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SOPHIA BUSH FROM TV ACTRESS TO GREEN ACTIVIST, THE CHICAGO P.D. STAR PLAYS TO HER PASSIONS

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FRONT RUNNER Two women erect a Victory Gardens emblem on their plot in the garden at Gladys and Leamington Avenues in Chicago’s Austin community in May 1943.

GardeninG for Good

During the Second World War, to help prevent food shortages, the US government encouraged citizens to grow their own fresh produce. Nearly 90 percent of Chicagoans had never gardened before, but in 1943, the victory garden movement bloomed across the nation—and Chicagoans led the way, planting an estimated 1,500 community gardens. “Chicago was really organized,” says LaManda Joy, a master gardener who started the victory garden–inspired Peterson Garden Project in 2010 to plant popup gardens on the city’s North Side. It was during WWII, notes Joy, that the city began offering educational programs while increasing media attention with newspaper articles and recorded radio broadcasts to promote urban gardening. Decades later, Joy wanted to preserve the same movement. “I kept driving by this empty lot on Peterson and Campbell in West Ridge, and I joked that I developed a medical condition called ‘lot lust,’ where I see an empty lot and I want to put a garden there.” Upon discovering a photo of the same lot serving as a WWII victory garden, the Budlong Woods resident realized she wanted to use the space to create her first teaching garden. “People are really excited to build gardens,”

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enthuses Joy. “It’s a community project. We do it together.” Now in its sixth season, the Peterson Garden Project works with neighbors, property owners, aldermen, and community centers. To date, it has created eight pop-up victory gardens comprising 1,039 plots and boasts 1,000 volunteers and almost 4,000 gardeners (some of whom, Joy notes, have assumed the title of “block captains,” as victory gardeners did during WWII). The nonprofit organization has also partnered with Grewbie 101, which teaches gardening basics; Senior/Senior, which connects senior citizens with high school seniors; and cooking classes on everything from Southern Indian cuisine to seasonal soups. Like the victory gardens that offered platforms to support the war effort, Joy values the dialogue the Peterson Garden Project continues to provide for the community. “Today, a lot of people are afraid of our food system,” she says. “They are worried about contamination, or they’re worried about GMOs [genetically modified organisms]. To me, the ability to use a piece of land and gather people together to solve their problems is a direct legacy of what happened 72 years ago.” ma

photography courtesy of the chicago history MuseuM

In World War II-era ChICago, loCal resIdents supported the natIon’s efforts by plantIng vICtory gardens around the CIty, InspIrIng a movement that lIves on today. by katina beniaris


contents

Late spring 2015

108

FLEURS DE VIE Designers are using flowers in fresh ways to capture the spirit of spring.

10 // front runner 24 // letter from the editor-in-Chief

26 // letter from the president and publisher

28 // ... Without Whom

this issue Would not have been possible

30 // the list 75 // invited

style 35 // feet first Creatures of the Wind designers Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters step into spring with their frst shoe line.

38 // on pointe This season, ballet-inspired fashions take center stage in the Windy City.

40 // style spotlight New boutiques from Two Penny Blue, Warby Parker, and iconic jeweler Marshall Pierce & Co.; and the latest line from menswear sensation Boga.

Shelby Steiner goes back to basics with a new eco-friendly collection.

44 // blaCk beauty Chicago fashion expert Ikram Goldman’s latest obsession? The edgy new collection from Japanese label Noir.

46 // the poWer of gold Watchmakers are crafting unique timepieces inspired by mankind’s most ancient obsession.

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photography by rene & radka/art department

42 // sustainably ChiC


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Late spring 2015

61

35

PARKS AND RECREATION Michael Kelly is upgrading and energizing the city’s outdoor spaces.

FEET FIRST Creatures of the Wind specializes in a fuss-free approach to standout style.

81

EAT AT DOVE’S Dove’s Luncheonette serves up “Mex-Tex” fare in a vintage diner setting.

culture

people

49 // CirCle of love

61 // PArks And

June is bustin’ out all over in the Lyric Opera’s star-studded Carousel.

52 // A ChiCAgoAn in PAris

Painter Archibald Motley made the art world pay attention, then played the game his way.

64 // touChdown ChiCAgo

54 // swing into sPring

The Chicago Sports Commission’s Kara Bachman welcomes the NFL Draft back to the Windy City.

From new green spaces to the return of alfresco dining, eight reasons to get excited for the season.

56 // Culture sPotlight Real estate power couple Milan and Amy Rubenstein invest in their passion for theater; Ed Asner and Loretta Swit star as FDR and his frst lady; Chicago’s dance scene heats up; the Antiques, Garden & Design Show gets a reboot.

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reCreAtion

Chicago Park District CEO and General Superintendent Michael Kelly gears up for another green season in the city.

66 // off the ChArts EDM duo (We Are) Nexus drops a new single and embarks on its frst national tour.

68 // investing in the future

As the Young Women’s Leadership Charter School celebrates its 15th anniversary, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt continues to encourage young women blazing the trail.

photography by dorothy hong (Creatures of the wind); heather talbert (Kelly); anjali pinto (dove’s)

contents


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contents

Late spring 2015

94

WONDER WOMAN Chicago P.D. star Sophia Bush chats with Mariska Hargitay about life on the police procedural beat.

taste 81 // Eat at DovE’s One Off Hospitality’s hot streak continues with retro-chic diner Dove’s Luncheonette.

84 // orDEr Up From ambitious taverns to upscale diners, some of Chicago’s coolest gourmet spots are all about casual.

86 // tastE spotlight Eloise Karlatiras gives restaurants an eco-friendly boost; Wansas Tequila arrives in the Windy City; three fresh faces on the Chicago dining scene; Swirlz Cupcakes thrives on.

88 // thE grEatEr gooD Chicago Community Trust’s Terry Mazany joins entrepreneur Brad Keywell at Xoco Bistro to discuss how to make a better Chicago.

features 94 // WonDEr Woman

100 // natUrE in thE EyE of thE storm Climate change is putting nature’s ability to provide for all of us at risk. Are we paying enough attention? By Jill Sigal

108 // flEUrs DE viE This season, Chicago fashion blossoms into a garden of sumptuous delights. Photography by Rene & Radka

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photography by rene & radka/art department

Chicago P.D. star and passionate environmentalist Sophia Bush raises her voice to build a better world. By Mariska Hargitay Photography by Rene & Radka


contents 121

GREEN ACRES Serosun Farms proves that home buyers don’t have to trade luxury for sustainability.

Late spring 2015

haute property 121 // Green Acres An hour outside Chicago, one luxury development is taking sustainable living to a whole new level.

124 // The Lowdown on LATe-ModeL Luxe

New luxury construction is born again in the Windy City—but it’s different this time around.

the guide 127 // Michigan avenue 101 You’ll be 101 percent in the know after consulting our bible of elite dining, nightlife, and shopping destinations.

gold coasting 136 // dirT deviL’s AdvocATe

There’s no “glam” in Earth Day—yet. But chic Chicagoans can lead the way.

on The cover:

Sophia Bush Photography by Rene & Radka/Art Department Styling by Giolliosa & Natalie Fuller/sisterstyling.com Hair by Sascha Breuer/Starworks using Wella Professionals Makeup by Elaine Offers for Exclusive Artists Management using Kevyn Aucoin Manicure by Whitney Gibson using Chanel for Nailing Hollywood Video: Nardeep Khurmi Shot on location at the Fairmont Miramar Hotel & Bungalows and The Bungalow Santa Monica, 101 Wilshire Boulevard, Santa Monica, CA, 310-576-7777; fairmont.com/santa-monica Sweater, MaxMara ($545). 900 North Michigan Shops, 312-475-9500; maxmara.com. Diamond long stud earrings ($38) and bar chain finger bracelet ($22), Makko. makkojewelry.com. Diamond stud earrings, Bush’s own

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Uptown chic meets downtown style to create rooms with attitude. The look is rich, raw and exciting, and the prices are signature Art Van. Pick up our 68 page catalog by visiting one of our convenient locations or see the entire Spring collection at artvan.com Scottsdale Trestle Table compare at $1339 NOW $699 Scottsdale Dining Bench compare at $569 NOW $299 Urban Rider Parsons Chair compare at $519 NOW $269 Rufo Wood Chest compare at $1670 NOW $799 Dexter Aluminum Chest compare at $600 NOW $399

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We have the inside scoop on Chicago’s best parties, style, dining, and more. dine

RESTAURANTS WITH PRIME OUTDOOR SEATING From spacious rooftops to cozy backyards, we found the best seats in the house for enjoying the warmer weather.

photos

Couldn’t attend? Browse the newest photos from Chicago’s most exclusive parties.

style

WHAT TO WEAR AROUND TOWN THIS SPRING Head-to-toe looks just for Chicago residents—no winter coat required.

COME FOLLOW US

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SCIENCE PHOTO (DINE); JEFF SCHEAR/GETTY IMAGES (ODENKIRK); ANN HARITONENKO (STYLE)

SEE THE LATEST FROM LAST NIGHT’S EVENTS


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J.P. ANDERSON Editor-in-Chief Deputy Editor MEG MATHIS Managing Editor OUSSAMA ZAHR Art Director JESSICA SARRO Photo Editor JODIE LOVE Associate Fashion Editor CASEY TRUDEAU Copy Editor WENDIE PECHARSKY Research Editor AVA WILLIAMS

DAN USLAN President and Publisher Account Executives SAMANTHA HARRIS, SARAH HECKLER, ERIN SALINS Director of Event Marketing KIMMY WILSON Event Marketing Coordinator BROOKE BIDDLE Sales Coordinator STEPHEN OSTROWSKI

NICHE MEDIA HOLDINGS, LLC Senior Vice President and Editorial Director MANDI NORWOOD    Vice President of Creative and Fashion ANN SONG Creative Director NICOLE A. WOLFSON NADBOY    Executive Fashion Director SAMANTHA YANKS ART AND PHOTO

Senior Art Director FRYDA LIDOR    Associate Art Directors  ANASTASIA TSIOUTAS CASALIGGI, ALLISON FLEMING, JUAN PARRA    Senior Designer NATALI SUASNAVAS Designers AARON BELANDRES, SARAH LITZ    Photo Director  LISA ROSENTHAL BADER    Photo Editors  KATHERINE HAUSENBAUER-KOSTER, SETH OLENICK, JENNIFER PAGAN, REBECCA SAHN Senior Staff Photographer JEFFREY CRAWFORD    Senior Digital Imaging Specialist JEFFREY SPITERY    Digital Imaging Specialist  JEREMY DEVERATURDA    Digital Imaging Assistant  HTET SAN FASHION

Fashion Editor FAYE POWER    Fashion Assistants CONNOR CHILDERS, LISA FERRANDINO Entertainment and Bookings Editor JULIET IZON COPY AND RESEARCH

Copy and Research Manager  WENDIE PECHARSKY Copy Editors DAVID FAIRHURST, JOHANNA MATTSSON, JULIA STEINER    Research Editors LESLIE ALEXANDER, JAMES BUSS, JUDY DEYOUNG, KAREN MCCREE EDITORIAL OPERATIONS

Director of Editorial Operations  DEBORAH L. MARTIN    Director of Editorial Relations  MATTHEW STEWART    Editorial Assistant CHRISTINA CLEMENTE Online Executive Editor  CAITLIN ROHAN    Online Editors  ANNA BEN YEHUDA, TRICIA CARR    Online Editorial Assistant CATHERINE PARK Senior Managing Editors  DANINE ALATI, KAREN ROSE, JILL SIERACKI Managing Editors JENNIFER DEMERITT, MURAT OZTASKIN Shelter and Design Editor  SUE HOSTETLER    Timepiece Editor  ROBERTA NAAS ADVERTISING SALES

Account Directors SUSAN ABRAMS, MICHELE ADDISON, GUY BROWN, CLAIRE CARLIN, MICHELLE CHALA, KATHLEEN FLEMING, VICTORIA HENRY, KAREN LEVINE, MEREDITH MERRILL, NORMA MONTALVO, JEFFREY NICHOLSON, SHANNON PASTUSZAK, MIA PIERRE-JACQUES, VALERIE ROBLES, JIM SMITH, JESSICA ZIVKOVITCH    Account Executives SUSANA ARAGON, KRISTIN BARNES, LAUREN BROGNA, MORGAN CLIFFORD, JANELLE DRISCOLL, VINCE DUROCHER, IRENA HALL, CATHERINE KUCHAR, JULIA MAZUR, FENDY MESY, MARY RUEGG, JACKIE VAN METER    Advertising Business Manager RICHARD YONG    Sales Support and Development  EMMA BEHRINGER, ANA BLAGOJEVIC, BRITTANY CORBETT, DARA HIRSH, KARA KEARNS, MICHELLE MASS, NICHOLE MAURER, RUE MCBRIDE, ELIZABETH MITCHELL, MICHELLE PETRILLO, ALEXANDRA WINTER MARKETING, PROMOTIONS, AND PUBLIC RELATIONS

Vice President of Marketing and Public Relations LANA BERNSTEIN    Senior Director of Brand Development ROBIN KEARSE    Director of Brand Development JOANNA TUCKER    Brand Development Manager JIMMY KONTOMANOLIS    Director of Creative Services SCOTT ROBSON    Promotions Art Designers KAITLYN RICHERT, CARLY RUSSELL Event Marketing Directors  AMY FISCHER, HALEE HARCZYNSKI, LAURA MULLEN      Event Marketing Managers  KELSEY MARRUJO, CRISTINA PARRA, ASHLEY VEHSLAGE    Event Marketing Assistant SHANA KAUFMAN ADVERTISING PRODUCTION

Director of Positioning and Planning  SALLY LYON    Positioning and Planning Manager TARA MCCRILLIS Assistant Production Director PAUL HUNTSBERRY    Production Manager BLUE UYEDA    Production Artists MARISSA MAHERAS, DARA RICCI, ALISHA SMITH Distribution Manager MATT HEMMERLING    Assistant Distribution Relations Manager  JENNIFER PALMER    Fulfillment Manager DORIS HOLLIFIELD    Traffic Supervisor  ESTEE WRIGHT     Traffic Coordinators JEANNE GLEESON, MALLORIE SOMMERS    Manufacturing Coordinator KIMBERLY CHANG    Circulation Research Specialist  CHAD HARWOOD FINANCE

Controller DANIELLE BIXLER    Finance Directors  AUDREY CADY, LISA VASSEUR-MODICA    Director of Credit and Collections CHRISTOPHER BEST Senior Credit and Collections Analyst  MYRNA ROSADO    Senior Billing Coordinator CHARLES CAGLE Senior Accountant  LILY WU    Junior Accountants  KATHY SABAROVA, NEIL SHAH, NATASHA WARREN Accounts Payable Coordinator NADINE DEODATT ADMINISTRATION, DIGITAL, AND OPERATIONS

Director of Operations MICHAEL CAPACE    Director of Human Resources STEPHANIE MITCHELL Digital Producer  ANTHONY PEARSON    Facilities Coordinator JOUBERT GUILLAUME    Chief Technology Officer  JESSE TAYLOR    Desktop Administrators ZACHARY CUMMO, EDGAR ROCHE EDITORS-IN-CHIEF

SPENCER BECK (Los Angeles Confidential), ANDREA BENNETT (Vegas), KATHY BLACKWELL (Austin Way), KRISTIN DETTERLINE (Philadelphia Style), LISA PIERPONT (Boston Common), CATHERINE SABINO (Gotham), JARED SHAPIRO (Ocean Drive), ELIZABETH E. THORP (Capitol File), DAMIEN WILLIAMSON (Executive Editor, Aspen Peak), SAMANTHA YANKS (Hamptons) PUBLISHERS

JOHN M. COLABELLI (Philadelphia Style), LOUIS F. DELONE (Austin Way), DAWN DUBOIS (Gotham), ALEXANDRA HALPERIN (Aspen Peak), DEBRA HALPERT (Hamptons), SUZY JACOBS (Capitol File), GLEN KELLEY (Boston Common), COURTLAND LANTAFF (Ocean Drive), ALISON MILLER (Los Angeles Confidential), JOSEF VANN (Vegas)

Managing Partner JANE GALE Chairman and Director of Photography JEFF GALE Chief Operating Officer MARIA BLONDEAUX Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer JOHN P. KUSHNIR Chief Executive Officer KATHERINE NICHOLLS Copyright 2015 by Niche Media Holdings, LLC. All rights reserved. Michigan Avenue magazine is published eight times per year. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publisher and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material, and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to Michigan Avenue magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs, and drawings. To order a subscription, please call 866-891-3144. For customer service, please inquire at michiganavenue@pubservice.com. To distribute Michigan Avenue at your business, please e-mail magazinerequest@nichemedia.net. Michigan Avenue magazine is published by Niche Media Holdings, LLC., a division of Greengale Publishing, LLC. michigan avenue : 500 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 1400, Chicago, IL 60611 T: 312-753-6200 F: 312-753-6250 niche media holdings: 711 Third Avenue, Suite 501, New York, NY 10017 T: 646-835-5200 F: 212-780-0003

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Letter from the editor-in-Chief // this issue //

on my radar From favorite new favors to the return of America’s pastime, three things I’m anticipating for spring… 1. Strolling through brand-new Maggie Daley Park as it blooms for the frst time. 2. People-watching at River North classic Piccolo Sogno Due over bar bites like arancini with meat ragu. 3. Catching early-season ball games at U.S. Cellular Field and at the newly made-over Wrigley Field.

1

Catching up with Mayor Rahm Emanuel and chef Art Smith at the Equality Illinois Gala, themed “Love is Love.”

It’s practIcally a rIte of sprIng: As soon as the mercury climbs

j.p. anderson Follow me on Twitter at @JP_ Anderson and at michiganavemag.com.

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2

3

photography by brooke Collins/City of ChiCago (emanuel); leigh loftus (food)

back to 50, Chicagoans shed their layers and flood the city’s parks and paths in a spontaneous celebration of the end of winter. You can hardly blame us for being overzealous; after months indoors, the prospect of the city coming to life again is enough to send even the most modest city dweller skipping into the brisk April air in shorts and a T-shirt. Seeing the first buds on the trees and the first tulips poking up on Michigan Avenue is an instant reminder of why we endure the cold—because there’s simply nothing more exhilarating than Chicago when it starts to bloom and turn green again. With spring in the air and Earth Day ahead, that green theme resonates throughout this issue of Michigan Avenue—in our cover story with Chicago P.D. starlet and passionate environmentalist Sophia Bush; in Conservation International executive Jill Sigal’s forceful examination of climate change (and what Chicagoans can do about it); in our nostalgic look back at the city’s WWII-era victory gardens and the modern-day community garden movement they’ve inspired; and in our profile of Chicago Park District General Superintendent and CEO Michael Kelly, a lifelong city resident who grew up playing in the CPD parks and is now charged with making sure they’re in tip-top shape. The greening of the city is just one of the many things worth getting excited about this spring. From the blossoming of the new Maggie Daley Park and the opening of the much-anticipated 606 recreation trail to the debut of two stunning rooftop hangouts at the new Virgin and Loews hotels, it’s no wonder that Chicagoans are racing to get outside and kick-start the season—and I’ll be right there with them, relishing the 50-degree weather and reveling in the green days ahead.


letter from the President and Publisher 1

Celebrating the release of our Spring issue with cover star Bob Odenkirk at Vertigo Sky Lounge at the Dana Hotel and Spa.

Having spent nearly 20 years Here, I feel more than well acquainted

dan uslan

Follow me on Twitter at @danuslan and on Facebook at facebook.com/danieluslan.

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2

// this issue //

on my radar Spring in Chicago is always a time for new adventures, and here are two I’m anticipating. 1. Chicago’s ready for some football! I’m looking forward to embracing the NFL Draft when it hits our city on April 30—especially the interactive fan experience, dubbed “Draft Town,” happening in Grant Park. 2. C Fish-House, from David Flom and Matt Moore of Chicago Cut Steakhouse, is one of the most talked-about new restaurant openings of the season. It’s certain to become a favorite among residents and visitors alike.

photography by Jeff Schear (odenkirk); ShutterStock (park)

with downtown Chicago. From Edgewater to the West Loop and everything in between, there’s not a neighborhood I haven’t explored or a corridor I haven’t canvased. But what makes Chicago great isn’t just what’s in the city proper: Surrounding communities like Winnetka, Lake Forest, Highland Park, and other areas offer equally trendy dining, shopping, and more. I love visiting these burgs to see what’s happening outside the concrete jungle. This spring reasons abound to step out of the city, chief among them the opening of Gene & Georgetti’s Rosemont location. That Chicago’s oldest steakhouse is expanding is a major milestone, and kudos to Rich Ciota and Tony, Marion, and Michelle Durpetti for keeping it in the family all these years. Being able to now indulge in the restaurant’s famed veal Parmesan at two different spots is certainly a development to be savored. Also worth anticipating? Furniture titan Art Van’s continued Midwest expansion. The flagship store, slated for a late-spring opening in Downers Grove, will not only boast the sleek signature furniture for which the brand is famed, but will also be the only provider in Illinois of Michigan-based brand Scott Shuptrine Interiors. Of course, the suburbs aren’t the only hive of activity. If you haven’t yet made it there, I strongly encourage checking out Pinstripes in River East, which recently made its downtown debut. Complementing its Northbrook, Oak Brook, and Barrington locations, the new 33,000-square-foot space boasts indoor bocce courts, bowling lanes, and upscale Italian-American fare—perfect for satisfying both your inner child and inner gourmand. With everything on the horizon, the season is stacking up to be nothing short of a strike.


nature doesn’t need people. people need nature. c o n s e r v A t I o n

I n t e r n A t I o n A L

...wIthout whom this issue would not have been possible

p r e s e n t s

nature is speaking JULIA

roBerts HArrIson

ford kevIn

spacey edwArd

norton penéLope

cruz robert

redford

natureisspeaking.org

JILL SIGAL writer Credentials: Jill Sigal is vice president of US government policy at Conservation International and also serves as chief of staff to CI’s chairman and CEO, Peter Seligmann. As the assistant secretary of energy for congressional and intergovernmental affairs during the George W. Bush administration, she led the effort to pass the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Behind the story: “For my entire life, I have loved being surrounded by nature—hiking, rock climbing, biking. In nature, I find a sense of peace that I do not find in the fast-paced world we live in. I was motivated to write this piece [“Nature in the Eye of the Storm,” page 100] to help raise awareness of the importance of nature in our daily lives and to inspire people to get involved and take action to sustain nature for generations to come.” Proudest career moment: “Serving my country during my tenure as a presidential appointee at the US Department of Energy.” Motivation: “What motivates me to work in the conservation field and what inspires me is one and the same—my son, Harrison. I have a choice: I can sit by and do nothing, or I can take action and do my small part to help ensure that nature continues to provide essential services to future generations.”


