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SHRINK THE OFFICE: Turns out, it’s the one surefire way to reduce the environmental footprint of any workplace, p.72

G R E E N B U I L D I N G M AY + J U N E 2 0 1 6

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How sports arenas are becoming some of our country’s greenest buildings, p.26

D E S I G N

THE FUTURE ACCORD ING TO PHIL ADELPHIA Five innovative projects from the host city of this year’s AIA Convention, p. 56

In Conversation with Philadelphia’s director of The Office of Sustainability, Christine Knapp, p. 12

Guest column: PennDesign professor Mark Alan Hughes on the best ways to make our cities sustainable, p. 110


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ES. CONNECTS. INFLUENC UNIFIES. CREATES. AFFIR ES. DESIGN THAT TARGETS MS. CELEBRATES INSPIRES. MOTIVATES. C NS. TRANSFORMS. VALUE North America’s most important design exposition and conference for commercial interiors.

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

CES. MS S. 104 S. ELEBRATES. ES In This Issue May+June 2016 Volume 7, Issue 39

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Green teams: explore three designs pioneering the way for sustainable stadiums— each a member of the incredible network that is the Green Sports Alliance

Featuring innovations in solar from Pfister Energy and Baker Electric Solar and a look at the future of drainage from ACO Polymer Products, Inc.

PHOTO: COURTESY OF SUITE PLANTS

Typology

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Trendsetters

56

72

104

In conjunction with Philadelphia’s role as the 2016 host of the AIA Convention, gb&d chose five recent projects that most exemplify the new Philadelphia

Workspace solutions giant AgilQuest says there is one surefire way to reduce the environmental footprint of any building—make it smaller

Suite Plants, which manufactures and markets an inviting selection of living wall systems, takes going green literally

Green in Philadelphia

Shrink the Office

Suite Plants

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Table of Contents May+June 2016 Volume 7, Issue 39

Up Front 12

In Conversation Christine Knapp

14

Editor’s Picks Curated by gb&d staff

16

Product Spotlight Milliken’s Whale Song Carpet

21 Event Preview Late Spring 2016 22

Defined Design Butterfly House by Feldman Architecture

Punch List

Spaces

Testimony for Progress

82

The D.C. office of a globally recognized law firm makes a strong case for scaling down in size while expanding the capacity for human comfort and energy efficiency

86

History Refines Itself The legendary French- based building materials company with a history as elegant as its architectural predilections builds a dynamic new North American HQ

92 Who Says You Need Air Conditioning? With Edmonds ecoPOWER hybrid rooftop ventilator, a new university building received a LEED Gold Certification and eliminated AC in nearly half of its rooms

104 Green Space Suite Plants

98 Intimacy, Immersion, and

110 Guest Column Mark Alan Hughes

Community

Jeanne Gang builds a new home for the Writers Theatre in Chicago

106 Sustainable Solution Constellation 108 Environmental Innovation EnGoPLANET

112 On the Spot Christine Knapp

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PHOTOS: ERIC LAIGNEL (THIS PAGE); HALKIN | MASON PHOTOGRAPHY LLC (FACING PAGE)

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Editor’s Note Chris Howe

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by the year 2050. He instead argues that cities should identify the energy, land use, and transportation options that maximize long-term employment, public health, and resilience net benefits—an interesting take that can be applied to cities all across the country and world. The overall message of our Philadelphia articles you’ll find on these pages is one of positivity, collaboration, and hope. I think Christine Knapp put it best when she answered the question, “What would you tell the green movement if it was your child?” on p. 113: “Go make friends! Hang out with other issues— health, community quality of life, economic development, public safety, art, and more!” Each of these sectors needs to interact with one another in order for change to happen.

Sincerely,

Chris Howe, Publisher & Editor-in-Chief

ON THE COVER The dazzling geometric design of Central Green at the Navy Yard, a new redevelopment project in Philadelphia, will function as a playground for the 11,000 employees who work at the Navy Yard campus. It boasts a yoga lawn, ping pong tables, an open-air “conference room” and amphitheater, and raised knoll.

PHOTO: HALKIN | MASON PHOTOGRAPHY

Here at gb&d , our editorial team has made a habit of following the American Institute of Architects annual convention to its host city for our May/June cover feature. This year was no different, and this issue is chock full of green gems from the City of Brotherly Love. To kick things off, we were lucky enough to have Philadelphia’s director of The Office of Sustainability, Christine Knapp, serve as the subject of this issue’s In Conversation interview (p. 13), which is particularly exciting considering that she’s had a hand in the city’s green agenda for over a decade. Knapp helped launch The Next Great City initiative, which inspired the mayor to create the office she now helms and kick start the city’s sustainability plan. Our cover feature on p. 56 explains that the city “has been infused with a heavy dose of green infrastructure and forward-looking redevelopment, giving rise to a hybrid urban fabric that is even richer and more delicately layered than its founding fathers could have imagined.” It’s here that we highlight five recent projects pushing the boundaries of sustainability, including a student apartment building, two multi-use public parks, a home inspired by German design, and a housing unit for formerly homeless families. The latter is “more about social sustainability than technical sustainability”—even though it not only meets but also exceeds energy codes. As Jules Dingle, DIGSAU principal on the project, says, “What it does in terms of a housing model is to help repair a damaged urban fabric with biophilic elements that support the community and nurture growth.” Although I hope you take away some technical tips from this edition of gb&d, I also hope stories like DIGSAU’s can inspire you on a social level, too. Our guest columnist, PennDesign professor and sustainability champion Mark Alan Hughes—also part of our Philadelphia series—uses this issue to explain why net benefits for local constituencies are more important than “80 by 50” goals, which call for an 80% reduction from a 2005 baseline in carbon emissions

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Editor’s Note Laura Heidenreich

gb&d Green Building & Design gbdmagazine.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Christopher Howe chris@gbdmagazine.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Laura Heidenreich laura@gbdmagazine.com MANAGING EDITOR

As we went into this issue, we discussed how the workforce of the future will be more diverse than ever, with multiple generations, cultures, and ethnicities working side by side. We also wondered how our workplaces have changed and how they’ll continue to do so moving forward. In hindsight, it’s no surprise AgilQuest, which offers “freedom and flexibility for the workforce, profitability and sustainability for the workplace,” was an obvious choice for a main subject of a feature aiming to tackle some of these big questions. In speaking to AgilQuest, p. 72, which specializes in workplace management software, services, and solutions, we learned that shrinking the office is one of the best ways to reduce its environmental footprint. The company’s office hoteling software allows employees to sign up for desks, cubicles, and other workspaces on an as-needed basis, which not only cuts energy costs (because, of course, if you’re only using 50% of your space, you’re only going to be using 50% of everything else that goes into an office), but also makes

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for happier employees as they cut back on commuting time/costs and strike a better work-life balance with the option to get things done remotely—an easy solution in today’s mobile world. The real-life results of these kinds of decisions that we were able to uncover in this feature were astounding. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection office worked with AgilQuest and saw a net savings of $3.3 million in rent and operational costs each year, with employees saving an average of $600 per year in commuting costs and reporting a 102% increase in worker productivity. In speaking with shading solutions provider MechoSystems, p. 82, about the company’s work with the law offices of Nixon Peabody in D.C., we learned the importance of a “green lease,” which allows both a tenant and landlord to set terms from the get-go that will allow each party to accomplish environmental goals. We were equally as inspired by the incredible renovation completed by the historic materials company Saint-Gobain, p. 88, whose 277,000-square-foot North American campus sits across 65 acres and boasts an open-concept office with 116 collaborative workspaces, a cafeteria, a fitness facility, 1.3 miles of walking trails, and more for its 800+ employees. Writer Brian Barth rounded out the AgilQuest feature by saying, “an office building is no longer just a box for employers to stick their workers into,” and we hope this issue can show those working in all facets of the green building industry just how big of an impact sustainable workplaces can have on both their people and the planet.

Amanda Koellner amanda@gbdmagazine.com ART DIRECTOR

Ravi Sathia ravi@gbdmagazine.com CLIENT SERVICES DIRECTOR

Krystle Blume krystle@gbdmagazine.com MARKETING COORDINATOR

Christina Wiedbusch christina@gbdmagazine.com ACCOUNT MANAGERS

Paige Moomey, Brianna Wynsma CONTRIBUTORS

Brian Barth, Vincent Caruso, Mark Alan Hughes, Jeff Link, Russ Klettke, Kristopher Lenz, Margaret Poe, Emily Torem, Maura Welch, Kate West EDITORIAL INTERN

Alex Nates-Perez DESIGN INTERNS

Michael Curiel Alec Majerchin MAIL

Green Building & Design 1765 N. Elston Ave. Suite 202B Chicago, IL 60642 The Green Building & Design logo is a registered trademark of Green Advocacy Partners, LLC Green Building & Design (gb&d) magazine is printed in the United States using only soy-based inks. Please recycle this magazine. The magazine is also available in digital formats for free on the Apple App Store and Google Play (tablet and mobile), at issuu.com/greenbuildingdesign.

Green Building & Design is a certified B Corp. B Corp is to business what Fair Trade certification is to coffee or USDA Organic certification is to milk. B Corps are certified by the nonprofit BLab to meet rigorous standards of social and environmental performance, accountability, and transparency.

Sincerely,

Laura Heidenreich, Associate Publisher gbdmagazine.com


GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Features Spaces Punch List

gb&d

12 In Conversation

Christine Knapp

14 Editor’s Picks Curated by gb&d staff 16 Product Spotlight Milliken’s Whale Song Carpet 21 Event Preview

Late Spring 2016

22 Defined Design

Butterfly House by Feldman Architecture

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UP FRONT

In Conversation Christine Knapp

IN CONVERSATION with Christine Knapp

By Brian Barth

Christine Knapp became the director of the City of Philadelphia’s Office of Sustainability as of the first of the year, but she’s had a hand in the city’s green agenda for more than a decade. In a prior position as the director of outreach at PennFuture, a local non-profit focused on making environmental responsibility a central tenet of Philadelphia’s future economy, Knapp helped to develop the Next Great City initiative, which inspired the mayor to create the Office of Sustainability in 2008, and led to the city’s first sustainability plan. Thanks to a ballot initiative in November of 2014 making the office permanent, the Office of Sustainability is no longer under the umbrella of the mayor’s office, but is its own permanent city agency. We recently spoke with her about her goals as the new director and her thoughts on what Philadelphia has to offer to the sustainability movement. Knapp would also like to extend a warm welcome to AIA convention-goers, who she hopes will get out and experience the cutting edge green architecture of the City of Brotherly Love—as well as Philadelphia’s incredible diverse food culture, which she says goes far beyond the those famous Philly cheesesteaks. gb&d

PART 1 AN INTERNATIONAL SUSTAINABILITY LEADER gb&d: What do you think made you the best candidate to become Philadelphia’s new sustainability director? Christine Knapp: Most of my career I spent in environmental policy and advocacy work. The piece that is most relevant to where I am now is that in 2007, I organized a coalition called Next Great City that put out a mayoral agenda around environmental quality of life. As part of that, we challenged the candidates for mayor to adopt our platform, but also to commit to creating an office that would implement those recommendations. That was essentially the Office of Sustainability. gb&d: So you were the natural choice for the job!

ABOVE In conjunction with AIA Philadelphia, we feature five projects from The City of Brotherly Love that represent sustainability (p. 56); Christine Knapp talks driverless cars, Vietnam, and karaoke (p. 112)

Knapp: It feels full circle to have advocated for the creation of this office and then to come in and take over eight years later. It feels like I was working towards this even though that wasn’t actually my intention [laughs]. Beyond that advocacy experience, I’ve also been the deputy chief of staff at the water department here for the last three and half years where I’ve done legislative and government affairs work and helped implement the green stormwater infrastructure plan. gb&d: What has been top of the agenda for you so far?

PHOTO: MARGO REED

Knapp: I think top of the agenda is to update Greenworks, which has been our sustainability framework since 2008. It was intended to be an eight-year plan, so it’s now time for it to be updated. We’re considering how to update it, whether it will be as simple as extending out the timelines and resetting the target goals, or if it will be a little bit deeper of a reformatting where we try to figure out what works best for different This conversation continues on p. 17

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Editor’s Picks Curated by gb&d staff

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COMPANY TANDUS CENTIVA

ARCHITECTURE FIRM EYP

PRODUCT SEALED AIR MUSHROOM PACKAGING

BOOK

(pictured above) Dealing with food waste is a hot button topic, especially in urban settings. One company, The Plant, is working to fix this problem right in Chicago’s backyard. The Plant will eventually divert over 10,000 tons of food waste from landfills into their circular, closed-loop model of material reuse in order to power over 250 homes. plantchicago.org

This flooring company has reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 15% since 2006 and has also reduced unnecessary chemicals and increased recycled content in their materials. Their production plants have also reduced water usage by utilizing a closed loop system to recycled processed water and boast a whopping 0% production wastewater in their Alabama LVT plant. tandus-centiva.com

Mastery of intelligent design, knowledge-based lifecycle approaches, close collaboration to inform innovation. What do all of these qualities have in common? They are part of the mission statement and best practices of EYP, located in many major US cities. They have ranked #1 in Energy and Sustainability in Architecture Top 50 and are committed to a sustainable future. eypaedesign.com

Packaging typically will sit in landfills for hundreds of years. But Restore Mushroom Packaging from Sealed Air is grown, not manufactured, and is 100% biodegradable and renewable, making it an efficient way to make any business more sustainable. sealedair.com

By taking a look into the past, author Vidar Lerum explores energy demand, lighting, thermal comfort, and how we can learn from design choices of the past to find future solutions. He analyzes materials, techniques, and methods used in design and building to provide a clear reference. amazon.com

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SUSTAINABLE BUILDING DESIGN: LEARNING FROM NINETEENTH-CENTURY INNOVATIONS

ARTIST BRIAN DETTMER

In a world where paper books are rapidly becoming digitalized and millions of books are left dusty and unused, artist Brian Dettmer has found inspiration. Using old encyclopedias, medical references, and any old book he can get his hands on, Dettmer builds, cuts, and reshapes to create beautiful, intricate recycled sculptures. briandettmer.com

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PHOTOS: COURTESY OF THE PLANT CHICAGO

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UP FRONT

Product Spotlight Milliken’s Whale Song Carpet By Emily Torem

It’s one thing to think of saving the whales in the abstract, but quite another to see their beautiful songs transposed onto the textiles beneath our feet, reminding us everyday what is at risk if we don’t protect our oceans. The latest collection from Spartanburg, South Carolina-based textile company Milliken— Whale Song Carpet—has interpreted the sound patterns produced by four species of our largest water-dwelling mammal and used them as templates for four corresponding carpet designs that transform the spaces they furnish. Whale Songs and Sounds Inspire a Unique Aesthetic The collection’s four designs recast sound waves and patterns onto highly textured, loop and tip shear designs. “Capturing the behemoth mammals’ musical spectrum, from steady bass tones to sweeping crescendos—these complex ballads guide and connect us to another world of communication in the depths of the ocean,” the brand says. Milliken selected four species of whale to inspire each design. Orca, an angular yet organic pattern, represents conversations taking place between the creatures underwater. Narwhal was inspired by the speedy movement of sound through the ocean, which takes place up to four times faster than it does on land. The resulting carpet is full of movement and repetition, creating a pattern that energizes. Humpback toys with scale, offering a lower contrast design with plenty of depth. The fourth pattern of the standard collection is Beluga, a whale species that harkens back to many of our first lessons on marine life and further connects our everyday with the majesty of the ocean. This pattern, like the beluga itself, is graceful and calm. The carpets are available in an 18-color array of Oceanic blues, mossy greens, and sandy off-whites. “Whale Song reminds us that each environment, whether outdoors or inside, tells a story,” says Stacy Walker, director of customer experience for the Milliken floor covering

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The Whale Song Carpet collection’s four designs recast sound waves and patterns of Orca, Narwhal, Humpback, and Beluga whales onto highly textured, loop and tip shear designs.

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UP FRONT

IN CONVERSATION with Christine Knapp Continued from p. 13

audiences that we would like to get engaged. Greenworks has traditionally been a little bit more focused on city government, so we’re trying to consider how we can reach residents and businesses and community groups, and all sorts of different partners to really be more directly engaged with it. gb&d: Are you a native Philadelphian? Knapp: I’m not. I grew up on Long Island, but I came to college here and have been here ever since. So it’s home now. gb&d: What do you think Philadelphia’s strong points are in the sustainability realm? Knapp: We like to say that Philadelphia has strong bones, a really good structure for sustainability work. We have an incredible parks system, we have these really walkable neighborhoods, we have a good transportation system, we have energy efficient building stock—there are row homes everywhere. We have all these inherent pieces of the city that help Philadelphia to start out on a higher rung of the ladder in terms of sustainability. I think we also have the

“It feels full circle to have advocated for the creation of this office and then to come in and take over eight years later.” added benefit of having a lot of academic research institutions here that are a great resource in helping us figure out where we want to go and how to move the needle forward. gb&d: How would you rate the city’s sustainability efforts or the last eight years since the framework was adopted?

