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I  nsight and inspiration from the global design industry

BEHIND THE SCENES ON an edgy fashion SHOOT: FACTORY311 reveals every stage of the creative process, with in-depth video diaries Abstract landscapes, digital montage and candid still life All the very latest trends in design, art direction and photography Timothy Saccenti: working with New Era, Sony and more The in-demand photographer and director talks technique in New York


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34 INDUS TRY FOCUS PHOTOGR APHY IN MOTION

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10 FOLIO INTRODUCTION

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Our carefully curated selection of stylish photographic work from image-makers around the world.

A new breed of creatives is cashing in on client needs by shooting both stills and video. We investigate the potential in this exciting growth area.

E XPE R T OVE RVIE W Cross-disciplinary skills are proving to be increasingly in-demand for clients, says Olivia Triggs, director at London-based agency Breed.

ELLE MULIARCHYK B R U N O D R U M MO N D SARAH ILLENBERGER PAU L I N E DA R L E Y LE A N D R O FA R I N A ROBIN MELLOR FREDERICO M ARTINS

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TREND REPORT INTRODUCTION Stay ahead of the curve with our in-depth guide to the most influential trends in photography, produced exclusively for Computer Arts Collection by experienced creative consultancy FranklinTill.

7 42 MICRO TRENDS From inventive assemblages of found objects to images within images, we explore the latest developments in photography. M ATE R IAL A S SE MB L AGE 42

FRAME ON FRAME CANDID IMPERFECTION ABSTR AC T L ANDSCAPES D I G ITA L M A S H - U P

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M ACRO TREND 46

Major movements in photography from the past year revisited and mapped out: this issue, Digital Real.

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115 PROCESS INTRODUCTION The inside scoop on some of the past year’s most inspiring photography projects.

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67 S TUDIO PROJEC T INTRODUCTION In this issue’s guest-edited studio project, we venture deep behind the scenes with Sohobased creative image studio FACTORY311 as it embarks on concurrent photo and video shoots for its own nascent clothing line. The team takes a collaborative approach that involves working with models, cameramen, photographers, make-up artists and stylists to create a dark and sexy series of images, plus a video commercial. Turn to page 71 for details of the in-depth video diaries which go right inside the creative process.

116 PROJEC T FOCUS: REDESIGN OF APERTURE M AGA ZINE Unchanged for a decade, the renowned photography title gets a new look from London design studio A2/SW/HK.

122 BEHIND THE SCENES From brief to debrief, with input from both studio and client: DDB TRIBAL BERLIN AND S Z YM O N P L E WA f o r B O S C H CHRISTIAN ÅSLUND PHOTOGR APHY for JIM RICKEY

142 IN BRIEF SOPHIE KE MP AT CRUF T S S TE PHE N WILKE S CR E ATE S TIME-L APSE CIT YSCAPES 132 www.computerar ts.co.uk

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148 INTERVIEW TIMOTHY SACCENTI The New York-based photographer, noted for his images of musicians who are perhaps less than typically photogenic, tells us about his move into music video direction and his love of self-generating video art.

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162 GLOBAL DESIGN MY C I T Y:   L J U B L J A N A A trip around the cemeteries, shopping centres and gay bars of Slovenia’s capital in the convivial company of delightful design duo Kitsch Nitsch.

171 TA LE NT D IR EC TO RY 155

All the key information and contact details for the creatives featured in this issue.

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Tren d Rep or t

Key trends in photography

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Kate Franklin Franklin has over 15 years’ experience producing trend reports and marketing strategy for some of the world’s leading brands, including Louis Vuitton, Samsung, Selfridges and Marks & Spencer, before co-founding FranklinTill in 2010.

Caroline Till An alumna of the Royal College of Art, Till has worked as a freelance designer and researcher for a diverse range of clients including gucci, Philips, the V&A and the design Council. www.franklintill.com

CR E AT I V E COnSULTA nC y FR A nK L In T IL L TA K E S A LOOK AT T HE M A In S T y L ES T H AT A R E dEFInIng PHOTO gR A PH y R IgH T nOW As a creative trend consultancy we’re continually working to find all the latest ways of bringing research and insight to life in the form of exhibitions, events and publications. Extensive research is the basis of all the work we do, and we’re always reaching out to our global directory of studios, individual creatives, agents and PRs to seek out work that feels completely fresh and resonant. Translating key visual research into carefully edited packages of inspiration, this issue we present some of the key stylistic and conceptual directions within the broad field of photography. Across the next 20 pages we will observe various patterns and commonalities in photographic style, highlighting some of the fresh stances in styling and art direction, lighting and technical approaches, and subject matter and image composition, ultimately aiming to unpick why these visual directions feel relevant right now. We will observe an overtly manipulated approach to post-production, showcasing a number of collaborations between

