches at the New Cove Spring High School in Roanoke. Jane has four children Becky Lowry Carwile has three boys and is Den Mother and Sunday School tea:her Connie Conson McCIanan has recently moved to San Diego, Calif. ,with her three children and husband who is Helen Hawkins teaches in the Navy in Arlington County and sponsors and coaches a bowling league for children .\rlene in addition to Girl Scout work Hunt w-as awarded a blaster of Arts Syracuse University in degree from .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

\'irginia Dazi'lcy Capron Minnesota \\here her husband a college professor. They have a son Rachel Abcntathy Paulson and fami-

August is

.

.

recently moved to Gloucester. Her son Ernie' is 11. She plans to teach in Glouctster High School. She and Noblin Woodson attend the same church. Em.ma has three small sons. Eva Reid Verelle and husband live in Richmond but spend their w^eekends at their trailer on the Piankatank River. Eva's father, Mr. Reid, our night watchman, joins Jean Steel Armthem occasionally istead writes from South Hill that there are never any dull moments with three ly

Emma

.

active

boys,

.

.

Ashby

Howard

7,

5,

and

Spencer 2. She is in a missionary circle and garden club. Marie Thompson Tucker is a busy garden club member and flower

Lumpkin at Park

show judge. Estelle Paidcttc and her husband both teach

View

High

organized

Estelle

School.

and sponsors an enthusiastic junior garden club in South Hill. Story sent news from She and her husband and daugh8 entertained Libby Carter Penn family. Libby has two girlsand Betty 5. Libby and her are busy restoring an old home

Royall

Ellen Suffolk. ter

Ann

and her

Lane 8 husband in Waynesboro. Ann Boszt'ell Kay also lives in Waynesboro and has four chil-

boys it's reported). Betty Hazc'kins Deyerle lives in Roanoke and has a son and a daughter. Jean Shulkcuni Baker and husband live in Wilmington. dren

(all

Dot Johnson Watson makes Camden, S. C, her home. She has four Jane children, two boys and tw'O girls Del.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Royall Phlegar, our class advisor, is enjoying her new home in Edge water in Norfolk. Our other advisor, Rachel Roj'all, lives in Tazewell and teaches in Ginny the new high school there Barksdalc Rotter lives in Madison, N. J., .

.

.

and has two daughters. She is a member Miriam of the iMasterwork Chorus Hanvey Smith last spring received her Master's degree in psychology at Kansas State College. Miriam and her husband have adopted a baby boy. They left in August for a three-year tour of duty in England. Elizabeth Ann Parker Stokes has two children. Porky 7 and Cindy 4. She was co-chairman of the city and county Garden Club show held in OctoIva Cunnniugs Johnson and ber family divide their time between Nag's Head and Franklin. She is teaching now that her children, Laura Lee 9 and Buddy Caroline Eason 6. are in school Roberts and family have moved from Fredericksburg to a new manse in Clifton Peg Forge. They have two boys .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Hughes Fisher 46

.

.

,

.

Mark

2.

manage

No

.

.

need to tell you that myself occupied.

I

to keep

.

.

in addition to taking care

a new home about 10 miles from Cherry Point, N. C. Besides being busy moving to a larger house in Falls Church, Irma Page Anderson has been substitutto

ing in the public schools, helping with the Brownies, a sorority chapter, and the Woman's Club. Living in Mountain is Winifred whose husband, Dave, is

\'iew, Calif.,

.

1943

W.

:

Agnes Patterson (Mrs. H.

Kelly Jr.)

Box

446, Fairfa.x, \'a.,

The heartfelt sympathy of wood alumnae is extended

Hodges

all

Long-

to

Mary

Han-ie Reaves, whose husband, Edward Merril Reaves, was a victim of the tragic two-plane crash in Grand Canyon, Ariz. Mary has been living in Prairie Village, Kansas, and has three daughters Two especially outstanding teachers from our class are Leona Moomaw and Charlotte Greeley. Leona is now a member of Delta Kappa Gamma and was the first teacher in Roanoke to appear on, television. Charlotte has done a great deal of work in public health research in A\'ashington. Elizabeth Walker Bailey has received her Master of Education degree at the LTniversity of Virginia. Rose Pharis is working for an insurance and real .

.

companj^ in

estate

superintendent

and

Alartinsville

is

nursery at her church there. Alargaret Lovins is welfare chairman of the Southside District of \'irginia Federation of \\'omen's Clubs. Last August Betty Youngbcrg Ottesen received her !M.A. in elementary educaof

.

she has been teaching in Cincinnati for three years. Ada Claire Snyder Snj'der, who teaches in Warrenton, also seems to have busy days landscaping her yard and playing with her husband in national bridge tournaments. Out in California \\'arwick Mitchell Garfield is an instructional reserve for the Los Angeles City Schools. She does a type of supervision in elementary education, observes, helps new teachers get adjusted, and finds instructional materials. Warwick wrote that she loves teaching and that she, her husband, son, and daughLast ter enjoy living in California summer .A.my Read Dickey, Frank, and their three daughters travelled by train from their home in Dewitt, N. Y., to San Antonio, Texas, to visit Frank's parents. Also doing quite a bit of travelling was May Bartlett Straughan, who left her daughter, Frances 4, with her parents while she and her husband spent 6Y2 weeks touring Europe. Maj' and her family ha\-e moved from New York City to Charleston, W. Va. and they plan to visit Dorothy Childress Hill in Orange soon Susie Moore Cieszko and family, Ed, Ned, Martin, and Anne, have moved 10,

.

.

.

.

.

.

Hampton. This June Anne Moore AgriJoice Stoakes Duffy, Elizabeth Walts Davis, Alice Belote Curling, and families gathered at Margaret Finney Powell's on the Eastern Shore for a

cola,

with

dinner

trimmings.

the

all

she and her husband move to Farmville. Her backyard will adjoin Mrginia Campfield Hay's, so those two will probably be found spending all of their time hanging on the backj-ard fence Jane Lee Sink Givens and her year-old son, Mark, are anxiously awaiting the return of Jane Lee's husband, Jim, who has been in Inchon, Korea. They are now livin.g in Mountain View, Calif Alice Seebcrt Godwin has been active in in Bluefield, W. \'a., wdiere she, her husband, two daughters, and a son now .

.

.

.

.

.

.

ACE

Barbara Tripp Friend has been an

li\"e.

member

acti\e

Longwood Alumnae

of the

group and the American Cancer Society in Richmond. Barbara Drczcry Grace keeps busy being a mother and a wife, with three children Diana, Ellen, and Eva Marie. She is active in the PTA, Brownies, and the church in Portsmouth Shirley Turner A'anLandingham's husband, John H. VanLandingham Jr., was chosen by the Petersburg Chamber of Commerce as the city's Outstanding

.

.

.

Young Man

of 1955.

Sarah Massie Goode Gregory's husband,

the

tion at the LTniversity of Cincinnati, and besides being the busy mother of Eric 12

and Kristie

.

.

and Sara Wade Owen, 1401 Street, South Boston, A"a,

.

.

Stella Scott Bosworth wrote that she e.xpects to see a great many alumnae after

President: Betty Boutchard (Mrs. S. C. Maclntire HL) Villa Rica, Ga. Secretaries

JJ'right Heron, assistant to the

director of libraries at Stanford University Opal Nelson Pegram and John are living in Bluefield, W. Va Lilly Bee Gray Zehmer is teaching in

turkey

.

.

.

Junior Woman's Club. !Mary Charlotte Jones Carson keeps busy with Junior Woman's Club and church work. She has two boys, Craig S and Charles 2. Imogene Hutter Gilmer is teaching at Cumberland High School. She has one Polly Keller St. Clair son, Bobby lives in Louisville and has two sons, Lowry 9 and Shelton 4. She is busy with Cub Scouting The Edwards have three little people Robin 5, John 4, and ville

in

lives

.

.

.

of her 2 J 2-year-old son, John, manages to take a botany course each semester at N. C. State, where her husband teaches. Hallie Hillstnan Fleetwood is the recently installed president of the Farm-

Kossen,

House

member of the Virginia They live in Roanoke

a

is

of Delegates.

Imogene Claytor Withers and her moved to Goldsboro, N. C, in January when Lawson was made head .

.

.

family

of the Goldsboro branch of the \\'achovia

Bank

and Trust Company. Imogene. Lawson, and Emily 8, Kate 6. and David 2 have met many nice people there. They Many have recently built a new home others are building homes. Nancye Allen .

.

.

Fitzpatrick says that their every free as well as many stolen ones are spent in inspecting theirs which is in the process of being built. While ice skatin.g last winter she broke her ankle and while recuperating in Hebron, she saw Anne

moment

Ellett

Hardy, who had

new

just

come home

Pagie Francis son Hickman and family have moved from Indianapolis to Charleston, W. Va., Bob having been transferred there in Au.gust Virginia Firesheets DuPriest is taking art classes and substituting; Preston is president of the Crewe PT.\. Susan, A^irginia's older daughter is in second Vir.ginia Corbin Lamb has grade moved to Kensington, ]Md., on the outskirts of Washington. The Capitol is a special place to them since it is Johnny's home, his working place, and also the place the\' met Anne Fitzgerald v.TOte from Richmond where she is teaching mathematics at Highland Springs and is superintendent of the junior department in her church. This summer Anne did with

.

.

her

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Alumx.^e

]M.\g.\zine


;

some painting

(in

oils)

of

landscapes

a

Ann. Lucille Lewis excited over her new baby, a girl this time after two boys.

and Virginia scenes and also completed several Chippendale trays and tule-ware. She sent the news along that Dot Marrow

Ward

has

moved

into

a

new home

in

Richmond.

1944 President: Faye Nimmo (Mrs. Jack W. Webb) 424 Parkway, Bluefield, W. Va.

25,

Va.

From Dreama

Athens, Greece, we hear of IVaid Johnson. Her husband, Lt. Col. Johnson, is with the Joint United State Military Advisory Group of the Air Force. Dreama has two little girls and is working with a Brownie group she loves. Lucille Cox Pace answered our card from Bordeau.x, France, where her husband is in the Air Force. She has done some substitute teaching since her girl 10 and boy 5 are settled in school Jenny Clardy Rowe wrote from Newfoundland where she and two boys have been living for two years. Her husband is stationed there with the Navy. Jenny taught first grade on the Base last year. They're looking forward to returning to the States soon. Virginia Mae Ellett .

.

.

Tucker now lives in Gridley, Calif., in the Sacramento Valley which she writes is the "Peach Bowl of the World." Her husband is an automobile dealer, and with their two boys they are active in Cub Scouts and Little League baseball .

.

.

Pat, and Lee, sons of

Hannah Lee Crawford

Reynolds, '44

and

surviving the constant 9S-degree temperature. note from Mary E. Pcarsall LeGrande finds her living in Kent, Ohio, where Bruce teaches at the University to

A

working on his doctorate. "Mep" is active in the League of Women Voters and leads a group of Camp Fire Girls. They have four children. A little nearer home is Louise Bell Lyons in Arlington, where her husband is minister of the Arlington Alethodist Church. She sings and

is

church choir, bowls with the church league and keeps busy with her two children who are 5; '2 and 4. ^Margaret Thomas Basilone took time out before flying to New York for vacation to write a note from Springfield. Her husband in the

PhD

working on his town L^niversity. Gertrude Wright visited Margaret Ingham Murphy

paper

George-

at

They have two

boys.

Wells from Lexington recently M. K. and son have just returned home to Wilmington, N. C.. from a trip to Canada. While in Quebec, she took some post-graduate work at Laval University and attended the first North -American Conference of Aledical Technologists. Also studying this summer was Mildred Willson who just returned to Richmond from Nashville, Tenn., where .

.

.

she took a course in pre-school work at Scarrett College. She is educational director of Lakeside Presbyterian Church

Alary House Smoot who lives in Kingsport, Tenn.. has just moved into a new home on Patrick Henry Lake. Her little girl is almost 2 Sue Harper Schumann has four children, and she still finds time to keep up with several classmates. She and Lewis plan to visit .

and Ruwland Lynn, ehildi-un Fiances Lee Han'thornc Browder, '44

pf

From

Chicago, Mary Sue Palmer Parvin wrote that she is teaching again now that Corky and Anna Lee are in school

Carolyn Early Leach and husband Dick have bought a farm in Ohio and

.

.

.

think

is

it

a wonderful

place

for

their

two boys. Carolyn can't seem to stay away from teaching and is back for her eighth year Nell Richard Bell reports six Bells now. She invites any of us coming that way to visit them in Taylor, S. C. From Florence, Ala., Romelia Sayrc Summerall is eager for news of home. She is the only Virginia graduate !

.

.

.