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF MILLIKEN

Knapp: I think we are seen as leaders. I’m now part of the Urban Sustainability Director’s Network, which is made up of all of the sustainability directors from around the country. Just seeing the work in that group and where a lot of the other cities are, I feel that we’re definitely seen as being an early adopter and a leader that folks are now looking to in order to figure out how to do this work in their cities. Also, just anecdotally, I had a great experience conveyed to me, which was a friend of mine was in This conversation continues on p. 21

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Made completely from various nylon waste materials, such as abandoned fishing nets, ECONYL yarns breathe new life into old products that would otherwise pollute the world’s oceans and landfills.

division. “We steward these environments by selecting clean materials to create interiors and manufacturing them responsibly to protect the natural world, dovetailing theses harmonious concepts to create cohesive space.” Recycled Material Reclaimed from the Oceans For the material used to create their Whale Song Carpets, Milliken sought to integrate a message about how the beauty of whales helps beautify their environment. “Whale Song is inspired by the life and habitat of the very oceans from which nylon waste is reclaimed,” the brand says in a release. “Made completely from various nylon waste materials, such as abandoned fishing nets, ECONYL yarns breathe new life into old products that would otherwise pollute the world’s oceans and landfills.” The carpets contain, on average, a Total Recycled Content of 55.6%. Additionally, Milliken manufactures the Whale Song collection using 52% renewable energy, and sends no process waste to the landfill. Improves Interior with Low Toxin Manufacturing

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PHOTOS: COURTESY OF MILLIKEN

Whale Song’s minimalist carpets also left out unneeded byproducts by ensuring that their materials were PVC-free. PVC, though long lasting and durable, can also stubbornly resist biodegradation. Embracing new designs and patterns responsibly can also mean allowing those designs and materials to cleanly return to their composite parts decades into the future without burdening future generations with their disposal. PVC-free as well, the ES Cushion Backing on the carpet improves air quality and provides 50% more noise reduction than other hard-backed carpets. The collection also carries an Environmental Product Declaration and Declare Living Building Challenge Compliant transparency label, which is a stepping-stone for LEED, the Living Building Challenge, and other green building certifications. gb&d gbdmagazine.com


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Introducing Xpozer

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UP FRONT

Event Preview Late Spring 2016 By Alex Nates-Perez

ICFF

DETAILS

At the forefront of contemporary design, When May 14-17 Where New York City, NY ICFF is a NYC-based showcase flaunting the latest Web icff.com trends and “up-to-the-moment” designs. With more than 33,000 interior designers, architects, and other industry professionals in attendance, as well as 750 avant-garde exhibitors from around the globe, this conference is opportune for creative inspiration and networking. Plus, on Tuesday, May 17, ICFF will open for general public, as well.

AIA National Convention

DETAILS

This year the AIA National Convention will When May 19-21 Where Philadelphia, PA be held in Philadelphia at the Pennsylvania Web convention.aia.org Convention Center. This exciting gathering of industry professionals hosting more than 800 exhibiting companies and live broadcasts from ARCHITECT Live allows for simultaneous networking and learning. This year’s keynote speakers, Kevin Spacey (yes, that Kevin Spacey), designer Neri Oxman, and architect Rem Koolhaas, will inspire through their talents as innovators in their fields. Turn to pages 12, 56, and 110 to learn more about the future according to Philly.

NeoCon

DETAILS

More than 100 industry leaders in sports susWhen June 27-30 Where Houston, TX tainability lead the programs of the 2016 Green Web summit.greensportsalliance.org Sports Alliance Summit, focused this year on The Power of Partnerships. With 700 industry stakeholders in attendance, leadership plenaries, keynotes, breakout sessions, and networking opportunities, this is the world’s largest and most influential gathering to support and educate sports sustainability. gb&d

Continued from p. 17

Paris for the climate talks, and when she would tell folks that she was with Philadelphia, people knew that Philadelphia was leading in the sustainability world and on the climate front, and they were happy to see that the new mayor was recommitting to that work. So it was really impressive to know that it’s not just on a national scale, but that internationally folks think that we are doing well. PART 2 PHILLY’S WORLD-CLASS GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE gb&d: You just left a position with the water department where you are involved with Philadelphia’s renowned green infrastructure plan—for those who don’t already know, what is that about? Knapp: Philadelphia was the first city in the country to get approval from the EPA to use green infrastructure as the primary means of managing combined sewer overflows. The plan, which is called Green City, Clean Waters, is to manage about 10,000 acres of land with green stormwater management practices. It’s about a $2 billion investment over the next 25 years. It’s definitely the largest green infrastructure project in the country at this time. gb&d: What has been the progress so far? Knapp: The EPA set up the agreement so there would be five-year milestones, and the plan is actually hitting its five-year mark this summer. The milestone was to have 750 acres of the project implemented, and I believe that we will well surpass that number.

DETAILS

When June 13-15 For 48 years, NeoCon has delivered an interiWhere Chicago, IL or design trade show exhibiting the best and Web neocon.com the brightest new designs. With 50,000 design professionals, 500 leading companies, 100+ seminars, and three keynote speakers, NeoCon promises to represent the forefront of changing commercial design and business trends at Chicago’s Merchandise Mart.

Green Sports Alliance Summit

IN CONVERSATION with Christine Knapp

gb&d: Is any of the green infrastructure visible for visitors to take a look at? Knapp: Yes, there are bio-swales, tree trenches, rain gardens, and green roofs, as well as things like porous pavement and stormwater retention basins that are invisible to the eye but are working hard when it rains. We generally try to encourage the surface expression of green infrastructure, so we can maximize the triple bottom line benefits. So there is an emphasis on trees and rain gardens and those types of things that have aboveground benefits, versus the infiltration systems that are below ground. gb&d: Will this plan eliminate the need for the city’s conventional stormwater system? This conversation continues on p. 22

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IN CONVERSATION with Christine Knapp Continued from p. 21

Knapp: It avoids the need to upgrade the sewer capacity. If we weren’t doing this, we would have to build a tank and tunnel system that would cost about $10 billion, which would only serve the single purpose of managing water during heavy rainstorms. So that was one of the reasons for thinking outside the box and not doing the traditional approach—it is really expensive for only one purpose, where green infrastructure is more cost-effective and adds additional co-benefits. PART 3 HOPE FOR THE FUTURE IN THE CITY OF BROTHERLY LOVE gb&d: Where is the greatest need for improvement in Philadelphia’s sustainability trajectory? Knapp: We haven’t had a strong engagement program in this office because we have such a small staff. Early on we had to prioritize what we could get done, and that was really working inside city government. We do all this great work, but even the best work doesn’t mean as much if people don’t know about it. We definitely want to make sure that’s a bigger priority and that more people are aware of what sustainability means in their own lives, whether it’s at

“We generally try to encourage the surface expression of green infrastructure, so we can maximize the triple bottom line benefits. So there is an emphasis on trees and rain gardens and those types of things that have aboveground benefits, versus the infiltration systems that are below ground.”

Defined Design Butterfly House by Feldman Architecture By Alex Nates-Perez

Visionary firm Feldman Architecture recently took peace and serenity to a new level by creating an imaginative, sustainable getaway retirement home dubbed the Butterfly House. Their clients spent two years selecting the perfect plot of land on the privately owned Santa Lucia Preserve near Carmel, California and settled on a 2,900-square-foot area within a meadowland butterfly habitat—the muse for their home’s name and unique design. Inspired by the surrounding colorful insects, Feldman Architecture designed

an indoor/outdoor integrated living space complete with a butterfly style roof built for sustainable temperature regulation and water conservation. The home has a modern aesthetic consisting of three spaces—a central area for main living and two buildings for sleeping, bathing, and relaxing. Each structure opens up to spectacular views of the surrounding hills and canyon below. The home is a leader in contemporary sustainable luxury thanks to its green features, outdoor integrations, and beautiful design. gb&d

Irrigate /ˈiriɡāt/ (verb) Supply water to (land or crops) to help growth, typically by means of channels. The butterfly roofs harvest rainwater in order to preserve water in an area of the world where droughts are common and water conservation is of the utmost importance. The roof collects water into an irrigation system that feeds the native plants and surrounding fields to keep the home green and lush, rendering the structure a self-sustaining environment with little to no landscape maintenance as a result.

home, or in their community, or in their school, or in their business. That’s something that I think is an opportunity for us to expand and do a little bit more with. Also, we have a high poverty rate in Philadelphia, and that’s been one of the challenges as well. We’re competing in a space where people are really struggling just to put food on the table and keep their kids safe and get a good education. This conversation continues on p. 107

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UP FRONT

Pavilion /pəˈvilyən/ (noun) A summerhouse or other decorative building used as a shelter in a park or large garden. Butterfly House is arranged into three connecting pavilions—a main living space, a space where the clients will sleep, bathe, and relax, and another guest chamber. The use of connecting pavilions promotes the indoor-outdoor integration essential to this home’s design. The pavilions also allow privacy for the clients while hosting their family and friends by having the main living area separate from the two sleeping spaces.

PHOTOS: JOE FLETCHER

Thermoregulation /thûr′mō-rĕg′yə-lā′shən/ (noun) The maintenance of a constant internal temperature independent from the environmental temperature. Concrete walls and large expanses of glass provide both aesthetic and functional services. This neural pallet enhances the beauty of the Butterfly House’s surrounding environment while regulating the temperature inside for comfortable living. Concrete and glass are materials that absorb heat from sunlight during the day to keep the internal temperature of the home cool and refreshing and release heat at night for a cozy interior.

THIS SPREAD The clients expressed a desire to integrate indoor and outdoor spaces with a simple, modern aesthetic.

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UP FRONT

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FRONT GREEN BUILDING UP & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Features Spaces Punch List

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GREEN SPORTS ALLIANCE

28 The Golden 1 Center

The Sacramento Kings will soon play at the world’s greenest sports venue

32 Fenway Park

Excel Dryer helps the home of the Boston Red Sox save an annual $83,000 by ditching paper towels

34 Husky Stadium The University of Washington looks to

recycling in its new football stadium

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TYPOLOGY GREEN SPORTS ALLIANCE

Introduction by Kate West

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TYPOLOGY

W RENDERINGS: COURTESY OF THE SACRAMENTO KINGS

hen we talk about sporting arenas, the conversation is usually about the team’s athletic ability or if they’re going to have a good season. But now, in an era where the 2016 Super Bowl was widely touted as the greenest yet (thanks to the incredibly efficient Levi’s Stadium), the arena itself is taking the spotlight when it comes to energy efficient and sustainable practices. In this section, Kate West and Emily Torem explore how Boston’s Fenway Park, Husky Stadium at the University of Washington in Seattle, and the new Golden 1 Center in Sacramento are making headlines using state-of-the-art resources and design that combines nature and technology to create a fan experience like no other. Each of these complexes is a member of the Green Sports Alliance, an organization that “leverages the cultural and market influence of sports to promote healthy, sustainable communities where we live and play” by inspiring sports leagues, teams, venues, their partners, and millions of fans to embrace renewable energy, healthy food, recycling, water efficiency, and much more. GSA boasts more than 345 sports teams and venues from 20 different leagues and 14 countries. Here, we look at how three of them are using fiscally beneficial sustainable practices and setting a new standard in architectural design for large multi-purpose facilities.

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TYPOLOGY GREEN SPORTS ALLIANCE

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TYPOLOGY

AFFILIATION: SACRAMENTO KINGS LEAGUE: NBA LOCATION: SACRAMENTO, CA

By Kate West

RENDERINGS: COURTESY OF THE SACRAMENTO KINGS

The NBA’s Sacramento Kings will soon be known for more than basketball when they open the 2016-17 season this October at the world’s greenest sports and entertainment venue. Golden 1 Center will be 100% solar powered, provide locally grown food—reflecting Sacramento’s farm-to-fork culture—and become a global model for an indoor/outdoor arena that not only sets a new standard in arena architecture but demonstrates how innovative design can attract new development to a region. Kings owner and chairman Vivek Ranadive calls it “the 21st Century Coliseum.” The inspiration for the design, created by AECOM, comes from the Sacramento region and lifestyle. “The design combines high-performance sustainability and metaphorical inspiration, for instance, from the granite walls of the Sierra Nevada,” says Rob Rothblatt, design principle. “Residents here really feel the power of nature—they like to hike, be outdoors, and they’re at the center of the farm-to-fork movement.” Golden 1 Center reflects that sentiment with five aircraft hangar doors that literally allow the outside in. And to control the temperature, a state-of-the-art temperature displacement system was designed instead of traditional top-down air conditioning. “This puts out air under the seats down to the court, keeping people comfortable much more efficiently,” Rothblatt says. “We can also keep the aircraft hangar doors open for hours, taking advantage of cool Delta breezes, and maintain a constant temperature and humidity on the court.” It’s all powered by a combination of 3,300 SPI solar panels on the arena’s roof and electricity from a new solar farm near Rancho Seco. This will make Golden 1 Center the first indoor sports arena in the world to derive 100% of its power from solar—all sourced within 50 miles of the venue. While 300 days of sunshine are good for solar, it can be bad news for an arena gb&d

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TYPOLOGY GREEN SPORTS ALLIANCE

NOTHING BUT NET SAVINGS

85% of electricity sourced from local solar farm—15% from solar panels on the arena roof

2,000 By moving to Downtown Sacramento, 2,000 tons of greenhouse gas emissions from guests will be eliminated annually— the equivalent of 4 million vehicle miles

3,300 SPI Solar panels on the Golden 1 Center roof

40% Up to 40% reduction on water consumption due to low flow fixtures 30

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RENDERINGS: COURTESY OF THE SACRAMENTO KINGS

TYPOLOGY

that incorporates glass windows throughout. In an effort to diffuse the sunlight, fritted glass windows were installed and Solera Windows used around the practice court facility. “The Solera glass allows plenty of daylight to come in without the heat radiation,” Rothblatt says. These greening efforts are estimated to reduce the arena’s greenhouse gas emissions by 2,000 tons annually. The team has even committed to a charter of 10 guiding principles that will help them educate fans on sustainability and nutrition, reduce their impact on the environment, and benefit the region. The charter calls for a reduction in food waste by donating left over concessions to local food pantries and sourcing 90% of the food and beverages prepared at the gb&d

ABOVE Golden 1 Center will be 100% solar powered and provide locally grown food. FACING PAGE In an effort to diffuse the sunlight, fritted glass windows were installed and Solera Windows used around the practice court facility.

arena from local farms and producers within 150 miles. All of this stems from a partnership with the National Resources Defense Council and the Green Sports Alliance to change the way sports teams think about arena food and the environment. It’s a combination of sustainability, architecture, and vision that is transforming a once underused three-block mall into a hub for entertainment and activity. During the demolition of the former mall, 100,000 tons of waste was recycled, which represents 99% of the material from the mall. The attraction of this arena has been the springboard for hotels, shops, and apartments aiming to implement similar sustainable and environmentally friendly energy plans. gb&d may–june 2016

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TYPOLOGY GREEN SPORTS ALLIANCE

AFFILIATION: BOSTON RED SOX LEAGUE: MLB LOCATION: BOSTON, MA By Emily Torem

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ABOVE Hand dryers, like the ones installed at Fenway Park, help facilities save, on average, 95% of what they were spending on paper products, as well as the necessary maintenance and delivery costs.

and made the switch to XLERATOR Hand Dryers, shrinking the park’s annual carbon footprint as well as its budget. One of the most common misconceptions about “greening” venues is that green technology has to be costly upfront—sometimes over the years as well. According to William Gagnon, vice president of marketing at Excel Dryer, hand dryers help facilities save, on average, 95% of what they were spending on paper products, as well as the necessary maintenance and delivery costs. At Fenway, the annual savings were actually $83,000, or 97% of what they had previously

PHOTO: COURTESY OF EXCEL DRYER/FENWAY PARK

One of America’s oldest sports stadiums, Fenway Park—home of the Boston Red Sox, is also one of its greenest. Since beginning its greening initiatives in 2008, this Green Sports Alliance member has partnered with the National Resources Defense Council to implement a variety of environmental improvements, including a rooftop garden for use in stadium kitchens and local communities, as well as 28 solar panels, which help heat water throughout the facility and divert 37% of the gas traditionally used in the process. More recently, Fenway has done away with paper towels

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TYPOLOGY

GRAPHICS: CREATIVE STALL (TREES); GREGOR CRESNAR (TRASH BIN); DANIL POLSHIN (FUEL STATION); LINGAILE ZIUKAITE (WAVES)

