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CELEBRATING OUR

GD USA

GD USA

55TH YEAR

GRAPHIC DESIGN USA

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS SPONSORED BY THE CREATIVE GROUP

55TH PRINT DESIGN SURVEY JUNE 2018

SPONSORED BY VERSO

EDUCATORS STRESS FUNDAMENTALS PRINT 18 UNIFIES INDUSTRY EXPRESSIVE LOGOS MAKE COMEBACK

www.gdusa.com

JU NE 2018


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June 2018 Pub Letter Focus_feb news play 6/4/18 12:24 PM Page 2

LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER | HURTS SO GOOD Did you ever have a relationship with someone you did not respect or trust, made you feel cheap and manipulated, would sell you out for a nickel bag … but … who you could not leave or live without. (Don’t lie, we’ve all been there.) That pretty much sums up our readers’ take on Facebook as expressed in our 55th (55th!) Annual Print Design Reader Survey. They know it’s a bad entanglement but it hurts so good. As one designer put it: “I get annoyed at the constantly targeted ads in my feed, but often I bite because somehow they know exactly what I’m looking for.” There should be a #MeToo movement for everyone compromised by Facebook and a support group for those who participate willingly in the power exchange. I’m not holding my breath.

GORDON KAYE IS THE PUBLISHER OF GDUSA Comments, suggestions and letters can be sent to gkaye @ gdusa.com.

THIS TIME IT’S PERSONAL Is there a greater editorial honor than publishing Bill Gardner’s LogoLounge Trend Report each year? The short answer is no; the long answer is “definitely no.” Bill’s views on logos and identity (and life) are always spot-on and I was struck, this time around, by his observation that expressive logos are making a comeback. The argument, in a nutshell, is that the last few years have seen a movement toward austere, flat, small, simple, sans serif logos. This makes sense because there is a demand for logos that evoke transparency and clarity, that are more symbolic and iconographic for a young digitally savvy audience, and that can better be rendered on small screens. There is a downside: this trend has tended to “strip these brands of personality when it becomes too sterile.” Accordingly, Bill detects a pendulum swing back toward more embellishment and customization, lettering with big serifs, nostalgic references to the ‘70s and ‘80s, and greater intensity and gradation of colors. It’s a pushback against antiseptic solutions, an attempt to reassert singularity and soul, and all part of the organic push-pull process through which design evolves. TIMELESS OVER TRANSITORY In preparing our annual “Educators To Watch” feature, I found it interesting how often the 2018 group affirmed the need to raise design fundamentals and problem-solving skills over more transitory concerns. For example, Carol Mauge-Lewis of Kennesaw State University tells us: “The challenge for professors is in first building a strong foundation of graphic design fundamentals, problem-solving and design-thinking skills that rise above mediocrity.” Frank Baseman of Jefferson focuses “on the fundamental processes of how to approach the work; break down the problem; conduct thorough information gathering and research; embrace the many, varied possible solutions vying for something that is above all else — appropriate to the subject matter — and somehow special.” Pamela Barby of PCA&D asserts: “The core teaching of design fundamentals will always guide and balance the ever-changing world of media, technology and culture.” States Jessica Barry of SAA: “The pace of technological progress will continue to increase exponentially over time. What will not change is the importance of being a problem solver.” The legendary Cheryl Heller of SVA’s MFA in Design & Social Innovation notes: “The principles, skills and process of social design apply to any situation involving human beings, which is everywhere.” And Shushi Yoshinaga of Drexel University’s Westphal College sums it up nicely: “Today, I teach my students that while technologies come and go, our knowledge of design foundation remains highly adaptable and timeless.” IT ALL WORKS TOGETHER There is almost too much to read in this edition. In addition to the features noted above, the two true cover stories speak to the state of print design and of digital media, respectively. Reduced to its essence, our 55th (55th!) Annual Print Design Survey finds that print and paper endure in the media mix because of classic and unique strengths, that print done well can transcend the clutter and project the credibility sorely lacking in society and communications today. This message is juxtaposed with our 2018 showcase of American Web Design Award™ winners – the biggest yet – which reminds us of that online media has massive reach, and that graphic designers are learning fast to master its power. Taken together, these features reminded of a simple truth stated by an art director in a recent GDUSA survey: “When it comes to finding effective solutions, all media has a role to play and it all works together.”


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MASTER YOUR CRAFT BY COLLABORATING ON REAL WORLD PROJECTS.

READ MORE ABOUT THIS RE-BRAND PROJECT AT academyart.edu/GDUSA Academy of Art University | Study On-site or Online | 888.680.8691 | Student design by Celina Oh | Yellow Ribbon Participant Visit academyart.edu to learn more about total costs, median student loan debt, potential occupations and other information.Accredited member WSCUC, NASAD, CIDA (BFA-IAD, MFA-IAD), NAAB (B.ARCH, M.ARCH), CTC (California Teacher Credential).


June 2018 TOC Impo_SEPT 07 TOC/Staff 6/4/18 1:21 PM Page 4

CONTENTS | JUNE

10

FRESH COLLINS brands new San Francisco neighborhood; American Express credits Pentagram with visual refresh; Gail Anderson gets ‘life’ in Cooper Hewitt National Design Awards; Thumbtack sticks new identity; CVS adds innovative post-production beauty mark; Google recognized by AIGA for corporate design leadership; and more.

60

PRINT DESIGN SURVEY Do creatives still value print and paper? Do they still control the spec and the buy? Do they believe print can standout from the digital clutter and project a rare sense of credibility and trust. Is this our oldest and most favorite survey? Yes, yes, yes, and yes. Verso Corporation is the sponsor.

70

EDUCATORS TO WATCH As a complement to our perennial and popular special reports — “People To Watch” and “Students To Watch” — we have added “Educators To Watch”. The reason: these teachers and administrators have more influence than ever on design, media and culture.

88 LOGOLOUNGE 2018 Bill Gardner once again proves himself to be the most insightful and thorough logo and identity trendspotter around. This time he sees expressive logos pushing back against the plethora of small, simple and san serif, with categories like Neo-Vintage, Serif Redux and Blurpie.

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PRINT 18 AND CREATIVES The PRINT® 18 exhibition and event promises a productive “convergence of creative and print.” The annual event is where print technology and creative minds meet to get a first hand look at new innovative print work, special effects, brilliant colors and inks, and interactive linking technologies. The dates: Sept 30 - October 12 at Chicago’s McCormick Place.

GDUSA - Graphic Design USA Volume 55 / No. 3 May/June 2018 Kaye Publishing Corporation (ISSN0274-7499/USPS227020). Published 6 times a year with combined issues in January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December. Executive, editorial and advertising offices at 89 Fifth Avenue, Suite 901, New York NY 10003. Phone: 212.696.4380, Fax: 212.696.4564, www.gdusa.com. SUBSCRIPTION: Domestic, $72 one year, $108 two years, International, $140 one year. Periodicals postage paid at New York NY and additional mailing office. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GDUSA - Graphic Design USA, PO Box 3072, Langhorne PA 19047. Permit #224.

WWW.GDUSA.COM


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June 2018 TOC Impo_SEPT 07 TOC/Staff 6/4/18 1:37 PM Page 6

| 2018 |

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS THE BEST IN DIGITAL + UX DESIGN SPONSORED BY THE CREATIVE GROUP

28

This is our annual showcase of the power of design to enhance online communications and experiences. The outstanding works displayed are created by elite creatives and developers, and encompass everything from websites and microsites to video and apps to social media and UX design. You can view the winners here and/or on our gdusa.com website.


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INSPIRED TALENT.

At The Creative Group (TCG), we believe that when your workforce is happy, so is your bottom line. And what makes creative people happy? Inspiration. Those moments when everything clicks and the absolute best idea is dreamed up and written down. We help inspiration strike by placing ridiculously skilled creative, digital, marketing, advertising and public relations professionals in the right role at the right company. The result? Happier creatives, engaged workforces and stronger companies. CONGRATULATIONS TO THE WINNERS OF THE 2018 AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS!

855.787.0951 roberthalf.com/creativegroup Š 2018 The Creative Group. A Robert Half Company. An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/Disability/Veterans. TCG-0518


June 2018 TOC Impo_SEPT 07 TOC/Staff 6/4/18 1:35 PM Page 8

A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO . . . THE CREATIVE GROUP (TCG) is exclusive sponsor of GDUSA’s 2018 American Web Design Awards™ —

The Best in Digital + UX Design. TCG specializes in connecting creative, digital, marketing, advertising and public relations talent with the best companies. As a division of Robert Half, TCG offers flexible solutions to meet companies' project, contract-to-hire and full-time employment needs. They can also scale for large projects that require a team of creative professionals and, by partnering with sister division Robert Half Technology, deliver the most efficient and cost-effective staffing solutions for complex digital projects that call for both creative and technical skills. With locations in major markets across the United States and in Canada, TCG is proud to serve as a respected community partner in the cities where they live and work. More information, including job-hunting services and candidate portfolios, can be found at roberthalf.com/creativegroup.

VERSO CORPORATION is the exclusive sponsor of GDUSA’s 55th Annual Print Design Survey. A leading provider of Printing Papers, Specialty Papers, and Pulp, Verso’s distinguished product line, streamlined supply chain and flexible manufacturing capabilities make it ultra-responsive to market demand, extending its ability to get you the products you need, when you need them. Verso offers the best quality printing papers with a broad selection of certified and recycled options for all types of printing applications. The paper mills are strategically located near top industry printers across North America, so products are available when you need them. Verso officials state: “We provide expert customer support, on-press technical service and insightful solutions that bring added efficiency and productivity straight to your business. And all of our products are MADE IN THE USA with pride and passion, vision and skill.” This special edition is printed on Influence Gloss 60 lb. Text from Verso, with its enhanced optical properties for truer, more vibrant image production, excellent surface gloss and smoothness, and unparallelled pressroom performance and printability. Learn more at versoco.com

GD USA GRAPHIC DESIGN USA

Gordon Kaye Publisher

ART & PRODUCTION Ilana Greenberg Creative Director Rachel Goldberg Production Director Jay Lewis Photographer

ADMINISTRATION & READER SERVICES Althea Edwards Accounts Manager Jennifer Hoff Scott Sczcypiorski Internet Services Bridget Bellavia Circulation

EDITORIAL

ABOUT THE COVER The transformative 'Happy Mac' icon was created by Susan Kare in the 1980s. Ms. Kare is noted in this issue as one of the 2018 AIGA Medalists, see story at PAGE 16, and her creation seemed an appropriate cover for our annual

Gordon Kaye Editor Sasha Kaye-Walsh E-News Editor Charlotte Kaye Assistant Editor

American Web Design Awards, which start at PAGE 28. FOUNDER PHOTO COURTESY OF SUSAN KARE

Milton L. Kaye (1921-2016)

ADVERTISING Ron Andriani Executive VP, Integrated Marketing + Business Development 201.485.8720 212.696.4380 randriani@ gdusa.com

COVER PAPER CREDIT: The cover of this edition of GDUSA is printed on FSC-certified Kallima Coated Cover C2S, part of the Kallima Paper family of FSC-certified coated cover paperboard, manufactured by Tembec. A leading advocate of sustainability, Kallima Paper has a distinct low-density high-bulk construction resulting in less trees used and significant cost savings to the customer. Kallima’s trusted line of Coated Cover C1S, C1S Plus and C2S are well-known for their bright white surfaces. Visit www.kallimapaper.com

Gordon Kaye Publisher 212.696.4380 gkaye @ gdusa.com COPYRIGHT 2018 BY KAYE PUBLISHING CORPORATION


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7o0;*Ō$_;u;-ঞˆb|‹om=;u;m1; October 15–17, 2018, Los Angeles, CA

These design hotshots and more are speaking at MAX. Join us to get inspired, learn skills, and connect with the world’s top creatives. MAX includes dedicated Graphic, Web, & UX Design and Illustration & Creative Imaging tracks and over 300 hands-on courses.

Annie Atkins Graphic designer

Natasha Jen Designer

Jessica Hische Letterer, illustrator and type designer

John Maeda Designer

Gemma O’Brien Designer, artist

Aaron Draplin Owner, Draplin Design Co.

GDUSA readers save $400 on a full conference pass. Use promo code M18PGD when you register. Learn more at adobe.com/go/maxgdusa

© 2018 Adobe. All rights reserved. Adobe and the Adobe logo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries.


June 2018 FRESH Impo_feb news play 6/4/18 9:44 AM Page 10

FRESH | FOR GAIL ANDERSON IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE

NEW YORK NY Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum has announced the winners

of the 2018 National Design Awards, recognizing design excellence and innovation in ten categories. The annual program promotes design as a vital humanistic tool in shaping the world and is accompanied by extensive educational programs in cities nationwide. “All ten of this year's winners present a powerful design perspective and body of work that is at once inclusive and deeply personal, accompanied by great achievement, humanity and social impact,” said Caroline Baumann, director of Cooper Hewitt. Of particular note to the graphic design community, Gail Anderson is recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award. Currently creative director at SVA’s Visual Arts Press and a partner at Anderson Newton Design, Anderson has excelled as a designer, writer and educator, co-authored 14 books on design and popular culture, lectured internationally, and received numerous awards from the likes of AIGA, Society of Illustrators, Society of Publication Designers, Type Directors Club, Art Directors Club, Graphis, and Communication Arts. In addition, her work appears in the permanent collections of the Cooper Hewitt, Library of Congress, and the Milton Glaser Design Archives at SVA. Anderson also has been featured in magazines that include Computer Arts (UK), designNET (Korea), kAk (Russia), and on the January 2010 cover of GDUSA. Other winners include: Civilization, The Seattle-based firm led by Michael Ellsworth, Corey Gutch and Gabriel Stromberg, for Communication Design; Weiss/Manfredi, a pioneer in connecting landscape, art, infrastructure and architecture, for Architectural Design; and Neri Oxman, architect, designer, inventor and professor at MIT, for Interaction Design. All winners and selected works can be seen at the Cooper Hewitt website. www.cooperhewitt.org/national-design-awards PICTURED TOP ROW (L TO R): Spread from Rolling Stone celebrating a young Chris Rock in full Jimi Hendrix mode. (October 2, 1997). Project partner: Mark Seliger (photographer); Poster for Avenue Q (2003), designed under Anderson’s leadership as creative director of design at SpotCo. Project partners: Drew Hodges (president, SpotCo); Nick Ruechel (photographer); United States Postal Service postage stamp, commemorating the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. Project partners: Antonio Alcal· (art director); Jim Sherraden (printer). PICTURED BOTTOM ROW (L TO R): School of Visual Arts poster for the New York City subway, designed using a quote supplied by the college’s executive vice president, Anthony P. Rhodes, to celebrate President Obama’s call to greatness (New York, New York, 2009). Project partner: Terry Allen (illustrator); SVA Style (Fall 2017). Anderson helped create SVA Style, a new initiative to encourage community at the School of Visual Arts. Project partners: Anthony P. Rhodes (executive creative director); Brian E. Smith (publication designer); Declan Van Welie (photographer); Sheilah Ledwidge and Angela Riechers (writers); SVA students; Anderson has coauthored thirteen books with design historian Steven Heller, including Type Tells Tales, The Graphic Design Idea Book, New Vintage Type, and the upcoming Type Speaks; Portrait of Gail Anderson by Declan Van Welie. All photos Courtesy of Gail Anderson

10 G D U SA


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June 2018 FRESH Impo_feb news play 6/4/18 10:45 AM Page 12

FRESH | AMEX SENDS SINGLE MESSAGE TO ALL CUSTOMERS

NEW YORK NY American Express has a new global brand

platform, “Powerful Backing: Don’t Do Business/Don’t Live Life Without It.” The goal is to unite its consumer and business customer segments under one shared message. The initiative includes an advertising campaign created by McGarryBowen, along with Ogilvy, Mindshare and Digitas, and a visual identity refresh by Pentagram. The ad campaign is the first major work from McGarryBowen for the client since winning the account. CMO Elizabeth Rutledge says that “at its core, our new brand platform reinforces our relationship with our customers and that American Express is there to support them in ways big and small.” As for Pentagram’s contribution, it focuses on retooling the iconic Blue Box logo and deriving a bolder typographic language. While the composition of the box has been retained — two bars of outline lettering crossing through the center of a blue square — the design team redrew the letterforms and finessed the details of the complex logotype to render it more clearly for large and small scale applications. The update also introduces an alternate logo for small-space digital use, and a new system of graphic elements and patterns for greater flexibility in creating applications and expressions of the brand. pentagram.com and mcgarrybowen.com

12 G D U SA


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June 2018 FRESH Impo_feb news play 6/4/18 10:51 AM Page 14

FRESH | COLLINS PUTS SAN FRANCISCO NEIGHBORHOOD ON THE MAP

SAN FRANCISCO CA COLLINS was challenged by the San

Francisco's Greater Rincon Hill Community Benefit District to create a unified neighborhood out of three separate sections of the city — the Rincon Hill, Folsom Street, and Transbay areas. The result is The East Cut, a newly-formed locality whose identity combines the neighborhood’s cosmopolitan sensibility and its historic past. The name and identity references the Second Street Cut made through Rincon Hill in 1869 which caused the area to become a separate part of the city, but it also speaks to the many layers of life found in an intensely urban and fast redeveloping. The bold E represents the three districts of the neighborhood and helps create a graphic treatment highlighting and celebrating unique features, from the bridge to the bay, through video, photography, illustration and a color palette that combines architectural tones with the bright hues in order “to stand out and fit in.” The new name, symbol and identity program now signal both the place The East Cut occupies, as well as its reinvention. wearecollins.com

