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How the Green Sports Alliance transforms iconic athletic venues into hubs for sustainability Architecture Firm to Watch SOM’s boundary pushing Pertamina Tower Tensile architecture takes [unlimited] shape G R E E N B U I L D I N G & D E S I G N M AY+ J U N E 2 0 15

Guest edited by Melody Harclerode

INTRODUCING THE FIRST ANNUAL

We’re following the AIA Convention to recognize its host city’s best work. First stop: ATL


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UP FRONT

Expo: Nov. 18-19, 2015 | Conference: Nov. 18-20, 2015

WASHINGTON CONVENTION CENTER | WASHINGTON, D.C.

OUR BUILDINGS—OUR HOMES, HOSPITALS, AND HIGH RISES— ARE MODERN MONUMENTS TO WHAT WE DEEM IMPORTANT Green buildings rise up from our communities like beacons of innovation and thoughtfulness. Every façade tells a story, every foundation leaves a lasting impression—no marble inscription needed. Green building is uniting people, changing lives, revolutionizing business, and addressing our world’s most pressing problems. What could be more monumental than that? Start your legacy and join the celebration at Greenbuild 2015! Visit www.greenbuildexpo.com for the latest information, news and updates.

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Presented by the U.S. Green Building Council owned and produced by Informa Exhibitions

Questions? Contact us at info@greenbuildexpo.com may–june 2015

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Restaurants

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

In This Issue May+June 2015 Volume 6, Issue 33

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PHOTO: COURTESTY OF SOM

Typology: Tensile Architecture

Birdair brings its services to outdoor excursionists and festive public assemblages

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66

The firm’s holistic combination of architectural design, structural engineering, and sustainable engineering services culminate for the creation of Jakarta’s Pertamina Tower

Nearly 300 teams across 20 leagues in 14 countries have assembled to promote sustainability in sports around the globe

SOM

Green Teams

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112

We partnered with AIA Atlanta to show off the city’s best sustainable architecture as it gears up for the AIA National Convention

A previously inaccessible pier in New York City will boast an innovative ecohabitat that will even allow visitors to text message the East River

Introducing the Green Awards

Digital Biology

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Table of Contents May+June 2015 Volume 6, Issue 33

Up Front

Trendsetters

Inner Workings

12 Guest Editor Melody Harclerode

42 Chatsworth Products Refining the art/science of

52 Penthouse Photosynthesis A vertical forest stretches

14 Editor’s Picks AIA ATL 16 Product Spotlight Mechosystems’ ShadeLoc 18 In Profile Sarah Dirsa 20 Defined Design Grotto at Bernyk Island 22 Event Preview AIA National Convention

keeping critical IT

45 EcoSafe Composting made easy for

the multi-family crowd

48 STHLMNYC From NYC to Stockholm, a

dialogue opens up about future uncertainties

toward the sky in Milan

54

Guide Dogs for the Blind New Student Residence

Strategic sustainability aids this organization

Student housing that fosters community

62 Whole Foods Brooklyn

The LEED Platinum grocery store sets a new standard for supermarkets

56 Future Tech

Iniside Panasonic Corporation’s double-LEED headquarters

Lightfair International, NeoCon

PHOTO: JONATHAN FRIEDMAN/PARTISANS

60 UC Davis Tercereo 3

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UP FRONT

102

Spaces

94

Next

Punch List

Making Greenhouse Gas a Thing of the Past

108 (Soon To Be) Rebuilt by Design Plans to reshape NYC’s

120 Person of Interest Aaron Betsky

A stunning net-zero home in Norway

98 A Rural Silhouette A jaw-dropping LEED

Platinum ranch

welcomed new addition

PHOTO: MICHAEL MORAN/OTTO

102 Such Green Heights The Aspen Art Museum’s

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coast post-Sandy

111 A Better Bottom Line Fannie Mae recognizes the

benefits of sustainability

116 Wieland Healthcare The hip chair is

126 On the Spot Melody Harclerode

122 On the Boards The winners of NYC’s City

of Dreams Pavillion Competition

124 Material World ECONYL

reimagined

“By and large, there is a consensus within the architect community at least, that as an industry, we simply cannot conscientiously create buildings that have detrimental impact to their environment locally, and globally.” 96 may–june 2015

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CREATE

YOUR OWN SUCCESS.

8

What does success in commercial real estate look like to you? It’s an important question—one that you’ll want to consider before heading to the Every Building Conference & Expo. Because here you’ll have access not only to the innovators, experts and decision makers who are actively laying the foundation for new possibilities in CRE; you’ll find the informational framework, sound ideas and concrete opportunities to create both your optimal business and your ideal career—down to the smallest detail.

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Commercial Real Estate—Inside & Out

www.EveryBuildingConference.org gbdmagazine.com


GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Editor’s Note Chris Howe

Familiar to most gb&d readers, “to create a more sustainable world” has long been our mission. As we know quite well by now, to continue to forge ahead in working toward a greener society, we must continue to reshape the way we live our lives. And when it comes to reshaping how we live, it is essential to begin to approach such a critical effort by reshaping where we live. This entails not only the places we retreat to eat and sleep, but the entire scope of built environments that human beings inhabit on a daily basis. From skyscrapers of colossal stature down to the much humbler shelter of a park gazebo, all sizes must too be considered as we stride toward sustainability in built environments. In this issue of gb&d, we saw the smaller end of the scale represented by the Billion Oyster and Organic Growth pavilions (p. 122). Demonstrating both stunningly attractive design aesthetics and cleverly resourceful material composition, these two projects were products of this year’s City of Dreams Competition, an annual affair in New York City. It is a model that rears again and again from the pages of this issue, that the balance of sustainable building practices and attractive design disposition can be maintained most effectively and most evenly with the incentivizing drive of competition. It’s a concept we had the privilege of witnessing first-hand at our first annual Green Awards, presented in conjunction with AIA Atlanta. In her conversation with our managing editor, Amanda Koellner, our guest editor and AIA Atlanta’s current president, Melody Harclerode, states her firm interest in upholding the responsibility of serving as a loud-and-leading voice for issues pertaining to the preservation of our ecosystem within, as well as outside of, her organization. Congruent with this credo, the invitation to participate in this newborn event was extended to architectural firms based all over the country, and what we got in return were among the most cutting-edge examples of how leadgb&d

ers in the world of architecture are spreading their green proclivities into the gambit of industry sectors through smart design in their own unique ways. First place winners, Perkins + Will, made maximum use of natural daylight with their Charles R. Drew Charter School Junior & Senior Academy, while second place Smith Dalia’s adaptive Decatur Fire Station harvests rain water and feeds largely off solar power. Meanwhile, TVA’s third place-winning Lennox Square Mall Nike store amply utilized reclaimed materials. I’ve always loved competition, but it sure is at its most satisfying when it’s creating a more sustainable world. Sincerely,

Chris Howe, Publisher & Editor-in-Chief

ON THE COVER Norway’s ZEB (zero energy building) Pilot House, on top if its striking angles, sets a new standard for sustainable architecture with its air quality, materiality, and use of daylight. The architects believe “as an industry, we cannot conscientiously create buildings that have a detrimental impact.”

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Editor’s Note Laura Heidenreich

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®

change the way they deal with waste, water, and electricity, managers have found their new techniques and systems that are paying for themselves. Sean Langer, director of operations at the KFC Yum! Center says he initially set out to green his stadium via changes that could be made without much up-front capital and that would also save money in the long term in order to eventually invest in other sustainability improvements. And that’s just what the “greening” of our built environment is: it’s an investment. It’s an investment in our cities, in our people, and in our future. As always, I hope this issue of gb&d can inspire you or your firm. And if it teaches you more about how sustainable practices can help you save a buck, too, then we’re doing our jobs.

Green Building & Design

Sincerely,

CLIENT SERVICES DIRECTOR

gbdmagazine.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Christopher Howe chris@gbdmagazine.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Laura Heidenreich laura@gbdmagazine.com MANAGING EDITOR

Amanda Koellner amanda@gbdmagazine.com ART DIRECTOR

Ravi Sathia ravi@gbdmagazine.com MARKETING DIRECTOR

Jenny Maraccini jenny@gbdmagazine.com Krystle Blume krystle@gbdmagazine.com ACCOUNT MANAGERS

When I think about how we can drive our magazine’s mission, to create a more sustainable world, I always return to the idea of lowering the bottom line and the importance of reminding our readers how much sustainable building practices can do just that. As our guest editor, AIA Atlanta president Melody Harclerode, says on p. 127, the most common green myth is that “being green is too expensive.” If one group in this issue realizes the weight of this myth, it’s the Green Sports Alliance (check out our massive feature on p. 66). The organization now represents nearly 300 sports teams and venues from 20 different leagues across 14 countries, leveraging “the cultural and market influence of sports to promote healthy, sustainable communities where we live and play.” They do so by fostering a network of teams, leagues, venues, and their partners who will inspire their millions of fans to accept sustainability as a necessity, not an option, and to essentially live happier, healthier lives. But as the alliance’s practices influence venues, whose annual consumption can reach truly mind-blowing levels, to

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Laura Heidenreich, Associate Publisher

Colleen Kelley, Brittany Kiley, HIllary Thornton, Ryan Wampler CONTRIBUTORS

Brian Barth, Rebecca Falzano, Jeff Link, Patrick Sisson EDITORIAL INTERN

Vincent Caruso MAIL

Green Building & Design 1765 N. Elston Ave. Suite 202B Chicago, IL 60642

Green Building & Design (gb&d) magazine is printed in the United States using only soy-based inks. The magazine is also available in digital formats through Apple iBooks on tablet and mobile or at issuu. com/greenbuildingdesign

Correction, Mar/Apr 2015 In our “Turning Waste Into Resources” piece, the company First American Water should have read Illinois American Water. Additionally, the facility in the story will extract enough phosphorus to produce nearly 10,000 tons of fertilizer, not 10,000 pounds. We regret and apologize for the errors.

Please recycle this magazine

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Inner Workings Features Spaces Next Punch List

gb&d

12 Guest Editor

Melody Harclerode

14 Editor’s Picks

AIA Atlanta

16 Product Spotlight

Mechosystems’ ShadeLoc

18 In Profile

Sarah Dirsa

20 Defined Design

The Grotto at Bernyk Island

22 Event Preview

Lightfair International, AIA National Convention, NeoCon

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UP FRONT

12

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UP FRONT

Guest Editor Melody Harclerode

IN CONVERSATION with Melody Harclerode

Melody Harclerode, current AIA Atlanta president and principal of her own eponymous firm, knew she wanted to be an architect when she was just 13 years old—roughly the time she learned the official word for the occupation. “Ever since I was a youngster, I loved going to watch my father, who was a bricklayer, work on his projects,” she recalls over the phone from her home in the peach state. “After a point, it became a thrill to see the phases of these residential projects and enjoy his craftsmanship. And then I realized I didn’t want to build or be a craftsman but that I wanted to be the person that designed the spaces he would construct.” She later made that dream come true by receiving a bachelor’s degree in architecture from Notre Dame (as well as her MBA from Georgia State). And after working at several firms, 2010’s lackluster economy led to a lay-off that would change the course of Harclerode’s career, catapulting her into becoming her own boss and opening her own firm. “I really wanted to explore and advance projects the way that I wanted to do them,” she says. “I’ve collaborated with some great firms, I’ve done smaller projects for myself, and I’ve engaged with the Atlanta and Fulton County communities in ways I never would have had I been with a firm.” As we decided this issue would best serve our readers as a centerpiece for the AIA National Convention (and this conversation a companion piece to our feature on our first annual Green Awards, p. 76), this year held in Atlanta, Harclerode’s role as 2015 president for the city’s chapter catapulted her to the top of our list for guest editors. Here, she and I discuss her firm, AIA, and all things ATL. –Amanda Koellner, managing editor

FEATURES GREEN AWARDS

FEATURES GREEN AWARDS

FEATURES

FEATURES

FIRST PLACE

Charles R. Drew Charter School Junior & Senior Academy by Perkins + Will

In conjunction with AIA Atlanta, we asked Georgia’s capital to show us their best sustainable designs. The next 15 pages hold the results. Here at gb&d, we’re always looking to bring our mission, “to create a more sustainable world,” to life. As we geared up for this issue, and with it, the 2015 installment of the AIA National Convention, we decided one impactful way to do just that would be to celebrate the host city of this year’s gathering, Atlanta, and award its projects that are leading the charge of incorporating sustainable building practices. We invited architects from across the nation to submit their best Atlanta-based building projects completed after January 1, 2013 and invited Randall Buescher (AIA, vice president and director of architecture at Epstein); Devon Patterson (AIA, LEED AP BD+C, principal at Solomon Cordwell Buenz); and Wayne Sherod (LEED AP, quality control manager and project manager of James McHugh Construction Co.) to help us judge the submissions based on originality in design, function, and of course, sustainability. “I think that the largest, most distinguished organization of architects should be out championing and advocating these issues of sustainability within its organization as well as to the public, so I think it’s great that you asked us to support these sustainable design awards,” says Melody Harclerode, president of AIA Atlanta (who also serves as this issue’s guest editor). “For us to be a part of these first-ever awards is an honor. It’s an honor that you see AIA Atlanta as an entity that is championing green design.” Although Atlanta was the co-presenter of this years’ Green Awards, we plan to follow the AIA National Convention each year to recognize sustainable building in each city it visits. But for now, sit back and enjoy the winners of the first-annual Green Awards.

Ample natural light basks onto what will ultimately be a student body of 1,000 middle and high school students.

by Amanda Koellner, managing editor

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We present our first annual Green Awards, which will follow the AIA Convention each year. First stop: Atlanta.

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engineering, and design labs; integrated performing and visual arts studios; a 525seat performing arts center serving students and the community; two gymnasiums; and a full-size track and field for both athletics and community wellness. Natural light was a huge priority for the client, so all of the learning spaces are fully glazed, and daylight pours in from all directions, basking onto what will ultimately be a student body of 1,000 middle and high school students. Locally sourced and manufactured materials such as field stone, glass, and concrete make up the majority of the building’s structure and envelope. The project team also used low-flow plumbing fixtures and low-emitting materials, such as the linoleum floors, while recycled trees

from the nearby golf course fairways comprise the wood rail and stadium seating in the central atrium. Additionally, solar panels on the roof provide 10% of the building’s energy, while rainwater collection is funneled through troughs in the pavement at the building’s edge that direct it to water features in the adjacent lawn. A roof overhang and series of exterior sunscreens that increase in number—responding to sunlight on the building’s facade—provide shade and mitigate heat gain without sacrificing daylighting and views. Planting beds and raised planters helping with storm-water management also define the front plaza while grounding the building and providing a continuous outdoor learning and social area. gb&d

“The Drew Charter School with its pencil shape columns, and the soaring atriums, the openness of the classroom bays embraced by the sun as it shone through the bowed curtainwalls; in coalesce with the campus/ fairway landscape is collectively elevating. The Drew school exemplifies the premise of the LEED Daylight and Views concept and seamlessly delivers a pristine learning environment.”

PHOTOS: JONATHAN HILLYER PHOTOGRAPHY

Set on the back nine of a former golf course and adjacent to the existing Drew Charter Elementary Campus, the new Charles R. Drew Charter School Junior and Senior Academy sits on one of the highest points in Atlanta and finds its inspiration in the existing landscape forms, as well as the breathtaking views of the city below. Tracking LEED Gold, the building is an example of a high-performance school that intelligently responds to its environment while supporting its educational program as well. Within the campus, you’ll find flexible learning suites to nurture Drew’s focus on what they call “STEAM” (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics), as well as project-based learning labs for each grade level; state-of-the art science,

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PUNCH LIST

PUNCH LIST

A CURRENT EVENT WE SHOULD FOLLOW MORE CLOSELY

Changes to the Architectural Registration Examination. ENVIRONMENTAL COME-TO-JESUS MOMENT

Seeing aerial images of the decreased tree coverage in metropolitan Atlanta.

WAY TO MAKE THE ENVIRONMENT A NONPARTISAN ISSUE

Present the long-term economic benefits of water and energy conservation. WHAT YOU’D PITCH TO PRESIDENT OBAMA IF YOU HAD 30 SECONDS

THE PERFECT CITY WOULD HAVE

A park in every neighborhood featuring an array of beautiful sculptures. ONE TECHNOLOGY ON THE HORIZON THAT CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

Driverless cars.

TOPIC IF YOU WERE ASKED TO GIVE A TED TALK

The enormous power of great, but small, architecture.

BUILDING YOU WOULD SAVE IF THE WORLD WAS GOING TO END

My home.

A CENTURY FROM NOW, HUMANITY WILL

Continue to underestimate the intelligence and talent of children.

ONE BOOK EVERYONE SHOULD READ

Architects should occasionally review their copy of the college textbook Architecture: Form, Space, and Order by Francis D.K. Ching to read about classic principles of architecture and see magnificent sketches.

PHOTO: PHILLIP ALEXANDER-COX

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On the Spot Melody Harclerode

This issue’s guest editor, AIA Atlanta President and principal of her own eponymous architecture firm, Melody Harclerode, responds to our questionnaire and gives the city of Atlanta a whole lot of love in the process.

MOST MEMORABLE MENTOR OR TEACHER

My first grade teacher Mrs. Russell who nicknamed me ‘Sunshine.”

FAVORITE MODE OF TRANSPORTATION

Historic trolley cars.

PHOTO: PHILLIP ALEXANDER-COX

WASTEFUL HABIT YOU’RE TRYING TO KICK

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Purchasing baked goods that I could easily make. MOST FULFILLING HOBBY

Writing (I wrote a book called Discover ARCHITECTURE).

GREATEST PROFESSIONAL PET PEEVE

The importance of affordable, yet high-quality college institutions to help our country stay globally competitive. WHAT YOU’D TELL THE GREEN MOVEMENT IF IT WAS YOUR CHILD

EXPLAIN “GREEN” TO A KINDERGARTNER

Be kind to our environment.

MOST COMMON GREEN MYTH

Being green is too expensive. Even without certification, a project can still be environmentally friendly. THE FIRST STEP TO BECOMING A STEWARD OF THE ENVIRONMENT

Conserving energy and water use at home.

CAUSE YOU’D SUPPORT IF YOU HAD A BILLION DOLLARS

Expanding the BeltLine and the MARTA rail system within the City of Atlanta. ONE QUESTION INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS SHOULD ALWAYS BE ASKING THEMSELVES

How can I add value to this project? MOST RESONANT DOCUMENTARY

Don’t be complacent about your successes. Many forces still wish to greatly weaken you.

Ken Burns’ Jazz.

THE BOLDEST IDEA IN SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

The Atlanta Business Chronicle. It helps architects to connect to the business community and vice versa.

CASUALTY OF THE CUTTING-ROOM FLOOR YOU’D RESURRECT

THE THOUGHT OR IDEA THAT CENTERS YOU

CURRENT PROJECT YOU’RE MOST EXCITED ABOUT

Visiting the Grand Canyon.

PUBLICATION YOU HOPE WILL NEVER DIE

Recycling steel from torn-down bridges as elements in public art.

Santiago Calatrava’s design for the Atlanta Symphony Center.

My love for my family, my community, and my profession.

MOST IMPACTFUL EXPERIENCE IN NATURE

The upcoming AIA Atlanta national design competition with the Atlanta BeltLine and the City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs.

MOST MEANINGFUL PROJECT YOU’VE COMPLETED

The Fulton County Aviation Community Cultural Center. gb&d

BUILDING TREND YOU HOPE WILL NEVER GO OUT OF FASHION

Adaptive reuse.

FAVORITE PLACE YOU’VE TRAVELED

Rome, Italy.

YOUR FIELD’S BIGGEST HURDLE TO IMPROVING ITS PRACTICES

Clients who assess design proposals by the architects’ fees rather than the quality of their work.

PERSON WHO HAS MOST INFLUENCED YOUR PHILOSOPHY

The late Atlanta architect Cecil Alexander, FAIA, who followed the philosophy of doing well by doing good.

MOST USEFUL INDUSTRY EVENT

The AIA National Convention.

Gum chewing on the job.

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Melody Harclerode answers our questionnaire and gives love to her city of Atlanta.

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gb&d: After reading the description of your firm and looking through your projects, it seems like sustainability is key to your ideals and really lies at the heart of the firm. Has it always been something that’s important to you? Harclerode: When I earned my LEED, it was during a time when very few people were gaining LEED. And one of the reasons I felt so strongly about it was because I’m from Jackson, Mississippi, and I’ve always felt that we’ve got to be really mindful of our natural and manmade resources and neighborhoods. My heart in sustainability is really from a community aspect. We have to be thoughtful about how we are using our existing buildings and that we don’t always need to build new. Not that there’s anything wrong with it, but there are existing buildings that have great potential and rather than tearing them down, there’s an opportunity to adapt them for a new use—to adapt even underutilized parks and underutilized public spaces. So for me, sustainability is not just about saving buildings but also about the fabric of our communities, preserving our communities, and improving our spaces and our public buildings as well. gb&d: What in your opinion has been the greatest achievement for your firm thus far?

Wayne Sherod, quality manager & project manager, James McHugh Construction Co.

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PART 1 SEEKING + GAINING INDEPENDENCE

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Harclerode: The greatest achievement for my firm as a small practitioner is that I partnered with a firm called Pond & Company for a cultural center project. And what makes the project so appealing to me is that it responded to a neighborhood that is old and needed revitalization, and even though it’s a new project, it is something that can sustain that neighborhood in terms of how it serves the community and in terms of how it advances the community with educational programs. The conversation continues on p. 16

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UP FRONT

Editor’s Picks AIA Atlanta Edition

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DRINK SECOND SELF BEER COMPANY

SHOP PONCE CITY MARKET

ADAPTIVE REUSE SCADPAD

PRODUCT PATCRAFT FLOORING

PERSON WELBY ALTIDOR

(Pictured) This treasure is lucky enough to show off works from Kennesaw State University’s permanent collection. Workshops, programming, and community outreach also allows the museum to bring the Georgians together. zuckerman.kennesaw. edu

Georgia’s newest craft brewery has a no compromise approach to both ingredients and techniques. Come for the Red Hop Rye, stay for the Thai Wheat or Mole Porter. secondselfbeer.com

Inside one of Atlanta’s historic buildings rests this gem of a market that offers retail, residentail, and restaurants for a great place in the peach state to gather, eat, and shop. poncecitymarket.com

Aiming to answer the question, “how can design change the world?”, SCADpad transforms previously uninhabitable spaces into “artful living” spaces. scadpad.com

This flooring company strives to provide solutions that ehance the world and support our daily activities. For more than 65 years, they’ve proved that flooring matters while operating outside of Atlanta. patcraft.com

The creative director for Cirque du Soleil is a keynote speaker at this year’s AIA National Convention. convention.aia.org/ event/

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PHOTO: KATIE BRICKER PHOTOGRAPHY

PLACE ZUCKERMAN MUSEUM OF ART

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UP FRONT

Continued from p. 13

gb&d: That’s excellent. How else has it served that area? Harclerode: It taps into history by serving the Tuskegee Airmen who live in the area, and it brings a new generation and an old generation together. It’s also there to sustain the community so people can say, “I can stay here, I can live here, we have attractive buildings, we have an attractive facility so we don’t have to move out of our neighborhood, but rather we can stay here and we can draw upon the strength and the history of our neighborhood.” It’s a wonderful gift to northwest Atlanta.