FENWAY PARK SAVINGS

spent. In addition, they fully recouped their upfront installation and unit costs within 12 months. Chris Knight, senior manager of facility services and planning at Fenway, recalls presenting the cost/saving estimates during the XLERATOR Hand Dryer project proposal, and finding it to be an easy sell. “It helped us gain credibility internally to our accounting and finance departments, to prove that we can not only green our organization, but that it will save us money in the long run,” Knight says. Benefits of Fenway’s move to XLERATOR dryers exceed fiscal savings, extending to hospitality and general safety at games and events. “The improvement of the fan experience as a whole is the most important benefit XLERATOR dryers offer to facilities like Fenway,” Knight says. “The fan and visitor experience is tied to public restrooms—if you have a dirty restroom, it reflects negatively on the visitor experience. At Fenway, fans now have a hand drying solution that works fast, so they can get back to their seats more quickly to enjoy the game.” Indirectly, the removal of paper towels, and their requisite maintenance, which requires staff to restock, check supplies, and empty waste receptacles, has been reduced significantly, freeing their time up to respond to accidents. “Before the XLERATOR Hand Dryers, it took about three to five minutes to have someone respond to the scene of a slip or fall,” says Knight. “Now, that time has dropped to 90 seconds.” When a fan or patron has been injured, every second counts, and now Fenway is better able to respond immediately. Even plumbing issues have drastically reduced since the installation of the high-speed dryers. “Anecdotally, we definitely have less clogs since removing paper towels from our waste stream,” Knight says. Often the greening of a facility means low flow fixtures are installed, which are less able to handle improper paper towel disposal; this can unexpectedly raise costs for a business due to plumbing issues unless they also eliminate paper towels. Built in 1912, Fenway’s ownership gb&d

is committed to preserving its historic charm, making the addition of brand new appliances something of a challenge. Yet Knight found a compatible design in the XLERATOR, whose minimal harsh lines and variety of finishes blended seamlessly into the retro feel of the stadium, while feeling modern enough for 2016. “We try to stick with the historic nature of what Fenway is and what we hope it will always be, so whether its hand dryers or new seats, or whatever modification, we try to make it in the look and feel of what makes Fenway so special,” Knight says. A building that predates WWI also requires a delicate hand with electric work—the XLERATOR can run on a single circuit, making it a relatively painless install for older facilities with limited circuits, Gagnon explains. “When we invented the XLERATOR, we put a lot of effort into designing it to look like the dryer of the 21st century,” he says. “The end result was a much improved aesthetic design to conventional dryers that could fit into any restroom, new or old.” Gagnon emphasizes the importance of versatility and accessibility for XLERATOR dryers, as we continue to build not only greener sports facilities, but also a more sustainable society. “While some sustainable solutions can be more expensive, XLERATOR Hand Dryers are easy to install, have built a reputation as being the most reliable and durable products on the market, and provide significant cost and environmental savings,” Gagnon says. “Our shared goal with GSA and Fenway is to reduce impact on the environment, and hope that by doing so, we inspire others to do likewise,” says Gagnon. The sports market is a unique opportunity to communicate with fans and athletes alike, through an environment that connects people to each other in a powerful, dialogue-sparking way, as any die hard sports fan can attest. “With sports being so important to so many people, it’s really important to me to share our greening efforts with the fans,” says Knight. “Because we do have a voice in impacting the environment beyond Fenway Park.” gb&d

Fenway Park saves $83,000 annually by switching from paper towels to the XLERATOR Hand Dryer

A 97% savings with full ROI in just over 12 months

100 XLERATOR Hand Dryers reduced the ballpark's hand-drying carbon footprint by 82%, which equates to an annual environmental savings of:

560 trees

100 cubic meters of landfill space

620 gallons of gasoline

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TYPOLOGY GREEN SPORTS ALLIANCE

AFFILIATION: UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON HUSKIES LEAGUE: NCAA (DIVISION I) LOCATION: SEATTLE, WA By Kate West

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PHOTOS: DOUG SCOTT

TYPOLOGY

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One of the best pieces of real estate in Seattle, Washington, might be the location of the University of Washington’s football stadium. Husky Stadium has prime views of Lake Washington and the Cascade Mountains, but prior to 2011, the building itself did not hold the grandeur to match its views. Concrete crumbled due to constant exposure to the moist weather, rebar was exposed, and golf carts often transported fans to their seats. 360 Architecture (which was acquired by HOK in 2015) took the challenge of redesigning the 1920’s stadium, which had already gone through four major remodels over the years, to a state-of-the-art facility. Protecting the environment during the $280 million remodel started with two retention ponds that filtered construction wastewater before it entered Lake Washington. “Even the trucks that drove off went through a washing cycle,” says Karen Baebler, assistant athletic director for the university. “We are a salmon safe university, which is probably unique—water that comes from the stadium goes into the lake, so it was important none of the construction waste wound up there.” In fact, 95% of the construction waste was either reused or recycled. For example, during the demolition of the lower bowl of the stadium, a concrete crusher was brought onsite to utilize the original materials as filler under the new structure. Some of the metal bleachers that once filled the student section are now used as a decorative design feature on the northwest and southwest entrances. And, knowing that the largest amount of waste would occur once fans returned to the stadium, recycling and compost was obviously a huge part of the plan. It started with changing out the containers used to serve food to nearly 100% recyclable and compostable materials. Onsite compactors were installed on the loading docks, and

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TYPOLOGY

BELOW The restrooms and locker rooms now have motion-activated LED lights; low-flow water fixtures that reduce the amount of water consumed; and elevators instead of spiral ramps, which eliminated vehicle traffic inside the stadium. RIGHT The remodel included the addition of suites with windows that allow fans to open and close—reducing the amount of heat or air conditioning the stadium consumes.

PHOTOS: DOUG SCOTT

planners created a two-stream recycling system. During the 2014 football season, nearly 80% of all waste from the stadium was recycled or composted using the new system. But that was just one way architects wanted to reduce the stadium’s carbon footprint. In an effort to take advantage of Washington’s climate, the architectural team brought the outside air and beauty inside. The remodel included the addition of suites with windows that allow fans to open and close—reducing the amount of heat or air conditioning the stadium consumes. The restrooms and locker rooms now have motion-activated LED lights; lowflow water fixtures that reduce the amount of water consumed; and elevators instead of spiral ramps, which eliminated vehicle traffic inside the stadium. “Before golf carts had to shuttle fans to their seats on the upper levels,” says Baebler. “It feels much more like an indoor building now.” It’s also now a building that can be utilized for more than just football games and practice. The new two-story, 83,000-square-foot football operations center, built as an addition to the west end of the stadium, offers players and coaches training and study space as well as a relaxation area that includes a barber’s chair. For players and the public, a 30,000-square-foot UW Sports Medicine Center opened. “What makes this special is everything is in one area now—players are not traveling between the locker rooms in another section of the university to get gb&d

95%

Percentage of construction waste that was recycled or reused

78%

Percentage of waste from food that is composted or recycled

71,500

Number of fans that can now be seated in the stadium (the largest stadium in the Pacific Northwest)

to the stadium and the public can take advantage of the sports medicine clinic,” Baebler says. In mid-March, the light rail system added a stop in front of Husky Stadium— adding easy access to the stadium and sports medicine clinic. The remodel of Husky Stadium took less than two years to complete and was ready for the 2013 football season. It now seats 71,500 fans and is the largest stadium in the Pacific Northwest. gb&d may–june 2016

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TYPOLOGY

Engineering peace of mind. You buy a window because of its ratings and certifications, but you love a window because of moments like these. REHAU, number one in energy-efficiency and memorable moments.

Learn more at na.rehau.com/geneo

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GREEN BUILDINGTYPOLOGY & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Features Spaces Punch List

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40 REHAU

German engineering and midwestern craftsmanship preserve a 1927 home’s character and outfit it with 21st-century efficiency

44 Pfister Energy

Delivering turnkey renewable energy systems, this company looks at the big picture of sustainable energy in its installation of a solar roof (and so much more) at the Humanscale Manufacturing and Distribution Center

47 ACO Polymer Products, Inc.

Could a CVS pharmacy in Greenville, South Carolina be the future of drainage?

50 Baker Solar Electric

State government policies, a developed supply chain, and environmentally focused philanthropists all add up to something simple in California: good food for the hungry and less carbon in the atmosphere

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TRENDSETTERS

WINDOW SPECIALISTS

REHAU

German engineering and Midwestern craftsmanship preserve a 1927 home’s character and outfit it with 21st-century efficiency

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF REHAU

By Margaret Poe

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From the outset, the project team wanted to follow Passive House building principles—a sustainability minded approach first developed by a German physicist and Swedish scientist—as much as possible. Ensuring the home had a very tight envelope with low leakage was a major focus, says general contractor Brian Butler, of Good Energy Construction. But equally, if not more important, were high-performance windows and doors. As in any project, the team considered a number of different window options, weighing the usual constraints. “Obviously cost is one of the biggest ones,” Butler says, “but it’s not the biggest one, because

GENEO windows from REHAU are up to 40% lighter than conventional steel-reinforced systems.

The winter of 2014-2015 was Boston’s snowiest in more than a century. With snow totals topping 108 inches, homes across the region turned into ice palaces, leaving owners with leaky roofs, destroyed walls, and ruined furniture. The area’s older properties fared worst of all. Yet one home, built in 1927, endured the onslaught without collecting a single icicle. Inside, the windows were warm to the touch, even as sub-zero winds howled outside. That’s because the house, a two-story brick Tudor, had recently been gutted and the walls, windows, and doors overhauled to achieve nearly net-zero energy usage. The deep energy retrofit aimed to preserve its 1920s character while outfitting it with 21st-century efficiency. gb&d

ABOVE REHAU’S GENEO windows are triple-glazed and meet—even exceed—stringent Passive House standards.

we’re in the context of a deep energy retrofit, where performance is also weighted very strongly.” REHAU quickly rose to the top of the heap. The German company has been designing uPVC windows for more than 60 years, earning accolades along the way for their efficiency, durability, and ease of maintenance. Good Energy Construction and the project architect, SA2 Studios, opted for REHAU’s GENEO windows, a fully reinforced polymer system that provides superior strength without relying on steel. The triple-glazed windows meet—and even exceed—stringent Passive House standards. As a blend, the fiber composite has the benefits of both PVC and fiberglass. It’s similar, in fact, to the components used in aircraft and Formula One racecars. Instead of importing from Germany, the renovation team found a company, WASCO Windows, that fabricates the windows may–june 2016

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TRENDSETTERS

The GENEO windows feature a “tiltturn” system. By turning the handle 180 degrees, the homeowner can tilt the windows at the top, allowing in natural ventilation without letting in rain. Turn it 90 degrees, and the window swings inward for easy cleaning and an intuitive means of egress in case of emergency.

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tem created a whole new market for WAS- letting in rain. Turn it 90 degrees, and the winCO—growing the staff to 13 employees that dow swings inward for easy cleaning and an now produce about 500 GENEO windows intuitive means of egress in case of emergency. annually. That feature contributes to the windows’ By building German windows, on Ger- “wow factor,” Butler says. Because they’re so man machines, WASCO is able to give all different from a typical American fixture, the quality of a premium window that you would buy in Europe, along with the convenience of stateside fabrication, Paulus says. “That allows us to deliver faster, and it also allows us to deliver far better technical support,” he says. “If something goes wrong on a job site, we can give technical advice one time zone out, instead of seven time zones out. And because we build these ourselves, we know visitors breeze past the kitchen—itself a showstopper—to closely examine them. what can go wrong—and how to fix stuff.” For architect Sayo Okada of SA2 Stu- “People are just drawn magnetically to the dios, that proximity was invaluable. Con- windows,” he says. struction, after all, is all about expecting For Butler, the project was a showstopthe unexpected. When a window breaks or is per, both aesthetically and environmentaldamaged on a job site, for example, shipping ly. “From a high-level view, the deep energy a new window from Europe simply takes too retrofit basically exceeds the building code much time—time that can’t be sacrificed on energy requirements by two to three times,” a tight schedule. he says. That’s compared to the stringent The GENEO windows feature a “tilt-turn” standards for a new build. “So that’s pretty system, the predominant window option in cool, because you’re taking an older home, Europe. By turning the handle 180 degrees, that probably was two to three times worse the homeowner can tilt the windows at the than code, and making it the opposite when top, allowing in natural ventilation without you’re done.” gb&d

25-30%: the share of residential heating and cooling energy use for which windows are responsible ... that’s about 2.5 quadrillion Btu.

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PHOTOS: COURTESY OF REHAU

stateside—vastly improving the turnaround time, Butler says. WASCO Windows has been building REHAU windows in its Wisconsin factory since 1989 and GENEO windows since 1992. WASCO Engineering director David Paulus gained a deep appreciation for the brand during the years he spent teaching at the Technical University of Berlin. When he returned home to the family business, which his father had run since 1983, Paulus modernized the factory with German equipment. The REHAU sys-


TRENDSETTERS

The windows allowed the team to achieve both aesthetic and environmental goals, with the retrofit exceeding the building code energy requirements.

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TOTA L S O L U T I O N S P R O V I D E R S

Pfister Energy amount of infrastructure inefficiency in the grid that we use in the United States. When power is generated in Ohio and ends up in a light bulb in New Jersey, energy is lost from point A to point B. When we look at the rooftops of America, we see platforms for technology.”

Stackable Technologies

By Maura Welch

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When leading ergonomics company Humanscale wanted to improve energy efficiency at its Piscataway, New Jersey Manufacturing and Distribution Center, the company searched for ways to reduce waste, employ renewable energy onsite, and create a healthier work environment for employees. Pfister Energy, which provides engineering, procurement, and construction services for renewable energy projects, provided a plan to seamlessly integrate solutions for all of those goals—and it all started on the roof. The company installed a new PVC roof with a 775-kilowatt solar array, 70 new high-bay LED lighting fixtures, and 72 daylighting units. Given Pfister’s philosophy on smart, real-world sustainability, it is no surprise that this project was all about achieving energy efficiency through complementary technologies and turnkey solutions. “When I incorporated the company, it was important for me to not only offer solar, but to take a more holistic approach of stackable technologies,” explains president Wayne Pfisterer. “There’s a massive

Prioritizing Human Health It makes sense that Humanscale, a leading producer of healthy work environment products (think ergonomic keyboards and standing desks), would choose Pfister, which works to make buildings more environmentally sustainable and promote the health of their occupants, for this project. The SolaTube daylighting units that allow natural daylight to fill the interior are complimented by light sensors that recognize when additional light is needed from the new LED lighting units. Since natural daylight has been shown to support people’s moods and health, Pfister customized the placement of the SolaTubes on the roof in order to best serve the people working inside. “We asked Pfister to take into consideration where our assembly locations were. We wanted the skylights to go where the people were. So Pfister laid out the solar panels on gbdmagazine.com

RENDERINGS: COURTESY OF PFISTER ENERGY; PHOTOS: SOLATUBE INTERNATIONAL

Delivering turnkey renewable energy systems, this company looks at the big picture of sustainable energy in its installation of a solar roof (and so much more) at the Humanscale Manufacturing and Distribution Center

At Humanscale, Pfister started by installing a new white roof membrane, which is much more reflective than the black surface it replaced. This helps to keep the building cool, and also keeps the solar panels from overheating. Placed among the solar panels on the roof were 72 SolaTube daylighting units, which diffuse daylight and spread it evenly inside the building. Pfister also installed 70 brand-new high-bay LED units. The installation significantly decreased the Humanscale facility’s energy demands, and massively reduced its reliance on external energy sources. In 2015, its first full year of operation, the solar array generated 980,000 kilowatt-hours, or nearly a megawatt-hour of energy—meaning that it provided 85% of its own electricity needs on site.


TRENDSETTERS

The Humanscale Installation By the Numbers:

2,585 Number of 300-watt solar modules, which equates to a total of about 775 kilowatts

980,000 Number of kilowatthours the solar array produced in 2015— nearly a megawatt THIS SPREAD Pfister Energy provides engineering, procurement, and construction services for renewable energy projects.

the roof to accommodate the SolaTubes and what was happening inside the building,” explains Jane Abernethy, sustainability officer at Humanscale. “As the sun goes behind clouds the light will ramp up automatically and when the sun comes out they will dim down. Inside there’s a really nice constant level of light.” Wayne Pfisterer elaborates, noting that daylighting is not only about the cost savings of offsetting artificial lighting. “It’s also about enhanced performance for employees. In well-daylit facilities we find that there are fewer people who are out sick, production tends to rise, and there are fewer accidents,” he says. “People generally feel better under natural light.”

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Moving Toward Smarter Energy Solutions The Humanscale facility in New Jersey demonstrates Pfister’s innovative approach to diversifying energy, to seamlessly integrating complementary technologies, and to using smart energy to create beautiful spaces and support human health. Pfister Energy works with a wide array of sustainable technologies—beyond those employed at the Humanscale facility. They have installed wind turbines that look more like modern art than energy infrastructure; rainwater harvesting systems that collect storm runoff for use in irrigation, toilet flushing, and fire suppression; geothermal systems that harness heat from below the earth’s surface to warm interior environments; and green roofs that manage storm water, reduce noise pollution, and keep buildings cool—just to name a few. “We take roofs and stack these technologies,” Pfisterer says. “We bring in thermal, solar, daylighting, and rainwater harvesting. We transform that roof from just a building component that keeps it dry and turn it into a generator of energy and irrigation.” He also notes that they are one of the companies that push this, and that Humanscale has been just one of their success stories. “More companies will realize that not only are these strategies a return on investment, but it’s also the right thing to do,” he says. “It gives us energy independence. And it’s better for our employees.” gb&d

85% Percentage of the Humanscale facility’s energy demands that the Pfister installation provides on site

$1.75 million Estimated savings resulting from the Pfister energy overhaul

110,000 Square footage of the Humanscale facility

12 Number of times more solar heat the white roof membrane can reflect than could the old black asphalt surface may–june 2016

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TRENDSETTERS

North America’s Most-Attended Solar Event Moscone Center, San Francisco Hear it here first! Be part of the first major U.S. solar event in 2016 Join 18,000 peers, visit 550 exhibitors, attend 60 sessions & workshops Gain insight: PV, energy storage, smart renewable energy & solar heating/cooling

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Register now! 46

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TRENDSETTERS

DR AINAGE TECHNOLOGY LE ADERS

ACO Polymer Products, Inc. Could a CVS pharmacy in Greenville, South Carolina be the future of drainage?