DOROTHY HONG photographer Credentials: One of Photo District News’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch in 2007, Dorothy Hong has worked for Nike, Monocle, Flaunt, The Guardian, and The Wall Street Journal and assembled two solo exhibitions at VisionQuest Gallery in Genoa, Italy. Behind the story: “Shane and Chris [“Feet First,” page 35] showed me how designers use every single bit [of material] without any waste, which I never knew about.” Her inspiration: “Light really inspires me. I’m obsessed with sunlight and taking portraits in it. I find it incredibly beautiful.” Dream shoot: “Most of the time, I’m more interested in the location I shoot in than the actual person I’m shooting. I would die to shoot in an old abandoned castle.”

ERIC RYAN ANDERSON photographer Credentials: Based in Brooklyn, Eric Ryan Anderson shoots for commercial clients such as Kate Spade, American Express, IBM, and Ernest Alexander, and for magazines like The Great Discontent, The Hollywood Reporter, and Billboard Magazine. Behind the story: “It was so neat to watch the Carousel crew [“Circle of Love,” page 49] dive straight into production together. Their conversation was just dripping with excitement for the show—so much so that I had to remind them that we were at a photo shoot a couple of times.” Chicago favorites: “There’s nothing I love more than a day trip to Wrigley with a quick stop at Sluggers before the game.”

ELAINE GLUSAC writer Credentials: Elaine Glusac writes about travel and food and contributes to The New York Times, National Geographic Traveler, The Wall Street Journal, Departures, and smithsonian.com. Behind the story: “Dove’s [“Eat at Dove’s,” page 81] isn’t like any other restaurant in the city. I wanted to linger there, because I felt immersed in some story playing out around me.” Her inspiration: “The quirky, offbeat, and contrarian ideas of those I’m drawn to write about.” Go-to dish: “The omakase at Katsu.”

‘7154’

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the list late spring 2015

Keren Cytter

Daniel Stefani

Sanjeev Misra

Diane Charles

Erica Strama

Iggy Azalea

Cristina Rocca

Satya Nadella

Megan Mullally

Geoff Button

Donald Lyons

Jim VanDercook

Daniel Alonso

Ludacris

Elizabeth Cutler

Thomas Raines

Jay Owen

Marc Bushala

Stan Lee

Edward Wehmer

Rajan Sharma

Seymour Stein

Natasha Patla

Monica Pedersen

Oscar Isberian

Kelly Piacenza Hundt

Jeff Garlin

Hillel Frankel

Helen Zell

Diana Sikes

Michael Burch

Julia Louis-Dreyfus

Iliana Regan

Aaron Schilling

Vicki Escarra

Marc Anderson

Scott Vance

Damien Rice

Erika Nelson

Kathleen Madigan

Richard Melman

Dr. Kevin Pinski

Harrison Ford

Francis Guinan

Cecily Strong

Jonathan Berry

Jay Dhillon

Darryl Hogue

Megan Marsden

Cathy DiSante

Maurice LĂŠvy

Cedric the Entertainer

Anthony Rizzo

Elizabeth Berg

Zooey Deschanel

Peter Rios

Diana McCarty

Chris Hayes

Steven Hartenstein

John Stanton

Richard Sandoval

Neil Diamond

Alessandra Branca

Margaret Cahow

30  michiganavemag.com


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STYLE Tastemaker

Feet First

Creatures of the Wind designers Shane Gabier and ChriStopher peterS step into spring With the label’s first shoe line.

photography by dorothy hong

by casey trudeau

An otherwise understated pair of menswear-inspired brogues—sans laces or hardware of any kind—sits atop a platform rainbow of navy, red, rust, and beige. With their bright pop of color, the stripes provide a whimsical counterpoint to the sophisticated minimalism of the gray brogues, resulting in a playful twist on a footwear classic. Not for the faint of heart, the look is perfect for the kind of women who wear Creatures of the Wind. The brainchild of designers Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters, the Chicago-bred label was established in 2008 and has generated buzz aplenty for its youthful aesthetic, which mixes boxy, of-the-moment jackets with feminine flowing skirts. This spring, with the launch of its first footwear line, the duo is hoping to take the label to the next level. continued on page 36

Shane Gabier (left) and Christopher Peters photographed in their New York City studio.

michiganavemag.com  35


style tastemaker

clockwise from left: The duo’s designs feature an eclectic mix of fabrics; art and fashion books offer creative inspiration; stripes add chic pops of color to menswearinspired brogues; samples in the studio.

“It’s important for us to have full control over things and grow categories ourselves,” Peters explains of the new shoe collection, which comes on the heels of six seasons of collaborating with the iconic British footwear designer Tabitha Simmons. “We consider shoes to be one of the most important parts of our outfits as we dress every day. Being able to design them is really appealing and exciting.” The duo points to an abundance of overthought, overly delicate shoes on the market, with a yearning to give women shoes that boast a

36  michiganavemag.com

“strong sense of direction, but at the same time aren’t precious art objects that you are afraid to actually wear.” Their fuss-free approach yields outfit-transforming tomboy slip-ons, illuminated by pops of primary hues, to be worn all day, every day. Creatures of the Wind was born when Gabier and Peters met at The School of the Art Institute, where the two started dating and organically creating loosely defined projects. “It was really like we were making stuff for the sake of making things,” says Peters, who began his fashion career

by crafting Sound Suits for Chicago fashion luminary Nick Cave. Local buyers saw the fresh, raw appeal in the duo’s sculptural brocade dresses and wild-yet-contained mixes of color and fabric—think tweed woven from hair-thin plastic, holographic jacquard, tulle against lamé, and vegan leather against canvas. “An editor from women’s wear daily saw [our work] and started talking to us, and that led to a wwd cover, which led to a w feature,” Gabier recalls. “That motivated us to keep going, and each [collection] got

a little bit more serious until the Spring 2011 collection, which we consider the first real collection.” Dear friend Ikram Goldman began carrying Creatures of the Wind pieces in her eponymous boutique, with Barneys soon signing on as well. Anna Wintour encouraged the pair to apply for the 2011 CFDA/vogue Fashion Fund Award, and they were named runner-up. Most recently, the design team won the 2014 CFDA Swarovski Award for Emerging Talent in Womenswear. Gabier and Peters, who relish a relatively low profile in

Logan Square, balance time in Chicago with work in New York and a whirlwind travel schedule (recent stops include China, Denmark, and Iceland), which is a constant source of inspiration. In fact, they allude to their itinerant lifestyle in the label’s name, which is inspired by the song “Wild Is the Wind.” “The song is quite emotional and eerie, and kind of sad but energizing, and those are the things we want the brand to encompass,” Gabier says. “It was always about the intensity.” available at ikram, 15 e. huron st., 312-587-1000; ikram.com MA

photography by dorothy hong

The pair’s fuss-free approach To fooTwear yields ouTfiT-Transforming Tomboy slip-ons, illuminaTed by pops of primary hues, To be worn all day, every day.


STYLE Accessories

on Pointe

This spring, balleT-inspired fashions Take cenTer sTage in The Windy ciTy.

EthErEal ElEgancE Whimsical slippers and fluid fabrics create a style that’s freshly feminine. Jumpsuit ($5,290) and skirt ($4,500), Valentino. Neiman Marcus, 737 N. Michigan Ave., 312-642-5900; neiman marcus.com. Gem clutch, Rauwolf ($990). Barneys New York, 15 E. Oak St., 312-587-1700; barneys.com. Kallie flats, Michael Kors ($550). 900 North Michigan Shops, 312-640-1122; michaelkors.com

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ProP Styling by Sharon ryan for halley reSourceS; hair and MakeuP by griSelle roSario uSing dior addict/tata harPer Skin care and aMika hair toolS at factory downtown; Manicure by caSandra laMar uSing dior VerniS/eoS hand lotion at factory downtown

photography by jeff crawford styling by faye power


1

2 Smooth SophiStication

prima pinkS rosy hues add a dash of playfulness to classic looks.

Delicate and dainty designs are poised for the spotlight.

3

4

curtain call

raiSing the Barre

posh pirouettes are inspired by these stylish staples.

improve your sartorial technique with ornate extras.

1. Headdress, Jenny Packham ($347). Ultimate Bride, 106 E. Oak St., 312-337-6300; jennypackham.com. Zoe envelope clutch, Max Mara ($425). 900 North Michigan Shops, 312-475-9500; maxmara.com. Mariposa flat, Alejandro Ingelmo ($625). Neiman Marcus, 737 N. Michigan Ave., 312-642-5900; neimanmarcus.com. 2. Crystal headdress, Jenny Packham ($733). Ultimate Bride, see above. Specchio resin clutch, Judith Leiber Couture ($1,495). Neiman Marcus, see above. Patent pump, Brian Atwood ($855). Saks Fifth Avenue, 700 N. Michigan Ave., 312-944-6500; saks.com. 3. Monili wallet, Brunello Cucinelli ($955). 939A N. Rush St., 312-266-6000; brunellocucinelli.com. Lana pump, Bionda Castana ($805). Intermix, 40 E. Delaware Pl., 312-640-2922; intermixonline.com. Comb, Jenny Packham ($376). Ultimate Bride, see above. 4. Lyssa flat, Jimmy Choo ($795). 63 E. Oak St., 312-255-1170; jimmychoo.com. Crown Goa clutch, Oscar de la Renta ($2,250). Neiman Marcus, see above; oscardelarenta.com. Tribal earrings, Dior (price on request). Saks Fifth Avenue, see above

michiganavemag.com  39


STYLE Spotlight for him

LOOK NATURAL

Blazing the Trail

debut

Jeff Burkard, CEO and lead designer of the West Loop-based menswear line Boga, is evolving the brand with a softer, lighter palette for spring. “When developing a new line, I always design around the colors and textures found in nature,” says Burkard. The label’s new collection features a vibrant mix of cool and warm tones, layering aqua blues beneath crushed berry and saturated citrus hues. “The line is both masculine and fresh,” notes Burkard of the collection, which features luxe fabrics like merino wool. 133 N. Jefferson St., 5th fl., 312-801-8662; boga.com

// GRAND OPENINGS // 1

DOUBLE VISION

Since 2010, online retailer Warby Parker has been bringing easy style to the bespectacled with its mission-based buy/donate model. Now, the eyewear company is debuting a permanent brick-and-mortar store in Lincoln Park, where Chicagoans can try and buy sunwear and optical styles, like the new Basso collection featuring contrasting frames. 837 W. Armitage Ave., 773-341-1890; warbyparker.com

2

MARIE WHITNEY LAUNCHES A STOREFRONT FOR ONLINE RETAIL LINE TWO PENNY BLUE. Founded by local fashionista Marie Whitney in 2012 as an online retailer of fitted, Technicolor blazers, Two Penny Blue has now launched a studio and shop in Lakeview featuring those signature pieces plus a curated selection of made-in-the-USA bags, jewelry, accessories, and home goods. “I wanted to give our customers a unique touch point with the brand and the opportunity to see the craftsmanship and fit of our jackets,” says Whitney of the shop, which is open all day Friday and Saturday and by appointment the rest of the week. With every jacket purchased, the company donates a uniform to an African schoolgirl. This spring, look for nautical styles and black and white blazers as the brand launches a trunk show series with emerging designers who share a philanthropic mission. 3738 N. Southport Ave., 872-802-0158; 2pennyblue.com MA

// need it now //

SADDLE UP!

Ralph Lauren ($1,250). 750 N. Michigan Ave., 312-280-1655; ralphlauren.com

40 MICHIGANAVEMAG.COM

SHINY AND NEW

Boga’s dress shirts come in spring-ready colors such as brandied apricot (SHOWN).

Bling alert: Family-owned Marshall Pierce & Company, one of Chicago’s ultimate resources for jewelry and luxury timepieces, will open an expanded location on Michigan Avenue to showcase collections by Jaeger-LeCoultre, Ivanka Trump, and Mikimoto in addition to its own line of baubles. 980 N. Michigan Ave., 312-372-2415; marshallpierce.com

A chic saddle bag is the perfect companion for an outdoor jaunt in the Windy City this spring.

Michael Kors ($795). 900 North Michigan Shops, 312-587-3600; michaelkors.com

Jil Sander ($1,820). 48 E. Oak St., 312-335-0006; jilsander.com

Chloé ($1,950). Neiman Marcus, 737 N. Michigan Ave., 312-6425900; neimanmarcus.com

Tory Burch ($550). 45 E. Oak St., 312-280-0010; toryburch.com


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STYLE Fashion Conscience

Shelby Steiner (below) uses fashion to encourage others to think critically about their lives. right: Two looks from Steiner’s newest collection.

“I thInk that sustaInabIlIty Is really the future of fashIon.” —shelby steiner

Sustainably Chic

ChiCago designer Shelby Steiner goes baCk to basiCs with a new eCo-friendly ColleCtion.

Shelby Steiner, 24, is dedicated to of-the-moment fashion and eco-friendly design in equal measure. “I’m moving toward the sustainability side of fashion,” notes the designer, whose eponymous label has been picked up by stores in LA, San Francisco, Portland, and New York, “so I’m working a lot with bamboo, organic cottons, vegan leather—trying to introduce styles in a different way.” This spring Steiner is making the move to Portland to begin designing for Nike, and as she prepares for a new sartorial chapter, the womenswear wunderkind shares why her less-is-more mentality is the key to looking good—and doing good—every day. Tell us about your new collection. Last season, I had a lot of ties that wrapped around the body; I did that same concept with a Japanese-inspired silhouette but with an American spin, so I did denim and plaid kimonos. What inspired this collection? I’ve been trying to simplify my life in every way, really stripping down to the basics and the necessities of what a woman would want in her day-to-day life—going from her house to yoga, or the train to her workplace. I tried to make things as casual and comfortable, but still interesting, as possible. Why is sustainability important to you?

42  michiganavemag.com

I think that’s really the future of fashion. A lot of people aren’t creating quality products that last. Where are those pieces going? That’s something I’ve been thinking a lot about; personally, I just went through my closet, and I want to get rid of 75 percent of what I own. I really wear the same three outfits every week, just in different combinations. How has living in Chicago influenced you as a designer? In so many ways. I took the Purple Line today so I could see the city on my way in, and I think the most beautiful thing is that you see something new all the time. I also love how our city is old-world, but so technologically advanced, especially in its architecture. I’ve been here six years, and I love this city in winter and summer. What do you envision for the future of your line? I’d like to be in my top 20 stores throughout the world: Robin Richman in Chicago, Totokaelo in Seattle, Barneys [New York], and Oak in NYC. Dagmar [Rousset] in Australia is hands-down my favorite [retailer]—she’s interesting and kind of quirky. How do you want to add your voice to the fashion industry? I’m working on expression, and I hope to encourage others to think critically about all of their life choices, from when you throw a plastic bottle into a garbage can to what you buy on the weekends. All of that collectively adds up, so the less waste you can create, the better off all of us will be. shelbysteiner.com  MA

photography by bryan Whitely (Steiner); Clay boutte (modelS)

by meg mathis


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Style Ikram’s It list

Black Beauty

ChiCago fashion expert I ram Goldman’s latest obsession? the edgy new ColleCtion from Japanese label noir.

Black is never out of style, but for Ikram Goldman, this season’s collection from Noir is nothing short of incredible. “In a sea of garments [at Fashion Week],” notes the River North boutique owner, “for me to have an emotionally charged, visceral reaction to a collection says a lot. This collection didn’t have a runway in Paris—it wasn’t on models. It was just hanging on a rack, which is essentially how you would be seeing the clothes in the store—but it was one of the most intricate, elaborate, embellished, most feminine, edgy collections I saw come out of Paris.” A particular favorite, Goldman enthuses, is Noir designer Kei Ninomiya’s leather jacket with pearls. “The jacket speaks for itself,” she insists. “The workmanship and the quality are a practice in perfection, and blending that tough edge with the beautiful sea pearls and the couture—and to have it fit the way it does—is one of the most exquisite things I’ve ever seen.” MA Black jacket with pearls, Noir Kei Ninomiya (price on request). Ikram, 15 E. Huron St., 312-587-1000; ikram.com

44  michiganavemag.com

photography by maria ponce berre (goldman). styling by jojo li

as told to j.p. anderson photography by jeff crawford


CH ICAG O HAS FOU N D A N EW FL AM E Chicago’s culinary renaissance contnues; this March, Iron Chef Jose Garces introduces Rural Society to the Windy City. Nestled in the heart of downtown, the Argentne steakhouse blends its South American-inspired menu into sophistcated yet warm décor ft for the signature restaurant of Loews Chicago Hotel. Breakfast

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Dinner

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STYLE Time Honored

The Power of Gold

Modern watchMakers are crafting unique tiMepieces inspired by Mankind’s Most ancient obsession. by roberta naas photography by jeff crawford

Gold has been considered the ultimate measure of wealth since the beginning of civilization: As far back as 3600 BC, Egyptians portrayed gold in their hieroglyphics, and the Mesopotamians were among the first to craft gold jewelry. Throughout history, gold has emerged as a unit of currency, a factor in art, and a universal sign of

From Bulgari, this stunning Serpenti watch ($59,000) is crafted in 18k white gold

46  michiganavemag.com

with a supple white-gold bracelet designed to emulate the creature’s appearance, including a tapered tail. 909 N. Michigan Ave., 312-255-1313; bulgari.com This Waldan International Power Reserve Chronometer ($20,000) features a two-part, 37mm 18k rose-gold case with fluted bezel. The COSC-certified chronometer offers second time zone,

day of week, and power reserve indicators. Wilfred Newman, 750 N. Franklin St., Ste. 105, 312-929-3067; waldanwatches.com Buccellati has crafted this Cleopatra cuff watch ($43,500) in a proprietary 18k black gold. The cuff consists of 66.22 grams of gold and is set with 32 diamonds. 62 E. Oak St., 312-600-9224; buccellati.com

styling by terry lewis

clockwise from left: The Ulysse Nardin Marine Chronometer Manufacture watch ($50,300) is crafted in 18k rose gold with a matching 18k rose-gold case and bracelet. It houses the self-winding UN-118 movement. B. Young & Co., 834 N. Rush St., 312-888-0027; ulysse-nardin.com


photography courtesy of chopard

Colors of gold trend over time, and yellow gold —though still used—is less popular today than 18k white or rose gold. love in the form of wedding bands. The luxurious partnership between gold and timekeeping began in the 17th century, which saw the creation of personal timepieces in the form of pocket watches, with early watchmakers naturally turning to gold to satisfy affluent clients. In its pure form (roughly 24 karats), gold is incredibly soft and malleable—much too soft to be crafted into the hull of a watchcase that is meant to protect the movement within. As such, the most standard international karatage in watchmaking is 18 karat, which contains 75 percent pure gold. The remaining 25 percent is comprised of other metals or alloys (materials that make the watch stronger and can lend a new hue to the color). To form the hues of gold, a variety of materials are added to the original yellow gold ingot during the melting process. Colors of gold trend over time, and yellow gold—though still consistently used—is less popular today than 18k white gold (made by mixing white metals like palladium or nickel with the gold) and 18k pink or “rose” gold (the more copper added, the richer and deeper the pink-gold hue). Typically the value of 3N and 4N is given to pink and rose gold, while 5N takes on a deeper, richer hue. Some brands refer to their 5N pink gold as “red” gold, with certain watchmakers going a step further to create their own gold hues—think green, orange, honey, brown, gray, and even purple—by adding various alloys. Others not only add special metals to achieve their own proprietary color, but also add materials to slow down or stop the fading of the color of gold, or assist in preventing scratches. To achieve certain unique shades like black, alloys are not part of the coloration process; instead, the color is achieved via an external coating in either electroplating, physical vapor deposit (PVD), or by controlled oxidation. For more watch features and expanded coverage, visit michiganavemag.com/watches. MA

L.U.C Tourbillon QF Fairmined watch ($144,570) is made with certified gold from South America. The brand’s top-notch movement powers it with L.U.C Quattro Technology. Neiman Marcus, 737 N. Michigan Ave., 312-642-5900; chopard.com

A FAirmined mAsterpiece

masterful watch and jewelry maker chopard takes luxury to sustainable heights with Fairmined gold. The watch and jewelry industry can be fraught with confict, especially when it comes to the mining of diamonds, gemstones, and precious metals. The 2006 release of the flm Blood Diamond brought home the reality that diamond mining often funds illegal or criminal activities and ultimately spurred reform. Now, the same code of ethics is being applied to gold mining, and Chopard has taken a leading role. In 2013 Chopard launched “The Journey to Sustainable Luxury” project, a multiyear commitment to sustainable and ethical practices in partnership with Eco-Age. For the initiative, the company teamed with the Alliance for Responsible Mining (ARM), the nonproft, nongovernmental organization behind the concept of setting Fairmined standards and certifcation for artisanal gold mining. Chopard’s support has included committing to purchasing a substantial portion of the cooperative’s resulting gold—certifed as “Fairmined”—and utilizing it in jewelry collections. “It is a bold commitment,” says Chopard co-president Karl-Friedrich Scheufele, “but one that we must pursue if we are to make a difference to the lives of people who make our business possible.” Taking the stance a step further, last year Chopard unveiled the world’s frst watch made of Fairmined gold from South America, marking the offcial arrival of ethical luxury watchmaking. Now available to the consumer, the L.U.C Tourbillon QF Fairmined watch features a case, caseback, and bezel that are made entirely with Fairmined gold. The watch holds the Fairmined certifcation that guarantees that the gold was extracted in a responsible manner and that miners have been fairly compensated. The 18k rose-gold watch is powered by a hand-wound mechanical movement with tourbillon escapement and nine days of power reserve, thanks to L.U.C Quattro Technology that utilizes two sets of two stacked barrels for consistent, long-lasting power. The 43mm COSC-certifed chronometer is not only also certifed as Fairmined, but also holds the Qualite Fleurier Foundation certifcation that attests to its precision and durability. Just 25 of these timepieces are being built, though Chopard plans further Fairmined watch releases in the future.

michiganavemag.com  47


Culture Hottest ticket The Lyric Opera of Chicago’s Carousel cast includes (from left) Laura Osnes, Jenn Gambatese, and Steven Pasquale, who sings the role of Billy Bigelow.