14 G D U SA


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June 2018 FRESH Impo_feb news play 6/4/18 10:52 AM Page 16

FRESH | AIGA AWARDS FIVE MEDALS. YOU CAN GOOGLE IT

AARON DOUGLAS

KARIN FONG

AREM DUPLESSIS

SUSAN KARE

VICTOR MOSCOSO

NEW YORK NY Since 1920, the AIGA Medal has been awarded to designers whose

influence, careers, and bodies of work tell unique stories of dedication to craft, career growth, social and cultural impact, and the bridge between design and the broader society. This year, five individuals met this high bar, with the coveted commemoratives going to: Karin Fong for her groundbreaking work and mastery in the field of visual storytelling as a motion graphics designer and director; Arem Duplessis for creative direction across media including The New York Times Magazine and Apple; Susan Kare for design of icons for the early Macintosh computers that defined the Apple user experience; Victor Moscono for originating an enduring graphic style instrumental in defining both Underground Comix and the psychedelic rock posters of the 60s; and Aaron Douglas, honored posthumously, for pioneering a visual language that authentically celebrated black experience during the Harlem Renaissance. The AIGA Corporate Leadership Award, granted rarely over the years, was presented to Google for “supporting the future of design and technology through its people, its work, and its commitments” as well as its “philanthropic support for designers, educators, students, and communities.” AIGA executive director Julie Anixter put the event in perspective: “The 2018 Medalists show how much impact designers make on culture. Each of PICTURED ABOVE TOP TO BOTTOM:

Susan Kare, Happy Mac, designed in the 1980s, courtesy of Susan Kare; Aaron Douglas, Cover of Opportunity, June 1926; Arem Duplessis, “The College Issue” cover, The New York Times Magazine, September 30, 2007

these designers exemplifies what is possible when you don’t stop being curious, being relentless in pursuit of a vision, being socially conscious, being agile and interdisciplinary in their work. Each one represents the continuous pursuit of mastery.” www.aiga.org/medal PICTURED ABOVE LEFT TO RIGHT: Victor Moscoso, Chamber Bros, 1967, offset lithography, copyright Victor Moscoso;

Karin Fong, Still from Boardwalk empire main title, courtesy of Imaginary Forces; A limited edition printed takeaway, created for the launch of Material Design at Google I/O 2014. Image courtesy of Manual; Portrait of Susan Kare by Ann Rhoney; Portrait of Victor Moscoso by Dress Code, 2018

16 G D U SA


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June 2018 FRESH Impo_feb news play 6/4/18 10:53 AM Page 18

FRESH | TACTILE FONT SHOWS PROMISE FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED

BROOKLYN NY In 1829, Louis Braille established the

revolutionary braille system, transforming the way the blind and visually impaired experience the world. But braille's use has steadily dwindled due to its level of complexity, and the team at Education, Literacy, Independence for All (ELIA) has been working for almost two decades to create a more contemporary, easy-to-learn system. The result is ELIA Frames, a tactile standard alphabet font that leverages modern printing technology. The system uses the existing alphabet's lettering for tactile reading, and thanks to the simple shapes with distinct details, the letters are both effective and attractive. ELIA Frames has received two honorable mentions from Fast Company's Innovation in Design Awards, has been exhibited at the Maker Faire and Techcrunch Disrupt NYC, and is currently included in the Smithsonian's Cooper Hewitt’s ambitious “The Senses: Design Beyond Vision” exhibition developed by Ellen Lupton and Andrea Lipps. It is also the subject of a Kickstarter campaign to print and ship starter kits for early adopters. www.theeliaidea.com/eliahome

18 G D U SA


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June 2018 FRESH Impo_feb news play 6/4/18 11:05 AM Page 20

FRESH | CVS GETS REAL WITH BEAUTY MARK

WOONSOCKET RI CVS Pharmacy has launched “Beauty

in Real Life,” an advertising campaign that demonstrates the retailer's commitment to highlight an authentic and realistic image of beauty for it customers. The campaign was created and produced by Standard Black, an LA and New York boutique creative agency, to show the ways that women use beauty within their lives. Photographer is Mei Tao and director is Kat Keene. The innovative campaign has adapted new standards for post-production photo alterations and unveils the first images to feature the “CVS Beauty Mark,” a watermark that highlights imagery that has not been materially altered. “There's been a shift in what consumers want to see when it comes to beauty. They are asking for more transparency and authenticity,” comments Norman de Greve, SVP and CMO, CVS Health. "We wanted to introduce a campaign that uses beauty to make women feel good about themselves by empowering them to feel comfortable and confident in their own skin.” Among its activities, Standard Black launched a nationwide search to cast real women to represent diverse beauty, and utilized Free The Bid — a 501c3 non-profit initiative that advocates on behalf of women directors for equal opportunities in commercial shoots — to identify and hire a female director for the campaign. standardblack.com

20 G D U SA


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The Convergence of Creative and PRINT

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Powerful design ideas. Emerging technology. Connections to expand your professional network. PRINT is the largest attended print and visual communications event in North America. PRINT® 18 delivers fresh ideas for “Wow!” print marketing, impactful visual techniques and the fusion of digital and print technologies to empower YOUR success. There’s no better place to experience the new and vibrant world of print. You need to be there.

Get the strategies to drive your creative with the power of print. Learn more at PRINTevent.com

PRINTevent.com #PRINT18 Owned and produced by the Association for Print Technologies


June 2018 FRESH Impo_feb news play 6/4/18 11:06 AM Page 22

FRESH | THUMBTACK BROADENS BRAND TOOLBOX

SAN FRANCISCO CA Thumbtack, a platform that automates

the hiring of local service professionals like plumbers or piano teachers, sticks a new visual identity that includes logo, web, app and more. The rebrand was largely done inhouse, led by Thumbtack's Creative Director Matteo Vianello, with help from digital brand and experience innovation company Instrument and design studio Very True Story. The unified brand promise to customers and pros — ease, possibility and accomplishment — is executed with a new blue signature color, simple language and design, lots of white space to highlight the stories of local businesses, real photography of real people doing real things, and a feeling for the user of crossing something off the to-do list. In this spirit, the new typeface, Mark, is straightforward and utilitarian. And last, but not least, the logo is now an actual tack rather than a pushpin. Explains Creative Director Vianello: “As the product evolves, we grew out of our utilitarian, orange wardrobe. Our new identity provides a wider toolbox for brand expression, and better position unique stories to be told.” www.thumbtack.com

22 G D U SA


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June 2018 FRESH Impo_feb news play 6/4/18 11:44 AM Page 24

FRESH | MINTED ARTIST AND DESIGNER PAINTS LIVE MURAL

NEW YORK NY Minted has come a long way since the

PHOTOS BY CHARLIE JULIET PHOTOGRAPHY

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company’s humble beginnings in 2008. What started as a bud of an idea — and Founder Mariam Naficy’s quest to unearth hidden creative talent everywhere — has grown into a marketplace that now surfaces emerging artists from all 50 states and more than 60 countries. One example is its Design Challenge, which started modestly as a Save-The-Date competition and now attracts thousands of submissions from independent artists designing custom stationery, limited edition art, home decor, and more. While exhibiting at the recent ICFF, a major home furnishings show, at the Javits Center in New York City, the company invited Brooklyn Minted artist Ilana Greenberg — she may be familiar to you from her role as GDUSA Creative Director — to paint a live mural. Minted partnered with the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) to host an electronics charging station for the show attendees which featured Ilana’s “Missed Connections” wall mural, part of a new collection launched by Minted. The mural was selected as a result of Ilana's entry into a Minted competition. Ilana explains, “Minted has been instrumental in giving emerging artists a platform to showcase their work as well as sell their creations. It was a wonderful experience to be able to share my talents with a wide range of people and honestly, it was so much fun!” On the side of the booth, Ilana replicated her “Abstract Forms” art print as visitors stopped by to take a look or chat. The finished installation was on view throughout the run of the show. Search for Ilana Greenberg on minted.com to see more of her artwork.


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AVAIL ABLE

NATIONALLY. DELIVERED

LOCALLY. E XC L U S I V ELY F R O M

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June 2018 FRESH Impo_feb news play 6/4/18 11:09 AM Page 26

FRESH | BRIGADE HELPS VODKA BRAND GO HANDHELD

HADLEY MA SVEDKA is a major vodka importer into the U.S. and a staple in the vodka aisle. Recently the brand decided to extend into the Ready-To-Drink space with a premium sparkling spiked seltzer. SVEDKA realized that many spiked seltzer fans were also vodka connoisseurs who enjoyed cocktails. With that parallel drawn, the company approached BRIGADE to help them navigate how to bring premium, cocktail-inspired spiked seltzers to consumers. “The challenge we faced,” says BRIGADE Executive Creative Director Kirsten Modestow, “was how do you create packaging that leverages the brand equity of the SVEDKA bottle and brand to convert current spiked seltzer fans and attract new vodka and cocktail lovers to the RTD space? Essentially, how do you help SVEDKA go handheld?” To attract seltzer loyalists as well as cocktail drinkers, the Hadley MAbased design firm developed slim cans, bold graphics, and clean typography to create vibrant cans for shelf impact. The bold horizontal band that’s iconic to all of its bottles is turned onto its side for an energetic and playful presence. Explains Modestow: “Taking the band vertical makes the branding larger than what you see on typical aluminum cans, and cutting into the edge of the ’S’ gives the impression that the brand is an even bigger than the can itself. Needless to say, when you hold one of these in your hand, you know you’re holding something premium and bold.” To keep things fresh, the designers created asymmetry by stacking the flavor descriptors to the right of the branding, and contrasted thick san-serifs with more elegant scripts to give everything a contemporary and premium vibe. wearebrigade.com

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2018 web awards_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:28 AM Page 28

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS THE BEST IN WEB + DIGITAL + UX DESIGN Welcome to our annual showcase of the power of design to enhance websites and online communications. The outstanding work displayed here are created by design ďŹ rms, ad agencies and inhouse departments, and encompass websites, microsites, apps, publications, video, social media, plus our new UX design category and more. You can view the showcase, selected from nearly than 1,500 entries, in print and on our website and in the GDUSA digital edition for desktop, tablet and mobile.

SPONSORED BY

THE CREATIVE GROUP 2 Fish Company, LLC Adcetera Alight Solutions Andra Design LLC APT (American Public Television) Argus atCommunications, LLC Auburn University School of Industrial + Graphic Design Back Forty Creative Behavior Design Bernhardt Fudyma Design Group c|change Canary, A Gould Evans Studio CrearĂŠ Web Solutions Creating Digital Crown Media Decker Design Dell, Experience Design Group Design Principles, Inc. [D3] Digital Experience, Hilton DMI DOOR3 Drexel University, Interactive Digital Media Echo Design Group Ellen Bruss Design Equity Creative FINE Firmseek Fluke Corporation Fresh Ideas G Design+Communications Gabe Diaz Graphic Design Gaslight GCMD Genworth Mortgage Insurance Gladiator Consulting, LLC Ideas On Purpose IM Graphics Inc.

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Kahala Brands Kitchen Collaborative Knowble Media KUDOS Design Collaboratory Leibowitz Branding & Design Manughian Design MassMutual, studio m Max Marketing Communications McCAY DESIGN Mermaid, Inc. Metropolis Branding MiDESign & Marketing Consultancy MiHyun Kim/Texas State University Monday Creatives MotivAction Neoscape Paradigm Marketing and Design Peter Hill Design Phase 3 Marketing & Communications Pixel Parlor Polaris Industries Premier Communications Group Prime Advertising & Design Ritz Marketing Rule29 Six Ink Smith Design Spectrum Brands - Pet, Home & Garden Division Steers Studios Stephen B. Starr Design Taylor Design temi the personal robot & Roof Studios The Walker Group Think Studio Tortuga Creative Services, LLC Trinity Church Wall Street Wilford Design Inc. World Synergy

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INSPIRED TALENT.

At The Creative Group (TCG), we believe that when your workforce is happy, so is your bottom line. And what makes creative people happy? Inspiration. Those moments when everything clicks and the absolute best idea is dreamed up and written down. We help inspiration strike by placing ridiculously skilled creative, digital, marketing, advertising and public relations professionals in the right role at the right company. The result? Happier creatives, engaged workforces and stronger companies. CONGRATULATIONS TO THE WINNERS OF THE 2018 AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS!

855.787.0951 roberthalf.com/creativegroup Š 2018 The Creative Group. A Robert Half Company. An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/Disability/Veterans. TCG-0518


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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: 2 Fish Company, LLC, Zeeland MI Title: 2 Fish Company Website Art Director: Scott Millen Designers: Jacob Hansen, Adam Rossi, Lisa Talarczyk, Martin Schoenborn Web Developer: Brandon Gohsman Photographers: Hannah Ziegeler, Barry Elz Illustrator: Jacob Hansen Copywriter: Andrea Pratt Project Manager: Matt Kuczynski

Design Firm: Adcetera, Houston TX Client: RLH Corporation Title: Franchiseasy Website Design Art Director: John Meyer Designer: Hugo Rocha Programmer: Sean Suggs Web Developer: David Loop Photographer: Donnie Vendivel Copywriter: Andrew Miller Director, Motion Services: Michael Castillo

Design Firm: Andra Design LLC, New York NY Client: Altria Group, Inc. Title: Altria 2017 Annual Report Website Art Director/Designer: Andra Hoffman Senior Website Designer: Brianna Meyer Web Developer/Programmer: Nic Scott Photographers: Casey Templeton, Leo Burnett

Design Firm: APT (American Public Television), Boston MA Title: APT Website Redesign Senior Graphic Designer: Samantha Paris Estes Senior Program Associate, Syndication & Premium Service: Erin Bowles Communications and Online Editor, Exchange: Colette Greenstein Vice President, Communications: Jamie Haines Communications Manager: Dawn Anderson Managing Editor, Research and Media: Kerry Taylor Vice President, Technology: Gerry Field Director, Systems: Anand Kavalapara Digital Content Manager: Justin Goltermann

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Design Firm: Argus, Emeryville CA Client: Pharmacyclics LLC Title: Pharmacyclics Corporate Website Art Directors: Jeff Breidenbach, Stephanie Wade Designer: Jeff Breidenbach

Design Firm: atCommunications, LLC, Northbrook IL Client: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Title: Strategic Brand Communication Program Creative Director: Terry Kasdan Designer: Cheryl Peaslee Programmer: Dan Jasker Copywriter: Brooke Bear

Design Firm: Back Forty Creative, St. Louis MO Client: Natural Hope Herbals Title: Natural Hope Herbals Website Creative Directors: Amanda Potts, Miranda Summers Art Director: Miranda Summers Designer: Tim Holdmeier Web Developer: Jim Courtois

Design Firm: Behavior Design, New York NY Client: Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aid Title: Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aid Website Art Director: Mimi Young Designer: Jeff Piazza Web Developers: Jason Nunes, Nilomee Jesrani Illustrators: Tracy Wong, Ian Cunningham Project Manager: Holly Esparrago

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Behavior Design, New York NY Client: University of Miami School of Business Title: Business School Website Art Director: Jeff Piazza Designer: Ian Cunningham Programmer: Matt Knight Web Developer: Jason Nunes Project Manager: Jim McGrath

Design Firm: Bernhardt Fudyma Design Group, New York NY Client: Atelier Anna Walinska Title: Anna Walinska Website Art Director: Janice Fudyma Designers: Janice Fudyma, Christopher Patrick Web Developer: Brendan Bruce Copywriter: Rosina Rubin

Design Firm: c |change, Chicago IL Title: Empathy Craves Imagination Art Director: Megan Palicki Designer: Allison Baker Programmer: Curtis Andrews Copywriter: Hugh Schulze Video: Kevin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Rourke Account Managers: Jenna Joerger, Nikki Luciano, Cassie Pype

Design Firm: Canary, A Gould Evans Studio, Phoenix AZ Client: BuildingBlox Consulting Title: BuildingBlox Consulting Website Redesign Art Director: Amanda Harper Designer: Nicole Norgren Programmers: Nicole Norgren, Ryan Fickenscher Web Developers: Nicole Norgren, Ryan Fickenscher

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Design Firm: CrearĂŠ Web Solutions, Ridgewood NJ Client: Deborah Cerbone Associates Title: Deborah Cerbone Associates Website Art Director: Brianna Scott Designer: Brianna Scott Programmer: Nicolas Scott Web Developer: Nicolas Scott Photographer: Deborah Cerbone Copywriter: Deborah Cerbone

Design Firm: Creating Digital, Garfield NJ Client: The Dinex Group Title: Boulud Sud Restaurant Website Art Director: Justin Miskowski Web Developer: Asif Somi Project Manager: Brian Essig