“So for me, sustainability is not just about saving buildings but also about the fabric of our communities, preserving our communities, and improving our spaces and our public buildings as well.” PART 2 STEPPING UP AT AIA gb&d: I wanted to know how long you have you personally been involved with AIA Atlanta and if you always thought you’d assume the role of president. Harclerode: I’ve been a volunteer with AIA Atlanta since 2009. In terms of eyeing the presidency, frankly, when I joined in 2009 I didn’t have any thought about being president. I came on the board in 2010 as the public awareness co-director and, again, had no inkling about wanting to be president. It only hit me in late 2013 when I felt passionately that I could make a difference. And I think most presidents do, but I felt I could bring something a little different to the table because I am a very civically active person in Atlanta, and a lot of my predecessors, as good as they have been, I don’t think that civic government engagement has received much focus. gb&d: I read an article in the Business Journal where former AIA president John Busby said that AIA Atlanta hasn’t always followed through on its most important ambitions. But, he touted you for coming in and changing that. How did you intend to change that or how have you seen your ability to change that thus far? The conversation continues on p. 19

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Product Spotlight MechoSystems’ ShadeLoc A new shading contraption eliminates vexing sunlight leakage and promotes sustainability by saving energy By Vincent Caruso

Whether at the office or in the comfort of one’s home, to be protected from the sun’s irksome beams via a modest apparatus of shades or blinds is somewhat of a given. It’s an asset that’s about as ubiquitous and taken for granted as the windows that harness them. However essential, we’re commonly confronted with the imperfections of these shielding instruments as the shifting angle of the sun creeps into scarcely exposed gaps at the edges of a particular window quadrant. Surely, this inconvenience is one of little gravity, though it’s one many of us let disrupt our workplace productivity or general peace of mind. Fortunately, the innovators at MechoSystems have devised a system for optimizing indoor shading that aids the ecosystem all the while. William Maiman elucidates the process succinctly. “The idea of the ShadeLoc system is that we are able to capture the free edge of the shade and truly eliminate the light gap between the edge of the material and the wall.” These gaps exist, says Maiman, because space is indeed needed for elements such as shade brackets and cords to exist. Some attempt to remedy this by simply draping windows with oversized shades, though this opens up the door to ever more disruptions such as air currents blowing and flapping shades around. However, MechoSystems’ ShadeLoc remains firmly fixed in place with credit due to its novel signature side zipper. “This is literally a zippered edge that gets captured by the inner channel of the side channel so that the textile cannot move in and out of the side channel,” Maiman says.

2 102 giN G3 dlo lagnith P e ngiseD ahS dor Led wA tcu dra 02 .co ekiL rof 1 4 As Imperative to this system is a otechnique rteM a draw CoeN p n o o sil “multi-bandthat Maiman and his team call Bd rf n tse mo M o C f ing,” making possible the customization a rtno nof zag tca .e i the shading of each quadrant via a central

“connector piece.” For example, “one motor on one side of the four window panes can do the work and lift all four shades at the same time,” Maiman adds, “this way we can save on wiring and we can save on motor costs.” And as often is the case, with cost benefits comes environmental gains. “All shades are going to help with the heating and air conditioning issue and all shades are going to help reduce the BTU load on the building,” a quality that pleases Maiman’s clients, which ranges from art museums to office buildings to hospitals. ShadeLoc made its formal debut at NeoCon and has enjoyed favorable reception from the AIA community. gb&d gbdmagazine.com

PHOTOS: CARLOS RIVERA

IN CONVERSATION with Melody Harclerode


UP FRONT

 he ShadeLoc system captures the T free edge of the shade and truly eliminates the light gap between the edge of the material and the wall.

metsyS ÂŽcoLedahS Multi-banding allows for the customization of the shading of each quadrant of a large window, such as this.

.elbappaflnU

The shade system will also help with heating and cooling and generally lower the BTU load on a building.

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UP FRONT

In Profile Sarah Dirsa by Amanda Koellner

When it came time for Sarah Dirsa to study for the MCATs, the future architect says she wanted to jam a pen in her eye. Realizing her intended path wasn’t necessarily feeling like the best fit, she moved abroad to bartend and figure out her next move when a design show unexpectedly captured her interest and planted what would go on to be a life-changing seed. “It focused on the ecology of design and how different layouts of spaces affect people differently, and I thought, ‘That’s something I’ve always been interested in but never really considered,’” she says. She spoke to a friend of the family in the field who suggested returning to school for architecture, which is how Dirsa, who would go on to win a 2015 AIA Young Architects Award, found herself at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. “I came to St. Louis because it seemed like such a Petri dish for intervention,” she says. “And being in architecture school, you can do a lot of good in the city while learning.” Upon graduation, she ended up at HOK where a coworker’s presentation on an organization she developed called SEED (Social Economic Environmental Design) inspired Dirsa to take the attitude and specific drive that landed her at Wash U and apply it to her professional life. “What really stuck out in that presentation was the idea of how buildings can positively affect and change human health and well being and can truly have an impact on your life,” she says, explaining how that afternoon inspired her to co-found HOK IMPACT—HOK’s

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corporate social responsibility initiative—in 2010. Through the initiative, HOK employees ask the question, “What happens when an international design firm mobilizes to make the world a better place through service and philanthropy?” It’s rooted in what Dirsa calls the triple bucket approach: projects (“How can you serve the community with respect to the role you were hired to fill?”), volunteerism (“How can you give your time outside of work?”), and donations (“How can the company give things other than time, whether it be money, canned food, or school supplies?”), with the perfect project being one that incorporates all three. Dirsa says the most impactful project she’s worked on with regards to Impact is the William Jefferson Clinton Orphanage and Children’s Center in Port Au Prince, Haiti, on which she served as a core member of the design team and worked to develop the overall form of the building. The project—a collaboration between HOK and the USGBC—“seeks to bring super-sustainable design to people in the developing world” and rebuild an orphanage damaged by the January 2010 earthquake. “Unfortunately the construction process is taking longer than we anticipated, so the volunteer aspect of actually working on the project hasn’t happened, but a lot of the people on the project have donated time to speak about the work at various conferences,” she says. “I think it’s the closest we’ve come to bringing together all three buckets at one time.” Dirsa’s work on additional projects such as a health

ABOVESarah Dirsa, a recipient of a 2015 AIA Young Architects Award.

gbdmagazine.com


UP FRONT

IN CONVERSATION with Melody Harclerode Continued from p. 16

clinic in Little Havana in Miami, as well as her position as the project designer on an apartment building in Minneapolis, were also included in her application for the AIA Young Architects Award, ultimately leading to her recognition by the organization this year. Also included in that roundup of the young designer’s inspiring work was her founding of SEED St. Louis—an education and advocacy platform for initiatives in the gateway to the west that supported the triple bottom line (social, economic, environmental)—which manifested simultaneously with HOK Impact. “It wasn’t that we were creating new projects or doing anything new; it was about

“I came to St. Louis because it seemed like such a Petri dish for intervention, and being in architecture school, you can do a lot of good in the city while learning. ”

PHOTOS: COURTESTY OF HOK

Sarah Dirsa, HOK the engagement and awareness in bringing forth projects that were already embodying these ideals and making them more known in the community and creating a shared collaborative space for people doing this kind of work,” she says, noting that although the community responded quite positively to the initiative, her very full plate led SEED St. Louis to take a backseat for the time being. Still, Dirsa’s work speaks for itself and it’s no surprise she’s been recognized by AIA for her commitment to service and community-driven work. Despite all of her personal achievements thus far and her role as HOK’s first-ever global chair of social responsibility, Dirsa will be the first to humbly downplay her successes. “We didn’t come up with anything new with Impact; these were all things that HOK was already doing,” she says. “Obviously I didn’t do all the work. Impact has been a group effort and a collaboration between a lot of people in the office. But, it is really nice to be recognized for this type of work and have the idea of social responsibility be recognized and promoted at the AIA awards. I was very excited and proud to learn that I won.” gb&d gb&d

Harclerode: I would say that it’s a work in progress, and I don’t claim to be a white knight. I’m only here for one year. What I will say is that I invited the mayor on behalf of AIA Atlanta to our biggest design celebration. John mentioned the fact that it was the first time in 25 years that the mayor has been invited to an AIA event like this. That’s the civic involvement and engagement that shows we care about design. It’s to broaden our perspective and to say we can celebrate design, and we can be a great civic partner. I think that’s what I’ve tried to do. We had a referendum recently that was for infrastructure for the majority of it, but I asked the board, as the president, to review it and to

“I felt I could bring something a little different to the table because I am a very civically active person in Atlanta, and a lot of my predecessors, as good as they have been, I don’t think that civic government engagement has received much focus.” vote in favor of it. And I wrote a letter that the board approved and I went down to city hall in front of all the council people and I read that letter of support from AIA Atlanta saying, “Yes, we agree with you that transportation and infrastructure need to help the livability of our city and be more efficient in terms of our transportation and be a more attractive city that we can build upon.” PART 2 ALL THINGS ATL gb&d: You said that since you’ve assumed the position of president, you’re often asked why Atlanta doesn’t have more great architecture but that you’d like the question rather to ask how the city can foster great architecture in metro Atlanta. What do you think the answer to this is, and how do you think that Atlanta can foster better architecture? Harclerode: My councilperson asked me that, and it was so profound yet so simple. It’s not a one-sentence answer. I think there are multiple approaches to fostering great architecture. The conversation continues on p. 21

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UP FRONT

Defined Design Grotto at Bernyk Island by Amanda Koellner

When architecture and design firm Partisans was commissioned to build a free-standing structure that not only respected but also matured from its contextual surroundings—a serene landscape along the blue waters of Lake Huron outside of Toronto—they had to take into account the prehistoric largescale rock formation on which they were instructed to build. Here, we choose three words to explain just how the team used cutting-edge software and fabrication technology to create an environmentally friendly grotto sauna that pays homage to the area’s extremities in the form of an architectural experience. gb&d

Prefabricate \(ˌ)prē-ˈfa-bri-ˌkāt\ (verb) To fabricate parts at a factory so that construction consists mainly of assembling and uniting standardized parts. In partnership with MCM Inc., Partisans developed original fabrication techniques to design the sculptural wood components that would emulate the walls of a “grotto.” The team rewrote the software code that Mastercam would eventually use to mill the sculptural wood, using state-of-the-art 3D technology to scan, model, and build the Grotto in Ontario (all the while using double and triple glazed high efficiency annealed glass to ensure high-energy savings and durability).

Context \ˈkän-ˌtekst\ (noun) The situation in which something happens. Inspired by an Italian grotto, the client behind this dreamy retreat on the northwest edge of an island on the Georgian Bay wanted the architecture to tell a story of escape and refuge. The design team created an exterior crafted from charred cedar, which conveys a weathered appearance—“as if the building has been hidden in plain sight for centuries.” The curved interior also is meant to emulate Lake Huron’s waves, while the interior cedar panels were reclaimed from local forests.

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PHOTO: JONATHAN FRIEDMAN/PARTISANS

UP FRONT

Sustainable \sə-ˈstā-nə-bəl\ (adj.) Involving methods that do not completely use up or destroy natural resources. In addition to the use of reclaimed wood, all interior and exterior products within the Grotto are either non-emitting/ non-VOC or were derived organically. Additionally, energy efficiency is maximized via a high-performance rainscreen enclosure with spray insulation and double- and triple-paned glass. Island solar power also provides electricity for the heaters and LED lights. And perhaps most interesting is the fact that one single faucet inside the sauna is fed by lake water, further ensuring that all of the energy use is completely sustainable.

IN CONVERSATION with Melody Harclerode Continued from p. 19

BELOW The curved interior also is meant to emulate Lake Huron’s waves, while the interior cedar panels were reclaimed from local forests.

I think that architects need to be more vocal and visible in terms of how great design can add value. We can’t be quiet about what we do. We have to show that great design adds value; it can add to your bottom line; it can add in terms of beauty; it can add in terms of resale. We have to celebrate when we do great work. I also think we have to grab the attention of our political leaders because they talk to business leaders and say, “When you’re doing that big project, design excellence and sustainability counts.” So it also has to be spoken from those in power so they can affect it. It’s a multifaceted

“So you have five or 10% of the population who understands [sustainability] and values it and talks a lot to each other. The opportunity now is to try to bring the rest of the masses along and figure out what are the key sensitizes that are personal to the majority of the people we can touch and truly accelerate that change.” approach to foster great design. Our clients, leadership—civic, business, and political—that we come together in unison and say design matters and push for better. gb&d: Are there specific cities that you think are taking this multifaceted approach to architecture that Atlanta could look to? Harclerode: I will use the pavilion design program in Dallas as a great example of bringing great design to communities. When I wrote that article about striving for great design and great buildings, they don’t have to be $200 million projects. They can be small projects. Dallas has had a program for decades that was a city initiative of designing and building beautiful pavilions around the cities in diverse areas that are unique neighborhoods. They have added vitality and beauty and stronger youth to a variety of numerous neighborhoods in Dallas. So when I think in terms of that example, I can say it inspired me—in Atlanta—to launch a design competition. We’ll be unveiling it at The conversation continues on p. 22

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UP FRONT

IN CONVERSATION with Melody Harclerode Continued from p. 21

the convention, and the inspiration was Dallas because I see the idea of small but great architecture. That’s not to say that big doesn’t count, but I think that in terms of getting it done more cheaply, being more geographically diverse, getting it done faster, and with less intensity in terms of labor required for small projects, they can be as great as a huge substantial, monumental landmark. So Dallas has definitely been an inspiration. gb&d: How do you feel Atlanta is doing as a city in regard to sustainability, architecturally and otherwise?

“My heart in sustainability is really from a community aspect. We have to be thoughtful about how we are using our existing buildings and that we don’t always need to build new. ” Harclerode: I feel we have done well! Our city has really seized the importance of sustainability. I’m really proud of what Atlanta has done and what I think is so great about it is that they think of sustainability not just as a good thing to do in terms of our health, which of course is important, but they see that we should ask, why spend more money for energy? Why use resources wastefully? gb&d

Event Preview Spring 2015 By Vincent Caruso and Ravi Sathia

Lightfair International

DETAILS

Forthcoming early this May, New York City’s What Lightfair International colossal Javits Center will be illuminated with When May 5-7 the most advanced innovations hatched by a Where New York City specialized industry coterie expert on com- Web lightfair.com mercial lighting integration. Championing “new solutions, new knowledge, and new practices,” Lightfair International, strong in its 25th year, pushes product design toward the future. Among the plethora of presentations that will demonstrate this is the LFI Innovation Awards, showcasing and prizing the most ambitiously ahead-of-the-curve creations that represent sustainability. in technology and design.

AIA National Convention

DETAILS

One of the largest and most exciting annu- What AIA National Convetion al gathering of industry professionals, the When May 14–16 2015 AIA National Convention, this year set Where Atlanta to be held at the Georgia World Congress Web convention.aia.org Center in Atlanta, will be a catalyst for the amalgamation of ideas, innovation, and interaction. The convention will be held in high regard, as the likes of Bill Clinton (this year’s keynote speaker) and industry professionals such as Welby Altidor grace the stage to share their insights on innovative practices across the industry. Immerse yourself in new materials and technology from nearly 800 exhibitors, and interact with the best-of-the-best in today’s architectual environment.

NeoCon

DETAILS

Since 1969, NeoCon has brought together de- What NeoCon sign professionals by the tens of thousands. When June 15-17 Plotted in downtown Chicago’s massive Mer- Where Chicago chandise Mart, the centrally located confer- Web neocon.com ence will host 50,000 visionaries representing 700 companies at the cutting edge of commercial interior design. For three days, programming will range from educational seminars and lectures from keynote industry leaders to a diverse array of vertical market vendors.

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Inner Workings Features Spaces Next Punch List

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TENSILE ARCHITECTURE: BIRDAIR

26 University of Louisville Soccer Stadium

The Estopinal Group minimizes solar heat gain

28 MacDonald Island Park Nexen Stage

360 Architects adds a newly constructed stage to this multi-use outdoor center

30 The Domain Austin Mall

Beck Architecture’s collaboration with Birdair adds a 150,000-square foot structure with PTFE fiberglass

32 Arkansas Music Pavilion

CORE and Birdair’s membrane roof curtails delays and cancellations

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TYPOLOGY TENSILE ARCHITECTURE

TENSILE TAKES FLIGHT As Green Building & Design has consistently documented, a mass transformation of standards and ethics in the realm of architecture has been in accelerating bloom. Remarkable strides have been made in conscientiously modifying our built environments in response to data disseminating from the scientific community. Birdair picks up where most others have left off, stepping outside the corral of the built structure and utilizing its singular brand at the service of outdoor excursionists and festive public assemblages. Birdair has earned a distinction as the paramount artisans for tensile roof structures that promote character in design and sustainability in constitution. From a bird’s eye view, Vincent Caruso surveys a few tensile developments and the advantages they impart to nature and humanity alike.

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TYPOLOGY

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TYPOLOGY TENSILE ARCHITECTURE

University of Louisville Soccer Stadium The Estopinal Group

Putting in over a decade’s worth of time digging cleats into the Cardinal Track and Soccer Stadium, Louisville, Kentucky’s men’s and women’s soccer teams had quite comfortably settled into their nest. However, when the opportunity presented itself, the Cardinals thought wise to decamp and migrate to a new secure site to nestle into, the way the feathered creatures of which they’re named after tend to do. And the move was anything but a lateral one. The team now disporting within what is now the biggest collegiate soccer turf in the United States, the supremely stateof-the-art Dr. Mark & Cindy Lynn Stadium boasts a capacity

LOUISVILLE, KY

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TYPOLOGY

that nears 6,000 onlookers’ seats. As a general rule of thumb, the size of a built structure grows correlatively with its adverse environmental impact. However, in the case of the Mark & Cindy Lynn Stadium (taking its name from the revamp’s prime donors), careful measures were considered throughout each step of the construction process to ensure the contrary. Unlike the previous Cardinal coliseum, this Olympic habitat

is gifted with the Birdair PTFE fiberglass canopy. Skyward the soccer fans’ heads, the 24,000-square-foot tensile fabric spans gracefully over the grandstands. The membrane, designed to reflect heat and glare, will dramatically minimize solar heat gain and thus the necessity of HV/AC energy consumption. Impressively, the Mark & Cindy Lynn Stadium is the first LEED-certified soccer stadium used exclusively by a Division 1 team.

6,000

The number of fans Cardinal Track and Soccer Stadium holds

24,000

Square feet of tensile fabric that spans the grandstands of the stadium

1st

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF BIRDAIR

The first LEED-certificed soccer stadium used exclusively by a Division 1 team

LEFT This tensile-topped stadium is the first LEEDcertified soccer stadium used exclusively by a Division 1 team.

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TYPOLOGY TENSILE ARCHITECTURE

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TYPOLOGY

MacDonald Island Park Nexen Stage 360 Architects ALBERTA, CANADA

ABOVEThe addition of the Nexen Stage will soon host a variety of entertainment, from international stars to local artists.

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF BIRDAIR

LEFT The fiberglass is coated in PTFE for weather resistance of nearly any extremity.

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Home to the likes of the Suncor Community Leisure Centre and Miskanaw Golf & Country Club, amusements of immense proportions are no foreign notion to the tracts of MacDonald Island Park. As Canada’s single largest public social center, Shell Place routinely sees action of all sorts and sizes. It is natural then, that this corner of the expanse has warmly welcomed its latest colossal recreational extension, the Equipment Stadium Nexen Energy Stage. A newly constructed addition to the parklands, the Nexen Stage will host a variety of lively entertainment, including “international stars, national heroes, and local talent.”

The not-for-profit company that owns MacDonald Island Park, the Regional Recreation Corporation of Wood Buffalo, will have the safeguarding Birdair canopy structure stretching over an exceptional 30,000 square feet, surmounting the Nexen Stage and neighboring Molson Outdoor Rink. The celestial visual beauty of the tensile canopy is a sight to behold, crafted carefully in the undulating image of Canada’s Northern Lights. The canopy’s functional capacity is likewise noteworthy, as the PTFE coating applied to the fiberglass grants the membrane a resistance to weather extremity across the spectrum and durability beyond compare. may–june 2015

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TYPOLOGY TENSILE ARCHITECTURE

The Domain Austin Mall Beck Architecture In a culture as competitive as our own, it is commonplace to claim our socio-categorical identity through personalization of our wardrobe. Most often, this pastime is pursued at the leisurely retreat of the shopping mall. In a like fashion, with the help of Beck Architecture, Austin, Texas’ Domain Mall has been treated to new accoutre-

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ments tailored by Birdair’s specialized hand. Spanning 15,000 square feet, the tensile structure includes a fiberglass membrane that makes exemplary use of PTFE fiberglass, a material that has been certified by both Energy Star and the Cool Roof Rating Council. Beyond immunity to UV radiation, PTFE fiberglass is too marked for its resistance against

extreme climates. Solar properties possessed by the domain’s PTFE membrane can reflect up to 73% of the sun’s ire. In addition, a multi-colored “mandolin” structure overlooks the mall’s outdoor area wherein “live music performances, festivals, markets and holiday activities” are among the events to inherit the luminance of the LED pattern. gbdmagazine.com

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF BIRDAIR

AUSTIN, TX


TYPOLOGY

ABOVE Spanning 15,000 square feet, the tensile structure includes a fiberglass membrane that uses PTFE fiberglass. LEFT A multi-colored “mandolin” structure overlooks the mall’s outdoor area for live performances, festivals, markets, and holiday activities.

15,000

Square feet that the tensile fabric, and fiberglass membrane structure spans.

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73

Percent of which the sun’s ire the PTFE membrane reflects and resists against.

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TYPOLOGY TENSILE ARCHITECTURE

CORE ROGERS, AR

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ABOVE The Walton Arts Center purchased and migrated the Arkansas Music Pavillion to the Washington County Fairgrounds, maximizing the potential of the venue.

steel-supported tensile structure reflects the brutality of southern sunrays during the day, glowing lights planted on the tent-like stage roof reflects the excitement and radiant awe felt between eager faces within the audience. In addition to the sound emanating from the amplifiers of the musical acts that take the stage, the roof structure itself is a work of art to admire, from the three cone-like forms protruding upward to the curved breadth of the membrane surface. The roof project is also notably cost-effective, minimizing the need for steel columns, significantly reducing maintenance and construction expenditures. gb&d gbdmagazine.com

PHOTOS: ASHLEY THOMPSON COURTESTY OF BIRDAIR

Arkansas Music Pavilion

After a brief dip in the early aughts, music festivals in North America have, over the past several years, reclaimed—if not surged beyond—the popularity they once knew during their early ‘90s onset. Subsequently, this rebirth has bestowed new meaning and purpose to the scarcer body of ad hoc outdoor music venues. When Walton Arts Center (WAC) purchased and migrated the Arkansas Music Pavilion to the Washington County Fairgrounds, they increased the amount of venue activity and diversified the content of live musical performances, leading to a 200% increase in ticket sales. Instead of allowing such a stunning success to satiate their business drive, they pondered how to maximize the potential of a venue comparatively limited due to its vulnerability to oftentimes-unpredictable weather conditions. The answer was green in terms of both profitability and sustainability, commissioning the construction of a PTFE membrane roof to curtail delays and cancellations driven by nature’s whim. While the


TYPOLOGY

PHOTOS: ASHLEY THOMPSON VIA OF BIRDAIR

Although this project proved cost-effective across the board, one of the biggest benefits is the roof’s minimization of the need for steel columns.

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ARCHITECTURE GRAPHICS + BRANDING INTERIOR DESIGN MEP STRUCTURAL + CIVIL ENGINEERING SUSTAINABLE DESIGN TALL BUILDINGS URBAN DESIGN + PLANNING

SKIDMORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP 14 WALL STREET NEW YORK, NY 10005 TEL: 212-298-9300 WWW.SOM.COM

Images, clockwise from upper left: Pearl River Tower, Guangzhou, China | Photo © Tim Griffith Pertamina Energy Tower, Jakarta, Indonesia | Rendering of wind turbines at tower crown © SOM U.S. Census Bureau Headquarters, Suitland, Maryland | Photo © Eduard Hueber P.S. 62 Net Zero Energy School, Staten Island, New York | Rendering © SOM

We believe sustainability inspires great architecture. Brilliant new forms result from designing with the lightest environmental touch.


GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Inner Workings Features Spaces Next Punch List

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36 SOM

Exploring the creation of the firm’s forthcoming Pertamina Tower in Jakarta

42 Chatsworth Products

How the company is refining the art and science of keeping critical IT

45 EcoSafe

Working to make compositing easy for the multi-family crowd

48 STHLMNYC

From New York to Stockholm, this organization opens up a dialogue about adapting architecture to future uncertainties

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TRENDSETTERS

A R C H I T E C T U R E F I R M TO WATC H

The firm’s holistic combination of architectural design, structural engineering, and sustainable engineering services culminate for the creation of Jakarta’s forthcoming Pertamina Tower By Amanda Koellner

OPPOSITE Pertamina Tower in Jakarta, tentatively set for a 2021 completion date, is targeting net zero by harnessing geothermal energy. Plus, a wind funnel at the top of the tower’s crown will generate additional energy, and the building’s curvature will mitigate solar heat gain throughout the year.

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Considering they’ve designed and built some of the world’s tallest buildings—including the John Hancock Center, Willis Tower, and Burj Khalifa—Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) was the perfect firm to tackle the upcoming Pertamina Energy Tower—the world’s first supertall tower for which energy is the number one design driver. Created for the Indonesian stateowned energy company and set to rise more than 1,640 feet above the city of Jakarta, this stunning new 99-story “beacon of energy” and skyline landmark will boast a performing arts and exhibition pavilion, a mosque, and a central energy plant. “What makes Pertamina particularly interesting is that while it’s geared toward corporate use, its auditoriums, exhibition space, and mosque are all also open to the city and the community,” says Mustafa K. Abadan, design partner at SOM, who orchestrated the overall vision for the project with a team that, at times, reached 60 or 70 people firm-wide. “There’s also a visitor center that has more controlled access, like a museum, that allows for direct interaction between the corporation and the public in educating them about what they do, how they harness energy, their petroleum products, etc.” Abadan

also notes that a series of additional employee-specific elements will also be dispersed around the campus, such as a fitness center/sporting pavilion and major cafeteria/food court. Although practicality (Pertamina brings together 20,000 formerly dispersed employees in one central location) and community (on top of the aforementioned, green spaces and parks will also be open) top the list of design drivers at play, sustainability is the focus. The development is targeting net zero by harnessing geothermal energy; a wind funnel at the top of the tower’s crown will generate additional energy, and the building’s curvature will mitigate solar heat gain throughout the year—just a few specifics among a myriad of boundary-pushing innovations. In addition to talking with Abadan on the subject, gb&d spoke with design director Scott Duncan, and Luke Leung, director of sustainable engineering, to learn more about Pertamina, which is tentatively set for a 2021 completion date. gb&d: So seeing as this is the world’s first supertall tower for which energy was the primary design driver, I’m curious as to if the sustainable strategies were a gbdmagazine.com

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF SOM

SOM


TRENDSETTERS

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TRENDSETTERS

demand of the client or something SOM brought to the table or a mixture of both? Scott Duncan: It was a mixture of both, but we brought it to the table as an idea, and it was immediately embraced by the board and the then-president, Karen Agustiawan, in particular. We felt immediately when we did our first presentation and proposal for net zero that it was the right direction for the project. Luke Leung: In the current world, the largest net zero building is about 360,000+ square feet. In contrast, Pertamina will be close to four million. gb&d: Wow! And atop all of that is the wind funnel. What inspired this method of harnessing energy; had you guys done it before?

BELOWAlthough the project is geared toward corporate use, its auditoriums, exhibition space, and mosque are all also open to the city and the community.

the accelerated wind forces at the top of the tower. It is also a renewable source that is not daylight-dependent, so we made the decision to use the energy generated to power the nighttime lighting. Leung: In another SOM building, we had experience using this sort of accelerated wind funnel before—on the Pearl River Tower [in China]. With Pertamina, it’s a little different because we have it at the very top of the building, and it’s more effective because the stronger wind is up there. What is really interesting is that the output of the wind turbine can vary, so the light in the nighttime will actually change color depending on how much power the wind is generating.

gb&d: What other sustainable elements or examples of green design are at play here? Leung: I think the key thing here is, while people are fascinated by the visual component of the wind turbine or the energy component or geothermal heat, some of the key things here are the fundamentals of saving energy, using good systems and good, basic practices. In this case, we have good daylight in the space, which is very important, and we have studied 600+ different shading options so that the building will be shaded from the Indonesian sun. Inside the building, we have LED lighting, which is state-of-the-art in terms of lighting efficiency.

Leung: We wanted to do something to react to the natural forces of nature, and wind speed increases as it gets up the tower. So the strongest wind is going to be at the top of the building, and the design naturally aligns the opening with the wind direction in the area to enhance it more. Wind speed is the most important driver for any wind turbine’s power generation. It’s not the largest, single most important power generation element in the building; but adding it as a feature that people can look at and get inspired by will hopefully generate a rich dialogue about what the building is about. Duncan: The majority of the power of the project is coming from geothermal, but it was important for us to look in all directions at all renewables, and as Luke pointed out, wind was a good candidate for

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PHOTOS: COURTESY OF SOM

BELOWThe crenelated surface on the interior of the mosque is cast stone that’s lining every single wall surface that acts as more of a radiator in reverse—more of an absorber—for the body heat of the 1,000 people or so that will be there at a time.

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LEFTAlthough the project boasts ample daylight, the team also studied 600+ different shading options so that the building will be shaded from the Indonesian sun.

Duncan: Also, the mosque is a low-tech solution that was arrived at through some high-tech analysis. We’re using a night flush system here. A mosque is not unlike a church in its volumetric configuration. The majority of the masonry surfaces on the inside are used to absorb the heat from the large quantity of people that are in there over the course of the day. Then that heat is re-radiated in off-hours and as the building is flushed out. Through computer simulations, the team at first developed a full-time naturally ventilated space that would have allowed air through it at any time during the day. But since it is almost always warm during the day, the daytime air would counteract the cooling benefits of ventilation. We found it was actually better to draw in the cooler air only at night and release it throughout the day. Additionally, the crenelated surface on the interior of the mosque is cast stone that’s lining every single wall surface that acts as more of a radiator in reverse—more of an absorber—for the body heat of the 1,000 people or so that will be there at a time. Another big part of the story is water. This is a zero water runoff project. Basically, no water leaves the site. Throughout the site, there are recharging wells that recharge the aquifer. Our water management system is designed so that it doesn’t burden the very fragile infrastructure of Jakarta, which is plagued by floods. Leung: We recycle all the water inside the building: grey water, black water, etc. Most buildings send it back through the sanitary line back to the city for treatment. But in this case, we designed the system more like a tree. We absorb whatever water we can, we recycle

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TRENDSETTERS

whatever water we can, but then whatever extra we can, we let some that go back to the ground to refill the water table.

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF SOM

RIGHTThe project’s water management system is designed so that it doesn’t burden the very fragile infrastructure of Jakarta, which is plagued by floods.

Duncan: To talk about the tower a little bit, the form of many parts of the project was driven by the idea and need to save energy. The big story with net zero is reduction first— trying to reduce the loads that are the demands. And then generation is the second part. So we’ve talked about geothermal, we’ve talked about the winds. The low buildings incorporated solar; the canopy incorporates solar. But the building’s shape helps substantially on the reduction side. The plan geometry is aligned with the sun path. The east and west notches have the specially designed façade with vertical fins counteract the low-angle east and west sun. The north and south facades have horizontal shading arrays, the two leaf-like forms that define the tower’s profile on the skyline. gb&d

LEFTThe mosque features a low-tech solution that was arrived at through high-tech anaylsis and includes the team’s findings that it is actually better to draw in the cooler air only at night and release it throughout the day.

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DATA C E N T E R G A M E C H A N G E R S

Chatsworth Products How the company is refining the art and science of keeping critical IT By Brian Barth

RIGHTChatsworth Products uses passive cooling principles to reduce cooling energy use of data centers by up to 40%.

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When Seattle-based TeleCommunication Systems (TCS) began drawing up plans for a new data center several years ago, they ran into a slight problem. The local utility company said the grid didn’t have enough available power to support the expansion. The servers, switches, and hard drives housed in data centers produce a tremendous amount of heat. The problem is that they also have very precise temperature tolerances—just a few degrees above the specified temperature, and entire IT networks can come crashing down and affect millions of people. In the case of TCS, the company is handling a large percentage of the 911 calls in the United States through their network, so if their servers overheat, it’s truly a matter of life and death. For these reasons, data centers are designed with multiple levels of redundancy built into their powerful HVAC systems. Energy use for cooling is an enormous expense for companies like TCS, not to mention an enormous environmental cost for the planet. It is exactly this equation that Chatsworth Products, Inc. (CPI) specializes in solving. For the last decade (an eternity in terms of IT development), the standard data center design employed the “hot aisle/cold aisle” method, which entails aligning two long rows of cabinets so the intake sides of the two rows are facing each other, then delivering conditioned “cold” air into the intake side “cold” aisle that has been created and venting the hot air out of the opposite exhausted of the “hot aisle.” From a thermodynamics perspective, it was pretty rudimentary compared to the high-tech HVAC acrobatics that LEED designers are used to. “Even though you had the cabinets properly positioned and were delivering chilled air where you needed to, the room itself had issues where there was heat coming off the back side of the equipment that would somehow find its way back up to the front and mix with the chilled air,” says Sam Rodriguez, a product manager, cabinet and thermal solutions, at CPI, of the old system. Rodriguez is part of a team at CPI that has helped develop an alternative method that employs passive cooling principles to reduce cooling energy use by data centers by up to 40%. CPI was brought on the project by the design-build firm McKinstry to help TCS solve the problem of power availability. Using the company’s “cooling wall” system of evaporative-only cooling and precision airflow containment, TCS became one of the most efficient data centers in the Pacific Northwest, saving an estimated 513,000 kilowatts per year. They have since won one national and one regional ASHRAE award with a remarkable average power usage effectiveness’ score of 1.15. gbdmagazine.com


PHOTOS: COURTESY OF CHATSWORTH PRODUCTS

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TOPIntroducing an atypical “Galcier White” finish at BendBroadband, a CPI client, not only makes for a sleek look but has increased visibility and allowed for reduced lighting in the facility by 30%.

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Rodriguez says the approach is quite simple and actually starts with the basic concept of hot aisle/cold aisle, but “takes it to another level in terms of how you control and isolate airflow.” The complicated part is to work within the precise parameters required for a data center equipment cabinet. The architecture of the cabinets includes many places where hot air can leak back to the cold air zone—in the gaps between the equipment and the cabinet walls, in the space where the cabinet is elevated off of the floor on casters, even in the tiny spaces between the cables where they come in through the floor of the cabinet. Working with the care of a brain surgeon, the CPI team has finetuned the innards of data center cabinets to seal off any possible point of leakage between the cold air zone at the front and the hot air zone at the back with carefully crafted air dams. “Studies have shown that up to 50% of the conditioned air used to cool equipment and the related cost to cool that air is wasted,” Rodriguez says of conventional cabinet design where air is allowed to flow freely. CPI’s Passive Cooling Systems are designed for less than 5% leakage at normal operating conditions, with customers that practice strict airflow management techniques achieving under 2%. In the old system, the cabinet had a ventilated door on the back side so the hot air could escape. The CPI system utilizes solid rear doors with gaskets while a rectangular duct on top of each cabinet acts like a chimney to whisk air from the exhaust side of the cabinet directly into the return air plenum in the ceiling above. What is most incredible about the CPI system is the highly effective use of seals to isolate hot and cold zones causes the air to be drawn from the cabinet by the air handler without the need for additional fans and the complete segregation of hot and cold makes for very efficient operation of the cooling system. And as Rodriguez points out: what does a fan do besides suck electricity, add heat

to the system with its motor, and eventually wear out, putting a mission critical system at risk? With no additional fans required within the cabinets, the only fans used to move air are the existing fans within the server computers and the facility’s air handler. It turns out that more and more telecom companies are thinking like CPI: passive cooling has multiple layers of benefits. By making data center HVAC systems more efficient, more cabinets can be fit into less space, cutting down on real estate costs. For huge providers like Telefonica Vivo, who provides IT services to half of Brazil’s population and is another one of CPI’s clients, all those savings add up and allow them to make improvements in service and reliability, as well as to keep their commitment to sustainability. Their new 362,000-square-foot facility is the most energy efficient in the country and one of only five in the world that has achieved LEED Gold certification. One of the other five data centers to achieve LEED Gold, BendBroadband in Bend, Oregon, is also a CPI client. The passive cooling approach was the basis for making that level of energy efficiency happen, but there was another more visually striking aspect of the cabinet design that also contributed to the LEED rating. The traditional color for data center cabinets is jet black, but CPI has introduced a “Glacier White” finish that completely changes the ambiance. The bright, clean look of a white cabinet has a practical importance as well. By having a surface that reflects light instead of absorbing it, data center technicians find it easier to see inside the cabinet for equipment changes and maintenance. It seems like a no-brainer, but the improved visibility has allowed BendBroadband to reduce lighting in their data center by 30%. Passive cooling has been called a low-tech approach to air conditioning, but thinking in those terms has allowed one of the most high-tech industries there is to “smarten” its HVAC approach. Thus, it seems a new industry of green IT infrastructure has been born. gb&d gbdmagazine.com

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF CHATSWORTH PRODUCTS

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TRENDSETTERS

COMPOSTING EXPERTS

EcoSafe EcoSafe works to make composting easy for the multi-family crowd By Brian Barth

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF ECOSAFE

ABOVEEcoSafe, which already has the strongest leak proof compostable bags on the market, has recently introduced a solution for organics separation that is geared for multi-family developments.

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Once upon a time, taking out the trash was a simple affair for apartment dwellers. You walked out back to the dumpster, held your nose and tossed in your bag. Of course we all know the consequences wrought by waste management practices in those simpler times. Since “zero waste” has become the mantra of the waste management industry, taking out the trash has become more complicated: “Mr. and Mrs. Smith, you are now responsible for sorting and separating your recyclables from the trash and the slimy, smelly compostable stuff.” In 2015, the average citizen may understand the rationale for separating organics from the waste stream, and they may wholeheartedly support the idea, but the experience of waste managers is that those good intentions don’t always translate to good follow through. Nowhere is this more of an issue than in the multi-family housing environment. Composting kitchen scraps has long been embraced by many homeowners in a single family context, but with more and more cities mandating source separation of organics, the enormous population of people living in condos and apartments—a demographic that has typically not composted their kitchen scraps because they lack a yard to do it in—are starting to contribute to the municipal compost stream. It’s a boon to the composting industry, but there are many hurdles to cross. “The challenge of keeping collection clean, easy, and understandable for residents is particularly important in multi-family buildings where occupancy turn-over can be high and there can be broad cultural and linguistic diversity,” says Alexa Kielty, zero waste specialist for the city of San Francisco. Whatever the underlying reasons are, it seems that everyone in the business agrees that

apartment and condo dwellers are less likely to separate their trash than in either single family or institutional settings, creating a bottleneck in the flow of recyclables and compostables along the way to the next step in their life cycle. “Cross-contamination rates in these buildings typically run into the double digits,” says Phil Ragan, director of market development for EcoSafe, a Vancouver-based company that provide solutions for diverting organic waste from landfills to commercial compost facilities. Composters feel the pinch when a load of organic waste shows up at their facility, a big issue given that the sale of compost is a primary economic driver turning the wheels of zero waste initiatives. “When improper bags made of film plastic accumulate at composting facilities, it adds costs, lowers recycling rates, jeopardizes product quality, and threatens the economic feasibility of urban composting into the future,” says Susan Thoman, vice president of corporate development for Cedar Grove Composting. “With multi-family [collection] programs on the rise, our greatest concern is the potential for confusion, improper sorting and, ultimately, increased contamination in the compost stream.” EcoSafe, a company already known for having the strongest leak proof compostable bags on the market, has recently introduced a turnkey solution for organics separation that is geared specifically for multi-family developments. “Over the years everyone has worked on ‘what does the composter need, what does the building manager need etc.’, but nobody was really focused on the cultural issue and the social side of things,” says Ragan. EcoSafe’s new MultiRes program includes bins, bags, and all the hardware needed for a successful organic waste separation system in a large residential building, but more importantly, it comes with a customized outreach program to engage residents and win their cooperation—the part that has always been such a challenge. A combination of affordability, convenience, simple communication, and graphic signage, is proving very successful in getting the message across. A number of municipalities, building operators and waste companies across North America are already implementing the new system. may–june 2015

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RIGHTEcoSafe’s MultiRes program includes bins, bags, and all the hardware needed for an organic waste separation system in a large residential building.

EcoSafe users depend on high-performance certified compostable bioplastic bags to collect food waste without the risk of breaking or leaking.

“We were able to provide each of our residents with a starter kit and an easy to understand the program to begin collecting organics and diverting them away from our regular garbage containers,” says Terry Hyska of Belcarra Apartments in Port Moody, British Columbia. “After just four months the acceptance from our residents allowed us to transition completely [to the new program] and reduce our regular garbage collection costs by 50%.” The city of Seattle is also testing out the system, and early indications are that food waste capture is up in the buildings where the new system is in place. “We are currently testing [MultiRes] in more than 50 buildings and hope to have our final report completed by late spring,” says Marcia Rutan, the community recycling program manager for the city. As the numbers trickle in, the power of communication and easy to understand systems in the urban compost space is increasingly appar-

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ent, for both the environment and the bottom line. “It’s an example of the importance of multi-stakeholder collaboration,” Rutan says. In terms of the ins and outs of the actual system, BASF, the world’s largest chemical company, has been integral in the success of the MultiRes system. The EcoSafe organic collection programs feature high-performance certified compostable bioplastic bags that home owners and commercial users can depend on to collect and transport food waste without the risk of breaking or leaking. EcoSafe says that their work with BASF in the development of their EcoSafe~6,400 compostable bags made with BASF’s ecovio has led to a durable product that serves as one of EcoSafe’s cornerstone successes. “Ecovio is a premium performance and versatile biopolymer that is certified compostable worldwide and contains verifiable bio-based content,” says Keith Edwards, North American biopolymer sales manager for BASF. “We are focused on developing sustainable solutions through chemistry that make programs such as the MultiRes system cleaner, safer, easier, and more effective.” In the fall of 2014, EcoSafe and BASF commissioned Cascadia Consulting and Building Insight to conduct a before and after study in four multi-family buildings in San Francisco that have made the switch to the MultiRes system. The results from a follow-up survey were impressive: recycling participation rates increased from less than 50% to more than 80% in all four buildings, while contamination fell to less than 1% in three of the buildings and to just 6% in the fourth. But perhaps the most telling result from the survey of residents about their impression of the new system: the resident satisfaction rate shot up to 89%—nearly double the rate with the standard gbdmagazine.com


TRENDSETTERS

“This pilot is the first step in successfully implementing large scale, multifamily organics collection in the city of Los Angeles...”

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF ECOSAFE

JESSICA ALDRIDGE, SUSTAINABILITY MANAGER, ATHENS SERVICES

city program. EcoSafe is already seeing the benefits down the line where kitchen scraps become compost, an environmental product with high market demand. Athens Services, a waste hauler in the Los Angeles area, has implemented the MultiRes pilot program at apartment complexes they serve throughout the region in a partnership with Global Green USA. The company runs their own compost facility where they transform vegetable, fruit, meat, dairy, and food-soiled paper waste from these communities into a valuable high-end soil amendment for use in farming and gardening. “This pilot is the first step in successfully implementing large scale, multifamily organics collection in the city of Los Angeles,” says Jessica Aldridge, Athens’ sustainability manager. “We are thrilled to jump start this program and believe it will help us to better understand the residents’ needs in composting their food scraps.” California has just passed new organics recycling legislation and a number of cities, including Los Angeles, have recently established zero waste goals, meaning the large scale composting of food scraps will weigh heavily in the future of the recycling and resource management industries. As this cradle-to-cradle, closed-loop solution to organics management revs up, engaging the masses as willing participants in the process will be key. Streamlining the separation process and cutting down on the ‘yuck’ factor for residents has mutually reinforcing benefits. The more effective people are in separating their waste, the fewer odors and insect infestations there are—which makes it even more likely that others will get in the habit. Soon, taking out the trash may feel just as simple as it used to. gb&d

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A R C H I T E C T U R E O R G A N I Z AT I O N

STHLMNYC

From New York to Stockholm, STHLMNYC Opens a Dialogue about Adapting Architecture to Future Uncertainties By Jeff Link

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“An architect is not a sole specialist in anything. But, they have the perspective to get the right people at the table to create visions and strategies to create a better environment.” SANDER SCHUUR, FOUNDING PARTNER, STHLMNYC

STHLMNYC is an organization founded and directed by the architects Linda Schuur and Sander Schuur, Int’l. Assoc. AIA, that collaborates closely with the Swedish Association of Architects and the American Institute of Architects’ New York Chapter. Former New York City residents who now live in Stockholm, the Schuurs observed many key differences in how architects in those cities worked and wanted to bring them together and close the gap. They recently began a series of semiannual seminars as a platform for collaboration toward architecture that is adaptive for uncertainties of the future. They argue that adaptivity is a higher and more useful standard than resiliency in urban design. The duo’s second seminar was held April 8–10 in Stockholm—a two-and-a-half day event centered on the theme of “Movement” that brought together architects, urban planners, and project developers from across the globe. Sander took time from his schedule to talk to gb&d about STHLMNYC’s mission and the Movement seminar.

gb&d: The STHMLNYC seminars are intended to tackle issues surrounding how architects can design urban environments to deal with unforeseeable future events. Without getting too Stephen Colbert-like, if we can’t foresee an event, how can we plan for it? Sander Schuur: Unforeseeable events can mean social, economic, and natural disasters. We think of a city like Detroit that loses 25% of its population in 10 years due to the downsizing of the auto industry. How can we design a city that can deal with that? Detroit is based on a single economy model, not easily adaptive. If that scenario gb&d

happens again, we have the opportunity to react faster. Stockholm is currently one of the fastest growing cities in Europe. How do we ensure we build a city, rather than merely housing? In New York after Hurricane Sandy, the city began preparing for 100- or 500-year storms. You can argue that a 500-year storm could be here in 20 years. A levy will not work. We argue for the principle of adaptation: controlled flooding rather than flood control. Creating an environment that can deal with more extreme situations. gb&d: Can you explain the context of the Movement seminar? Are we talking about architectural movement, pedestrian movement, vehicular movement, social movement—all of the above? Schuur: First off, movement is about people. How do you make areas attractive? It’s not, for example, just about helping people in East Harlem get to Soho, but also about helping people in Soho get to East Harlem. This raises socio-economic questions. People of limited means shouldn’t have an excessively high cost of transportation. It’s movement of people in economic and social terms. Movement also applies to water, particularly as it relates to storm water surges. A study we did with KWR Watercycle Research Institute in the Netherlands looked at cities’ effectiveness in regulating the water cycle, including managing storm water and providing clean drinking water. Cities are growing in density. With more hard surfaces and shrinking vegetative spaces, we need to find effective ways to deal with rainwater. Finally, movement applies to food and the natural world. The distance between inhabitants and

LEFTThe Schuurs are seeking to bridge the differences between how architects in New York City and Stockholm work, as well as to get those figures thinking about future uncertainties.

their food sources is growing. How do we move food and fresh water to people? Nearly all food hubs in New York, for example, are located in Brooklyn. During Hurricane Sandy, Brooklyn was not hit, but if it had been it would have wiped out New Yorkers’ food supply for two weeks. There’s also a biodiversity tie in: birds and bees need to go from A to B, in order to survive. If we make cities too big and too long, we limit biodiversity. In a nutshell, we’re looking at how can we make cities more sustainable, biodiverse, and green. gb&d: The World Health Organization predicts that 70% of the world’s population will live in urban environments by 2050. How do we design for the movement of people in the increasingly dense urban environments? Schuur: There’s this brilliant quote, “The future is not what it used to be,” which first appeared in an article titled “From a Private Correspondence on Reality” by Laura Riding and Robert Graves. We had an idea of what the future looked like in the ‘50s, which has almost never changed. The easy way out is to go vertical. Can we connect people and structures on different levels that facilitate multiple layers of movement within in the city? Multi-layered cities that give people several options for travel is a part of the adaptation principle. Even more interesting is the Central Artery/Tunnel Project in Boston, where they decided to get rid of

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TOP LEFTLinda Schuur is a senior architect specializing in sustainable, social, and high-end residential projects. BOTTOM LEFT Sander Schuur is a senior architect and urban designer with experience working on international projects.

gb&d: Multi-layered cities are a fascinating concept. Who is doing interesting work on this front? Schuur: An interesting one is someone I know in New York, Guy Nordenson, a structural engineer and professor at Princeton, who does studies before people start thinking of things. He has the idea of providing more transportation through vertical approaches like the Roosevelt Island Tramway, an aerial tram that spans the East River from the Upper East Side of Manhattan to Roosevelt Island. It’s effective and the footprint is minimal. gb&d: If transportation and infrastructure are important to the adaptive urban design, so are people’s living arrangements, right? Where will people live in the future? Schuur: We had an interesting discussion in Stockholm the other day. We discussed the possibility for more flexibility in people’s living arrangements. Take someone whose job is partly in New York and partly in Stockholm. Can he rent an apartment every week or every month? Does everybody have to have an apartment? Or, can we think out of the box? People and economies are moving faster. This demands new modes of living. Flexibility to be adaptive is the key. We’re looking at different models that allow for more density per square meter. The most obvious way is to go up in the air, but there are other approaches. Airbnb, for example, is increasing density by making use of unused living space for short-term lodging. Are there other models? Can two people working the night and day shift, for example, share the same apartment? That is the question:

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how do we live? It’s not that our platform aims to provide solutions; we aim to start a discussion and create a broader forum for thinking about these issues. gb&d: How would you like to see cities adapt to predicted socioeconomic challenges of the future, such as a lack of access to affordable healthy food? Schuur: This is somewhat basic in a sense: offering seasonal produce that coincides with the time of year and climate. But, ideally, enhancing the local food supply can provide auxiliary benefits. One interesting example is from Kate Orff, whose office, SCAPE, participated in the first STHLMNYC event. The project is called Oyster-Tecture and would bring back oyster reefs to help shield New York from future storm surges. Oyster farms provide multiple benefits at once: protecting the hinterlands by limiting wave energy from sea surges, while also providing people with a food source. Day to day, they also limit erosion on the beaches. The project has great educational value. In an adaptive urban environment, a single design solution fulfills multiple functions. gb&d: Your website says that it is “time to rethink the architectural practice.” How is STHLMNYC’s work helping to do that? Schuur: I would like architecture to take a leading role, again, in thinking about how to create a truly sustainable urban environment. An architect is not a sole specialist in anything. But, they have the perspective to get the right people at the table to create visions and strategies to create a better environment. gb&d gbdmagazine.com

PHOTOS: ANNA-LENA AHLSTRÖM (LINDA SCHURR); THOMAS ZAAR (SANDER SCHURR)

highway overpasses and go underground. This is good for providing space, but if Boston gets hit with hurricane, there is no escape route. It is good on one hand, but trouble on the other hand. We have to weigh multiple benefits and risks.