AAUW

chapter there. Her husband is pastor of the First Presbyterian Church there they have a son Paul ... A new Te.xan is Hannah Crazvford in

the

;

Reynolds who moved to Houston in April. were happy to hear that the hot climate has helped Hannah Lee. She. Chuck, and the two boys are busy ad-

We

December, 1956

Virginia Sezvard Harris' husband has been transferred from Surry to Richmond. Virginia is busy with church and Woman's Club work and is her husband's secretary. Her daughter Shirley entered school in September, as did Alary "Lib" Griz::ard Darby's daughter Joanne Gene Seymour Raper is happy to be back in Virginia after four years in .-Mabama. They live in a new home near Suffolk with the two boys who are 8 and 3. Eileen Boivles Johnson is still teaching in South Norfolk and loves it. Besides school, she is superintendent of an adult Sunday School department, is active in club work, and sings with the Woman's Club Chorus Kitty Vaughan wrote that she had a wonderful trip to Bermuda .

.

.

.

.

the summer. She sees Mary Wilson Carper who is working at the University of Virginia. Elizabeth Tennant Shiflett works with an advertising firm in Atlanta, Ga. Sara Hardy Blanton has been help-

in

justing

is

Beverly

all

.

Secretaries: Mildred Corvin (Mrs. L. H. Lingerfelt) 1202 Bobbiedell Lane, Richmond 26, Va., and F. Lee Hawthorne (Mrs. J. R. Browder) 5302

Media Road, Richmond

Alary

daughter,

Armstrong was

.

.

.

.

.

Sara Jeffries Gilliam. "Jeiif" also wrote quite a few news items. She and Theo with

Sue and Lewis attended Joscelyn Gillum's wedding in March, 1955. Joscelyn Gilliim Silva wrote that she and Rene now live in New Jersey with a wonderful view of

New York to the city

City .

.

;

she loves having access

Jane Smith Dunlap, of

.

Plainview, Minn., has five children. Doesn't she hold the record for our class ? .

.

.

Sara

Wayne

Fraiiee Forsythe and

her husband have bought a home in Marietta, Ga. Rosemary Elam Pritchard says her children, church, and club work keep her busy Mary Afoore MeCorhle Anderson wrote that she lives on a farm near Lexington. She has two daugliters, 4 and 3. She sometimes sees Lois Alpliin Dunlap who now has three boys and lives in Lexington .A.nne .

.

.

.

.

lives in

Library Ernestine Morgan Holloman has two children and does some substitute teaching. Her husband is a minister in Sparta Dorothy Massic Faulconer, who holds a Alaster's degree from the University of A'irginia. has recently been named Supervisor of Buckingham County Schools Betty Watts, Virginia Methodist Director of Youth Work, was a participant in the first conference in the new Methodist .Assembly Center in Blackstone this year ,\udrey Hawthorne has done graduate work at the University .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

A'irginia and is now a teacher of remedial reading in the Richmond schools Alary Tune teaches in Brookneal she recently enjoyed a trip to the west coast Kitty Laneastcr Johnson lives at Buckroe Beach. Her husband is an aeronautical engineer at Langley Field. of

.

.

.

.

.

;

.

Thev have two

lackie

children,

12

and

Betsy Bullock Walker and family are living in a new home in NiElizabeth .'Vnn Joragara Falls, N. Y. dan Robson is now living in Richmond and works for Alcoa Aluminum. She and her husband are busy remodeling an old house Jeanne Strick Aloomaw won a scholarship to Duke and studied there Betty Albright Tredthis summer wa}- now works for the Highway Department. She and her husband are buying Elizabeth a new house in Richmond Craig S

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Crump works for the Bank X'irginia. Her two children, 4 and Scoff

of 3.

are in nursery school Jane Hohson Chappell has been working at the Farmville Baptist Church and is active in Junior \\'oman's Club work. She and son Tommy spent some time in Kentucky while her husband was on the tobacco Frances Stroliecker market there Aly life is that teaches in Hampton "Airs. of the typical Suburbia" with children and gardening my favorite pastimes. Beverly has started school now Rowland Lynn 3 is teaching me what boys are like! I enjoy working in the ^^"oman's Club and teaching Sunday School. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Berry Sterrett

Richmond Community House

ing in the

.

.

1945 President: Eleanor Wade (Airs. E. G. Tremblay) 2649 Jefferson Park. Charlottesville.

\'a.

.

Hampton and has

Secretarv

Ala

Anne

Jarratt

(Mrs.

47


!

Kemper L. Kellogg Road, Warwick, \'a.

Jr.

Biandon

43

)

turned

from a two-weeks' vacation to Norfolk and the Beach. She and Bob went ice skating in mid-summer, and

Dody Jones Anfin of Radford will have the distinction of having the first member of the Longwood Granddaughters' Club from the Class of '45. She married a widower in 1951 who has two children Judy who was 17 in July and John who was 14 in December. Judy plans to enter

Virginia Shackelford Alclntyre ^^rote

from South Carolina that Alaggie McIntyre Davis had been visiting in Alarion for a month. Mrginia and the three girls vacationed in Gloucester with her family

Nancy McCauley Gregory wrote fiom Java that her husband was recently elected chairman of the Board of Deacons' of their church they both teach young adult .

.

Anne

her kindergarten this winter Helen writes that since 1946 she has been teaching seventh gradt at Onancock. During two of her recent summer \-acations she had wonderful tours of the

Shcppard

engineer

the

at

Depot, Yorktown Butler has four children Stuart 6, Janie 4, and .

.

.

Naval

.

1.

The

.

.

Mary

.

Eleanor

Butlers

two children

live

Barhamsville where Joseph is in the Rachel Joyner Taylor lumber business and Harold reside in Norfolk. He is .

.

Broad Creek Elementary Michael School. They have two children

principal

of

4 and Lynn

1.

Elizabeth Jtlast Halstead and Bill are in Atlanta, Ga. They have three little Anne Hamlin Parrott. daughters Emory, and their two daughters live in Shirley Easterly Abilene, Texas Osborne and Piper have moved to Black Mountain. N. C. He is head chemical dyer of the Old Fort Finishing Plant at .

.

.

.

Old

Fort, N. C.

.

.

They have two

children.

Frances J!'eiit:ci Diane 4 and Ken Gayle flew to Europe in July. She visited London. Paris. Germany, Switzerland, and Italy Edith Sanford Kearns and Jack have moved to Silver Spring. Aid. He is a mechanical engineer for the Johns-Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory where Edith worked before her marriage. They have a little Virginia Lee Abernathy girl, Gwen Courter. her husband, and Susan 2' j live on a Golden Guernsey dairy farm, four miles from Amelia Court House Martha Hite Graves and George have moved into a new home in Kirkland, Wash., a suburb of Seattle. He is an engineer for the Boeing Airplane Company. They have a son, Merrick, 2, and a baby girl. Georgianne ... Jo Shaffncr Anderson, Merle, and their daughter. Barby 3, have moved into their new home in Oak Lawn, 111., just outside Chicago Helen IVilson Cover and "Chuck" Kemper, have a daughter, Julia Meade our little son "Trip", and I are enjoying our new home. Come to see us .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Her

boy,

little

Morgan,

is

4

now

.

.

.

.

.

had just gotten word, that he had been promoted to Product Sales-AIanager of Confection for the Eastern Division of Kraft Foods Compan\', which entails a move to New York. Son Joey is 5. See the list of Births for the '46ers.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

word from ^"irginia Lee Price Perrow. At the time of her writing, she and Joe

.

tinuing to work in the District of Columbia in Social Service work. "Although legally not her own." she says she claims an average of 70 children with whom she works continuously children who are in placements outside their own homes Margie Pierce Harrison writes that their church, St. Peter's Episcopal at New Kent, will be one of the historical points open during the Jamestown Festival _next year. Their little girl, Kendall, is 5 Becky Norfleet Meyer wrote from Jefferson, Ohio, that she was busier than ever. See list of Births for news of her and many others Carolyn Boothe Saunders, her husband, and three children have moved to Warrenton where he is now the pastor of the Warrenton Baptist Church. Their summer's vacation included a week at Ridgecrest at the Foreign Missions Conference. Rebecca is 9, Burrell, 4, and Rachel, 7 months.

.

own with six dift'erent apartments therein .. From Kensington, Conn., comes

Frances Lee Stoneburner said, "Our tenth reunion w-as more like a class meeting than a reunion." Her three children, Martha 8. Lewis 5, and Frank, Jr., 1 keep her busy Louise Blane is con.

news

many

of

of

Pierce Aladdox's daughter Kindergarten. Joe still teaches business but works for the T\'A in the summer Katheryne Tindall Hundley and Louis are living in Lexington where he is teaching at ^''AII. He recently received his PhD degree in biologi,' at Glenn Ann Patterson Alarsh, VPI who lives in Strasburg, continues her art

Evelyn

Gwyn

in

is

.

.

work

.

.

.

as a

urines

.

.

.

.

hobby

oils, pastels, and figLee Crnmpler Burger, a construction worker

Alinnie

whose husband

Warwick Junior Woman's

is

is a member of the Club, the Newport News Opera Society, the garden club, and the Alethodist choir Dorothy IVinslon' Cole wrote of her interest in boatin.g. She belongs to the Willoughby Yacht Club and is secretary of the Bowling

the

in

area,

.

League

in

.

.

Norfolk

..

.

Page Cook Axson

helps in the Woman's Club, the Alusic Club, and other community organizations Anne Carmines Ransdell, former

.

.

.

accountant and bookkeeper, lives in Williamsburg where her husband is manager Jane of one of the chain stores Philhozaer Young has held many offices in church and community organizations in she is organist and choir Aiken, S. C. director of her church. They moved recently into a lovely new eight-room home

.

.

.

.

;

1946 Eleanor Eisese (Mrs. Robert Johnson) 2110'^ Creecy Avenue. Wilmington, N. C.

President:

.

Secretary: Virginia Treakle (Mrs. Earl W. Alarshburn) Box 89, Annandale,

Eleanor Biscse Johnson (Bessy) wrote, she and her family had just re-

48

.

Alike Shiflett

"First Craig,

and

son

of

Sallie.

Cousins"

Frances Treakle Rountree '48, Daughter of Virginia Treakle Marshburn '46.

Toomer wrote from

Burns, Colo., to say they are still on the ranch in winter and up in the cow Lt. (jg) Katherine camp in summer .Allen, who has been stationed in Washington, D. C, for several years, expects to be transferred to Norfolk Sarah IVoodiivtrd Tuoh}' and Ed have lived in the Chevy Chase area for five years. She .

\"a.

When

.

;

:

day."

.

.

numbers four now. Paul travels quite a bit but is home on week ends Aleg is Also 4H and Charles Randolph is 1 from Stamford came a letter from Luverta Joyner Gumkowski, saying that she and Eddie are the parents of three healthy youngsters, and in addition, are kept busy running an apartment house which they

.

.

.

.

Stamford, Conn., to say that her family

'46

Bessy managed to "stay up", while Bob flat on his face Shirley Cniscr \\"hite wrote of the pleasure she had in seeing Bessy and Bob in their recent vacation. She said of our reunion "It was the best week end I have spent in many a fell

in

.

Johnson.

Bisetie

of

Tom

W oodivard

Franklin

Potts and Joseph and

Ann, Rob. and Mark, children

Carol

have moved into a new home in Winchester. Nancy is active in garden club

work

.

.

Aline

9,

.

.

Nancy HarrcU

— Helen

.

West and of Canada Ruby Keeton was a summer school student at Longwood, working on her ALA. degree Alartha U'atkins Alergler's two kiddies, Debbie 5 and Donnie 3, keep her busy Peggy T. Ross Byrd writes from far-off

building a new- home at Queen's Lake, Williamsburg. They have a little daughter, Catherine Sheppard. Reginald is a mechanical

.

.

Phillips

.

.

preparing

in

.

.

sum-

this

studying,

in

materials, and renovating her basement to meet the needs of 15 children who are

Gloria and Mozelle 3;,2 Beane and her husband are

6,

moments

spare

mer were spent

8,

Her

classes

in

.

.

;

the fall of '57. Dody and Lloyd's little daughter, Alary Todd, is nearly 4. Mary ll'atkins Alorgan and Fred visited them last winter. The Mor"Gin T." gans reside in Natchez, !Miss. PuUcn Palmer's husband, a commander in tlie Navy, is a surgeon at the Naval Hospital at Camp Lejeune. N. C. Gin T. and John have three children Ben

Longwood

.

.

.

.

.

.