Design Firm: Creating Digital, Garfield NJ Client: The Blue Olive Shop Title: The Blue Olive Shop eCommerce Site Art Director: Justin Miskowski Web Developer: Asif Zaman Project Manager: Brian Essig

Design Firm: Creating Digital, Garfield NJ Client: Unique Influence Title: Unique Influence Website Art Director: Justin Miskowski Web Developer: Asif Somi Project Manager: Brian Essig

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Crown Media, Studio City CA Client: Hallmark Channel Title: Hallmark Channelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Countdown to Christmas Art Director: Brian Fujimori Designers: Brian Fujimori, Kaitlyn Smith Project Director: Erin Doyle

Design Firm: Decker Design, New York NY Client: Mutual of America Title: 2017 Annual Report Website Art Director: Lynda Decker Designers: Susanne Adrian, Evander Batson Web Developer: Manyfold Photographer: John Madere

Design Firm: Decker Design, New York NY Client: Schiffer Hicks Johnson PLLC Title: Law Firm Website Art Director: Lynda Decker Designers: Susanne Adrian, Evander Batson Web Developer: Manyfold Photographer: John Madere Copywriter: Deborah Gaines Associates

Design Firm: Design Principles, Inc., Marion MA Client: Northland Residential Title: Northland Residential Custom Designed Website Art Director: Karen Alves Designer: Karen Alves Programmer: Michael Cronin Web Developer: Michael Cronin

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Design Firm: Echo Design Group, Darien IL Title: Echo Design Group Website Art Director: John Burton Designer: Leslie Groenwoldt Programmer: Mike Pascarella Web Developer: Mike Pascarella Copywriter: John Burton

Design Firm: Echo Design Group, Darien IL Client: Symphony Health Title: Symphony Health Website Art Director: John Burton Designer: Leslie Groenwoldt Programmer: Mike Pascarella Web Developer: Mike Pascarella Copywriter: Heather Varela

Design Firm: Ellen Bruss Design, Denver CO Client: Continuum Partners Title: Market Station Website Creative Directors: Ellen Bruss, Ken Garcia Designers: Rose Chenoweth, Emily Fitzgerald

Design Firm: Equity Creative, Kenosha WI Client: Santarelli & Tiboris Oral and Facial Surgery Title: Santarelli & Taboris Oral and Facial Surgery Website Art Director: John Kirchen Designer: John Kirchen Programmers: Mike Atkins, Jonah Larson Web Developers: Mike Atkins, John Larson Copywriter: Alex Mohler Photographers: Mike Atkins, Christine Adams

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: FINE, San Francisco CA Client: Ashes & Diamonds Title: Ashes & Diamonds Website Art Director: Tsilli Pines Designer: Joe Flory Web Developers: Nichole Barrett, Aaron Ransley Project Director: Amber Stansfield Strategist: Steve Fine Information Architecture: Lisa Wright

Design Firm: FINE, San Francisco CA Client: XOJET Title: XOJET Website Art Director: Tsilli Pines Designer: Adam Parry Web Developers: Nichole Barrett, Tim Shedor Copywriter: Josh Kelly Project Director: Sara Stockett Strategists: Steve Fine, Josh Kelly, Caroline Moloney Information Architecture: Lisa Wright

Design Firm: Firmseek, Washington DC Client: Connell Foley Title: Connell Foley Law Firm Website Art Director: Firmseek Designer: Firmseek Programmer: Firmseek Web Developer: Firmseek

Design Firm: Fluke Corporation, Everett WA Title: Fluke Infrared Camera Solution Center Art Director/Designer: Mark Inouye Web Developer: Daniel Pouley UX Design: Severin Kibby Content Development: Jeff Black Photographer: Louis Fliger Marketing Coordinator: Leah Schedin

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Design Firm: Fresh Ideas, Columbia MO Title: Dining Services Customized Websites Art Director: Sarah Carnes Designer: Merry Ellen Meece Web Developer: Jamie Stephens Photographer: Holly Kite Account Executive: Kelsey Blackman

Design Firm: G Design+Communications, New York NY Client: Young Heroes Title: Young Heroes Website Creative Director/Designer: Janet Giampietro Senior Designer: Jouna Saza Wordpress Developer: Alfredo Mercedes Mejia Database Developer: Brendan Butts Principal Photographer: Gary Irving

Design Firm: Gabe Diaz Graphic Design, Tampa FL Client: JL Marine Systems, Inc. Title: C-Monster Control System Website Design Creative Director: Scott Hereford Art Director: Gabe Diaz Designer: Gabe Diaz Programmer: Anthony Thorn Marketing Director: Barry Wallace

Design Firm: Gaslight, Cincinnati OH Client: Mike Albert Fleeting Solutions Title: Mike Albert Overdrive Designer: Kati Best Web Developers: Doug Alcorn, Jason Duncan Project Manager: Brian Bathe

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: GCMD, Portland ME Client: Stockbridge Associates Title: Stockbridge Associates Website Rebuild Art Director: Alexandra Heseltine Designer: Alexandra Heseltine Programmer: Maria Focsa Web Developer: Maria Focsa Copywriter: Catherine Berce

Design Firm: Gladiator Consulting, LLC, Austin TX Client: ABRAXAS Technology Title: ABRAXAS Technology Website Designer: Nakevia Miller CMO, ABRAXAS Technology: Kristine Bryant

Design Firm: Ideas On Purpose, New York NY Client: AGCO Title: 2017 Annual Report Website - Innovation Feeds Creative Director: Darren Namaye Designers: Kara Mason, James Kwak

Design Firm: Ideas On Purpose, New York NY Client: Kids In Crisis Title: Kids In Crisis Website Creative Directors: John Connolly, Darren Namaye Designers: Fred Lee, Isaac Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill, Ryan Breeser Programmer: Joe Maller

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Design Firm: Ideas On Purpose, New York NY Client: Nielsen Title: 2017 Year in Review Website - Investing and Innovating Creative Director: Anna Tan Designers: Anna Tan, James Kwak

Design Firm: Ideas On Purpose, New York NY Client: Stanley Black & Decker Title: 2017 Year in Review Website - Purpose Driven Creative Directors: Michelle Marks, John Connolly Designer: Fred Lee

Design Firm: Ideas On Purpose, New York NY Client: United Technologies Title: 2017 Annual Report Website - We Do The Big Things The Right Way Creative Directors: John Connolly, Anna Tan Designers: Anna Tan, Ryan Breeser

Design Firm: IM Graphics Inc., Coral Springs FL Client: Matrix Z, LLC Title: Martix Z Sustainable Surfaces Website Art Director: Randy Braunstein Designer: Randy Braunstein Web Developer: Randy Braunstein

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Knowble Media, Columbus OH Client: Illinois College Title: Illinois College Website Art Director: Knowble Media Programmer: Knowble Media Web Developer: Knowble Media Photographer: Knowble Media Copywriter: Knowble Media

Design Firm: KUDOS Design Collaboratory, New York NY Client: Made in Japan

Design Firm: KUDOS Design Collaboratory, New York NY Client: EG Conference Title: EG Conference Frontiers Website Art Director: John Kudos Designer: Sumit Paul Web Developer: Sumit Paul Illustrator: Kelly Burns

Design Firm: KUDOS Design Collaboratory, New York NY Client: Stanley Marthin Title: Stanley Marthin Website Art Director: Andy Kurniawan Designer: Sumit Paul

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Project Title:

â&#x2C6;&#x17E;ARITA - Eternally Modern

Art Director: John Kudos

Designers: Sumit Paul, Ashley Wu Web Developer: Sumit Paul Photographer: Fuse Copywriters: David Imber, Mika Yoshida


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Design Firm: KUDOS Design Collaboratory, New York NY Client: Marras Design Title: Marras Design Website Art Director: John Kudos Designer: Ashley Wu Web Developer: Chris Manlapid

Design Firm: Leibowitz Branding & Design, New York NY Client: Calamos Wealth Management Title: Calamos Website Creative Director: Paul Leibowitz Art Director: Sangmi Lim Designer: Angela Lee Web Developer: Priyanka Singh Copywriter: Kevin Windorf

Design Firm: Leibowitz Branding & Design, New York NY Client: Coordinated Behavioral Care (CBC) Title: CBC Website Creative Director: Paul Leibowitz Art Director: Sangmi Lim Designer: Angela Lee Web Developer: Priyanka Singh Copywriter: Kevin Windorf

Design Firm: Leibowitz Branding & Design, New York NY Client: Syracuse University Title: SU News Website Creative Director: Paul Leibowitz Art Director: Sangmi Lim Designer: Angela Lee Web Developer: Priyanka Singh Copywriter: Kevin Windorf

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Manughian Design, Redondo Beach CA Client: Title: Moni Manughian - Manughian Design Website Art Director: Moni Manughian Designer: Moni Manughian Web Developer: Cosi Manughian-Peter Photographer: Moni Manughian Illustrator: Moni Manughian Copywriter: Moni Manughian UX/UI Designer: Moni Manughian

Design Firm: MassMutual, studio m, Springfield MA Client: MassMutual Ventures LLC Title: MassMutual Ventures Website Art Director: Nicholas Packey Designer: Nicholas Packey Web Developer: Nicholas Packey Copywriter: Charles Svirk

Design Firm: Max Marketing Communications, St. Paul MN Client: United Bankersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Bank Title: AAP New Product Launch Microsite Art Director: Max Allers Designer: Max Allers Web Developer: Max Allers Copywriter: United Bankersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Bank

Design Firm: Mermaid, Inc., New York NY Client: 50 Perry Street Title: I Heart Perry Street Responsive Website Art Director: Sharon Lloyd McLaughlin Programmer: Bart McLaughlin Copywriter: Paul V.

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Design Firm: Mermaid, Inc., New York NY Client: National Resources Title: UNO Responsive Website Art Director: Sharon Lloyd McLaughlin Programmer: Bart McLaughlin Marketing Director: Lauren Calabria

Design Firm: MiDESign & Marketing Consultancy, El Dorado Hills CA Client: LandX Inc. Title: LandX Inc. Website Art Director: Marco Ippaso Designer: Marco Ippaso Web Developer: Marco Ippaso

Design Firm: MiHyun Kim, Arlington TX Client: Young Hyun Cho Title: Young Hyun Cho, Classical Pianist, Website Art Director: MiHyun Kim Designer: MiHyun Web Developer: MiHyun Kim Copywriter: Young Hyun Cho

Design Firm: Monday Creatives, Jersey City NJ Client: The Oakman Condominiums Title: The Oakman 2018 Website Rebranding Art Directors: Mackienzie Centeno, Kendra Stoll Programmer: Anay Rajadhyaksha Copywriter: Chelsea Duffy

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: MotivAction, Minneapolis MN Client: Quick Base, Inc. Title: Empower 2018 User Conference Creative Director: Stephanie Teig Art Director/Designer: Stephanie Studer Project Manager: Amy Schmidt

Design Firm: Neoscape, Boston MA Client: Advisors Living / CCM Title: The Archer Residences Website Designer: Neoscape Programmer: Neoscape

Design Firm: Paradigm Marketing and Design, Mount Tabor NJ Client: Sweet Valley Venture Title: Sweet Valley Venture Website Art Director: Rachel Durkan Designer: Michael Scorcia Web Developer: Michael Scorcia

Design Firm: Peter Hill Design, Minneapolis MN Client: Henson Efron Title: Henson Efron Law Firm Website Art Director: Megan Junius Designer: Stephanie Manternach

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Design Firm: Phase 3 Marketing & Communications, Atlanta GA Client: New South Culinary Week Title: New South Culinary Week Website Art Director: Kendra Lively Designers: Carlton Roberts, Chavez Procope Programmer: Matt Weaver

Design Firm: Pixel Parlor, Philadelphia PA Client: The Orchard Title: BPM Film Website Art Director: Andrew Nicholas Designer: Lou Stuber Web Developer: Lou Stuber

Design Firm: Pixel Parlor, Philadelphia PA Client: Evron Title: Evron Website Art Director: Andrew Nicholas Designer: Jason McClintock Programmer: Rob Williams Photographer: Mark Likosky Copywriter: Lindsay Li Art Direction, Photography: Jason McClintock

Design Firm: Pixel Parlor, Philadelphia PA Client: U3 Studio Title: U3 Studio Website Art Director: Jenn Richey Nicholas Designer: Jason McClintock Programmer: Rob Williams Web Developer: Lou Stuber

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Polaris Industries, Plymouth MN Client: Indian Motorcycle Title: Indian Motorcycle Home Page Art Director: Polaris UX Design Team Designer: Polaris UX Design Team

Design Firm: Polaris Industries, Plymouth MN Client: Polaris ORV Title: Polaris ORV Model Page Art Director: Polaris UX Design Team Designer: Polaris UX Design Team

Design Firm: Polaris Industries, Plymouth MN Client: Slingshot Title: Slingshot Home Page Art Director: Polaris UX Design Team Designer: Polaris UX Design Team

Design Firm: Premier Communications Group, Royal Oak MI Client: Sonus Title: Sonus Website Development & Design Art Director: Michael Fossano Designer: Randy Fossano Programmer: Joe Perri Web Developer: Joe Perri Photographer: Dark Spark Copywriter: Michael Fossano

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Design Firm: Prime Advertising & Design, Maple Grove MN Client: Midwest Center for Reproductive Health Title: Midwest Center for Reproductive Health Website Design Art Director: Roclyn Bradshaw Designer: Roclyn Bradshaw Web Developer: Prime Advertising & Design Director of Web Development: Shauna Smart

Design Firm: Prime Advertising & Design, Maple Grove MN Client: Jonathan Homes Title: Jonathan Homes Website Art Director: Roclyn Bradshaw Designer: Roclyn Bradshaw Web Developer: Prime Advertising & Design Director of Web Development: Shauna Smart

Design Firm: Prime Advertising & Design, Maple Grove MN Client: Nadia Cakes Title: Nadia Cakes Website Art Director: Roclyn Bradshaw Designers: Roclyn Bradshaw, Alaina Roth Web Developer: Prime Advertising & Design Photographer: Austin Peters Director of Web Development: Shauna Smart

Design Firm: Rule29, Geneva IL Client: Raffles Insurance Title: Raffles Insurance Website Art Director: Justin Ahrens Designer: Adrian Mendez Web Developer: Factor1 Studios Copywriter: Wills Francis

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Rule29, Geneva IL Title: Rule29 Website Art Director: Justin Ahrens Designer: Edwin Carter Web Developer: Factor1 Studios Photographer: Wonderkind Studios Copywriter: Kelly Reed

Design Firm: Six Ink, Baltimore MD Client: Johns Hopkins University Center for Technology Title: Boundless Learning Website Art Director: Ellen Lichtman Designer: Ellen Lichtman Programmer: Bill Streett Copywriter: Digital Learning Group Video Production: Digital Learning Group

Design Firm: Six Ink, Baltimore MD Client: Johns Hopkins University Center for Technology Title: Kindergarten Readiness Assessment in Practice Website Art Director: Ellen Lichtman Designer: Ellen Lichtman Programmer: Bill Streett Copywriter: Digital Learning Group Video Production: Digital Learning Group

Design Firm: Smith Design, Morristown NJ Client: Simit & Smith Title: Simit & Smith Website Art Directors: Melissa Mullin Sadowski, Jane Sayer Designer: Melissa Mullin Sadowski Programmer: Nicole Guzman Web Developer: Mark Errichetti Photographers: Ken Keiger, Amy Roth Copywriters: Patrick Legin, Jane Sayer Food Stylist: Grace Ugliarolo

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Design Firm: Spectrum Brands - Pet, Home & Garden Division, Earth City MO Title: Better Belly™ Website Designer: Spectrum Brands - Pet, Home & Garden Division Programmer: Spectrum Brands Web Developer: Spectrum Brands

Design Firm: Spectrum Brands - Pet, Home & Garden Division, Earth City MO Title: Dingo® Website Designer: Spectrum Brands - Pet, Home & Garden Division Programmer: Spectrum Brands Web Developer: Spectrum Brands

Design Firm: Spectrum Brands - Pet, Home & Garden Division, Title: FURminator® Website Designer: Spectrum Brands - Pet, Home & Garden Division Programmer: Spectrum Brands Web Developer: Spectrum Brands

Design Firm: Steers Studios, Roxbury CT Client: Guill Tool & Engineering Co. Title: Guill Corporate Website Art Director: Jeanne Steers Designer: Jeanne Steers Programmer: Ben Steers Web Developer: Dan Coolbeth, KatArt Graphics

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Stephen B. Starr Design, Evanston IL Client: Dream To Product Title: Dream To Product Website Art Director: Stephen B. Starr Designer: Stephen B. Starr Programmer: Stephen B. Starr Web Developer: Stephen B. Starr Photographer: Deborah Overbey Copywriter: Deborah Overbey

Design Firm: Taylor Design, Stamford CT Client: Great American Aquaculture Title: Ideal Fish Website Creative Director: Dan Taylor Art Directors: Steve Habersang, Dan Taylor Designer: Steve Habersang Programmer: Chris Yerkes Web Developer: Chris Yerkes Illustrator: Steve Habersang