CirCle of love photography by eric ryan anderson

June is bustin’ out all over in the lyric opera’s star-studded new production of Carousel. by thomas connors In the hit TV series Rescue Me, Steven Pasquale’s firefighter, Sean Garrity, wasn’t the brightest bulb in the box. But the actor is no slouch when it comes to conveying the more nuanced notes in his characterizations—or hitting the high notes, for that matter. After earning raves for his performance in the crowd-pleasing Broadway musical The Bridges of Madison County, he’s now

set to sing the role of Billy Bigelow in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s dark but delightful Carousel at the Lyric Opera of Chicago. And he’s in good company, with a cast that includes Laura Osnes, Denyce Graves, and Jenn Gambatese, and a star director/choreographer in Tony, Emmy, and Olivier Award winner Rob Ashford. ConTinued on page 50

michiganavemag.com  49


Culture hottest ticket Tari Kelly (left) and Ashley Brown in Oklahoma!, which launched the Lyric’s American Musical Initiative in 2013.

Jenn Gambatese as Maria in the Lyric’s The Sound of Music in 2014.

Who Wants Cake? steppenwolf theatre mounts Rory Kinnear’s family-driven dramedy, The Herd. Not content just making movies (think Bill Tanner in the James Bond ficks) or earning an Olivier Award for his Iago in the National Theatre production of Othello, Rory Kinnear has added playwright to his CV. Centered on a family’s birthday celebration for a young man with disabilities, The Herd comes to Steppenwolf Theatre in April. Before the curtain rises, Kinnear tells us a bit about it.

“I’d never studied singing,” says Pasquale, a jock who fell into acting in high school after an injury sidelined him. “I just sang along in the car to Billy Joel and Stevie Wonder. And when I discovered my love for theater, that became singing along with Anthony Warlow and Mandy Patinkin.” Tackling Carousel, he says, will be a highlight of his career. “It was probably number one on my bucket list of roles to play, not just because I think the song ‘Soliloquy’ is the single greatest piece of musical theater music ever composed, but the writing is extraordinary, the character’s behavior so organic. I think it’s Rodgers and Hammerstein’s masterpiece.” He’s not alone in that estimation. The story of a self-assured carousel barker who woos and wins Julie Jordan, a guileless millworker, Carousel is not, as director Ashford notes, “all ribbons and bows and ‘yee-haw!’” With a baby on the way, Billy attempts a robbery; when it goes wrong, he accidentally kills himself. “It’s quite intense and, at the time, it was pivotal in the development of musical theater’s ability to really tell stories,” Ashford says. “It’s been a dream of mine, ever since I choreographed my first step, to someday do a production of Carousel.” Julie Jordan may be a simple girl, but as Osnes—a two-time Tony nominee who recently appeared on Broadway in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella— observes, she’s no cardboard character. “Rodgers and Hammerstein heroines are not your typical ingénues. They all have these complex colors to them, and

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they go on such journeys. There’s definitely depth to this woman.” For Gambatese, Julie’s friend Carrie Pipperidge is an old acquaintance: She first performed the part in a production at Connecticut’s respected Goodspeed Opera House in 2012. “Billy and Julie are kind of wounded odd ducks. They connect in their alienation,” Gambatese notes. “Carrie and her guy, Enoch, are more fully present in the world; their love story is healthy in a way that Billy and Julie’s isn’t. The candidness of their expression allows the audience to catch its breath and be lifted out of the darker stuff.” Carousel is the latest effort in the Lyric’s American Musical Theater Initiative to focus on the work of Rodgers and Hammerstein. It was launched in 2013 with a wildly popular production of Oklahoma! and continued the following year with The Sound of Music (featuring Gambatese as Maria opposite Billy Zane’s Captain von Trapp). “Through our orchestral forces, choral forces, and the scale at which we are able to produce in a big opera house, we can add a great deal of value to musicals,” states Lyric’s general director, Anthony Freud. “The great masterpieces of Rodgers and Hammerstein are good examples of the sort of musicals to which we can bring something special, and which should be seen alongside the great operatic masterpieces of Mozart, Verdi, Puccini, and Wagner.” April 10–May 3. 20 N. Wacker Dr., 312-8275600; lyricopera.org MA

Do you think you’ll write another play? That’s the plan. I’m working on something else at the moment, in fact. I found the whole experience of The Herd so incredibly exhilarating, terrifying, and rewarding in equal measure that I’d be an idiot not to try and do it again. What else are you up to? I’m currently flming the second [season] of Penny Dreadful [in which he plays Frankenstein’s monster], due to air on Showtime in May, as well as the next Bond flm, Spectre, due out at the end of the year. April 2–June 7, 1650 N. Halsted St., 312335-1650; steppenwolf.org

photography by dan rest (oklahoma!); todd rosenberg (the sound of music)

“RodgeRs and HammeRstein HeRoines aRe not youR typical ingénues. tHey all Have tHese complex coloRs to tHem, and tHey go on sucH jouRneys.” —laura osnes

Your eldest sister is disabled. How much does The Herd borrow from your family experience? The idea for writing the play did come from my own experience… but once I’d created a situation and characters far enough away from my own history, it quickly became more about that family, and the specifcs of their struggle and dynamics, rather than mine.


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culture Art Full

A ChiCAgoAn in PAris

Painter ArchibAld Motley made the art world Pay attention, then Played the game his way. by thomas connors

Archibald J. Motley Jr. didn’t do himself any favors. Though he trained at the Art Institute of Chicago in the 1910s and was the first black artist to have a show in a major New York gallery, he dismissed the idea of the Harlem Renaissance, had no trouble criticizing other black artists, and—perhaps most detrimental to his legacy—wasn’t much for selling his work. So perhaps it’s no wonder he remains one of the best little-known American artists. A son of Chicago (raised in thenwhite Englewood), Motley gets his due at the Chicago Cultural Center this spring and summer with the exhibit “Archibald Motley: Jazz Age Modernist.” Organized by the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, the show reveals the breadth of Motley’s work, from traditionally rendered portraits to wildly colorful depictions of life in the clubs and streets of Chicago and Paris. Motley not

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only brought a deeper resonance to the black figure in art, but as an AfricanAmerican man who wed a white woman and had a biracial son, he was a great delineator of the color spectrum within black society. He cast his eye widely around his community, capturing the exuberance of kids at play, the fraternity of the pool hall, the guardedness of the card table, and the carousing of a late night on the town. Whether painting a portrait with the directness of an old master or conveying the syncopated rhythms of a scene, Motley had no doubts about what he was doing. As he once told an interviewer from the Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art, “I’ve always wanted to paint my people just the way that they were.” March 7–August 31. 78 E. Washington St., 312-744-6630; chicagoculturalcenter.org MA

photography © Valerie gerrard Browne, courtesy of the chicago history MuseuM

Hot Rhythm, a 1961 painting by Archibald Motley, part of an exhibit of the artist’s work now on view at the Chicago Cultural Center.


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culture Out & About

from left:

The Commons Club at Virgin Hotel features 270-degree city views from its windows; Joe Maddon, the Cubs’ new manager; a rendering of Maggie Daley Park, which features a playground with a castle as well as a climbing wall, gardens, and tennis courts.

Swing into Spring There’s nothing like spring to snap Chicagoans out of their winter slumber—and this year, locals have more reasons than ever to look forward to the thaw, from brand-new green spaces to a new Cubs manager who has the North Side faithful believing again. Ready to spring ahead? Here are eight ways we’re looking forward to doing it.

1. daley activities Maggie Daley Park gears up for its frst spring. Over the winter, skaters laced up and navigated the hairpin turns and

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swooshing curves of the ice ribbon at Maggie Daley Park (337 E. Randolph St., 312-742-3918; chicagoparkdistrict.com) while the rest of us waited patiently for the thaw that would reveal the urban playground of our dreams. The 20-acre space features a 50-foot climbing wall, pathways and formal gardens, tennis courts, chess and checker tables, a miniature golf course, a playground (with castle, natch), and a field house with locker rooms.

3. Play ball!

Side, Cubs fans are cheering the arrival of new manager Joe Maddon as well as the imminent completion of phase-one renovations to Wrigley Field (1060 W. Addison St., 773-404-2827; chicago.cubs. mlb.com). Meanwhile, ’05 World Series Champions the White Sox welcome the return of second baseman Gordon Beckham as well as a renovated clubhouse at U.S. Cellular Field (333 W. 35th St., 312-674-1000; chicago. whitesox.mlb.com).

2. blaze new trails

Cubs and Sox fans, this could be the year.

4. drink in the View

Chicago baseball fans have plenty to be excited about this season. On the North

Two new hotels open enviable outdoor spaces.

The 606 fnally arrives. Residents of Wicker Park, Bucktown,

Humboldt Park, and Logan Square have a new reason to boast: A decadeslong dream reaches fruition this spring with the opening of The 606—aka The Bloomingdale Trail, a 2.7-mile rail line that’s been converted into a multi-use recreational trail, alternative transportation corridor, and green space. Above Bloomingdale Avenue between Ashland and Ridgeway Avenues; the606.org

photography by stephen green/courtesy of chicago cubs (maddon)

From the First blossoming oF maggie Daley Park to the return oF alFresco Dining, eight reasons to get exciteD For the new season. by jason a. heidemann


Perched atop the 26th floor of its new Loop home, the rooftop lounge at the Virgin Hotel (203 N. Wabash Ave., 312-940-4400; virginhotels.com) opens in April with a bold color palette, 270-degree city views, and a beverage program aimed to complement its menu of izakaya-style tapas, like braised pork belly buns and spicy shrimp dumplings. At the new Loews Hotel (455 N. Park Dr., 877-8688232; loewshotels.com/chicago), meanwhile, Streeter ville Social clocks in at 9,000 square feet, making it the largest outdoor roof terrace in the city. The third-floor space features multiple bars, a grassy lawn for sunbathing and bocce ball, and both lake and city views.

5. Pulling for Pullman A city landmark becomes a National Monument. In February, President Obama traveled to Chicago to do something historic: give the city its first national monument. With its new status, the Pullman Historic District (11141 S. Cottage Grove Ave., 773-785-8901; pullmanil.org), a perfectly preserved model industrial town built during the 1880s to house the workers of railway magnate George Pullman, is placed within the National Park System, which means tourism to this far South Side charmer and slice of living history will likely increase tenfold. Starting May 3, the neighborhood will host its first Sunday walking tours.

6. Alfresco at Last

photography by getty images (stevens)

Don’t miss these new patio hot spots. Newcomers to the city’s outdoor dining scene include Alpana Singh’s second outing, Seven Lions (130 S. Michigan Ave., 312-880-0130; sevenlionschicago.com), whose enviable Loop location boasts 70 patio seats along Michigan Avenue ringed with flower boxes and a patio-friendly food and drink menu. West Loop hot spot Parlor Pizza Bar (108 N. Green St., 312-600-6090; parlorchicago.com), which already boasts an outdoor patio that seats 140, is installing a full bar on its rooftop, made of a salvaged freight

shipping container, as well as a mobile wood-fire pizza oven to complement a space that will accommodate 150 people. In other news, Steakhouse Prime & Provisions (222 N. LaSalle St.; primeandprovisions.com) will have a 50-seat garden terrace along the Chicago River that will be shrouded in greenery and offer expansive views of the city.

7. Summer Comes Early A new outdoor space lands in Washington Park. The Summer Pavilion (256 E. Garfield Blvd.; artsandpubliclife.uchicago.edu), a project by Chicago-based MAS Studio that was built for Millennium Park in 2013 but never used, is relocating to a city-owned lot near Washington Park as part of the University of Chicago’s Arts + Public Life initiative. A collection of brightly colored shinglelike overhangs connected via a series of zigzagging wooden beams, the Pavilion drops at the new site on May 4 and will include six interlocking wooden tables that can be pushed together along with chairs, benches, stools, and a stage.

8. Show Time The city’s arts calendar heats up. What isn’t happening this spring in the city? Indie crooner Sufjan Stevens, who made our state the subject of his second full-length album, comes to the Chicago Theatre (175 N. State St., 312-462-6300; thechicagotheatre.com) April 24 and 25. New works from the Joffrey Ballet land April 22 at the Cadillac Palace (151 W. Randolph St., 312-977-1700; joffrey.org), and the world premiere of Marcus Gardley’s An Issue of Blood, about an interracial marriage set in 17th-century West Virginia, kicks off April 3 at Victory Gardens Biograph Theater (2433 N. Lincoln Ave., 773-871-3000; victorygardens.org). And at the Museum of Science and Industry (5700 S. Lake Shore Dr., 773-684-1414; msichicago.org), interactive exhibit “Robot Revolution” opens May 21. MA

from top:

Sufjan Stevens comes to the Chicago Theatre in April to promote his new album, Carrie & Lowell; Streeterville Social, on the third floor of the new Loews Hotel, is the largest rooftop terrace in the city.

michiganavemag.com  55


CULTURE Spotlight role play

profile

Second Act

REAL ESTATE POWER COUPLE MILAN AND AMY RUBENSTEIN INVEST IN THEIR PASSION FOR THEATER WITH A NEW PLAYHOUSE. “We come to this theater from a very different place,” says Amy Rubenstein, who, with husband Milan, is celebrating the launch of their new nonprofit Equity theater, Windy City Playhouse. After 12 years in real estate (the duo owns Windy City RE), the former actress was eager to return to her passion for the stage, and with the playhouse, the pair is aiming to appeal to a broad audience, focusing on comedy and avoiding the overly serious. But with an all-star lineup of directors (think Goodman’s Henry Godinez) and works by the likes of Neil Simon (Chapter Two), the opening season is anything but fluffy. Notes Rubenstein of the lineup, “There is intellect behind everything.” Tickets range from $20 to $45. 3014 W. Irving Park Road, 773-891-8985; windycityplayhouse.com MA

// fresh air //

Roosevelt University, one of the first institutions of higher education to admit all qualified students regardless of race, religion, or gender, celebrates its legacy at its 70th anniversary gala and dinner with a double bill of one-person shows honoring the university’s namesake president and first lady. An Evening with the Roosevelts stars television legend Ed Asner as the titular character in FDR, while Emmy award-winning M*A*S*H actress Loretta Swit takes on Eleanor Roosevelt, a role she deems “formidable.” “It’s a slice of her life,” Swit says of the one-woman play Eleanor Roosevelt: Her Secret Journey, a part she’s been tackling for two years. “The more I learn about her, the more intimidated I become. Her faith in humanity, her perseverance, her pluck... the overall human being was inspiring and continues to inspire.” April 10, Auditorium Theatre, 50 E. Congress Pkwy., 312-341-3849; auditoriumtheatre.org

MICHIGANAVEMAG.COM

With a slate of upcoming must-see performances, Chicago’s dance scene is heating up with the weather. First, jazz saxophonist and composer Rudresh Mahanthappa teams with dance ensemble Ragamala Dance for the Museum of Contemporary Art’s spiritual Song of the Jasmine, set to the sounds of Western jazz infused with traditional South Indian music (April 10–12, 220 E. Chicago Ave., 312-280-2660; mcachicago.org). At Harris Theater, the South Side Community Art Center presents Off the Wall and Onto the Stage: Dancing the Art of Jonathan Green, in which Columbia City Ballet dancers bring Green’s Gullah-inspired paintings to life with a mix of traditional work songs, gospel, Motown, classical, and jazz music (April 11, 205 E. Randolph Dr., 312-3347777; harristheaterchicago.org). And the Joffrey Ballet concludes its season with a mixed repertory program featuring four premieres—In Creases, Liturgy, Evenfall, and Incantations—at the Cadillac Palace Theatre (April 22–May 3, 151 W. Randolph St., 312-386-8905; joffrey.org).

Joffrey Ballet

IN FULL BLOOM

“This is for people who appreciate beautiful things that have been very juried and very selected,” says Craig Bergmann, principal garden designer of the Chicago Botanic Garden’s revamped Antiques, Garden & Design

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ON THE MOVE

Show. In its 15th iteration, this annual salute to spring highlights the elements of design and features interior decorator Mario Buatta as keynote speaker. Browse modern and antique furniture, garden tools, and plants from 100

exhibitors while weaving through a labyrinth of gardens with a contemporary twist. Insists Bergmann, “It’s not just garden antiques anymore.” April 17–19, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe, 847-835-5440; chicagobotanic.org

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHERYL MANN (JOFFREY); CHICAGO BOTANIC GARDEN (DESIGN SHOW)

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PEOPLE View from the Top

Parks and Recreation

PHOTOGRAPHY BY HEATHER TALBERT

CHICAGO PARK DISTRICT CEO AND GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT MICHAEL ELLY GEARS UP FOR ANOTHER ACTION-PACKED SPRINGTIME IN THE CITY. BY J.P. ANDERSON It’s a bitterly cold Friday afternoon in mid-February—the kind of raw, gray day that makes it feel like winter may never end—but Michael Kelly’s face is lighting up as he anticipates spring in the Windy City. “It means opening day for baseball season,” enthuses the Chicago Park District CEO and general superintendent. “It means the grass starts to grow. It means the Lakefront Trail—people start coming out in droves. It means opening our playgrounds and, for all our capital projects, it means breaking new ground. Spring is king for us.” As the chief of the nation’s largest municipal park district (Chicago boasts more than 8,300 acres of open space, 580 parks, 31 beaches, 50 nature areas, and two conservatories), Kelly’s got a big job: making sure that after all the snow has melted, the city blossoms and grows, living up to its motto, “Urbs in Horto” (“City in a Garden”). It’s hard to imagine someone better fit for the task. A native of Mount Greenwood on the southwest side and a current resident of West Morgan Park with his wife and four young children, the 43-year-old practically grew up in the parks. “The Park District was in my life since I was 3 years old, when I learned to swim at the pool,” he reminisces. CONTINUED ON PAGE 62

Michael Kelly photographed at the Chicago Park District’s Garfield Park Conservatory, one of the largest conservatories in the world.

MICHIGANAVEMAG.COM

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PEOPLE View from the Top

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never forget. Let’s face it, you’re trusting your 5- or 6-year-old to the staff of the Park District—that’s an awesome responsibility.” Kelly acknowledges that running the CPD isn’t all green grass and laughing kids; limited resources are a constant challenge. “In a typical year, two-thirds of [our capital] goes to maintenance,” notes Kelly. “That doesn’t leave much money.” For his team, that means hustling for partnerships—with the state, the federal government, and local community groups— to keep the money flowing. “We can’t just sit back and say, ‘We’ll get to you when we get to you,’” he says. “People in Chicago love their parks, and they want to see improvements in their child’s lifetime.” In his travels, Kelly has found inspiration in green spaces from Philadelphia to Paris—“Every city we go, I’m dragging my family to the parks”—but he’s adamant that there’s no place like home. “A lot of park districts have more land,” he concedes. “But nobody has the facilities we have; we’re second to none. We really are the green fabric of the city.” MA

Play Time Chicago Park District head Michael Kelly gets personal about some of his favorite things. chicago view:

“I’m a South Sider, so I’m biased toward the view from the south looking north. If you can get to those South Side vantage points— Promontory Point, 31st Street Beach, way down at 79th Street—just do it. Those views are sensational.” that’s his bag:

“I used to play the bagpipes. When I graduated from college, my father asked me what I was going to

do. I said, ‘Well, I’m either going to learn to play the banjo, the fddle, or the bagpipes.’ Next day he hands me a card. ‘This guy’s name is Terry. He’s going to teach you the bagpipes. You start tomorrow.’” local eats:

“I’m lucky enough that my kids like seafood. Shaw’s Oyster Bar is noisy [in a good way], and we can still squeeze into one booth. So that’s my place.”

photography by heather talbert

“Our Mount Greenwood Park had everything for us. I played hockey; I learned how to wrestle in the park. You name it.” At 23, Kelly served in the city’s department of human services as a youth-service worker; after graduating from DePaul law school in 2001 and working in various positions with the City of Chicago, he joined the Park District as director of inter-governmental affairs, working his way up to first deputy general counsel (the CPD’s first), COO, and in 2011, general superintendent and CEO. Since then, Kelly has seriously stepped up the Park District’s game: He led the agency to the NRPA’s 2014 Gold Medal Award for excellence in planning and resource management—a first for the city, and, says Kelly with pride, the equivalent of winning “the national championship of parks.” Now, with the Mayor Emanuel–driven vision of “Children First,” Kelly and his team have embarked on a series of ambitious new projects to ensure that the city’s kids are well-served: 168 new playgrounds completed under the mayor’s Chicago Plays! program, with an additional 78 on the docket for 2015; new, cutting-edge parks like La Villita in the Little Village neighborhood as well as the new 606 recreation area and Maggie Daley Park (see page 54); and soon-tocome projects like a 600-acre cyclo-cross course on the far South Side that Kelly pledges will be the best in the country—“and probably the world.” At the crux of the department’s success, insists Kelly, is his team. It’s a statement that would normally provoke an eye roll, but, in the case of CPD, rings true: In peak season, scattered across Chicago is a CPD staff of 7,100 recreation leaders, camp counselors, lifeguards, landscapers, park attendants, and tradespeople. “What I’m most proud of is the sense of morale and pride that I get from our employees,” says Kelly, who has visited every park in the city during his four-and-a-half-year tenure. “When I’m out in the field I can look our folks in the eye and say, ‘You are the front line.’ Our people are like that great teacher or coach you had growing up that you’ll

clockwise from top left: Books from the Chicago Park District; autographed guitars from Lollapalooza (held annually in Grant Park) on display at the CPD offices; Michael Kelly’s desk.