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF ACO POLYMER PRODUCTS, INC.

By Jeff Link

Catch basins aren’t known for their beauty. They serve an important function, to be sure—collecting stormwater run-off so it can be detained, filtered, and released safely into the subsurface hydrological system or watershed. But their depressed intake systems make them difficult to incorporate architecturally, particularly in high-traffic pedestrian areas, such as crosswalks, where steeply sloped surfaces can be difficult to navigate. Then there are the aesthetic concerns: the landscape architect whose linear, clean-lined hardscape is sullied by the grated cast iron maw of a water inlet; the designer who wants to install pavers but can’t because such a flat, ungraded surface won’t divert enough run-off. Finding a solution to these competing gb&d

ABOVE The depressed intake systems of catch basins make them difficult to incorporate architecturally, but the ACO Brickslot L-shaped intake system helps to alleviate competing concerns over aesthetics and functionality.

concerns—draining stormwater, while retaining an even, walkable surface—is essentially why Brickslot was designed, says Ben Aulick, the southeast region specifications manager for ACO. The ACO Brickslot L-shaped slotted intake system, nearly invisible to the eye, rests atop a four-inch-wide galvanized or stainless steel trench, Aulick says, allowing brick or stone pavers to be installed in a linear fashion along walkways and courtyards. Water slips through the grated slots, which take the place of paving joints, and is funneled into a catch basin where it is detained and filtered before being released to an outlet point. Brickslot is the first step of a much larger stormwater system chain, and, in some ways, the goal of the product is may–june 2016

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Breaking down Brickslot:

Half meter sections are available and provide access to the channel or catch basin for maintenance.

Brick pavers fit directly against the slot, making the Brickslot optimal for light duty pedestrian applications or heavier duty projects.

A 7/16” flared ADA compliant slot prevents debris from being trapped and blocking the opening.

The ACO Brickslot L-shaped slotted intake system, nearly invisible to the eye, rests atop a four-inchwide trench drain, allowing brick or stone pavers to be installed in a linear fashion along walkways and courtyards. Brickslot is available in either galvanized or stainless steel.

not to see it at all. “Brickslot was really designed to help engineers and architects work together more efficiently to develop an aesthetically pleasing stormwater system that is virtually invisible within a hardscape,” Aulick says. As an example, he points to the design and installation of a gracious, boulevard-like walkway of brick, pavers, and concrete that forms the pedestrian entrance to a CVS at the corner of Augusta St. and Faris Rd. in Greenville, South Carolina. A project team that included McLeod Landscape Architects, Little Diversified Architectural Consulting, and Spell Construction Inc. completed the seven-month project in November of last year. And here’s how ACO got involved: Parks McLeod, of McLeod Landscape

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ACO KlassikDrain Channels are made of polymer concrete—a durable yet lightweight material made from polyester resin binder, reinforced by mineral aggregates and fillers.

Water slips through the grated slots, which take the place of paving joints, and is funneled into a catch basin, where it is detained and filtered before being released to an outlet point.

Architects, was attending the 2013 American Society of Landscape Architects trade show in Asheville, North Carolina, when he bumped into Aulick. He shared his plans for the front entrance, which delineates the main road from the building and is inlaid with brick pavers from end to end. “Parks saw an immediate need [for Brickslot]. He had this beautiful hardscape and he didn’t want to hurt it,” Aulick says. The issue, of course, was stormwater drainage. Because the new walkway would reduce water absorption into the ground, Aulick says, the difference needed to be accounted for in the drainage system. Greenville’s stormwater design criteria, specified in the city’s Design and Specification Manual, are particularly stringent. gbdmagazine.com


PHOTOS/RENDERINGS: COURTESY OF ACO POLYMER PRODUCTS, INC.

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With the adoption of the Land Management Ordinance in January 2008 and a new stormwater ordinance in February that same year, the city retains tight control over how development will affect system sizing, flow rates, and system depth, alignment, and materials. In this way, it adheres more closely to the regulatory environment of larger cities, such as New York, than small- to mid-market cities, Aulick says. “They’re very advanced and forward thinking in how they handle stormwater retention, which is a good thing. We’ve done a lot of projects in that market; they have landscape architects on the city’s staff and have placed a special interest in making the city’s parks and streetscapes attractive,” Aulick says. But Greenville is not alone in their progressive policies. Across the country, according to Aulick, such requirements are becoming increasingly common: some municipalities mandate that flow rate differences in stormwater run-off before and after development be recovered on-site, either by incorporating water-absorbing landscapes, such as raingardens and bioswales, or by regulating the rate of release of stormwater back into the hydrological system. Others specify a “first flush” rule, holding that water cannot collect on-site after the first major rain following development. The CVS project is but one of many that use Brickslot. “It’s a very good selling, quality product. We’ve used it at the World Trade Center site in New York City and the Atlanta Braves’ [SunTrust Park] and Falcons’ [Mercedes-Benz Stadium] stadiums in Atlanta,” Aulick says. Self-described on their website as “the world market leader in drainage technology,” ACO occupies a dominant position in a market that would appear to be growing as development and predicted climate change effects put increasing strain on aging municipal stormwater systems and intensified flooding. The family-owned company, headquartered in Rendsburg/ Büdelsdorf, Germany, has a presence in over 40 countries, with a total of 30 gb&d

Brickslot is the first step of a much larger stormwater system chain, and, in some ways, the goal of the product is not to see it at all.

production sites on four continents. In addition to Brickslot, ACO manufactures drainage channels, oil and grease separators, backflow stop systems, pumps and pressure-water-tight cellar windows and light shafts. Their tag line reads “ACO. The Future of Drainage.” Asked what that future looks like, Aulick responded, “We’re a global company on a global scale. We’re on track to exceed a billion dollars in revenue. In the US market, you don’t have a comparison in terms of lineal stormwater drainage. Our global counterparts have been doing sustainable

designs a lot longer than in the US, and the evolution of these products and their availability to designers means that efficiency can be built into the design; form and function are getting married in terms of stormwater drainage,” Aulick says. What’s next? According to Aulick, a new curbside system, already popular in Europe, which is being used by several hotels and resorts in the southern United States and gaining attention. The monolithic system, made of poured polymer concrete and built into curbs, sits above a trench drain and draws water in through an ungrated mouth. He expects to see increased usage in parking islands and at crosswalks near schools. “It won’t take the place of underground piping, but it will use areas of heavy foot traffic, like crosswalks in cities, to release surface water,” Aulick says. gb&d may–june 2016

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SOLAR POWER INSTALLATION SOLUTIONS PROVIDERS

Baker Electric Solar

Net energy metering, a developed supply chain, and environmentally focused philanthropists all add up to something simple in California: good food for the hungry and less carbon in the atmosphere By Russ Klettke

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There are many good stories that come out of the progressive sustainability policies in California. Most have to do with the reduction of air pollution, greenhouse gases, and the effects that increased use of solar and wind energy products has had on the US marketplace—namely, that prices have tumbled because the supply networks have ramped up their R&D and production capacity. But the experience of the Jacobs & Cushman San Diego Food Bank (SDFB) in Miramar, California takes it to another level. Thanks to the installation of 80,000 square feet of solar photovoltaic panels in 2015 by Baker Electric Solar, this non-

profit organization was able to expand and improve upon its mission of combating hunger in San Diego County. This is about more than saving money in a not-for-profit organization. It’s about being able to afford more costly fresh produce and expanding its ability to serve meals to San Diego area individuals and families. The Food Bank is now able to keep more of that food fresh due to a doubling of cooler capacity run on solar power. In other words, harnessing sunshine means healthier food for people in need. It’s the result of philanthropy—and innovative financing that enabled this solar installation to become a reality. gbdmagazine.com


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BELOW Casey Castillo, VP of Finance and Administration, Jacobs Cushman San Diego Food Bank

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF BAKER ELECTRIC SOLAR

The $1 million cost of the solar power system, which by the way, takes advantage of the large roof of the Food Bank’s warehouse facility, was covered by a donation from Joan and Irwin Jacobs, San Diego-area philanthropists. While the specifics of the tax implications of their donations are unknown, there are now ways for non-profits to benefit further from special financing that passes through the benefits of tax savings to non-profits. Meanwhile, the SDFB has also tapped into an incentive specific to the Golden State, the San Diego-headquartered Center for Sustainable Energy (CSE), to supplement its budget. As Casey Castillo, VP of Finance and Administration for SDFB points out, because the Food Bank is able to meet targets for energy use reductions, they will receive $90,000 annually from CSE across the course of five years, a total of $450,000. “Effectively, it brings down our ROI to five years,” Castillo says. “Because we are a non-profit, that is something that also helps to bring in more donors.” The 350-kilowatt solar installation, which annually removes the carbon dioxide equivalent of burning almost 600,000 pounds of coal, wasn’t a one-hit wonder of sustainability for the SDFB.

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The 350-kilowatt solar installation will annually remove the carbon dioxide equivalent of burning almost 600,000 pounds of coal. The panels were manufactured by Hyundai and the inverters by SMA America.

Castillo describes several other measures to reduce energy use and support the organization’s LEED initiative that were already completed or in process. They include a lighting retrofit to LEDs from incandescent bulbs; installation of newer, highly efficient air conditioning units; and participation in San Diego Gas & Electric’s demand-response program, where they reduce usage in peak demand times to achieve savings. But what Castillo is most proud about is how more meals are available to the approximately 400,000 people in San Diego County who are food insecure. “We can serve 600,000 additional meals every year because of the $120,000 saved in annual energy costs,” he says. A handful of other food banks around the country have made use of their large roofs to do something similar, including in Houston (Texas), Contra Costa County (California), Bellingham (Washington), Washington, D.C. and Boston (Massachusetts). And that’s the way it should be, according to Kevin Weinberg, head of Baker Electric Solar commercial sales, which installed the SDFB system. The Escondido, California-based company also works on utility scale, residential as well as commercial solar installations. may–june 2016

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WHEN ENERGY SAVED = MOUTHS FED

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF BAKER ELECTRIC SOLAR; GRAPHICS: JORGE CARRILLO (PLUG), RAYMOND FELIX (KNIFE & FORK)

80,000 SQUARE FEET OF PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS, 350 KILOWATTS, WILL REMOVE THE CARBON DIOXIDE EQUIVALENT OF BURNING ALMOST 600,000 POUNDS OF COAL. PLUS, THE FOOD BANK CAN NOW SERVE 60,000 ADDITIONAL MEALS EVERY YEAR BECAUSE OF THE $120,000 SAVED IN ENERGY COSTS.

“Any non-profit that handles refrigeration or has a lot of lighting such as SDFB, is a good candidate for solar,” Weinberg says. “It’s about energy consumption. If an organization has a large roof or space on the ground such as a parking lot with existing carport structures, they can benefit from solar.” Weinberg acknowledges that the tax benefits make it a clearer financial advantage for for-profit businesses, which he says can shave up to 30% off the cost with a federal tax credit, and potentially an additional 35%+ off in deductions due to accelerated depreciation. He adds that electricity costs in California are set to go up—“some rates structures double energy costs” he says—such that for any company with a healthy balance sheet and intention to stay in a building with a large roof, gb&d

ABOVE The California Solar Initiative provides incentives to outfit non-profits with solar panels, like the ones installed at the SDFB.

“there’s almost no reason not to install solar.” Several other trends in energy, particularly in California, suggest for-profits and not-for-profits alike will continue on the path toward adopting solar. Southern California Edison announced in late 2015 it was shifting its focus from natural gas fired plants to battery storage to accommodate peak demand periods. Such a move naturally favors solar and wind, which can produce excess capacity but not always when it’s most needed. Advancing storage technologies are a hotbed of research because of this potential. “We have a strong set of industry and advocacy groups in California,” says Weinberg. What it boils down to is fewer emissions—and in the case of SDFB, a lot more healthy meals. gb&d may–june 2016

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Sustainability, available on-the-go.

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GREEN BUILDING TRENDSETTERS & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Features Spaces Punch List

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56 Green in Philadelphia

In conjunction with Philadelphia’s role as the 2016 host of the AIA Convention, gb&d chose five recent projects that most exemplify the new Philadelphia

72 Shrink the Office

Workspace solutions giant AqilQuest says there is one sure-fire way to reduce the environmental footprint of any building—make it smaller

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PHOTOS HALKIN | MASON PHOTOGRAPHY

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GREEN IN PHILADELPHIA BY BRIAN BARTH

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The City of Brotherly Love has long been adored by architects for having some of the finest historic structures in America. Its row houselined street grid is an iconic example of urban planning done right. But recently, Philadelphia, for which some preferred the tagline “City of Sisterly Affection,” has been infused with a heavy dose of green infrastructure and forward-looking redevelopment, giving rise to a hybrid urban fabric that is even richer and more delicately layered than its founding fathers could have ever imagined. In conjunction with Philadelphia’s role as the 2016 host of the AIA Convention, gb&d chose five recent projects that most exemplify the new Philadelphia. We invite you to explore, and enjoy, what the city’s architectural talent has been up to of late.

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01 Dilworth Park KieranTimberlake and OLIN

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Much of the park is just wide open space, making it possible to host everything from political demonstrations to concerts to a wintertime skating rink while keeping the attention on the monumentality of City Hall, if not subtly enhancing it.

passageways that people generally avoided because it was so confusing and uninviting. KieranTimberlake’s solution is as practical as it is graceful; an asymmetrical pair of glass pavilions mark the locations for the stairs that lead pedestrians into the transit hub in a logical manner. The curved architecture of the glass, which contains no metal framing or fasteners that would interfere with its transparency, frames City Hall with a perfectly proportioned wave-like gesture. “There are a variety of sustainability features that may not be immediately apparent,” Maimon says. “The glazing provides natural lighting down into the subway concourse, for example, and we were able to recycle granite from the existing plaza and use it in the below grade concourse.” Of course, simplicity in and of itself is one of the most important, and often overlooked, tenets of sustainable land use. gbdmagazine.com

PHOTOS: JAMES EWING/OTTO

For decades, Philadelphia’s glorious 19th century city hall building had a very dreary front doormat known as Dilworth Plaza. Its sunken courtyards were uninviting and difficult to access, leading to less and less public use and more and more vandalism and blight over the years. But recently, a redesign by the renowned Philadelphia-based firms OLIN (the landscape architect) and KieranTimberlake (the architect) has brought it back from that downward spiral. The disjointed arrangement of surfaces at different levels, stairways, and walls are gone—in their place is an open, inviting 2.5-acre spread that rivals the great civic spaces of the world. In reflection of the city’s newfound emphasis on landscape as not something to be built on top of, but as the unifying theme around which urban development is organized, Dilworth Plaza has been renamed Dilworth Park and includes much more greenery than in the prior incarnation. “This is really the ceremonial front door of the city,” says Richard Maimon, the partner at KieranTimberlake who oversaw architectural work on the project. “The design was really intended to celebrate that.” OLIN and KieranTimberlake’s approach was to come up with the simplest possible gestures that would have the greatest possible effect. Thus, much of the park is just wide open space, making it possible to host everything from political demonstrations to concerts to a wintertime skating rink while keeping the attention on the monumentality of City Hall, if not subtly enhancing it. Besides creating an elegant and functional open space, the design had to provide access to the transit infrastructure below. Multiple subway lines, trolley lines, and a regional rail link converge beneath the ground around City Hall. But previously, transit access from the plaza was by way of a labyrinthine network of stairs and


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“This is really the ceremonial front door of the city. The design was really intended to celebrate that.” — Richard Maimon, partner, KieranTimberlake

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PHOTOS: JAMES EWING/OTTO

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An asymmetrical pair of glass pavilions mark the locations for the stairs that lead pedestrians into the transit hub in a logical manner. The curved architecture of the glass, which contains no metal framing or fasteners that would interfere with its transparency, frames City Hall with a perfectly proportioned wave-like gesture.

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Bigham Leatherberry Wise Place DIGSAU

“It’s fair to say that pretty much all great architecture projects start with great clients, and this is a great client. Not a client that has any money, but they have a desire to do things right, and to do things well. The challenge was to build a housing model around their mission that was supportive of the specific needs of a particularly vulnerable set of the population. It’s certainly a housing type that is often neglected from an architectural perspective.”