Alumnae Magazine


——

went to the University of Virginia and completed her training in medical technology, and for the past three years she has been working in the new clinical of Institute National in Bethesda. Ed is in the same field, and does research at Walter Reed Army Aledical Center w'here he works on the Rh blood factor and related Carolyn Babbitt Jones wrote subjects that Jacqueline Babbitt Field '49 is home from Hawaii with her two children her first trip home in four years As we assembled for our tenth reunion at Founders Day, one of our classmates was unable to come because of the untimely death of her brother. Because of our iove for Agnes Stakes Richardson in her hour of bereavement, we wired her and received in return a note of

Center Health medical

the

at

.

.

.

.

.

.

appreciation to the entire class ... In the midst of preparing this newsletter. I have had lots of help from Sallie, our 2-year-old who has the reputation already of talking as much as her mother stay busy with our activities at Duke Street Baptist Church in Alexandria, where Earl is the minister. 1

We

1947 :Margaret Ellett (Mrs. J. B. Anderson) 460 10th Street, Wytheville,

President:

Va.

Brugh (Mrs. G. B. Paul's Episcopal Church, Edenton, N. C.

Secretary: Rachael

Holmes)

St.

Dorothy Ozi'cns Hubbard was

still

so

shocked over the news of her twin daughters in April 1955 that she didn't get the news in for the previous Bulletin. Sandra

and Terry keep "Dot" stepping

in

addi-

tion to caring for 3-year-old Lynne. According to the number of our classmates

port, Tenn.,

AAUW

branch of

Hair has been hard

at

.

.

.

around

Evelyn

work on her M.Ed

at the University of \'irginia. Janice Halstead has been a working girl Audrey in Richmond for four years Hudson Grinstead teaches in the Danville school system. Her husband is a certified watchmaker, so she says he keeps things ticking around home Martha Webb Delano wrote about the May reunion of the "Lotts, Harrison, .

returned to teaching this fall after getting little Kim off to a good start in this world. Virginia Mae Packctt Barnes and family enjoy spending their summers at Wildwood. N. J. Peggy FinI: Brown from Sonora. Texas, where Al is rector of St. Church, visited her John's Episcopal folks in \'ienna recently. Peggy has two sons. I wish that many of you would follow Martha IVchb Delano's good example. Even tho' she is kept busy with life

on the dairy farm and caring for Susan and Chip, she still found time to send some news to share Sutton Bland Hutcherson sees Ellen Moore Turner when she comes home for a visit from North Carolina and also Ann U'illis Holden when she comes from Petersburg. Judy Rieck Bass is now living in the .

Washington

.

Sutton keeps in touch with Stewart Bujord Perry w'ho has a son and a daughter Nellie Smith area.

.

.

.

Margaret Ellett Anderson away from their families to meet many of you at Long-

Goddin

and

.

Newport News to accept a position of a similar nature in the New Orleans, La., shipyard. Frances and Craig will be joining him soon . Katie Laivrence Graves writes that her husband, Matt, graduated a year ago from the school of Veterinary Medicine at Texas & M. Since then they have been living in .

Fink and Webb" suite at Marion l.otts Mears' home in College Park, Md. Gene Harrison Knopp, her daughter and two sons have moved from Richmond to Minneapolis, Minn., where Alan has accepted a position. Marion Lotts ]Mears

.

.

.

.

.

rearing

is

.

and her husband have a little girl Treaklc Frances Rountree's husband Charles has gone from the shipyard in

.

.

and .

.

degree

.

Bridge

Natural

two boys, 5 and Ijj Jean Tolley Bourne lives near Natural Bridge. She

.

A

Ellen McMnllen Graves only a few miles from Katie. She

Madison lives

has a

.

.

.

Ann.

little girl

"Mitty" Hahn Sledd writes that Hunter, her husband, is now vice president and general manager of Taylor and Sledd, Inc. in Richmond. She and Hunter went to a Florida Citrus Convention in

Miami Beach

where they stayed

last fall

Martha Fountainbleau Anderson Rollings w'ent back to teaching last fall and with a 2-year-old daughter Faye at home it proved to be a really Ruth Stephenson has busy year been teaching at Bellwood School in Petersburg for three years. Last year she

at the fabulous

.

was chairman

.

.

.

.

.

Welfare Committee County and Colonial Jean Edgertan \\'inch is

of the

Chesterfield

for

Heights

.

.

.

attending Longwood Alumnae meetings in Philadelphia and is enjoying her year-

Ann

daughter Sentinan has

old

Chuck

Ruby

.

.

children

Debra

and

2,

.

three

Griffith

— David

4,

Her husband

1.

Dick is still teaching science in Brocton, N. Y. He was awarded a GE Fellowship for study at L'nion College in Schenectady,

each hopes to take time

wood

to celebrate the tenth class reunion

on Founders Day next March. I hope that many of you will be there to make our celebration an eventful one with fond reminiscing and much merrymaking During the past year I have enjoyed Patsy Dale visiting in the homes of .

Barham

in

.

Mankin

Shirley

\\'arwick.

.

Nelson in Highland Springs, and Beatrice Bnieh Wilson in Fairfax. "The Holmesteaders" had their first family vacation in June and journeyed to the lovely mountains of Waynesville. N. C. The four small ones thrilled at the sight of real bears in the Great Smokies and the Sue

Cherokee Indians.

Charles.

1948

N. Y.,

President and Acting Secretary

"Peep-

:

Brooks (Mrs. John W. Howard 1404 Ruffner Road. Alexandria.

sie" Tr.) \^a.

Hilda Abernathy (Mrs. E. Jackson) 55 Raleigh Road. War-

Secretary; E. Rachael Bruyh Holmes, '47, and "The HoJmestedders". Rosemary. George, Jr., J.-ane, and Rachael

who have

a trio of girls. Longwood's enrollment increase considerably should within a few years Cab Oz'crby Field writes "We have moved into our new house on Lake Barcroft. I am not !

.

.

.

:

with my husband anymore keeping house for him and two

working just

Bassett hounds !" ... A newsy letter from Betty Deuel Cock Elam indicates that her four young ladies keep her busy but happy. She is an officer in the Kings-

December, 1956

v.ick,

\'a.

Johnny and I have two boys Johnny 1. Johnny is assistant 4, and Bill. cashier of the First and Citizens National Bank in Alexandria, and is managing

Woody

brandies La^'ergne Tuck of Bassett has a daughter Claudia

its

.

.

.

Dot Tuck Johnson also of Bassett works in her husband's law oftice. She and Joe have three children Diane, Roband Jeff \'irginia Marshall bie, Walker has just returned from Panama. She and her husband Chris, who is in Nancy the .^rmy, have two children .

.

.

.

.

.

.

l.ita

.

.

Braford says she loves country

life

last

summer

.

.

.

Sue Davis Breed-

ing writes that she stays at home tendirig Sara Squires is still three children Evelyn Moore Coleman, teaching Dr. Lankford's secretary, was at Founders along with Harriette Sutherlin Daj-, Overstreet and Ruth Brown from our class ... It was so good to hear from .

.

Julia

III,

one of

Breeding '48. with her children, Nancy, and Ralph

Davis

.

.

.

.

Baohcr Nelson who

is

living

in

Galax. Slie has two girls, Barbara 7 and Judy 2. She sees "Liz" Harrell \'aughan

and George Alice

real often.

Ann Abernathy

Phillips

and C.

C. where he is with a large starch concern. They have two girls. Pamela and Terry Anne Randolph Homes works for an insurance company in Richmond --doing secretarial work. She is going to Pan B. have

moved

to Greenville, S.

.

.

.American Business Night School tak-ing shorthand. She recently spent an enjoyable

week end bers

in

New York

received her

.

.

.

Nancy Cham-

Master's degree June

49


in the school of Library Science at Columbia. Hoot is now working in the University of Kentucky library in Lexington, Ky. Lois Fuller Robertson and husband have been living in Arabia now for the past nine years. He is with the Arabian .American Oil Company. They have two children, Ale.x 8 and Ponza o. Lois has her own dancing school in the American Colony Elizabeth Motley Lentz and Stan, of Aberdeen, Aid., vaca-

5th

.

.

.

.

.

.

tioned in California and Mexico this summer. Elizabeth was honored by becoming

member

a

February

says her 2-year-old her every minute.

.

and Forrest an investment Betty Bnrchctt Almarode is

and Dick moved into their new home in McBryde Village, Blacksburg last August. Dick is in the vocational education depart-

ment

VPI

teaching distributive educaMillie MclVillianis Hayes, husband Jack, and Claiborne 3 are still living in Warwick. Jack works at Langley for the Neva Brmiklcy Parker and Gene are living in Warwick. She was chairman of our annual spring alumnae luncheon and did a grand job Mary Helmer, Janie Hanks Phillips, and Eloise tion

at

.

.

.

NACA

.

.

.

.

Hanes Henley are

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Marion where Giles is at the A'irHouse Motor Hotel. They have two sons. Brad and Mike, and a new baby. Edna Earle Waters Mizelle has a in

is

ginia

where he

.

.

occupies

Billy

Wommack

Jane Burchett live in Suffolk

counselor

son

last

Owen

Dorothy Bcvard

.

.

.

Gamma

Delta Kappa

of

Wilnia Allen, Speight and Charles are in Hampton. He is an engineer for the Newport News SB and DD Company Martha Moorehead Landerman and Stuart live at Willoughby in Norfolk where he is stationed Betty Jane Brockzcay Low and family moved into their new house in September. Son "Sammy" is 2J'2 Martha Cillum Burr's husband, David, conducted the first service on June 17 in the lovely new building of the Charlottesville Presbyterian Church where he is pastor. Ann Snead Whitcomb and Peck are members of the church Betty Tilson Walker living

.

Warwick

in

all

.

.

.

.

Catherine Bickle received a nice write up in her church newspaper under Who's W'ho in Central Church School from which I quote "Catherine is superintendent of the Youth Division of her church in Staunton, is secretary of the Commission on Education, and is a member of a circle. She is also a member

new house and son. Nancy lessee Woodward has moved to Louisa where they are building a new home. -\ page in the January number of the Richmond School Bulletin was devoted to the Children's Room, officially named "The John B. Tabb Memorial Library' honor of Jennie Master Tabb's uncle Ruth M. Eggleston is librarian there "a young woman devoted to her job, enthusastic about children, and eager to improve their reading habits and tastes. Erla Brown is working in Richmond as a lab technician at the Blood Bank. Anne

Woman's

Timior

the

Club,

East loves her job as a private secretary Richmond Rives Edwards Clark

in

.

moved from

.

.

California to Bonifay.

Fla.,

Kings'

the

of

UDC, DAR,

Emily Smith Auxiliary, and she is on the Board

of Trustees of

Daughters'

Hospital." Congratulations, Catherine, on the fine w'Ork you are doing "BeBe" Gcycr Redmond has three children Frankie 5, Jimmy 3, and Patti 1. Jeane Bentley visited her .

.

.

I

.

.

heard Mildred Shepherd Blakey works

for the State Corporation Commission in Richmond. Hope to see you at our tenth

reunion in

'58.

1949 President:

Esther Gv,ttigan Maxey's '49

Ritchie (Mrs. Gloucester, Va.

A'iolet

Morgan)

J.

V.

Forbes Jr.) town, Aid. I

never

Route

f^Mrs. 3,

know where

Box to

Richard A. 6, Hagers-

begin

one of

these letters so guess I'll just close my eyes and reach into the stack of notes Here's a letter from Joyce Tozcnsend Hoge. She and Bill and their three sons have moved into a new antique brick split level home. Bill is a stock broker in Washington. Son Curtis is 7, Bobby, AlA,

and

Terry, teaching in

Jennie Lee Cross is University Park, Md., and \]A.

Martha

Ashby Srm^h lives in Chevy Chase, Md. "The Smiths have one son. Joyce saw Dot Sholu'ell Strickland in South Boston this summer. Stopping in Richmond, Joyce visited Betty Spindler Scott in her lovely new air-conditioned rambler overlooking the James. Son, Ricky is 3 and his sister Elizabeth is 1. Janie Fo.r White and Ernie and their children, Alickey and Robin, visited Joyce recentlv.

50

little

son.

Bill

where her husband does forestry work ^'irginia Hollificid Meredith and dies have an apartment a block from the water at \'irginia Beach but are planning to build a home in Bay Colony this fall. Ginny enjoyed teaching fourth grade last year. Connie Living Horden and her husband Hal, a Naval pilot, were .

Secretary: Jean Cake

Ozi'oi Bowling and Laura Jean Comerford Chumney and their husbands.