Design Firm: Taylor Design, Stamford CT Client: RiverRoad Waste Solutions Title: RiverRoad Website Creative Director: Dan Taylor Art Directors: Steve Habersang, Dan Taylor Designer: Steve Habersang Programmer: Hannah Wool Web Developer: Hannah Wool Photographer: Danny Sanchez Copywriters: Jennifer Covello, Jennifer Bernheim

Design Firm: temi the personal robot & Roof Studios, New York NY Client: temi the personal robot Title: temi Website Art Director: Alon Deri Designers: Alon Deri, Rotem Bicksnspaner Programmer: Uri Weil Web Developer: Yaron Yoels Copywriters: Asaf Zelicovitch, Yoav Hebel Project Lead: Yossi Wolf

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Design Firm: The Walker Group, Farmington CT Client: Boyd Productions Title: Boyd Productions Website Creative Director: Jeff Williams Art Director: Nicole Pierzchalski Designer: Nicole Pierzchalski Web Developer: Michael Delaney

Design Firm: Think Studio, Maplewood NJ Client: McLaren Engineering Group Title: McLaren Engineering Group Website Art Director: John Clifford Designer: John Clifford Programmer: Rowland Holmes, Arturan Web Developer: Rowland Holmes, Arturan Copywriter: Violet PR

Design Firm: Trinity Church Wall Street, New York NY Title: Stations of the Cross: Art. Passion. Justice. Art Director: Rea Ackerman Designer: Marc Tremitiere Programmer: Ben Marshall Web Developer: Entermedia

Design Firm: Wilford Design Inc., Tacoma WA Client: Joseph Shvidler, MD Title: West Coast Face Plastic Surgery Website Art Director: Dedra Jones Wilford Designer: Dedra Jones Wilford Web Developer: Collin Alligood Photographer: Michael Wilford Copywriters: Shawn Cole, Dedra Jones Wilford, Joseph Shvidler MD

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: World Synergy, Cleveland OH Client: Roundstone Insurance Title: Roundstone Insurance Corporate Website Art Director: Jay Kozar Programmer: Ross Ritchey Web Developer: Sean Shea Project Manager: Gina Bartlett

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | APPS

Design Firm: DMI, Arlington VA Client: Dollywood - Herschend Family Entertainment Corporation Title: The Official Dollywood App Art Directors: Sean Wallace, Ben Cannon, Erin Krieger Programmers: Leandro Barbosa, Sumit Agarwal, Monica Rebelo, Rui Alves, Sergio Silva, Vitor Gomes UI Designer: Jenn Giesler UX Designers: Josh Sukonnik, Pep Trias, Andrea Vega, Quinn Peyser QA Testers: Sopheak Chan, Kimseng Long, Daravichet Ven, Daraboth Ven, Enmanuel Pinate Garcia, Kimlin Ngoun Copywriter: Elizabeth Van Blargan Account Director: Julie Liberatore

Design Firm: KUDOS Design Collaboratory, New York NY Client: No Fun Radio Title: No Fun Radio App Art Director: John Kudos Designer: Sumit Paul Programmer: Lattice Teknologi Mandiri

Design Firm: Neoscape, Boston MA Client: Advisors Living / CCM Title: The Archer Residences App Designer: Neoscape Programmer: Neoscape

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2018 web awards_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:20 AM Page 54

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | SOCIAL MEDIA

Design Firm: Kitchen Collaborative, Burbank CA Client: Twin Eagles Title: Twin Eagles Social Media Art Director: Aniko Hill Designers: Doris Jew, Raquel Bailey Photographer: Jesse Hill Copywriter: Alison Stolpa

54 G D USA


2018 web awards_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:20 AM Page 55

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | ADVERTISING + PROMOTION

Design Firm: McCAY DESIGN, Monterey CA Client: Monterey Touring Vehicles Title: Monterey Touring Vehicles Promotional Campaign Art Director: Kelly McCay Designer: Kelly McCay Programmer: Kelly McCay Photographer: Robbie McCay Copywriter: Wesley Schweikhard Videographer + Digital Media Content Creator: Robbie McCay

Design Firm: Monday Creatives, Jersey City NJ Title: The New Creative Cats in Town Art Directors: Mackienzie Centeno, Kendra Stoll Programmer: Anay Rajadhyaksha

Design Firm: Ritz Marketing, Charlotte NC Client: PENSKE Automotive Group Title: Porsche Ageless Performance Designer: Chris Bucher

Design Firm: The Walker Group, Farmington CT Client: Advent Advisory Group Title: HEDIS Client Conference Landing Page Creative Director: Jeff Williams Art Director: Nicole Pierzchalski Designer: Nicole Pierzchalski Web Developer: Michael Delaney

G D USA 55


2018 web awards_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:21 AM Page 56

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | VIDEO, ANIMATION + MOTION

Design Firm: Alight Solutions, Islip NY Client: PepsiCo Title: Jiff Launch Video Creative Director/Client Lead: Jill Rafkin Art Directors: Victoria Cook, Cristine Giannotti Designers: Victoria Cook, Cristine Giannotti Programmer: Michael Spencer Project Manager: Kristin Peacock Production Editor: Randall Van Vynckt

56 G D USA


2018 web awards_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:21 AM Page 57

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | UX + UI

Design Firm: [D3] Digital Experience, Hilton, Memphis TN Client: Conrad Algarve Title: Conrad Algarve â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A Place Worth Exploring

Design Firm: Dell, Experience Design Group, Round Rock TX Client: Alienware Title: Intrepid Design Language for Alienware Art Director: John Pruitt Design Team: Experience Design Group, Dell

Design Firm: DOOR3, New York NY Client: Elsevier Title: Knovel - Web Application for Engineers Designer: DOOR3 Web Developer: Elsevier

Design Firm: Genworth Mortgage Insurance, Raleigh NC Title: Genworth Mortgage Insurance Website Art Director: Elena Page, Tavant Technologies Designer: Rachel Rumsey, Genworth Web Developer: Tavant Technologies Copywriter: Nancy Ingalls, Genworth

G D USA 57


2018 web awards_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:21 AM Page 58

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | UX + UI

Design Firm: Kahala Brands, Scottsdale AZ Client: Extreme Pita Title: Extreme Pita USA Website Senior Web Designer: Leslie York Web Developer: Ryan Pernack

Design Firm: Metropolis Branding, Charlotte NC Client: Ken Wrench Title: Augusta Homes Website Art Director: Denise Lorraine Davis Designer: Denise Lorraine Davis Programmer: Sohel Rana Web Developer: Denise Lorraine Davis Photographer: metropolisiconicshots.com

58 G D USA

Design Firm: Metropolis Branding, Charlotte NC Client: Buddy Edwards Title: Lynn Luxury Homes Website Art Director: Denise Lorraine Davis Designer: Denise Lorraine Davis Programmer: Sohel Rana Web Developer: Denise Lorraine Davis Photographer: metropolisiconicshots.com

Design Firm: Tortuga Creative Services, LLC, Lanoka Harbor NJ Client: Barefoot Athleisure Title: Barefoot Athleisure Website Designer: Chris Connors Web Developer: Jess Connors


2018 web awards_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:21 AM Page 59

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | STUDENT DESIGN

School: Auburn University School of Industrial + Graphic Design, Auburn AL Title: Klyde Warren Park Website Redesign Project Art Director: Hailey Briggs Designer: Hailey Briggs Professor: Courtney Windham

School: Drexel University, Interactive Digital Media, Philadelphia PA Title: Souvinear App Project Art Director: Tori Stewart Designer: Jake Bender Programmer: Anisa Sloan Web Developers: Kam Kutz, Kaitlyn Nunez Project Manager: Kristen Rehm

G D USA 59


June 2018 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:36 AM Page 60

55TH ANNUAL

PRINT DESIGN SURVEY SPONSORED BY VERSO CORPORATION

BY

GORDON KAYE

PRINT AND TRUST FAKE NEWS, CLICKBAIT, SPAM, DATA MISUSE. WHO AND WHAT CAN YOU TRUST? In 2018, this question strikes at the heart of what is right and wrong with our society, our politics, our media, our commerce, our connectedness. In GDUSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 55th annual print and paper survey, the question of trust bubbles to the surface. Understandably so. In an era of fake news, fake solicitations, fake identities, fake imagery, our readers engage in a lively debate as to whether print communications provide a greater degree of credibility for the senders and to the recipient.

60 G D USA


June 2018 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:36 AM Page 61

For many, the answer is yes: a quality printed piece is inherently suffused with authenticity. For others, the answer is no: the medium is not the message and a delivery system does not make one more or less credible. And yet for others, the answer depends: on the quality of the piece and the paper it is printed on, the type of message, the nature of the audience. Reality? Perception? Perception as reality? More on this below. More broadly, the debate speaks to how and why print endures in a digital age. GDUSA has been conducting a reader survey about the state of print design for more than five decades. When print and paper were dominant in graphic design, our surveys got into the weeds: details about projects, presses, papers, practices. Today, print is a choice and an option, and the questions now tend to focus on more existential issues: the role, relevance and purpose of print now and in the near future.

HERE ARE TEN OBSERVATIONS ABOUT PRINT DESIGN IN 2018 GLEANED FROM THE DATA AND COMMENTS. If print is to standout and be special, that

Print remains crucial as to how professional

1

graphic designers make a living. Fully 98% of respondents say they work in print as part of the mix and that 2-in-3 projects involve a

7

imposes a special responsibility on creators and producers: superior print design, wellcrafted execution, strategic deployment, sustainable methods matter as much, perhaps

print component.

more, than ever. When print is included as part of the marketing

2

for critical steps in the process, with roughly 8-in-10 making decisions on paper specification and print buying. Designers believe print endures because of its

3

There are pockets of growth. Package design

mix, designers retain responsibility and control

classic strengths. Foremost among these is tangibility – it is sensual, touchable, physical, real, permanent, and encourages a human

8

4

digital clutter. Because print is relatively rare, it has the potential to stand out and be special – fresh, welcome, surprising, disruptive, personal, engaging, meaningful,

a statement that a brand values itself and its customers. These traditional strengths are also magnified

5

Paper book sales are up a few percent as ebooks falter. There is a small but buzz-y artisanal demand for album covers, paperbacks and other items millennials view as quaint.

piece, so the argument goes, exudes credibility because it feels real and present, springs from a committed and identifiable source, and is the result of an act of craftsmanship. In a related thought, selective use of print

6

Despite the many positives noted above,

9

lends itself to certain audiences and offerings where communication needs to be retained, contemplated, touched or trusted: luxury

everyone understands that print is now a role player. Slightly more survey respondents say they are doing slightly more print work, but we also record a modest decline, once again,

in the percentage of projects and the percentage of time spent on print by designers. This is part and parcel of the challenges that confront the overall commercial print industry, which has spent years trying to find its floor. The move to social media as a primary adver-

the electronic communications we receive, to institutions on which we rely. A quality printed

other traditional print areas. Digital short-run printing is valued for its ability to target and

by a general lack of trust in everything from the companies with which we deal, to the

impacted by online communications than

customize. Cards and invitations make a personal statement.

connection often missing in the virtual world. These classic strengths are amplified by the

is robust since the need for packaging is less

10

tising and marketing vehicle is accelerating. Despite a mix of fear and loathing, media decisionmakers have accepted the tradeoff. They recognize that social media is “where

the eyeballs are” and see the Facebook and Google duopoly, in particular, as compelling because of the ease and affordability of targeting consumers. Happily or grudgingly, brands and products are voting with their feet to the detriment of legacy media and even to forward-facing digital media companies like Vice, Buzzfeed and Vox Media.

goods, premium services and expensive purchases are a few of the commonsense examples.

G D USA 61


June 2018 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:37 AM Page 62

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62 G D USA

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June 2018 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:38 AM Page 64

PRINT SURVEY | THE NUMBERS W

Our 2018 survey was sent to a random selection of 10,000 GDUSA print magazine and e-subscribers, and generated 1,104 responses. The benchmark results make clear that, even in a digital age, print remains essential to the graphic design profession. The highlights: 98% of GDUSA readers work in print as part of their mix, 68% of their projects have a print component, and 66% of their time is devoted to print work. With so much at stake, designers also continue to assert control over key elements of the process: 82% buy or specify paper and 87% buy or specify printing. The numbers below tell some interesting tales.

ARE YOU DOING MORE OR LESS PRINT DESIGN THAN IN THE PAST?

66%

A A

15% LESS

SAME

19% MORE

WHAT TYPES OF DESIGN PROJECTS DO YOU WORK ON?

A

ONLINE

98%

66%

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, RECOMMEND MORE OR LESS PRINTING THAN IN PAST YEARS?

OF YOUR TIME IS SPENT WORKING IN PRINT

PRINT

81%

65%

16% LESS

PACKAGE | POP | SIGNS

TV | FILM | VIDEO

P

68%

31%

WHAT KINDS OF PRINT PROJECTS HAVE YOU WORKED ON THE PAST YEAR?

18%

MORE

(IN ORDER)

BROCHURES/COLLATERAL

H

SAME

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, RECOMMEND PRINTING?

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, RECOMMEND MORE OR LESS PAPER THAN IN PAST YEARS?

INVITATIONS + CARDS PRINTING IN GENERAL

18%

DIGITAL PRINTING

LETTERHEAD + BUSINESS CARDS

57%

POSTERS

87%

87%

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, RECOMMEND PAPERS AND SUBSTRATES?

DIGITAL PAPERS

DIRECT MAIL/POSTCARDS

LESS

PRINT ADVERTISING POP/SIGNS

SAME

18% MORE

SALES PROMOTION ANNUAL + CORPORATE REPORTS

PAPERS IN GENERAL

MAGAZINES + NEWSPAPERS

82%

25%

71%

CATALOGS

68%

BOOKS SELF-PROMOTION CALENDARS 64 G D USA

OF YOUR PROJECTS INVOLVE PRINT


June 2018 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:38 AM Page 65

PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS PRINT’S PLACE IN YOUR PROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL LIFE

Print is still important but size and number of pages are greatly reduced for optimal client approval. They want the meat and not a whole lot of filler.

Print still has an important place in my professional work. Many of my clients are real estate development based. Having printed items referencing the project feel and look is just as important (or more so) than the online presence of the brand. Their market needs to be able to take away printed items for both practical and fantasy reasons. I find the tactile nature of the materials used is often so important in relating to the feel of the home before the client ever is able to see or move into their finished house. DONNA HUFF, GRAPHIC DESIGNER, SOLVE

We are old school. We love offset printing and specialty processes and we look to do them as often as possible, but it is a digital world. These days all of our work is integrated. A concept has to work across all channels, print and digital. Rather than working for one medium or the other, the necessity is to work with the client toward appropriate channels. Audiences of any age, gender, race or region appreciate physical material. The tactile nature offers some kind of personal connection that can't be achieved through digital, potentially offering a larger impact. Business Cards, letterhead, forms, brochures, posters, punch cards are all better in print.

I personally love print. The quality of paper and the feel of it in your hands really elevates the work, and that's something you

Print continues to have an important place in graphic design and

can't get from digital.

communications. Employing the sense of touch is integral to the overall visual experience. Catalogs, brochures and collateral in

Many people still want to see and feel a well-designed print piece.

general are still in very high demand. A great looking invitation or

It seems to signify that the 'product' has permanence and isn’t

stationery with die-cuts and embossment cannot be achieved in

as fleeting as online or digital pieces. Non-profits, educational

digital format.

organizations, and think tanks can use print to their advantage. Print is even more special in our predominantly digital age. The As far as what I see, print absolutely still has an important place

extra impact is valuable, but can be difficult to justify against

in professional design work today. Touch and permanence may be

cost, particularly for nonprofits and small businesses.

even more meaningful now, but the touch needs to really stand out to compete with digital media. Soft touch, motion coating, reticu-

Print is very important. Packaging is a huge part of our customer

lation, spot gloss, felt stock: talk to your printer about what stocks/

experience; and sales sheets and brochures help our sales teams

techniques/finishes they offer that can set your print piece apart.

interact with distributors, channels sales and end users.

I have a private-school client that went to a digital-only version of

I am primarily a print designer. The tangible object of a book and

their weekly, informative parent newsletter. It goes out via email

the physical qualities of the cover/jacket are still very relevant to

and is posted on the website. We found that the parents are now

the felt value of the object by the user, perhaps even more so than

less informed because they either don't read the newsletter anymore,

5 or 10 years ago – permanent, physical realness in the age of vir-

or they don't retain the information. When it was in print, the

tual and invisible realities. Books, in the way they are conceived

parents would hold onto the newsletter and refer to it regularly.

and written today, are still better and more widely consumed as

Parents are missing important dates and information and we are

printed matter.

considering going back to a print version.

Print works very well for all of my clients. I'm even currently work-

In-store POP is still very important. We still use print at trade

ing on a print project for a mobile app client, so even the tech

shows but also share it digitally with customers.

guys need print!

The demographic for my business is much older so print is still

Print is useful for architecture, art, cultural organizations,

the main vehicle of communication.

nonprofits, education, editorial, the list goes on and on.