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PHOTOS: HALKIN | MASON PHOTOGRAPHY

Commissioned by the People’s Emergency Center in West Philadelphia, a non-profit that provides housing and other services to help formerly homeless women and their children get off the street and reintegrate with society, the seven-unit Bigham Leatherberry Wise Place complex by the interdisciplinary firm DIGSAU is a case study in social sustainability. Here, DIGSAU principal Jules Dingle describes the design and the philosophy behind it.


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“I think it’s safe to say the Philadelphia row house is probably one of the best models of aggregate housing in America. It’s centered around the street, the stoop. The transition from the public space of the street to the private space of the unit to the super private space of the backyard is exemplary of the rich layering that has made cities great over the millennia. The challenge here was that we had a site that was narrow and long, so we weren’t going to fit seven row houses across the front of it. The physical constraints of the site dictated that another solution was in order, but considering the vulnerable situation of the residents and the need for the single parents to build a community around their seven families led to a design that is a little bit unique.”

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“We turned the traditional Philadelphia row house on its side and then folded the block inward to create a semi-public courtyard space in the middle, and a private natural space behind. The result is a sequence of three gardens. The first garden is the public garden, which is out on the street where the building presents itself as a good neighbor and a positive contributor to the streetscape of Philadelphia. The second garden is the courtyard, where all of the entrance doors to the units are focused, as well as the frontage of just about every interior space. This is the shared living room for the seven families, which is really important for creating a sense of community among the homeless mothers who are trying to get back to work and send their kids to school and get job training. The third garden is the private space in the back, a place of nature, a place for independent play, a place of safety and refuge where the kids get something that is largely missing in the city, especially for kids like these that have experienced homelessness.

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“Most everything you hear about sustainability in architecture is about decreasing the environmental impacts of the project, but this project is much more about addressing human reconnection with the natural world and the good that can come from that. So it’s more about social sustainability than it is about technical sustainability. The building meets and exceeds energy codes but what it does in terms of a housing model is to help repair a damaged urban fabric with biophilic elements that support the community and nurture growth.”

LEFT The project’s rich layering is seen in the transition from the public space of the street to the private space of the unit to the super private space of the backyard.

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DIGSAU created a semi-public courtyard space in the middle and a private natural space behind the building, redefining what a traditional Philadelphia row house could be.

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PHOTOS: TOM CRANE PHOTOGRAPHY

The Douglas Fir timber, which was sustainably harvested in British Columbia, is what gives the house its name.

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03 The Leaning Timber Haus Archer and Buchanan Architecture

Just west of Philadelphia, in the historic township of Newtown Square, is a stunning new home with deep roots in the old world. Commissioned by a young German couple whose family was relocating to the area for work, the unassuming curb presence of this timber frame home belies its sophisticated and environmentally friendly design. Richard Buchanan of Archer and Buchanan Architecture, who designed the home, explains the inspiration, process, and components that went into it. “The client’s goal was to find a way to bring a German sensibility to a home that wouldn’t feel out of place in this suburban context in the United States. We learned

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a great deal about what motivates design in Germany, not least of which is a real emphasis on sustainability, natural materials and their expression, but also a very contemporary kind of interpretation of domestic architecture. As a result, we have a house that is unusually strong, because it is built with this German idea that your building should last for at least 200 years, not 30 years. The Douglas Fir timber, which was sustainably harvested in British Columbia, is what gives the house its name. We wanted to create a metaphor for timber standing in the woods with the way the timber’s haunch and embrace the structure.” “The house is oriented towards the southeast with a lot of glass and deep overhangs protecting the glass. There is an exterior shading system to keep solar gain from getting past the glass, which makes a lot of sense—you’re not introducing any heat to the building, which then you would have to get rid of. All the lighting is LED, but there is natural daylight in every space. You can walk everywhere without turning on lights, even in the lower levels. The basement and first floor deck are made of concrete, and within that deck is a radiant heat system. The Loewen windows are very efficient, creating a high insulating capacity despite the vastness of glass on the house, which is very satisfying.”

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04

Central Green at the Navy Yard Multiple architects, including James Corner Field Operations and Environetics

This historic site on the Delaware River in South Philadelphia was once home to a major ship building facility of the U.S. Navy. Operations began in 1776 at the height of the Revolutionary War and continued well in to the 20th century, as the city grew up around it. In 2000, the city of Philadelphia took over ownership of the 1200-acre site with plans to create a unique corporate campus, industrial park, and residential neighborhood. Now halfway into the $3.5 billion, 13.5-million-square-foot project, the unique character of this new neighborhood has begun to take shape: hundred-year-old sycamore trees line streets filled with a combination of historic brick loft structures and modern glass buildings, eight of which are LEED certified, attracting a lively and creative community to work at the nearly 150 companies that have located there so far, including Philadelphia-based favorites like Urban Outfitters. “It’s one of the largest and most iconic redevelopment projects happening in Philadelphia right now,” says Jonathan Hicks, an architect with Environetics, a locally based firm

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THIS SPREAD The park includes a yoga lawn, ping pong tables, an open-air “conference room” and amphitheater, and a raised knoll planted with pine trees in honor of a local native plant community known as the Pine Barrens.

that has had a hand in many of the new Navy Yard buildings. Environetics was also part of the team that built Central Green, a 5-acre park in the center of the development by renowned landscape architecture firm James Corner Field Operations. The dazzling geometric design of the park, which features a series of circles within circles, is intended as a playground for the 11,000 employees who already work at the Navy Yard campus—a number which will grow dramatically once the site is completely developed with additional commercial and residential districts—as well as to recreate a bit of the wetland and riparian meadow habitat that once comprised the site. “The park was intended to engage the millennial demographic of folks who

are working in the offices and speak to their ‘work hard, play hard’ lifestyle in a big way,” says Sarah Weidner Astheimer, a senior associate with JCFO. “Health and sustainability were the two big components of the project.” A .2-mile “social track” is the organizing feature of the site, built with local aggregate and a permeable resin bond, where people can stroll, jog, or just relax on one of the oversize lounge chairs. Inside the track is a series of distinct garden spaces, including a large wet meadow in the center that handles all the storm water on the site. There is a yoga lawn, ping pong tables, open-air “conference room” and amphitheater, and a raised knoll planted with pine trees in honor of a local native plant community known as the Pine Barrens. gbdmagazine.com


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“The park was intended to engage the millennial demographic of folks who are working in the offices and speak to their ‘work hard, play hard’ lifestyle in a big way.” Sarah Weidner Astheimer, senior associate, JCFO

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05 The View at Montgomery Wallace Roberts and Todd

A new 14-story student apartment building is making a provocative mark in the skyline along the edge of Temple University in North Philadelphia. It is phase one of the redevelopment of a 4.5-acre site, which is bringing muchneeded housing to campus, as well as a revitalization of what has for years been a very pedestrian-unfriendly part of the neighborhood. The LEED Silver structure by Wallace Roberts and Todd houses 834 beds in a mix of 1- to 4-bedroom apartments, as well as a medley of restaurants and shops at street level. The top floor is home to the primary amenity: a space called the Sky Lounge, which is an immensely popular student hang out for studying and socializing. “We call it the Sky Lounge, and the building is called The View, because it is in an area that is fairly flat a mile or so from downtown, so you get this fantastic sweeping view of the city skyline from river to river,” explains Antonio Fiol-Silva, the architect and lead designer on the project from WRT. Besides gaining accolades from the architectural community for its playful yet modern aesthetic, the university community and municipal leaders have praised the multiple layers of environmental sensitivity that were built into the The View’s design. As an urban brownfield redevelopment flanked by a mix of residential, university, and commercial uses, and with direct connections to the city’s vast public transportation network (bus, subway, and regional rail stations are all within walking distance), the project represents the best practices of city building, which have been wholeheartedly embraced in Philadelphia in recent years. An innovative “blue roof” design and other features to mitigate storm water runoff go above and beyond Philadelphia’s stringent green infrastructure regulations. “Our goal was to design and build out the project in a way that would improve health on three levels – the health of the occupants, the health of the surrounding community, and the health of natural resources,” Fiol-Silva says. gb&d

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ABOVE The top floor is home to the primary amenity: a space called the Sky Lounge, which is an immensely popular student hang out for studying and socializing.

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THE OFFICE Workspace solutions giant AgilQuest says there is one surefire way to reduce the environmental footprint of any building-make it smaller By Brian Barth

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24” 32" 18"

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF AGILQUEST

The Department of Homeland Security’s internal mandate is to reduce what they term “usable space per person” to a maximum of 150 square feet in each of its facilities.

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Customs and Border Protection Office Transformation: By The Numbers $287,000: the annual savings in rent as a result of phase one (which saw a space reduction of 5,300 square feet)

$3.3 million: annual savings in rent and operational costs as a result of phase two (in which seven floors of office space were reduced to three)

Since 2013, the federal government has quietly carried out a decidedly unsexy sustainability mission. The White House’s “Freeze the Footprint” policy states that federal agencies are not allowed to increase their leased square footage and, where possible, must take steps to reduce it. The Department of Homeland Security’s internal mandate is to reduce what they term “usable space per person” to a maximum of 150 square feet in each of their facilities. In the case of Customs and Border Protection, an agency housed within the DHS, some existing facilities “have a space utilization rate above 200 usable square feet per person,” says Aron Beninghove, an architect contracted by the CBP to help improve that metric. “From a sustainability standpoint, space reduction is a huge thing,” he says. “In most cases, we’re looking at making a significant reduction in the footprint.” In other words, the same number of workers will occupy much less space—which means a major reduction in building materials, energy usage, and everything else that goes into a government office—without sacrificing productivity. As it turns out, the solutions that CBP is implementing are actually improving worker productivity. There is also the not-so-minor detail that every square foot of space reduction represents savings in rent, construction costs, and operational expenses. Beninghove, as a government contractor with AECOM, acted as the facilities lead for CBP’s recent pilot program to reduce its footprint, for which employee mobility was the central strategy. The idea is simple: rather than each employee being assigned to a specific desk or office, a multitude of different workspaces are made available—ranging from private offices to collaborative workspaces, and everything in between—and employees pick and choose which one they need on a given day. Some employees constantly move about throughout the day so they may use a handful of different workspaces on an informal basis. Telework is also a huge component: by encouraging employees to work from home

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46%: reduction in overall square footage

25%: reduction in office paper use as a result of increased use of electronic files

$600: the amount employees will save, on average, in commuting costs

Additional Phase One Pilot Results:

98%:

percentage of employees who reported they felt that communication and collaboration were improved by the transformation

102%:

increase in worker productivity due to the increased use of mobile technologies

two days a week, workspace is freed up for those who actually need it. The first pilot project involved about 80 employees spread across two floors and nearly 14,000 square feet in one of CBP’s Office of Administration buildings in Washington D.C., who were consolidated onto one 8,700-square-foot floor with just 27 desks. The transformation will net a savings of $287,000 in rent each year, while the increased teleworking will save employees an average of $600 per year in commuting

costs. The number of miles commuted by employees has been cut in half, resulting in a corresponding reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. Phase two was even more ambitious: 550 employees from seven floors in three buildings were brought together onto three floors in one building, resulting in a 46% reduction in square footage and a savings of $3.3 million per year in rent and operational costs. The increased use of electronic files, which went hand-in-hand with the gbdmagazine.com


FEATURES

Freeze The Footprint: The White House's sustainability policy states that federal agencies are not allowed to increase their leased square footage and, where possible, must take steps to reduce it

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF AGILQUEST

As a result of the changes at the CBP Office of Administration, 17% of employees reported an improvement in their sense of work-life balance.

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new mobility strategy, has resulted in a 25% reduction in office paper use. In addition, 17% of employees reported an improvement in their sense of work-life balance. Eleanor Moody, the “people and practice” lead for the AECOM project, says the mobility strategy has nothing to do with cramming more people into less space, but is aimed at “depersonalizing the work environment and adapting to a more mobile work style, not just in the sense of teleworking, but also to be mobile within the space where you work. So one day you might sit in one seat, and the next day you sit in another, and the next day you might just be working

in a conference room all day. It liberates people to move throughout the space.” Moody herself works in one of the transformed spaces and says that she typically sits in one of the tablet armchairs that are arranged next to a bank of windows on her floor. If she needs to make a private call, there are phone booth style cubicles scattered throughout the space that she can duck into as needed. There are also “touchdown stations,” where she can sit down for a few minutes to touch base with a colleague, as well as comfy diner style booths for working lunches, among a myriad of other flexible workspaces.“It’s really rewarding to have worked on this project, where you can just see the change in people’s attitudes in the way that they have embraced coming to work,” Moody says. “People have said to me that the flexibility of the new approach has allowed them to be home when their kids get off the bus from school. They have the ability to manage their time in their own way, and they are really appreciative of that.” may–june 2016

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BELOW AgilQuest’s CEO and founder, who launched the company in 1994 after working on the team that developed the workspace management tool that helped bring IBM back from the brink of insolvency.

"It's like Airbnb for office space, but it's more than that. Who would have thought that a company could have legitimized hitchhiking? It's called Uber. Who would think that they would share their home with somebody else and charge them a fee to stay there? Three years ago you would say you're absolutely mad. But now it's not unreasonable to think that a company with excess office space would share it with workers from outside the company for a fee."

john vivadelli ceo & founder, agilquest 76

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Office Hoteling: a method of office management in which workers dynamically schedule their use of workspaces such as desks, cubicles, and offices. It's an alternative approach to the more traditional method of permanently assigned seating.

Software snapshot:

OnBoard:

AgilQuest’s cloud-based workspace reservation software

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF AGILQUEST

AgilQuest's Quantum Leap: The Internet of Things and the Sharing Economy

Of course CBP’s employees didn’t just self-organize themselves into the new space sharing system. That part was left to AgilQuest, a Richmond, Virginia-based company that provides technology and professional services that support mobile workforce development and eliminate wasted office space. AgilQuest is well known among Fortune 500 companies throughout the world, as well as its many government clients, for OnBoard, its cloud-based workspace reservation software. Employees can reserve the space they need from their desktop tablet or mobile phone, as well as keep track of their colleagues’ schedule of meetings and whereabouts. The software also integrates with common workplace needs, such as catering, along with building automation systems that manage electricity, lighting, and HVAC usage. “AgilQuest provided us with a very proven solution for facilitating that whole idea of sharing space. Their online reservation platform makes it easy,” Beninghove says. CBP also made use of AgilQuest’s Commander BI software, which collects data about workspace utilization from the gb&d

OnBoard system and identifies trends in workspace utilization so that managers can make informed decisions about future projects and glean insight into how different workspace configurations affect employee behavior. CBP is using that feedback to assess the success of their two pilot projects and develop a suite of best practices for implementation across the real estate portfolio. “We are already working on a bunch of other CBP spaces to help build them out in a more mobile configuration,” Beninghove says. “[Commander BI] allows us to pull metrics and statistics that show that our methods worked, that we designed and programmed the correct number of workstations per person. It’s an opportunity to validate a lot of the assumptions that we made.” John Vivadelli, AgilQuest’s CEO and founder, launched the company in 1994 after reading study upon study showing that the average office worker in the US and Europe uses their office only 50% of the time during working hours. Prior to AgilQuest, he worked for IBM, who he says “in the late 80’s and early 90’s had a little problem of the stock price dropping by 70% and huge

Commander BI: The company’s software, which collects data about workspace utilization from the OnBoard system and identifies trends in workspace utilization so that managers can make informed decisions about future projects and glean insight into how different workspace configurations affect employee behavior

agilquest.com: In essence, is a way for businesses to monetize the excess space that they have by renting it out to anyone who needs it whenever it is unoccupied

AgilQuest’s software and service solutions support today’s mobile workforce and eliminate wasted office space. For more information visit www.agilquest.com.

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"How can an asset that is being used 50% of the time be called sustainable? If it's only used 50% of the time, it's using 50% too much material, creating 50% more construction waste, releasing 50% more wastewater runoff, consuming 50% more energy, and producing 50% more CO2 than it should." john vivadelli ceo & founder, agilquest

bottom line losses. They needed to cut costs in order to survive, so they looked at their second largest expense, which is what real estate and occupancy tends to be for most organizations.” Vivadelli led the team that developed the workspace management tool that helped bring IBM back from the brink of insolvency. He started AgilQuest based around the concept, now commonly referred to as office hoteling, which routinely cuts corporate real estate portfolios by 30-40%, saving his clients millions in wasted expenses—while making an equal dent in resource consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. “How can an asset that is being used 50% of the time be called sustainable?” Vivadelli implores. “If it’s only used 50% of the time, it’s using 50% too much material, creating 50% more construction waste, releasing 50% more wastewater runoff, consuming 50% more energy, and producing 50% more CO2 than it should.” The overwhelming success of the AgilQuest model has not made Vivadelli complacent. He’s now expanding the concept to link a multitude of potential workspaces in every major city of the world through a new cloud-based platform known simply as AgilQuest.com, which will be released this summer. Rather than functioning as a discrete system within each corporate or government real estate portfolio, the new platform will go beyond those walls to allow workers to find suitable space when and where they need it, whether that’s up the street from their house at a café, or in the well-appointed video conference room of a global corporation. In essence, AgilQuest.com is a way for businesses to monetize the excess space that they have by renting it out to anyone who needs it whenever it is unoccupied. Vivadelli sees this new initiative not as just another iteration of his core business model, but an approach that will revolutionize the way people work. “It’s like Airbnb for office space, but it’s more than that,” says Vivadelli. “Who would have thought that a company could have legitimized hitchhiking? It’s called Uber. Who would

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think that they would share their home with somebody else and charge them a fee to stay there? Three years ago you would say you’re absolutely mad. But now it’s not unreasonable to think that a company with excess office space would share it with workers from outside the company for a fee.” Clearly, Vivadelli and his team are not afraid to think big.