The Chumnej's have moved into a new home in Richmond where he has recently been

appointed administrative assistant C. Brinkley, \''irginia Commissioner of Agriculture. He is president of the Virginia Seedsmen's Association the youngest man ever to hold this office. Laura Jean is Bible teacher in her church

Parke

to

Their two children, Kevin and Karlee Jean, are 5 and 3 We moved to Hampton in January when Dick completed his seiwice with the Navy, and are now in Hagerstown, where he is a management trainee with Montgomery Ward. David is a lively 3-year-old and little Beth is I Many thanks to all of you who wrote such grand letters sending news. circle.

.

.

.

.

.

.

1950

Norma Roady,

President:

1108

Wickham

Avenue, Newport News, Va. Secretary

Carol Bird Stoops, 103 South Road, Lindamere, Wilmington, Del. :

had a very quick

to Virginia was able to \Tsit with Charlotte Flaugher Ferro, Jim, Angela, and little Jimmy. Charlotte and Jim spent several weeks in Europe this winter and are now in the middle of plans for a beautiful new home in Norfolk. Charlotte and I were pleased to find Ann Orgain's ('49) exhibition in the Boardwalk .-Art Show. Lizzie Bragg Crafts, Buddy and their California born and widely traveled daughter Lynn spent several days with us at Christmas and are living near Philadelphia now. Lizzie and I represented our class at the recent meeting of the Philadelphia area LongI

Beach

trip

summer where

this

I

.

.

their neighbors for awhile.

They

live in

Oceana now. Among Ginny's visitors were Grace Mallory Rives and daughter, and Dolly Ann Freeman Sydnor and family think she has three children now. The last news I had of Anne Gallozvay Reddish was, "I have a dog and a new

Chevrolet convertible." Lee Staples bert, at a

Naval Base

in

Lam-

French Morocco,

expected to return to the State in the fall with her husband and 3-year-old son, Gwen Smith Kentiedy has tnoved to Tullahoma, Tenn., and Phyllis Baglcy Hoefer has gone 'way out to Lincoln, Neb. Ruthellen Mears Taylor is back in Richmond ... I saw Cathryn Mosteller Garrett occasionally in our Junior League work. In June. Dick .-aid .

.

.

pic-

Jean Edgcrton Winch's ('48) sweet daughter Anne Edgerton. In July Lizzie, Buddy and I went to Baltimore for Anna Nock Flanigan's wedding. Nock and Joe are living in Philadelphia. Peggy .Ann -Ames was her attendant, and we particd with .\nnette Jones Birdsong and Tom, Hank Hardin Luck and David, Peggy White, Margaret Wall Irby '49 and John, Harriet Ratchjord Schach and Will. Harriet's daughter, Carey, has dark tures

summer and is Patti's godmother Norman Soyars Watkins has a girl 2. Bill has his own law office in Farmville. .

Ann

wood Alumnae. There we admired

last

attended the Presbyterian Conference at While there I saw

Massanetta Springs.

in

:

of

I

of

curly hair. This spring I spent a week in Williamsburg with Suzie Bowie Brooks, G. T. and their two big boys. Then in Richmond I visited several days with Cab and Elinor Overbey '48 ) who are both teaching there. Cab and I spent an evenShirley Hillstcad Lorraine, ing with Kemper and their four wee ones. Chatted with Jane Williams Chambliss. Jane, Russ, and their two children have moved (

into their

new home

in

Richmond. Spent

Patsy afternoon with Pettus and her two boys,

an

Richard

.

Kimbrongh and

Regi

Mary Lou Wilson McGee, and new son, are now living in .

.

dau.ghter .Alexandria, where her husband is pastor Paul of one of the Baptist churches Price received his blaster's degree in education this summer from the L^niversity of Virginia. He is principal at Craigsville Higli School Corky Corvin is still working in Washington, D. C. Betty House Higginbotham has three children now two girls and a boy Jane Hunt Ghisclin Lindley and Don The are living in Columbus, Ohio .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

AlUMX.^E

.

.

.

.

.

]SL4G.A2IXE


:

!

Norfolk girls, Peggy White, Curly Diggs Lane, Frankie Dodson White, Lelia Mae Ferratt Leggett, Jean Hobbs Alton, Charlotte Flaughcr Ferro, Hank Hardin Luck, etc., get together quite often Harriette Bozvtitig Stokes and her son Bill spent a day with Lucy I'aughan Taylor and her three. Chuck, Nancy, and Annie Swann teaches at the Sarah new Tazewell High School but still spends her summers at home in Norfolk Dolores Duncan Smallwood and .

.

.

.

.

picture of Debbie at Nice note from Ray Phillips Vaughan, Frank, Jan, and Lee. .Also picture of Doris Old Davis' daughter Patricia Gail taken in their new home. They visited by Jean Anderson Smith, her husband, son and daughter. Pat Paddison Evans and Carroll report that Wyndee is mighty excited about Santa

Christmas

.

Lynda Black Washburn has Janice Diane,

Lester are at Peahody College in Nashville where Lester is doing graduate work in educational administration. Betty Lewis Shank Blount and her children are living in Roanoke with her family since the sudden death of her husband Strousse in his private plane .

.

.

of the artistic

She

She sends her best to all us gals Becky Mann is also abroad only in the Far East, teaching in Japan. In the summer of 1955 she went with a Methodist Youth Caravan to England, Holland, Germany, Switzerland, and France.

Harding

Greensboro.

in

a unit

is

My

.

.

ville

:

to believe we've been out of school five long years. Can't thank the ones of you enough that came back for the celebration in March. I hope there will be as good a showing in 1961. We'll be looking for the rest of you next time had the pleasure of visiting Helen I

Agnew Koonce I

while

was working

in

High Point when

the furniture market

at

See Marriage and Birtli our class June Divers is teaching Latin and history in Smith High School. Norfolk Saw in the paper that Nancy Gillie Shelton

there in July

.

.

.

news

for

lists

of

.

.

.

was

visiting

relatives

husband John was

BraijQ

Crafts.

'.50.

Bird

Carol

Lynn

and

Crafts,

Stoops

.

regretted missing Patsy I Ritter Jack's wedding this summer. Sister M. John Therese (Mary Miller) professed her first vows at Saint Mary's House of Studies, Notre Dame, Ind., in August. She has greatly enjoyed hearing from those of you who have kept in touch with her. She is teaching at Academy of the Holy Cross in Rockville, Md. Louise Turner Cundiff, Bobby, and their son are living in Rochmond while Bobby is taking a course in hospital supervision Hilda Edicards Tall has been living in Elizabeth City, N. C, since her marriage last fall Last October I attended Jean Carrello's marriage to Ron Lynch in D. C. Pat Davis Gray and Basil are still in .

course this year

.

completed

.

.

Auxiliary in her church Jett Carter Groves is living here in ^Martinsville. She and her husband Irving have just

moved

new

a

into

.

.

home

.

.

Emily

.

Miami ...

.

County while

.

Ruth Walker McGhee and Stuart havi! two children Carrie Ann O'Laughlin received her Master's degree from the University of Maine and is teaching in .

didn't

Helen Smith Massie is owner and manager of a fuel oil business in Amherst. She is past president of the Junior W'oman's Club and first vice-president of the Woman's his

Lizzie

.

Peggy Perry

:

MCV. He

at

.

but

here,

a chance to see her Yost taught in Henrico

get

.

Hastings

husband

whose

Baxter

is a doctor in the Navy is currently living on the Naval .Air Station in Willow Grove, Pa., with Don and their two

Her Longwood

children. at

Sarah

sister .

.

.

is a A'irginia

sophomore Westbrook

Goggin is living in .Alexandria with her husband Mel and two young ones I am now working for two doctors at .

the

local

Avith

hospital

Capital

after

.Airlines

in

a

short

.

.

job

Washington,

D. C.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

December, 1956

.

.

.

1952 President: Peggy land .Ames)

Harris

(Mrs.

Gar-

Jean Ridenour (Mrs. Charles Jr.) 4605 Stuart .Avenue, Richmond. \^a. Red and \Miite, it's Red and "It's

Secretary:

W. Appich

.

.

winter John Huegel is now an elementary school principal in Danville Maria Jackson is completing work on her Master's at the University of last

hard

it's

in

,

.

President and Secretary Betsy Gravely, 201 Starling Avenue, Martinsville, Va.

This was our reunion year and

won an honorable mention

the \'irginia Press Association feature writing contest for 1956 Eleanor Weddle received her M.S. from the University of Tennessee and is teaching at Longwood College. Congratulations to Harold Hutter, now a captain in the Marines and stationed at Parris Island. He spent three months in Puerto Rico

1951

is

.

Hearld,

award

.

.

.

.

Heart, pub.

.

with refugees on the Iron Curtain. Then she went to Norway just to visit Our other celebrities are Jackie Sardine Wall, who was author of "Seen and Heard" series in the Farm-

Nancy Lee Maddox 1956 was here to visit me in August Keep in touch with me through the year. We want news of YOU. lished in

.

Worked

.

.

.

.

Sonnets and Songs of

teaching art at Great Bridge. Lou Bergman Phelps ('49) is teaching there too. Ruth had a visit from Jame Smith Tyndall and her Dana.

member.

.

.

re-

all

received

."^sher

the work. Her boys are fine. Virginia IVilkins Floyd has a daughter, Jennie 3. Frances Garnett was the efficient March of Dimes Director for Buckingham CounGrace Oakes Burton ty this year has a new volume of poems to her credit.

.

.

Ruth we

Puckett

.

manager for Tupper Ware home parties. She loves Tro.xie

sender in the U. S. when hers arrived with interesting note from D. C. before I had fully digested my Thanksgiving turkey. Attractive card from Ruth HatliaZi'ay Anderson. Dick, Pamela, and Grey

— typical

.

and her family are living

Johnson ('52) and Maude Savage Smith ('49) who live near by Jacky Eagle scooped the earliest Bird Christmas card .

is

of a .

three sons.

M.A. from Columbia LTniversity last Ann "Hank" Sa'wyer Knight June

AAUW.

.

who

News

port her

.

.

the pride of every girl that's headed a letter postmarked Germany from Joan Pritehett Mathews and her three black cocker spaniels. Pen and Ink, and Billy the Kid II. They are champion stock and have brought home some beautiful trophies and ribbons in Southwest United States, Germany, Austria, and France. Pritch is president of the Air Force Officer's Wives Club of Bermerhaven, and at one time had a 15-minute radio program over AFN Bremerhaven. Last summer she and Bobby visited Italy, Spain, France, and England.

here"

Hagan has a daughter 3''2. Her husband Bob is loan corporation in New-

Slavin

manager

December Jane Richards MarkuKatie son has a son, Richard Severin Bondurant Carpenter, Jim, and their two children are living in Annapolis where They visit Katie is active in back and forth with Gris Boxley Cousins C'49) and her family, two children, and a dog. Katie also sees Conway Rice .

White,

.

Claus.

.

last

.

.

.

.

Cute

California.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Nancy Walker Reams, who is with Piedmont Airlines, party on weekends together. Nancy and Bill came by for a good visit with Charlie and me last fall. Maria was in Richmond in the spring for Ann Moody's wedding also in the party were Bootie Poarch, Pat Tuggle Miller, and Rachael Peters Sue Highfield Herr is a psychiatric nurse in Chapel Hill while her husband is working on his PhD. She has a daughter 3 .. "Boots" Russell is Service Club Director for the Air Force at Sarah Olmsted Air Force Base, Pa. Graham Wells visited May Henry Sadler Alidgett. A. B.. and baby boy. May Henry sees Jerry Korbach Hermbree and Betty Barnes Lampert now and then. Shirley Grogan Duncan, Mildred Bright Hatcher, and Lucy Jane Perkinson Angle, and latter's daughter have frequent gab -"essions in Danville. Shirley and Fred visited Connie Blankcnship Paris in Richmond Virginia. There she and

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Whenever B. B. IVilson Thompson leaves Virginia Beach for Farmville she plays bridge with Jackie Jardine ^\'all and Frances Thomas Pairet. The Class wishes to express its sympathy to Frances Ginny Mcin the loss of her father Lean Pharr is filling in as Longwood Alumnae Secretary for a year. Ginny. .

.

.

.

.

.

Macon, and little Steve and Ginny Leigh have been living in Farmville for over Alargaret Jones Cunningham a year and !Monk and her two boys are now living in Cumberland. Md. Dot Gregory Alorrison and her little girl see lots of Longwoodites in Charlottesville. Mary Helen "Cookie" Blair writes that Blair and Gin Reed are putting on extra pounds .

in

.

.

Fayetteville. Audrey Pettit Mesmer. and their two girls spent a vacation Paulv's Island, S. C. They are still Florida where Bill is attending L^ni-

Bill

at in

Law School Rice Johnson has been teaching

vcrsity of Florida

.

.

.