Print still has a place in our work, however more clients are

My clients attend a lot of trade shows. Our team designs the

concerned about cost and less concerned about touch, feel,

graphics for the booths and all the collaterals too. A quality piece

special processes.

elevates the brand and is a useful tool for our sales team.

Digital communication is great for something quick, but it will never

Print is still very important for our company. Clients seem to want

be able to take the place of printed work and it's staying power.

more customized packaging and collateral than in the past. G D USA 65


June 2018 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:38 AM Page 66

PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS PRINT’S PLACE IN YOUR PROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL LIFE CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE As digital as this world is, from living on your mobile to using

As a member of an inhouse design team at a publishing company, I would say print is as robust as ever. We are publishing dozens of new books each season and the demand for printed books, largely due to their tactile, traditional qualities, is as high as ever. Nothing compares to holding a printed book in your hands, smelling the fresh ink and bending the binding for the first time.

online ordering and paying with digital money, people still want something physical to hold and touch to feel the worth. Print maintains an important place in my work today and its strength is the tactile sensation along with easier viewing. Print works best with most types of collateral and announcements/invitations. Packaging is a large part of our work - touch and feel is a key

BRIANNA DOMBO DESIGNER, AVE MARIA PRESS

component and huge indicator of quality, concept and competitive edge for our work & clients. The touch and feel of paper is very impactful in a digital era.

It's a zoo out there. You can navigate and flip from one ad to another in a matter of seconds, and just as quickly forget all you saw or read.

Print is still meaningful, especially for events and campaigns on

ZOHRAB DONABEDIAN CREATIVE DIRECTOR, THE DESIGNERS

be considered with print and are very much a part of the solution.

the road and where we need to leave behind information or promotion with CTAs. Touch and permanence are details that should always

My clients like to have and receive tangible materials for promotion. I find print works best for annual reports and print materials. Having something to hold in your hand is still useful today. I work for a B2B company who is a master re-distributor and our product catalog is a highly sought after piece. I still have a real fondness for print because that’s how I started my career, and I still think its strength is its permanence, but I'm not sure the rest of the world agrees. It works best for clients that want

Print still plays and always has played an important part in my job, especially for our History publications. Ironically, I just met with my Paper Rep yesterday and we were discussing how important print is, more than ever. The tactile feel and versatility of paper can make or break a project. We all still cherish that favorite book, or collect beautifully printed packaging

to be more inclusive and support their online and social presence.

or business cards. These things have lasting impact and are

Print will be around for many years to come. I've had clients who

doesn’t have that kind of clout or permanence. And as for projects,

tried to take their magazines completely online and it did not work out. Theses clients received complaints from members who

physically there to experience time and again. Digital work just I’d say without a doubt, print is great for packaging, business cards (there’s a sort of ritual there), and well-done publications –

WANTED a printed piece, not a digital copy.

especially cookbooks. I don’t even look at my kindle cookbooks

Digital advertising is becoming oversaturated and producing

photographed and printed cookbook? Priceless.

shareable content is expensive. Our annual meeting is huge and though we have an app and a website, a print program is extremely necessary as are printed

and, mostly, forget they are there. But a greatly composed,

I am an in-plant printer and we print more now than ever. No matter what, someone needs to open their mailbox and physi-

signage and menu cards, etc.

cally touch a piece of direct mail That is time that they are hold-

Print is of 100% importance in my every day job, but I'm not

is to walk it to the recycle bin. With social media there is an easy

sure that touch actually plays a large role as much as it used to. Now it is more about the message conveyed and what's in it for the consumer.

66 G D USA

ing the piece and time they could be reading the piece even if it swipe to delete or block.


June 2018 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:38 AM Page 67

PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS PRINT, PERMANENCE AND CREDIBILITY In a way, print seems to have more credibility than digital because

Print communications will always have more credibility because

it takes a commitment to produce and read, there's sense of

of the fact more work is required of it, as well as investment.

permanence. Digital is fleeting and becomes easy to forget.

Digital, while effective at times, tends to be antiseptic with a feeling

Digital content can be edited, updated and changed at the click of a mouse or tap of a finger. Printed material offers some authenticity and intent, now more than ever, since the information is more of a commitment.

of being too immediate. Print always requires the recipient to take in a whole experience centered around most of the five senses and creates a greater connection to the viewed communication. Print is still more of a commitment because once it is done, it cannot be changed, but the distinction between print and digital

Print just feels more substantial and there is a sense that someone or something real is standing behind it.

is fading in the eyes of the consumer. Now it is all just information. I agree that print is better at building trust and relationships between company and consumer. However, I also believe that credibility depends more generally on the quality of the design of marketing materials and of the organization that stands behind them. At a quick glance, printed media engenders more trust

There is a credibility gap between print and digital media for one primary reason: the consumer knows that today almost anyone can create a professional looking web presence without a large investment. However, when you’re talking print, readers either know or can sense that if something has been well designed and printed (especially on high end papers), then that means the company must have solidity. Printed materials inherently exude credibility. With a deliberately targeted pertinent message, print and digital communications can carry the same weight of legitimacy and trustworthiness. Using both well is the key for saturation and cohesion. I feel print gets more notice than the never-ending flow of junk to my email inbox.

than digital, but there are other factors to be considered. Because of ephemerality and easy access to production tools for digital graphics, print feels more special. But, if poorly executed, blunders in print are far more difficult to undo both in cost and visibility. Print is an important foundation for nearly any brand. Historically print is recognized as a commitment to the brand, inherently valuable and respected. Until history changes that, print will remain the credible choice. I totally agree that print is a vital part of design because it puts my clients literally in their customers' hands. To me, a company is much more credible when I have their business collateral in hand – it truly and in a tactile way, connects me to the company.

I agree that print is better at building trust and relationship between

I am getting tired of online mediums because it all ends up looking

company and consumer. However, I also believe that credibility

the same — print has more character and presence.

depends more generally on the quality of the design of marketing materials and of the organization that stands behind them. At a quick glance, printed media engenders more trust than digital, but there are other factors to be considered. So much of what is digital or online has become undermined in recent years. People realize that you can just throw anything together digitally. Whereas print represents an investment in both time and money that makes people trust it more. In my experience, if you're spending the money to print communications, there's a distinct reasoning for it, giving the messaging a feeling of importance.

Traditional media is seen as more credible than digital media overall, but there is no doubt that traditional media must be partnered with digital media to effectively communicate, especially across age groups; younger age groups are immersed in digital communication. On the issue of trust and credibility in print, I think it is still the most reliable medium. Its longevity is unmatched and people still like to handle and feel neat things. Interesting papers aren’t used as much anymore because of turnaround time and cost, but if you can create something using them, even the CEO will show it to his friends. Nevertheless, we still need to adopt more technol-

Not sure if print has more credibility than any other form of

ogy in marketing. You can grab people with a cool printed piece

communication but I do think in the era of 'fake news' there is

that will be passed around, but if you want your target to respond

an inherent reality to committing your branding message to

quickly, electronic is the way to go.

something you can hold on to for longer than a few seconds.

Good print takes more time, thus more devotion, so I think there is more trust in a well-done printed piece. G D USA 67


June 2018 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 6/4/18 11:39 AM Page 68

PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS PRINT, PERMANENCE AND CREDIBILITY CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE I believe print is more trusted because it can’t be

The notion that print is more credible is a generational perception and is changing fast. A new generation of leaders will figure out how to establish trust using new media.

removed/deleted after it has been delivered. I don’t think print is more trustworthy than digital, but it is producing positive results when integrated with digital. I believe that printed materials have a deeper connection to us

JUAN CAROLS LOPEZ NEMA ASSOCIATES INC, NEWARK NJ

as humans and resonate in our brains much faster than digital. It's important to make them meaningful and sustainable when at all possible.

I don't think print pieces are necessarily more trustworthy. I

I guess there is some additional credibility that comes along

think it depends on the design and method of delivery for the

with print. In this world of digital where 'fake news' seems to

web piece.

be a trend, I can see how print might be taken a bit more seriously. The permanence of it lends itself to that more easily.

Our real estate and financial clients still require print for reasons of trust and confidence, but they are moving toward digital

If someone goes to the expense of printing over shooting off an

distribution such as PDFs and apps.

email (which can be costly too, but people do not associate it with great cost) the recipient generally feels value as well as

Print definitely has more credibility ... who can trust anything

legitimacy and trustworthiness.

online these days? I think printed material still has the edge over digital printing. I believe digital has just as much credibility as print now. Both

People still like to feel, smell and hold printed material. I guess

mediums tell truth and lies.

this would be especially true of baby boomers.

Our sales team has better responses on larger projects when

For the seasoned marketing professional there is nothing that

they give a potential customer a leave behind, coupled with a

can truly replace the feel and experience of handling a printed

presentation.

material.

Well-designed printed communications are less frequent, so

All age groups have a certain innate mistrust of digital — either

they become less noise-like and are seen more.

due to lack of familiarity, to stories of identity theft and phishing,

I think print pieces are more memorable. Print stays in the hands of customers longer. There is a difference in the user interaction; I just don't think it is as subjectively linked to trust or legitimacy.

or even to their techno-savvy allowing them to understand just how changeable and dangerous the digital world can be. A lot of this is perception, but perception often becomes reality. Until this changes, print will be more credible. I think the trouble with online media, specifically the advertising,

This depends on the communication being presented, but print

is that it is more invasive to users in the online space, creating

has a longer shelf life than digital communication.

a block between user and content. Print is more stable, passive

Print is seen as more trustworthy but with the time and cost elements involved it is increasingly less pursued.

and respectful about letting the user decide where to put his or her attention, and this behavior has built up over generations. Print is effective at building confidence and relationships,

Print has credibility and trustworthiness as it has the precise information that clients want. No searching website links.

especially for more expensive purchases such as cars. Trust and credibility are not necessarily preferred in print form.

I appreciate a good quality printed piece; it shows legit

Trust and credibility come with quality of work. I always check

business status.

a firm's background on the web whether I initially am contacted

I think printed communications at least SEEM more trustworthy than a lot of what is found on the Internet because, often, we are not sure of the true source of information online.

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via print or web.


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THE RISE OF FACEBOOK AND GOOGLE AS ADVERTISING VEHICLES Get on the bandwagon’ is today’s mantra. You read it everyday.

I honestly think that advertising, as we know it should end. A study, as reported by Eric Qualman, states that social media through social influencers and peer-to-peer interaction influences 93% of buying decisions. In other words, people share what they like on social media. That is what ultimately sways people’s

But I need to see research that proves that it actually works.

buying decisions.

This is a truly disturbing trend. The dominance of these

We use social media to keep our students informed – its more

monopolies is warping public understanding and behavior.

successful than print

They need more government controls and media needs to start exposing their worst abuses. Facebook is an unfortunate platform. It is discouraging that so many people do not understand the way their personal information is being gobbled up and used for targeted marketing. Since I personally spend time looking at other media and media outlets, I do value those options over Facebook due to their content and

I work for a company that sells business to business; Facebook isn't so good for that but Google is certainly huge. As humans, we must do everything in our power to stop them. I get annoyed at ads in my feed, but sometimes I bite because somehow they know exactly what I'm looking for.

integrity. However, due to the reach and targeted nature of

I think Facebook and other digital outlets are certainly getting

Facebook, I cannot deny its value to advertisers.

more scrutiny after some of the fake news and other issues that have come out recently. We will see how that affects things.

DONNA HUFF, GRAPHIC DESIGNER, SOLVE Targeted advertising has moved to the extreme level. I feel this tactic excludes customers who don't yet know about your product.

The oversaturation of these platforms leads to a natural numbness and blocking out of the ads.

My experience with both Facebook and Google indicate a monetized benefit for brands that would support their other marketing efforts. I don't think either is the 'silver bullet', but do introduce the brand to the un-initiated and continue the conversation with

It's a joke. Yes, people spend time on these sites but they are

the loyalists.

really not in a buying frame of mind. My experience is that

I personally ignore any and all ads on Facebook. I will not buy

taking ads or boosting posts is largely a waste of money. The

from a company using Facebook for advertising because I don’t

promise is cheap and easy targeting of media; the delivery

trust that it’s a real company and not a scam.

is thin gruel.

FB and Google have too much of a stronghold on the ad market

The digital reach is deep, but what tangible elements arrive at

and start filtering the same campaigns over and over again.

the other end of the experience for consumers? Packaging, hang

Without other outlets to provide diverse perspectives, it becomes

tags, business cards, etc. Great brands connect digital and print

homogenous and dilutes campaigns rendering them ineffective.

so the consumer experience is seamless, interesting and delightful. Fake news, spam, clickbait, data misuse, ugh! Facebook and Google are just another way to get the word out. Traditional forms of advertising and marketing are just as viable in today's market. The shift is toward digital. This does not surprise me. And the price is right! While digital communication and advertising may be a quicker way to get the word out, it is also forgotten just as quickly. There will always be an edge for digital over print. The efficiency of readily available content is unbeatable. However, digital advertising will never be able to fully take the place of print. There will always be some percentage in the ad market for both.

This is definitely problematic, since they use algorithms that are not transparent to create hierarchies of importance. On the other hand, they dominate because of size and there are still many other outlets. Given recent events, I would argue that both have lost trust with users. We need more transparency of how user info is shared or not. Clearer (less legal) policies need to be written for consumers. It's true that most other media is being ignored, which is a shame. I love designing ads. The added Google Posts are a plus for smaller businesses. Unfortunately they have affected people in the wrong way because of an unprotected platform. There’s a lot of false advertising. This is an opportunity to elevate print beyond advertising. G D USA 69


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EDUCATORS

TO WATCH 70 G D U SA


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LAST YEAR, AS A COMPLEMENT TO OUR PERENNIAL AND POPULAR SPECIAL REPORTS — “PEOPLE TO WATCH” (INFLUENTIAL PROFESSIONAL CREATIVES) AND “STUDENTS TO WATCH” (RISING GRADUATES OF NOTE) — WE ADDED AN ANNUAL “EDUCATORS TO WATCH” FEATURE TO OUR MIX.

| THE REASON | Design education and educators have more influence than ever on the fast-changing shape of design, media and culture. This is certainly true of the 2018 group, who run the gamut from legends to relative newcomers, from full-timers to adjuncts, from teachers to administrators, and from those who planned a teaching career and those who found it by serendipity.

| THE COMMON THREAD |

These are people who are making a difference to their students, schools and community.

t

NIKKI JUEN

VERMONT COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS Nikki Juen is an artist, designer, and educator interested in the spaces where these practices overlap. She is Co-Chair of the MFA in Graphic Design at Vermont College of Fine Arts and an instructor in the Division of Experimental and Foundation Studies at Rhode Island School of Design. In Juen’s design studio Happymatter she partners with individuals and cultural institutions to develop an attentive and holistic understanding of their intention, function, and efficacy. Juen recently spoke in Chicago on International Women’s Day as part of the American Institute of Graphic Arts initiative, Women in Design: Leading with Intent and Integrity. Juen’s collective, Public Displays of Affection (PDA) is a collective of artists, designers, educators, and organizers that engage in nonviolent direct art action. Their actions start with hope and aim to build communities that thrive on intersecting relationships. To resist misogyny, sexism, and exclusion they practice rematriation and believe interconnectivity is essential in honoring the earth and all living beings.

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER? Teaching is a lineage and by entering into larger conversations about art, design, history, culture, humanity, and education I have encountered mentors who have changed my life in blinding instances. Luckily, I listened long enough to catch on. My teachers and mentors, who all taught from a perspective of love[s] are: Elise Curry, Malcolm Grear, Jan Baker, Matthew Monk, Dr. William K. Mahony, Dr. Marie Shurkus, and the entire faculty of the MFA in Graphic Design at VCFA remind me regularly that teaching is centered in listening and that all designers are educators and educating in one way or another. HOW DO YOU BALANCE THE TEACHING OF FUNDAMENTALS WITH THE NEED TO RESPOND TO A FAST-CHANGING WORLD OF MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE? I recognize that balance is equivalent to change and remember that the most important tool in the equation is the human body. Wellness and community building are essential tools in resistance to fast-changing worlds. To teach from this perspective is to open space to student-centric learning, respect of differences, and to value and encourage personal agency.

PDA collective stands in solidarity with a chorus of voices from all socio-economic, geographic, religious, and ethnic backgrounds, including indigenous communities, people of color, people with disabilities, and LGBTQ+ communities.