The Business Case for Smart Buildings and Happy Workers One key to both the business case for downsizing corporate real estate portfolios, and for the impact that it has on sustainability metrics, is the degree to which it is integrated with other efficiency-oriented initiatives—namely, those summed up in the phrase “smart buildings.” Vivadelli calls the approach “smart occupancy.” AgilQuest’s technologies are increasingly able to interface with building automation systems, which are strengthened by the data the company’s software can provide, and vice-versa. “More and more buildings are being built with layers of networks—heating and cooling, lighting, emergency systems—and they are becoming very smart, they’re becoming very aware,” says Torrance Houlihan, AgilQuest’s VP of product. “We’re starting to leverage that, to communicate with the building, talk to the turnstile, talk to the lights, talk to the heating and cooling systems, and get information from them.” The General Services Administration, another federal agency that utilizes AgilQuest software, recently integrated the building automation system of its Washington D.C. headquarters with the OnBoard and Commander BI platforms as part of a major renovation and technology upgrade. With the new system, each time an employgbdmagazine.com


FEATURES

GSA Transformation: By the NumberS 50%: percentage by which GSA cut its operational costs

$32m: in combined savings on leased space and associated service costs as a result of cutting operational costs

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF AGILQUEST

10%: percentage of additional energy costs that the integration with smart building technologies yielded

ee swipes their badge at the entry turnstile, OnBoard registers their presence in the building and sets a sequence of behind the scenes events in motion. The building automation system reads the schedule for that employee and primes itself to bring the various spaces that he or she will use The GSA recently integrated the that day up to a comfortable temperature, building automation system of its just in time for them to arrive. Washington D.C. headquarters with the OnBoard and Commander If they go into a conference room where BI platforms as part of a major they have a meeting scheduled, a sensor in renovation and technology upgrade. the room turns on the lights, which in turn informs the OnBoard system that the person has indeed used the space that they reserved. If the meeting were to be cancelled at the last minute, the building automation leased space and associated service costs. system would inform OnBoard that no one The integration with smart building techwas present, and the space would automat- nologies has yielded an additional 10% anically become available again on the reser- nual savings on energy costs. In the process, vation system. Assuming the meeting does the GSA has saved 16 million kilowatts of happen, five minutes before it is scheduled energy annually, and avoided the omissions to end, the lights briefly dim to signal every- of 16,000 metric tons of CO2. one in the room that another group may be Houlihan points out that a mobile workwaiting to use the space, so they are sure to force is also “fundamentally more resilient finish on time. If no one else is scheduled than when you assign people to one place.” for the space, the lights and HVAC turn Employees can work from home, and with off once the room’s sensors detect that ev- AgilQuest’s upcoming public access resereryone has left, and all of the data about vation system, people will have access to a how the space was actually used, versus large network of other places to work. “It how its use was anticipated, is logged by enhances resiliency and business continuboth the building automation system and ity in the events of unforeseen closures resulting from fire, terrorism, natural diAgilQuest’s Commander BI. Investing in such a high level of work- sasters, or other acts of God,” says Houlihan. place utilization precision pays for itself “People can quickly find another place to go very quickly: the GSA cut its operational to work and continue to deliver value to costs by more than 50%—a total of $32 their customers.” million annually in combined savings on Finally, there is another less direct, hardgb&d

er to quantify benefit that Houlihan refers to as “personal ROI.” As someone who frequently works from his home office, which is an hour and a half drive from AgilQuest headquarters, he speaks from personal experience when noting, “It’s a huge benefit to not have to spend three hours a day in a car. If an organization can offer a better experience to a person by letting them choose where and when they are going to work, by letting them see who is coming in, making sure that they have the right technology for them and making sure that the right space is available to them, it’s really a much more compelling story.” That’s definitely a story that attracts today’s most talented workers, which is perhaps the most important business strategy of all. An office building is no longer just a box for employers to stick their workers into. Today’s top minds see work as what you do, not as a place you go every day. gb&d may–june 2016

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FEATURES

Beauty & Performance ™ in Wood The sustainable alternative to tropical hardwood Refined & beautiful Real wood Maximum hardness & stability Low maintenance Guaranteed long life

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GREEN BUILDINGFEATURES & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Features Spaces Punch List

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82 Testimony for Progress

The D.C. office of a globally recognized law firm makes a strong case for scaling down in size while expanding the capacity for human comfort and energy efficiency

88 History Refines Itself

The legendary French-based building materials company with a history as elegant as its architectural predilections builds a dynamic new North American HQ

92 Who Says You Need Air Conditioning?

With Edmonds ecoPOWER hybrid rooftop ventilator, a new university building received a LEED Gold Certification and eliminated AC in nearly half of its rooms

98 Intimacy, Immersion, and Community

Jeanne Gang builds a new home for the Writers Theatre in Chicago

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S PAC E S WO R K

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PHOTOS: ERIC LAIGNEL

Nixon Peabody’s D.C. office negotiated a green lease for this space, which allows both the landlord and tenant to work toward shared environmental goals.

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TESTIMONY FOR PROGRESS The D.C. office of a globally recognized law firm makes a strong case for scaling down in size while expanding the capacity for human comfort and energy efficiency By Vincent Caruso

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In the competitive orbit of the legal sector, Nixon Peabody is a name that is widely recognized and high-ranking. A Global 100 law firm, the brand mans offices around the world and operates a practice that has collected an enviable trove of awards and accolades. With a diverse team of prestigious legal talent, the specialized focuses of law that the firm practices are as vast as its geographic reach. Boasting a reputation of such domineering stature, it’s certain that the firm’s work hasn’t been honed by thinking in simple or modest terms but rather by commanding a forward-thinking cerebral appetite and a culture aspirational toward growth. For this reason, it is perhaps surprising then that the hunt for a new Washington, D.C. office was in part steered by a practical desire for a smaller workspace. Shrinking physically does not necessarily mean the same conceptually, however. In fact, with Nixon Peabody’s case as an example, sometimes just the opposite is true. While sifting through real estate prospects, Nixon Peabody D.C. office managing partner Jeffrey Lesk understood that minimalism, if executed properly, could mean maximal efficiency. And while the strangulating effects of an uncertain economic climate demand many in the trade to think more tactically about real estate occupancies, investment in smart energy-saving building methodologies are doubly advantageous. The search wasn’t a harrowing one, as the team happened upon a space just a comfortable four blocks away. To ensure that all parties involved in the project were committed to the same environmental ideals, Lesk sowed the company’s sustainability principles into the contractual bond of the space. “We negotiated what’s called a ‘green lease,’” Lesk says. “Essentially, it’s looking at all the components of a commercial lease, in this case from a tenant’s perspective, and negotiating each provision to accomplish not only the landlord’s, but also the tenant’s environmental goals.” The goals in question were as rigorous as they were pervasive. Some tasks were as complex and

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PHOTOS: ERIC LAIGNEL

THIS SPREAD One of the assets that best progressed the intertwined interests of cost and ecology for the Nixon Peabody office was deceivingly inconspicuous. The automated shading via MechoSystems’ SolarTrac System was introduced to the firm to scale down energy consumption by automating shade usage.

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“We negotiated what's called a ‘green lease.’ Essentially, it's looking at all the components of a commercial lease, in this case from a tenant's perspective, and negotiating each provision to accomplish not only the landlord's, but also the tenant's environmental goals.” —Jeffrey Lesk, Office Managing Partner, Nixon Peabody

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PHOTOS: ERIC LAIGNEL

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large-scale as separating Nixon Peabody’s occupied floors from the rest of the building’s electricity infrastructure—a peculiarity for Washington, D.C. law firms. This provoked the team to pursue other avenues that intersected evenly with sustainability and cost-benefit, aided by the Washington, D.C. office of the global firm, Perkins+Will. One of the assets that best progressed the intertwined interests of cost and ecology was deceivingly inconspicuous. The automated shading via MechoSystems’ SolarTrac System was introduced to scale down energy consumption by automating shade usage. After an analysis of the adjacent buildings and solar position throughout the year, Perkins+Will determined that introducing the motorized SolarTrac system on the east and west facades of the new space (the south façade was shaded by an adjacent building) would minimize HVAC energy loads by reducing solar heat gain, while allowing occupants to take full advantage of exterior glazing. The SolarTrac system takes advantage of the democratized open floor plan layout, which includes all glass office fronts along both interior and exterior offices and allows daylight to penetrate deeply into the space. The SolarTrac system helps optimize the circadian benefits to occupants from exposure to natural light while eliminating the need for employees to wrestle over shade positioning, or suffer eyestrain and ergonomic discomfort from glare. The SolarTrac control system is fed information from the radiometers on the roof and makes adjustments accordingly. “What it does is it pulls in weather information from the radiometers on the roof,” explains Dana Strickland, MechoSystems manager of business development. “These radiometers are part of the control system that gb&d

can calculate from the glazing how much heat or light is hitting the glass at any given time.” The shading then either lifts or drops to a certain height based on these calculations, relative to end user preferences. And for greater efficiency and comfort, the program can override the system during cloudy periods and under conditions where the glare is so strong from sun bouncing off surrounding buildings that the shades need to be lowered. The gains of newly immersive outside views and washes of natural daylight endowed by the high level of transparency, it would be thought, are afforded only when the shades are raised. However, the specialized material tempers the circadian interference imposed by traditional weighty curtains. “You’re not creating a wall like you are with drapery, and you’re not creating a wall like you are with closed venetian blinds,” explains Bill Maiman, marketing manager at MechoSystems. “Instead, you have perforations through the fabric, but yet the openness is selected to match the glazing, the elevation, and the architectural arrangement of the building.” MechoSystems offers a range of perforated shade cloth options with different degrees of openness and materiality. Perkins+Will specified the EcoVeil Series with PVC-free composition and Cradle to Cradle Product

ABOVE The SolarTrac control system pulls in weather information from the radiometers on the roof. These radiometers are part of the control system that can calculate from the glazing how much heat or light is hitting the glass at any given time. The shading then either lifts or drops to a certain height based on these calculations, relative to end user preferences. And for greater efficiency and comfort, the program can override the system during cloudy periods and under conditions where the glare is so strong from sun bouncing off surrounding buildings that the shades need to be lowered.

Certification to comply with the project’s material health goals. As Perkins+Will fine-tailored their design to Nixon Peabody’s environmental ambitions, MechoSystems provided a customized system that conformed to the architectural design and sustainability goals of the project. In effect, the sophisticated symbiosis Nixon Peabody’s D.C. office sought to inspire through the space was tested through the very process of creating it. gb&d may–june 2016

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HISTORY REFINES ITSELF The legendary French-based building materials company with a history as elegant as its architectural predilections builds a dynamic new North American HQ By Vincent Caruso

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freestanding buildings that were erected sometime in the 1960s, and had been sitting idly and in relatively poor shape for years before finally being scouted by Saint-Gobain’s team. At 277,000 square feet and spanning more than 65 acres, this 18-month-long renovation project was executed as a comprehensive, virtually all-encompassing transformation designed to situate more than 800 employees. This began with creating an entirely new building envelope, as the one they inherited was undesirably circumscribed by exposed steel. “The steel, because it was outside of the building envelope, became a conductor of cold air straight through into the building,” says Neil B. Liebman, principal at Bernardon and the core and shell architect on the project. “There were no thermal breaks.” Large thermal breaks between the inside and outside were applied by the team to the effect of maintaining the space’s existing feel while thwarting the cold air conductivity. By bridging the gap, literally, between the two individual buildings on the site, this headquarters will house more than 800 employees of both Saint-Gobain and CertainTeed, the company’s North American construction materials subsidiary. “The existing buildings were kind of in an L-shape to each other and had a very small connecting link between the two,” Liebman illustrates, with one of the “L” lines positioned on a south-

PHOTOS: JEFFREY TOTARO

Excellence, luxury, and efficiency are three qualities that are essentially woven into Saint-Gobain’s DNA. Founded in the mid-17th century at the decree of King Louis XIV, the establishment served initially as an ad hoc manufacturer of glass for the Hall of Mirrors at the Palace of Versailles. Fast-forward a few centuries and while the monarchy crumbled under the stampede of the French Revolution, the industrial giant has remained firmly intact. In fact, SaintGobain has enjoyed the opposite fate of the discarded nobility. Today the company is one of the largest building materials manufacturers in the world, managing a vast, global network of diverse industrial subsidiaries and affiliates. Building on its esteemed legacy, SaintGobain has marked its 350th anniversary as an industrial powerhouse with the construction of a new North American headquarters. Located roughly 25 miles west of metropolitan Philadelphia in the cozy borough of Malvern, Pennsylvania, the tranquil setting enveloping this residence might at first appear too muted for Saint-Gobain’s lineage of ostentatious royalty. But the marks of highness here are expressed less by imposing extravagance than by the stature of its design ingenuities and the advanced sustainability approach that they enabled. The space selected for the project included two separate, though cozily proximate,

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SPACES

By bridging the gap, literally, between these two individual buildings on the site, this new headquarters will house more than 800 employees.

RIGHT The design was “really about people connecting with each other,” so many open, comfortable meeting spaces were included in the new building.

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SPACES

FACING PAGE The HQ boasts a cafe and fitness center, both of which were central to the entire design process and encourage employees to be healthy.

north axis and the other, east-west. Rather than simply linking the two buildings with a skyway-like structure, Liebman’s team connected the two original buildings with a full building expansion. The resulting adjoining building was subsequently furnished with the services and amusements comprising a designated “amenity zone” that includes a place to pick up health foods and a gymnasium. “The cafe and fitness center were actually a big part of the whole design process,” says Pier Derrickson, interior design principal at Jacobs and the interior architect on the project. Experts joined the project to provide wellness guidance on details such as the selection of food, fitness center equipment and programs, and the ambiance of areas where employees would convene recreationally. “We included pantry spaces that allow a lot of gathering and social interaction,” Derrickson illustrates. “So it’s really about people connecting with each other.” The site of the Malvern headquarters is most unique in that its very constitution is an affirming statement of self-sufficiency. In constructing the space, Saint-Gobain opted to employ a plethora of their own products, too. “Nobody has ever done this,” boasts Carmen Ferrigno, vice president of communications for Saint-Gobain, “We became our supplier and our customer.” This autonomy was demonstrated perhaps most strikingly with the utilization of Saint-Gobain Corporation subsidiary SageGlass, an electrochromic glass that electronically tints in proportion to the intensity of the beam of the sun. Much of the building’s facade is comprised of floor-to-ceiling glazing, and SageGlass fixgb&d

LEFT Much of the building’s facade is comprised of floor-to-ceiling glazing, and in fact is made of Saint-Gobain’s own SageGlass.

ture is heavily represented on the southern and western facades. This makes for a sleek modernist appearance, but a glass facade typically poses potential burdens. “From day one, we were concerned about how we were going to cool that space,” recounts Liebman, “but SageGlass allowed us to create a comfortable interior environment where the employees are working in the building but the building is always comfortable and temperature-maintained.” In the areas of the Malvern headquarters where the SageGlass was installed, management of heat gain and optimized shading enables the space to aid the comfort of employees while reducing the energy consumption of lighting and HVAC systems. But underpinning the impactful application of SageGlass is a larger ethical philosophy that’s as deeply rooted as the soil upon which this edifice rests. “This company started with science and aesthetics,” says Ferrigno, expounding that by using design to honor and interpret natural beauty, the physical and emotional experience of occupants is heightened. Prosperous visual pleasure blended with expression of the corporation’s identity manifests boldly in the contours of the facade. The curved wall bears a resemblance to that of the first World Expo in Paris constructed by SaintGobain in 1937. For Ferrigno and his team, this represents the Saint-Gobain’s next profound generational declaration. “That’s a world in transition.” gb&d may–june 2016

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S PAC E S L E A R N

WHO SAYS YOU NEED AIR CONDITIONING? With Edmonds ecoPOWER hybrid rooftop ventilator, a new university building received a LEED Gold Certification and eliminated AC in nearly half of its rooms By Maura Welch

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and adding some type of wind-driven feature made sense for us. The fact that the system can be passive or active was important,” he says. Breathing Fresh Air into Ventilation Methods To understand why the ecoPOWER is so effective, one first needs to understand what exactly distinguishes a hybrid roof ventilator from traditional models. Purely gravity roof ventilators use upward movement of warm air, as well as the power of the wind to turn turbines, which draw air up and out of a building. Mechanical roof ventilators rely on electric motors to actively move the air up the shaft and out through the ventilator. Edmonds’s ecoPOWER Hybrid Roof Ven-

PHOTOS: BEN BENSCHNEIDER

Seattle summers have been unusually hot in recent years, but students and researchers at the University of Washington’s new Molecular Engineering Laboratory have managed to stay quite comfortable. And it may come as a surprise that they do so without the help of air conditioning. In 2013, the university partnered up with Affiliated Engineers, Inc. and architecture firm ZGF Architects to begin designing and constructing the new lab. Engineers from AEI searched for ventilation solutions that would create a comfortable environment while keeping costs low. They stumbled upon a new system by Edmonds, a leading producer of energy efficient ventilation solutions. Edmonds had blended gravity and mechanical ventilation to achieve serious energy efficiency with a product that suited the university’s needs perfectly—the ecoPOWER Hybrid Roof Ventilator. “They didn’t start out looking for a hybrid roof ventilator because none existed before this!” explains director of Edmonds USA Kurt Shafer. “The ecoPOWER is the first one of its kind. And the Edmonds product happened to fit their needs perfectly.” Bruce McLay of Affiliated Engineers, Inc. served as the project manager for AEI on the UW project; he explains why the hybrid design suited the University’s needs. “We decided to incorporate solar chimneys into the design of the gravity ventilation system,

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Noteworthy: This is the first UW lab building with offices that use natural ventilation instead of mechanical air conditioning. In addition to the ecoPOWER hybrid roof ventilators that draw hot air up and out, natural ventilation in office spaces is provided by windows that open and electronically controlled ceiling fans. To add to the sustainability of the building, two rain gardens control storm water, and three rooftop gardens absorb and filter storm water and moderate building temperatures.