Connie in

An51


napolis, Md., hut she and Asa will be in Charlottesville after February Nancy Carbce O'Connell teaches English in Ridgefield, N. C, while Jack is an editor .

with

McGraw

that

it

.

Hill Publishers. She writes great to live so close to New York City Nora Pollard Burgess was in Texas for four months but now she and her husband are stationed at Army Chemical Center, Edgewood, Md. M\' card caught Sadie Crcgar Stone just before she and Jake moved to Chicago Lucyle Humpries returned to teach at St. Andrews Episcopal School in Hilton Village from New York City ... Jo Price Greenburg and her captain is

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

husband are stationed at Manhatten Beach Air Force Station, Brooklyn, N. Y. Jo has been teaching in Texas this past year Dolores Hoback Kanner's husband Al received his M. D. in June and is now interning in Madison, Wise. "Hoey" is engaged in enzyme research there as a .

.

Poconos.

Elsie

George

.

Rae Page Bonner and

young

and

visited

Jay

their

Virginia, then went on to Niagara Falls before returning home to Stokes Overbey Howard Lodi, N. J. and Robert vacationed in Florida. Stokes is teaching in Charlotte, N. C. Beebie families

in

.

.

.

Hancock Beard was in Florida in August, but has moved into her new home in Norfolk Frances Ann Ra)nscy Hun.

.

.

and Bill are do-it-yourself fans having remodeled some of their house in Appomattox. Lynchburg now has Mary Brame Trotter, Ed., and little Nick. Marian Bcckner Riggins and Bill went to Cape Cod for a few weeks. Jan Peebles Host, Parker, and their two boys Tom 5 and David 2 have a new home in Warwick. In Pulaski is Nell ter

Smith. Audrey

Daltoii

Ramsey Long

is

.

.

.

.

Henry Henry

.

are

living

Martinsville where

in

with duPont; their

is

girl

little

Dale is ly'i. They have recently bought a house Jan Van Horn Page and Jerry have two boys Jeanne Mercer Luttrell is teaching again at Saluda High School this year Ann Keith Hundley Brame, Harper, and little Marilyn are .

.

.

.

.

living

.

.

.

Warwick

in

.

.

.

Baker

Betty

.

Kulp and

Sis Burton Holland are both living in Norfolk, where their husbands are stationed with the Navy. Both have little girls Joyce Catling and Nancy .

.

.

Lawrence are teaching in Suffolk Frances Howell Abernathy lives there .

.

.

.

They

project assistant.

spent last Christ-

Nancy Honnsell mas in Bermuda Brame is home in Culpeper until the Navy can give Bob a permanent address. They have acquired a baby bo.xer .

.

.

.

.

Bunnie Rocks travels all around. year she taught in Savannah, Ga., flew down to Florida on weekends. took up water skiing and sailing,

summer

taught

which she

after

school

She then

Waynesboro

in

visited in

.

Last and

Houston, Texas.

Dot Frahcr Now she is in Hampton Garber teaches Sunday School in Sarasota, Fla., and works in Rudy's office Edith Goff Street and H. A. spent their vacation at Virginia Beach. She has taken up golf lessons and is drawing up .

.

plans

for

new

their

.

.

Richmond

house.

seems to be most popular among our class members. Margie Hood Caldwell is here. Anne Rosson White teaches at Laburnum Elementary School. Maxine Watts Peschel is a librarian. She and

Roy

see

some

of

Mary

working for Halifax Department of Public Welfare, keeps house, and takes care of her daughter, Janice Elaine. principal of Luray High School

The new Margie

is

Traylor Nolen's husband, Hugh. Charlie and I saw Anne Moseley Akers and Tom and Bruce in Roanoke. Moe is president of a garden club. They visited Boston last summer. Nancy Walthal Avery, Ed, and their little boy are back home in Alberta. We are proud to hear that Elvin S. Elmore has sent her three sons to college on a teacher's salary one is in dental school and the oldest, Shep Elmore CSl) received his M.S. at

.

.

Moore Karr

Borkey and Walter. Charlie and I had Pat Tnggle Miller and Bill, Betty Scott Borkey Banks and Franklin, and Harriet Biittcru'orfh Miller ('51) and Bill to a bufTet dinner last spring. Pat and I met Penny Gilmer at Sunday School last

summer. Branchy Fristoe Choate is in Richmond while her husband is working on his M. S. at RPL New houses in Richmond belong to Elsie Baker Tokarz, Tommy, and their little boy. Bobby Betty Scott and Franklin Banks also, Mary Crawford Andrews and Frank. They spent two weeks in Florida, but now .Vlary is teaching in Richmond while Frank is atending MCV. Also in Richmond in her new home is Gladys Savedge Baker and her new little girl Clara CuUip Winkler taught in Pulaski with Marty Miller Mason. Now Clara is in

University of Virginia last June. Frances Turner Widgeon is helping her husband in his new Western Auto Parts store in Cheriton. .^nne Motley Ryland is rearing a lovely family of two girls and a boy in Dahlgren. She and Bobby Brou-n Moore are the only ones in our Lucy Jane class with three children Morton Pratt is teaching in Richardson Park, Del. ... In Crewe is Joan Missimer Mary Jo Smith Fore is teachRoss ing in Winchester ... I wish I could be the first to announce about all the .

.

.

.

.

.

.

Roanoke. Flora Ballozve deHart and Allen are working on their Masters at the University of Virginia.

time

Flora

teaching

is

at

At the same Lane High

Bristow is teaching at Jackson School in Newport News. Norma Saunders loves teaching at James Blair in Williamsburg. Peggy Harris Amti is also there. In Shipman is Lee Wood Dowdy teaching at Lovingston Elementary while Ned is working with Central Virginia Electric Corporation Midge Woods .'\kers, Pete and School.

Elsie

Stonewall

.

their

.

.

two

ingham, Ala.

many

girls are living in

little .

.

.

Our

interesting

Mathews

and

Ed

Birm-

gals have been on Sue A^elson vacationed in the

trips.

.

Nell Bradshazc Green, Abie, boy are living in Rich-

.

.

and their

mond

little

Mary Meade Robertson Edwards and her husband are both teaching .

.

.

High School this year. They have a little girl 2 Billie Dunlafr Powell moved back to Portsmouth in

at Farmville

.

.

.

Octciber after 2J 2 years in Te.xas. Wilson going into private practice as a doctor there Sarah McElroy Harvie and is

.

.

.

Jack have bought a house in West End in Richmond. Jack is Boys' Work Secretary for the there, since graduating from college in June .Margie Hall ;Massey, Bill, and' their little boy and girl also live in Richmond. They have a new home right off Cherokee Road.

YMCA

.

.

1954 President

Nell

;

our

fifth

reunion

some big plans

March.

in

in

the

We

have

to

make

making

an extra special weekend for us

it

all.

Secretary

Moneda

:

Key,

329-B

Jean Hodges has been appointed disdirector of the \'irginia Tidewater Area Council of Girl Scouts Betty Benton Odom is now living in Suffolk Betty Islin Saffelle has moved to Salisbury, N. C, and is teaching there Sylvia Reames Picardat and Bob spent two fine weeks at Daytona Beach, trict

.

.

.

.

Va.

ville,

degree from Theological Seminary

in

May

Lucy Page Hall Kennedy and

Clip-

Baptist .

.

per

Master Southern

a

Education

of

.

received

are

living

Royal

Front

in

where

teaching this year, while Ted is serving with the Navy in Japan. They are eagerly awaiting his return in the fall of '57 Janet IViggins Pumphrey and Bill are living in Arlington where Janet is teaching this year. Bill is manager of a warehouse outlet in Sarah .\nn Jones Light's Washington husband. Heath, is the Episcopal minister in Boydton, and they have two boys Nanc3' Driskill Finley is living in AtTeachin.g lanta where Earl is working in .Arlington again this year is Celeste Bishop .'^nne Jones holds a teaching position in Alexandria where she and Nancy Nelson '55 share an apartment .\nn Murphy ^Morton and Bucky have a home in Falls Church Jean Kreicnhatim Zollman's husband is the assistant citv engineer of .Alexandria Wanda

Lucy

is

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

;

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Fla. Mason Moore Barrett is now teaching in Atlanta, Ga. Lib Bosivell Lackey and Hal are in Oceana Ann Foster Posey is at Virginia Beach Lou Kitts is a lab technician at Nell Copley is a private secretary at .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

MCV

.

Owen

Annie Lee

.

.

.

President: Polly Brothers (Mrs. H. G. Simpson) 60S Rives Road, Martins-

73rd

Newport News, Va.

Street,

.

1953

Hanover

2303

Copley,

Avenue, Richmond, Va.

.

babies that will arrive in the Fall, but the best way to learn is to come to

:

.

also

.

new

;

52

Karlet Marshall and Echol are living in Roanoke, and she is teaching . Harriet Minichan Thomas and Hayes have bought their own home in Danville Polly Brothers Simpson and

.

.

Reynolds Metal Company in Richmond. Also in Richmond are Patty Derring Coleman and Jo Anne Dyer Ridenour .

Mary Anne King Barrett is living Warwick Ann Thomas Wicke .

.

in

.

.

.

and Ralph are living in San Luis Obispo, Calif. Jeanne Hamilton Lafoon, "Mike", ''Kipper", and Lisa are in Farmville June Johns. Ann Edmonds, and I are still living in Warwick Ann Mallory Hancock is in Norfolk. Last year she moved to a new junior high school and took over the dutv of heading the science department ... I saw Marj' Denny IVilson Parr at Pat .Altwegg's wedding she and ^^'ilton are still Norfolk. Also in Norfolk is in Trianne Lampkin Freese. her husband, and baby boy Grace Booker Barr and her husband are living in ^Moscow, U.S. S.R., where he is"vice consul, third secretary assigned to general service administration". Grace is teaching in the AmeriElleanor Koch is doing can Embassy Red Cross recreational work in the Far .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

;

.

.

.

.

.

.

Alumnae

ISLagazine


;

Else Wente received her M.S. from the University of Tennessee in August and is now teaching in Newport

turned

home

mouth

is

News High

teach

East

.

.

.

School

Doris Caiiascu Umberger is living in New Britain, Conn. Betsy Jean Robertson, Paty Donnelly, Rebecca Baird, and Frances Marker .

.

.

.

Jane

.

are teaching in Hampton Mary Lou Burnette is teaching at Quantico \^irginia Sutherland teaches in Dinwiddle .

.

.

.

.

Wanda Home,

Portsmouth and Dolly Kempsville We are sorry

Doll, in in

;

.

.

.

member

to report the death of a

Class

who

Sarah

died

in

baby boy are

Do

me

let

.

Lcathcnnan April. Her living in

still

hear from

of

our

Muyskens

feger

.

.

.

of j'ou.

liII

now

is

her husband Phyllis tooK

Edwards) Box

Mrs. H. Robert

(

205, Wincliester, \'a.

.

.

Longwood

also

.

.

.

.

.

Anne

Thaxton Daniel taught in South Boston year and was very active in her church Carolyn Stanley is an art consultant for two schools in Alexandria Also teaching there is Beth Kent last

.

Betty Davis

:

in Tenafly,

,

.

.

.

to quote her,

President

.

is

.

.

1955

.

N. J., while studying at Columbia. graduate work at Longwood in the sunmier Jean Anderson Guthrie is teaching in Cumberland Carolyn Watson Yeatts is at Amelia High School. She has been taking graduyear, but

ate classes at

husband and

Wyoming

;

.

;

Owen

.

to Virginia Beach in PortsDorothy T. Cooper Betty West returned to Chuckatuck to home economics Nell Crocker is also tliere. Phyllis Powell Swerttaught in Chesterfield County last

LOVE

the place" teaches math

"I

.

.

.

in Contey Leonard Fairfax County in Montross is Anna Our class president, Mae Sanders Betty Davis Edwards is busily engaged in teaching in Winchester and holding oflices. She is treasurer of the Longwood Alumnae Chapter there and secretary of the Winchester Education Association

Joan

:

Secretary: Eloise Macon {^Irs. H. Melvin Smith) c/o Mrs. Evelyn T. Macon, 1110 Griiifin Street, Lynchburg, Va.

.

.

.

.

.

In addition to raising Cynthia, the first

baby born to one of our '55 graduates, Barbara Moore Curling is librarian in elementary schools in Henrico three County. In Raleigh, N. C, we find Roberta Naomi CuniKing McGuire teaching bia King taught social studies in Beaufort, N. C, while her husband studied at Southeastern Seminary at \\'ake Forest Edna Trader Cain taught home economics in Texas last year where her Air Force husband is stationed They have been to Mexico Jean Lynch Hobbs was awarded a Master's degree at the .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

LIniversity of Pittsburgh last June Sally Wilsor. has been working on

.

.