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2018 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH TANYA BHANDHARI

CHERYL HELLER

MFA DESIGN FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS (SVA) Cheryl Heller is the Founding Chair of the MFA Design for Social Innovation at the School of Visual Arts. Since its launch in 2014, DSI at SVA has attracted students from twenty-eight countries and graduated over one hundred alums now working as change leaders in industry, government and the social sector. Cheryl is

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER? Richard Wilde, Chair of Design at SVA, talked me into teaching by inviting me to create a class on something I thought was missing. I was bothered by the fact that design education teaches tools and self-expression, but never what impact designers’ work can – and does – have on the world. I have become deeply passionate about rectifying that. Our graduates are now out in the world leading change in industry, government and the social sector. That is the measure of success.

also the founder of the design consultancy CommonWise and the Measured Lab, created in 2017 to investigate the impact of social design on human health. She is a recipient of the prestigious AIGA Medal for her contribution to design, and was recently awarded a coveted Rockefeller Bellagio Fellowship. Her book, The Intergalactic Design Guide: Harnessing the Creative Potential of Social Design, will be published by Island Press in September 2018. She is the former Board Chair of PopTech, and a Senior Fellow at the Babson Social Innovation Lab. She created the Ideas that Matter program for Sappi in 1999, which has since given over $14 million to designers working for the public good, and partnered with Paul Polak and the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum to create the exhibit, “Design for the Other 90%.” She is currently a Ph.D candidate at RMIT in Melbourne. 72 G D U SA

HOW DO YOU, BALANCE THE TEACHING OF FUNDAMENTALS VERSUS THE NEED TO RESPOND A FAST-CHANGING WORLD OF MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE? At DSI, we define Social Design as the creation of new social conditions – in cities, corporate cultures or communities – that result in increased creativity, equity, social justice, resilience, and a healthy connection to nature. This requires systems design, interaction design, entrepreneurial and leadership skills, as well as mastery of every aspect of the design process. The principles, skills and process of social design apply to any situation involving human beings, which is everywhere. This is why our graduates are prepared to be creative leaders wherever they work.


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HANNAH MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY

FRANK BASEMAN KANBAR COLLEGE OF DESIGN, ENGINEERING & COMMERCE | JEFFERSON Frank Baseman is the Director of, and Professor in, the Graphic Design Communication program at Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University), where he has taught since 1998. In 2007, he was awarded Philadelphia University’s Innovation in Teaching Award. Work produced by his students has been recognized by the Adobe Design Achievement Awards, AIGA, Graphis New Talent Design Annual, UCDA among others. Frank is also the Creative Director and Principal of Baseman Design Associates, an award-winning interdisciplinary graphic design firm providing strategic design thinking through visual communication solutions to businesses, corporations and institutions. In 2013, Frank was named one of the “Most Influential Graphic Designers Working Today” by GDUSA Magazine. And in 2008 he was awarded the AIGA Fellow Award from AIGA Philadelphia. He has served on the National Board of Directors of AIGA and as Founding Chair of the AIGA Design Education Community. Frank is also a printer, serving as proprietor of the respected letterpress studio Base Press.

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER? From the outset, I never planned to go to grad school — but then I did (long story). After that, I went out and worked some; and taught some; but I felt that I really needed more work experience before I fully belonged in the classroom. So, after several wonderful work experiences I found myself at a crossroads of sorts, and I embraced a full-time teaching gig. More than twenty years later, I’m still somehow juggling full-time teaching, my studio work and now my letterpress work. It’s crazy, but it’s all good as I thoroughly enjoy each aspect. HOW DO YOU BALANCE THE TEACHING OF FUNDAMENTALS VERSUS THE NEED TO RESPOND TO A FAST-CHANGING WORLD OF MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE? Things are changing so fast that some days it is hard to keep up with it all. After many years of teaching, I find that I do tend to focus on the fundamental process(es) of how to approach the work; break down the problem; conduct thorough information gathering and research; embrace the many, varied possible solutions vying for something that is above all else — appropriate to the subject matter — and somehow special. As I believe that it is this solid foundational work process that I hope and trust students will carry with them throughout their careers as media, technology, and culture etc. keeps changing. Perhaps their approach to the work will stay consistent and carry them forward in their careers.

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2018 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

JESSICA BARRY SCHOOL OF ADVERTISING ART (SAA) Jessica Barry is a 1997 graduate of the School of Advertising Art (SAA), holds a BA in management from Antioch University Midwest, and has been recognized as an award-winning educator and creative director. Jessica has served as President of SAA since 2007, overseeing all operations of the college and, in 2013, she purchased the assets of the college and is the sole owner. On July 20, SAA will be become The Modern College of Design.) With over twenty years’ experience as a graphic designer, art director, and creative director, Barry is uniquely suited to make informed decisions regarding program development, curriculum, faculty, equipment, and learning resources. Her work has been honored by AIGA, GDUSA, the Columbus Society of Communicating Arts, Art Center Dayton, and the Admissions Marketing Report. In addition, she is an active member and leader of many local and national organizations. Most notably, she served as a primary negotiator on the 2017–18 U.S. Department of Education’s gainful employment negotiated rule-making committee, and she co-chaired a 2016–17 Career Education Colleges and Universities committee to draft recommendations for the Reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. 74 G D U SA

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER? After working in the design industry, I returned to an SAA portfolio show and was elated to witness the students’ work. It went beyond the quality of the students’ portfolio pieces: it was their dedication to building a future doing what they love. I decided then that I wanted to be involved in education as their advocate and promote how students can utilize their artistic talents and have a successful career. Every time I connect with our graduates and they speak passionately about their lives, and their strong careers in the design field, I know we are making a difference. HOW DO YOU BALANCE THE TEACHING OF FUNDAMENTALS VERSUS THE NEED TO RESPOND TO A FAST-CHANGING WORLD OF MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE? The pace of technological progress will continue to increase exponentially over time. What will not change is the importance of being a problem solver. To be successful in their futures, students must learn how to view these changes as problems to solve. At SAA, students learn to evaluate new technologies and choose how those technologies can become part of their solutions. Strong problemsolving skills are the foundation for success in 2018 and beyond.


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THOMAS MCNULTY ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSITY Thomas McNulty has served as a brand and package design consultant for over 30 years in United States and in Europe, and has been teaching at Academy of Art University in San Francisco since 1991. He has worked with various industry powerhouses over the course of his career, including renowned designer Robert Miles Runyan, Enterprise IG, CF NAPA, and Dublin-based marketing agency Neworld Associates. He has successfully managed

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER? Education has always been an integral part of my life and career as a designer. I was invited to teach evening classes at Academy of Art in San Francisco 27 years ago, and now I serve as a full-time professor and Associate Director for the School of Graphic Design. What I appreciate most as an educator is you never stop learning because you engage with students every day, seeking to find answers to complex problems. I get to teach design and also foster passionate and eager students, and help them fulfill their dreams of becoming a successful designer.

and directed many multinational brand and packaging programs for Apple, Anheuser Busch, Anomaly Vineyards, Coca-Cola, Mrs. Fields, Oracle, The Hershey Company, Logitech, Charles Krug Winery, Lynch Vineyards, Safeway Stores, and Trinchero Family Estates. Thomas has also won numerous awards and recognition for design excellence, and has been published in American Corporate Identity, Communication Arts, GDUSA, Graphis, Graphic Design Showcase Publication, International Packaging, PRINT, How Magazine, CMYK, and Graphic Design Business Association. He is co-founder and vice president of Profile Design, which is feathered as a leading graphic design agency in the San Francisco area.

HOW DO YOU BALANCE THE TEACHING OF FUNDAMENTALS VERSUS THE NEED TO RESPOND A FAST-CHANGING WORLD OF MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE? We live in a time where technology and media have changed the way we communicate with one another and how we problem-solve design. As an educator, I find that young designers are eager to find their answers too quickly through the internet or simply forget to take the time to observe what is around them. I find this especially true for package designers working in 3D form and product design. I encourage my students to think outside the box as designers and storytellers. Taking a moment to look around, you might be surprised what you can learn.

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2018 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

DERMOT MAC CORMACK TYLER SCHOOL OF DESIGN Dermot Mac Cormack is an educator, designer, and writer, living in Philadelphia. After graduating from The National College of Art & Design in Ireland, he worked at Kilkenny Design Workshops before working in various design studios in Dublin. In the mid1980’s he moved to Philadelphia where he was hired as a designer and art director for firms such as Design Resource, SmithKline

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER? A good friend of mine told me of an opportunity to teach part-time at Tyler School of Art. Teaching is probably in my blood (my father taught high school for 42 years) and I think I always had it in my subconscious that one day I would teach so I jumped at the chance. Later, when a full-time position opened up I decided to change course, and I’ve been teaching at Tyler ever since. So, in a way, I sort of stumbled into it, but from day one it has always felt like this was the most natural thing in the world for me to be doing with my life.

Beckman, and Marcolina Design before becoming a professor at Tyler School of Design in 1997, and forming his own small multidisciplinary design firm, 21xdesign. He is currently the chair of the Graphic Arts & Design Department at Tyler, where he works with a diverse faculty and student body. His passion for design and education has always been driven by the desire to learn from and inspire the next generation of designers. He has also taught in Temple University’s international locations in Rome and Tokyo. His design firm, where he is a partner along with his wife Patricia McElroy, has earned numerous awards and his work has been published and shown widely.

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HOW DO YOU BALANCE THE TEACHING OF FUNDAMENTALS VERSUS THE NEED TO RESPOND A FAST-CHANGING WORLD OF MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY, AND CULTURE? It’s definitely a difficult dance to hold that balance but I think that working alongside my students every day is a constant source of inspiration and learning. While the exponential pace of technological change can be daunting at times, it can be liberating too. I am constantly amazed at the caliber of work our students create and it just keeps improving and expanding each year. Another method I use to keep centered is to try and see the overview picture, and learn to love learning as a never-ending, always evolving process without predetermined outcomes. It’s a philosophy I hopefully impart to my students too.


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ANTHONY WOOD SHILLINGTON EDUCATION Anthony Wood is Global Managing Director of Shillington Education, a fast-paced, immersive design school with campuses in New York, London, Manchester, Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane. He is an award-winning designer and educator — originally from Sydney, via London and currently based in New York — who loves design for its ability to change perceptions, solve visual problems and inject more beauty into our world. Anthony received an Honours Degree in Design from the University of Technology Sydney. He has worked as a senior designer at leading ad agencies from Havas Worldwide to Ogilvy & Mather. In his spare time, Anthony takes on pro-bono passion projects, such as the Sydney Mardi Gras Film Festival or designing for startups and artists. HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER? Teaching is seriously the most satisfying job I've ever had. Back when I was working at ad agencies, I loved designing in teams and mentoring young designers. Working in education wasn't really on my radar, but Shillington piqued my interest because of its innovative curriculum and approach. It was so different from my traditional University

experience, where I learned to master my craft, but graduated feeling unequipped to deal with real-world clients and was forced to learn quickly on the job. After I got past Shillington's shockingly fast-paced format, I realized it covered a lot of gaps in typical design education. I'm proud that our students are prepared to be productive, efficient designers. It’s incredibly rewarding to see students transform their lives in such a short period of time. HOW DO YOU BALANCE THE TEACHING OF FUNDAMENTALS VERSUS THE NEED TO RESPOND TO THE FAST-CHANGING WORLD OF MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE? As educators, it's vital to remember that regardless of our crazy, fast-changing world — design is unquestionably rooted in problemsolving. And it always will be. Even as new apps, tools and software updates are being released faster than RuPaul changes outfits. By applying keen research skills, design thinking and always relying on the fundamentals, students will be able to create clever solutions for any media or technology. At the end of the day, we need to teach designers who are adaptable and inspired by change and challenges. At Shillington, we know both students and teachers are always learning. We aren’t precious or elitist. Our curriculum is developed by a small, agile team of practising designers and it's constantly evolving with one mission in mind - teaching relevant industry skills to give our graduates the best possible chance of employment.

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2018 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

CAROLE MAUGE-LEWIS COLLEGE OF THE ARTS KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY

Carole Maugé-Lewis, tenured professor in the College of the Arts at Kennesaw State University, boasts an impressive record of teaching excellence. For the past 23 years she has been the driving force in developing the Graphic Communication concentration in the School of Art and Design at Kennesaw State University. An award-winning designer, she has been recognized for several print publication designs, namely the Aegis, Cindy, Telly and AiMe Awards; presented at several major conferences; and has twice received the Distinguished Teaching Award in the College of the Arts at KSU. Under her tutelage, the students’ accomplishments have been significant and they have won awards at local, national and international levels, including several from GDUSA and most recently from the 48 Hour Re-Pack competition. Maugé-Lewis’ sustained quest is for excellence in teaching and student learning, backed by her teaching philosophy of building a strong foundation in graphic design fundamentals, problemsolving and design-thinking. She aims to motivate and empower students to meet the demands of the ever-changing technological and diverse world, and to ultimately find rewarding careers. Maugé-Lewis is well-respected by her students and peers and is known for her direct, no-nonsense stance in the classroom. She sets a high bar.

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HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER? My career as an educator took root during my undergraduate years. With excellent professors and rigorous work, students participated in and grew from the constructive demise of their work, during brutal class critiques. Within this environment we thrived, produced our best works, and realized that it was not how good one was, but how good one can become. I held both Undergraduate and Graduate Teaching Assistantships, and after receiving my MFA, that of Assistant Professor. For five years I shared my knowledge and fell in love with teaching as I developed young minds for the future. My design career as an educator had begun. HOW DO YOU BALANCE THE TEACHING OF FUNDAMENTALS VERSUS THE NEED TO RESPOND TO OUR FAST-CHANGING WORLD OF MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE? The challenge for professors is in first building a strong foundation of graphic design fundamentals, problem-solving and design-thinking skills that rise above mediocrity. Along with technology skills, students also need to develop excellent research, oral and written skills, that help to empower them to function fearlessly in our ever-changing media-driven, technology world and its diverse culture. As future leaders, imagemakers and messengers for local, national and international issues, we should provide students with the tools necessary to move beyond individual client relationships, to define and address social issues that test their design thinking and creativity; and make a difference.


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ROBERT FINKEL AUBURN UNIVERSITY Robert Finkel was born and raised in Birmingham AL He attended Rhodes College in Memphis TN where he received a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology and Sociology concentrating in cultural anthropology and sociological theory. He is a graduate of the Portfolio Center and in 2011 received a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Florida. He has interned at Pentagram under Michael Bierut and was a designer at Slaughter Group in Birmingham where he specialized in corporate identity and branding,

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER? I think the desire to teach has always been just below the surface of my design practice. After focusing on a professional design career I felt like I had reached a point where the projects I was doing didn’t satisfy my personal interests. My wife encouraged me to pursue an MFA and explore shifting into design education. It was the right call. Teaching has helped me clarify my own design process and to be more intentional and reflective in the projects I pursue. Everyday I’m around curious and enthusiastic designers — both students and colleagues. The reciprocal nature of the student-teacher relationship is motivating and inspirational.

and custom letterpress printing and design. Currently, Robert is an Associate Professor of Graphic Design at Auburn University teaching courses in Graphic Design History, Corporate Identity Design, Letterpress Printing, and Design for Social Good. He maintains an active design practice and continues to pursue commissions and self-initiated projects.

HOW DO YOU BALANCE THE TEACHING OF FUNDAMENTALS VERSUS THE NEED TO RESPOND A FAST-CHANGING WORLD OF MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE? Mastery of design fundamentals should be evident in all aspects of design regardless of the medium. They are our shared language in the studio. Today, digital craft is just as important as traditional notions of craft. Students must be proficient in both. However, I believe that expanding the notion of “fundamentals” to include core competencies in the humanities is just as important to designers. These are the common histories, values, and conventions of society. Our work as designers is influenced by culture and shapes culture. It’s a powerful responsibility that require skills beyond just the studio.

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2018 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

SHUSHI YOSHINAGA ANTOINETTE WESTPHAL COLLEGE OF MEDIA, ARTS & DESIGN | DREXEL UNIVERSITY A native of Hirosaki, Japan, Shushi studied Graphic Design at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and the Allgemeine Gewerbeschule in Basel. Her ongoing design research projects — visual translation of cultural ideas — focuses on gesture, form, and type compositions and is based on baroque liturgical music. Twenty-seven series are housed in the permanent collection of the Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts’s museum in China. Shushi has lectured in London, China, and Japan, and given radio and TV interviews in Japan and Argentina. She has also exhibited her works, presented papers and published in the US, Japan, China, Italy and Argentina. An avid advocate of international opportunities for students, Shushi created a cultural exchange program with Tamagawa University in 2013, which she has led every year. This multidisciplinary intensive course in Japan is the first Study Abroad program at Drexel to have a reciprocal relationship. Shushi also organizes a mentorship program for the Charter High School for Architecture and Design (CHAD) in Philadelphia, where Drexel students work with CHAD seniors to design their yearbook. After 80 G D U SA

five successful collaborations, the program became an official class at CHAD. HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER? Vezelay, France, changed my life! One summer, a couple of decades ago, a group of us, alumni of the Basel School of Design and the UArts, met in this UNESCO World Heritage Site for a two-week drawing camp, with Dorothea Hofmann and Bill Longhauser. Drawing and painting the gorgeous Burgundian rolling hills, the Romanesque abbey church and capitals, and engrossed by village architecture (coupled with great regional cuisine and wines…), was quite inspirational! Not long after, I left my internet corporate job and never looked back. HOW DO YOU BALANCE THE TEACHING OF FUNDAMENTALS VERSUS THE NEED TO RESPOND TO A FAST-CHANGING WORLD OF MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE? While in Basel, though a frustrated student at times, I enjoyed drawing letterforms in André Gürtler’s class and eventually managed setting type by hand in Wolfgang Weingart’s Typography class. Today, I teach my students that while technologies come and go, our knowledge of design foundation remains highly adaptable and timeless. Reintroducing humanity in what we do is a much-needed oasis in our world…


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JAY ADAMS

ROBERTSON SCHOOL OF MEDIA AND CULTURE VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY Jay Adams is an Assistant Professor in advertising at the Robertson School of Media and Culture at VCU. He currently teaches portfolio and campaigns courses with heavy emphasis on design and art direction and has led student teams to win numerous AAF ADDY awards on the local, regional and national levels. He holds a B.S. from Virginia Tech and an M.S. from the VCU Brandcenter where

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER? A student once asked why I became a professor instead of remaining in the advertising industry. Without hesitation I responded that teaching has been far more rewarding than anything I’ve accomplished elsewhere. My teaching style is not about demonstrating the knowledge of the instructor but about guiding students through a creative landscape, encouraging them to push the boundaries while providing support and resources along the way. The most successful work is often the result of a previous failure. And that’s ok, because it’s the nature of the advertising industry.

he graduated at the top of his class. Before becoming an educator, Jay spent 17 years working in the advertising industry as an art director, copywriter, graphic and web designer, and creative director. This connection to the industry enables him to continue working in the form of professional scholarship. His work has been recognized by numerous award programs and organizations. Staying active in the profession keeps Jay relevant and allows him to learn by doing, a philosophy that carries over into the classroom. His professionally-focused teaching method engages students in real-world projects, allowing them to work on regional and national clients such as Anthem, Capital One, Virginia

HOW DO YOU BALANCE THE TEACHING OF FUNDAMENTALS VERSUS THE NEED TO RESPOND TO THE FAST-CHANGING WORLD OF MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE? As technology continues to change at a rapid rate, the advertising industry remains in a constant state of flux. Staying active in the profession keeps me relevant and allows me to learn by doing, a philosophy that carries over into the classroom. I share my professional experiences in all of my classes, showing my work along with the process behind it. My course projects are also professionally-focused, as they present new challenges and opportunities while allowing students to explore and build upon their craft.