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PHOTOS: BEN BENSCHNEIDER

ECOPOWER VENTILATORS BY THE NUMBERS

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125MPH

Wind speeds up to which the ecoPOWER ventilators are warranted

63-76%

Energy savings in areas where ecoPOWER ventilators eliminate the need for air conditioning

40%

Percentage of the above-ground square footage where the ecoPOWER ventilators have eliminated the need for air conditioning

260

Maximum running power consumption (in watts) of each ecoPOWER vent in mechanical mode (for perspective, a typical window air conditioning unit would consume approximately 1400 watts)

45.5

Decibels emitted in power mode (for perspective, a single residential air conditioning unit at 100 feet emits 60 decibels)

10

Year warranty—history shows all units deployed are still in operation after 12 years and counting

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Best suited project for the ecoPOWER hybrid rooftop ventilator: Perfect for LEED Silver & Gold certification or any projects that need lower power and higher performance energy saving rooftop ventilation. The standard return on the investment can be: As high as 90% depending on application and usage. Wind will increase its performance, so at no wind, it has one of the lowest power consumption rates in the industry, and with wind, the power consumption can decrease by an additional 20%.

tilator is unique because it combines both gravity and mechanical modes. On many days, upward momentum of warm air and the wind-actuated turbines are enough to cool the facility. On very hot days when the gravity mode is not enough, it switches to mechanical mode, which engages the motor to actively move more warm air out. The two modes can also work simultaneously. “The engineers who do research here like the idea that engineering solved this problem,” says Steve Tatge, executive director of Major Capital Projects at the University. “And people who are in a lab environment many hours a day appreciate the fact that you can open the windows to the fresh air outside. You can’t do that in a more controlled air conditioned environment.”

Total energy saved by the product: Estimated to be in the billions of kilowatt hours.

Clean, Quiet, and Low Maintenance

What Hybrid Designs Mean for the Future of Ventilation The university credits the ecoPOWER ventilators for helping the laboratory achieve LEED Gold certification. They have been deemed such a success that they will also be used in the school’s construction of a new Nano Engineering and Sciences building, which is slated for completion by April 2017.

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ABOVE By utilizing ecoPOWER ventilators, you can have comfortable office spaces that are not air conditioned.

Tatge will also oversee this upcoming installation of ecoPOWER ventilators and says that the installation is a symbol for the university’s movement toward greater energy efficiency. “Its not even so much about the specific success of the Molecular Engineering lab or the upcoming Nano Lab project,” he says. “ By utilizing ecoPOWER ventilators you can have comfortable office spaces that are not air conditioned. That’s an even bigger story for me. This could influence how we design campus buildings in the future.” gb&d

PHOTOS: BEN BENSCHNEIDER

The ecoPOWER ventilators are much quieter than traditional motorized ventilators (essentially inaudible in typical background noise), and are also low-maintenance. They are made from marine grade aluminum, which makes them lightweight and easy to install. Allan Ramsay, export manager for Edmonds, credits the motor, which is manufactured by ebm papst of Germany, for the system’s reliability. “It’s an electronically commutated motor, which is the newest of motor technologies,” he explains. “ebm papst was really the forerunner on these. They don’t have brushes; they work with magnetism. So there is nothing to maintain in them. They don’t need oil, grease, nothing.”

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SPACES

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1.

Purely gravity roof ventilators use upward movement of warm air, as well as the power of the wind to turn turbines, which draw air up and out of a building. Mechanical roof ventilators rely on electric motors to actively move the air up the shaft and out through the ventilator. Edmonds’s ecoPOWER Hybrid Roof Ventilator is unique because it combines both gravity and mechanical modes.

2.

The ecoPOWER ventilators are much quieter than traditional motorized ventilators (essentially inaudible in typical background noise), and are also low-maintenance.

3.

On very hot days when the gravity mode of the ventilators is not enough, it switches to mechanical mode, which engages the motor to actively move more warm air out. The two modes can also work simultaneously.

RENDERING: COURTESY OF ZGF ARCHITECTS

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SPACES

S PA C E S P L AY

INTIMACY, IMMERSION, A N D C O M M U N I TY Jeanne Gang builds a new home for the Writers Theatre in Chicago

PHOTOS: STEVE HALL (C) HEDRICH BLESSING

By Kristofer Lenz

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PHOTOS: STEVE HALL (C) HEDRICH BLESSING

An astonishing 98% of the previous Women’s Library Building was recycled during construction, crowned by the attractive re-use of exterior bricks to create an acoustic shell in the main theater. Local plants also populate multiple green spaces that are supported by local and renewable building materials.

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SPACES

ABOVE The structure follows a “theater in the park” concept and is organized around a 36,000-squarefoot multi-use gathering space.

When the critically acclaimed Writers Theatre decided that they needed a new space, they set out to find a “home” in every sense of the word. They needed something permanent, comfortable, intimate, and capable of supporting the company’s ambitious staging. Additionally, they sought a shared communal space that would ensure that they would remain embedded within the broader day-to-day community of the theatre’s hometown of Glencoe, Illinois. Together with the Village of Glencoe and the Woman’s Library Club (whose building the company inhabited), Writers Theatre hatched an exciting plan to turn the club’s structure into an engaging multiuse community hub, providing the town with a vital platform to support artistic creation and a catalyst for further development in the downtown area. To create this new space, Writers Theatre engaged Studio Gang Architects, the renowned local firm with a strong and growing legacy of developing inspired buildings and public spaces throughout the Chicagoland area. Led by led by founder and design principal Jeanne Gang, the Stugb&d

dio Gang team collaborated with Writers Theater staff, artists, and patrons to design an artistically generative space focused on intimate communal interactions and developed with sustainable building practices. The most immediate impression from the new Writers Theatre structure is one of openness and invitation. The structure follows a “theater in the park” concept and is organized around a 36,000-square-foot multi-use gathering space. Depending on the time and day, the Litowitz Atrium will be utilized as a lobby for performances, a public gathering space, in informal rehearsal stage, or the site of community readings and other events. Glass walls to the south and east let sunlight flood the area, while sliding doors allow natural flow into the adjacent park. High above the atrium is Studio Gang’s stunning Grand Gallery Walk, a wood-screen enclosed walkway that allows patrons to stroll around the atrium and gain access to the green roof garden. Further inspiration can be seen in Tudor-style design elements, which echo both the great theaters of English tradition, and Glencoe’s own architectural history. Writers Theatre made its name by creating intimate experiences between performer and audience. The center’s two performance spaces, a 250-seat main stage, and a 99-seat black box venue are optimized to facilitate interpersonal connection. In

the larger theater, a thrust stage and three distinct seating banks allow for actor circulation and dramatic staging. The smaller theater offers movable walls and variable seating that allows for a wide variety of stage sizes and layouts. Additionally, an expansive rehearsal space represents the first time the troupe’s players have been able to rehearse onsite in the company’s 24 seasons. To make the structure accessible to all visitors, the entire space is ADA compliant with accessible ramps and elevators throughout. Additionally, the performance and rehearsal areas offer state-of-the-art hearing induction loops designed to assist visitors with a limited range of hearing. Studio Gang’s focus on sustainable building practices can be seen throughout the center. An astonishing 98% of the previous Women’s Library Building was recycled during construction, crowned by the attractive re-use of exterior bricks to create an acoustic shell in the main theater. Local plants populate multiple green spaces that are supported by local and renewable building materials. Studio Gang and Writers Theatre are currently seeking LEED Gold Certification for the center. During evening performances, the Writers Theatre center will glow from within, sending a clear message to the community-at-large that they’ve found a warm, inviting space safe for artistic expression. gb&d may–june 2016

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Acczent® Flourish High Performance Flooring. Healthier Workplaces Start Here. The Acczent Flourish system – flooring, adhesive and maintenance routine - can contribute to better indoor air quality for a healthier workplace. This low-emitting product is certified asthma & allergy friendly™ by the Asthma & Allergy Foundation of America. And Tarkett products are currently the only flooring products with this certification. Room to room, floor to floor, bring the whole experience together. Find out more at www.tarkettna.com.

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Features Spaces Punch List

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Suite Plants

106 Sustainable Solution

Constellation

108 Environmental Innovation

EnGoPLANET Street Lights

110 Guest Column

Mark Alan Hughes

112 On the Spot

Christine Knapp

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Green Space Suite Plants Suite Plants, which manufactures and markets an inviting selection of living wall systems, takes going green literally. This family company is affiliated with two Dutch industry authorities with experience ranging from decades to a century, making Suite Plants an expert on living wall systems for both indoors and out. Here, we will discuss the benefits of these wall installations, which are just as alive as the people who get to enjoy them day in and day out. By Alex Nates-Perez

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF SUITE PLANTS

Increased Working Productivity: While the wall pictured here was installed outdoors, Living Walls found inside have shown to increase worker productivity. Texas A&M University conducted a study that showed workers in greener conditions generated 15% more ideas. Incorporating a Living Wall in your office or workspace could increase employee productivity as an added bonus to a pleasing green aesthetic.

Biophilia: Humans face a yearning for unchanged Earth—a phenomenon explained as biophilia. Biophilia is the reason why natural spaces have healing effects and why views of nature are so highly desired. Green spaces like parks and nature preserves can quench this thirst, as can Living Green Walls.

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Sustainability and LEED Credits: Sustainable rating systems such as LEED, the WELL building Standard, and the International Green Construction Code (IgCC) have recognized Living Walls in varying degrees as a product to make living spaces more green and sustainable.

Improved Air Quality: We spend most of our time inside, and unfortunately for us, indoor air is 5-10 times more polluted than outdoor air. Living Green Walls can dramatically reduce inside air pollutants such as carbon dioxide, volatile organic compounds, and also prevent illnesses caused by poor air quality.

For more information visit www.suiteplants.com

Lower Occupant Stress: Many credited universities such as Texas A&M and Washington State have conducted experiments that give the presence of plants credit for lowering stress levels within the workplace. In these tests, participants working around plants were 12% less stressed than workers without greenery nearby.

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Sustainable Solution Constellation

Constellation cuts carbon and costs to supplement education budgets By Emily Torem

Like many others, school districts in California experience budget crunches. Reallocating existing funds is usually the first solution, but instead of cutting from the arts or band, why not trim down fixed operational costs—like electricity? Constellation, a competitive energy company, works with variety of businesses and institutions to help them do just that through affordable and accessible options for distributed energy solutions, like solar. The company recently completed a solar project for The Chaffey Joint Union High School District in Southern California, which allowed the school district to install the system at no upfront cost. This was achieved through a power purchase agreement (PPA) contract model, which delivers the benefits of solar energy to educational institutions and businesses, while unlocking potentially significant savings on their energy costs. Through Constellation’s end-to-end management of on-site solar installations, schools are able to free up time and funds to focus on what is really important—a win for any school district.

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The complete 6.76-megawatt (MW) array will provide approximately 11,000 MW hours of energy to eight schools, which is enough power to meet approximately 46 =% of the school district’s energy needs. The solar panels will be mounted on a combination of carport and shade structures—providing shade to cars while simultaneously generating solar energy. Shade structures, which look very similar to carports, are typically built in recreational areas for children, especially valuable in sunny places like Southern California. “Power purchase agreements are a great option for school districts like Chaffey,” says Brendon Quinlivan, director, distributed energy origination for Constellation. ”By financing the construction and maintenance costs for solar, schools avoid the costly installation and purchasing of panels and realize an immediate benefit of powering their daily operations at a fixed cost that’s often at or below their current electricity rate.” Depending on who retains the solar renewable energy certificates (SRECs) for a project, schools can also reduce their carbon footprint. The arrangement works by selling the solar power generated by Constellation’s onsite arrays back to the school districts at a discounted rate. The school buys all the power produced by the solar arrays as long as the power purchase agreement is still active. And, as it often offers them substantial savings, it’s an

attractive option for schools looking to inject more capital into student services, operations, or other critical projects. Constellation worked directly with PFMG Solar, which specializes in meeting the energy needs of schools,

“Some of these schools are paying up to $7 million a year on electricity, so if you’re cutting 25-30% back on their bills, that’s amazing for education.” PAUL MIKOS, PRESIDENT, PFMG SOLAR

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IN CONVERSATION with Christine Knapp

By The Numbers

Continued from p. 22

Sustainability has often been considered a higher tier issue on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. But I think it actually needs to be integrated much more closely with those things that people care about in their daily life. So I think we have to challenge ourselves to partner up a little bit better and create some new non-traditional allies.

6.76 MW The size of the project

25 years The length of the power purchase agreement

21,800 Number of photovoltaic panels located on parking canopies at eight sites

11k MW hours The amount the project will generate per year

46% The approximate amount of the electricity needs met by onsite solar panels

8,782 tons

PHOTO: PFMG SOLAR; GRAPHIC: MICHAEL CURIEL

The amount of carbon dioxide that will be diverted annually, which is the equivalent of 1,677 passenger vehicles according to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data

$40 Million The amount of money estimated to be saved on electricity over the next 25 years gb&d

to develop the solar project for Chaffey. “Some of these schools are paying up to $7 million a year on electricity, so if you’re cutting 25-30% back on their bills, that’s amazing for education,” says Paul Mikos, president of PFMG Solar. Schools often fall victim to expensive energy costs because they consume power during peak hours (midafternoon), making their electricity bills on the whole higher than many other types of buildings and businesses. Having solar panels onsite means that instead of simply using energy during peak hours, and paying top dollar for it, schools are now involved in producing energy during the peak, which reduces the amount of power they need to purchase from the grid and helps them realize savings. “You can think of it like a piggy bank,” says Zeb Wallace, senior business development manager at Constellation, “When the solar system produces more than the needs of the school, like in the summer when there’s virtually no activity, energy credits are deposited into the bank, which can then be applied when school goes back into session.” The solar array also comes with educational benefits, encouraging a dialogue for young children on alternative energy, sustainability, and our closest star—the sun. “We’ve written some easier to comprehend programs for students, so they can make sense of how and why solar energy is working at their school, why a sunny day is better than a cloudy day, why a southern facing panel is more productive, etc.,” Mikos explains. Supporting the idea that clean solar power is not only a good option for the environment, but a viable one for schools, or any entity looking to save money and invest in the environment, is a great achievement for Constellation, PFMG Solar, and education—and one which is expanding the landscape of renewable energy. “Frankly, the first reason schools buy solar now is because it’s far less expensive,” Mikos says. gb&d

gb&d: Are low energy prices making it a challenge to motivate people to adopt energy efficiency practices? Knapp: That is a challenge right now, but fortunately or unfortunately, depending on how you’re looking at it, I don’t think that low energy prices are here to stay. Folks who are familiar with the energy world pretty much know that this is a blip, and we’re not exactly sure how long it will be around, but it’s unlikely that it will be this low long-term. People who are making

“That is a challenge right now, but fortunately or unfortunately, depending on how you’re looking at it, I don’t think that low energy prices are here to stay.” long-term decisions that might impact their energy consumption are smart to consider that energy prices will certainly go up. But for the current moment, it is difficult to get someone to want to invest in energy efficiency retrofits if they have to put up a lot of money up front and have to wait longer to get the full return on that investment, as opposed to if prices are high and they can see in just two years that they would be saving money. gb&d: Does the city offer incentives for energy efficiency investments? Knapp: We ran a program called EnergyWorks for a number of years for both residential and for commercial buildings. The residential program has ended, though there is still a small amount of funds for commercial properties that is done through a revolving loan program. So as the money that was loaned out comes back in, it can be loaned out again. But we are considering new strategies to help incentivize folks. At this point, commercial banks really do understand that energy efficiency is a good This conversation continues on p. 113

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Environmental Innovation EnGoPLANET Street Lights By Kristofer Lenz

When you think of Las Vegas, you probably imagine the famous neon-glowing sign and streets with casino after casino lit up and bursting with activity well into the night. Every one of those lightbulbs represents an electric bill, and they add up fast. The city of Las Vegas currently pays more than a million dollars per year on streetlights alone, but a money-saving solution is currently in the works. The city is working toward lowering the electric bill by testing solar- and pedestrian-powered streetlights developed by New York-based clean tech startup EnGoPLANET. The installation, announced in March, will be the first ever in the world to combine kinetic and solar energy in street lighting technology. The lights are zero emission, off the grid, and could provide the city with a wide variety of benefits. The highly efficient LEDs draw energy from a combination of maximum efficiency solar cells and an innovative pad system that harvests kinetic energy from the footfalls of passersby—also utilizing motion sensors to

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light the way when needed (and save energy when not). The streetlights are festooned with a variety of other technological features, such as an array of sensors can track things like atmospheric and traffic conditions and upload data into the cloud, providing a bounty of information to city planners. EnGoPLANET’s design also allows for the streetlights to become something of a social hub. They have comfortable seating and a small surface that lets pedestrians charge their electronic devices wirelessly or via USB ports while they rest and use the provided WiFi. Four streetlights will be installed in Vegas’ Arts District’s Boulder Plaza where they will be monitored and tested. The primary concern for EnGoPLANET is seeing if the batteries can survive the blistering heat of a Vegas summer. If the launch is a success, EnGoPLANET could provide an ideal solution to bringing much needed light to the off-the-grid trails throughout Las Vegas Valley and beyond. gb&d

ABOVE New York-based clean tech startup EnGoPLANET, whose products promote a lifestyle of using alternative energy sources that will reduce dependency on fossil fuels for energy, currently has clients across the nation, ranging from AT&T, Alliant Energy, and the City of Santa Monica.