.

her Master's degree in music Pollyanna Martin Foard, her husband, and son spent another summer at Oak Ridge. .

.

.

working on his PhD. now Marlene Lucas is enjoying being a home

Don

is

.

economist

witli

.\ppalachian

baby of the class of '55: Cynthia, daughter of Barbara Moore Curling.

one year the members of our class have scattered to the "Four Winds". Already many have changed addresses so that our letters didn't reach their destination. So please, be sure to drop us a line this spring, so we can keep in touch Wedding bells have rung for nearly 50% of us. Some already have their hands full with a "little one". So be sure to check the lists of Marriages and Births in the back for these. Congratulations are in order for those who have completed that first loiifj year of teaching and have started another. In Roanoke we find Betty Jean Persinger, Virginia Burgess, Mary Ann Ward Deaton, and Phoebe Warner Emily Kesler is at one of the oldest schools in the state Academy Street School in Salem Grace Garnctt is in Lynchburg Donnie Dn'inc Clark, in Richmond Clare Davis, in Danville. In Henrico in

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

;

;

County Shirley Ward lish and biology .

Coates ing

15

.

.

EngSpencer

teacliing

Karen

Chesterfield County travelschools teaching music. She

in

Richmond where her husband a law student Nancy Taylor re-

lives is

to

is

is

in

.

December, 1956

.

.

Electric

\\'orking in Staunton in the same oc"Tanley" is cupation is Jane Bailey still interested in dramatics. She had a part in the Virginia Museum play jili. Some of us Wilderness last winter are seeing the world because of LIncle .

amazing how

is

.

Power Company in Roanoke. Also in Roanoke is Sally Cecil doing social work.

First

It

.

.

.

.

.

.

Sam. Jean Carol Parker Harrell is in Georgia Audrey j\Iorsc Tillet is in W'ashington State Ann, Carter Wcndenburg Silver's husband has received his wings now in the Air Force Nan Picinich Jordan and Pete have returned from .\laska and are living in Charlottesville while he is attending L'niversity of ^^irginia doing graduate work Tanley, Louise Nelson Parris, Mary Cowles, Flip Blake, and Frances Northern were among those back to Longwood for graduation last Tune Mrs. Maria Warren Bromleigh's son. Gray, Jr., after appearing in The Covvnon Glory as narrator this summer, is now studying abroad as an Exeter scholar ... As for me, I'm back in Pittsburg teaching after a six month's "tour" of New Jersey and Massachusetts provided by LTncle Sam. :

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

1956 President: Georgia Jackson, Street, Lexington, Va.

114

Lee

;

Secretary: Joan Harvey, Route pomattox, Va.

1.

Ap-

The summer fouPid some of the members of the Class of '56 quite busy working and traveling while others just enjoyed themselves loafing. Evelyn Hall and Bettye Maas went to Europe. Patsy Abcrnathy Rice joined her husband in Germany Dottie Rector and Nancy Cousins studied at the University of .

Virginia

.

.

.

Nancy McLawhorn Rhue

.

traveled to California Rose Frost served as a counselor for the Methodist Youth Caravan and worked in the St. Louis, Mo., Conference Jackie Marshall was playground director in Suffolk Joanne Earless served as counselor at a playground there Bootsie Miller worked in the shipyards Carolyn .

.

.

.

,

.

.

.

.

.

.

Gray and Lee Hayes kept busy working at Fort Lee Joyce Clyingenpeel sang in The Contino)i Glory choir Mary Ann Maddox was back in Farmville working with the Baptist students in summer school. In Blackstone Julie Moncure served as a lifeguard Ann Weatherholts worked in the Clerk's office in Winchester ... At the University Hospital in Charlottesville, Winnie Louhoff Betty was busy keeping records Shackelford Ellison, Lorene Allen Roberts, and Audrey Beale Owen joined .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

their husbands Many entered the bonds of matrimony. See the list of Marriages for them Some were very lucky in having new homes in which to start houskeeping such as Becky Blair Butcher and Jean Edzcards Edwards. James Parker and Dottie Rector, who .

.

.

.

.

.

both received scholarships, are at the University of Virginia working towards Masters degrees in speech and drama. -At the University of Tennessee Patsy Hamner is working towards her Master's degree in physical education. Georgia Jackson is at the Medical College of Virginia studying medical technology As fall approaclied quite a few of us were attending workshops and then beginning our first year of teaching. In .

.

.

Richmond and Henrico County we find Lee Hayes, Gail Leonard Diane Hansen, Bettye Maas, Julie Aloncure, Jean Moseley, Virginia Ohenehain Cross, Helen Warriner, Jean Windley Pollock, Loretta Brooking, Barbara Mays, and Bonnie Moore. Shirleye .Adams, Virginia Cowles, and Jane Blake Lawrence are teaching Norfolk; Joyce Clingenpeel, Ann in Jor.es, and Shirley Wilbourne are in Norfolk County. In Portsmouth \\e find Mary Davis and Alargaret Aliller. Dale Brothers is in South Norfolk. Louise T. Caldwell and Phyllis Nurney are in

Newport in

Meeks is Catherine Hampton we find George Shirley Kemp, Norma Jeanne News.

Oceana.

Elliott,

Croft,

In

Joan Darnell, and Helen Kelsey.

Fairfax are Euphan Carter, Sue Barbara Williams. Janice Lee Haines, Mary Jo Hutchinson, Betty Pat Rodgers, Shirley Fishback Crosen, and Frances Edwards, Dottie ^^a^ace Jean Edzcards Edwards, Jo Tarpley, and Joan Harvey are teaching in Southhampton County. In Lynchburg we find Marguerite Franklin, Betty Jane Harlowe, and Mary Ann Maddox. Rose Frost and Janet Bain are in Petersburg. In Danville we find Nancy Riddle Tippett, Betty Rose Davis Wittkopp, Rheta Russell, and Kathryne Tompkins. Others

Those

at

Upson,

.

.

.

(Continued on page 56)

53


June Gianninx Teffrev

Scott

son,

'49x. a

Allen

Martha Hilda Abcrnathy Jackson '48. a son, ^laury Hamilton Marjorie Agcc Milan '50, a daughter. Susan Christine Helen Agnew Koonce '51, a daughter Lorene AlUvi Roberts '56, a son Phyllis Alley Carter '49, a son Lovice Altizcr Harris '47, a son, Kevin Lee Elsie Baker Tokarz '52, a son, Robert

Thomas Thomas M. Beckham '52.x and Mrs. Beckham, a daughter, Nora Campbell

Capt.

Marion Bcekner Riggins

'52,

a son Wil-

liam ^Morris

Mary Evelyn Bennett

.\rrington '53. a son Betty Benton Odom '54, a daughter Mary Louise Blacknian Kayton '47, a son, Gilbert Stuart Sutton Bland Hutcherson '47, a daughter, Beverly Scott Carolyn Boothc Saunders '46, a daughter,

Rachel Williams Griswold Boxicy Cousins '49. a daughter Joyce Brisentine McGall '57x, a son Betty Jane Broekz^'ay Low '49, a son,

Thomas Edward

Meade

Nomeka Bryant Sours

John

'50x. a son.

W'illiam

Laura Bnehanan Hays

a son, Robert

'50.

Gresham Biiek

Elizabeth

Waters.

Muse

'50.

a

Lee

son.

Jr.

Mary Stewart

Biiford Perry '47, a son Betsy Bnllock Walker '44\. a dattghter.

Margaret Ann Paige Bnnn Prince

Hazel-Wood

'52,

a daughter

Burbank

Thomas

daughter, Beth Betty Burehett Alniarode Jane Burehett Pe.egy Cobiness Andrews

'40,

a

'48,

a daughter.

'48,

a daughter.

Nancy Wendell \'irginia Canipfield

Hay

a daughter.

Betty Jo Lee Crockett Ingle 'SOx. Michael Wayne Mary Minta Croivder W'hite '51, Charlotte Hall Davis Moore '52x, Gladys Doiody Putney '53x. a son, ter.

^'^rginia

a son.

son

a son

Lloyd

'50.

a son.

Charles

I\^

Anne

Ellett Hardy '43, a son Margaret EllctI Anderson '47. a

daugh-

Patty Armistead

Jane Englchy Haney

'42.

Charlotte Fills Maragon lean Freeman Bartrow Mary Nell

a daughter. Jan '55, '48,

a son a daughter,

Patricia Garth Rhodes '44x, a daughter, Melissa \\'atkins "BeBe" Geyer Redmond '48, a daughter, Patti

54

I\Iargaret a son, }\Iark

Edward

Margaret Massey Massey ]\Jish

'55,

Ben-

a son,

Andrew

Ellis '45, a son,

Timberlake

'43.

a

son,

Shannon

Joel

Babara ^Jonre Curling

Mary

'55. a daughter, Cynthia .Anne Motley Ryland '52, a daughter, Anne Sommerville Rebecca Norflcct ^leyer '46. a son. William John, Jr. Betty Cakes McGrew '55, a son. Craig

Jeanne Hamilton Lafoon '54, a daughter, Lisa Hamilton Rosalie Anne Hamlin Parrott '45, a son,

Louise Parcell W'^atts '43. a daughter, Trina Minette Mildred Parker Candler '54. a daughter

Dot Gregory Morrison Karen Ann

a daughter,

'52,

Elizabeth Gri:::ard Darby '44, a son, Irving Everett, HI Lucy Page Flail Kennedy '53, a son, Theodore Clifford, Jr. Alarjorie Flal! Massey '53, a daughter

Emory

W'ade, II

Sue Harper Schumann '44, a daughter Louise Harrell Clark '47, a son, Peter Emily Hastings Baxter 'Six, a son, Donald L., Jr. -\udra Hazekins James '52, a daughter, Randolph Bell Challice Haydon Parsons '53, a daughter Nancy Hayncs Hall '53x, a daughter, Karen Lou Lorraine

Hillstead

Shirley

'50.

son.

a

Kemper Hite Georgianne

Graves

'45.

daughter.

a

LeStourgeon

daughter, Joanne Betty House Higginbotham Fredrika Hitbard Nichols

'46,

'50,

son

a

a

'47,

a

son,

James Anderson Jane Lee Hutehcson Hanbury '42, a son, John Irvine Peggy Jacob Dichtel '48x, a daughter, Catherine Frederica Jacc|ueline (Jackie) Jardine W'all '52, a son Barrye Langhorne Sara Jeffreys Gilliam '44, a daughter, Virginia Ruftin Clara Jenkins Michael '48, a daughter Dot Johnson Watson '42, a daughter Martha Ellen Jones Holmes '46, a son, Peter Samuel Ruth Jones Duval! '42x, a daughter, Elizabeth Leigh Sarah Anne Jones Light '53, a son,

Nelson

Ann Darden Joyner Jordan

'51, a daughSuzanne Frances Kent Cralle '38, twins, a son, William Kent, and a daughter, Eliza-

ter,

Hill

beth

Patsy Kimbrongh Pettus Richard Emerson Julia

Koch French

son.

a

'50,

Bennett

a son.

'49x,

Livingston

Trianne J.ampkin Freese

'54,

Francis. Jr. Natalie Lancaster Robertson ter. Natalie Lancaster

Lawrence

a son. Ralph a

daugh-

Graves

son,

a

'48,

'44,

a daugh-

ter

Lucille Lezcis Armstrong Maryan Lucille

Braford

'48.

'44.

Bess McGlothlin Gish

'53.

'i7.

Maukin Nelson

son,

Pierce

Pifer Childress (Jill) daughter. Carolyn King \'irginia Lee Price Perrow '46,

\'irgilia

'51.

a

a

son.

Xaricy Pv.rdnni Hurt '53, a daughter .Audrey Kaittsey Long '52. a daughter. Janice Elaine Frances Ann Ramsey Hunter '52, a daugh-

Martha Elzie

ter,

Harriet Ratchford Schach

'50,

a daughter,

Carey Coeburn

Ann Rcaz'cs Poole a son, Heath, Jr. Nell Richard Bell '44. a _son Jean Ridenonr .Appich '52. a daughter, Mary Campbell Roberta Jean Robertson Stables '50, a '47,

Shirlev

son,

David Clinton,

III

Rosalie Rogers Talbert

'43,

a daughter.

'49,

a daughter,

Susan Mears Betty Romeo Wingfield Betsy Carolyn

Peggy T. Ross Byrd '46. a son. Charles Randolph Alay Henry Sadler Midgett '52. a son, Richard Sadler

Shumate

'36,

Gladys Saz'cdge Baker

'52,

Lclia Sanford

a sou a daughter

Elizabeth Scales DeShazo '40, a daughter, Elizabeth Scales Phil Sehlobohm Duval '40, a daughter

Sarah Schnlcr Pevehouse '55-x, a daughter, Sarah Seda Mary Lou Shannon Delaney '42, a son Shirley Sheppard Goodman '57x, a daughEthel Shoekley Southall

'49,

Dot

Shotti'ell Strickland

a son.