Tourism and VCU.

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2018 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

PAMELA S. BARBY PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN Pam Barby is an Assistant Professor and Chair of the Graphic Design Department at Pennsylvania College of Art & Design. Influenced by her grandfather, a painter in Lancaster PA, Pam developed a love for art and design at a young age. Expanding her influences and passion for design began during her years at Kutztown University. After graduation, Pam worked at an inhouse

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER? My teaching career found me, and I never looked back. The energy and enthusiasm of PCA&D students is captivating. The rewards of being an educator go beyond the classroom. Being part of an individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growth and development is a privilege. Knowing that they are prepared for a life in art, a career that allows them to do what they love, is very gratifying. The students make me a better person. My goal is not only to impart to my students a great education, but also a belief and confidence in themselves so they can make a difference.

design department within the beauty industry, and then moved on to a small design studio creating a variety of print work. Her freelance career began in 2001, and an invitation to teach at PCA&D followed in 2005. With 33 years of designing experience, Pam brings a commitment to teaching that is cultivated by a desire to share and give back. This mindset has also spread among her students as they give back to the community in a college-wide event called Designathon that she initiated 10 years ago. Designathon is a 24-hour event providing free design services to the local non-profits, where alumni, students, and faculty give of their time and talents to design for good. As chair of the department, Pam continues to assess the curriculum and work with faculty to provide the best education and student learning experience at PCA&D. 86 G D U SA

HOW DO YOU BALANCE THE TEACHING OF FUNDAMENTALS VERSUS THE NEED TO RESPOND TO A FAST-CHANGING WORLD OF MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE? The core teaching of design fundamentals will always guide and balance the fast-changing world of media, technology and culture. While keeping the best interest of our students in mind, I have the advantages of working with a talented team of faculty who are also design professionals, which makes assessment and progression of the curriculum both focused and rewarding. The challenge to fit all the material in and keep the content relevant will always be part of the paradigm. PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSHUA GINGERICH, PCA&D GRAPHIC DESIGN GRADUATE, CLASS OF 2018


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5,800 NFL football fields per day!

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June 2018 Logolounge_feb news play 6/4/18 11:55 AM Page 88

LOGOLOUNGE THE 2018 LOGO TREND REPORT BY BILL GARDNER, FOUNDER AND PRESIDENT, LOGOLOUNGE.COM

This year’s logo trends were influenced by a pendulum shift that’s starting to swing from clean, modern aesthetics toward curvy, retro designs that reflect a new attitude through color and embellishments. Any time we look at trends, we tend to see that there is a pendulum

like red shifting toward red-orange, in essence making a new color.

that is swinging. For instance, it’s not uncommon to see an evolu-

People now recognize gradients as colors. This is a trend that will

tion from a flat logo to something dimensional or vice versa. But

continue to shift and grow.

over the last three years in particular, from a typography standpoint, we’ve seen a transition toward very austere sans serif logos. Google flipped from a serif font to a sans serif, and other major brands like Verizon, Calvin Klein, and Century 21 did the same. Part of what’s going on here is this idea of clarifying the message and conveying transparency. Unfortunately, it also strips these brands of any personality when it becomes too sterile. However, this year, the pen-

All three of these movements work together as nostalgia swings the pendulum through different decades and influences color choice and customization. You’ll see a vast array of these examples throughout the report. It’s important to note that trend is not a bad word, and it doesn’t

dulum is starting to swing in the other direction as a direct reaction.

equate to trendy, as in here today, gone tomorrow. The logos featured

When everyone moves to this level of simplicity, designers counter

of it is experimental, which ultimately pushes design to the next

it with some embellishment. Very expressive logos are making a

evolution. We all live by trends — whether it’s fashion, food, or

comeback, which is a direct result of nostalgia or reboots. We’ve

design. We like them and we adopt them because they make life

seen it played out on the big screen in Ready Player One and on

more diverse and fun, even as they evolve and change. The key

the small screen in Stranger Things. There’s a thirst for nostalgia and

takeaway from this is not to imitate, but to find a way to push these

this hearkening to past decades. Designers are dusting off their old

ideas forward and make them your own.

here are on the outer-edge, influencing the next big thing. Much

font folders, going back to designs that were popular in the ’70s, ’80s, and early ’90s. Letters with big, expressive serifs, similar to a man having a mustache — it’s an added embellishment that changes

ABOUT THE 2018 LOGO TREND REPORT

the viewer’s perspective, perhaps recalling a different time period,

2018 marks the 16th year of this report and again offers us the

but done in a uniquely new way, with modern influences. Millennials

opportunity to literally review thousands upon thousands of logos

are most responsible for bringing these trends back into play, and

one at a time looking for the nuances and artifacts of emerging

you see it everywhere with the resurgence of tiki bars and speakeasys,

trends. As we acknowledge that each design represents hours and

and custom products like shaving kits for men. By going backwards,

hours of thought and struggle from designers around the world, we

you can pick and choose what you want to bring forward and blend

are as humbled and awed as ever by their dedication to the craft

it with contemporary aesthetics. I’ve seen a lot of brands doing

and grateful for the important role they play in helping us create

this successfully, and I think it’s just the beginning.

these reports. So thank you to all of the designers who have and

Color expectations have also changed dramatically. Because color mostly lives onscreen, there is a greater intensity in color range because it’s being projected. Colors are merging and blending, and

will contribute to the Trend Reports then, now, and for years to come. A special thanks to that group of designers we lean on for their personal observations and guidance included here within.

gradients are now part of our color dialogue. A lot of this has to do

For an even deeper look at this year’s trends, visit our learning

with apps like Instagram — which, in fact, has a gradation as part

course on LinkedIn Learning (formerly Lynda.com).

of its logo. That’s an extreme example, because it runs the gamut from yellow to pink to purple, but most gradients are very subtle

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TUMBLED Much as a tide and time can dull the sharpest corner of stone or random shard of glass, designers are tossing the occasional mark into the wash for one last tumble before presenting to clients. This is a bit like over-easing the edges before handing off a newly minted bobble to a child. Guaranteed, there will be no eyes poked out in the handling of these logos. The key phrase here is not easing, it’s over-easing. There is a certain level of finish that occurs when knocking back a sharp corner, but in over-amplifying the effect, designers are delivering an entirely different message. A friendlier, more approachable mark is crafted, but by applying this effect, the designer assures the consumer a certain level of implied simplicity. The mark represents a process, product, or service that’s been tested and worn in to remove any unfriendly burrs. Simplicity of initial design is imperative as a starting point, and you may notice most of these are a single-color solution. Reduction of tumbled logos never create screen challenges as a computer’s process of simplifying detail has already handled it. As friendly as these are to consumers, clients should have reasoning in mind when asked, “Why so round?” How much you should ease a corner can be like the fine line between a healthy tan and someone who’s over-baked on the tanning bed.

01D, GREATPLACE

SEAN HEISLER, CUBEDHOST

ORTEGA GRAPHICS, FLEXATIK (UNUSED)

BEN DOLEZAL DESIGNS, MOUNTAINSIDE OUTDOOR SUPPLY

PARALLELOGRAM One of the tenets of logo design is that forward motion means up and to the right. It’s the direction you want your investments, or your production to take if you’re looking at a graph. It’s the difference between gazing up to the future or glancing back at the past. So, what a surprise to discover a flurry of up and to the right parallelograms littered throughout this year’s field of work. And though the symbolism is not unexpected, the sheer number of them is. And the puzzlement of this discovery is only matched by the diversity of applications. The nature of the oblique shape gives it a sharp, aggressive attitude. An element captured in motion and perfect in form to serve as a vehicle for type or as a passenger to accent a larger message. Note the parallelogram in the lead role with Carling or as a demure accent on the “i” in Stripe. Or taking on a number of configurations to speed other solutions to the fore. A remnant of Spartan attitude remains in this trend that leaves no home for embellishment. All of these are clean, to the point solutions that signal “up and to the right” as their clients’ mantra.

BRANDOPUS, CARLING

TIMES NETWORK, MNX

STRIPE IN-HOUSE, STRIPE

FEEDMEE DESIGN, ZDF NEO

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LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2018 LOGO TREND REPORT

OUTLINE It’s easy to muse that master sports logo designers may lose credentials and peer respect if they ever released a mark without encasing it in a wide gray outline. How else would we know it was for a team? This may or may not be the influence at work, but over the last year, we’ve seen an uptick of logos with absolutely no sports affiliation tightly ensconced in their own mono-weight outline. An astral aura if you will, exuding a rich karmic energy. Drawing attention with a highlight outline in most of these cases adds a nice touch or serves a functional purpose, but you have to ask to what end. It may imply a team essence to the entity or much as sports logos, it may be designed to allow the image to work on both light and dark color fields. Note that the Acid Pineapple actually has a double aura. A better hunch is it’s a stylistic pop of embellishment that allows an otherwise unremarkable mark to capture additional attention and project a bit of its own graphic energy.

FRANK TOOGOOD, TOWNSEND SYSTEMS

BARNSTORM CREATIVE GROUP INC, THE ZOO

SUNDAY LOUNGE, ELEVATION BEER CO.

WILL BRYAN DESIGN, NEXT GENERATION THERAPY SERVICES

NEO-VINTAGE In a common thread, designers are retreating this year to a number of themes drawn from past influence. Which is not too dissimilar from the movies only generating sequels and remakes. There’s certainly a level of guilty pleasure involved in turning back the nostalgia dial, but such efforts seldom create advances in our craft. Whether born as an antidote to put the brakes on a fast-paced counter movement or to fill the time while we give serious thought to where we go from here. We must also consider these forays into the past as not just a revisit for an older generation, but as a first-time trip for the more recently minted designers. Imagery that was plucked from the last century seems to be fair game here. A wink to Mid-Century Modern is still popular, as is the reboot of ad mascots and characters of the same era. Note that many of these examples blend a typographic solution with a primary image, much as other badges we are looking at in this report. A noticeable marking tag for this group may be the placement of a primary typographic solution or wordmark plopped dead center on top of the supporting image. Fun, light-hearted, and well-crafted but with the gravitas of a romance novel.

RIVAL BRANDS, TRAVELER BEER COMPANY

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AMIT BOTRE - SPIN DESIGN, THE OLD FLAMINGO VINTAGE

CHIMERA SIGN, FARMER JOHN'S

THE FOREFATHERS GROUP, PEOPLES GARMENT COMPANY


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MODERN RELIGION Let’s start by recognizing the works in this trend are not going to be seen representing anything more than a designer’s folio site. They might appear on a couple of great T-shirts or a band’s drum kit as well, but more than anything, these logos tend to reinforce the design fraternity’s infatuation with rich symbolism. These stars, jewels, hearts, arrows, and skulls are so entrenched in the lore of secret societies that their very essence reeks of mystic ritual. Either that or naivety blinds us to an underground designer cult with secret passcodes and a handshake. From a design standpoint, these explorations are beautiful to view and demonstrate how a crafty designer can build an aesthetic fortress from completely vacuous elements. Exercising our design chops on fantasy projects is not completely bereft of value, though. This group has elegance of execution and each could, for example, represent another topic altogether after exchanging a moon, a hand, and a sword for a couple of roosters, a pig, and a chef’s hat.

JON KAY DESIGN, FANGAMER

CHAD MICHAEL STUDIO, THEORY ELEVEN

DARKSQUARE, ANNO DOMINI

STEELY WORKS, SPARROWHAWK STUDIOS

B/W HIPSTER Hipsters, by their very definition, shun status quo and embrace an alternate perspective. This category first started to define itself several years ago as stock elements became available online actually marketed as Hipster Badges. As we discuss this trend, it would be fair to ask if the hipster is the designer or the target of the solution. Fortunately, this direction has matured by advancing beyond the crossed arrows, flowing casual scripts, and other clichés that originally defined the set. These logos do a smart job of targeting this group by combing otherwise traditional components in a counter traditional way. Generally, the marks are void of color as our trend name suggests, but rich in detail. The style is a nod to monoline construction adopted over the last decade. It’s not uncommon to see these marks used to represent entities with a vibe, or culture that feels comfortable with a reference to the past but with a spin that defines the next generation at a glance.

SUNDAY LOUNGE, COLORADO BREWERS GUILD

STEELY WORKS, GERALDINE'S

NIGEL HOOD, HANSEN SUPPLY CO. FORTIS ET LIBER

PETER KOMIEROWSKI, THE WOLF & THE HARE

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LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2018 LOGO TREND REPORT

EST TRD MRK A deeper dive into our exuberant infatuation with badges has to touch on the use of the big three, established, trade, and mark. That quintessential balance created by clustering letters, numbers, and graphics has come to rely on some convenient abbreviating that leaves wordsmiths wriggling with pangs. Like a set of scales requiring adroit attention to level them, designers weigh out three letters on the left and three on the right. Does that mean a four-digit date on the right needs a four letter ESTB on the left? And most important, if you use TRD MRK for trademark, will consumers read TRD phonetically? Our infatuation with the creation of implied heritage really deserves greater attention than these two paragraphs allow. The new culture of small shoppe business and personal attention are fiercely fighting the truly established bluebloods for the same share of consumer attention. Heritage thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only inches deep is winning through smart design, even when the identity reads ESTB 2018.

SEAN HEISLER, NORTHMAN BREWING

MOSS CREATIVE, LLC, MOSS BASECAMP

PETER KOMIEROWSKI, KODIAK

JAY MASTER DESIGN, REVOLT COFFEE

BLURPLE Gradation in logo design is nothing new. Extreme eye-popping, chroma-screaming applications like Instagram continue, but the trend here is the adoption of subtlety. Dropping a field of color onto a mark that could easily be solid black, blue, or purple. But how about a gentle almost sub-existent transition of hue? A blue field that ticks a notch or two more purple, or a magenta that drops from a 100 percent intensity to 80? These are the new spectrums that are expanding the thinking in branding and color affiliation. The time when T-Mobile owned magenta or FedEx owned orange and violet, is shifting to Belfast owning yellow creeping to a yellow orange. These are tight- and short-run gradients that might initially give the impression half the logo is just poorly lit. These gradients can indicate a transition or a process and are made practical by a societal shift toward the RGB dominion of digital screens. Blurple is no longer that color halfway between blue and purple; it is the trek between the two.

CAUSE DESIGN CO., GROW

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VADIM CARAZAN, SOCIALZ

MCCADDEN, BELFAST CITY COUNCIL

DESIGNSTUDIO & TINDER IN-HOUSE, TINDER


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GOLD That cringe associated with a client suggesting they’d like their logo in gold has been replaced by the designer suggesting the same back to the client. The afore mentioned embrace of subtle gradation has led to a swell in the number of marks rendered with their own glint of faux bullion. While the option of foiling a mark or utilizing metallic inks are both traditional solutions for such a dilemma, neither solution translates to the screen. Our industry has seen the importance of digital imagery rocket past the secondary print materials in the last decade, but note this as an evident shift in who has the car key. Gold still conveys everything it always has, it just has a better agent working for it. Flexibility in rendering is still abundant. If you want a flat gold, go for it. If you want a sheen, do you want it flat or textured as in the letter B monogram? Or, since you’re digital, maybe you want a gentle wash of light across the logo with a lens flare and a ping at the end. Let’s hope not. Gold, used properly, still carries a 14K level of prestige, elegance, and sophistication like no other color. It’s a color the public expects, the application is not.