GREEN BUILDING TRENDSETTERS & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Inner Workings Features Spaces Next Punch List

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52 Penthouse Photosynthesis

A vertical forest stretches toward the sky in Milan

54 Guide Dogs for the Blind New Student Residence

Strategic sustainability aids this organization

56 Future Tech

Iniside Panasonic Corporation’s double-LEED headquarters

60 UC Davis Tercero 3

Student housing that fosters community

62 Whole Foods Brooklyn

The LEED Platinum grocery store sets a new standard for supermarkets

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INNER WORKINGS

Penthouse Photosynthesis Milan’s Bosco Verticale, a revolutionary green residential tower, redefines the idea of the garden level apartment

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During a trip to Dubai a few years ago, architect Stefano Boeri couldn’t escape the concept of vertical cities. The breakneck building boom in the desert metropolis had created walls of glass and steel, new neighborhoods stretching along a skyward axis where none existed before. The vertical sprawl inspired the Italian architect to devise an alternative with an organic edge. Bosco Verticale (or, vertical forest), his response and revolutionary take on ecological highrise developments, consists of twin towers in Porta Nuova, Milan, that support a literal forest in the sky. “It’s like an injection of biodiversity,” Boeri says, since the 26- and 18-story towers, which support thousands of trees and shrubs that blossom off its balconies, add the equivalent of roughly five acres of parkland to the city. Since opening last fall, the concept has planted a seed for developers around the world. Boeri is already discussing similar projects in China, including incorporating a vertical forest into the façade of the Old Stock Exchange Building in Shanghai. by Patrick Sisson

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INNER WORKINGS

PROJECT LOCATION Milan, Italy Size 430,556ft ² Completion 2014 Awards 2014 International Highrise Award Cost $70.9 million

TEAM OWNER Hines Italia Architect Boeri Studio Structural Engineer Arup Interior Design Dolce Vita Homes and Coima Images Landscape Architect Emanuela Borio and Laura Gatti

ABOVE The project consists of twin towers in Porta Nuova, Milan that support a literal forest in the sky. LEFTBosco Verticale (or, vertical forest), is architect Stefano Boeri’s response and revolutionary take on ecological high-rise developments.

PLANTING ROOTS

NEW TYPES OF TENANTS

During the long development phase for the project, Boeri

An arboretum now runs between the two towers of Bosco Verticale, which boasts 900 trees, 5,000 shrubs, and 11,000 floral plants. “I really wanted to see if it was possible to have a real forest,” he says. “I didn’t want homogenous trees. I wanted something diverse.” To encourage that diversity, Boeri consulted with landscape artists to devise just the right mix; they even released a swarm of ladybugs on site to battle pests, so they wouldn’t have to resort to pesticides. The patient, planned community of plants has paid off; Boeri says they’ve counted nests from 20 different birds spread among the vertical forest. gb&d

and his team realized the true challenge of planting hundreds of full-grown trees on the sides of two residential towers wasn’t the added weight, it was the wind. All those braches could become a series of sails during a storm. In collaboration with structural engineer Arup, the team experimented with numerous balcony configurations, testing angles and measuring potential vibrations before settling on a tiered system that minimized the danger of being caught in the breeze. The stacked design and dense foliage is truly rooted, and offers the added benefit of shading residents from both the sun and the sounds of the city. “It just transmits this idea of sustainability,” Boeri says. “Imagine you’re in your bedroom a dozen stories up and look out your window, and it’s partially covered by the leaves from your neighbor’s tree.” ROOM FOR GROWTH Extending 11 feet out above Milan, the balconies of Bos-

PHOTOS: PAOLO ROSSELLI

co Verticale don’t just provide a pleasant view or shaded spot to relax. The variety of plants on the building create a microclimate above one of Europe’s most polluted cities, producing humidity, turning CO2 into oxygen, and removing dust from the air. While the airborne amenities get the most press, don’t discount the ground floor. By locating parking facilities underground, the designers made room for a cycling area and public square.

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INNER WORKINGS

Guide Dogs for the Blind New Student Residence Studio Bondy Architecture thoughtfully crafted a new facility that caters to the needs of the blind and their service animals

Guide Dogs for the Blind raises service dogs and provides training to approximately 350 visually impaired people each year across two campuses in California and in Oregon, at no charge. On the San Rafael campus, Studio Bondy Architecture designed a new student residence that houses guest rooms, community spaces, classrooms, and administrative offices. Folding forms and simple materials characterize the architecture, and deep roof overhangs, layers of glass, and day-lit corridors provide transparency and natural ventilation. “It is a serene, beautiful place for learning,” says Laura Rambin, principal at SBA. By Rebecca Falzano

ABOVEThe heating system is designed to use 150°F/120°F heating water at peak design allowing boilers to run continuously at their highest efficiency.

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PROJECT LOCATION San Rafael, CA Size 35,000ft ² Completion 2013 Cost $11.4 million

RIGHT This project challenged the architects to consider how the building would be experienced by the visually impaired.

TEAM

PHOTOS: KEN GUTMAKER

OWNER Guide Dogs for the Blind Owner’s Representative Greystone West Architect Studio Bondy Architecture (formerly Starkweather Bondy) Civil Engineer Sandis Structural Engineer Nishkian Menninger Mechanical Engineer Guttmann & Blaevoet Electrical Engineer/ Lighting Design O’Mahony & Myer Audio-Visual Design The Shalleck Collaborative Interior Design Gail Gordon Design General Contractor Lathrop Construction Associates

SUPPLIERS

STRATEGIC SUSTAINABILITY & COMMUNICATION

MINIMIZING IMPACT, MAXIMIZING WAYFINDING

Although LEED certification was an initial goal, the

The architecture needed to integrate the new

non-profit chose not to pursue it in the end due to cost. “Every dollar spent is a dollar that must be donated to the organization,” Rambin says. The new building incorporates all of the sustainable features required by the California Green Building Standards Code, which is essentially equivalent to LEED Silver. In addition, it is pre-wired and pre-plumbed for future photovoltaic and solar thermal panels. Not only did the project challenge the architects to consider how the building would be experienced by the visually impaired, they also had to communicate in a new way: drawings were printed with Braille text and raised lines so that all members of the board, including those who are visually impaired, could review.

student residence within the context of the existing campus buildings and create a spatial organization that facilitated wayfinding—all while minimizing impact on existing landscaped gardens and picnic areas, including mature redwood trees. A landscaped garden between the existing administration building and the new student residence was preserved, along with the outdoor graduation area. The gardens were enhanced with new planting to provide olfactory cues to orient students on campus, and existing pedestrian paths were modified to provide accessible points of entry into the new student residence building.

DURABLE, SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS

HIGH-EFFICIENCY MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

Since animals would be present in all areas of the building, finishes were carefully chosen for durability and sustainability. Guest suites, circulation spaces, and the dog grooming room feature stained and sealed concrete floors. The main corridor has a wainscot covered in washable wallcoverings for ease of cleaning and a handrail that aids in orientation. Exterior materials consisting of wood siding and cement plaster blend seamlessly with the existing buildings on campus and the natural wooded landscape.

Because of the intense use by animals, higher

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Glass Systems Blomberg, SAFTI fire rated glazing, PPG glazing, Kalwall Air/Weather Barrier Stego Wrap, Fortifiber Sealants BASF, Dow Roofing Firestone TPO, AEP Span metal roofing Waterproofing Carlisle, Greenguard Acoustical Ceilings USG, Wall Technology Acoustical Systems Quiet Technology Systems Wall Panels Lighting Lightolier, Wellmade, Shaper, Bega, Focal Point, Del Ray, Beta, Williams HVAC Carrier, Reznor Window Coverings Mecho Shade Flooring Nora, Roppe, Burke, Tandus, Tera-Lite Paint Sherwin Williams

ventilation rates were a requirement for the building. Mechanical units are high efficiency with a heat recovery feature on the air side. Zoning and controls were used to make the system environmentally responsive. Additionally, mechanical systems for suites operate only when assigned to a guest who controls the thermostat. Administrative spaces and classroom VAV boxes close when rooms are unoccupied, and the assembly room has a dedicated mechanical unit that operates only during events.gb&d

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Future Tech The new Panasonic headquarters is double-LEED certified and very, very ‘smart’ By Brian Barth

Panasonic Corporation will celebrate its 100th birthday in 2018. But the company is planning more than just a party to rejoice its success as one of the most storied electronics companies on the planet. It’s set the impressive goal of becoming the greenest electronics company on Earth by then—in less than three years. With the way things have been going for the company recently, that shouldn’t be too hard. Panasonic makes photovoltaic panels, batteries for hybrid electric vehicles, a full line of energy efficient appliances, and is also a major player in advancing much of the “smart” technology used in net zero homes. Interbrand’s 2014 survey of the “Best Global Green Brands” ranked Panasonic number five overall, but the company was the highest ranking electronics brand in the report. Those 100th birthday goals don’t seem so tough, after all. But beyond the good work that Panasonic does with its product line, the company has a vision about mobilizing communities around the ideals of sustainability—a mission that plays out at multiple levels, from its own staff to its neighbors in the regions where Panasonic facilities are located to its business partners to the consumers who purchase products with Panasonic components. Panasonic Corporation of North America’s new headquarters in Newark, New Jersey is a recent, and major, embodiment of this goal. Todd Rytting, Panasonic’s chief technology officer for North America, says the new headquarters “is designed to reduce the company’s carbon footprint and to create conditions to support customer and industry partnerships in green innovation.” The 12-story, 340,000-square-foot building by Gensler (core and shell) and HLW (interiors) is the first newly built office tower in Newark to earn both LEED Gold (for the core and shell) and LEED Platinum (for the interior) certifications. Here, we check out just how they did it.

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PROJECT

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INNOVATION CENTER

PANASONIC PLAYGROUND

B2B

While the workspaces demonstrate Panasonic’s corporate philosophy in a very functional way, the first floor of the building showcases those ideals in a dramatic and inspiring fashion. Known as the Innovation Center, this area displays the newest products and ideas under development at Panasonic. This thematic and ever-changing exhibit contains a series of interactive components including Panasonic’s latest 4K televisions and tablets and a spectrum of inventions for the solar, avionics, and automotive industries. “You get a sense of how one element moves to the next,” says John Gering, HLW’s managing partner and lead architect on the Panasonic project. “It’s like an interactive exhibit of their products, but it’s designed to be an educational process…it would be a great thing to bring kids to.” One of those educational features, easy to imagine kids flocking to, is a scale model of the Fujisawa Sustainable Smart Town—a sustainable city outside of Tokyo that Panasonic developed on the grounds of an old TV factory.

With its location in a densely built

The new HQ includes conference

urban area, the roughly 1,000 employees, contractors, and business partners at the new Panasonic HQ have easy access to amenities including restaurants, parks, and the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, conveniently located next door. But from an employee perspective, the building itself is a workplace haven—and of course, it’s outfitted with Panasonic’s top-of-the-line energy efficient technology throughout (most of which is Energy Star rated). There’s ample bike parking and changing rooms, an electric vehicle charging station in the parking deck (which often has Panasonic’s Tesla Model S’s docked at it), and bountiful natural daylight in 90% of employee views. The 245 Panasonic photovoltaic panels on the roof are the cherry on top.

facilities where Panasonic’s business partners from around the world converge to strategize, brainstorm, and, ultimately, to form fruitful partnerships. “Sales to other businesses, which is what we refer to as ‘B2B’ sales, make up a majority of Panasonic’s North American market,” Rytting says. “The Innovation Center provides highlights of our B2B priorities, and glimpses of what we’re working on for the future.” As an example, there is a display for Panasonic’s TAMDAR sensor, an aircraft device used to capture weather data during flights. Clients and business partners can check out the lithium ion batteries that Panasonic makes for hybrid and electric vehicles; they can also opt for an impromptu workout on an electric bicycle that is on display.

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LOCATION Newark, NJ Size 340,000ft ² Completion 2013 Program Class A Office Space & Conference Center Certification LEED Gold (Core and Shell) LEED Platinum (Commerical Interiors) Awards CoreNet Global Innovators Award, USGBC NJ Chapter, Corporate Culture of Sustainability & Best Practices Award Cost Witheld

SUPPLIERS Workstation & Office Systems Herman Miller via BFI Ergonomics Humanscale Wall Systems DIRTT Exhibit HB Stubbs

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INNER WORKINGS

TEAM

PHOTOS: JEFF CATE PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF HLW INTERNATIONAL

Engineers AMA Consulting Engineers (MEP Engineering) Acoustical Engineering Cerami Lighting Design Lighting Workshop Interior Designer HLW International Project Manager Avison Young Landlord SJP Properties/Matrix Development Group Strategist Newmark Grubb Knight Frank Food Service Consultant Vision Builders

BACK FROM THE ‘BURBS

THE FRESH FOOD VISION

Prior to building their new headquar-

A grand staircase brings guests from

ters in Newark, Panasonic occupied a suburban campus in nearby Secaucus, New Jersey. ”Literally half of the real estate was dedicated to parking,” Gering says. “It didn’t send the appropriate message for their brand, so they decided to rethink their real estate model to be more in parallel with their business model. Prior to design, a HLW led Sustainability Charrette responded to concerns around the proposed shift from a suburban to a more urban, public transportation oriented context.” The new HQ is on a tight urban footprint adjacent to Newark Penn Station, New Jersey’s largest transit hub for trains and buses. Thanks to the building’s location and a company transit subsidy, about 57% of employees now commute using mass transit, up from less than 5% before the move.

the second floor conferencing center down to the first floor where the cafeteria is located. “Cafeteria” probably gives the wrong image, though, as this eatery is more like an enormous lightdrenched café. “We designed it so that everyone knows that the food is fresh,” says Kathy Fowler, a senior food service consultant at Vision Builders, the firm who came up with Panasonic’s food system concept. Besides being both beautiful and inviting, the kitchen was designed for energy and water efficiency and made a significant contribution to the building’s LEED score. There is LED lighting throughout, and the walk-in coolers and freezers are not air-cooled, but are instead tied into the building’s chilled water system. The dishwasher recovers its own heat and water vapor at the end of every cycle and uses it to pre-heat the water for the next cycle. “We did little things like that here and there that just help the energy and water load,” says Jennifer Murphy, LEED AP food service consultant for Vision Builders. gb&d

ABOVEThe ever-changing Innovation Center displays the newest products and ideas under development at Panasonic.

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INNER WORKINGS

UC Davis Tercero 3 Student Housing New residence halls at UC Davis employ sustainable strategies while fostering community

The University of California, Davis Tercero 3, student housing built by Sundt Construction and designed by EHDD exceeded its sustainability goals: the project aimed for LEED Gold and wound up achieving LEED Platinum. The $70-million facility spans 320,000 gross square feet across seven, four-story buildings. Multiple lounges, study areas, computer centers, and gathering spaces comprise the complex, which surrounds a picturesque landscaped courtyard. By Rebecca Falzano

PROJECT LOCATION Davis, CA Size 320,000 ft ² Completion July 2014 Certification LEED Platinum Program Student Housing Cost $70.1 million

TEAM OWNER UC Davis Architect EHDD Civil Engineer Cunningham Engineering Structural Engineer KPFF Mechanical Engineer Guttmann & Blaevoet Electrical Engineer Guttmann & Blaevoet Lanscape Architect Cunningham Engineering General Contractor Sundt Construction

SUPPLIERS

PHOTO: DONALD SATTERLE PHOTOGRAPHY

Glass Systems Oldcastle/Montez Glass Roofing Kodiak Roofing Lighting Bergelectric HVAC Lawson Mechanical

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BELOWThe floorplan of Tercero 3 was designed to maximize natural light and was created to foster a feeling of community.

CONDENSING ECONOMIZER

BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING

NATURAL VENTILATION STRATEGIES

The floorplan of Tercero 3 was

All heat and hot water for Tercero 3

In addition to their extensive top-

Natural ventilation strategies provide

designed to maximize natural light and was created to foster a feeling of community by way of “clusters.” Dorm rooms bundle around bathrooms and windowed “porches” with views outside. “The idea is that the dorm cluster is the first community a student will have,” says preconstruction manager Dave Downey. At the end of every corridor, a large floor-to-ceiling window brings in ample daylight. At the main entry, a four-story glass curtainwall system lets light stream into the study rooms and lounge areas, and from a large skylight above the center stairwell, light also pours in from above.

comes from an unlikely source—steam vapor emitted by the campus steam plant. Coils on the boiler stacks divert the plant’s water vapor (previously released into the atmosphere) into a condensing economizer, where heat transfer occurs from the vapor to the water in the pipelines. Two of the pipelines carry water that ends up in the boilers; the third coil is part of a closed loop that carries water between the condensing economizer and Tercero 3, where heat is “exchanged” again— this time from the water in the closed loop to fresh water from the sinks and showers, and to the water supply for the space heating systems. “We were able to take advantage of the plant and capture that energy to essentially get free hot water,” Downey says. The system is saving the university 511,000 therms of natural gas annually, for which the campus earned a $511,000 rebate from Pacific Gas & Electric Co.

to-bottom Building Information Modeling, the team also modeled all of the underground utility work. “By modeling everything from the get-go, we were able to confirm that it all was going to fit,” says project manager Shawn Marty. The walls, electrical components, and much of the underground piping were pre-fabricated off-site, which minimized on-site waste and cleanup. “When you prefab in a factory setting, it’s a lot easier to take scraps and repurpose and recycle them pre-consumer,” Marty says.

fresh air and cooling, eliminating the need for mechanical cooling systems. Under the windows by the stairs on each floor are grilles that let fresh air in. Hot air rises through the central staircase to operable louvers surrounding the skylight that exhaust the extra heat at the top of the stairs. An energy management system monitors temperatures inside and out, triggering louvers and fans to assist in natural ventilation throughout the building. gb&d

PHOTO: BRUCE DAMONTE

CREATING COMMUNITY

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INNER WORKINGS

Whole Foods Market Brooklyn

The LEED Platinum grocery store sets a new sustainability standard for supermarkets

More than 10 years ago, the current home of Brooklyn’s shiny, sustainable new Whole Foods Market in the Red Hook neighborhood was strewn with junky automobiles and debris from the spot’s previous 200 years spent serving as a coal storage and processing area, trucking company, freight depot, and junkyard (among other various, garbage-purveying operations). “To say the site was a mess would be a significant understatement,” says Rainer Muhlbauer, principal and director of architecture on the project and for BL Companies, which handled a multitude of responsibilities on the Whole Foods undertaking. Here, we check out how he and his team transformed the site into Brooklyn’s greenest grocery store. by Amanda Koellner

LANDING LEED

PROJECT

A multitude of elements led the

LOCATION Brooklyn, NY Client Whole Foods Market Size 56,000 ft ² with 20,000 ft ² of hydroponic greenhouse space on the roof Completion December 2013 Program Grocery Store, Rooftop Hydroponic Greenhouse, Beer Garden, Dining Areas, Offices, Community Room, Back of House Spaces, Car Parking Certification LEED Platinum, Four Green Globes, EPA GreenChill Platinum Awards AIA New York Committee on The Environment (COTE) 2014 Proof & Beauty Awards – Merit Award Cost Withheld

project to achieve LEED Platinum, each largely stemming from, as Muhlbauer says, “sun, wind, and water.” A 20,000-square-foot hydroponic greenhouse on the roof provides an abundance of fresh produce to the store below throughout the year while also keeping the roof cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Additionally, solar parking canopies produce 320 kilowatts of electricity while “sky pumps” use wind generation and photovoltaics to provide power for electric car charging stations and parking lot lighting. Muhlbauer notes that this combination results in 2.5 million kilowatt hours saved per year, making the store 60% more efficient than any other grocery store in the country. He also notes that perhaps one of the most significant achievements is the fact that the Whole Foods is on its way to becoming the only grocery store in the country to completely eliminate Freon gas emissions in an effort to reduce the depletion of the ozone layer.

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“It took a lot of imagination to envision what has been built today.” Rainer Muhlbauer, BL Companies

REDUCE, REUSE, RECLAIM

PHOTOS: CHRIS COOPER

The dilapidated site took ample due

diligence, as the entire project took more than 10 years. “Along the canal, the existing bulkhead was rotting and collapsing into the water, which was filthy and filled with garbage,” Muhlbauer says. “It took a lot of imagination to envision what has been built today.” Part of that imagination came in the form of reclaimed materials— specifically a brick skin made from 250,000 reclaimed bricks from a former Westinghouse factory in Newark. Additionally, reclaimed wood from the Coney Island Boardwalk that was destroyed by Superstorm Sandy was also used throughout the interior of the supermarket.