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PEOPLE Thought Leader

Touchdown Chicago

ChiCago SportS CommiSSion exeCutive direCtor ara Bachman welComeS the nFl draFt baCk to the windy City. by dawn reiss It may be baseball season, but Chicago sports fans have football on the brain this month, as the 2015 NFL Draft comes to the Windy City for the first time since 1963. Long a staple of NYC’s Radio City Music Hall, the draft arrives at the equally legendary Auditorium Theatre on April 30 and runs through May 2, complete with an outdoor festival in Grant Park and at Congress Plaza. As the executive director of the Chicago Sports Commission (a department of Choose Chicago), Kara Bachman was instrumental in sealing the deal. Gearing up for Draft Day, the 31-year-old chatted with Michigan Avenue about helping cement Chicago’s status as a major player in the sporting world.

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How was Chicago able to close the draft deal? I think [the NFL] saw it as an opportunity to engage more fans and invite more fans. We welcome all NFL fans—yes, we love the Bears, but for us to take full advantage of the opportunity, [our attitude] was, “Let’s get everybody here who wants to be here.” We just emphasized that we welcome everybody. How did you work with the city to make it happen? The mayor has been very involved, and [Chicago Bears Chairman George] McCaskey played a supportive role. I also worked closely with Bears President and CEO Ted Phillips and with Chris Hibbs, the team’s vice president of sales and marketing, who is also on our board. Without their support, we wouldn’t have been able to do this. What does it mean to have the draft in a landmark Chicago building like the Auditorium Theatre? It’s impossible to talk about Chicago without mentioning its incredible architecture and history, and the Auditorium Theatre is a classic example. The fact that it is celebrating its 125th anniversary in conjunction with hosting the NFL Draft is truly a special occurrence. How is this draft going to be different? [We’ll have] a free outdoor component [in Grant Park and Congress Plaza] and an indoor component [in the Auditorium Theatre], increasing the footprint of it so we can engage more fans. I think we will see it become a tourism event; I wouldn’t be surprised if there are 30,000 people or more in Grant Park in a single day. There are 11 NFL teams within a 500-mile radius of Chicago; it makes it so easy to get here. What are you anticipating the tourism impact will be? All the people who watch the draft on TV will have a better understanding of Chicago. They’ll see Buckingham Fountain with the lake, the beautiful landmark theater that we’re going to be hosting our draft in, and [we’ll have a] red carpet on Michigan Avenue on Thursday evening. You played Division I hockey at Colgate and are a noted sports fan. Why is getting the draft so exciting for you personally? For the Sports Commission, this is our biggest win, without a doubt—and I would argue it’s one of Chicago’s biggest wins as well. It’s incredibly exciting to get to help deliver this experience. April 30–May 2 in Grant Park and at Auditorium Theatre, 50 E. Congress Pkwy., 800-982-2787; choosechicago.com/2015NFLDraft MA

photography by heather talbert

Kara Bachman, photographed at the Auditorium Theatre, where the 2015 NFL Draft kicks off April 30.


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PEOPLE Partners in Crime INSIGHT GO-TO RESTAURANT:

BBC DEVOTEES:

“Gilt Bar,” says Gunn. “No question about it. It’s got a local vibe and great food. Best bone marrow in town, too.”

“Our favorite guilty pleasure is watching Masterpiece Theatre. We buy and binge-watch by the season,” says Rainier. Adds Gunn, “It’s escapism.”

WESTERN CIVILIZATION:

“It’s great to see old meatpacking warehouses being converted to residences and businesses,” Gunn says of (We Are) Nexus’ West Loop neighborhood. “It has a creative vibe we enjoy.”

WELL-READ:

“I’m that person who has kept every book from college, so my shelves are full of Nicholas Kristof, Fareed Zakaria, and global studies books,” says Rainier.

Off the Charts

As they embArk on their first nAtionAl tour, ChiCAgoAns Nic GuNN And carmeN raiNier of (We Are) nexus Aim to shAke up the eleCtroniC dAnCe musiC sCene. by jacqueline bender “My dreams are not reality/My head’s in the sky,” proclaim Streeterville-based musicians Nick Gunn and Carmen Rainier in their new song, “They’ll Never Stop Me.” It’s the latest pop-inspired dance single by the duo known as (We Are) Nexus—and having just kicked off their first national tour, Gunn and Rainier’s dreams are quickly proving to be a reality. “Truth is, I run the show,” attests Rainier, the 32-year-old singer/songwriter who also manages the act’s business operations, “but it’s so that Nick can do absolutely nothing but produce music day in and day out. He wears the producer hat, and I wear all the others.” Adds Gunn, “Amazingly, we hardly step on each other’s toes, and we allow each other to do what we each do best.” (We Are) Nexus’ debut single, a cover of the 1998 Sonique hit “It Feels So

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Good,” climbed to number 14 on the Billboard Dance Club Songs Chart in 2013; the following single, “World Around Me,” also garnered chart status. The duo’s drive to succeed inspired Rainier’s lyrics for their latest track. “‘They’ll Never Stop Me’ is about being determined to overcome all the negative things you’ve been told,” says Rainier, whose vocals are combined with live instrumentation and synthesis composed by Gunn. “All the times you’ve been told you can’t do something. All the times you’ve been told, ‘Just get a 9 to 5.’” A typical career has never been in the cards for Gunn, 46. A classically trained flutist born in Kent, England, Gunn grew up in Los Angeles, where he gained renown as a world musician and instrumentalist, selling millions of albums in the 1990s through national retail chains like The Nature Company and Natural Wonders. When the world music genre started to decline, Gunn changed tacks, starting his own record label in 2001 and ultimately managing 75 artists. As successful as the label was, confesses Gunn, “It was a nightmare for me because I lost my artistry.” But in 2010, Gunn met Rainier, a former stage actress and world traveler who was born in Maine but who has lived in Guatemala, Costa Rica, Spain, and Mexico. The duo met in California, but soon after moved to Chicago, where they formed (We Are) Nexus in 2012. “We wanted that big downtown city life—something to get a fire under us and get us hyperfocused,” says Gunn. “Chicago has that energy.” The two emphasize their artistry, but their entrepreneurship is equally impressive. Gunn and Rainier have already learned the necessary survival skill of evolving their sound and strategy as the genre and industry continue to change. “I’ve always been really good at predicting trends in the music industry,” says Gunn, who has framed 14 of his world music albums and chart positions for (We Are) Nexus on the walls of the duo’s West Loop studio. From Gunn’s perspective, EDM is here to stay. “It’s the new rock ’n’ roll.” MA

photography by ryan lowry

“I run the show,” says (We Are) Nexus vocalist Carmen Rainier (left) so partner Nick Gunn can “do absolutely nothing but produce music day in and day out.”


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PEOPLE Spirit of Generosity

clockwise from left: Anna Roosevelt (left) stands with 12th-grade YWLCS student Kaylynn Cusic, who will introduce Roosevelt at the 2015 Girl Power Luncheon on April 29 at the Hilton Chicago; Patricia Filomeno helps her 10th-grade chemistry students with a hands-on lab project; Linda Johnson Rice (right), who delivered the keynote address at last year’s luncheon, with YWLCS class of 2014 graduate Charnae Caldwell.

Investing in the Future

Fifteen years ago, 23 businesswomen, civic leaders, and philanthropists with a vision joined forces to create the Young Women’s Leadership Charter School of Chicago (YWLCS). As the only all-girls public college preparatory school in the city, YWLCS has been molding the minds of young women in grades 8–12 with a curriculum that emphasizes math, science, and technology. A supporter of the school since its conception, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt became more involved during her role as vice president of global corporate citizenship for The Boeing Company, where she focused on system-wide innovation and reform. “Young Women’s Leadership Charter School was the only charter school that stepped up to say, ‘We want to share the knowledge we’re gaining with the system and make every school a quality education for every child in Chicago,’” says the former Chicagoan, who since 2011 has been serving Maine, New Hampshire, and northern Vermont as CEO of Goodwill Industries of Northern New England. “It’s that kind of community focus and intention that has made me a big admirer ever since.” As Roosevelt returns to Chicago as the keynote speaker of YWLCS’s Girl Power Luncheon, she shares her excitement for the next generation of female leaders. What does the Young Women’s Leadership Charter School mean to you? It means success story after success story; it means people coming together to raise

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expectations for our youth—to say, “You can make of your life something meaningful through education, so you can make the right decisions.” It’s that investment in the development of a youth’s personality and confidence—and giving them the tools to make good decisions in life—that distinguishes the school to me. That focus is on raising young women into people who are going to not only be instrumental in our future generations, but in shaping the communities that they end up living in. How have you seen the school evolve in the last 15 years? These young women have been going off to college, and they’ve been graduating, and now they’re launched into careers. That evolution—making your own history—is extremely important. I’ve also seen an evolution in the administration: When you start something that’s innovative and new, it’s often hard to move beyond that first team that makes it work. I’ve watched the women who are engaged with the school stick together with great loyalty and determination to make sure the leadership of the school is able to evolve, because that’s what will ensure its stability going forward. What have you learned from Young Women’s Leadership Charter School? If you really believe change is possible and that every person’s life can be useful, worthwhile, and wonderful, you can make that happen. I’m so proud of [Young continued on page 70

photography by Jon recana

As the Young Women’s LeAdership ChArter sChooL of ChiCAgo CeLebrAtes its 15th AnniversArY With the AnnuAL girL poWer LunCheon, keYnote speAker AnnA ElEAnor roosEvElt Continues to enCourAge Young Women bLAzing the trAiL. by meg mathis


PEOPLE Spirit of Generosity Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan talks with YWLCS class of 2014 graduate Shadia Wilcox at the 2014 Girl Power Luncheon.

“the focus [of YWLcs] is on raising Young Women Who are going to be instrumentaL in our future.” —anna eleanor roosevelt

Women’s Leadership Charter School] for staying with those principles that every girl can succeed. In the work that I do now, Goodwill is focused on helping people with serious challenges find and keep employment, and what we have experienced is that same thing: that not everybody is able to find success at the same rate and in the same way, so you need to take the time to help the individual stick with it until they find that level of stability and success. Watching that happen at YWLCS has really helped me understand how that needs to happen in the work that I do. The young women currently enrolled at Young Women’s Leadership Charter School are in such a formative time in their life. What do you want them to know? I want them to notice the people who are caring about them, and I want them to think about the fact that, as they grow and become adults, it will be their turn to care and nurture the girls who are coming up behind them. It’s not only that they themselves will continue to grow, change, learn, and develop, but that they will soon be in a place to give back. What are your hopes for the next 15 years of the Young Women’s Leadership Charter School? I hope that [Young Women’s Leadership Charter School] will continue to create that record of seeing young women find themselves, their power, their talent, their purpose, and sticking with them as they move into their higher-education experience and then their engagement in the professional world and their communities. That will be such an enormous contribution as a model to all of Chicago—and any city. Tickets are $150 for Young Women’s Leadership Charter School of Chicago’s Girl Power Luncheon, April 29 at 11 am at the Hilton Downtown Chicago, 720 S. Michigan Ave. For tickets, call 312-9499400, ext. 415, or visit ywlcs.org. MA


XII XI MCMLXXXIX Charity register Opportunities to give.

by katina beniaris

making history together What: american theater Company celebrates its 30th anniversary season with a cocktail reception, dinner, and live and silent auctions to support the company’s new play development as well as youth education initiatives. When: april 10, 6 pm Where: interContinental hotel, 505 n. michigan ave. tickets: Contact emma J. hendren at 773-409-4125 ext. 4 or ehendren@atcweb.org.

ChiCago arChiteCtUre FoUnDation gaLa What: the 40th annual celebration, which recognizes former mayor richard m. Daley, showcases an assortment of the city’s food trucks, and benefts the Chicago architecture Foundation’s youth education programs.

DECEMBER 11, 1989. 9,496 days have passed, yet it feels like only yesterday.

When: april 16, 6 pm Where: Bridgeport art Center skyline Loft, 1200 W. 35th st. tickets: Visit architecture.org/gala or call 312-922-3432.

hoPe gaLa What: Join Unicef for its eighth annual dinner to promote the eliminate Project, which offers lifesaving resources for children and mothers to help end neonatal tetanus. When: april 17, 6:30 pm Where: Four seasons hotel, 120 e. Delaware Pl. tickets: Contact meghan Doetschman at 312-222-9121 or mdoetschman@unicefusa.org.

CoUrt theatre 60th anniVersary gaLa What: enjoy cocktails, dinner, a silent auction, raffe, and a variety of performances at Court theatre’s largest fundraising event of the year. When: april 18, 6 pm Where: ritz-Carlton hotel, 160 e. Pearson st. tickets: Contact grace Wong at 773-834-5293 or gracewong@uchicago.edu.

FaCing history anD oUrseLVes BeneFit Dinner What: hear stories shared by participants of the 1961 Freedom rides at this dinner honoring the legendary civil rights journey. When: april 30, 5:30 pm Where: hyatt Chicago regency, 151 e. Wacker Dr. tickets: Contact Lizzie Cohen at 312-345-3221 or elizabeth_cohen@facing.org.

mUsiC matters What: the ravinia associates Board honors President and Ceo Welz kauffman with a black-tie beneft featuring cocktails, light bites, dinner, live and silent auctions, and entertainment by maggie speaks. When: may 9, 6:30 pm Where: radisson Blu aqua hotel, 221 n. Columbus Dr. tickets: Visit ravinia.org/musicmatters.

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GUESS?Š2015

#DENIMDAY There is no excuse and never an invitation to rape .


InvIted Bob Odenkirk

PhotograPhy by Jeff Schear

Mr. Show Hot off the record-breaking premiere of Better Call Saul, Naperville native Bob Odenkirk celebrated his Spring cover with a 200-guest bash at Vertigo Sky Lounge at the Dana Hotel and Spa. “[This cover] makes me look as handsome as I can be,” the Breaking Bad alum announced to the crowd, quipping, “I’m going to be in The George Clooney Story.”

michiganavemag.com  75


INVITED

Miguel Aguila, Nick Roy, and Jordan Greenberg Richard Roeper and Bob Odenkirk

BOB ODENKIRK COVER PARTY

Mikki Stern and Janie Smith

MICHIGAN AVENUE PARTNERED with C.D. Peacock to toast

Jesse Jordy and Daniella Rosa

Spring cover star Bob Odenkirk at Vertigo Sky Lounge. Throughout the evening, nearly 200 partygoers sipped specialty Wansas Tequila cocktails while enjoying southwestern fare, an homage to Better Call Saul’s Albuquerque setting. “I’ve made so many projects that went nowhere that I think I’ve stopped thinking people see anything I do,” Odenkirk confessed to the crowd, joking of Saul’s breakaway success. “I’m telling you, if you want your teenagers to behave, pay for a giant billboard four blocks from your house so you can go, ‘I’m that guy!’”

Guests admired C.D. Peacock timepieces throughout the evening.

David Ha, Linda Lee, Kelly King, and Andy Li

Peter and Cynthia Au with Sara Allison and Raj Sai

76 MICHIGANAVEMAG.COM

Kelly and Jim Muno

Marcus Riley and Kay Yasin

THIS PAGE: PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF SCHEAR OPPOSITE PAGE: PHOTOGRAPHY BY DWAYNE KUAN (FIRST BITES); VIRGIN HOTELS CHICAGO (VIRGIN HOTELS)

Tim Smithe


Janet and Tim Kirker

Rob Stafford, Allison Rosati, and Don Welsh

Leah Cominsky, Alvaro Zamudio, and Tionna Van Gundy

David Eigenberg

Alpana Singh

FIRST BITES BASH MORE THAN 1,300 FOODIES gathered in Union Station’s Great Hall for the official kick-off event of Chicago Restaurant Week. Presented by Choose

Chicago and hosted by Alpana Singh, the evening featured light bites from over 50 restaurants and libations by Goose Island and Terlato Wines.

Colleen Hensler, James Sitkiewicz, and Jessica Ortiz

Bartenders mixed libations in The Commons Club.

Laura Dove and Dina Giardina

Mayor Rahm Emanuel

Sir Richard Branson

VIRGIN HOTELS DEBUT VIRGIN HOTELS CHICAGO celebrated its Windy City opening with an intimate fête in the hotel’s Commons Club. Founder Sir Richard Branson and CEO Raul Leal mingled with VIPs, including Mayor Rahm Emanuel and 1871 CEO Howard Tullman. Howard Tullman

MICHIGANAVEMAG.COM

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INVITED

Mark and Samantha Zisook with Doug Money

PURPLE AFFAIR FOR THE BEAR

Tiffany St. James and Rachel Manthey

Klaudia Dworzanczyk, ´ Christine Zafiropoulos, and Amela Bego

MORE THAN $72,000 was raised

for the Bear Necessities Pediatric Cancer Foundation at the Auxiliary Board’s annual ball at the Chicago Cultural Center. Nearly 400 purple-clad partygoers indulged in Lagunitas beer and Jim Beam before moving on to an afterparty at Parliament. Melinda Chan and Greg Wong

Morgan Nieman and Courtney Cheatham

Sophie Gatins, Morgan Waller, and Kelly Scott

Jonathon Greifenkamp

Emmanuel Nony and Gary Metzner

David Pisor and Karen Herold

STUDIO K CELEBRATION STUDIO K COMMEMORATED its

one-year anniversary with a gathering at its West Loop space. Founder Karen Herold Katrina Markoff and Meredith Harrigan

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MICHIGANAVEMAG.COM

Giuseppe Tentori

was on hand to mingle with the crowd, which included GT Fish & Oyster’s Giuseppe Tentori.

THIS PAGE: PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBERT ROHDE AND IVAN MEYERS (PURPLE AFFAIR); NICK FOCHTMAN (STUDIO K) OPPOSITE PAGE: PHOTOGRAPHY BY KAT FITZGERALD (EQUALITY); WALDEMAR REICHERT (BREW & BALLET)

Andrea Varias, Paul Octavious, and Julie Purpura


Kevin McGirr, Michael Richardson, and Roderick Hawkins Patrick and Mariterese Balthrop

State Rep. Greg Harris and Jim LoBianco

Susan Mendoza and Anita Alvarez

Lea DeLaria

EQUALITY ILLINOIS GALA ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK actress Lea DeLaria, Mayor Rahm Emanuel, and former Governor Pat Quinn were among the 1,200 guests at Equality Illinois’

marquee soirée. DeLaria, along with the TransLife Center of Chicago House, was honored with the Freedom Award for her LGBT advocacy efforts. Myles Brady and Precious Davis

Judie Moore Green and Nicolas Blanc

Derrick Agnoletti, Matthew Adamczyk, and Rory Hohenstein

Joakim Stephenson and Ashley Wheater

BREW & BALLET

Ryan VanMeter and Greg Cameron

JOFFREY BALLET TEAMED with Center on Halsted to host a gathering in anticipation of the ballet’s Unique Voices program. Hosted at Joffrey Tower, the affair featured sips by Lagunitas, hors d’oeuvres, and line dancing to the tunes of DJ Matthew Harvat. Fernando Duarte

Kathleen Hechinger

MICHIGANAVEMAG.COM

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TasTe This Issue: Counter Culture The golden chicken-fried chicken at Dove’s comes slathered in green chorizo gravy.

Eat at dovE’s

One Off HOspitality’s HOt streak cOntinues witH retrO-cHic diner Dove’s Luncheonette.

photography by anjali pinto

by elaine glusac

In American culture, the humble diner often plays the plain cover to an engrossing story within: Think of the buddy-bonding backdrop in Barry Levinson’s film Diner, the thousand words telegraphed by painter Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks, and playwright William Inge’s Bus Stop, which casts a diner as a refuge for the waylaid. Chicago’s quirky new Dove’s Luncheonette upholds the tradition by telling a story, this one about the neighborhood, past and present. “We knew we wanted to do a diner,” says Donnie Madia, one of four

partners involved with Dove’s from the seven-partner One Off Hospitality, the group behind hits like Big Star, Blackbird, and The Publican. Like partners Terry Alexander, Peter Garfield, and chef Paul Kahan, Madia was nostalgic for Busy Bee, the long-gone hash-slinger across the street, and funky Leo’s Lunchroom, formerly on Division. When the Wicker Park property neighboring Big Star became available, One Off jumped at the chance to give the taqueria a larger kitchen, inheriting a sliver of a storefront in the landmarked Milwaukee Avenue District in the deal. Says coNtiNueD oN page 82

michiganavemag.com  81


taste

Drink Me

Bernard; the chiles rellenos floats in a sea of orange salsa; in a nod to classic diner décor, stainless steel counters and leathercapped stools line the dining room.