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The EnGoPLANET installation, announced in March, will be the first ever in the world to combine kinetic and solar energy in street lighting technology.

The streetlights are equipped with an array of sensors that can track things like atmospheric and traffic conditions and upload data into the cloud, providing a bounty of information to city planners.

The streetlights have comfortable seating and a small surface that lets pedestrians charge their electronic devices wirelessly or via USB ports while they rest and use the provided WiFi.

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF ENGOPLANET

The highly efficient LEDs draw energy from a combination of maximum efficiency solar cells and an innovative pad system that harvests kinetic energy from the footfalls of passersby—also utilizing motion sensors to light the way when needed (and save energy when not).

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Guest Column Mark Alan Hughes

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policy is that almost all of the benefits of emissions reduction will accrue to those outside the city or region that creates those benefits. We share an atmosphere with the entire population of the world. And this is exactly what makes the logic so brutal: local effort on emissions reduction receives only small fraction of the total return on that effort, most of which is “external,” in the language of economists. So, an emissions goal provides too little value for local leaders to mobilize local interests. It’s a recipe for under-investing and under-performing. Third, the cruel irony of this collective action problem is that cities and regions may well generate more emissions reductions from programs driven by other policy goals than by explicit emissions goals themselves. The green building sector provides a useful example of this. The sector would surely have more motivation for complying with disclosure programs and energy codes on the basis of avoided costs in energy and/or resilience than on the basis of emissions reductions and climate change mitigation. Emissions reductions would be co-benefits of disclosure and codes, but not the goal. So what’s the alternative to “80 by 50”? Instead of commissioning feasibility studies of whether they can achieve “80 by 50,” cities should instead be identifying the energy, land use, and transportation options that maximize long-term employment, public health, and resilience net benefits for their local constituencies. That is the best way to prepare cities for a future that is already unavoidable. At the same time, it is probably the most effective way for cities to do their share for the rest of the world. gb&d Mark Alan Hughes has taught at Penn since 1999, where he is Professor of Practice in the School of Design and faculty director of the Kleinman Center for Energy Policy. He was the founding Director of Sustainability for Philadelphia and led the creation of Greenworks Philadelphia in 2008.

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PHOTO: CLARA HUGHES

The Penn professor explains why, instead of focusing on “80 by 50” goals, cities should identify the energy, land use, and transportation options that maximize longterm employment, public health, and resilience net benefits for their local constituencies

Cities often have a “Charge of the Light Brigade” attitude on green policy goals. This comes from a well-intentioned place: there is overwhelming scientific evidence that the risks of devastating climate change warrant very large and very rapid reductions in the greenhouse gas emissions generated by our energy system. No contest. But with our rising sense of urgency, one of our many challenges will be making these reductions in smart, fair, and effective ways. The current rallying cry for many cities is “80 by 50”—a call for an 80% reduction (from a 2005 baseline) in carbon emissions by the year 2050. This target comes from a very wellgrounded source. Since 2007, the scientific community has estimated that a reduction at that scale is needed to provide a 50-50 chance of limiting global warming to 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, which is the standard threshold after which we can expect greater and greater impacts from climate change. (And trust me, all these numbers err on the side of caution and most people who study these issues would say they understate the risks and costs.) In the decade since this target was adopted by every major scientific institution in the US and around the world, it has also been adopted around the world by many governments, including at least 16 US states and 35 US cities, including New York, Chicago, and Seattle. Philadelphia is considering it. But there are three basic flaws with using a planetary target as a fundamental driver and organizer for local policy development and implementation. First, it is unlikely that the efficient way to meet any national or global target is for every state, city, block, and building to meet the exact same numerical target. Different local conditions will always mean the efficient policy strategy will allow for variation in the targets, some higher and some lower. Second, the brutal logic of climate


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On the Spot Christine Knapp

IN CONVERSATION with Christine Knapp Continued from p. 107

A CURRENT EVENT WE SHOULD FOLLOW MORE CLOSELY

investment, so there is actually less of a need for the government to step in and provide those products because they are readily available in the private lending sector.

CAUSE YOU’D SUPPORT IF YOU HAD A BILLION DOLLARS

gb&d: What would you like people coming to the AIA conference to know about Philadelphia?

The fight over the Clean Power Plan and whether the EPA will be able to move it ahead.

Campaign finance reform.

The subject of this issue’s In Conversation interview, Philadelphia’s director of The Office of Sustainability—Christine Knapp—answers our questionnaire and touches on driverless cars, Vietnam, and karaoke.

FIRST STEP TOWARD BECOMING A STEWARD OF THE ENVIRONMENT

Voting. Individual action is wonderful, but the politics and laws that govern us all make such a bigger impact, so we need elected officials that will act on these issues. MOST MEANINGFUL PROJECT YOU’VE COMPLETED

While with the Philadelphia Water Department, I helped start PowercorpsPHL, an Americorps program for at risk youth that provides on-thejob training in the service of the environment. The Powercorps members serve with dedication and passion, and often go on to pursue sustainability related degrees or careers. PERSON WHO HAS MOST INFLUENCED YOUR PHILOSOPHY

ONE TECHNOLOGY ON THE HORIZON THAT CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

Driverless cars. Just thinking about how they could change the way we design and use public spaces gets me excited about the possibilities. YOUR TOPIC IF YOU WERE ASKED TO GIVE A TED TALK

I once gave a presentation similar to a TED talk on how to be good at karaoke!

THE NEXT BIG IDEA WILL COME FROM

Making something old new again. Older generations often practiced sustainability out of necessity—from reusable milk jugs to using all parts of an animal. What else can we learn from our past to help solve today’s problems? ONE BOOK EVERYONE SHOULD READ

For Philadelphians, I always recommend A Prayer for the City by Buzz Bissinger for a great primer on city and neighborhood politics. FAVORITE MODE OF TRANSPORTATION

BUILDING TREND YOU HOPE WILL NEVER GO OUT OF FASHION

Maximizing daylight. Who enjoys spending their day in the dark? WHAT YOU WOULD TELL THE GREEN MOVEMENT IF IT WAS YOUR CHILD

Go make friends! Hang out with other issues— health, community quality of life, economic development, public safety, art, and more!

WAY TO MAKE THE ENVIRONMENT A NON-PARTISAN ISSUE

Science education. If more people, particularly politicians, understood the science of climate change, they would understand the imperative to act. MOST COMPELLING ARGUMENT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP

I hate creating food waste. Even though I compost, I always think of all the work that went into producing the food and of those who suffer from hunger, which makes it all the more heartbreaking.

From an urban perspective, we’re now seeing more studies confirming the connection between environmental stewardship and positive community benefits, such as reducing crime and improving property values. A green space, even if it’s just a few trees or a rain garden, can make marked differences in both physical and mental health. Stewardship is the difference between a vacant lot strewn with trash and a vibrant community garden.

MOST FULFILLING HOBBY

ENVIRONMENTAL COME-TO-JESUS MOMENT

Bicycles are the best way to take in your city and are usually the fastest way to get around. WASTEFUL HABIT YOU’RE TRYING TO KICK

PHOTO: MARGO REED

Van Jones’s work to connect the environment solutions with economic progress permanently shifted the way I approach my work and how I engage people in it.

Volunteering with my neighborhood civic association where I’ve been on the board for 10 years. We fight litter, plant trees, support our local schools, review zoning variances, and generally bring neighbors together. GREATEST PROFESSIONAL PET PEEVE

Not knowing who the decision makers are on the issues you care about.

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Working with neighbors who lived in the shadow of the Sunoco refinery in Southwest Philadelphia and seeing environmental health and justice issues firsthand. FAVORITE PLACE YOU’VE TRAVELED

Vietnam. It exceeded any expectations I had and delivered some of the most beautiful landscapes and delicious food I’ve ever had.

Knapp: I think one of the things a lot of people don’t know if they haven’t been here in a long time is how amazing our food scene is. I think everyone just goes and gets a cheesesteak and thinks that is what Philadelphia has to offer. But in the last decade or so, we really exploded in having so many different types of food. I think it’s partly because of the growth of our immigrant population that there are so many types of cuisine from around the world here. But we also have an unusual liquor control board that enables a lot of our restaurants to be

“The former mayor’s tagline for our work was for Philadelphia to be the number one green city in America. And I don’t see any reason why we shouldn’t continue to keep that as our goal.” BYOB, so it can be a little cheaper for, say, a young chef to start up their own restaurant, because they don’t have to buy a liquor license, which can be really expensive. So there’s been a lot of ingenuity and younger chefs opening up small, really creative 30-seat restaurants where they can do what they want to do. So I encourage people to get out of the convention center area and try some of the local restaurants that are doing really interesting food. I think they will be pleasantly surprised. gb&d: Philadelphia is uniquely known as the City of Brotherly Love, to which the tagline “and sisterly affection” has been oft-forgotten. Has there been any talk of creating an equally catchy slogan for the office of sustainability? Knapp: Not yet… But the former mayor’s tagline for our work was for Philadelphia to be the number one green city in America. And I don’t see any reason why we shouldn’t continue to keep that as our goal. gb&d

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Directory & Index

ADVERTISERS

A AgilQuest Corp, 2 agilquest.com 804.745.0467 ASSA Abloy, 111 assaabloy.com 877.543-8765 B Baker Electric Solar, 24 bakerelectricsolar.com 877.543.8765 Bay Photo, 19, 20 bayphoto.com 800.435.6686 E Edmonds USA, 3 edmondsusa.com 800.610.9222 Excel Dryer, 116 exceldryer.com 888.994.5541 G Green Sports Alliance, 115 greensportsalliance.org 503.278.5393 I Intersolar America, 46 intersolar.us +49 (7)231 585980 M Mechosystems, 8 mechoshade.com 718.729.2020 N NeoCon, 4 neocon.com 312.527.7999 P Pine River Group, 80 pinerivergroup.com 855.230.5656 R Rehau Construction, LLC, 38 rehau.com 800.247.9445 T Tandus Centiva, 15,102 tandus-centiva.com 312.467.1409

PEOPLE & COMPANIES

# 360 Architecture, 36 A ACO, 47 AECOM, 29

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AECOM, 74 Affiliated Engineers, Inc., 92 AgilQuest, 77 AIA National Convention, 21 Airbnb, 78 Allan Ramsay, 96 American Society of Landscape Architects, 48 Antonio Fiol-Silva, 70 Archer & Buchanan Architecture, 65 Aron Beninghove, 74 B Baker Electric Solar, 50 Beluga, 16 Ben Aulick, 47 Bernardon, 88 Bill Maiman, 87 Boulder Plaza, 108 Brendon Quinlivan, 106 Brian Butler, 41 Brian Dettmer, 14 Brickslot, 47 Bruce McLay, 92 Butterfly House, 22 Carmen Ferrigno, 91 Casey Castillo, 51 Center for Sustainable Energy, 51 C Central Green, 66 CertainTeed, 88 Chris Knight, 33 Christine Knapp, 113 Clean Power Plan, 113 Commander BI, 77 Constellation Energy, 106 Cradle to Cradle Product Certification, 87 Customs and Border Protection, 74 CVS, 48 D Dana Strickland, 87 David Paulus, 42 Declare Living Building Challenge Compliant, 18 Department of Homeland Security, 74 Dilworth Plaza, 58 E ebm papst, 96 ECONYL, 18 ecoPOWER Hybrid Roof Ventilator, 92 EcoVeil Series, 87 Edmonds, 92 Eleanor Moody, 75 EnGoPLANET, 108 Environetics, 66 Environmental Product Declaration, 18 Excel Dryer, 32 EYP, 14 F Feldman Architecture, 22 Fenway Park, 32

G GENEO, 41 General Services Administration, 78 Global 100, 84 Golden 1 Center, 29 Good Energy Construction, 41 Grand Gallery Walk, 101 Green Sports Alliance, 27 Green Sports Alliance Summit, 21 Greenworks, 110 H HOK, 36 Humanscale, 44 Humpback, 16 Husky Stadium, 36 ICFF, 21 I International Green Construction Code (IgCC), 105 J Jacobs, 91 Jacobs & Cushman San Diego Food Bank, 50 James Corner Field Operations, 66 Jane Abernethy, 45 Jeffrey Lesk, 84 Joan and Irwin Jacobs, 51 John Vivadelli, 77 Jonathan Hicks, 66 K Karen Baebler, 36 Kevin Spacey, 21 Kevin Weinberg, 51 KieranTimberlake, 58 Kleinman Center for Energy Policy, 110 Kurt Shafer, 92 L Las Vegas, 108 LEED, 104 LEED Gold, 96 LEED Silver, 70 Levi’s Stadium, 27 Litowitz Atrium, 101 Little Diversified Architectural Consulting, 48 M Major Capital Projects, 96 Mark Alan Hughes, 110 McLeod Landscape Architects, 48 MechoSystems’ SolarTrac System, 87 Merchandise Mart, 21 Milliken, 16 N Narwhal, 16 National Resources Defense Council, 31 Navy Yard, 66 NBA, 29 Neil B. Liebman, 88 NeoCon, 21 Neri Oxman, 21 Newtown Square, 65 Nixon Peabody, 84 O Office of Administration, 74

OLIN, 58 OnBoard, 77 Orca, 16 P Parks McLeod, 48 Paul Mikos, 107 Pennsylvania Convention Center, 21 Perkins+Will, 87 Pfister Energy, 44 PFMG Solar, 106 Pier Derrickson, 91 Pine Barrens, 66 R REHAU, 41 Rem Koolhaass, 21 Richard Buchanan, 65 Richard Maimon, 58 Rob Rothblatt, 29 S SA2 Studios, 41 Sacramento Kings, 29 SageGlass, 91 Saint-Gobain, 88 San Diego Gas & Electric, 51 Santa Lucia Preserve, 22 Sarah Weidner Astheimer, 66 Sayo Okada, 42 Sealed Air Mushroom Packaging, 14 SolaTube, 45 Solera Windows, 31 Southern California Edison, 53 Spell Construction Inc., 48 Stacy Walker, 16 Steve Tatge, 96 Studio Gang Architects, 101 Suite Plants, 104 Super Bowl, 27 Sustainable Building Design: Learning from nineteenth-century innovation, 14 T Tandus Centiva, 14 Technical University of Berlin, 42 Temple University, 70 Texas A&M University, 104 The Chaffey Joint Union High School District, 106 The Plant Chicago, 14 Torrance Houlihan, 78 U U.S. Navy, 66 Uber, 78 University of Pennsylvania, 110 University of Washington, 36 Urban Outfitters, 66 UW Sports Medicine Center, 37 V Vidar Lerum, 14 Village of Glencoe, 101 Vivek Ranadive, 29 W Wallace Roberts and Todd, 70 WASCO Windows, 41 Washington State University, 105 Wayne Pfisterer, 44 WELL building Standard, 104 Whale Song Carpet, 16 White House, 74 William Gagnon, 32 Woman’s Library Club, 101 Writers Theatre, 101 XLERATOR Hand Dryers, 32 Z Zeb Wallace, 107 ZGF Architects, 92

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gb&d Issue 39: May/June 2016  
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