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GREYWATER, MEET RAINWATER

TEAM

Although Whole Foods originally

Architect BL Companies Civil Engineer BL Companies Structural Engineer BL Companies Land Surveying & Subsurface Utlity Engineering BL Companies Environmental Scientists BL Companies Sustainability Consultant EME Group Landscape Architect Cunningham Engineering Energy Efficient Services E2S Hydroponic Greenhouse Design Gotham Greens Refrigeration Engineering Supermarket Technical Services Construction Manager CM+B Construction Management

wanted a greywater system to support toilet flushing in the store, water harvesting solutions company Wahaso soon learned that the total demand far exceeded the bathrooms’ supply. So, they added rainwater (which Muhlbauer notes runs off the solar parking canopies and stores in a 30,000-gallon tank under the parking lot—treated through a “backof-house” water purification system and used for washing hands and flushing toilets) in a hybrid approach, which required no additional water processing costs and significantly boosted the overall water savings for the property. “Once we were collecting and storing rainwater, it was logical to add irrigation to the uses of the non-potable water,” adds John R. Bauer, president of Wahaso. “We think the idea of evaluating all potential sources and uses of non-potable water for every project is essential in maximizing total water savings.”

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Is Water Harvesting Right for Your Commercial Project? FREAEskAAnbaolyut Our Design

INNER WORKINGS

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SUPPLIERS

Muhlbauer notes that Tristam Coffin

Solar/Wind-powered Car Charging Stations, Wind Turbines Urban Green Energy Photovoltaic System Solaire Generation Water Harvesting Systems Wahaso Water Harvesting Solutions, Inc. Porous Pavers Unilock New York, Inc. Combined Heat & Power Unit Systecon

was the driver behind many of the ideas explored, such as the hydroponic greenhouse and solar parking canopies (both firsts for the Whole Foods brand). “His task was to tap into the collective expertise of the entire design and construction teams to explore what could be accomplished,” Muhlbauer says. “I really believe that the results wouldn’t have been attained if left up to a single person or single consultant; it was the collaboration that led to the richness of ideas that were incorporated.” Certainly reaping the benefits of this massive collaboration are the Brooklynites enjoying the store’s beer garden and access to the waterfront, both of which have led the spot to become “a neighborhood gathering place that lends itself to much more than simply grocery shopping.” gb&d

PHOTOS: CHRIS COOPER

VisionBuilders is dedicated to creating a positive environment for our clients

A GROUP EFFORT

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Inner Workings Features Spaces Next Punch List

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66 Green Teams

How the Green Sports Alliance transforms iconic athletic venues into hubs for sustainability and encourages communities to go green

76 Introducing the First Annual Green Awards

In conjunction with AIA Atlanta, we asked Georgia’s capital to show us their best sustainable designs

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GREEN

FEATURES GREEN SPORTS ALLIANCE

Sports aren’t the first thing anyone associates with sustainability, but the Green Sports Alliance aims to change that by Brian Barth

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TEAMS

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FEATURES

I

PHOTO: BRACE HEMMELGARN; LOGO: COURTESY OF THE GREEN SPORTS ALLIANCE

n 2004, Dr. Allen Hershkowitz, then a senior scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), received a call from the owners of the Philadelphia Eagles. “They asked if I would be willing to help them reduce the carbon emissions at their new stadium, Lincoln Financial Field,” he says. Hershkowitz, who knew nothing about stadium operations, almost let the offer pass; but a few facts in the stadium owners’ presentation caught his attention. Much of his focus as a scientist with the NRDC centered on industrial ecology—the study of consumer products and their environmental impacts as they move from production to consumption. He was a national expert on consumer waste, especially paper products. “The paper industry is the third largest industrial generator of global warming pollution, and I figured if we’re going to reduce their carbon emissions, we needed to deal with the products they use,” Hershkowitz says. Research revealed that the paper used in the Eagles stadium actually (and quite unbelievably) came from an eagle habitat. “They were using a paper company that was wiping out eagle habitats to supply bathroom tissue,” he says. “We all saw that as a branding liability.” Hershkowitz spearheaded a successful greening program for the Eagles, thinking it would be a one-off project for him and the NRDC, but looking back a decade later, he sees it as a lesson in “how small things can lead to big changes.” Today, Hershkowitz is the president of the Green Sports Alliance, a global non-profit organization that promotes environmental stewardship through professional sports. Teams from around the world have flocked to join the organization since its founding in 2009 by the NRDC and Vulcan Corp. (it launched publicly with six gb&d

teams in March 2011). What started with six teams in six leagues has ballooned to 300 teams from 20 leagues in 14 countries. “The premise of this is simple,” says Hershkowitz, “the single most important thing that we can do to advance environmental stewardship is to change cultural attitudes and expectations about how we relate to the Earth.” The mission of the Green Sports Alliance is to “leverage the cultural and market influence of sports to promote healthy, sustainable communities.” What better platform is there to advance the environmental movement than the enormous, enthusiastic, and apolitical community surrounding the local sports team? “13% of Americans follow science, 71% follow sports,” says Hershkowitz, “if you want to reach the masses, you have to tap into trusted networks, [like] the family, the church…or, a sporting event where people go, and if they see solar panels or a compost bin, they’re getting an environmental message in a politically safe, non-controversial way.”

ABOVE A leader in promoting sustainable and green practices, Safeco Field encourages patrons to recycle through various programs and initiatives. LEFT The Green Sports Alliance, whose logo is displayed here, inspires sports leagues, teams, venues, and their partners to embrace sustainable practices in their communities.

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FEATURES GREEN SPORTS ALLIANCE

“Every sports team is part of the cultural fabric of its community, so we have a social responsibility that teams activate in a number of ways—it hasn’t traditionally been around climate and the environment, but it has been around education, around health, around the community. It’s hard not to make the connection [with sustainability] once you sit back and think about it. It’s new, but it’s obvious and that was the ‘aha’ that we had — ‘boy, why aren’t we doing this’? We ought to be doing this.”

Scott Jenkins, chairman of the Green Sports Alliance teams in the Pacific Northwest. He agreed, and the Vancouver Canucks (NHL), Seattle Storm (WNBA), and the Seattle Mariners (MLB) were brought into the fold. The Green Sports Alliance was born, and the idea spread like wildfire throughout the Pacific Northwest and beyond. This cool, cloud-shrouded part of the country has long been a hotbed for environmental awareness, but in the sports world, few teams have carried the torch like the Mariners. In 2012, gb&d told the story of Safeco Field where the Mariners play—a sports venue that has attacked the goal of zero waste with an unparalleled passion. When they first started keeping track in 2005, their waste diversion rate was about 12%. Between 2009 and 2010, when they affirmed their sustainability commitment by joining the Green Sports Alliance, the rate jumped from 38% to 70%. In the last two years, it has topped 90%, and in the 2015 season it is expected edge incredibly close to the 100% goal. “We work very closely with our concessions provider, Cen-

terplate, to increase recycling,” says Rebecca Hale, director of public information for the Mariners, “which also saves us money by reducing the tonnage we send to the landfill.” In 2013 alone, they diverted more than 3 million pounds of waste from the landfill, saving $114,000 in waste disposal costs. Since 2006, the Mariners have reduced their use of natural gas by 40%, electricity by 25%, and water use by 25%, saving an additional $1.75 million. An ongoing fan engagement initiative has resulted in new tactics each year to get the community involved, from a trivia game/scavenger hunt on “Sustainable Saturdays” to a video display in the stadium where fans can track the output of the facility’s photovoltaic array. Two green-themed mascots have also been developed, Captain Plastic and Kid Compost, who pop up on game days to engage children with the waste diversion program. “We continued to peck away at our use of electricity, water, and other utilities,” Hale says. 50% of energy use at the Mariners’ spring training facility in Peoria, Arizona now comes

Two young fans share in the sustainability efforts of the Seattle Mariners by using one the many recycling containers on the stadium’s concourse.

GSA INVOLVEMENT BY THE NUMBERS

NUMBER OF TEAMS 68

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020 014 NUMBER OF COUNTRIES

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PHOTO: COURTESTY OF SEATTLE MARINERS

THE GREEN SPORTS LEADERS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST While Hershkowitz was lighting the fire on the East Coast, similar events were transpiring out West. Paul G. Allen— the co-founder of Microsoft and owner of the Portland Trail Blazers (NBA), Seattle Seahawks (NFL), and the Seattle Sounders (MLS)—and his philanthropic foundation had been working to green their teams since the early 2000s. “We were looking at [our sports teams] in terms of what could be done about not only their own environmental footprint, but what could be done to inspire the communities where we live, work, and play,” says Justin Zeulner , formerly of Vulcan Philanthropy and the Trail Blazers and now the chief operating officer for the Green Sports Alliance, who spearheaded an energy efficiency retrofit of the Trail Blazers’ arena that reduced their consumption by 35%, the equivalent of 3 million kilowatt hours per year. In 2009, Allen’s group contacted Hershkowitz about starting a coalition of green sports


PHOTO: BRACE HEMMELGARN; MINNESOTA TWINS

FEATURES

from solar panels, but during the recent off-season, the team took an additional, some might say daring, step. All of the metal halide field lights back home were removed and replaced with LEDs, making Safeco Field the first MLB venue to illuminate its playing field with energy efficient technology. The switch will net a 60% energy savings, but Hale notes that the new fixtures also have a 30-year lifespan versus only 3 to 5 years for the old halide fixtures. “We don’t really think about it that much anymore,” says Hale of the Mariners’ focus on sustainability, “it’s become part of our DNA that this is what we do here. We don’t have to stop and think about whether something will keep with [those] goals…that way of thinking overrides most of our decision-making process when it comes to operations.”

SPORTS ARENAS: THE NEXT GENERATION Much of the Green Sports Alliance’s work focuses on stadium gb&d

and arena operations; they are massive consumers, so even incremental improvements in efficiency and recycling have tremendous impacts. But around the world, the newest generation of stadiums and arenas are building these ideas into the fabric of the structures themselves. Target Field, home of the Minnesota Twins, was one of the first large sports facilities in the country to be LEED certified, initially with a LEEDNC Silver certification after it opened in 2010, followed by a 2011 certification under the LEED Operations and Maintenance category for existing buildings. Since then, they’ve continued to raise the bar with further efficiency retrofits and an aggressive waste reduction campaign. Dave Horsman, senior director of ballpark operations at Target Field, says the waste diversion rate for the stadium is now up to 75.6%, but insists that the Twins aren’t interested in tooting their own horn about sustainability—they’d rather just walk the walk.

ABOVE Target Field, one of the first large sports facilities in the country to be LEED certified, continues to weave sustainable practices into its operations.

“The single most important thing that we can do to advance environmental stewardship is to change cultural attitudes and expectations about how we relate to the Earth.”

Dr. Allen Hershkowitz, Green Sports Alliance

“For us, it’s more about the meaningful improvements than it is about telling the story,” he says. “We approach our environmental initiatives simply from the standpoint of being effective.” However, the word is certainly getting around. Last summer the Twins hosted the MLB All-Star Game, which by all accounts was the greenest ever. The Twins supplied a “green team” at related events, which took place all over downtown Minneapolis. All events were planned to be within walking distance from one another in an effort to reduce the use of motorized transportation. “We actually drew a green path on the sidewalk between all of the event locations,” says Horsman of their way-finding program. Talk about telling a story without saying anything. This spring will see the grand opening of the newest environmentally minded sports facility in the country: Avaya Stadium, home of the San Jose Earthquakes (MLS) and a major victory for soccer fans in the Silicon Valley area. Earthquakes may–june 2015

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president Dave Kaval says the Avaya Stadium is expected to achieve LEED Silver. “We have a building that can really represent the Valley and the values of this area—that’s where sustainability comes in,” he says. Those values are well-embodied by the 325-kilowat photovoltaic array that doubles as a shade structure over a portion of the parking lot, the bio-swales that manage runoff, toilets and irrigation pipes that are plumbed to make use of recycled water, and a waste diversion program that permeates the facility. A bit of the region’s history is literally embodied in the stadium in the form of redwood lumber that was reclaimed from the iconic Moffett airship hangar that was recently renovated in nearby Mountain View. A bit further down the North American stadium and arena pipeline is Rogers Place, the future home of the Edmonton Oilers (NHL). Set to open in

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time for the 2016 hockey season, Rogers Place is designed to be the first LEED Silver NHL facility in Canada, featuring a state-of-the-art heat recovery ventilation system, water-conserving features that will drive water use down 35% compared to the baseline, and an agreement with the contractor that has diverted 93% of construction waste from the local landfill so far. But one of the biggest areas of emphasis in the design of Rogers Place is how it fits into the city fabric around it— the arena will be the anchor for an emerging 25-acre live/work/ play redevelopment project underway in the heart of the city, which is a big component of the city’s push to improve urban walkability and cut down on traffic congestion and the pollution that stems from it. “We’re excited about energy and environmental literacy among our fans,” says Tim Shipton, vice president of communi-

TOP Aimolent occaborerum sitat vellabo rrovit hillo mos rerumquas essunto es audae nos aut optaspelest litiis sed ut rem am, volupta tescita niae optatur audit experum. BOTTOM Aimolent occaborerum sitat vellabo rrovit hillo mos rem quid quia pe cus, quaspis autet am, volupta tescita niae optatur audit experum.

Various Avaya stadium structures, like this concessions stand, embody the region’s past in the form of reclaimed redwood lumber from the nearby iconic Moffett airship hangar.

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PHOTOS: OILERS ENTERTAINMENT GROUP (ROGERS PLACE); JOHN TODD/ISI PHOTOS (AVAYA STADIUM)

FEATURES GREEN SPORTS ALLIANCE


FEATURES

“13% of Americans follow science, 71% follow sports. If you want to reach the masses, you have to tap into trusted networks, [like] the family, the church…or, a sporting event where people go, and if they see solar panels or a compost bin, they’re getting an environmental message in a politically safe, non-controversial way.”

PHOTO: LINDA DOANE, KFC YUM! CENTER STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Dr. Allen Hershkowitz, president of the Green Sports Alliance

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RIGHT Rogers Place, the future home of the Edmonton Oilers (NHL), will feature a state-ofthe-art heat recovery ventilation system and water-conserving features that will drive water use down 35% compared to the baseline.

cations for the Oilers Entertainment Group. “Northern Alberta is a very beautiful part of Canada, and people here have a strong connection with the land…so we’re sensitive to the fact that we need to be responsible.” As a sport that can only be played on ice, the hockey community has stepped up as a voice against global warming within the sports industry. Star hockey player Andrew Ference, who created an NHL program where players buy carbon offset credits to counteract the negative environmental impacts of professional sports, was signed by the Oilers in 2013 and is now team captain, bringing the sustainability conversation into the Oilers’ locker room, as well.

SIMPLE SUSTAINABILITY Even as the next generation of arenas starts to showcase the potential for integrated sustainable design, hundreds of other facilities in the Green Sports Alliance network are making small, but impactful changes to improve the environmental performance of existing facilities. The KFC Yum! Center in Louisville, Kentucky—a 22,000 seat multi-use venue that is home to the Uni-

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PHOTO: OILERS ENTERTAINMENT GROUP

versity of Louisville Cardinals (NCAA) and more than 100 entertainment events each year— has taken a “slow and steady wins the race” approach to integrating sustainability practices. The KFC Yum! Center was built in 2010, but until a couple of years ago, not much was happening on the sustainability front, even with regards to simple things like recycling. That all changed when Sean Langer came on board as the director of operations. “When gbdmagazine.com


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I first came here I was asked to look into our sustainability efforts,” he says. “And I was asked to do it without having an impact on the operating budget.” So Langer set out to see what operational changes could be made without much up-front capital and that would also save money in the long term in order to eventually invest in other sustainability improvements. He started with waste diversion, reconfiguring the

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venue to better separate the waste stream, and adding a composting component. eTemp, a low-cost device to cut down on the energy draw of refrigeration equipment, has been installed in the venue’s coolers and freezers. A similar smart device known as BERT is also being installed on electrical outlets throughout the facility—these WiFi-controlled devices turn off the circuit when it is not needed accord-

ing to a schedule devised by Langer and his team. Langer also changed out all 120 of the men’s urinals in the facility, not with waterless urinals, but with a one-flush-a-day model that has reduced water use for f lushing from 1 million gallons per year to just 23,000 gallons per year. One truly innovative technology employed at the KFC Yum! Center is a system that converts tap water into a

BELOW The eight-paneled retractable roof of the new Atlanta stadium, set to open in 2017, will unfold like an origami flower when the sun shines.

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF HOK

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green cleaning product simply with the addition of salt and an electrical current. Based on the technology of water softening devices, the proprietary equipment produced by PathoSans represents a revolution in the green cleaning industry—large venues now have the ability to produce their own non-toxic cleaning supplies, meaning the manufacturing and transportation components are erased from the product lifecycle. “My housecleaning manager came to me and said, ‘not only does this stuff work better than any chemicals we’ve ever used, but it’s so easy for everybody’,” Langer says. “As far as cost-ef-

The Green Sports Alliance Mission: “To leverage the cultural and market influence of sports to promote healthy, sustainable communities.”

fectiveness, the amount of money that I was spending on a monthly basis to buy all the chemicals and the mixing stations was a wash—now the system is almost paid for, so that money I was spending comes back to us.”

GOING BIG Set to open in 2017, the Atlanta Falcons (NFL) new $1.4 billion, 75,000-seat stadium might be the most seismic development to date in the emerging field of green sports facilities. It is designed as an icon, with an eight-paneled retractable roof that will open like an origami flower when the sun shines and close again in just six minutes if inclement weather threatens. The lightweight fabric roof panels will be made with a translucent material to let in ambient light when closed; a similar material is planned for much of the stadium’s exterior, creating a combination of temperature control and natural lighting that is rarely achieved on buildings of this scale. From waste to water to energy, the new stadium will hit high marks on virtually every sustainability checklist and will even have its own community garden on the grounds. As designed, the new Falcons stadium could be the world’s first LEED Platinum sports facility. The level of impact of the project is in no small part a result of the efforts of its general manager, Scott Jenkins. Jenkins is the current chairman of the Green Sports Alliance, the man gb&d

who started the sustainability program for the Seattle Mariners in 2006, and the operations manager that welcomed Allen Hershkowitz to Philadelphia in 2004. Hershkowitz recalls their first meeting fondly: “I was afraid to meet him and he was afraid to meet me—I was like, ‘Oh God, how do I talk to a stadium operator’, and he was like, ‘Oh God, how do I talk to an environmental scientist’,” he recalls. “But we became best buddies.” It was in that meeting that the green sports movement truly ignited. “Every sports team is part of the cultural fabric of its community,” says Jenkins, “so we have a social responsibility that teams activate in a number of ways—it hasn’t traditionally been around climate and the environment, but it has been around education, around health, around the community. It’s hard not to make the connection [with sustainability] once you sit back and think about it. It’s new, but it’s obvious and that was the ‘aha’ that we had — ‘boy, why aren’t we doing this’? We ought to be doing this.” Three-hundred teams and 20 leagues later, it looks as if the rest of the sports world is also making the connection. Sports teams are a titanic force that bring communities together in an inclusive, celebrator y spirit. What a wonderful resource of energy to direct toward caring for the Earth, the one team that every fan can root for. gb&d may–june 2015

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by Amanda Koellner, managing editor

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In conjunction with AIA Atlanta, we asked Georgia’s capital to show us their best sustainable designs. The next 15 pages hold the results. Here at gb&d, we’re always looking to bring our mission, “to create a more sustainable world,” to life. As we geared up for this issue, and with it, the 2015 installment of the AIA National Convention, we decided one impactful way to do just that would be to celebrate the host city of this year’s gathering, Atlanta, and award its projects that are leading the charge of incorporating sustainable building practices. We invited architects from across the nation to submit their best Atlanta-based building projects completed after January 1, 2013 and invited Randall Buescher (AIA, vice president and director of architecture at Epstein); Devon Patterson (AIA, LEED AP BD+C, principal at Solomon Cordwell Buenz); and Wayne Sherod (LEED AP, quality control manager and project manager of James McHugh Construction Co.) to help us judge the submissions based on originality in design, function, and of course, sustainability. “I think that the largest, most distinguished organization of architects should be out championing and advocating these issues of sustainability within its organization as well as to the public, so I think it’s great that you asked us to support these sustainable design awards,” says Melody Harclerode, president of AIA Atlanta (who also serves as this issue’s guest editor). “For us to be a part of these first-ever awards is an honor. It’s an honor that you see AIA Atlanta as an entity that is championing green design.” Although Atlanta was the co-presenter of this years’ Green Awards, we plan to follow the AIA National Convention each year to recognize sustainable building in each city it visits. But for now, sit back and enjoy the winners of the first-annual Green Awards.

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FIRST PLACE

Set on the back nine of a former golf course and adjacent to the existing Drew Charter Elementary Campus, the new Charles R. Drew Charter School Junior and Senior Academy sits on one of the highest points in Atlanta and finds its inspiration in the existing landscape forms, as well as the breathtaking views of the city below. Tracking LEED Gold, the building is an example of a high-performance school that intelligently responds to its environment while supporting its educational program as well. Within the campus, you’ll find flexible learning suites to nurture Drew’s focus on what they call “STEAM” (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics), as well as project-based learning labs for each grade level; state-of-the art science,

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engineering, and design labs; integrated performing and visual arts studios; a 525seat performing arts center serving students and the community; two gymnasiums; and a full-size track and field for both athletics and community wellness. Natural light was a huge priority for the client, so all of the learning spaces are fully glazed, and daylight pours in from all directions, basking onto what will ultimately be a student body of 1,000 middle and high school students. Locally sourced and manufactured materials such as field stone, glass, and concrete make up the majority of the building’s structure and envelope. The project team also used low-flow plumbing fixtures and low-emitting materials, such as the linoleum floors, while recycled trees

from the nearby golf course fairways comprise the wood rail and stadium seating in the central atrium. Additionally, solar panels on the roof provide 10% of the building’s energy, while rainwater collection is funneled through troughs in the pavement at the building’s edge that direct it to water features in the adjacent lawn. A roof overhang and series of exterior sunscreens that increase in number—responding to sunlight on the building’s facade—provide shade and mitigate heat gain without sacrificing daylighting and views. Planting beds and raised planters helping with storm-water management also define the front plaza while grounding the building and providing a continuous outdoor learning and social area. gb&d gbdmagazine.com

PHOTOS: JONATHAN HILLYER PHOTOGRAPHY

Charles R. Drew Charter School Junior & Senior Academy by Perkins + Will


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Ample natural light basks onto what will ultimately be a student body of 1,000 middle and high school students.

“The Drew Charter School with its pencil shape columns, and the soaring atriums, the openness of the classroom bays embraced by the sun as it shone through the bowed curtainwalls; in coalesce with the campus/ fairway landscape is collectively elevating. The Drew school exemplifies the premise of the LEED Daylight and Views concept and seamlessly delivers a pristine learning environment.” ­Wayne Sherod, quality manager & project manager, James McHugh Construction Co.

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PHOTO: JONATHAN HILLYER PHOTOGRAPHY; PERKINS + WILL (DRAWING)

ABOVE This campus boasts two gymnasiums and a full-size track and field for both athletics and community wellness, uniquely designed to allow for ample natural light and views to the outdoors. RIGHT The school nestles into the landscape and rests on what used to be a golf course.

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“This project’s design elevated it to the top of our list. The dynamic, flexible, curved design is integrated into the hillside landscape, with a sunken gymnasium that incorporates a running track at grade and bathes the interior space with abundant natural light.” Devon Patterson, principal, Solomon Cordwell Buenz

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“Excellent use of natural daylighting in all classrooms and extremely flexible spaces. The innovative sunken auditorium allows natural light plus vistas of the landscape. This is a very thoughtful, beautifully designed sustainable project.” Randall Buescher, vice president & director of architecture, Epstein

TEAM MEMBERS

LEFT Flexible learning suites nurture Drew’s focus on what they call “STEAM”: science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics. RIGHT A roof overhang and series of exterior sunscreens that increase in number—responding to sunlight on the building’s facade—provide shade and mitigate heat gain without sacrificing daylighting and views.