Madia, “We wanted Dove’s to be important for the neighborhood, to draw artists and creatives and everyone else who lives here now.” Madia and company began by drawing on local talents, crowding the walls with photographer Marc Hauser’s black and white street candids and a series of small, feverish contemporary etchings from Tony Fitzpatrick. They added their own ’70s-vintage family photos, later choosing the name Dove’s from the novel A Walk on the Wild Side by Nelson Algren, the late Wicker Park resident who celebrated the city’s grit. Food followed form only in the sense that it’s casual and quick, turned out by behindthe-counter, somewhat-shortorder cooks. “I didn’t want to do food that appeals to a small percentage of people,” says Kahan. Neither did he want to do eggs and toast. Instead,

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One Off’s partners roadtripped to South Texas, picking up inspiration in the border’s Norteño food and translating it with carefully sourced ingredients 1,400 miles north. “It’s more MexTex than Tex-Mex,” he says. If the hybrid fare is less familiar than the tacos at Big Star, it’s unfailingly friendly as delivered under chef Dennis Bernard, formerly of The Publican. A giant house-made flour tortilla, given a swipe of habanero-avocado sauce, grips caramelized slabs of smoked brisket spiked by pickled onions; chiles rellenos sit pretty in sunrise-orange salsa; the golden chicken-fried chicken comes blanketed in green chorizo gravy. Drawing again on local talents, this time for dessert, the partners enlisted Hoosier Mama to make pies in flavors like horchata and peach jalapeño. Neo-diners can easily slip

“We Wanted dove’s to be important for the neighborhood, to draW artists and creatives.” —donnie madia

into the Ed Debevic’s School of Cliché; Dove’s flash-free finishes manage to avoid such kitsch in the compact storefront edged in stainless steel dining counters. Plywood paneling came from a supplier with ’70s-era stock on hand. Brown leather-capped stools perch on matte metal rather than polished bases. Floor tiles stop just shy of the walls, a subtle design nod to less sophisticated diners. “We wanted to take every guest to a place and time, but we didn’t want it to feel curated,” says Madia. With just 41 stools, it doesn’t take much of a rush to fill

Dove’s. On a recent Tuesday evening, the team appeared to have accomplished their goal of creating a local hangout. Over a plate of enchiladas, an unshaven artist type swayed to the sounds of Curtis Mayfield emanating from the diner’s record player as a conspiring couple leaned in over drinks at the end of the bar. “Other people build restaurants,” says Madia, explaining why Dove’s warrants such a thoroughly realized script. “We want to make people happy.” 1545 N. Damen Ave., 773-645-4060; doveschicago.com MA

soul Music The all-vinyl soundtrack at Dove’s pays homage to Chicago’s R&B history. Most of the LPs spun behind the bar and 45s stocked in a 1950s-vintage Seeburg jukebox feature Chicago musicians or local labels like Curtom, cofounded by Curtis Mayfeld.

photography by anjali pinto

clockwise from far left: Chef Dennis

Ben Fasman, the man behind Dove’s cocktail menu, discovered the Cantarito (shown) in the agave felds of Jalisco, Mexico. Considered a poor-man’s margarita, the tequila, orange, and grapefruit juice blend mixes in roughly a halfteaspoon of salt, offsetting the sweet Mexican Squirt poured atop. Served in a terra-cotta mug, “It’s the anti-craft-cocktail cocktail,” says Fasman.


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taste Cuiscene

Housed in a pre-Prohibition-era tavern in Bridgeport, The Duck Inn boasts a 1960s vibe, complete with a vintage record player. right: It’s always snack time at Little Goat, where the Machos Nachos— with house masa chips, barbecued pork, pickled peppers, and avocado—are available all day long.

Order Up Forget the Fine dining Fuss. From ambitious taverns to upscale diners, some oF chicago’s coolest gourmet spots are all about casual. by sarah freeman When it comes to fantastic foodie destinations in Chicago, white-tablecloth restaurants no longer rule the roost. These days, some of the city’s top chefs are rolling up their shirtsleeves and focusing on superior cuisine with a distinctly low-key flair. Take former Four Seasons chef Kevin Hickey, who first dipped his toe into the gourmet-casual scene last year at River North’s Bottlefork (441 N. Clark St., 312-955-1900; bottlefork.com), known for its succulent crispy

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oyster-topped lobster roll and braised beef-cheek poutine. Now Hickey has ventured back to his native South Side with The Duck Inn (2701 S. Eleanor St., 312-724-8811; theduckinnchicago.com) to cook “hamburger sandwiches” and Chicago-style duck fat dogs. The Bridgeport space blends the best of both worlds with a 1960s-inspired remodel, complete with vintage record player and sloe(r) gin(nier) fizz cocktails, as well as a dining room that serves seasonal fare like spot prawns

and Nantucket lemon sole. Just as familiar as the corner tavern is the neighborhood diner, a concept that’s benefiting from a gourmet makeover thanks to the likes of Brendan Sodikoff and Stephanie Izard. At West Loop smash Au Cheval (800 W. Randolph St., 312-929-4580; aucheval chicago.com), griddled cheeseburgers topped with fried eggs and house-made bacon aren’t the only things enticing customers to wait up to three hours for a table.

With dim lighting that barely illuminates the brown leather booths and open kitchen, the atmosphere is equal parts understated and elegant. “Food’s too indulgent, room’s too small, music’s too loud, and staff’s having too much fun,” quips Sodikoff. “I need someone smarter than me to explain how that works.” Meanwhile, the initial bakery concept for Izard’s Little Goat (820 W. Randolph St., 312-888-3455; littlegoatchicago.com) changed when the large Randolph Street location became available. “My husband, Gary, and I would always be out looking for a good meal at odd times of the day, around 3 pm, when most spots are closed,” Izard recalls. “I thought, Let’s do a diner that serves anything anyone wants to eat at any time throughout the day.” Offering dishes ranging from pancakes made with sourdough-buttermilk batter (using the house bread starter) to a goat Sloppy Joe with rosemary slaw and served on a squash roll, Little Goat has gained acclaim for its locally sourced

ingredients and global culinary influences. Hoping to match Izard with an Art Deco–inspired diner hit of his own is Rick Gresh, who recently unveiled Miss Ricky’s (203 N. Wabash Ave., 312-940-4400; virginhotels.com), inside the new Virgin Hotel. Open Sunday–Thursday from 6 am to 11 pm and Friday and Saturday from 6 am to 1 am, Miss Ricky’s is staking its claim in the Loop with fried chicken-stuffed waffles topped with fried chicken skin, as well as knife-and-fork doughnuts filled with peanut marshmallow fluff, roasted bananas, and honey-glazed bacon. Guests are invited to get nostalgic for tried-andtrue 24-hour East Coast diners at the 14-seat soda counter, or glam up Hollywood-style in the casting room, decorated with vintage spotlights and a gold-embellished ceiling. “There’s something so comforting about American diner classics,” notes Gresh. “Miss Ricky’s easily embodies that level of comfort while bringing elevated touches to favorite dishes.” MA


taste spotlight Something old, Something new

sips

Smooth operator

Green Queen

EloisE arlatiras is giving an ecofriendly boost to the city’s dining scene. Eloise Karlatiras has put her passion for the environment to good use ever since her college days working at Piece Pizzeria & Brewery, where she helped divert 400,000 pounds of the restaurant’s food waste from landfills—and caught the attention of Green Chicago Restaurant Coalition (GCRC) in the process. Since becoming GCRC’s CEO in 2011, Karlatiras has led partnerships with hundreds of restaurants (think Topolobampo, Blackbird, and Lou Malnati’s) to reduce waste and create long-term sustainability plans. Next, the environmentalist has her eye on the professional sports world (a fitting partnership, considering Soldier Field boasts the world’s largest green roof) through this month’s Sustainable Chicago Sports Project to identify teams’ sustainability practices while engaging fans. Says Karlatiras, “We want to leverage the excitement and competitive nature of sports to increase Chicagoans’ awareness and encourage participation in conservation.” greenchicago.org MA

// sweet stuff //

Lemon blueberry cupcakes by Swirlz.

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“Tequila is as versatile as vodka,” says Benjamin Greenfield of Chicagobased 312 Spirits, which recently introduced its Wansas tequila to Windy City imbibers. “Playing off the sweet and vibrant fruitiness or the spicy and mineral essences, there are limitless flavor combinations.” Sold in a striking pyramid-shaped bottle, the estate-grown Jalisco tequila is available in three varieties, ranging from translucent, double-distilled Silver (a gold medal winner from the International Review of Spirits) to rich Añejo, aged for 18 months in charred French oak. Available at Mariano’s; 312spirits.com

Lamb chops from The Estate, by Gene & Georgetti.

Wansas tequila is available in Silver (above), Reposado, and Añejo.

TREAT YOURSELF

For those who think the cupcake trend has faded, Swirlz Cupcakes (705 W. Belden Ave., 773-404-2253; swirlzcupcakes.com) co-owner Pam Rose begs to differ. “Our product is not just a cupcake,” says Rose. “It’s edible art. Every one of our cupcakes

is made fresh daily from the finest ingredients we can get our spatulas on.” Whole Foods Market has taken notice, recently tapping the Lincoln Park mainstay to deliver hundreds of fresh-baked cupcakes in a dozen different flavors each morning to the

newly opened Streeterville outpost (255 E. Grand Ave., 312-379-7900; wholefoodsmarket.com), where whipped Italian buttercream frosting and raspberry truffle filling are upping the dessert ante in the grocer’s bakery showcase.

photography by nick robins (swirlz)

Eloise Karlatiras (inset) aims to get sports teams to create long-term sustainability plans as she and GCRC have done with hundreds of area restaurants, like Michael Jordan’s Steakhouse (shown).

This month, chicago foodies welcome  a notable newcomer and two refreshed  classics to the city’s dining scene. in the  West Loop, old-school cocktail salon The Betty (839 W. Fulton Market, 312-733-2222; thebettychicago.com) serves cocktails like  Life During War Time (genever, green tea  syrup, fennel bitters) but is also gaining  renown for creative plates like clams with  uni butter, charred squid, and lightly fried  caulifower with pomegranate. River north  classic Rockit Bar & Grill (22 W. Hubbard St., 312-645-6000; rockitbarandgrill.com)  celebrates 10 years with a glamorous new  interior designed by Vogue-approved  chicago designer Kara mann. Lilac marble  and sleek, monochromatic black and white  accents make for a fresh look, but fear not:  Staples like Rockit’s Kobe burger and truffe  fries will remain on chef amanda Downing’s  new menu. and chicago’s oldest steakhouse  is opening its second location with a 340seat ballroom at The Estate, by Gene & Georgetti (9421 W. Higgins Road, 312-5273718; geneandgeorgetti.com). Live weekend  entertainment accompanies the same wetaged steaks and veal Parmesan that won the  original outpost the chicago classic award  at the 2015 Jean Banchet awards.


BIRCH DESIGN STUDIO DANA ROSSINI PHOTOGRAPHY

KERI MILLER, Venue Manager 312-846-6610 19EAST@ffTCHICAGO.COM 19EASTCHICAGO.COM

19 East

AT

19 East 21st strEEt • ChiCagO, IllINOIS 60616


taste On the town

The Greater Good

Both Terry Mazany and Brad Keywell are in the business of helping the Windy City thrive—Mazany, former interim head of Chicago Public Schools, as the CEO of Chicago Community Trust, which connects donors with deserving Windy City nonprofits, and Keywell as the chairman of both Chicago Ideas Week and the entrepreneurship-minded Future Founders Foundation. As CCT prepares to kick off its 100th-year celebration on May 12, the colleagues convened over bites at Rick Bayless’ restaurant Xoco Bistro to discuss philanthropy, guacamole, and Chicago’s collaborative spirit. How do you know each other? Brad Keywell: I met Terry [a few years ago] when he was running the schools; I was in the mayor’s office and he was walking out. I tried to tell him what we were doing with our Future Founders Foundation mentoring program, and that’s how the relationship started. Terry Mazany: I look at Brad as a next-generation civic-leader philanthropist— BK: Disrupter. [Laughs] TM: Exactly. BK: A philanthropic disrupter— TM: And I’m privileged to lead an organization that is 100 years old, and I’m looking at how we can remain relevant and contemporary. I look to Brad for insight and inspiration. How do I think disruptively for this institution? Terry, you suggested meeting at a Rick Bayless restaurant. Are you a fan? TM: It’s more about just being someplace that represents the soul of the city and reflects our diversity, which is one of the core values of the Trust. For us to progress as a city and community, we have to embrace diversity and embrace everyone’s talent. [Server approaches] BK: I’d like guacamole and chips—with double pomegranate seeds. TM: I want something munchable—I’ll go with the sopes. What do you appreciate about the atmosphere here? BK: I see a wall that’s a couple of hundred years old and a CoNTiNuEd oN pAgE 90

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CHAMpions of CHiCAgo WHAT:

A powwow between two infuential Windy City advocates. WHen:

Early evening on a blustery Tuesday in February. WHeRe:

Xoco Bistro, 1471 N. Milwaukee Ave., 872-829-3821; rickbayless.com/xoco

clockwise from top: Brad Keywell (left) and Terry Mazany; Xoco

Bistro’s open kitchen; a display of the restaurant’s local partners, including Tallgrass Beef and Intelligentsia Coffee; guacamole with pomegranate seeds.

photography by anjali pinto

As ChiCAgo Community trust CelebrAtes its 100th AnniversAry, president And Ceo Terry Mazany joins entrepreneur Brad Keywell At XoCo bistro to disCuss how to mAke A better ChiCAgo. By j.p. anderson


It’s the right time to change the story of HIV, but we can only move forward with your unwavering support. Our 30th Year Gala will be a rallying point for our most dedicated supporters to stand with AFC in this unprecedented moment in the history of HIV. Recent medical breakthroughs and shifts in the health care landscape have put AFC in its strongest position ever to prevent new infections and better support people living with HIV and AIDS.

Saturday, May 16, 2015

6:00 p.m. Reception 7:30 p.m. Dinner & Program Dancing until midnight

HILTON CHICAGO 720 South Michigan Avenue Tickets available at aidschicago.org/gala

Master of Ceremonies Amy Landecker

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Music by DJ Kiss

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“[coming to xoco bistro] is about being someplace that represents the soul of the city and reflects our diversity.” —terry mazany

The sopes de barbacoa features ancho-braised short ribs in a three-chile salsa. above: The bar serves up handcrafted margaritas and a selection of local craft beers.

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roof that’s probably restored, which to me is what neighborhoods are all about—trying to retrofit the new and the old. After 100 years, how does the Chicago Community Trust stay relevant? TM: For our 100th, we won’t be celebrating the institution—we will be celebrating our impact, and we will celebrate the philanthropists that Chicago is blessed with. Last year the Trust hosted On the Table, with dinners and conversation around the city. What was the response? TM: We’ve come to recognize that our role is far more than distributing grant dollars—and that’s where I became very inspired by Chicago Ideas Week. At the core it’s about bringing together people and ideas and trusting that good things will happen. And so I thought, for the 99th anniversary, what if we had thousands of people come together and have a conversation about the future of Chicago? We then linked it with Chicago Ideas Week. I don’t know how you feel about it, but I thought that it was a brilliant common denominator. BK: It’s been unbelievable. TM: People expressed a real hunger to have their voices heard, and they knew they were part of a larger conversation—in this case, the future of Chicago—so we built it in again as the launch of our 100th anniversary. Brad, you have your own foundation as well. Why is the concept of giving back for the good of the city important to you? BK: I grew up in Michigan, and when I moved to Chicago, I thought that was just the natural thing to do: to say, how do I help sustain the culture of where I live? There’s a lot of responsibilities that we all have, right? And they don’t require money—they just require action and effort and engagement. So to me it’s about giving energy. If we all give our energy, a lot can happen. [guacamole with pomegranate seeds and sopes de barbacoa with three-chile salsa and añejo cheese are served] What are your thoughts on the food? TM: The sopes are complexly delicious—the corncakes have great texture and flavor. What about the guacamole? BK: Great—the pomegranate seeds add a little punch of sweetness. TM: I wouldn’t have thought of putting those together, but the tastes really blend well. Chicago seems to be having a moment in various industries—from tech to dining. Why do you think that is? BK: Every big city has a personality, and I would say that the personality here is collaborative more than competitive— there’s a sense that when somebody does well, it helps everyone. What’s your verdict on Xoco Bistro? BK: I would come back here. I love Rick Bayless’ restaurants. I know you do too, Terry. TM: Rick is very committed to giving back, and I think it shows in the ambiance. We haven’t even gotten to the craft beers—if we had done this on a Friday night, it would have been a very different conversation. [Laughs] MA

photography by anjali pinto

taste On the town


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Wonder Woman

As pAssionAte About the environment As she is About her Adopted hometown of the windy City, ChiCago P.D. stAr Sophia BuSh rAises her voiCe to build A better world. BY MARISKA HARGITAY PHOTOGRAPHY BY RENE & RADKA

Pasadena native Sophia Bush first wove herself into America’s pop culture lexicon in the early aughts as Brooke Davis on cult TV drama One Tree Hill, going on to play the ever-popular cheerleader-turned-fashion designer for nearly a decade. Now, Bush is garnering acclaim as Detective Erin Lindsay on NBC breakout hit Chicago P.D., which was recently renewed for a third season. The analytical, no-nonsense character is not unlike Bush, a vocal advocate of causes ranging from the environment to education. In a spirited conversation with friend and Law & Order: SVU star Mariska Hargitay, Bush opened up about the changing face of TV storytelling, her favorite Chicago foodie haunts, and how she’s working every day to manifest a brighter future. Mariska Hargitay: Honey, how are you? Sophia Bush: I just got home, and I feel like I’ve won the lottery. MH: “Home” home, like LA home? SB: Yeah. MH: Good for you! SB: It’s three degrees in Chicago, and it’s 80 degrees [at] home— MH: Oh God, insanity. So, sweet Sophia, let’s start at the beginning: Tell me when you first knew that you wanted to become an actor. SB: It was honestly an accident. My junior high and high school had a series of arts requirements, and I put off my theater requirement until the last semester. I knew it would interfere with all my extracurricular activities, and I guess at 13 I figured if I ignored it, it would go away. [Laughs] The second semester of my eighth-grade year, they said, “You have to take a theater class,” and I protested because I was on the volleyball team, and they said, “It doesn’t matter. You could have done this last semester, but you waited and now you have to do it.” We did a production of Our Town— MH: Oh! SB: Something just clicked, and I realized that my passion for English and my love of literature could be put into action. And it rocked my world; it scrambled my brain, and I just thought, I get this. MH: I have a similar story—I was an athlete. I met somebody, and he was like, “You should go on auditions,” and I was like, “Nope, I’ve got a volleyball game; I’ve got a cross-country game.” It wasn’t until I did a play that I went, Hey, wait a minute. I like this. I can do this. Doing sports as a young girl sets up the pattern for achieving goals and really teaches us how to strive for something; in so many ways, too, it makes you a better actor. SB: Absolutely, because you have some understanding of the discipline and a need to persevere. I get this question all the time about our schedules—people say, “What happens when you’re sick?” MH: And you say, “Nobody cares.” [Laughs] SB: If you’re sick, you come to work with a bucket, and you deal with it. If I have pneumonia, I still go to work.

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MH: Speaking about your show, tell me what you think it is about Chicago P.D. that the audiences connect to. SB: First of all, we’re so lucky to be part of this larger wheelhouse that you’ve influenced and Dick [Wolf] has been growing and [enriching] for so many years. Television has grown as an industry—when I was a little kid, there were only a handful of channels, and now there’s a thousand to choose from. That has widened avenues that we have for storytelling because we’re not looking at shows the way we used to. I grew up watching reruns of Dragnet on Nick at Nite, and I thought those guys were the coolest cops ever. That was a great black and white era. There was crime, and then they solved it, and that was that. With the advent of typical storytelling, you crave getting to know people—not just watching them do something, but seeing who they are, and why they tick, and the good, the bad, and the ugly. We’ve been given permission on the show to allow our heroes to be flawed— to allow them to have moments where the audience has been inside the person being an antihero, or are they heroic? Are they bending the rules to service the law, are they breaking the law? Do we root for them; are we afraid of them? Nobody’s always playing perfect. MH: What’s your favorite thing about playing Detective Lindsay? SB: I like that she has been made in the fire. She’s not one of those bleeding hearts that sees the world and wants to fix it: She wants to fix the world because she’s been so terribly broken by it, because she was taken advantage of as a child, because she was recruited to work in a gang environment, because she was a drug addict, because she’s been at the lowest point and seen what one person who cares about you can do for you, and now she wants to give that to other people. And I love that all of her fight comes from a place of having fought herself. MH: And what initially drew you to it? SB: Honestly, I’d been on location doing [One Tree Hill] for nine years, and then I worked a season on a show in LA and was so excited to be home. I didn’t quite know what I wanted to do next, but I always wanted to work for Dick, and I always wanted to work with you. I get this call and my agent said, “Dick Wolf is doing this show, and they really want to see you for the lead female, and it shoots in Chicago,” and I’m like, “No way. Chicago’s so cold, it’s so far away, I don’t know anybody there... I’m not going.” MH: [Laughs] But Dick Wolf has a pretty good record. SB: I know. And they were like, “But Sophia, it’s literally two of the three criteria for a job you’ve ever wanted. You could just read it.” And I said, “All right.” I was protesting, but not much, because in the back of my head I was so excited. MH: Of course. SB: And I read it, and I just got her. I thought she was interesting, and different, and I just thought it was so cool. MH: There’s nothing better than that, right?


Dress, Valentino ($13,500).