'53.

a

Wilson

a son, iMichael

'47, a

son

'49,

'49,

a daughter,

a

a daughter

Allen

son,

Davies

Peggy Simpson Kelsey 'S7x, a son. Esther Slagle Fulgham '50, a daughter, Deborah Jo Jane Smith Dunlap '44, a daughter, Mary Harrison Jane Smith Tindall '50, a son, Mark

Cook Betty Jean Snapp Fawcett ter, Carol Ann

a son

.\nne }[cClniig Grigg daughter. Pettice Elizabeth

McElroy Harvie

son,

a daughter.

F^lizabeth

Shirlej'

Coenan '41, a son, Stephen Evelyn Pierce Maddox '46, a son, David Phillips

Anne Sintpson Alston

Sarah Leathennau Aluvskcns '54, a David Frances Lee Stoneburner '40, a Frank, Jr. Carolyn Leffcl Graham '53. a son

.Sarah

Nancy Louise

ter,

Kay

Jane Gay

Margaret Lazcrence Grayson

Lit::

Glenn Ann Patterson, Marsh '4(). a son, John Robert The Rev'd Douglas L. Paulson '50 and Mrs. Paulson, a son, Fred Albert Joan Payne Southern '57x, a daughter Lucy Jane Perkinson Angle '52, a daugh-

ter '53.

Thomas Aladison

Nancy

Alan

William Spencer

Hoi man

Martha

Katie a

A'ladison

Hilda Edioards Tall

ter.

ter, Mary Ellen Rosalie Grecar Hamlin

Philip '43.

Emily Campfield Barbara Caskey Hopkins '53, a son, James Caskey a son. Lucille Cheatham Mosley '44, Robert Augustus Jenny Clardy Rowe '44. a son, Thomas Clement Dinny Crates Siersema '58x. a daughter. Laura Leigh Josie Lee Cogsdale Taylor '40. a daugh-

Howard,

Pollyanna Martin Foard jamin Martin

'38,

Thomas

Gates '5Sx, a son,

Gilhiin Burr '49, a son, Richard Sarah Graham \\'ells '52, a son, John Edward, I \Margaret Grayson Lawrence '44, a daugh-

Martha

Barbara Bro'a')i Aloore '52, a son, Paul Gregory ilartha Brou'n Hamrick '52x. a son. Richard M.. HI Nancy Bniee Maitland '50. a son. David

Mann Mann

Betty

Southern Stephen Byrd

Barbara

'48,

Meeker

a

'55,

daugha

son,

Elizabeth Amenable Spiiidler Scott '49 son, Charles Granville

(Continned on page

Alumnae

a

56")

M.ac..\zixe


;

Jarman

Elizabeth

Hankins

'53

Mrs.

;

Kimo Wilder AlcVay

Wjajvdaqadu

Frances Aliles Harper Ellsworth Powell

'51

Airs.

;

Pliillip

Hazel Alarie Hart '55; Mrs. J. B. Hilman Hilda Ann Hartis '55 Mrs. Alorris Hall Jean Ottley Heichelbcch '59x; Airs. ;

Holt Abernalhy

Patricia

wood Allen Rice Lois Ann Abshur '59x Hayden Elizaoeth

'56

Mrs.

El-

Mrs. Jerry Lowell

;

'4(j

Airs.

;

Herbert Rockwood Coleman Jr. Doris Elizabeth Allen 'S'Jx Mrs. Robert ;

Warner Mays Eva Lorene Allen

Alinta-Hopkins Critzer AIcDonald Ogilvie

'51

George

Airs.

;

Nell Elizabeth Cocker '55; Airs. Bernard

Owen Adams

Viannah

;

Mrs.

'56;

J.

F. Roberts

Jr.

VVilma Delois Allen '49; Mrs. Charles Fred Speight Jr. Mary Louise Alphin '5U Mrs. Homer Howard Hurley Patricia Palmer .Altwegg '54; Airs. Raymond AIcDonald Brown Jr. Jean Ruth Anderson '55; Mrs. Derwood ;

Virginia Lee Crockett '56x Carrol Ingle

Thelma Inez Crump H. Alihalcoe Claia Ruth CuUip Winkler

'59x

Charles

Airs.

;

'50;

Charles

Airs.

;

'52;

Airs.

William

Airs.

Airs. Glenn Preston Curtis '59x Slusher Cock Juanita Hazel Dayberry 'S6x Airs. John

Julia

;

;

Ruth Elizabeth Blackmail '58x Airs. Fred Bruce P-berwine Jr. Rebecca .Ann Blair '56 Airs. William

Frank Hodges Ir. Airs. Carl Ann Henly DeAlba •58x Henry North Airs. Frances Harrison DeBerry '49 Eubank Dowiies Dunton Patty Aliller Derring '54; Airs. William Eugene Coleman, Jr. Ilia Atkinson DesPortes '54; Mrs. Tiby Bland Brown Donnetta Elizabeth Deviiie '55 Airs. Linwood Hardv Clark, Jr. Elizabeth D'lch] Laws '26; Airs. Lee Wiii-

Henrj' Butcher Nan Ellen Bland '54

Alary

Franklin Guthrie Flora Alice Ballowe '52, Mrs. Sheppard Allen deHart Airs. Howard Billie Jane Barber '51 Stair Winston Elizabeth Leigh Eentley '55.^; Airs. Neil Joseph Leverenz Johanna Alay Biddlecoinb '54; Airs. Don;

ald

Brooks Shahan ;

;

Mrs. Walter Clifton

Frank Lloyd

Airs.

Beale Elizabeth AIcKewn Boswell '54 Airs. Hal \'enion Lackey, Jr. Aluriel Olive Boswell '50; Airs. Alicbael ;

Flynn Sylvia Paige Bradshaw

'55; Airs.

Butler, Jr. Breslin '54.\

Richard

Alary Ann Mrs. Frederick Williams Siewers, Jr. Barbara Yvonne Brinkley '59x Airs. ;

;

William Drewry Andrews Jane Roberts Browder '49-x Airs. Robert Howland Hines Nancy Elaine Brown '55x Robert Ham;

;

ilton

Alessick

Anne Brown '56 Mrs. Charles Alarvin Johnson Jane Burchett '48 Airs. Forrest Sinclaire Patricia

;

;

Wommack Rufinia Alice Burnette '58x Airs. Joseph Lo.5an Richardson Virginia Page Burnette '50; Airs. John ;

Henry Johnson Hope Campbell

Phyllis

'56x

;

Airs.

John

Clayton Lee Sara Elizabeth Cantrell '58x

;

Airs.

Rob-

bie Frazier

Owen

Emily Claiborne Carper '46, Howard Robinson Marie Jean Carrello '50x Lynch Margaret Gail Carroll '58x ;

;

Airs.

;

William Branner Cridlin,

'57x

;

Edward

Garrett, Jr.

Jo .Anne Dyer '55 Airs. Henry Crump Ridenour Jr. Dorothy Alarie Edwads '54; Airs. Rolo Turner Lassiter, Jr. Hilda Alarie Edwards '50 Airs. Charles ;

;

Howard

Tall

HI

Jean Talmadge Edwards

Edwards Carol Lee Emrick Lee Fry

James

'56; Airs.

Cecil

'58x

Charles

Airs.

;

Carolyn Nelson Fauber '54.x; Airs. Fernando E. Rodriguez Rebecca Jane Fizer '56; Airs. Charles Alurray Allison Ernest

Airs. Anji James Foster '54 Betchel Posey III Martha Elizabeth Foster '59x ;

Thomas William Bryant Ada Branch Fristoe '52

Bowman Mae Gilchrest

Airs.

;

Airs.

Jr.

;

Joe

H. Eugene

;

R. Williams

Joan Marie Conley '55 Airs. Jack Leonard Betty Page Cory '57; Mrs. Charles A. Coppedge

Alma Jean Hopkins

;

Galen

Airs.

;

Airs.

Douglas

'58x

Richard Bollinger Frances Carol Hutson '56 Thomas Ferguson Betty Jo Jennings '53 Francis Curran Jr. Cora Alallin Johnson '56x

;

;

Airs.

Airs.

Glenn

How ard

Airs.

;

Airs.

Joseph

Airs.

William

Airs.

William

;

;

Edward Cox

Mary Ann Johnson

'53x

;

Fearney Kinder Alartha Alarie Joyner '56x ward Kirk Nicholson Wanda Jean Karlet '53;

Airs.

;

Ed-

Airs. Echol Speina Alarshall. Jr. Alary Aloore Karr '52 Airs. Walter Franklin Boikey Glenna [can Kesterson '56; Alr=;. Leon ;

F.

Cash

Mary Anne King

'54

Frederick

Airs.

;

Mitchell Barretl HI Claire A'irginia Kreienbaum

'54;

Airs.

Robert Alan Hannan Jean Rainey Kreienbaum

Airs.

Wil-

'53;

liam Alarshall ZoUman,

Mary Jane Lohr

'56;

Jr.

Airs.

Harry Em-

mick Lee Eleanor Alae Long '56x George Kelsinger Denise Aladelyn Love 'SO

Airs.

;

William Robert

Airs.

;

Nellie

Harman Lucy

'54;

Cleaton Nancy Jane

Airs.

William

Airs. Robert Lyon '58x Kendrick Perdue Christine McKai} Scharch '15; Airs. I. Wallace Walke Annie Griswold Mcintosh Boxley '27; Airs. John G. May Jr. Nancy Helen AIcLawhorn '56; Airs. William H. Rhue Airs. Shirley Winston Alallory 56x Benjamin Waller Hutcheson Betlv Hart Alann '58x Mrs. Thomas ;

L. Gates

David

Coates Sue Elizabeth Atason '5Sx Airs. James Wallace Paulson Airs. Nannie Alildred Alatthews '59x .Andrew B. Stanley Teressa .Ann Alattox '58x Airs. Rodnev ;

Young ;

Airs.

George

Edwin Ogburn Gravatt '59x;

Airs.

William Henry Deppenschmidt III Betty lane GrifTin '55 Mrs. Tohn ^^'alter Holland Roberta Ruth Hamlet '56; Airs. Thomas

Lee Wells .Ann

Elaine

Rawl Witten, Jr. Anne Elizabeth Hamner

'56; Airs. Roliert

Alontgomery

'58x

;

Airs.

Harry

Tildeii Gladding, Jr. Langston Aloody '52; Airs.

-Ann Francis Gabbert Morehead Britt Alartha Stuart D. Landerman Alotley Charlotte Lucille

;

Roy Bryant

'58x

;

'55

Alartha Caroline Goble '57x Aleredith

Elizabeth Curtis Hogge Charles R. Alorton Jr.

;

'5o

Betty Frances Gillett '54; Mrs. .Arthur Frederick Heald Nita Belle Goad '57; Airs. WilHam R.

Charlotte

Robert

Airs.

M. Hayden

A'irginia Hilda Alanvell '52; Airs. Airs.

;

Joyce

;

Thomas

;

'56x

Ron

Rcnald

Airs.

;

AIcLin

Airs.

;

Sheddan Choate, Jr. Shirley Patricia Garst Scott Alaupin Nettie Jane Gerald '58x -Arrington

Mrs.

;

Wilcox Waugh Airs.

Mrs. Ernest

;

Webster Nash

Bunyan Rowena Gibson

J.

Thomas

Airs.

;

Dorothy Anita Douglas '55 Mrs. William Hunter Daughtrey Jr. Lois Arlene Duncan '58.x; Airs. George

Robert

Audrey Dinsmore "Dinny" Coates '58x Mrs. Fldwin Wertz Siersema .Anne Renalds Cock '41 Mrs. Joseph F. Bruno Verna Louise Coleman 'i\ Airs. James ;

Ryan

Kay Donnelly Eugene Hawks

Ellis Airs.

Curtis Colen-an Charlotte Lockhart Cbadwick 'S8x

December, 1956

;

fiee ;

Seeley, Jr. Patricia Bodkin '55;

Sherman

;

William

Airs.

;

Yvonne Cross '56 Leland Brownley Alary Flournoy Crowgey Ala: tin Elden Jeness.

Claiidette

Mrs. Jack

;

Seaman

Russell

Marion Carol Hepler '58; Lee Odom Carolyn Rebecca Hines '55 Hooper Bowling, Jr. Jean Spotswood Hines '57 Watkins Alorris Virginia Lee Hinton '57;

.Alvin

'59x

'59x

;

;

Neil Airs. Airs.