Barbara Crum Manuel Cadrecha John Poelker Chad Stacy Neda Ghani Joe Jamgochian Matt Finn Sumegha Shah Denise Procida Marcia Knight Leo Alvarez Justin Cooper Micah Lipscomb Valdis Zusmanis

SUPPLIERS Furnishings Dekalb Office Steelcase

COLLABORATORS/ PARTNERS

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PHOTOS: JONATHAN HILLYER PHOTOGRAPHY

Civil Engineers Pharr Engineering Associates, LLC Structural Engineers Uzun Case, LLC MEP Newcomb and Boyd Acoustical Consultant Arpeggio Food Service Camacho Associates Theater Stagefront Presentation Audio/Visual Waveguide Energy ModelingSustainability ConsultantCommissioning WorkingBuildings, LLC General Contractor JE Dunn Construction

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SECOND PLACE

PHOTOS: ZACH ROLEN

Decatur Fire Station #1 by Smith Dalia Architects

The building is designed to achieve a 33% reduction in energy consumption and a 30% reduction in water usage, which both contribute to a 43% cost-savings.

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Built as a modern or “international”-style station back in 1956, this public icon was recently adapted for modern use and picked up a LEED Platinum rating along the way. The complex, unique adaptation both preserved the building’s classic ‘50s aesthetic while also re-programming the space, which included masonry repair; the replacement of the roof, windows, overhead doors, and interior finishes; and necessary upgrades to both the mechanical and electrical systems. Much of the interior changes came as a result of the fact that the station has long been home to a co-ed fire department. The living spaces were finally adapted for true co-ed use, as the architects converted the original dorms and restrooms into innovative, private sleeping pods and bathrooms. All the while, sustainability was at the heart of the overhaul; here, you’ll find high-efficiency equipment and lighting; low albeda white PVC roof membrane; an extensive green-roof succulent garden; a geothermal vertical closed-loop heat pump system; solar water heating; and rainwater harvesting and greywater reclamation. The building is designed to achieve a 33% reduction in energy consumption and a 30% reduction in water usage, which both contribute to a 43% cost-savings.

In This Project •

Geothermal vertical closed-loop ground source heat pump systems: With 10 wells that are 500 feet deep, this system replaces bulky exterior-located condensers and cooling towers and utilizes the constant temperatures of the earth to exchange heat for the cooling and heating process.

Solar thermal water heater: A 120-gallon solar storage tank provides 71% of hot water needs, saving approximately $600-700 in annual gas consumption.

Rainwater harvesting: A 5,000 gallon, below-grade storage cistern collects rainwater from roof surfaces and stores it for non-potable usage, largely for washing the fire trucks.

Greywater reclamation for toilet flushing: The system collects and treats greywater from showers and lavatories to use for flushing toilets.

“This thoughtful renovation of a Mid-Century fire station integrates a series of sustainable mechanical systems that aggressively reduced its energy consumption while preserving an existing structure.” Devon Patterson, principal, Solomon Cordwell Buenz gb&d

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“This project represents building reuse at the highest achievable level as it relates to sustainable criteria: LEED Platinum. The transformation and the restoration from yesterday’s 1950’s uni-function style box-construction to today’s “avant-garde” cutting edge technology infused firehouse is magical, a literal prestidigitation.” ­Wayne Sherod, quality control manager & project manager, James McHugh Construction Co.

COLLABORATORS/ PARTNERS Owner City of Decatur Architecture Smith Dalia Architects Leed Consulting & Administration Smith Dalia Architects Interior Design Smith Dalia Architects MEP & Structural McVeigh & Mangum Engineering, Inc. Commissioning Agent HESM&A, Inc. Contractor D.A. Edwards & Company, Inc.

The station features an extensive green-roof succulent garden and outdoor seating space.

“The constraints of the firehouse’s site, building, and usage didn’t prevent a wonderfully adaptive intervention of all things green. This 50’s gem is a 21st-century leader.”

PHOTOS: ZACH ROLEN

Randall Buescher, vice president & director of architecture, Epstein

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THIRD PLACE

Nike at Lenox Square Mall by Nike’s in-house design team and TVA Architects

A renovation of an existing space in a larger mall development, this vibrant project used sustainability as a driver and features reclaimed materials, giving the interiors a hard-working, energetic tone that captures the spirit of the Nike brand.

PHOTOS: MICHAEL WELLS PHOTOGRAPHY

Devon Patterson, principal, Solomon Cordwell Buenz Nike’s new retail space, a two-story, 23,000-square-foot LEED Gold addition to the Lenox Square Mall, is an example of the sustainable possibilities available in retail design. Both levels feature reclaimed wood flooring, as well as reclaimed bleacher board for a finish material on many of the wall surfaces, stair treads, risers, and landings. This design element, coupled with the exposed structure, lends itself to an industrial aesthetic that also eliminated the need for additional ceiling finishes.

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An HVAC system uses VAV boxes to provide separate conditioned zones, depending on the store’s occupants and their proximity to the exterior walls. The rooftop units were also specified to monitor outdoor air delivery and increase ventilation. More zoning, this case in regards to lighting, allows employees to use minimal wattage during the off-hours; current-limiting control panels prohibit superfluous fixtures from being added to a lighting rack, thereby limiting the amount of wattage consumed. gb&d may–june 2015

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“We don’t expect such forward green thinking in a mall environment: Recycled product, zoned HVAC, and a great wow-factor.”

TEAM MEMBERS John Heili Erik Dorsett Pearse O’Moore Nick Williams Aung Barteaux Dan Bradbury Phil Krueger Elisa Rocha

SUPPLIERS Retail Display Fixtures Artitalia Group

COLLABORATORS/ PARTNERS Lead Designer Nike In-House Store Design Team Co-Designer TVA Architects General Contractor David Nice Builders Structural Engineers KPFF Consulting Engineers MEP & Structural KLH Engineers LEED Consultant Green Building Services

“The Nike Retail space’s grand staircase and wall panels constructed of reclaimed bleacher board, and the reclaimed wood flooring accented with skylights (reducing the need for electrical lights) makes this parcel a sustainable outdoorsman’s manlyman dream come true. The fact that in a mall setting, an isolated HVAC rooftop system was installed to allow for increased ventilation takes LEED IEQc 2 to different level.”

­Wayne Sherod, quality control manager & project manager, James McHugh Construction Co.

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PHOTOS: MICHAEL WELLS PHOTOGRAPHY

Randall Buescher, vice president & director of architecture, Epstein


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HONORABLE MENTION

PHOTOS: FREDRIK BRAUER PHOTOGRAPHY

Ranch Style Redux by Robert M. Cain

After touring the long-time owner’s home, property, and neighborhood, Robert M. Cain and his team recommended that their client retain the existing character and structure. So, they set out to satisfy the owners’ desires to bring order to a chaotic plan and open the home up to the beauty of the wooded lot; respect the style of the house; and fulfill the owner’s request for a sustainable, energy-efficient home. The overhaul included renovating the existing house, the installation of geothermal heat pumps and an energy recovery ventilator in the crawl space, as well as vertical geothermal wells that were installed below the new driveway for heating, cooling, and hot water. Oak flooring and brick veneer were salvaged and reused, and the architect also used true stucco throughout the project. In addition to a myriad of sustainable features, the stunning design of the home, which includes extensive glass on the back of the house coupled with a deck off of the living areas that faces south to mature trees and a large beech. gb&d gb&d

TEAM MEMBERS Robert M. Cain Carmen P. Stan Juliann Tompkins Molly Lay Drew Bell

ABOVE One goal on this project was to open the home up to the beauty of its wooded lot. RIGHT Extensive glass on the back of the house leads to a deck off the living areas that faces the beautiful surroundings.

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COLLABORATORS/ PARTNERS Engineering Coastal GEOExchange Contractor Pinnacle Custom Builders Technical Advisor Southface Energy Institute

SUPPLIERS Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers Belgard Natural 3-Coat Stucco Bel Marmo Valentino HVAC Equipment Climate Master Geothermal Heat Pump Systems Energy Recovery Ventilation RenewAire

PHOTOS: FREDRIK BRAUER PHOTOGRAPHY

The overhaul also included the installation of geothermal heat pumps and an energy recovery ventilator in the crawl space, as well as vertical geothermal wells that were installed below the new driveway for heating, cooling, and hot water.

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HONORABLE MENTION

AMLI Ponce Park by Smith Dalia Architects

ABOVE This project solved a regional stormwater flooding problem through its stormwater abatement system that channels stormwater directly into this detention pond.

PHOTOS: MICHAEL LOWRY

RIGHT Brick, siding, concrete, and flooring all was sourced from local materials.

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This 305-unit, multifamily LEED for Homes Platinum rated project demonstrated a commitment to sustainability from its earliest design phase. As a part of a monumnetal redevelopment in Atlanta’s Old Fourth Ward that encompasses more than 25 acres of urban infill, this urban renewal has impacted historic and blighted neighborhoods, solved a regional stormwater flooding problem (through its stormwater abatement system, which channels stormwater directly into the nearby detention pond), and has included environmental remediation of a former industrial brownfield. In addition, a slate of “green initiatives” accompanied the design that addresses areas of sustainable construction, materials, amenities, and quality of life. These include: native landscaping installed with a high-efficiency, on-demand irrigation system that is sensor-activated; diversion of 93% of con-

struction waste; creation of a dense site (67.5 units per acre); use of local materials for brick, siding, concrete, and flooring; onsite car charging stations; bicycle storage and community bike repair shop; private and shared landscaped dog runs for several apartments; and observance of a smoke-free community, in which smoking is not permitted either inside or outside any area of the property. gb&d may–june 2015

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Coastal GeoExchange and Don Easson, Owner, Professional Engineer, Certified GeoExchange Designer, and ClimateMaster Residential Products Distributor are being recognized at the First Annual Green Awards by the American Institute of Architects.

The award recognizes Don’s Geothermal HVAC System Design for a Residential Gut Restoration of a 2200 square foot 1950’s home. This system used a ClimateMaster TEV038, and a Renewaire EV200. Don Easson, PE, CGD doneasson@aol.com (843) 227-1501 coastalgeoexchange.com

COLLABORATORS/ PARTNERS Architecture & Sustainability Smith Dalia Architects Developer/Owner AMLI Development Company, LLC Civil Engineering J. Lancaster & Associates, Inc. MEP Engineering Lilly Young & Associates Structural Engineering Integrity Structural Corporation Contractor AMLI Development Company, LLC

TOP A slate of “green initiatives” accompanied the design that addresses areas of sustainable construction, materials, amenities, and quality of life.

digital editions now available for iPad & iPhone on the Apple iBooks store

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PHOTOS: MICHAEL LOWRY

SUPPLIERS Amenity Interiors The Preston Partnership

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Inner Workings Features Spaces Next Punch List

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94 Making Greenhouse Gas a Thing of the Past

For a roundtable of Norway-based green pioneers, zero is the magic number

A 160-acre plot in California gets raised by the barn-shaped Hupomone Ranch

98 A Rural Silhouette

102 Such Green Heights

Aspen’s thriving downtown area welcomes its fully transformed art museum

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S PAC E S L I V E

For a roundtable of Norway-based green industry pioneers, zero is the magic number when it comes to constructing the homes of the future By Vincent Caruso

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“By and large, there is a consensus within the architect community at least, that as an industry, we simply cannot conscientiously create buildings that have detrimental impact to their environment locally, and globally.” Kristian Edwards

most conspicuously extraordinary feature, was pursued in the interest of optimal orientation. In collating bales of vital research information, most of which provided by the likes of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Building Information Modeling (BIM) and Environmental Product Declaration (EPD), it was determined that the angle precision of the roof, bedecked with solar collectors, would maximize its solar harvest. In addition to the pronounced roof incline, there are two additional “conceptual components” exhibited by the ZEB Pilot House (also known as the Multi-Comfort House), Edwards says. One of which is the centrally located outdoor atrium, for a moment veering from the initial modernist façade in favor of a full embrace of a bucolic simplicity, in perfect harmony with the pilot house’s surrounding environment. Cozily corralled within four walls comprised of reclaimed brick and firewood,

PROJECT LOCATION Ringdalskogen, Larvik, Norway Program Zero Emission Demonstration Building Size 220 m ² (house), 220 m ² (site) Completion 2014 Certification Z  EB-OM

TEAM CLIENT Optimera and Brødrene Dahl (Saint Gobaink) Architect Snøhetta Energy Specialist, SINTEF Tor Helge Dokka Embodied Specialist, SINTEF Torhildur Kristjansdottir Energy Specialist, Brødrene Dahl Harald Amundsen Technical Consultant, Optimera Halvor Kråkenes Site Management Gjermund Kaupang General Building Contractor Espen Stær AS Landscape Contractor Steen Lund AS

SUPPLIERS Windows Natre/Velux Doors Jeld Wen Acoustic Ceiling Tor Helge Dokka PV Panels Innotech Solar Electrical System Schneider Electric Ventilation System Nilan Compact P

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PHOTO: BRUCE DAMONT; EVE (OPENER)

As the collective consciousness of the architectural class warms to the imperative of environmental sustainability, a variety of committed organizations have in tandem devised sets of graded building standards, issuing certificates to buildings according to the level of quantified eco-friendliness achieved. It’s a trend that has freshly incentivized the industry, and as the shift toward eliminating nonrenewable energy gets more competitive, such administrative bodies have in turn been inspired to raise the bar by tightening their sets of prerequisites. The perhaps most ambitious manifestation of this move is embodied by the ZEB-OM classification, conceived by ZEB (The Research Center on Zero Emission Buildings). As the name of the entity should imply, the Norway-based ZEB seeks to expel greenhouse gases altogether from the design equation. And transnational architectural firm, Snøhetta—tightknit ZEB industry allies—alongside a multidisciplinary coterie of like minds and objectives, have brought this concept into fruition with the recent ZEB Pilot House. The eccentric angular structure of this project is instantly awe-inspiring, hinting at strict and advanced modernist aesthetics instructing the contours of the single-family simulation, though according to Snøhetta senior architect Kristian Edwards, this transfixing appearance was predominately a utilitarian implementation. “The design is very much a product of research and function,” Edwards notes, pointing out that the steep slope of the roof, the building’s


SPACES

PHOTO: EVE

LEFTThe steep slope of the roof, the building’s most conspicuously extraordinary feature, was pursued in the interest of optimal orientation. The outdoor atrium, also pictured here, is nestled within walls comprised of reclaimed brick and firewood.

the atrium offers the serenity of outdoor dining during the temperate seasons. The other component of Edwards’ emphasis is the gabion wall structure, imposingly girding the zero-emission home at its borders, effectively commanding the privacy of its inhabitants and concealment of their passive technology interior features. Budding still as we are in the early stages of this paradigm transformation, a feat as lofty as a built structure that produces a net CO2 impact of precisely zero isn’t exactly a feasible solitary mission. For this reason, multiple parties with varying fields of expertise were recruited for its execution. “Ranging from material studies, insulation solutions, realistic measured energy use, to project and building processes,” Edwards says, “We were able to really extend our ambitions across the board.” The ZEB Center and Snøhetta were escorted along the way by a trusty entourage that included reputed problem-solvers SINTEF, Brødrene Dahl (“Norway’s leading heating, ventilation, and sanitation technology wholesaler”), and mammoth building materials purveyor Optimera. The results did not merely illustrate the value-neutral elimination of greenhouse gas output, but the value-positive production of clean energy as well—neatly in line with the “plus house” model. This made possible by the abovementioned abundance of solar panels and collectors, as well as in-ground geothermal “energy wells.” For this model to succeed, however, Edwards stresses, the detail of personal comfort must not become lost or forgotten in the pursuit of supreme sustainability, however honorable. “We are clearly defeating the purpose if we ignore comfort and well-being in ZEB projects, no matter how advanced.” To complement this aspect of the project, items pertaining to air quality, materiality, daylight, and even gb&d

traditional Norwegian culture influenced the design of the house tremendously. And though the ZEB Pilot House is a prototype of sorts, with framework that might appear overwhelmingly intricate at first hand, one must ponder the eventuality of this design template being further adopted and emulated by the industry as a whole. “I think on a certain scale this is slowly happening,” Edwards says of the remarkable increase in accepted responsibility among his industry peers, “and that by and large, there is a consensus within the architect community at least, that as an industry, we simply cannot conscientiously create buildings that have detrimental impact to their environment locally, and globally.” gb&d may–june 2015

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A RURAL SILHOUETTE

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A 160-acre plot in Petaluma, CA gets raised by the barn-shaped Hupomone Ranch home By Patrick Sisson

PHOTO: DAVID WAKELY

For architect Eric Haesloop, the American barn is a simple structure with symbolism that runs deep. Gables of faded red lumber surrounded his hometown in Indiana, and the familiar shape has been a form his architecture firm, Turnbull Griffin Haesloop, has revisited in projects across northern California. So when a couple with three children approached him with a fallow piece of farmland in the Chileno Valley, just west of Petaluma, and the desire for an open, airy homestead, a certain silhouette popped into his head. But the LEED Platinum-certified Hupomone Ranch—with a name meaning, “joyful endurance and steadfastness”— took joy in subverting the rural standard. “There are so many ways to think about buildings when you’re in this kind of landscape,” Haesloop says. “The barn provides this comfortable repose. We wanted to design in minimal, modern terms. The white gives it an abstraction—a taut, crisp quality.” The slope of the barn-shaped structure’s roof, covered in AEP Span panels, echoes the hills on the horizon. Along with the two outcropping on the side of the home, which Haesloop calls “saddlebags,” the silhouette helps frame the landscape and sets up a dramatic entrance. After taking a road from the hills to the north into the valley below, guests open the sliding entrance doors and walk into the airy living room, with a glass wall providing fantastic views to the south. The opaque gives way to the nearly translucent. While the 21-foot high great room serves as a gathering place and hive of activity for the family, as well as the centerpiece of the roughly 2,500-squarefoot second home, the volumetric space also plays a central role in the passive heating and cooling systems. Geothermal heating and radiant cooling in the concrete floor moderate the temperature year round. But it’s the well-considered interplay of cross-ventilating windows, energy modeling, massive circulating fans, skylights set up for passive cooling, gb&d

PROJECT LOCATION Petaluma, CA Program New family home on a 160-acre ranch Size 2,500ft ² Completion2014 Certification LEED Platinum Architect Turnbull Griffin Haesloop Cost Withheld

TEAM General Contractor Sawyer Construction Mechanical Engineer  Meline Engineering Civil Engineer Adobe Associates Structural Engineer MKM & Associates Geotechnical Consultant Bauer Associates Energy Consultant Loisos + Ubbelohde Interior Erin Martin Design LEED Consultant Michael Heacock + Associates Landscape Architect Lutsko Associates

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SUPPLIERS

PHOTOS: DAVID WAKELY

Countertops Carrera Marble Kitchen Windows Blomberg Window Systems Kitchen Sinks Franke Kitchen Fittings Dornbracht Kitchen Appliances Miele, BlueStar Master Bath Tile Waterworks Master Bath Countertop Carrera Marble Master Bath Tub Agape Bath Fittings Dornbracht Bath Toilet TOTO Bedroom Windows Blomberg Window Systems Lighting RSA Lighting, Translite Fan Big Ass Fans Living Room Doors Liberty Valley Doors Skylights Window Wasco Skylights Roof AEP Span Exterior Siding Western Red Cedar

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and a white roof that work in concert to help cool down the home during warm stretches in the late summer. The unobtrusive engineering gives the home, wrapped in simple cedar siding, incredible energy efficiency, exceeding Title 24 (the California Energy Code) by more than 50%. After analyzing a year of data, Haesloop found the home hit the 98 percentile of the 2030 challenge, meaning it’s 98% below average consumption for homes in the region. The glass wall and sliding doors lead to a backyard, outdoor dining space with a fire pit, pizza oven, and a pool house, all ringed with wooden furniture and tables hewn from eucalyptus trees that used to dot the property. An angular pool house designed by Haesloop boasting a rooftop solar array adds to both the enjoyment of indoor-outdoor living and home energy efficiency. “In California, as opposed to other parts of the country, there’s such a benign climate,” Haesloop says. “The nights get cool and the days can heat up, but if you calculate it right, you can get the building to largely take care of itself. It makes the whole indoor/out-

door lifestyle readily achievable here.” Along with the atypical interior design, which plays down rustic cliches in favor of sleekness and a massive print of a Mexican movie star, the whole project gives off an unfussy sophistication. “What was important to them was scale,” Haesloop says. “There are a lot of kids, the house gets used, but they wanted to keep it compact at a reasonable scale, especially considering they were enamored with the barn-house concept.” When he first encountered the property, a fallow ranch dotted with collapsed structures and a broken feeding trough, he shared the owners appraisal that this was a plot with promise that just needed some editing. The simple barn structure created a center for sustainable family life, without overwhelming the home’s biggest natural asset. The resulting breezy lifestyle suggested by the minimalist home is a testament to how looking effortless often takes the most effort. “When they enter, we want guests to view the house as a great frame,” Haesloop says. “But, then again, we’re not trying to be too literal here. It is a house, right?” gb&d may–june 2015

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PHOTO: MICHAEL MORAN/OTTO

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Aspen’s thriving downtown area welcomes a new hot spot for a fully transformed contemporary art museum where a novel sustainability approach is just one of many things to admire By Vincent Caruso

PROJECT LOCATION Aspen, CO Program Art Museum Size 33,000ft ² Completion2014 Architect Shigeru Ban Architects Executive Architect Cottle Carr Yaw Architects, Ltd.

TEAM OWNER Aspen Art Museum Owner Representative O’Connor Consulting, Inc. Structural Engineer KL&A, Inc. in association with Création Holz GmbH Civil Engineer Sopris Engineering MEP/IT/AV/Security Engineer  Beaudin Ganze Consulting Engineers, Inc. Landscape Architect Bluegreen Lighting Consultant L’Observatoire International Building Envelope FRONT Climate Engineer Transsolar, Inc. Specialty Timber Fabricator Spearhead Specialty Exterior Cladding Fabricator (Woven Screen) Gen3 Architectural Wall Systems in Association with Lyman Fogel Specialty Glass Curtain Wall, Floor & Skylight Fabricator Harmon, Inc. General Contractor Turner Construction in association with Summit Construction

SUPPLIERS Window Treaments Gotcha Covered Painting Jeff Schiros Painting Millwork Imperial Woodworking Enterprises Landscaping 4 Seasons

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The Aspen Art Museum has long existed as one of the well-to-do town’s major focal cultural sites for public engagement, alongside the likes of the Aspen Institute and Aspen Music Festival and School. And though the recently reconstructed art hub is a few decades younger than the latter two institutions, its significance and its novelty were blockaded by few, albeit vexing, setbacks: One, the space was located outside of Aspen’s downtown area and thus largely removed from the public eye; and two, rather than the museum enjoying the autonomy of a standalone structure, it was merely one of a number of rented units occupying a converted industrial plant. It was for these reasons primarily that the first stage of redesigning the facility was first to disassemble and decamp. In order for AIA Zack Moreland, designated senior project architect of Shigeru Ban Architects America, and his team to ultimately fulfill their vision they opted for a more transparently noticeable venue. The project resultantly found itself planted snug in the very core of Aspen’s upscale downtown amusements, a scenic privilege Moreland and co. integrated into the building’s physical essence. “The Grand Stair,” as termed by Moreland’s team, is “an indoor/outdoor, very public, generous-sized stair that goes from the ground sidewalk level up to the third,” intended to analogize the custom-

arily Aspen leisure of ski lift elevation. “It’s kind of inverted in that way where you start at the top and descend down through the building. You sort of enter galleries and then come back out to that public stair and experience the public zone where the screen is as you go down level by level.” Encompassing the property’s exterior, the abovementioned screen proved to be one of the building’s most instantly captivating features, a work of art in itself gifted for public admiration before even reaching the entrance. Upon first view, the screen appears almost as a latticed barricade fortifying the galleries, sheltering the invaluable works contained within the built space, while offering but a limited glimpse to whet the fascinations of the myriad onlookers. “As an architectural device, the goals were to have a surface that was permeable to a degree,” Moreland reveals, “degree so that, as you’re either on the inside or outside of it, it has a presence but it’s transparent at the same time.” Still, while asserting a visually commanding presence, the fence also serves as a functional instrument “to control the views and light coming through the glass and to present the material that was more contextual.” Summarily, application of an attractive wooden veneer draws the attention of passersby and further supplements the quality of museum-goers’ gallery experience. gbdmagazine.com


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LEFT The architect concedes that energy efficiency typically can be an obstacle for museums due to strict lighting and climate control demands, but here, sustainability was made a priority from the very outset by the architectural and engineering teams alike.