Neiman Marcus, 737 N. Michigan Ave., 312-642-5900; neimanmarcus.com. Brief

earrings, Swarovski ($79). The Shops at North Bridge, 312-464-0130; swarovski.com. Diamond long stud earrings ($38) and diamond stud earrings ($38), Makko. makkojewelry.com. Naja cuff in rose gold ($199) and bondage bangle in rose gold ($199), Pushmataaha. pushmataaha.com


SB: No, and you know what that feeling is like: When you read a script and from the first moment it gets its hooks in you? I just went, “Uh-oh.” [Laughs] I knew I was in trouble. MH: You’ve said that Law & Order: SVU, which you starred in obviously in the crossovers, is your favorite show. What was that experience like? I want you to be honest. [Laughs] SB: I have to take our dear readers back, because for so long, I talked about how all I would do on a day off in North Carolina was binge-watch SVU marathons, and how Mariska Hargitay was just the coolest woman on TV. I was this shameless gusher. I was doing this as an actor on a show, so these words were being printed—it wasn’t, like, on my private Tumblr page—and they were out there for all to see. Then, six or seven years ago, I was walking down the street in Soho, and I looked up, and it was like all the lights on Broadway started shining in my face—it became a weird sort of Wes Anderson film—and there you were, greeting all the beautiful fans in Soho, and I just blacked out. I know that I went up to you and that I probably babbled. I think you knew my brain was short-circuiting, and you touched my arm and said, “It’s so nice to meet you. I think your show is just great. Want to take a walk with me?” And I was like, “Sure.” What? And we just talked for 20 minutes, and it’s weird because now we text, we e-mail, we chat, we send each other stupid pictures and things that real humans do, but I remember that day not understanding how to compute just how genuinely lovely you were. MH: That’s so gracious, but it’s been such a pleasure getting to know you, working with you, and having you teach me how to Tweet and Instagram. And your photos are amazing—this is a fun fact about Sophia Bush: She is such a great photographer. You wouldn’t even know she’s an actor, and she’s like, “OK, stand over here.” Way to take photos and take charge of the set to get a good photo. You have quite the eye. SB: Taking photos together now, it’s like, “Wow, I basically accosted this woman on the street in Soho, and now we’re working together—” MH: And now you’re telling me where to stand for photos. [Laughs] SB: It’s such a trip. It’s almost like I manifested it in all those embarrassing fangirl interviews over the years. It happened. MH: Be careful what you wish for—we can manifest those things, so if that’s what you want, you did good, girl. [Laughs] So how is Chicago? You had some trepidation about moving there. What’s it like for you now? SB: It’s been so lovely. There are elements in Chicago of so many of my favorite cities: There’s this big lake culture in the summer that reminds me of Austin; there’s amazing neighborhoods full of street art, little craft stores, and artisanal coffee, and it reminds me of all my favorite funky neighborhoods in LA; and there’s this incredible music scene and art scene that is really reminiscent of New York. If I can’t be home, it’s one of the best places that I’ve ever been.

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opposite page: White lace dress,

Dolce & Gabbana ($3,345). 68 E. Oak St., 312-255-0630; dolcegabbana.com. Diamond long stud earring ($38) and diamond stud earring ($38), Makko. makkojewelry. com. Ruthenium angular cuff with floating blue sapphire crystal pyrite doublets, Alexis Bittar ($295). 1710 N. Damen Ave., 773-486-5627; alexisbittar.com. Vanilla ring, Swarovski ($62.50). swarovski.com this page: Top, Burberry Prorsum

($1,150). 633 N. Michigan Ave., 312-787-2500; burberry.com. High-waist trouser, MaxMara ($650). 900 North Michigan Shops, 312-475-9500; maxmara.com. Belt, Donna Karan New York ($350). Saks Fifth Avenue, 700 N. Michigan Ave., 312-944-6500; saksfifthavenue.com. Diamond long stud earring ($38), diamond stud earring ($38), and bar chain necklace ($68), Makko. makkojewelry.com


MH: When I was there we had so much fun, and I couldn’t believe how many great restaurants were there. You were so sweet going, “Go here. Go there.” Tell me some of your favorite places and favorite dishes. SB: There’s a really amazing place downtown called The Purple Pig, and I just had this the other day for the first time: They do a pork that tastes like it’s bourbon-glazed. It’s insanely delicious. There’s a great Asian-fusion restaurant that just opened called Momotaro that’s phenomenal. Au Cheval has the best burger I’ve ever had. There’s a great shop in Wicker Park called Antique Taco that is off-the-chain delicious. MH: What’s the place that I went that I loved? Big Star? SB: Yeah, Big Star is also fantastic. MH: Well, I’m coming back in a couple weeks, so I’m hoping that we can have short days and grab some dinner. SB: Me, too—I’m hoping that we can actually go gallivanting. It’s so different. In the summertime, you just want to be outside. One of my favorite things to do is [visit] the Randolph Street Market, and it reminds me of the Rose Bowl or the Long Beach Flea Market—amazing antique jewelry, vintage furniture, incredible food... MH: I’d call you a half-Chicagoan, because I found that there is this bizarre and lovely and surprising feeling of intimacy and family with everyone [in the city]. But let’s talk about support: The environment is something that means a lot to you—I know you’ve done beach cleanups, marathons to benefit The Nature Conservancy, and all that. Tell me about conservation and why it’s so dear to you. SB: I honestly think it’s a no-brainer, and some of that comes from growing up in Southern California—spending all my time as a kid exploring beaches and the sea and the mountains, and just realizing that we’re such a small part of this giant planet in this enormous ecosystem, yet we wreak the most havoc on it. No matter what we might argue about amongst ourselves or what we might fight wars about around the world, if there’s no world left to host us, none of it’s going to matter. If we kill the planet, that’s it. When the president of the United States is saying that climate change poses a greater threat to American citizens than terrorism, people are finally opening their eyes and realizing that the world doesn’t exist for us to trample and use. It’s all supposed to be more symbiotic, and I really hope that citizens will start to demand that change both from the companies where they spend their money and the governments they elect to represent them. MH: What are a couple of things you’d suggest to readers who want to protect the environment? SB: It’s important to realize that every dollar you spend casts a vote. When you have to spend money, look at where it’s going. There’s actually a company that a friend of mine helped start called Conscious Commerce, where you can look up all kinds of conscious beauty products, gift items, fashion items. Of course it’s great to say, “Hey, try the fuel-efficient car.” I switched over to a clean diesel [car] a couple of years ago, and it’s made a great impact on my life and saved me a ton of money in the process. I don’t use plastic bags anymore; I take my own bags to the grocery store. I try to drink bottled water that I bring from home in a glass bottle instead of buying plastic bottles, but if I have to use plastic, I make sure I’m recycling. Buying my groceries at the farmers market on the weekend instead of buying produce that’s shipped [and] using pesticides. There’s big options and small, and in the minutiae of our everyday we have the chance to create change. MH: It’s been beautiful to see how you’ve used your social media to get the message out there, and it says on your social media that you call yourself a “storyteller” and an “activist,” and “I believe a pencil can change the world.” How do you want to change the world? SB: The notion of a pencil changing the world to me comes from all of my work with Pencils of Promise and really seeing that we have the capability to change the world by educating its children. I’d like to see us investing in education, in the environment; I’d like to see us treating one another like we’re all in this together. I just try to remind myself that I have the power to change my world and to change a little bit of the world around me, but if every one of us really embraces that and says, “I should start with myself, then I can have a ripple effect in my universe,” that’s it. If every person in the world commits to making one substantial change, the whole world’s a different place. MA

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Dress, Bottega Veneta ($5,000). 800 N. Michigan Ave., 312-6643220; bottegaveneta.com. Spike earrings, Makko ($98). makkojewelry.com. Gold Araw rings, Pushmataaha (price on request). pushmataaha.com. Shoes, Greymer (price on request). greymer.it. Gold earrings, Bush’s own beautÊ: Kevyn Aucoin The Sensual Skin Fluid Foundation in Sf03 and Sf05 ($65 each), The Creamy Glow in Isadore ($26), The Celestial Bronzing Veil in Tropical Nights ($48), The Celestial Powder in Candlelight ($44), The Precision Brow Pencil in Brunette ($26), The Essential Eyeshadow Set in Palette #1 ($58), The Curling Mascara in Rich Pitch Black ($28), The Expert Lip Color in Dantrice ($35). Neiman Marcus, 737 N. Michigan Ave., 312-642-5900; neimanmarcus. com. Wella Oil Reflections Anti-Oxidant Smoothing Oil ($40), Ocean Spritz Beach Texture Hairspray ($17). Ulta, 114 S. State St., 312-279-5081; ulta.com. Chanel Le Vernis Nail Colour in Secret ($27). Neiman Marcus, see above

Photography by Rene & Radka/ Art Department Styling by Giolliosa & Natalie Fuller/sisterstyling.com Makeup by Elaine Offers for Exclusive Artists Management using Kevyn Aucoin Hair by Sascha Breuer for Wella Professionals Manicure by Whitney Gibson using Chanel for Nailing Hollywood Video: Nardeep Khurmi Shot on location at the Fairmont Miramar Hotel & Bungalows and The Bungalow Santa Monica, 101 Wilshire Blvd., Santa Monica, 310-576-7777; fairmont.com/santa-monica Located in Santa Monica, the Fairmont Miramar Hotel & Bungalows boasts suites designed by Lynda Murray, seasonal cuisine at Fig Restaurant, fitness by Exhale mind body spa, and The Bungalow by Brent Bolthouse. A freestanding Baja-style cottage on the grounds of the hotel, The Bungalow features expansive ocean views, lush gardens, sweeping decks, and rustic interior designs.


NATUR E

I N T H E E Y E of T H E S T O R M

By Jill Sigal

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this page: photography by Kurt MarKus/trunK archive; opposite page: JaMes WoJciK/trunK archive

The world’s growing population and the impact of the changing climate are putting nature’s ability to provide for all of us at risk. Are we paying enough attention to this looming threat?


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When you see the abundance of food at the local supermarket—the bins of fruits and vegetables, the seafood on ice, the water bottles on the shelves—you may not always think about where it all comes from or what would happen if nature could no longer provide for us. Currently there are 7.3 billion people on the planet. According to a report by the United Nations, the world’s population is expected to grow to 9.6 billion by the year 2050. Global demand for food, water, and energy is predicted to increase by 35 percent, 40 percent, and 50 percent, respectively, by 2030. This will further test nature’s ability to provide for us, as will the expanding middle class around the world. The unprecedented consumption of critical natural resources poses enormous challenges for the entire planet. Some countries are already feeling the effects with depleted fisheries and diminished food stocks resulting from the inability of agricultural production to keep pace with demand. In recent years, more food was consumed around the world than was produced. The changing climate compounds these trends, as the increasing number and severity of storms (like Hurricane Sandy, which battered the East Coast in 2012), floods, and droughts threaten global food and water supplies. Competition for increasingly scarce resources can lead to social and political instability, conflict, radicalization, and possibly even failed nations. According to the US National Intelligence Council, “[resource] scarcities are likely to hit hardest on poorer states, leading in the worst case to internal or interstate conflict and spillover to regional destabilization.” Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, the country’s premier foreign-policy think tank, agrees. “Resources are linked to both the stability of countries and to the stability of regions,” he says. Resource shortages and competition need to be on “the list of possible sources of friction or conflict” and are “potentially a contributing cause of instability within countries and conceivably a source of instability between countries.” But resource scarcity is not just a problem for other countries; it is also a threat to the United States’ economic interests and national security.

is there hope? Given the stress on nature’s ability to provide for the growing population due to increasing demand and the serious impacts of the changing climate, are we doomed, or is there still hope? According to Peter Seligmann, a leading conservationist and the founder, chairman, and CEO of Conservation International, a nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting nature for the well-being of people, there is reason to be hopeful. “Many governments,

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businesses, and local communities are realizing the importance of nature to the global economy, livelihoods, and security,” he says. “They are not standing on the sidelines watching as nature is depleted. They are engaging and taking actions to ensure nature is sustainable.” Seligmann cites the example of Walmart, the world’s largest retailer, which is leading the charge for sustainability among corporations with its three goals: to sell products that sustain both people and the environment, to create zero waste, and to run on 100 percent renewable energy. Due to its vast size, Walmart can have a significant impact on sustainability up and down its supply chain. “Walmart executives see that their supplies of fish and food depend upon the health of ecosystems,” Seligmann explains, “and they see that ecosystems are being stressed out by shifts in climate. That affects their supply. They’re thinking long-term.” According to Rob Walton, the company’s chairman and the eldest son of Walmart founder Sam Walton, “For Walmart, it’s about our responsibility as a business, but partly about how many of our sustainability efforts allow us to be more efficient and to continue to pass those savings on to our customers.” Ensuring a sustainable supply chain so that its shelves are always fully stocked is critical to the company’s business. If you’ve noticed a difference in the size of laundry detergent bottles in the last decade, you have Walmart to thank. The company has single-handedly driven the industry to embrace more eco-friendly packaging. And at Walmart’s 2014 Sustainability Product Expo, it introduced an initiative challenging manufacturers to reduce by 25 percent the amount of water in every dose of detergent in North America by 2018. Also announced at the Expo was a new initiative to increase recycling rates in the US by providing low-interest loans to municipalities for recycling projects. Increasingly, companies—including Disney, Starbucks, and Marriott—are realizing that environmental sustainability is not only in their economic self-interest; it is also in the interest of their customers and the communities in which they operate. For example, The Walt Disney Company is implementing major changes designed to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, improve its energy efficiency, reduce its water consumption, minimize waste, protect natural ecosystems, and inspire action on environmental health. The company is also funding a flagship project in the Peruvian Amazon to address the main causes of deforestation. Many are aware of Whole Foods’ eco-friendly policies, which include supporting sustainable agriculture and sound environmental practices. The company has also designed Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design [LEED]certified stores and initiated recycling programs, and it offsets 100 percent of its

PhotograPhy by XoNoVEtS

ake a look around and it becomes clear that nearly everything surrounding us—the food we eat, the water we drink, the air we breathe, the butcher-block table in your kitchen, the paper used for this magazine—comes from nature. The simple truth is that humanity cannot survive without nature: for our food, fresh water, lifesaving medicines, and so much more.


The unprecedented consumption of natural resources

poses enormous challenges for the entire planet.

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“Protecting nature is not an option— it is essential for the well-being of people.

it is not someone else’s problem. We are all in this together.”

PhotograPhy by montree hanlue

—Peter Seligmann

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energy consumption with renewable-energy credits. And through its sustainable coffee-sourcing program, known as CAFE (Coffee and Farmer Equity) Practices, Starbucks is maintaining the quality of its brews while encouraging higher environmental, social, and economic standards. The initiative has had a significant positive impact on forest conservation and coffee-farming communities, and the company is expected to meet its goal of serving 100 percent ethically sourced coffee this year. (See sidebar for a list of other eco-conscious companies.)

how is the changing climate affecting us now? The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an international body that reviews scientific research on the changing climate, stated in a recent report that it is “unequivocal” that the global climate is warming: “The atmosphere and ocean have warmed, the amounts of snow and ice have diminished, and sea level has risen.” The IPCC notes that concentrations of greenhouse gases have increased and projects that if the current rate of greenhouse gas emissions continues, the climate and oceans will continue to warm during the 21st century. That could result in sea levels rising anywhere from 21 inches to three feet by 2100, endangering cities worldwide, from New York and Miami to London and Sydney. Coastal flooding and erosion are expected to increase with rising sea levels. The panel also found evidence that human health, agriculture, water supplies, and in some cases people’s livelihoods have already been impacted by climate change. Increased acidification of the oceans (from the absorption of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere) has harmed marine ecosystems, such as coral reefs and fisheries, potentially threatening our food security. The IPCC predicts climate change is projected to impact the availability of fresh water and increase water scarcity, which could result in competition for the resource. The production of crops like wheat and rice is also projected to be negatively impacted by the changing climate. Risks to human health may also rise due to stronger heat waves, decreased food production, and a greater prevalence of disease, according to the panel. One place that is already feeling the impact of the changing climate is the remote nation of Kiribati, which sits just a few feet above sea level in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, more than 1,000 miles south of Hawaii. Kiribati is composed of 33 tiny islands and has a population of just over 100,000. If sea levels continue to rise, this republic, which is directly in the eye of the storm, could literally be swallowed up by the sea. According to the country’s president, Anote Tong, rising tides have damaged property and infrastructure, and sea water is intruding on freshwater plants and damaging food crops. “The future is a very real concern,” he says. “My grandchildren will have a very difficult future. We really have to do a lot of work. We need resources to be able to build up the islands in order to be resilient to the impacts that will come in the future.” Although people living thousands of miles from Kiribati may not yet feel the effects of climate change directly, eventually they will, Tong adds, and the world should act now, before it’s too late. “It is better not to look back and say, ‘Oh no, we should have done something,’” says Tong. He sees this issue as “the most serious moral challenge for humanity,” adding that “humanity will, at some point in time, see the need and the obligation to respond to what is happening. If it’s later, we will go down the drain, but hopefully it will be a lesson. I hope that lesson is well learned to ensure that whatever further damage would be caused will not happen.” Here at home, the third National Climate Assessment, published last year, reports that people across the United States—from corn growers in Iowa to oyster farmers in Washington State—are already feeling the impact of our changing climate, and that impact is growing. The first decade of the 21st century was the world’s hottest on record, and 2012 was the warmest year recorded in the continental United States. According to the report, temperatures in most areas of the country are expected to rise by as much as four degrees Fahrenheit in the coming decades, which threatens US agricultural production, worth about $330 billion annually. The US defense and intelligence communities are increasingly focusing on the impact of climate change on resource scarcity, food security, and stability within and among nations. The US Department of Defense’s 2014 Quadrennial

Making a

Difference

These global brands are leading the way in environmentally responsible practices.

Chipotle Mexican Grill has made a commitment to “Food with Integrity” by serving organic, locally grown, and familyfarmed foods. The company has also pledged to offer sustainably produced food and dairy products without synthetic hormones. The Coca-Cola Company is working to achieve its 2020 environmental goals, which include improving water efficiency by 25 percent, reducing carbon dioxide emissions by 25 percent, raising the recovery rate of its cans and bottles to 75 percent in developed markets, and sustainably sourcing key ingredients. The company has also participated in hundreds of Community Water Partnership projects, providing access to safe water in countries around the world. Hewlett-Packard, through its Living Progress program, employs its technological expertise to help build a sustainable world. As part of the program, the Earth Insights project uses a groundbreaking early-warning system that allows scientists to monitor endangered species in tropical ecosystems in almost real time. Marriott International is implementing a comprehensive sustainability strategy that includes commitments to reduce energy and water consumption, green its supply chain, and inspire its guests and associates to conserve natural resources. The company has also provided support to forest and water conservation projects in Brazil and China. Omega partnered with the GoodPlanet Foundation in 2011, and within a year the company showcased the beauty of the world’s oceans in the documentary Planet Ocean, examined the stresses on its ecosystems, and offered solutions. To further foster conservation, Omega designed a special timepiece, the Seamaster Planet Ocean 600M GMT GoodPlanet, a portion of whose sales proceeds fully fund a project to preserve mangroves, sea grasses, and coral reefs in the seas of Southeast Asia. Starwood Hotels & Resorts is committed to sustainable practices while continuing to offer a great experience for its guests. The company has set a target of 2020 to decrease energy and water consumption by 30 percent and 20 percent, respectively, and to reduce emissions and waste. Stella McCartney’s line features an array of environmentally friendly products, such as eyewear produced with materials like castor oil seeds and citric acid; shoes with soles made from a bio-plastic called APINAT, which degrades when placed in a compost pile; and a faux-leather line created with more than 50 percent vegetable oil, which allows the company to use less petroleum in its products. Tiffany & Co. employs only paper suppliers that have been certified by the Forest Stewardship Council for the brand’s famous blue boxes and bags. Unilever has established the goal of sourcing 100 percent of its agricultural raw materials sustainably by 2020. In the same time period, the company has also committed to cutting its greenhouse gas emissions, per-customer water use, and waste.

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adapt to the changes that have already occurred and prepare for those to come. Ecosystem-based approaches, such as conserving and restoring forests and coastal mangrove swamps, as well as building seawalls to protect against the rising oceans, are adaptive measures that can reduce the impact of climate change by increasing a locality’s resilience. “Those actions require a change in our behavior,” he says. “Those actions require a change in how we supply our energy. Those actions require an increased recognition of the importance of securing ecosystems and their health.” What can individuals do to make a difference? “There is much we can do, in terms of whom we vote for and in terms of making good choices with our dollars to make sure we purchase things that are manufactured by companies that are really helping to find solutions rather than exacerbating the problem,” Seligmann says. “Protecting nature is not an option. It is essential for the well-being of people. It is not someone else’s problem. We are all in this together.” No one can predict the future with 100 percent accuracy, so we cannot know for sure how the changing climate will alter nature’s ability to provide for the world’s growing population. Nor can we be certain of the long-term impact that resource scarcity will have on the global economy, security, and people’s livelihoods. But what we can see are the consequences of the changing climate today. We can either take action now to ensure the health of our natural world, or we can wait and see whether the predictions come true and hope we don’t end up looking back and saying, “Oh no, we should have done something.” Nature and all it provides for us—fresh water, fertile soil, food, and so much more—is the lifeblood of human well-being. The pressures on its ecosystems have never been greater. The stakes have never been higher. Protecting nature from the changing climate and ensuring its health is of strategic importance to our economy, our security, and our survival. The planet will endure, with or without us. As Harrison Ford, vice chair of Conservation International, says, “Nature doesn’t need people. People need nature.” MA

PhotograPhy by Jan Mika

DefenseReview characterizes climate change as a significant global challenge. “The pressures caused by climate change will influence resource competition while placing additional burdens on economies, societies, and governance institutions around the world,” the report states. “These effects are threat multipliers that will aggravate stressors abroad such as poverty, environmental degradation, political instability, and social tensions—conditions that can enable terrorist activity and other forms of violence.” In a 2013 speech, Chuck Hagel, then the US secretary of defense, spoke about how climate change can “significantly add to the challenges of global instability, hunger, poverty, and conflict. Food and water shortages, pandemic disease, disputes over refugees and resources, and more severe natural disasters all place additional burdens on economies, societies, and institutions around the world.” Richard Haass of the Council on Foreign Relations agrees that the changing climate is potentially a source of social instability, possibly resulting in large-scale population movements and a humanitarian nightmare as well as political destabilization. The changing climate raises real questions of economic viability, he says, and if it leads to failed states, “that can create breeding grounds for terrorism or other forms of behaviors that we do not want to see.” Despite the concerns expressed by scientists and world leaders, Americans rank addressing global warming near the bottom of their policy priorities. In a poll conducted last year by the Pew Research Center, global warming came in 19th among 20 policy concerns, with the economy, jobs, and defending the country from terrorism being the respondents’ top priorities. Yet, according to Conservation International’s Peter Seligmann, the changing climate could be devastating in all of those areas—threatening our food and water supply, our economic stability, and ultimately our security—and he believes that something must be done now. Nations and communities need to take measures to mitigate climate change by reducing their greenhouse gas emissions, Seligmann says, adding they must also


CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT: The

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES (ELEVATED TRAIN); COURTESY OF AILEY SOLAR (SOLAR PANEL INSTALLATION)

elevated rail over Wabash Avenue in downtown Chicago; workers from Ailey Solar installing solar panels on a house; Being Born, a sculpture by Virginio Ferrari, is part of one of the many expressway greening and neighborhood beautification programs sponsored by Chicago Gateway Green.