Edwards

Frances .Anne Alurphy '53; Airs. Claiborne Barksdale Alorton, Jr. Ruth Ann Nock '50; Airs. Joseph Gratton Flanigan

55


;; ;;

Virginia Lee Obenchain '56; Mrs. John Armstrong Cross, Jr. Mrs. Bruce Dorothy Dallas Orr 'S6.x Humey Dovell Audrey Mayes Owen '56x Mrs. Robert Scott Beale Elizabeth Calvert Owen '56x Mrs. Colin Gansert Steele Jr. Barbara Ann Peach '57.x Mrs. Tony R. ;

Mrs. Joseph Shirley Ann Perkins '54x D. East Audrey Nolen Powell '55x; Mrs. Johnnie E. Pittard ;

'55

Ruth Riggins '57x Waller Johnson

;

Mcllwaine Irma Mae Setchel '58x Ward Lane Jr.

;

'50;

Ritter

'58x

^\illia^l

Don

;

Jane Shackleford Ellison

Margaret Ann Shelton

'56

'51

Mrs.

;

R.

Mrs. George

;

;

Mrs. Gerald

;

Carlos

Mrs. Sterling

Price Anderson. Jr.

Ann Salmon

'55

Thomas

Mrs.

;

Merrill Robinson

Mary Jean Sandvig Allen Chapman

Steck

Joanne

'55;

James

Mrs.

Robert

Edwards Evelyn

Elaine

'59x

Steele

Mrs.

;

Jack

'54x

;

Mrs. Collins

;

Mildred Sutherland Clark Melany

Airs.

King Sylvester

Shirley

Mrs.

'57; '57.x

ard John Levondoski Elizabeth Ann Temple '58x

{Continued from page 54)

Mary Frances Spurlock Taylor

William Alwood Turner White '55; Airs. Vinton Lee Twyman Elisabeth Ann Wilson '56; Airs. Alartin Q. Aliller, Jr. Alartha Alice Wilson '52; Airs. William

David

Cora Jacqueline

'52,

a

'49.

a son a daughter.

Anita Louise "Dibbs" Tyree Balboni Laura Lee

Bvers '53, a son, lohn Ray, III Iris Sntphin Wall '51, a son, Steven Ed-

I'anHorn Randolph

a son, Samuel a son,

Thomas

Page

'X7

,

a

son,

daugh-

a

daughter.

a

a daugh-

a

'53,

'46,

a

daughter,

a

daugh-

'43 a son,

George

'40-x,

Walker Bailey

Edna Earle Walters

Johnson,

Alizelle

'49.

a

.^on

Ann

Buckingham County

in

(Continued from page 53)

;

Rebecca

Carolyn Gray Fi::er .\llison, in Radford and Elizabeth Jl'ilson Aliller. in Staunton School for the Deaf and Blind Alanchester; Prillaman, in Alarion Ruffin Anderson, in South Hill Stephanie Bander Settle, in Greene CounRuth Shelton at Stratford College, ty in Danville Anne Snyder, in Winchester Alargaret Terrell, in Dinwiddle; ElizaJean Ward, beth Sutherland, Hopewell Fieldale Ann Weatherholtz, Princess Anne County Lou Wilder, Quantico and Becky Blair Butcher, Prince Edward County. Three are teaching in other states Betsy Il'elbon AUgood, Grand Rapids, Mich. Aluriel Boswell, in New and Nancy MeLaivhorne Rhue, Jersey the

at

;

;

;

;

;

Suzanne

;

;

;

;

;

;

—

;

;

in

Alassachusetts.

a

'49,

Wendenhurg Hayden Judson, III

Carter

son,

Wil-

a daughter,

Silver

Virginia Westbrook Goggin Jl'illiatiison

Hoyt

'40,

'55,

a

'51, a son a daughter,

Leigh Williamson Ililson Jordan '54x, a daughter,

Enmia

Alartha

Anne

Helen IVilson Cover Alice

IJ' ilson

'45,

a

daughter

Thompson

'52,

a

William Wofford, Jr. Alary Lou Wilson AIcGee '50x, a son Alary Franklin H'oodzcard Potts '45, a son, James Woodward ^"irginia Dare ll'oody \\" right '52, a son, son,

Ephriam Bruce,

;

teaching in various parts of the State are Ann Lush and Jackie Alarshall in Chesterfield County Lois Alarshall in Lunenburg County Joan Willard. in Rural Retreat Joanne Farless, in Chuckatuck. Glenna Kestcrson Cash, in Lexington AloUy Ann Harvey, in Roanoke Mary Ellen Hawthorne, in Narrows Frances Hutson Ferguson, in Bassett Nancy Hartmann and Annie Leigh Lewis, in Alanassas; Anne Hamner Bryant, in Waynesboro; Evelyn Hall, in Pulaski; Blankenship, Alartinsville Shirley in Sarah Jane Bristine, in Suffolk; Nannie Andrews, at Whitmell Patricia Brown

Watson Price

A'irginia

Johnn}'

CLASS NEWS

'49,

Scott

Alartha

Jr.

Ruth Walker AIcGehee '50 and Stuart AIcGehee '50. a daughter, Brenda Nancy Walthall Averv '52, a son, Joseph

Pamela Gail

Watson Dudley

Jackie liam

David

son,

Walthall

Monroe Lorene Thomas Clarke

Kyle

;

son, '36,

Nobuko

Elizabeth

Mrs.

;

Laura '39,

Funii jl'alcayama Tajima ter,

'54

Robert

;

Isabel

William,

'52,

'44,

ter

Tan

Wood

Airs.

;

thaniel Alagee

Marion Umberger Hoffman '39,

'56

Clinton Alann Patricia Ann \\'orrell '58x Eugene Alondell Grizzard Flora Jo York '57x Airs. Ralph Na-

ter.

Sally Blaine Elizabeth Stone

Baxter Fances Thomas Pairct

Mrs. Welling-

;

;

Eleanor Jean Windley Edwin Pollock

Mrs. George

;

Tilman Aebersold

A^irginia

'51.

Airs.

;

Bruce

Mrs. Rich-

;

Thomas Basilone Thomas Anthony

ward Kathryn Terry Wilson

'57

;

Jr.

Billie

Warthen Downs

daughter, Janet Leigh Frances Steed Edwards Joanne Sterling Ferrell

Ward,

'54.x

Wofford Thompson '58,x

Alargaret

56

Barbara Joyce Tyer

Sherman Sarah Wilhoit Stephens

Edward Engstler ;

Caroline Traynham Edwin Hall Chauncy

Jactiueline

John

;

'50

Cook Chapman \'irginia

Mrs.

M'

V

Ludson Hardie Marion Bruce Ruffin

Ann Thomas '54; Mrs. Ralph Stephens Wicke Lucy Blakeslee Thwing '55; Mrs. Frank Elizabeth

ton

Alan Gildersleeve

Robins

Guy

Mrs.

;

Raymond Stringer, Jr. Mary Brownley Smith '51

;

Mrs.

Hall Mrs. Charles Bobbie Jo Rogers '5Sx Melvin Denny Barbara Deane Roller '57; Mrs. Harvie

Wilnia

William

Mrs.

;

'57 Jr.

Mrs. JefTerson

Betiv

Beitzen Jack

Marcia Lee

;

Henry

Airs.

;

Pocahontas "Polly" Simpson 'S7>i: Mrs. William E. Duncan Mrs. George Carolyn Fay Smith '57x

Mrs. Richard

;

Rhodes '58x

Amy

Ann

Mark

Mrs.

;

Scott '56 Mrs. Lewis Milford Harrison Mrs. Parke Galusha Janie Scott '55 Iris Priscilla

Thomas

White

Flournoy Matthew's

Howard Hillman

'55

Jr.

Ann A^anlandingham '58x Mrs. Carrington Richard Mothershead Jean Carter Watkins '51 Airs. Carson Elmore Saunders Jennie Sue Webb '49; Airs; Airs. Harry Stratton Aleade Elizabeth Elaine Welbon '56; Mrs. John

Cumbey Patsy

Ann

Bill

ilrs.

;

Norman Munro

Keiter Christine

Ivy

Reed

'57x

Scott

Anne Minter Thaxton Broaddus Daniel

Craig Gibson Fannie Hawthorne Scott '56x

Aubey

\"irginia

Ann

Mrs.. Charles

Barbara

;

L.

Nancy Ann Saunders '56.x; Henry Johnson III

;

;

Naomi

;; ;

Jr.

Some

are in other fields. Anne Brooking a social worker in Winchester. Elizabeth Pancake is doing VPI Extension work in Appomattox. Shirley Willhide is working in Washington, D. C. Ann Coleman Ross is working as secretary for the Savings & Loan Company in Ala-

is

Winfree is a minister. \\'right is minister of music director of religious education at

nassas.

Alary

Charles

Ann

and Chestnut Hill Baptist Church in Lynchburg. Pat Cantrell is secretary to the president of

Alagnusson

AICV. In Lunenburg Harold is

serving as principal, Rober-

Hamlet ^^'itten is doing secretarial work in Richmond ... I am looking

ta

forward to hearing from each of you. me all about the places you are going and the things you are doing. telling

Alumnae M.agazine


Calendar of College Events September

Opening

17

5

,

One Act

Plays

Artist

Series

October 8 October

13

Hockey Game, Westhampton

(there)

Madison

(here)

Game,

.Hockey

20

October

Alumnae Board Meeting

--

and 27

2(i

October 27

Circus

,

Walter Urben Recital

October 30

November

2 and 3

November

8

November

15,

November

17

Tidewater Hockey Tournament

November

Id,

and 17

--

6

December

7

__Water Pageant

_--VMI

._

December

14

December

15

December

16

French

12

January

25-31

Feburary 8

Basketball Game,

.

Basketball

(here)

Mary

(here)

Religious Basketball

2

Leaders of

Business

and 16

Spring

,

Freshman

April 6

June

Spring Vacation

--

Spanish Institute of

Movie

Southern Culture

May Day .

1

Dance

Artist Series

4

25-31

Day

Production

Cotillion

April 25

14

Play

Concert

Founder's .

.\pril 8

5

America

Spring

Marcl; 23

May May May May

(there)

Water Pageant Future

March 22 and 23

April 26

Week

Emphasis

Game, Westhampton

and 8

18-23

Roanoke (there)

Game. Madison

Basketball Game, William and

February 24-28

15,

Carnival

Examinations

March 29

Club

Sectional

February 22

April

Concert

Christmas

16

14.

Dance

Sophomore Production

1 1

January

Marcli

Fiesta

Senior

Miss Josephine Bailey Recital

January

9

— Spanish

Christmas Holidays

3

January 7

7

Glee Club

Y.W.C.A. Pageant

.

December 19-January

Marcli

Series

Artist

and 7

13

March

Play

(here)

Elem, District Teachers Meeting

December

March

Colonels

Little

Tlianksgiving Holidays

5

December

(there)

Fall

.

Hockey Game,

27

December

(here)

Hockey Game, William and Mary

November 21-26

February

Day

Rat

October 13 October

session

Hockey Game, Roanoke (here)

Ooctober 4 October

1956-57

of

Athletic Association Demonstration and Picnic

September 25

Music Recital

One Act Plays Examinations Class

Day

June 2

Baccalaureate Sermon

Tune 2

Commencement


QoUnqsL

Produced by Wedgewood

Sponsored by the Association of Alumnae Colors

— Mulberry — Rotunda — Longwood or Blue

Scene

lOVi

Salad Plates— Reduced

to

Bread and Putter Plates ^.sh

—Reduced

Trays

The

to

in.

plates

each $ .75

Plates, lO'/j inch size

each $2.50

each $ .75

Tea Cups and Saucers

each $2.50

each $1.25

After Dinner

Cups and Saucers

proceeds from the sale of this china will go to the Association of Alumnae.

checks payable to charges

The

also

Send

Associ.^tion of Alumn.^e, Longwood College, Farmville, Va.

each $1.50

all

orders and

make

Express or postage

collect.

FOR SALE IN THE COLLEGE SNACK BAR

PLAYING CARDS

INFORMALS a

box

For bridge or canasta, Rotunda

— Hand-sketched

in

blue, yellow, gray, green, or red at seventy-five cents o deck.

scene of Rotunda, Longwood House, The Library, and The President's House.

Twelve

in

at $1 .00.

COLLEGE SEAL STATIONERY—Two PICTURE STATIONERY

POST CARDS

— Of

sizes at $1 .00 per box.

Rotunda, at forty cents per package.

Rotunda, Library, Student Building, and cents each, or four cards for fifteen cents.

Jarman

Hall,

Extra envelopes twenty-five cents a package.

made from

natural

color

transparencies.

Four


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