PHOTOS: MICHAEL MORAN/OTTO

RIGHT The huge staircase goes from the ground sidewalk level up to the third, intended to analogize the leisure of an Aspen ski lift.

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For the galleries that are exposed by the wall of glass, certainly, the fence succeeded in connecting the museum to its alpine backdrop, though it more importantly facilitates the use of natural daylight into the space. While Moreland concedes that energy efficiency typically can be an obstacle for museums due to strict lighting and climate control demands, sustainability was made a priority from the very outset by the architectural and engineering teams alike. “The area we thought we could make the most impact was through maximizing the use of day lighting and providing the absolute highest efficiency lighting system we could,” affirms Moreland, highlighting that, in addition to daylight shone through fence lattices, a series of skylights were employed, on the second floor in particular, to capture its share of natural luminance as well. With similar singularity, the team optimized climate conditioning via a concept for which they also have ascribed an original title. “The Thermos,” Moreland explains, is a structural technique that plots the most consumptively demanding gallery room in the center of the building and “wrapping” it with spaces where consumption isn’t quite so strenuous. “By doing that, you create a buffer zone which puts less demand on the mechanical systems that serve the galleries themselves.” Moreland reflects upon the project fondly, with particular emphasis allotted to the fence and rooftop space. Whereas the eccentricities of Shigeru Ban’s signature utilization of wood as a key material is amply conspicuous on this work, another peculiarity for the city’s day life is the patio area housed above the galleries. It is one of the only existing outdoor dining areas in the city and, being perched atop, the space enjoys the vast range of mountainous Aspen splendor for which the town is known from an ideal vantage point. And it is a luxury truly available to the general public as a whole. “The museum is free so anyone can go at any time and go up to that space even if you’re not interested in going through the galleries.” In any case, green energy and fine art are supported simultaneously. gb&d may–june 2015

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Aspen Art Museum, Aspen, CO Photographer: Greg Kingsley, KL&A

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Approach Inner Workings Features Spaces Next Punch List

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108 (Soon To Be) Rebuilt By Design

Two years after Sandy, plans to reshape the coastal landscapes around NYC begin to take shape

111 A Better Bottom Line

A look inside Fannie Mae’s Green Initiative loan program

112 Digital Biology

A previously inaccessible pier in NYC will boast an innovative ecohabitat

116 Wieland Healthcare

The hip chair is reimagined

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(Soon To Be) Rebuilt By Design Two years after Sandy, plans to reshape the coastal landscapes around New York City begin to take shape By Brian Barth

Hurricane Sandy struck the shores of New York and New Jersey on October 29, 2012, wreaking $68 billion in property damages, taking the lives of 233 people, and upending the lives of millions of others in the most densely populated stretch of the United States. The storm also unleashed a flurry of creativity in the design community, as planners, engineers, architects, and others dug into the idea of resilient design with unprecedented intensity. Rebuild by Design—an organization whose name has become synonymous with the effort to not only rebuild the devastated areas, but to reprogram them to survive and thrive in the face of future climate change related disruptions—facilitated a year-long design competition and community-building effort that generated an exhaustive menu of design interventions and a palpable buzz of opportunity in the regions most affected by the storm. In June of 2014, six proposals from the design competition were approved by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the agency charged with administering the design competition, and a total of $930 million was awarded to fully develop the designs and begin implementation. In the wake of excitement following what may have been the biggest, and arguably the most important, design competition in history, the serious work of moving from concept to reality has begun. “Rebuild by Design is really more of a process, than a competition,” says Amy Chester, the organization’s managing director who coordinated the work of the 10 teams as they moved through the various stages of the design competition. This was not a case of a few ‘starchitects’ swooping in with lush renderings hoping to garner a prestigious award. Chester, a one-woman show at the time,

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NEXT PAGE A  corridor of berms, walls and associated flood control structures are interwoven with existing civic elements that would wrap around the lower tip of Manhattan and transform it from flood-prone to flood-proof.

$68b

Hurricane Sandy caused this much in property damages as it also took the lives of 233 people.

$930m

The amount that the Department of Housing and Urban Development allocated to fully develop the projects for Rebuild by Design.

2020

When completion of the ‘Dry Line’, designed by BIG, is set to happen.

says she led the teams through an exhaustive program “where they got to know the region by talking to the folks on the ground, whether a mayor of a small town, a public housing tenant leader, NGO groups, or Occupy Sandy.” A BIG SOLUTION “It was a design process of the people, by the people,” says Kai-Uwe Bergmann, a partner in the New York office of the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) of Copenhagen, one of the firms whose proposal was selected for implementation. BIG led the consortium that developed the idea of the Big U, a corridor of berms, walls and associated flood control structures interwoven with existing civic elements that would wrap around the lower tip of Manhattan and transform it from flood-prone to flood-proof. “We call it a bridging berm,” Bergmann says. “Each berm is like the hull of a ship that extends into and wraps around each neighborhood to protect it on three sides. We’re building bridges that connect the urban fabric to that berm… right now there aren’t that many bridges that connect from the city side to the water’s edge.” As envisioned, the Big U would wrap around a 10-mile stretch of lower Manhattan, which has been broken up into six compartments that are each associated with different neighborhoods. Fleshed out designs have been completed for three of those compartments and $335 million has been allocated by HUD to implement the design for the first of those compartments—a two-mile stretch of coastline meandering along FDR Drive between East 23rd Street and Montgomery Street in the Lower East Side, an area that received the brunt of the storm surge in 2012. No longer known as the Big U, the project has been rebranded gbdmagazine.com


OMA TEAM COURTESY OF REBUILD BY DESIGN

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as the ‘Dry Line,’ in part because the entire ‘U’ could take decades to complete. Since the funds were awarded in November, an intensive process of data collection, analysis, and environmental review has been underway. “We have divers going up and down the entire two mile length of the seaboard,” Bergmann says, illustrating the complexity of assessing the existing infrastructure and how to adapt it for the future. Construction is expected to begin in 2017 and should be completed by 2020. STATE BY STATE The other five projects are also moving forward to varying degrees, though the bureaucracy involved in allocating nearly a billion dollars of federal funds never allows things to move as quickly as anyone would like. The caveat of the HUD funding is that it cannot be disbursed directly to pay for design and construcgb&d

tion. It must first be disbursed to the states, who can then funnel it to municipalities or other entities who will actually award contracts to get the projects moving. Because of the rules that govern the procurement process, there is no guarantee that the firms who composed the winning proposals will be retained to see their designs to fruition. “The projects were the winners, not the teams,” Chester says. Each state must create a detailed plan for how the funds are to be used before the money leaves the federal coffer, a process that is still underway in New Jersey. In the Meadowlands area of New Jersey, just across the Hudson River from Manhattan, $150 million has been awarded toward an initial pilot project to test the ideas of a larger $3.5 billion infrastructure improvement plan for almost 30,000 acres of low-lying land around the Hackensack River. Though the Meadowlands was histor-

“Rebuild by Design is really more of a process, than a competition,” Amy Chester, managing director, Rebuild By Design ically an enormous intertidal marsh, it has long been an area of concentrated industrial development, which has resulted in severe water pollution—sending a surge of toxic soup into nearby residential areas during major storm events like Sandy. Much work has been done to clean up the Meadowlands in recent years, but the Rebuild by Design proposal will complete the restoration of the wetlands and build a berm system within them that “chambers the wamay–june 2015

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ABOVEIn June of 2014, six proposals from the design competition were approved by the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

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of resiliency, so as one room floods, it spills over and fills up the next room.” Atop these berms will be a new roadway with bus rapid transit and bike and pedestrian pathways linking development nodes in the area. “This has been the garbage pit of Manhattan,” D’Hooghe says, “but [when it’s done] these areas will have an address on a park.” The other New Jersey-based project selected for funding is also inching forward. $230 million was awarded for phase one of a plan to protect Hoboken and its smaller neighbor to the north, the city of Weehawken. This proposal was led by the international design firm OMA and involves a similar strategy of protective berms designed to pay for their construction over time through tax revenue leveraged by the increased value of the adjacent development. Daniel Pittman of OMA’s New York office says it’s unclear at this point exactly what involvement his firm will have in the project moving forward, but that the initial feasibility studies are slated to commence this spring and that they “expect to be part of the process” in some fashion. Even though the HUD funding has taken its time to come through, the [proposal] has been taken to heart by the city leaders [of Hoboken] who have organized their efforts around the strategies proposed in the competition,” Pittman says. While the berms are the capital intensive portion of the proposal and are reliant on HUD funding, the OMA-led team provided a suite of other recommen-

dations for knitting together resiliency from all angles, many of which will be funded by other means. Pittman cites a program to encourage the building of green roofs, for example: “not necessarily funding the construction of green roofs, but building the capacity, the know-how, the best practices and providing the tax incentives and zoning that will initiate the larger build out.” A BIG SOLUTION Leveraging multiple layers of resiliency by building partnerships among stakeholder groups has been at the core of the Rebuilding by Design process. Chester now has seven permanent employees on staff who continue to liaise with the scores of design firms, developers, public agencies, private foundations, non-profits, and other parties working toward the common vision. No one expects immediate results—the new infrastructure will likely be a generation in the making. Two years post-Sandy, Rebuild by Design has taken its mission, and the expertise it has accrued, beyond the New York City region. The group travels regularly to cities around the world to share the results of their work and are carrying out a similar process of resiliency planning in Boston and San Francisco. “We’re adapting the idea to be about disaster preparedness, rather than disaster response,” says Chester. Preparedness, hopefully, is one lesson from Sandy the world will heed. gb&d

PHOTOS: OMA & BIG TEAMS COURTESY OF REBUILD BY DESIGN

ter into a series landscaped rooms,” says Alexander D’Hooghe, co-director of the MIT Center for Advanced Urbanism and leader of the design consortium for the Meadowlands area. “This builds multiple layers

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A Better Bottom Line Fannie Mae’s Green Initiative loan program helps homeowners—and Wall Street—see the benefit in sustainable construction

PHOTO: COURTESY OF FANNIE MAE

By Patrick Sisson

In practical terms, the bottom line for Fannie Mae isn’t a small thing; the lending company oversees a $200 billion loan portfolio in the United States, slightly less than the GDP of Peru. That means when lending standards or mortgage rates change, what may appear like a miniscule shift actually has a massive effect on the lender’s overall business. It makes the company’s new Green Initiative , a financing tool announced in February that provides a break for multi-family homes with recognized green building certification, an encouraging sign that sustainable building practices aren’t just better for the Earth. In the long run, they’re better for the banks, too. “The only reason the program is taking off is because we looked at the financial, social, and environmental arguments,” says Chrissa Pagitsas, director of the Green Initiative at Fannie Mae. “I think about the triple bottom line. Our tenants have better quality housing and save money; we get better quality properties in our portfolio and the environment benefits.” In the works for five years, the Green Initiative is the first program in the US market that has figured out how to recognize, asset manage, and securitize green building loans. Builders and property owners with a multi-family building project that has a recognized, third-party certification—such as LEED, Energy Star, or Green Globes—can apply for this loan and receive a 10 basis point reduction, equivalent to a tenth of a percentage point (single-family projects have other sets of incentives and breaks). If you were applying for a $10 million loan for an apartment building, the Green Initiative would lower your interest rate. By shaving the prevailing rate from, say, 4 to 3.9%, the program would gb&d

save $95,000 over the life of a 10-year loan. Looking at it from another perspective, these savings can help recoup the up-front capital costs of investments such as solar panels, themselves a money saver over time, and provide an incentive to retrofit an existing building and apply for the proper certification. These are investments this sector requires to catch up to the rest of the US building stock. Dr. Gary Pivo of the University of Arizona conducted a study in 2012 that found that multi-family homes have 34% fewer energy efficiency features overall than other types of housing. Fannie Mae has also partnered with the Department of Housing and Urban Development on the initiative, providing encouragement for owners of affordable housing to seek out the same break. Pagitsas sees the program’s rollout as a shift in how property managers view their investments and portfolios. It took years to build the foundation, so when they ramped up and started offering the program, they had a solid base of understanding how all the different factors played off each other. For Fannie Mae, there’s definitely a healthy amount of self-interest in promoting this initiative. Green homes have lower energy costs, which means the owner has more free cash to pay Fannie. Investors are also increasingly seeking out green investments, and now Fannie Mae has a ready source of loans to securitize and sell. They’ve already securitized $130 million in green loan thus far. “There are only certain levers that you can maneuver in the financial world, give more money or reduce interest rates,” says Dan Winters, a Senior Fellow: Business Strategy and Finance at the US Green Building Council . “ Freddie Mac

$200b

The size of the loan portfolio Fannie Mae oversees in the US

5

How long the Green Initiative was in the works before its launch

10

The basis point reduction that multi-family building and property owners with a recognized, third-party certification can receive

$130m Amount of green loans Fannie Mae has securitized thus far

RIGHTChrissa Pagitsas, director of the Green Initiative at Fannie Mae.

has been talking about something like this for awhile, but hasn’t done it. This is a driver for Fannie Mae to be more competitive. Think about the ripple effect of this. Appraisers need to think about what it means to be green. It begins to differentiate projects in the marketplace more. You are establishing benchmarks, making the whole process more systemic. It’s yet another positive piece of the puzzle that helps move the market towards adopting greener construction.” Pagitsas is the first to admit that getting certification isn’t the only way to go green. But she believes the initiative can help establish best practices, and create financial systems that reward good actors instead of greenwashing. “This kind of program can provide certainty to groups such as Wall Street,” she says. “I want this program to help encourage more property owners to achieve the certification that meets their business plans. I want the awareness and level of green building to skyrocket. I want lenders to understand this, make it the lingua franca of financing.” gb&d may–june 2015

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Digital Biology A previously inaccessible pier in New York City is set to boast an innovative ecohabitat, even allowing visitors to text message the East River By Vincent Caruso

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF THE LIVING PREPARED FOR NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF STATE WITH FUNDS UNDER TITLE 11 OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION FUND

In 2004, an interdepartmental study concerning Lower Manhattan’s two-mile East River Waterfront Esplanade was conducted—a byproduct of then-mayor Michael Bloomberg’s “Vision for a 21st Century Lower Manhattan.” The white paper outlined a set of value-based target objectives aimed at strengthening the cultural, architectural, and environmental attributes of the southernmost pocket of New York’s loftiest borough. Among the multitudinous projects that followed the yearlong undertaking was, accompanied by SHoP Architects, the New York City Economic Development Corporation’s (NYCEDC) revitalization of the East River Waterfront Esplanade and its neighboring Pier 35. Meanwhile, futurist David Benjamin of The Living New York firm, in collaboration with artist Natalie Jeremijenko, were busy generating buzz with a recently completed prototype of a collaborative project they dubbed Amphibious Architecture wherein buoys, laden with sensors and plotted along the Bronx and East rivers, triggered LED signals in response to various elements of aquatic activity. Imposing a central theme of interconnectivity on hugb&d

man life and its presiding natural environment, and further monitoring the relationship between them, the duo naturally attracted the eager attention of the NYCEDC. By 2012, the two parties were bound by contract and the Pier 35 EcoPark project went into development, with Amphibious Architecture serving as the template to work from. Parlaying the integrated approach of his previous venture into the redevelopment of the pier, Benjamin expounds, “we are very interested in the intersection of biology, computation, and design.” Over the course of Benjamin’s career, this area of interest has evolved into a central tenet of his profession, and one that has likewise enforced itself as the very framework of the renewed Pier 35. Such interactivity is effectively demonstrated by the technical communication of environmental health within the project, for example, a “shadow pier” comprised of floating tubes arranged in the East River parallel to the esplanade. The tubes, like the “Amphibious” buoys, employ sensors that monitor water quality and presence of underwater species. The detections are then relayed via two lay-

LEFT Transcending the transient allure of a public art installation, Pier 35 Eco Park will remain a permanent attraction.

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Guests can text message the floating shadow pier tubes and receive real-time facts and information.

Tracking the Trajectory: Pier 35 EcoPark 2004 An interdepartmental study was conducted (a byproduct of Bloomberg’s “Vision for a 21st Century Lower Manhattan”) about the East River Waterfront Esplanade, outlining objectives aimed at strengthening the cultural, architectural, and environmental attributes of the area.

2012 David Benjamin’s The Living joins forces, via a contract, with the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) to put Pier 35 EcoPark into development, basing the design off of The Living’s prototype project, Amphibious Architecture.

“The idea that citizens can ‘text the river’ is meant to make people pause and wonder about their technology, their environment, and their world. One feature I love is that as soon as someone texts the river, this inanimate object becomes a contact in their phone.” David Benjamin, The Living New York ers of color-coded LED lighting cues. If the water is cleaner than the previous week, the upper layer transmits a bluer color, while a “warmer” tone indicates a downgrade, while the lower LED layer traces the trail of fish activity. Meanwhile, identical

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tubes hang below FDR Drive measuring air quality in a like fashion. Unifying human beings to their surrounding ecosystem in a revolutionarily literal sense, as guests may text message the floating shadow pier tubes and, in reply, receive neat, real-time facts and information based on what the tube sensors are presently gathering. The intention is to create a platform that can facilitate and simplify dialogue concerning the precarious standing of environmental quality. “The idea that citizens can ‘text the river’ is meant to make people pause and wonder about their technology, their environment, and their world. One feature I love is that as soon as someone texts the river, this inanimate object becomes a contact in their phone.” The addition of a live mussel habitat especially demonstrates Benjamin’s cross-disciplinary principle by merging “artificial intelligence and natural intelligence,” in effect engendering a receptive biomechatronic cyborg entity, not unbefitting for the theme of the installation. To

2017 Although the Pier 35 EcoPark has seen delays, some of which are a result of Hurricane Sandy’s effects, construction is slated to resume in the fall. The NYCEDC predicts the project will be complete by 2017.

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breathe, mussels must open their shell, and the degree of the gape responds directly to the quality of water they inhabit. As is the case with the FDR Drive and shadow pier tubes, the results are collected with harnessed biosensors. “This is an example of harnessing natural intelligence and making it part of the palette of design,” explains Benjamin, emphasizing an urgency for “developing new hybrid possibilities that combine artificial and natural, digital and biological, new and ancient technologies.” Transcending the transient allure of a public art installation, Pier 35 EcoPark will remain a permanent attraction. And though briefly hampered by an unfortunate series of setbacks, including a contractor squabble and the calamitous impacts of Hurricane Sandy, the project has regained steady momentum. As construction is slated to resume in the fall, Benjamin’s focus remains fixed on the ultimate objective. “I do hope that it provokes debate, discussion, and new thinking about nature,” he says. The NYCEDC is presently eyeing a 2017 completion. gb&d gb&d

ABOVE A prototype of this system was commissioned by the U.S. Pavilion for the Venice Biennale in 2012. RIGHT Instead of seeing the river’s surface as a mirror to reflect our own skyline and our own image, a two-way interface between the interrelated systems of land and water is established.

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One Seat to Heal Them All At the technological forefront, Wieland Healthcare produces a revolutionary (and sustainably designed) orthopedic chair that leads in comfort while aiding the recovery of orthopedic patients By Vincent Caruso and Amanda Koellner

One would assume that the standard rehabilitating hip chair found across hospitals and doctor’s offices would have already been updated to meet modern orthopedic post-op and rehab requirements, but before Wieland Healthcare’s innovative new Trace Hip chair was recently released, that unfortunately was not the case. The company closely consulted with 25 physical therapists and two athletic trainers to develop a chair tailored to recovering patients. We spoke with Chris Baden, product engineer, about the process, the feedback from patients and doctors alike, and how sustainable design plays into the product. gb&d: Your research led you to learn that there have been technological changes in orthopedic surgery procedures. What were these changes, and how did they influence your design of this new hip chair? Chris Baden: Patients are instructed to sit with their hips at least as high as knee level. Due to the incision going laterally through the hip, patients risked dislocation if their trunk-to-hip angle was less than 90 degrees. Recent advances have allowed many of our physicians to eliminate hip precautions following hip arthroplasty, as they are going in at the front of the hip in today’s procedures. The other issue is that patients with long legs but short torsos have a difficult time transitioning their body weight forward far enough to get up. The seat would need to be high enough to get their knees off the edge so that their knees are lower than their hips. gb&d: Can you tell me a bit more about how standard hip chairs are different from the new Trace Collection? Baden: Standard hip chairs have always had a higher seat height. Most of these chairs are in the 25–26-inch height range. This hampers many patients’ ability to get in and out of the standard hip chair. The new Trace collection hip chair is 21.5 inches in height, which is 3 inches higher than our standard chair. This allows the patient

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to use the floor as a stable base for sitting down. No two people are the same. We all have different ways of getting comfortable in a chair, and one of them is leg placement. We did not want to limit the patient to a crossbar or foot rest that would only work for a select few. gb&d: I know sustainability is important to Wieland. How did you employ sustainable design in this particular collection and chair? Baden: In addition to keeping up and complying with the latest environmental laws and regulations, we actively seek to conserve, recycle, and act with respect toward our environment. For instance, 100% of steel, foam, wood, plastic, and corrugated packaging used is recyclable; 90% of the fabrics we offer are environmentally conscious products; 70% of supplies come from within a 500 mile radius of northwest Ohio and northeast Indiana; and all furniture is designed to be easily renewed as part of our commitment to maximize the useful life of the product. Also, our

ABOVE Wieland Healthcare consulted with 25 physical therapists and two athletic trainers to develop a hip chair tailored for recovering patients.

GREENGUARD Certification ensures that a product has met some of the world’s most rigorous and comprehensive standards for low emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into indoor air.

gb&d: What has the response from doctors and patients been like so far? Baden: The response has been great from both orthopedic professionals and patients. We feel like the Trace Hip chair changes the perspective of what a hip chair should look like, and we feel that we have done a great job at capturing that. gb&d gbdmagazine.com


NEXT

Inside the Trace Hip Chair

Trace Hip makes standing easier for patients by sporting a flat seat pitch.

Trace Ottoman can be included for the benefit of patients instructed to keep legs extended. The ottoman can be kept neatly underneath between chair legs.

The 16-inch seat depth allows for optimal ergonomic ease for sitting down upon and standing up from the chair.

According to the latest research, the 21.5-inch seat height sported by Trace Hip is ideal for patients instructed to sit with their hips above knee level.

Personalized widths of the Trace Hip are available between 22 and 30 inches.

PHOTOS: EVAN LINDSAY/BLAQUE

100% of the steel, foam, wood, plastic, and corrugated packaging used here is recyclable.