ULYANOV DENIS, AMA RIVER CRUISES

STUDIO SUDAR LTD, BORIS BANOVIC

CHAD MICHAEL STUDIO, ALMANAC BEER CO.

BRAND UNION + COMMISSAIRE OFFICIEL, CIRQUE DU SOLEIL

FATTY FADE Smart designers understand that the past and the future are inextricably connected and that if you’re clever enough, you’ll call your appropriation a discovery. The seminal textile design of Verner Panton in 1971, launched an era of wall art and carpets that swayed, curved, and zagged with concentric stripes of vivid, stepped colors. Saul Bass notably used the same effect many times to smart success in the ’70s, including the brilliant Paul Harris Stores logo. Though similar to the ombré trend of the 2016 report, the momentum here is with strong stepped geometry. This is an analog gradient that’s fresh and vibrant to a new generation of eyes with a hint of retro for a kicker. Aaron Draplin has done as much as anyone to rekindle this genre with a more contemporary aesthetic to its application. The resurgence comes with invigorated thinking and applications that blend the stripes with diverse elements that make for much richer solutions.

O'DELL DESIGN CO., RUBY'S TEQUILA'S

ALMOSH82, BP

HAMPTON CREATIVE INC., IN TOUCH MINISTRIES

ALEX TASS, MIND HEROES

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LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2018 LOGO TREND REPORT

LINEAR FADE Some trend reports are filled with more nuances than others, but they are here for a reason. What may seem like modest variants on a theme to one, look like significant departures to others. Linear Fades carry much of the same attribution and history as Fatty Fades with a significant mutation. Our stepped gradient effect is divided by channels that reflect a marriage and offspring from our stripped theme last year. A discreet variant, but an important one, as this evolves. Because of the channels, these marks appear much more grounded and don’t exhibit the same flood of intense color found in Fatty Fades. Channels may equal the width of the stripes or they may thin down significantly. It’s easier to envision this group of logos in a corporate climate, but with the right colors they still radiate a stylish level of optimism. Note that the simpler the design the more effective these read. Adding channels doubles the complexity of any design so brevity of strokes is essential.

O'DELL DESIGN CO., APEX FOAM INSULATION

ROLAND REKECZKI, IFDC

OCULAR INK, ROBYN'S RETRO WORLD

GREENCOW STUDIO, ICE PEAK PRODUCTION

FIELD LINES Big, fat, burly Kevlar-plated line work is what happens when traditional monoline design starts bulking up for its next role in Logo the movie. Any assumption you’d escape this report without yet another evolution of the monoline aesthetic is wrong. Once, this fine outline started as the antithesis to areas of tone by describing perimeters as opposed to content. Now these lines are tipping the scale with a girth that’s turned the line into a field of its own. Frankly, it’s a good look as the faint haze of linework reduced has now been replaced by a bold undeniable mark reminiscent of past works that launched the golden era of logos. Now, instead of squirming that the linework won’t stand up to reduction, we might find ourselves concerned the negative space is too fine to do the same. Loading up these marks with fields of color may be gilding the lily, which is why many of them don’t even try. The lines on these marks still maintain a consistent weight that continues to convey a measured, technical aesthetic. Finding the weight that creates a balanced contrast allows these to read well at a distance or when squeezed down for micro application.

ZAC JACOBSON, THE RENTAL SHACK

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PETER KOMIEROWSKI, ARCTIC BEAR

GEORGE BOKHUA, GRIFFIN

GARDNER DESIGN, HEARTLANDIA


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CUT We tend to take our letterforms pretty seriously, and I’m not just referring to designers. Ask any type maven and they can regale you with just how much leeway the public is willing to allow when crafting a font. Embellish a letterform, and you’re just improving; but remove a stroke here or there, and you’ll be issued a cease and desist notice without apology. The designers of the marks in this trend are just flat flaunting their disrespect, and in doing so have captured the attention of the consumer. A judiciously excised aspect of a word or letterform may create no issue with legibility. We folk are a pretty clever lot when playing fill in the blank. But what we edit out can be either a vacuous stylistic gesture or a clever treatment to reinforce a message or help provide context for a brand. The latter is certainly preferred. With Slate’s new wordmark, the A is no less legible, and it helps convey the journalistic editing and overlapping of content that’s a part of their process. When crafted with wit and prudence, these solutions earn honors in Disruption 101.

2X4, CENTRO BOTÍN

PRINCIPALS, RUSSELL MCVEAGH

GRETEL & SLATE IN-HOUSE, SLATE

SID LEE, WSP

PUNCTUATION Logo design is such a succinct practice exactly because a mark has to completely speak for itself. There’s no room to attach a preamble or an explanation as a sidecar on a symbol. Yet the last year has been notable for the refresh and creation of numerous brands punctuated into an alternate state of meaning. Linguaphiles may be simultaneously cringing and cheering their support, depending on the application, but planting a fleck or a speck at the end of a name is much more than a stylish affliction. These periods, commas, colons, and more are opening a previously unconsidered dialogue with consumers. Though Redbox is not a sentence, it is determined to drop the mic with a period, capping out any additional discussion. That is all there is to say. The publication Darling, sets the stage for what’s to come with the perfect use of a comma. Like the opening of a letter, the publication both greets the reader and prepares them for what’s to follow. The inc. in Winc. may well have been lost on the consumer with the two-color split, but the period at the end of the abbreviation of “incorporated,” makes it evident. Punctuation is a trend that has its place, but there’s reason to fear it could lose good standing with rampant misuse.

DARLING MEDIA, DARLING

OATH IN-HOUSE, OATH

REDBOX IN-HOUSE, REDBOX

FUTUREBRAND, WINC

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LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2018 LOGO TREND REPORT

SERIF REDUX Picture a cycle of rebrand austerity that found many of the most beloved brands racing for the anonymity of soulless sans serifs. Such a flood of willing participants in this still bleeding, but waning trend, proves that an action of descent speaks louder than sans. Maybe it was a crop of nascent designers prepping to binge the freshly hyped Stranger Things, and looked at the title graphic, mouth agape, at the entrancing serifs hanging from each and every letter. A throwback for sure, but the cultural impact of this show canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be denied. It may well have led to the largest mass migration of designers in history, as they scrolled through their font files and were reunited with long-lost serifs. The rebrand of Chobani at the leadership of Leland Maschmeyer, brought warmth, humanity and unapologetic charm to a product previously lingering behind a futuristic sans serif. In logo design, many of the trend-countering serif, signal a return to a period when a little fat and curve on the bones was a good thing. The resurgence also welcomes back lowercase solutions to the tent that was starting to feel pretty empty. Nature abhors a vacuum and designers do too.

PENTAGRAM, BUFFY

CHOBANI IN-HOUSE, CHOBANI

PHENOMENON, MR. COOPER

CARBONE SMOLAN AGENCY, TAPESTRY

ABOUT BILL GARDENER Bill Gardner is the president of Gardner Design and founder of LogoLounge.com, a repository site where, in real time, members can post their logo design work and search the works of others by keyword, designerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, client type, and other attributes. The site also offers articles and news written expressly for logo designers and much more. Bill can be contacted at bill@logolounge.com.

ABOUT LOGOLOUNGE LogoLounge.com is the most comprehensive and searchable database of logos available today. More than 272,000 logos have been submitted to the site since 2002, growing it to the largest online treasury of professionally designed logos. Through their submissions, members also gain the benefit of consideration for publication in the LogoLounge book series, the best selling graphic design books series in the world. Through the line of LogoLounge books (currently published in volumes 1 through 10), designers can gain even more insights from a collection of the smartest logo designs submitted to LogoLounge from all over the world and hand-selected by a prestigious team of some of the most respected names in the industry. In 2016, LogoLounge took a giant step forward as it extended membership to the next generation of designers with LogoLounge Leap, which allows educators and students free or deeply discounted access to the site as well as online resources and educational tools.

For more information on membership and identity design news, visit LogoLounge.com.

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4 POTENTIAL CHALLENGES OF WORKING WITH FREELANCERS AND HOW TO OVERCOME THEM BY DIANE DOMEYER

If you’re like the majority of creative managers, your company uses freelancers. And for good reason.

Solution: To arrive at a reasonable yet competitive rate, use resources like “The Creative Group 2018 Salary Guide” to benchmark what you pay. This annual report lists starting salaries for more than 80 creative positions in the U.S. and Canada, based

Hiring a mix of full-time and project professionals enables com-

on actual placements made by The Creative Group. And don’t

panies to keep costs down and access specialized skills needed for

be caught off-guard if a candidate asks for higher pay. Make

new business initiatives. Today, freelancers make up an average

sure you are prepared to negotiate compensation by doing your

of 14% of U.S. creative teams, according to a recent survey of

research, knowing your limit and offering non-monetary bene-

advertising and marketing executives by The Creative Group.

fits where possible.

What’s more, many are doing higher quality work than before.

CHALLENGE #3: FINDING SKILLED FREELANCERS

Of the executives interviewed, 39% said the caliber of freelance

With all the creative talent out there, you know the ones you

talent has grown stronger. This increase may be due to the many top-notch designers who are embracing the gig economy at a time when social media, digital portfolios and free website builders have made it easy for individuals to market their services and build their clientele. Project professionals can save businesses money and provide them with a competitive edge, but it takes a little legwork to build productive relationships with them. Here are some common obstacles managers shared with us, followed by tips for overcoming them.

need for your project are out there — somewhere. But how do you find them? Where do you start? This was the top concern for 19% of the respondents. Solution: The internet is filled with job boards and forums designed to connect freelancers and clients. Social media is another way to put out the word. To save yourself the time and hassle of finding talent, though, work with a staffing agency. Specialized recruiters can handle much or all the sifting and vetting, leaving you with more time to focus on other priorities.

CHALLENGE #1: MAKING THEM FEEL LIKE PART OF THE TEAM

CHALLENGE #4:

Freelancers are in that funny gray area. They’re temporary

Many freelancers work remotely, which means you don’t have the

professionals, yet they need all the background that full-time

regular face time that you do with inhouse team members. Of the

employees have if they are to deliver quality work. A quarter of

creative executives surveyed, 19% felt the greatest challenge of

creative executives admitted they find it difficult to integrate

working with freelancers is communicating and collaborating

freelancers with the in-house team.

effectively with them.

Solution: Orientation isn’t just for full-time staff. Solid onboard-

Solution: The key to working well with project professionals is

ing is especially important if the relationship will be long-term.

to treat them as you would anyone else on your creative team.

This means providing them with information about not just the

Give them full access to workplace communication and collab-

project but also your organization and its culture. Give free-

oration tools. Freelancers also have questions and creative ideas,

lancers a company email address if they’ll be communicating with

so include them in meetings. And don’t forget about providing

clients. Introduce them to the team as you would any new hire,

them with regular feedback, virtually. The more points of contact

talking up their work history and expertise. Invite those who are

you have with them and they have with you, the stronger the

based in the office to staff meetings and social events. Add them

relationship will be.

to the office email list so they’ll know when free food is available in the break room. Ultimately, your goal should be to treat fulltime and project workers as equal contributors to the team.

COMMUNICATING OR COLLABORATING EFFECTIVELY

Gig workers are here to stay, and it pays to tap into this market. Learn how to make the most of freelancers’ talents, and you’ll increase the caliber and productivity of your team.

CHALLENGE #2: NEGOTIATING PAY RATES 22% of the executives we surveyed felt negotiating payment is the toughest aspect of working with freelancers. Set rates too low, and you won’t attract top talent. And while you may want

DIANE DOMEYER is Executive Director of The Creative Group, a specialized staffing service placing interactive, design, marketing, advertising

to offer top dollar to attract the cream of the crop, you have to

and public relations professionals with

keep an eye on the budget.

a variety of firms. For more information, visit roberthalf.com/creativegroup.com.

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June 2018 Pub Letter Focus_feb news play 6/4/18 12:06 PM Page 98

PRINT ® 18 CELEBRATES 50 YEAR HERITAGE AS INDUSTRY TRANSFORMS VISIONARY ENTREPRENEUR SETH GODIN TO KEYNOTE Early in 2018, the Association for Print Technologies (APT), formerly NPES, launched a new identity and mission in response to sweeping and fundamental changes in the printing, print production and print design industries. As part of the organization’s repositioning, the Association announced that the PRINT® brand will be the name for its signature annual event. Held for the first time in 1968, the 50-year-old trade show is the best-attended U.S. show for the graphic communications industry, attracting more than 22,000 people last year. This year’s event – PRINT 18 – is set for September 30 through October 2 at McCormick Place in Chicago.

PHOTOGRAPH: BRIAN BLOOM 98 G D U SA


June 2018 Pub Letter Focus_feb news play 6/4/18 12:06 PM Page 99

Demonstrating it’s vibrancy, PRINT is ranked among the top

Long. “We are aligning the educational programming at PRINT

100 U.S. Trade Shows by Trade Show News Network (TSNN)

18 with enhanced networking opportunities and new technology

and was recently honored as among the top 25 fastest-growing

areas to help drive the entire value chain on a path to success.”

events in attendance. “This award speaks to the evolving expan-

Session categories include: Big Picture, an overview of the in-

sion of the printing and graphic communications industry,” said

dustry and its future; Business/Executive Development; How it’s

President Thayer Long. “We are proud to be placed in elite com-

Done, a very hands-on set of sessions; Opportunities and Markets;

pany with many of the event industry’s most recognized names.”

Printing Operations; and Sales and Marketing, advice for business success and growth.

UNIFIED COMMUNITY Founded in 1933 as NPEA, the Association for Print Technologies

VISIONARY KEYNOTE BY SETH GODIN

has served the printing and graphic communications industry

To underscore the new energy and perspective, world-renowned

for 85 years. It has grown into a unified community that convenes

entrepreneur and best-selling author Seth Godin will be the

the commercial printing, sign/display, digital print/imaging,

keynote speaker and set the tone for what will follow. He will

in-plant and transactional print, and branding/creative market

also be available afterwards to sign his best-selling book, “What

segments. PRINT remains an important education venue for

to Do When It’s Your Turn (and It’s Always Your Turn).” Godin

future trends, innovative technology and business growth,

will look back (briefly) on a century of marketing, industrialism

boosting its offerings year after year to meet the changing tech-

and print, and paint a picture for how we can each make a dent

nology landscape.

in the future with the work we do.

“APT’s sole mission is to empower business success for our

Godin promises the PRINT 18 audience will leave with action-

members and grow the printing and graphic communications

able takeaways that can shape their personal and professional

industry as a whole,” explains President Long. “The industry is

lives into the future. “If I could put it all in a memo, I would,”

undergoing massive transformation, so by using the tremendous

he says. “But bullet points just don’t work. If you are in the

amount of data we have gathered from the value chain over the

room, I will be able to help you think differently.”

past 12 months, we have formulated a winning strategy for our event and programs that align the industry on a path for growth

Godin is the author of 18 books that have been bestsellers

moving forward.”

around the world and have been translated into more than 35 languages. He writes about the post-industrial revolution, the

This data was collected over several months and represents

way ideas spread, marketing, quitting, leadership and most of all,

thousands of stakeholders in the printing services value chain.

changing everything. His most popular books include Linchpin,

Interestingly, 90% expressed the desire for more meaningful

Tribes, The Dip and Purple Cow. He is also founder of Yoyodyne

in-person interactions and need increased visibility and collab-

and Squidoo. His blog (which you can find by typing “seth”

oration with their current and potential customers. And over 80%

into Google) is one of the most popular in the world. In May

indicated purposeful events are their most significant resource

2018, he will be inducted into the Marketing Hall of Fame.

for education about emerging technology, business strategy guidance and connections to grow their businesses.

CONVERGENCE OF CREATIVE AND PRINT For GDUSA readers (who spend roughly two-thirds of their time

THE LEARNING EXPERIENCE

working in print) – as well as all creative and branding pro-

The innovative Learning Experience at PRINT 18, a compre-

fessionals – PRINT 18 promises fresh ideas for “wow” print

hensive educational event, sheds light on solutions that are tied

marketing, impactful digital techniques, seminars and hands-on

directly to the technology on the show floor. Registration for The

design labes, and a better understanding of the fusion of digital

Learning Experience is now open with the program including 50+

and print technologies. In short it’s a place to get a first-hand

sessions, presented in a variety of learning formats, including

look at innovative examples of print design and production,

seminars, hands-on labs, luncheon sessions and panel discus-

from special finishing effects to use of brilliant and new ink

sions. New to PRINT 18 are special exhibit floor guided tours

colors to interactive linking technologies, and a crash course on

led by teams of industry experts.

print technologies and print’s creative potential.

“Our education lineup this year addresses the biggest challenges

Learn more or register at www.printtechnologies.org/events/print18

facing our industry today, including business growth, workforce development, and staying competitive,” explains President

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dec17readerpage_feb news play 6/4/18 12:26 PM Page 100

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GDUSA June 2018  

American Web Design Awards Logolounge 2018 Logo Trends Educators to Watch

GDUSA June 2018  

American Web Design Awards Logolounge 2018 Logo Trends Educators to Watch