CHICAGO REACTS TO CLIMATE CHANGE

Since 2012, the action plan Sustainable Chicago 2015 has guided the Windy City’s efforts to become a more eco-friendly metropolis. By Carly Dyer In 2012, after research gathered by the Chicago Climate Task Force indicated a future with severe storms and hotter summers due to the high level of greenhouse gas emissions, the city government created a three-year action agenda called Sustainable Chicago 2015. Broken up into categories ranging from energy efficiency and economic development to water, parks, and climate change, the plan provides specific solutions to improve the city’s use of clean energy, broaden access to recycling, strengthen city transit, and more. Since the plan’s inception, the city has cut down carbon emissions from buildings and vehicles while creating more power sources from a mix of solar panels, nuclear, natural gas, and renewables. Says Karen Weigert, Chicago’s chief sustainability officer, “Through two years of implementation of Chicago’s road map for a more livable, competitive, and sustainable city, [we] have made progress across all

seven categories of the plan. Our goals moving forward are to continue doing just that.” In that same time period, alternate energy sources have generated goals that take advantage of new programs as well as what the city’s landscape already offers. Retrofit Chicago, for example, works to accelerate efficiency in buildings, historical and new, in the city. Divvy, the popular bike program, has 3,000 bikes parked at 300 solar-powered stations. Chicago is also now coal-free, having closed the city’s two remaining coal power plants in 2012. With $5.9 million in energy savings from the Retrofit Chicago Residential Partnership, 5,400 trees planted last year, and 65 miles of bikeways installed, it’s no surprise that the World Wildlife Fund named Chicago the Earth Hour Capital of the Unites States in 2014. To find out more about the city’s progress and future goals, visit cityofchicago.org/city/ en/progs/env/sustainable_chicago2015/.html.

ACTION ITEMS

Chief Sustainability Officer Karen Weigert and Chicago Conservation Corps’ Kristen Pratt offer these tips for maintaining a more sustainable lifestyle. - Make your home more energy efficient with simple changes like turning off lights and lowering the thermostat when not in a room. - Don’t use the dishwasher or washing machine during rainstorms, which can cause flooding and sewer overflows. Faucet aerators are a good way to decrease water usage. - Use city transit (transitchicago.com), walk, or Divvy (divvybikes.com) rather than driving your own vehicle. Go to divvybikes.com/stations to find Divvy stations near you. - Call 855-9-IMPACT to have Retrofit Chicago evaluate your home’s efficiency and give tips for improvement. - Install solar panels on your home. Visit illinois solar.org/illinoisreinstallers for a list of installers. - Volunteer for the Chicago Conservation Corps (chicagoconservationcorps.org), Chicago Wilderness (chicagowilderness.org), or the Chicago Botanic Garden (chicagobotanic.org).

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Fleurs de Vie This season, ChiCago fashion blossoms inTo a garden of sumpTuous delighTs.

photography by rene & radka styling by martina nilsson

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Cotton seersucker dress, Hermès ($1,925). 25 E. Oak St., 312-787-8175; hermes.com


opposite page: Bellini dress ($7,900),

resin drop earrings (price on request), and Firenze t-strap sandal ($995), Altuzarra. Neiman Marcus, 737 N. Michigan Ave., 312-642-5900; neimanmarcus.com this page: Double linen

embroidered-collar dress, Valentino ($4,390). Neiman Marcus, see above


this page: Long blue three-tiered

silk dress, Lanvin ($5,150). 116 E. Oak St., 312-765-7075; lanvin.com. Gunmetal crystal flower necklace, Oscar de la Renta ($1,195). Neiman Marcus, 737 N. Michigan Ave., 312-642-5900; neimanmarcus.com. Flower Power Notte blue sandals, Casadei ($895). Saks Fifth Avenue, 700 N. Michigan Ave., 312-944-6500; casadei.com opposite page: Pale Banane

embroidered cotton dress, Bottega Veneta ($10,000). 800 N. Michigan Ave., 312-664-3220; bottegaveneta.com


Embroidered black tulle gown, Dolce & Gabbana (price on request). 68 E. Oak St., 312-255-0630; dolcegabbana.com


this page: Embroidered bomber

jacket ($9,600), silk Cadi pants ($1,650), and Moderknit woven pumps ($1,240), Dior. Neiman Marcus, 737 N. Michigan Ave., 312-642-5900; neimanmarcus.com opposite page: Nude silk organza

beaded flower dress ($6,190) and Russian gold flower necklace ($695), Oscar de la Renta. Neiman Marcus, see above beauté: Koh Gen Do Maifanshi Moisture Foundation ($62). Sephora, 520 N. Michigan Ave., 312-494-9598; sephora.com. Anastasia Beverly Hills Brow Wiz Eyebrow Pencil in Taupe ($21). Sephora, see above. Givenchy Ombre Couture Cream Eyeshadow in Prune Taffetas and Brun Cachemire ($23 each). Sephora, see above. Tom Ford Lip Color in Sable Smoke ($50). Tom Ford, 66 E. Oak St., 312-605-5041; tom ford.com. L’Oréal Paris EveryStyle Smooth & Shine Crème ($7), Elnett Hairspray Extra Strong Hold ($15), EverStyle Texture Series Energizing Dry Shampoo ($7). lorealparisusa.com

Photography by Rene & Radka at Art Department Styling by Martina Nilsson at Opus Beauty Prop styling by Jason McKnight at Exclusive Artists Hair by Dimitris Giannetos at Opus Beauty using L’Oréal Paris Makeup by Kathy Jeung at Forward Artists using Givenchy Production by Art Department Photo assistance by Adam Rondou Styling assistance by Jacquelyn Jones


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6 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms $8,700,000 An outstanding example of residential design by iconic architect Howard Van Doren Shaw and one of the city’s most prestigious buildings. The meticulous renovation pays homage to the original architecture while creating a beautiful home with a timeless sensibility. Views are extraordinary.

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Wish Ball is coming to Navy Pier for one brilliant evening. Join us as we celebrate the sustaining power of wishes and the color they bring to children’s lives.

Saturday, May 16, 2015 6pm Cocktails 7:30pm Dinner 600 / person 6,000 / table $ 12,000 / premium table $ $

Highlights include: headlining entertainer, live and silent auctions, musical entertainment and dancing.

Headlining Celebrity

For online registration, visit illinois.wish.org or call 312.602.WISH (9474).

JAY LENO Main Program Emcees NBC 5 Chicago’s Morning Team Stefan Holt and Zoraida Sambolin

#WishBall15 Presenting Sponsor

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Refer a child with a life-threatening illness to Make-A-Wish and help grant every eligible child’s wish: Illinois.wish.org/refer


Haute ProPerty News, Stars, and trends in real estate

Green Acres

An hour outside ChiCAgo, one luxury development is tAking sustAinAble living to A whole new level. by judith nemes Living green in the country just got a lot more luxurious: An hour northwest of downtown Chicago, a new sustainable community is taking shape for city dwellers longing for an eco-conscious lifestyle in a less urban setting. Opening this spring, Serosun Farms is an environmentally focused community in Hampshire, where 114 deluxe, high-performance, energyefficient homes on one-acre-plus lots will be scattered across a 410-acre spread. The homes will be built around horse trails, an equestrian center, an organic vegetable farm, prairie, wetlands, a grove of 100-year-old oak trees, and more. A concept new to Chicago, high-end green communities amid nature should appeal to urbanites who want to live in deluxe eco-friendly

homes while surrounded by more greenery than just a city park. “Sustainability attracts people who are intelligent and successful,” asserts Jane Stickland, who purchased the first 80 acres from a few farming families in 2001, aiming to create an elite equestrian center while restoring and preserving a sizeable piece of Midwestern land. “They know that living in a high-performance home is a luxury, not a sacrifice, and they like that they’re helping the environment, too.” Serosun Farms’ lots will likely be snapped up by Chicago professionals seeking a retreat that emphasizes environmental stewardship, horses, continued on page 122

At Serosun Farms, 114 deluxe, eco-friendly homes will be built around horse trails, an equestrian center, an organic vegetable garden, and naturally occuring wetlands.

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haute property News, Stars, and trends in real estate SuStainable living

Three new communities where luxurious green living is a given. Tryon Farm. a small-scale community in

michigan city, indiana, this development spans 170 acres (120 of them preserved), with more than 20 lots still available. owners are free to install all the deluxe high-performance features they’d like in a maximum 2,500-square-foot home. 1500 Tryon Road, Michigan City, 301-455-5257; tryonfarm.com EcoSquarE chicago. under construction on the near West Side, this 150-unit development will have single-family homes, townhouses, and condos on a fve-plus-acre property that will meet the requirements for energy Star 3.0 certifcation set by the uS Department of energy. Grenshaw and Campbell Streets, 773-252-3177; smarttechhomes.com PrairiE croSSing. an hour north of chicago in

grayslake, this eco-conscious, 677-acre property boasts 359 homes and condo clusters; the surrounding community features a working organic farm, a charter school, and horse stables. Illinois Rte. 137 and W. Casey Road, Grayslake; prairiecrossing.com

clockwise from top: A state-of-the-art equestrian center is one of

the draws at Serosun Farms; an organic vegetable garden will be a boon to those seeking locally grown produce; natural wetlands and 100-year-old oak trees create a serene setting.

“SuStainaBility attRactS people WHo knoW tHat living in a HigH-peRfoRmance Home iS a luxuRy, not a SacRifice.” —jane stickland and an appreciation for locally grown organic food, says Stickland, a lifelong equestrian who also imports specialty Holsteins from Germany. To map out the ambitious project and get development rolling, Stickland teamed up with her brother, John DeWald, a developer and the owner of John DeWald & Associates (jd-assoc.com) in Encinitas, California. DeWald anticipates that home and lot packages will range from $800,000 to $2 million. The first model home will be on view this spring. “It’s the lifestyle of being connected to nature, sustainability, and good food that is drawing lots of

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people to Serosun Farms,” says DeWald. “We seem to be attracting lots of foodies and chefs because good food is a luxury item.” Four of the first 14 lots have sold, with construction beginning this spring. The master plan calls for three open acres of restored and preserved land for every acre developed, and DeWald is assembling a list of preferred architects, builders, and vendors with expertise in sustainable practices and green products to execute the plan (homebuyers can also work with professionals of their choice). One architect on the list, Jeffrey Funke of Funke

Architects in Chicago (funkearchitects.com), designed the model home, a modern farmhouse that showcases a number of available features, including a geothermal energy system that taps underground water for heating and cooling; solar panels on the roof for electricity; high motorized windows that open to let out rising heat in the summer; and automated appliances as well as lighting and HVAC systems controllable through the owner’s smartphone or tablet. Other features will be made of nontoxic and recycled materials, like the bamboo flooring and repurposed cabinets. “If it’s a weekend place,” says Funke, “they could type in a living scene from their iPad or phone on their way out, and everything will be functioning in their home as they want it by the time they get there.” Unlike at most developments, owners can design a unique home—Serosun does not mandate that they choose from several cookie-cutter styles—but the structure must have a farmhouse look and comply with basic green standards. “More sophisticated buyers are looking for sustainable features in high-performance homes,” says DeWald. “It’s less of a ‘granola’ thing to do and becoming more mainstream among the luxury crowd.” 45W489 Berner Road, Hampshire, 847-683-4796; serosunfarms.com MA


I n p r I n t. o n l I n e . I n l I f e .

Art BAsel MiAMi BeAch | Aspen peAk | Austin WAy | Boston coMMon cApitol File | GothAM | hAMptons | los AnGeles conFidentiAl the MAll At short hills | MichiGAn Avenue | oceAn drive philAdelphiA style | veGAs | Wynn

nichemedia.net


haute property Brokers’ roundtable

The Lowdown on Late-Model Luxe

Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, new Luxury construction is born again and bLossoming in chicago—but it’s different this time around. by lisa skolnik Chicago home sales are dramatically slow—a reality reflected in 2014 year-over-year price rises of 1.9 percent for single-family homes and 1.1 percent for condos—but new luxury construction is booming. “The market’s exploding for dazzling new mini mansions,” notes Baird & Warner broker Gabrielle Weisberg. Adds Conlon/Christie’s International Real Estate founder Sean Conlon, “New multi-unit condo developments are just as hot.” Here’s why. Why is new construction in demand right now? Sean Conlon: Basically, the industry threw the baby out with the bathwater and stopped building after the crash, so right now, new construction is like a new concept. Buyers are rediscovering it. And anyone wealthy enough to buy a property over $1 million wants what they want… and that means customized. Gabrielle Weisberg: People want turnkey properties; they don’t want to have to do any work. That’s especially true in the Gold Coast condo market, where demand is off the charts and supply is short because construction has lagged. I have lots of couples with kids looking for properties they can use as a second home now and primary home in the future. How do you find new construction properties? GW: It’s easier for high-rises since they get covered in the press, but even when something is announced and the sales office isn’t open yet, it’s likely that some of the prime units are already gone. It’s really about a broker knowing the market and what their buyer wants and needs. I sit on the zoning board of the Gold Coast Neighbors Association, so I know about new developments before the fact. SC: We’ve turned the new home buying process into an ecosystem. Our brokers have a buyer in mind, then find the land and get a builder to develop the deal and handle all the sales issues for the developer and buyer. It’s easy for buyers because it gives them an edge. We’re a one-stop shop and have a stable of 25 to 50 builders we’ve groomed for years. We know their capabilities and the quality of their work. What do buyers want now? SC: Definitely single-family homes, but a year ago we realized that there’s no inventory for multi-unit luxury condos in family-friendly neighborhoods. Not

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everyone wants to live in the Gold Coast or in a house. So we’re pioneering a whole new kind of luxury condo with three or four large units in a building and outside space that start a little over a million dollars. They’re especially popular near good schools, like Lincoln Park, Lakeview, and Lincoln Square. GW: Really big room sizes, high ceilings, large kitchens, and en suite bedrooms are always in demand, but right now buyers also want a good separation of public and private areas. A home’s flow has to make sense. And in condos, views, good amenities, and high Walk Scores are critical. People don’t want to drive to everything. Are there any properties you really admire? SC: We have so many in-progress [homes] with single-families going up at 1243 West Wrightwood Avenue (marketed by Jamie Connor for $3.3 million) in Lincoln Park; 1649 West Grace Street (marketed by Tim Sheahan for $2.8 million) in Lakeview; and two more in the works in Bucktown. GW: For new luxury condos, it’s ironic that the best stock right now was developed in 2012 and is only selling out now—2550 North Lakeview Avenue and the Ritz-Carlton Residences at 118 East Erie Street. Units are going for $1,000 per square foot at both. But hopes are high for 4 East Elm developed by DRW Holdings—the first new construction Gold Coast high-rise in almost a decade—and a just-announced project on the southwest corner of State and Walton being developed by JDL. Gabrielle Weisberg, 312-981-2784; gabrielleweisberg.bairdwarner.com; Sean Conlon, 312-558-1082; conlonrealestate.com MA

clockwise from above left: Gabrielle Weisberg;

Sean Conlon; the exterior of Lincoln Park 2550, located at 2550 North Lakeview Avenue; a model living room at the luxury high-rise.


N EW TO

EV

D

AN

O W N TO

ST

Wedding Cermonies

W N

O

N

Wedding Receptions

Timeless elegance... Lifelong memories. Located in vibrant downtown Evanston, the newest ballroom and lounge in Chicago’s North Shore is open and offers the perfect location for your dream wedding! A stunning space for both ceremonies and receptions, the venue also offers a fabulous adjoining lounge, pre-event cocktail space, and outdoor garden terrace. With a unique emphasis

Bridal Showrs

on custom prepared cuisine created by its experienced culinary team, The Crystal Ballroom & Lounge will be setting new expectations for catered events.

847.570.4400 or CrystalEvanston.com 529 Davis Street, Evanston

In Memoriam

AWAKEN YOUR SPIRIT THIS SPRING Les Nomades – A Fresh Expression of French Cuisine

W William K. (“Bill”) Bass, a highly respected and talented family law litigator with the Law Ofces of Jefery M. Leving, Ltd. for many years in Chicago, passed away on February 9, 2015. Bill worked tirelessly to rescue children from dangerous situations. He was a great man, a great father, a friend, and many fathers and children are now safe because of him. Bill will live on through the children who are able to now live in a safe environment free of abuse and danger because of his dedication. In addition to his prodigious legal skills and acumen, Bill was well known for his wit, his enthusiasm and positive attitude. His loyalty and integrity were strong and unbreakable. We will miss him.

222 E. Ontario Street | Chicago, IL For reservations and information, call 312.649.9010 or visit lesnomades.net


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Wedding venue rental includes linens, crystal Chivari chairs, and custom designed lounge vignettes and bars. Fully equipped with lighting, AV, and a restaurant-style kitchen with our executive chef.

Opening Fall 2015 venueone North Shore Formally, the Berto Center

venueonechicago.com

1034 W Randolph St

312.605.8300


the guide Chicago’s Finest Order cocktails like the South Sea Dipper (left) and Pool Rules from Lost Lake’s colorful cocktail menu.

Paradise Found

With sizzling neW bar lost lake, master mixologist Paul McGee brings the city’s tiki trend to logan square. by meg mathis When Paul McGee (Three Dots and a Dash, The Whistler) announced his return to Logan Square with a new tiki concept, the neighborhood’s hip denizens rejoiced—and serious imbibers across the city took note that the tropical tipple trend isn’t slowing down anytime soon. A partnership between McGee and Land and Sea Dept. (Longman & Eagle, Parson’s Chicken & Fish), Lost Lake stocks more than 275 varieties of rum selected by McGee and Martin Cate of San Francisco’s Smuggler’s Cove. The kitschy-cool oasis—complete with bamboo walls, Martinique banana leaf wallpaper, Hawaiian shirt-clad mixologists, and McGee’s signature carved

banana dolphins—is a nod to the city’s Polynesian lounges of yesteryear, Trader Vic’s and Don the Beachcomber. (Bonus: Revelers can order Chinese takeout from Thank You, the restaurant next door.) Transport yourself to the tropics with a sip of the South Sea Dipper (rhum agricole, aged Jamaican rum, lemon, pineapple, passion fruit, ruby port) or the Pool Rules (bourbon, aged Guyana rum, lime, Curaçao, cinnamon, allspice, vanilla, Angostura bitters), keeping in mind that while running and diving may not be allowed on the premises, sitting back and relaxing is strongly encouraged. 3154 W. Diversey Ave., 773-961-7475; lostlaketiki.com MA

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the guide Chicago’s Finest

Michigan Avenue 101

Look no further for chicagoLand’s most sizzLing restaurants, bars, and boutiques.