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Trendsetters Inner Workings Features Spaces Next Punch List

gb&d

120 Person of Interest

Aaron Betsky, new dean of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

122 On the Boards

Inside the winners of the City of Dreams Pavillion Competition

124 Material World

Aquafil has found a way to regenerate Nylon waste into yarn for brand new, recycled products

126 On the Spot

Guest editor Melody Harclerode

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Person of Interest Aaron Betsky

The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation recently appointed Aaron Betsky, curator, educator, and architecture critic, as the new dean of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture. In February, Betsky assumed full responsibility for the school’s academic and institutional direction, including raising $2 million by the end of 2015 to help transform the school from a subsidiary of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation to an autonomous institution. That’s a lot to have on one’s plate. But Betsky is an intellectual powerhouse accustomed to taking on challenges. Recently, he took time from his schedule to talk with gb&d about himself, his new gig, and how inspired architecture can create a better reality. Interview by Jeff Link

gbt&d: So how did your fascination with architecture begin?

sion. How are you doing that? Where are you in relation to your goal?

Aaron Betsky: Well, I grew up in the Netherlands, and my fascination started at a young age. While I was still in high school I went to see the Schröder House, a 1921 masterpiece by architect Gerrit Rietveld described as a three-dimensional Mondrian. That was my first inspiration to think about what architecture can be. Then, in college at Yale, I was very much inspired by Vincent Scully. I became his teaching assistant and did my senior thesis for him. Those were the strongest influences. But since I was a kid, I remember looking at buildings; they’ve always held a strong fascination for me.

Betsky: I have worked out a plan with the board that will allow us to raise necessary funds. We are beginning to do the work necessary to achieve that.

gb&d: How have your experiences as director of the Cincinnati Art Museum, director of the Netherlands Architecture Institute in Rotterdam, and head of the 11th International Architecture Exhibition at the 2008 Venice Biennale prepared you for your new role? Betsky: I am interested in experimental architecture that does not pretend it is the most efficient way to solve problems, but rather, considers how we can make the world more sustainable, open, and beautiful—and does so through continual experimentation and learning by doing. Obviously, Taliesin is a great place that has worked in that tradition. I hope what I bring is a combination of having run cultural institutions for several decades—and the knowledge of institutional leadership that comes with it—as well as a three-decade-long history of teaching; I have taught for a long time with great pleasure. gb&d: You are charged with raising $2 million by the end of 2015 to help transform the school from a subsidiary of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation to an autonomous institution in order to keep accreditation from the Higher Learning Commis-

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gb&d: The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture, founded by the renowned architect in 1932, is a master’s degree program located on two campuses on the estates of Frank Lloyd Wright: Taliesin East in Spring Green, Wisconsin, and Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Arizona. How does it attempt to carry on Wright’s legacy? Betsky: Frank Lloyd Wright came out of traditions of American pragmatism, the arts and crafts movement, and elements of romanticism, and he developed positions and responses to those traditions that have carried on at Taliesin East and West today. He was the first architect to think seriously about sprawl, and the foremost architect to make sense of the concatenation of human dwellings from here to Timbuktu. He taught us not to ignore sprawl but to make it better, and that means making it environmentally sustainable, socially just, and more beautiful. Projects like Broadacre City are evidence of his research interests and the work of his students. Taliesin, in various fashions, carries on all those elements of his legacy. gb&d: What do you see as your primary responsibilities as dean? Betsky: To lead the school. Obviously, you don’t do that alone, given a community as established as Taliesin. I see myself very much working with faculty, staff, and the foundation to build on a great tradition and move it forward: first, to achieve the school’s independence and, then, to turn it into the best experimental architecture school in the United States. gb&d: How would you like to see the school transform under your leadership? gbdmagazine.com


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PHOTO: PATRICK HOLLAND

Betsky: I think we need to take traditions that are there and use them as a basis to attract the best students and faculty to gather and engage in that kind of experimentation in the real world. This will be the place to deal with sprawl: design buildings where people can be at home in the modern world, create a democratic architecture, and show how experimental architecture can be the solution at the center of debate and to which people turn. gb&d: While a proponent of sustainable building design, you are critical of methods that use expensive variations of standard building technology. What popular building technologies are problematic in your view? Has the green design movement become a province of the elite? Betsky: The technology itself isn’t problematic, but you don’t make something sustainable just by slapping solar panels on it with double-glazing. The first quesgb&d

tion of sustainable building is, do we need to make a building at all? Do we need to engage in new construction? Second, if it is necessary to build something, can we reuse the materials? Is the building designed in such a manner as to respond to and use the surrounding landscape? Is it built with the land rather than on it? Does it have a correct solar orientation? Does it make use of the land and require a minimum amount of energy to build and climatize it? Finally, whatever you’re using in terms of energy should be used in a manner that ensures its source does not deplete natural resources. But, that is the end of a process that should start much earlier and consider the necessity and nature of new building. gb&d: You write that, “We don’t know usually what a ‘better’ reality is when it comes to architecture,” and yet you believe this should be architecture’s goal. How can architecture create a better reality?

ABOVEAs the new dean of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture, Aaron Betsky aims to turn it into the best experimental architecture school in the United States.

Betsky: Well, again I have to try to be specific. I’m referring to architecture that is more sustainable and uses fewer natural resources. All buildings should be net zero. I’m also referring to architecture in a social sense. We are, too often, enclosed in boxes that are made by others and are abstract and imprisoning. Architecture should strive to incorporate open spaces, which encourage open interaction across classes and between peoples where we work, play, and live. We’ve produced a human world that is extraordinarily ugly and dumbing. We need to figure out how to make it more beautiful—and understand what beautiful is. That’s very much open to debate, but we need to at least have that debate. gb&d may–june 2015

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On the Boards City of Dreams Pavilion Competition Winning Designs By Vincent Caruso

ABOVE The Billion Oyster Pavilion is made of materials that will be re-used by the Harbor School to rebuild oyster habitats in New York’s waterways.

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PHOTOS: IZASKUN CHINCHILLA (THIS PAGE); BANG STUDIOS (FACING PAGE)

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For most of Governors Island’s modern existence, the historic New York isle has predominately served as a post for the United States Army and later, Coast Guard. In more recent years, however, the federal government has bequeathed the property onto nearer holders, formulating a joint ownership between the city and state of New York. The change his invited increased public occupancy, transforming the island into a site for community-based art functions such as the City of Dreams Pavilion Competition, which, in its fifth year has recently revealed its 2015 winners: BanG Studio’s Billion Oyster Pavilion and Izaskun Chinchilla’s Organic Growth. We caught up with the designers behind the two to chat sustainability in public art. “We call it ‘ping-pong,’” explains Babak Bryan of the creative exercise he shares with his BanG Studio partner Henry Grosman, wherein ideas are expressed in a brisk, to-and-fro exchange between parties, constricting time to retract or overthink. The ritual is intended to pull ideas from any chanced area of the mind to the table of discussion, worrying not about relevance to the project or to architecture in general. The natural outcome is that the “good ideas build resonance and the weaker gb&d

ones fall through the cracks.” Bryan, one half of BanG Studio architectural duo, enjoys culling inspiration from various, unpredictable sources and, observing BanG’s “Billion Oyster Pavilion,” defying convention and espousing an otherworldly vibrancy, this is apparent. After sketching out an agreed-upon concept, the team brainstormed selecting building materials that would limit the pavilion’s environmental impact, eventually learning that the New York Harbor School was also located on Governors Island. Leveraging the coincidence, the two got in touch with the school and consulted them in regards to what materials they would find useful and could acquire after the run of the installation has lapsed. The conversation shaped BanG’s approach, and the designers have kept in contact with the Harbor School throughout the entire process to confirm that each building block be reusable to their curriculum, leaving no piece discarded or suffering the fate of waste. Whereas BanG Studio aims to prevent waste, Izaskun Chinchilla ventures to intercept it. Bicycle wheels, umbrellas, and stools all damaged or otherwise unfit to serve their purpose, rerouted from their destination to the dump, constitute the Madrid-based architect’s

THIS PAGE Bicycle wheels, umbrellas, and stools comprise the “Organic Growth” pavilion by Izaskun Chinchilla.

“Organic Growth” pavilion. And unlikely as it might seem, the assembly of these discarded remnants results in an undeniable object of beauty and enchantment effectively honoring and celebrating the delicate gifts of nature— specifically, Hydrangea flowers. Explains Chinchilla of the alluring genus, “The Hydrangea flower is a resilient structure: a number of the stems or smaller flowers may break but the dome keeps resistant,” which is reflected in the pavilion’s structural density, adding that the Hydrangea’s behavior is characterized by what’s called “capacity design.” “The joints between different elements are stronger than the elements themselves creating a resisting shape out of slender components,” allowing the canopies to lightly interact with the wind’s shifts while remaining grounded by reused bicycle wheels and tripods. The wheels are also intended to inspire the sustainability of human health. “In our projects, we work to promote cycling culture in many ways,” Chinchilla says of his team. gb&d may–june 2015

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Aquafil has found a way to regenerate Nylon waste into yarn for brand new, recycled products By Vincent Caruso Throughout history, many inventions that we now take for granted were made possible following a breakthrough, albeit seemingly minuscule, scientific discovery. In this case, IG Farben’s landmark 1930’s patent for Nylon 6—a complex synthetic macromolecule—has been employed for a variety of purposes, ranging from food packaging to UV-absorption. It has most recently, however, found itself the subject of Aquafil’s interest, according to Aquafil USA president Franco Rossi. The Aquafil R&D team performed four years worth of research and development in exploring new uses for this peculiar compound. And although

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Aquafil’s extraordinary findings have certainly invited accolades on the grounds of inventiveness, the biggest benefactor might be Mother Nature. “After realizing Nylon 6 could be endlessly regenerable, the issue became finding waste that contained a high percentage of Nylon 6 to be broken down,” a discovery that inspired the above-mentioned research and development Rossi explains. This inspired the launch of the ECONYL Regeneration System in 2011, the process of which entails the “un-zipping” of Nylon 6 molecules that then brings it back to its “monomer state” of the solid compound, caprolactam. The result, now, can be transformed endlessly into newly refashioned Nylon 6 “pellets,” absent the impurities of any sort of fossil fuel trail. Put simply, discarded items containing Nylon 6 are recovered from their wasteland afterlife, revived via the ECONYL Regeneration System. The process finally results in the signature textile

This is one of the many commercial collections using ECONYL. The collection, pictured here in Limestone Kiwi, uses the vibrant fibers to amp up a modern space.

apparel and synthetic carpet flooring for which ECONYL is known, and rebounded back to the industry anew. Though Aquafil is constantly experimenting with ECONYL, the product has already manifested itself in differing, colorful forms. Of interior designers, Rossi remarks, “They are starting to step outside the box to create innovative designs that add flare to interior spaces.” Meanwhile, ECONYL is stimulating the creative impulses in larger industries as well. “Carpet mills are starting to explore their color options more with each collection.” On its own, the ECONYL Global Collection’s palette has expanded to over 130 colors, a feature offered by every Aquafil facility across the globe. Manufacturing industries, having long been after sustainability in products, have welcomed ECONYL into the marketplace warmly. The market is becoming more intrigued,” affirms Rossi, “the demand for sustainable products is higher than ever.” gb&d gbdmagazine.com

PHOTO: INTERFACE, INC. COURTESY OF AQUAFIL USA

Material World ECONYL

HUMAN NATURE COLLECTION by Interface


Green Sports Alliance members span nearly 300 pro and collegiate sports teams and venues from 20 different leagues and 14 countries. PUNCH LIST

The annual Green Sports Alliance Summit is the world’s largest and most influential gathering for the sports community to unite around sustainability. The event brings together more than 800 industry stakeholders to learn and share better practices and the latest innovations in greening operations, advancing the supply chain and engaging fans. Discover a better way to play at the

June 29-July 1, 2015 // CHICAGO, USA

gb&dmore and register today at www.greensportssummit.org Find out

may–june 2015 125 @SportsAlliance


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On the Spot Melody Harclerode

This issue’s guest editor, AIA Atlanta President and principal of her own eponymous architecture firm, Melody Harclerode, responds to our questionnaire and gives the city of Atlanta a whole lot of love in the process.

A CURRENT EVENT WE SHOULD FOLLOW MORE CLOSELY

Changes to the Architectural Registration Examination. ENVIRONMENTAL COME-TO-JESUS MOMENT

Seeing aerial images of the decreased tree coverage in metropolitan Atlanta.

WAY TO MAKE THE ENVIRONMENT A NONPARTISAN ISSUE

Present the long-term economic benefits of water and energy conservation. WHAT YOU’D PITCH TO PRESIDENT OBAMA IF YOU HAD 30 SECONDS

THE PERFECT CITY WOULD HAVE

A park in every neighborhood featuring an array of beautiful sculptures. ONE TECHNOLOGY ON THE HORIZON THAT CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

Driverless cars.

TOPIC IF YOU WERE ASKED TO GIVE A TED TALK

The enormous power of great, but small, architecture.

BUILDING YOU WOULD SAVE IF THE WORLD WAS GOING TO END

My home.

A CENTURY FROM NOW, HUMANITY WILL

Continue to underestimate the intelligence and talent of children.

ONE BOOK EVERYONE SHOULD READ

Architects should occasionally review their copy of the college textbook Architecture: Form, Space, and Order by Francis D.K. Ching to read about classic principles of architecture and see magnificent sketches.

MOST MEMORABLE MENTOR OR TEACHER

My first grade teacher Mrs. Russell who nicknamed me “Sunshine.” FAVORITE MODE OF TRANSPORTATION

Historic trolley cars.

PHOTO: PHILLIP ALEXANDER-COX

WASTEFUL HABIT YOU’RE TRYING TO KICK

Purchasing baked goods that I could easily make.

MOST FULFILLING HOBBY

Writing (I wrote a book called Discover ARCHITECTURE).

GREATEST PROFESSIONAL PET PEEVE

The importance of affordable, yet high-quality college institutions to help our country stay globally competitive. WHAT YOU’D TELL THE GREEN MOVEMENT IF IT WAS YOUR CHILD

EXPLAIN “GREEN” TO A KINDERGARTNER

Be kind to our environment.

MOST COMMON GREEN MYTH

Being green is too expensive. Even without certification, a project can still be environmentally friendly. THE FIRST STEP TO BECOMING A STEWARD OF THE ENVIRONMENT

Conserving energy and water use at home.

CAUSE YOU’D SUPPORT IF YOU HAD A BILLION DOLLARS

Expanding the BeltLine and the MARTA rail system within the City of Atlanta. ONE QUESTION INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS SHOULD ALWAYS BE ASKING THEMSELVES

How can I add value to this project? MOST RESONANT DOCUMENTARY

Don’t be complacent about your successes. Many forces still wish to greatly weaken you.

Ken Burns’ Jazz.

THE BOLDEST IDEA IN SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

The Atlanta Business Chronicle. It helps architects to connect to the business community and vice versa.

CASUALTY OF THE CUTTING-ROOM FLOOR YOU’D RESURRECT

THE THOUGHT OR IDEA THAT CENTERS YOU

PUBLICATION YOU HOPE WILL NEVER DIE

Recycling steel from torn-down bridges as elements in public art.

Santiago Calatrava’s design for the Atlanta Symphony Center.

My love for my family, my community, and my profession.

MOST IMPACTFUL EXPERIENCE IN NATURE CURRENT PROJECT YOU’RE MOST EXCITED ABOUT

The upcoming AIA Atlanta national design competition with the Atlanta BeltLine and the City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs.

Visiting the Grand Canyon.

MOST MEANINGFUL PROJECT YOU’VE COMPLETED

The Fulton County Aviation Community Cultural Center. gb&d

BUILDING TREND YOU HOPE WILL NEVER GO OUT OF FASHION

Adaptive reuse.

FAVORITE PLACE YOU’VE TRAVELED

Rome, Italy.

YOUR FIELD’S BIGGEST HURDLE TO IMPROVING ITS PRACTICES

Clients who assess design proposals by the architects’ fees rather than the quality of their work.

PERSON WHO HAS MOST INFLUENCED YOUR PHILOSOPHY

The late Atlanta architect Cecil Alexander, FAIA, who followed the philosophy of doing well by doing good. MOST USEFUL INDUSTRY EVENT

The AIA National Convention.

Gum chewing on the job.

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gb&d Exchange Your go-to resource guide for incorporating sustainable practices into your business. INTERESTED? Contact Krystle Blume at krystle@gbdmagazine.com

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Directory & Index

ADVERTISERS

B B-K Lighting, 106 bklighting.com 559.438.5800 BASF Corporation, 131 ecovio.com 513.314.6359 Bayer MaterialScience, LLC, 128 altenconstruction.com 510.234.4200

Beaudin Ganze Consulting Engineers, Inc., 106 bgce.com 866.MEP.BGCE (637-2423) C Chatsworth Products, 132 chatsworth.com 800.834.4969 Coastal GeoExchange, LLC, 92 coastalgeoexchange.com 843.227.1501 G Green Sports Alliance, 125 greensportssummit.org 503.278.5393 I IFMA (International Facility Management Association), 129 ifma.org 713.623.4362 L LiveRoof and LiveWall, 118 liveroof.com 800.847.1392 M MechoSystems, 15 mechosystems.com 718.729.2020 P Pathosans, 4 pathosans.com 1.800.95.SPRAY S Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill LLP, 34 som.com 212.298.9300 V VisionBuilders and Design, LLC, 64 visionbuildersusa.com 704.405.3101 W Wahaso – Water Harvesting Solutions, 64 wahaso.com 800.580.5350

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Wieland, 118 wielandhealthcare.com 800.WIELAND (945-5263) Workrite Ergonomics, 2 workriteergo.com 800.959.9675 PEOPLE & COMPANIES # 11th International Architecture Exhibition, 120 2008 Venice Biennale, 120 2015 AIA Young Architects Award, 18 A Abadan, Mustafa K., 36 AEP Span, 99 Arup, 53 Agustiawan, Karen, 38 AIA Atlanta, 13 AIA National Convetntion, 13 Aldridge, Jessica, 47 Allen, Paul G., 68 American Institute of Architects, 49 Arkansas Music Pavilion, 32 ASHRAE award, 42 Aspen Art Museum, 104 Aspen Institute, 104 Aspen Music Festival and School, 104 Athens Services, 47 Atlanta Falcons, 75 Aquafil USA, 124 Avaya Stadium, 69 B Baden, Chris, 116 BanG Studio BASF, 46 Bauer, John. R., 63 Beck Architecture, 30 Benjamin, David, 113 BERT, 74 Bergmann, Kai-Uwe, 108 Billion Oyster Pavilion, 123 Birdair, 24 Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), 108 BL Companies, 62 Boeri, Stefano, 52 Bosco Verticale, 52 Brødrene Dahl, 97 Bryan, Babak, 123 Buescher, Randall, 77 Building Information Modeling (BIM), 96 C Cain, Robert M., 89 Cascadia Consulting and Building Insight, 46 Cedar Grove Composting, 45 Centerplate, 68 Central Artery/Tunnel Project, 49 Charles R. Drew Charter School Junior and Senior Academy, 78

Chatsworth Products, Inc. (CPI), 42 Chester, Amy, 108 Chinchilla, Izaskun, 123 Cincinnati Art Museum, 120 City of Dreams Pavilion Competition, 123 Coffin, Tristam, 64 Cool Roof Rating Council, 30 D Decatur Fire Station, 84 Department of Housing and Urban Development, 108 D’Hooghe, Alexander, 110 Dirsa, Sarah, 18 Domain Mall, 30 Downey, Dave, 61 Dr. Mark & Cindy Lynn Stadium, 26 Duncan, Scott, 36 E ECONYL Regeneration System, 124 EcoSafe, 45 Edmonton Oilers, 70 Edwards, Kristin, 96 EHDD, 60 Energy Star, 30 Environmental Product Declaration (EPD), 96 Epstein, 77 eTemp, 74 Equipment Stadium Nexen Energy Stage, 29 F Fannie Mae, 111 Ference, Andrew, 72 Freddie Mac, 111 Fowler, Kathy, 59 G Gensler, 56 Gering, John 59 Global Green USA, 47 Green Initiative, 111 Green Sports Alliance, 67 Grosman, Henry, 123 Guide Dogs for the Blind, 54 H Haesloop, Eric, 99 Hale, Rebecca, 68 Hershkowitz, Dr. Allen, 67 Harclerode, Melody, 13 HLW, 56 HOK, 18 HOK IMPACT, 18 Horsman, Dave, 69 Hyska, Terr, 46 I Interbrand, 56 J James McHugh Construction Co., 77 Javits Center, 22 Jeremijenko, Natalie, 113 K Kaval, Dave, 70 Kielty, Alexa, 45 KFC Yum! Center, 72 KWR Watercycle Research Institute, 49

L

LEED for Homes Platinum, 91 LEED Gold Certification, 44 LEED Gold BendBroadband, 44 LEED Silver, 70 LEED Operations and Maintenance, 69 LEED Platinum, 56 LEED-NC Silver, 69 Leung, Luke, 36 Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), 96 Lincoln Financial Field, 67 M Maimain, William, 16 Marty, Shawn, 61 Mastercam, 20 McDonald Island Park, 29 McKinstry, 42 MCM, Inc., 20 MechoSystems, 16 Microsoft, 68 Minnesota Twins, 69 MIT Center for Advanced Urbanism, 110 MLB All-Star Game, 69 Moffett Airship Hangar, 70 Moreland, Zack, 104 Muhlbauer, Rainer, 62 MultiRes, 45 Murphy, Jennifer, 59 N Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), 67 NeoCon AIA, 16 Netherlands Architecture Institute in Rotterdam, 120 New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC), 113 New York Harbor School, 123 Nike, 87 Nordenson, Guy, 50 O OMA, 110 Optimera, 97 Organic Growth, 123 P Pagitsas, Chrissa, 111 Partisans, 20 PathoSans, 75 Patterson, Devon, 77 Pearl River Tower, 38 Pertamina, 36 Pier 35 EcoPark, 113 Pittman, Daniel, 110 Pivo, Dr. Gary, 111 Pond & Company, 13 Portland Trail Blazers, 68 R Ragen, Phil, 45

Rambin, Laura, 54 Rebuild by Design, 108 Rodriguez, Sam, 42 Rogers Place, 70 Roosevelt Island Tramway, 50 Rossi, Franco, 124 Rutan, Marcia, 46 Rytting, Todd, 56 S Safeco Field, 68 San Jose Earthquakes, 69 Schuur, Linda, 49 Schuur, Sander, 49 Seattle Mariners, 68 Seattle Seahawks, 68 Seattle Sounders, 68 Seattle Storm, 68 ShadeLoc, 16 Shipton, Tim, 70 SHoP Architects, 113 SINTEF, 97 SEED (Social Economic Environmental Design), 18 SEED St. Louis, 19 Shigeru Ban Architects America, 104 Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM), 36 Snøhetta, 96 Solomon Cordwell Buenz, 77 STHLMNYC, 49 Studio Bondy Architecture, 54 Sundt Construction, 60 Swedish Association of Architects, 49 T Target Field, 69 TeleCommunication Systems (TCS), 42 Telefonica Vivo, 44 The Living New York, 113 Thoman, Susan, 45 Trace Hip Chair, 116 Turnbull Griffin Haesloop, 99 U University of California, Davis, 60 University of Louisville Cardinals, 72 US Green Building Council, 111 V Vancouver Canucks, 68 Vision Builders, 59 Vulcan Corp., 67 W Wahaso, 63 Walton Arts Center (WAC), 32 Winters, Dan, 111 Whole Foods Market, 62 Wieland Healthcare, 116 William Jefferson Clinton Orphanage and Children’s Center, 18 World Health Organization, 49 Z ZEB (The Research Center on Zero Emission Buildings), 96 ZEB-OM, 96 ZEB Pilot House, 96 Zeulner, Justin, 68

INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING?

Contact Laura Heidenreich at laura@gbdmagazine.com for more information about advertising in our print magazine, iPad, Web, and E-newsletter, as well as custom media.

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