Dine

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312-445-0060; figandolive.com The Franklin Room Rustic dishes like venison chops with spicy bourbon miso are specialties at this buzzy River North tavern. 675 N. Franklin St., 312-445-4686; franklinroom.com Fulton Market Kitchen Art, cocktails, and cuisine collide in the West Loop. 311 N. Sangamon St., 312-733-6900; fultonmarketkitchen.com Gibsons Bar & Steakhouse Enjoy the finest people-watching in town. 1028 N. Rush St., 312-266-8999; gibsonssteakhouse.com Good Stuff Eatery Feel-good fare (try the Prez Obama Burger, featuring natural farm-raised beef, applewood bacon, onion marmalade, Roquefort cheese, and horseradish mayo) by Top Chef alum Spike Mendelsohn. 22 S. Wabash Ave., 312-854-3027; good stuffeatery.com Hubbard Inn Head to Hubbard Street for small plates like baconwrapped dates and grilled chili shrimp. 110 W. Hubbard St., 312-222-1331; hubbardinn.com Izakaya Mita Bucktown’s Japanese pub serves shio and tare dishes from a traditional binchotan grill. 1960 N. Damen Ave., 773-799-8677; izakayamita.com IO Urban Roofscape Ascend to the Godfrey Hotel’s fourth-floor rooftop lounge for an unparalleled vantage point. 127 W. Huron St., 312-649-2000; godfreyhotelchicago.com Knife & Tine Savor hash, spoon bread, and chicken and dumplings in Lincoln Park. 1417 W. Fullerton Ave., 773-697-8311; knifeandtine.com Labriola Ristorante & Café The baker behind cult hit Stan’s Donuts brings Neapolitan pizza, salumi, and cheese to the Mag Mile. 535 N. Michigan Ave., 312-955-3100; labriolacafe.com/chicago

La Sirena Clandestina Latininspired bites by chef John Manion. 954 W. Fulton Market, 312-226-5300; lasirenachicago.com Mariposa Neiman Marcus’s new culinary oasis boasts menu items like steak frites and Mandarin orange soufflé. 737 N. Michigan Ave., 4th fl., 312-694-4050; neimanmarcus.com Mastro’s Steakhouse A glitzy River North destination for steaks and sushi. 520 N. Dearborn St., 312-521-5100; mastrosrestaurants.com MFK Serious seafood, like crunchy prawn heads and salt-cured anchovies. 432 W. Diversey Pkwy., 773-857-2540; mfkrestaurant.com Momotaro The years-in-the-making hit from the team behind Boka is gaining renown for dishes by America’s lone Michelin-starred sushi chef, Jeff Ramsey. 820 W. Lake St., 312-733-4818; momotarochicago.com NoMI Ambitious seasonal cuisine in a lovely space overlooking the Mag Mile. 800 N. Michigan Ave., 7th fl.,

The KiTchen The Rockies meet River North at this Colorado-based, community-inspired concept; share the seafood platter of lobster, oysters, smoked mussels, littleneck clams, and king crab legs. 316 N. Clark St., 312-836-1300; thekitchen.com/the-kitchen-chicago

312-239-4030; hyatt.com/gallery/nomi Oak + Char Hearty plates by Executive Chef Joseph Heppe. 217 W. Huron St., 312-643-2427; oakandchar.com Parachute Korean-American dishes by Top Chef alum Beverly Kim and husband Johnny Clark in Avondale. 3500 N. Elston Ave., 773-654-1460; parachuterestaurant.com Pinstripes A 30,000-square-foot dining destination complete with bowling lanes and bocce courts in River East. 435 E. Illinois St., 312-527-3010; pinstripes.com

photography by huge galdones

A10 Chef Matthias Merges inspires Hyde Park foodies with plates small and large. 1462 E. 53rd St., 773-288-1010; a10hydepark.com Acanto With salumi, suckling pig, and pizza, Billy Lawless leads an Italian renaissance in the former Henri space. 18 S. Michigan Ave., 312-578-0763; acantochicago.com Baker Miller Breakfast is served all day, every day at this Lincoln Square bakery and millhouse from the husband and wife team behind Bang Bang Pie. 4610 N. Western Ave., 312-208-5639; bakermillerchicago.com Barley & Brass Bar bites and brews in Wicker Park. 2015 W. Division St., 312-763-9600; barleyandbrass.com The Brass Monkey Feast on hearty dishes like pork chop with applesauce and seared duck breast at this buzzing Fulton Market concept boasting an American Hustle vibe. 401 N. Morgan St., 312-763-3316; brassmonkeychicago.com Charlatan West Town welcomes inspired Italian fare like black kale spaghettini and whole oxtail. 1329 W. Chicago Ave., 312-818-2073; charlatanchicago.com Chicago Chop House Go old school at this clubby classic River North steakhouse. 60 W. Ontario St., 312-787-7100; chicagochophouse.com Chicago Cut Steakhouse Colossal steaks and shellfish in a sleek riverside location. 300 N. LaSalle St., 312-329-1800; chicagocutsteakhouse.com Current Seasonal Italian and scenic views in the W Lakeshore Hotel. 644 N. Lake Shore Dr., 312-255-4460; currentchicago.com The Duck Inn Chef Kevin Hickey (Bottlefork) plates bar snacks in his beloved Bridgeport. 2701 S. Eleanor St., 312-724-8811; theduckinnchicago.com Fig & Olive The French Riviera meets the Gold Coast at this eatery overlooking Oak Street. 104 E. Oak St.,


photography by andrea donadio (White oak tavern & inn); dave burk of hedrich blessing (the allis)

The Promontory The team behind Dusek’s and Longman & Eagle creates a community dining experience in Hyde Park. 5311 S. Lake Park Ave., 312-801-2100; promontorychicago.com RPM Steak Bill and Giuliana Rancic throw their hat into Chicago’s steakhouse ring. 66 W. Kinzie St., 312-284-4990; rpmsteak.com Salero This Spanish spot adds to Restaurant Row’s sizzle. 621 W. Randolph St., 312-466-1000; salerochicago.com Siena Tavern Top Chef alum Fabio Viviani conquers the Windy City. 51 W. Kinzie St., 312-595-1322; sienatavern.com

WhiTe OAk TAvern & inn Alinea alumnus John Asbaty plates artful dishes like squash custard tart with crème fraiche, candied pepitas, and Blis syrup ( pictured) at this farm-to-table nook in Lincoln Park. 1200 W. Webster Ave., 773-2480200; whiteoakchicago.com

Sophie’s Savor jumbo lump crab cakes, Wagyu burgers, and a killer view of the Mag Mile at this chic spot in Saks Fifth Avenue. 700 N. Michigan Ave., 7th fl., 312-525-3400; sophies.com Tanta A taste of Peru in a cool, contemporary space. 118 W. Grand Ave., 312-222-9700; tantachicago.com

Travelle A stunning Mediterranean destination in the chic Langham Hotel. 330 N. Wabash Ave., 312-9239988; travellechicago.com Untitled Come for the American whiskies and stay for hearty fare like pork-shoulder spoon bread. 111 W. Kinzie St., 312-880-1511; untitledchicago.com

Drink Analogue Sip inventive libations at this Logan Square hot spot. 2523 N. Milwaukee Ave., 773-904-8567; analoguechicago.com The Aviary Twenty-first-century cocktails from the Next team. 955 W. Fulton Market, 312-226-0868; theaviary.com ¡Ay Chiwowa! The Rockit Ranch nightspot serves up killer tacos and more than 80 tequilas. 311 W. Chicago Ave., 312-643-3200; aychiwowa.com Barley & Brass Mixologist Jan Henrichsen (Fat Rice, Found) tempts hip Wicker Park imbibers with kegged cocktails like the basil jalapeño cobbler (tequila, basil, jalapeño simple syrup, Bittered Sling grapefruit bitters, and lemon juice). 2015 W. Division St., 312-763-9600; barleyandbrass.com The Berkshire Room Old-world cool meets modern mixology at the Acme Hotel’s lounge. 15 E. Ohio St., 312-894-0800; theberkshireroom.com The Betty Make tracks to the West Loop for a nightcap courtesy of mixologist Peter Vestinos. 839 W. Fulton Market, 312-733-2222; thebettychicago.com Billy Sunday Imaginative drinks from Yusho chef Matthias Merges and mixologist Alex Bachman. 3143 W. Logan Blvd., 773-661-2485; billy-sunday.com Bordel Black Bull makes room for this new cabaret and cocktail bar. 1721 W. Division St., 773-227-8600; bordelchicago.com The Brixton Bar bites and cocktails in Andersonville. 5420 N. Clark St., 773-961-7358; thebrixtonchicago.com California Clipper Brendan Sodikoff breathes hipster life into this Humboldt Park institution. 1002 N. California Ave.,

773-384-2547; californiaclipper.com CH Distillery Tour Chicago’s first vodka distillery and try The Tradition, a shot of vodka with a side of rye bread and pickles. 564 W. Randolph St., 312-707-8780; chdistillery.com Henry’s Swing Club Laid-back ambience meets serious drinks at this new River North tavern. 18 W. Hubbard St., 312-955-8018; henrys-swing-club.com The J. Parker Thanks to a new retractable roof, the Hotel Lincoln’s sleek cocktail patio is now a year-round hot spot. 1816 N. Clark St., 13th fl., 312-254-4747; jparkerchicago.com Jimmy This ’70s-inspired lounge pours clever cocktails in a dark, sultry James Hotel space. 610 N. Rush St., 312-660-7191; jimmyatjames.com Lagunitas Brewing Company The California import hits Pilsen with a 300,000-square-foot brewery. 1843 S. Washtenaw Ave.; lagunitas.com Le Bar This boîte at the Sofitel Chicago Water Tower attracts a premium crowd. 20 E. Chestnut St., 312-324-4000; cafedesarchitectes.com/ Le-Bar Links Taproom Craft beer, sausage, and hand-cut fries in Wicker Park. 1559 N. Milwaukee Ave., 773-360-7692; linkstaproom.com Maude’s Liquor Bar This West Loop hot spot offers cocktails and Frenchinspired bites. 840 W. Randolph St., 312-243-9712; maudesliquorbar.com

The Allis This buzzing haunt on the ground floor of Soho House attracts a dynamic crowd; cocktails like The Creole, the Soho Mule, and the Picante De La Casa ( pictured, from left) are perfect people-watching accompaniments. 113-125 N. Green St., 312-521-8000; theallis.com

Owen + Alchemy Hit refresh at this goth-inspired juice bar, where a rainbow of citrus and nut-seed blends awaits. 2355 N. Milwaukee Ave., 773-227-3444; owenandalchemy.com Presidio The former Bluebird space welcomes this new Bay Area-inspired craft cocktail lounge in Bucktown. 1749 N. Damen Ave., 773-329-7227; presidiochicago.com Real Good Juice Co. With concoctions like Juice Springsteen and Juice-Tin Bieber, this new cold-pressed destination is bringing plenty of personality to Old Town. 1647 N. Wells St., 312-846-1897; realgoodjuiceco.com The Red Lion Pub The beloved British haunt is revived in Lincoln Park. 2446 N. Lincoln Ave., 773-883-2422; redlionchicago.com RM Champagne Salon Sip bubbly in this tucked-away West Loop gem. 116 N. Green St., 312-243-1199; rmchampagnesalon.com

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the guide Chicago’s Finest

Punch house Head to Thalia Hall’s lower-level lounge for contemporary libations like Dusek Punch #3 (rum, saison ale, passion fruit, lime, and hibiscus). 1227 W. 18th St., 312-526-3851; punchhousechicago.com

Vertigo Sky Lounge The Dana Hotel’s gravity-defying libation destination. 2 W. Erie St., 26th fl., 312-202-6060; vertigoskylounge.com The Violet Hour The original Chicago mixology bar. 1520 N. Damen Ave., 773-252-1500; theviolethour.com Webster’s Wine Bar One of the city’s oldest wine bars settles into its new Logan Square digs. 2601 N. Milwaukee Ave., 773-292-9463; websterwinebar.com

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shoP Alexis Bittar Shop celeb-approved earrings, necklaces, and more. 61 E. Oak St., 312-649-9112; alexisbittar.com Alice + Olivia The witty, whimsical fashion label makes its Mag Mile debut. 919 N. Michigan Ave., 312-273-1254; aliceandolivia.com Athleta Fashionable fitness apparel for women on the go. 101 E. Oak St., 312-640-0223; athleta.com Bird Dog Bay Neckties get the Technicolor treatment at this madein-Chicago flagship. 117 N. Clinton St., 312-631-3108; birddogbay.com Boga The new West Loop showroom stocks a full range of menswear, from dress shirts and blazers to tees and socks. 133 N. Jefferson St., 5th fl., 312-801-8662; boga.com Buccellati Handcrafted baubles from Milan. 62 E. Oak St., 312-600-9224; buccellati.com Burberry Chicago finds its London calling at the gleaming Michigan Avenue flagship. 633 N. Michigan Ave., 312-787-2500; us.burberry.com Chalk Boutique owners Carrie Kane and Sharon Watrous edit a chic selection of women’s apparel and accessories on the North Shore. 2611 Prairie Ave., Evanston, 847-424-0011; chalkboutique.com CH Carolina Herrera Timeless silhouettes and pops of color in a lovely Oak Street space. 70 E. Oak St., 312-988-9339; carolinaherrera.com Christian Louboutin Paint the town red with fabulous French pumps. 58 E. Oak St., 312-337-8200; christianlouboutin.com Dolce & Gabbana Italian high fashion on Oak Street. 68 E. Oak St., 312-255-0630; dolcegabbana.com Escada Add elegance to your wardrobe with European-inspired designs. 51 E. Oak St., 312-9150500; escada.com Graff Diamonds Brilliant baubles in the Gold Coast. 103 E. Oak St., 312-604-1000; graffdiamonds.com Hermès The ultimate in aspiration, straight from Paris. 25 E. Oak St., 312-787-8175; hermes.com Ikram Definitive fashions from

Chicago’s own style maven Ikram Goldman. 15 E. Huron St., 312-587-1000; ikram.com Jonathan Adler Cheeky home décor and gifts. 676 N. Wabash Ave., 312-274-9920; jonathanadler.com Louis Vuitton Monogrammed leather bags and luxury trunks galore. 700 N. Michigan Ave., 312-255-0470; louisvuitton.com LuLu’s on the Avenue An unmatched selection of vintage jewelry and couture. 900 N. Michigan Ave., 3rd fl., 312-888-9149; lulusbellekay.com Maje Parisian chic hits Oak Street. 100 E. Oak St., 312-649-9228; us.maje.com Marshall Pierce & Company This family-owned jeweler adds sparkle to Chicago. 335 N. Michigan Ave., 312-782-4403; marshallpierce.com Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams Sleek home furnishings in Lincoln Park. 1555 N. Halsted St., 312-397-3135; mgbwhome.com Nest Furniture Contemporary furniture and home décor in a prime boutique on the Mag Mile. 900 North Michigan Shops, 3rd and 4th fls., 312-649-2407; thefurniturenest.com Porsche Design Luxe looks in The Shops at North Bridge. 520 N. Michigan Ave., 2nd fl., 312-321-0911; porsche-design.com

shinola Bicycles, watches, bags, and more are now available in this Wicker Park boutique, the Motor City label’s newest brick-and-mortar outpost. 1619 N. Damen Ave., 773-904-2417; shinola.com

Saint Laurent The iconic label returns to Chicago with a sleek boutique. 11 E. Walton St., 312-2020166; ysl.com Salvatore Ferragamo Put your best foot forward in classic Italian designs. 645 N. Michigan Ave., 312-397-0464; ferragamo.com Soñador Boutique Stock up on McQ Alexander McQueen and 10 Crosby Derek Lam at this new Lincoln Park destination. 1006 W. Armitage Ave., 773-799-8084; sonadorboutique.com Tom Ford One of the kings of Oak Street. 66 E. Oak St., 312-605-5041; tomford.com Tommy Bahama Island fever on the Mag Mile. 664 N. Michigan Ave., 312-488-5686; tommybahama.com TOMS Philanthropic footwear has landed in Wicker Park. 1611 N. Damen Ave., 773-486-5882; toms.com Zadig & Voltaire Rock ’n’ roll looks in the Gold Coast. 114 E. Oak St., 312-643-1240; zadig-et-voltaire.com MA

photography courtesy of punch house (punch house)

Sportsman’s Club This Humboldt Park tavern offers wine, beer, and cocktails by former Aviary barman Jeff Donahue. 948 N. Western Ave., 872-206-8054; drinkingandgathering.com Three Dots and a Dash A subterranean Polynesian paradise. 435 N. Clark St., 312-610-4220; threedotschicago.com Tippling Hall The highly anticipated watering hole by Paul Tanguay and Tad Carducci of Tippling Bros. 646 N. Franklin St., 312-448-9922; tipplinghall.com The Underground Rockit Ranch Productions’ subterranean nightclub smash. 56 W. Illinois St., 312-9437600; theundergroundchicago.com


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SECRET WEAPON. The battle against cancer is hard fought and hard won, and often treatments are as debilitating as the disease itself. But inside each of us is the power to fight cancer: our immune system. Stand Up To Cancer and the Cancer Research Institute have joined forces in one of the most promising new research areas, using the science of immunology to get our bodies’ own natural defenses to fight the disease. Immunotherapy has the potential to significantly change the treatment of cancer as we know it. Stand Up with us. Together, we can impact millions of lives.

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To learn more go to StandUp2Cancer.org or CancerResearch.org/Dream-Team

Stand Up To Cancer is a program of the Entertainment Industry Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.

Photo by Kevin Lynch


INVITED

Anne N. Reyes and J. Christopher Reyes

Andy and Betsy Rosenfield

Cameron and Daniel Pilkey

400 for the Lyric Opera Women’s Board’s triennial wine auction. The evening garnered $1.8 million in proceeds and boasted a menu by Sixteen’s Thomas Lents, complemented with Château Gruaud Larose wine.

Eve Rogers, Erica L. Sandner, and Henri Barguirdjian

Spike Mendelsohn and Marina Squerciati Rachel Krieger, John Findlay, and Lisa Chapman

THE CIVIC OPERA HOUSE WELCOMED a crowd of

Brett Zimmerman and Dee Robinson

Olivia Miller and Ashley Hooks Williams

GOOD STUFF EATERY PREVIEW

TOP CHEF PERSONALITY Spike Mendelsohn treated friends and family to an exclusive preview of his South Loop concept. The fashionable set, including Chicago P.D.’s Marina Squerciati, were treated to handcrafted burgers, specialty shakes, and the beats of DJ Matt Roan. Kristina Miller and Paula Oskroba

132 MICHIGANAVEMAG.COM

Lori Allen, Sylvia Perez, and Monika Lotter

THIS PAGE: PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES (LYRIC OPERA); BARRY BRECHEISEN (GOOD STUFF) OPPOSITE PAGE: PHOTOGRAPHY BY TINA SMOTHERS PHOTOGRAPHY (CYSO); JOHN REILLY PHOTOGRAPHY (GOODMAN)

Steven and Nancy Crown

John Gorey and Catherine De Orio

LYRIC OPERA WINE AUCTION


Deborah Liverett and Joshua Simonds T.J. Shanoff

Nate Dufort

Allen Tinkham and Chas Davis

Karen Hedberg and Diane Bruce with John and Joyce Schladweiler

THE NOTEWORTHY NIGHT GALA THE FOUR SEASONS HOSTED 300 guests for the annual

gala of the Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestras (CYSO). The VIP crowd, which raised more than $260,000 for the organization’s education programs, enjoyed the sounds of CYSO’s Preparatory Strings and new Steel Orchestra ensembles in addition to a performance by The Second City. Niccole Thurman, Annaliese Toft, and Brad Einstein

Second City performers provided entertainment.

Mary Beth Fisher, Kimbra Walter, and Roche Schulfer

Jane Gardner, Sarah Begel, and Nancy Swan

Darlene Bobb, Joan Clifford, and Lorrayne Weiss Peter C.B. Bynoe with Kathleen and James Cowie

FAME, FANTASY, FOOD, ADVENTURE AUCTION THE GOODMAN THEATRE WOMEN’S BOARD WELCOMED

200 guests to the Peninsula Chicago for its annual winter fundraiser. Generating more than $450,000 for the theater’s

education programs, the silent and live auction featured lavish items like a private dinner at Spiaggia and baubles by Ulysse Nardin. Robert Clifford

Michael Pope, Eileen Murphy, and Christine Pope

MICHIGANAVEMAG.COM

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Greta WeathersbyBowens and Melvin Bowens

David and Pat Mosena with Myra and Kevin Price

Cedric Thurman

BLACK CREATIVITY GALA NEARLY 750 GUESTS IN FORMAL ATTIRE gathered

at the Museum of Science and Industry for the 32nd annual Black Creativity Gala. Throughout the evening, which raised $500,000 for the museum’s Black Creativity initiatives, partygoers enjoyed cocktails, live music, and an internationally themed buffet station. Deven Rand

Sandra Rand

Naree and Carlos Hankins

THIS PAGE: PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN WHEELER, ALISON NEIDT TOONEN, AND J.B. SPECTOR/MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY OPPOSITE PAGE: PHOTOGRAPHY BY GEORGE STREET PHOTO & VIDEO

INVITED


Alan and Sabrina Kossof

Paula Smith, Patty Weiss, Anne Snyder, and Caryn Gerch

Lisa Block and Nancy Pender

Dennis Downes and Gail Spreen with Dave and Laura Roberts

PINSTRIPES GRAND OPENING PINSTRIPES TOASTED its River East debut with a 2,000-guest celebration. Partygoers tried their luck at bowling and

bocce ball while sampling Italian American cuisine from Executive Chef Cesar Gutierrez. Sandie Montgomery and Chris Soukup

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Gold coastinG late spring 2015

Dirt Devil’s Advocate What’s not to like about Earth Day? Fund­ raising galas! Lush new parks! Dressing down for a day to play in the dirt, just like Marie Antoinette used to do! But there’s just no getting around it: Earth Day is a frumpy holiday, right up there with Tax Day. Among the words associated with it? Compost. Emissions. Carbon. Waste. Denim. Not even a stamp of approval from überchic, environmentally correct fashion designer Stella McCartney herself can overcome the day’s unsexier elements. Celebrants are urged to wear green and brown, a look that not even Girl Scout troop leaders should attempt. So as Earth Day grows in importance, it’s stylish Chicagoans’ duty to give back—not just by planting trees, but by offering some brutal honesty… and the gift of glamour. For starters, that name! “Earth Day.” It might have been acceptable in 1970, before Halston brought sequined jumpsuits to the masses, but it would never pass muster with a branding expert today. Some alternatives: “Cosmic Remodeling Day.” “Planetary Makeover Day.” Even “Global Rehab Day” would be more successful, as “rehab” has come to be associated with young, attractive social types who retreat to Lakeview’s Harborview Recovery Center—just minutes from the boutiques of the Magnificent Mile—when life becomes too much. Chicago, of course, is an environmental role model for the world. It was former Mayor Daley who showed us how to accessorize a city with flowers. Mayor Emanuel is simply mad for bicycles, and it’s not for us to say whether his motivation has anything to do with how fetching he looks in bike shorts. We’re pretty sure we’d be more inspired if he wore shorts that were even tighter. And couldn’t we follow his example and pioneer

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some more body­conscious activewear, perhaps in hemp or alpaca? There are all sorts of ways to glamorize Earth Day. Who says your kitchen recycling bin needs to be made of (ick) plastic? Reclaimed wine barrels from a respectable Harbor Country vineyard do just as well. Shock the fashionistas with a skirt made out of your old Burberry umbrellas. Call attention to your cruelty­free cologne— loudly—at the Green Tie Ball. Some other crucial reminders: * “Saving the minks” does not mean boarding your coats in a furrier’s cold­ storage unit. It means actually not buying fur in the first place. (Don’t go too far and adopt a mink as a pet; they are liable to have their way with your exotic saltwater fish.) * If someone starts talking about an “eco­flush,” just walk away. They are not referring to a designer body cleanse. * We admit that, technically, wearing an outfit twice counts as recycling. But we’re better than that! And ask yourself: Is “sustainable living” actually sustainable for you? Just because you’re passionate about the environment doesn’t mean you need to stop shaving your legs in the shower. Yes, you will save a substantial amount of water. But then you will also be very alone and tempted to abuse overprocessed, overpackaged McNuggets and high­fructose corn syrup. So is it truly effective in the long run? Instead, give yourself a break. Be eco­ fabulous. Be you. Kick back with an environmentally friendly cocktail—may I suggest an organic cucumber gimlet? Wear those fringed Stuart Weitzmans and remind your admirers that your stiletto heels are aerating the soil. There’s more than one way to save the planet, after all, and if anyone can do it in style, Chicagoans can. MA

IllustratIon by DanIel o’leary

There’s no “glam” in earTh Day—yeT. BuT chic chicagoans can leaD The way. by paige wiser


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Michigan Avenue - 2015 - Issue 2 - Late Spring - Sophia Bush  

Michigan Avenue - 2015 - Issue 2 - Late Spring - Sophia Bush  

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