photographers and graphic designers adopting a layered, collaged aesthetic within the Frame On Frame trend, while Photoshop tools and filters are heavily employed to generate a digitised feel in the digital Mash-Up direction. In contrast, we also profile how an increasing number of photographers are exploring an alternative view of the natural environment, using unexpected compositions and viewpoints within Abstract Landscapes. We then return to our feature from the Photography issue of volume one of CA Collection, exploring the blurring of digital and analogue within the worlds of art and design. Reporting on a new, playful subversion of the digital vernacular, we also revisit the increasingly sophisticated crafting of 3d tactile worlds in the digital space, profiling the development of a number of new virtual gallery environments that are showcasing exciting digital work. This section aims to provide inspiration and information for those looking to expand and innovate with their photography.

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S tudio Proje c t

 S tage t wo

P   reparing for the shoot day Setting up a studio for video and stills at the same time has a sting in the tail

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S u pp o r t in g v id e o: In part three of F311’s exclusive video diaries, photographer Nikolay Biryukov and director Guy Soulsby introduce their working methods: see page 71 for more.

When preparing for the shoot the first factor we took into consideration was the look we wanted to create. This meant finding the right props and models, pushing our identity further through the small details. The most dominant idea was to have a real scorpion on set, which ended up affecting our choice of models. Ensuring that the finished product matched our expectations meant the final touches were essential. Nikolay has a lot of experience working with other fashion creatives, so knew that make-up artist Marina Keri and stylist Victoria Hwang would be perfect for the look we wanted. As far as studio space was concerned, Park Village Studio provided everything that we were looking for and more. We had many requirements due to the large scale of the project, so getting the right lighting, equipment and props was a real priority. Tackling requirements for motion and still photography at the same time proved tricky, but we were able to put a schedule together that had us working to effective deadlines. Our initial mood board had played on the themes of sex and fetish, so we wanted to bring these into the shoot without making

too bold a statement that might detract from the clothes and the branding. When thinking of ideas, latex and bondage were mentioned as they’re familiar to Soho, where the agency is based – so we played on the idea of sex and fun it inspires. We also drew from Tamzin’s work, as she has produced bondage-style products. It was rather more difficult sourcing the scorpion, as it had to be the right size and shape. We considered using a plastic model, but after having looked at the available options it was decided that it may cheapen the look of the shots. A taxidermy scorpion was the only option.

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 guest edi tor

FACTORY311 Founder Nicholas Hardy explains how an outlaw motorcycle club from Málaga inspired his creative image agency

S u p p ort in g v ideo: Nicholas Hardy gives a piece-to-camera intro to FACTORY311 in the agency’s first video diary: turn to page 71 for more details.

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FA C T O R Y311 Founded back in 2007 by self-taught creative Nicholas Hardy, FACTORY311 is an image production agency that’s built a reputation for both its high-end imagery and its collaborations with some of the best new and established artists from around the world.

Words Gary Evans Photography FACTORY311

Engines rumbling under the Andalusian sun, a uniform of beaten-up black leather, shades and tattoos, the Road Demons MC is a cloak-and-dagger motorcycle club based in the Spanish city of Málaga. The Demons was granted its ‘threepiece patch’ status in 2004, meaning the powers that be recognise it as an official outlaw MC. While most creatives cite Paul Rand, Saul Bass, George Lois and their ilk as influences, for Nicholas Hardy, the way in which he runs his studio is based on the guiding principles of his dad’s biker gang. “It’s a very strict club,” says FACTORY311 founder and creative director Hardy. “It’s a proper MC, which has been accepted by the Hell’s Angels. I’ve been brought up with that mentality and it’s only just coming out now. It’s allowing me to inspire that club feeling. I’ve got 311 tattooed on me – big, on my leg. “The clothing line that we’ve been doing is based on this togetherness, this involvement, this standing as one, as family, as a club. Like my dad’s motorbike club. It’s a way of life rather than a business. That’s what makes us different.” Hardy set up FACTORY311 in 2007. The agency specialises in imagery and motion graphics for advertising, fashion and sports, while also representing a burgeoning roster of illustrators and photographers. Its evergrowing client list includes football clubs Arsenal and Manchester United, apparel brands Nike and Lacoste and international magazines Cosmopolitan and Vanity Fair. Becoming event partner for fashion tradeshow Bread & Butter was 311’s big break. Hardy took a ‘dream team’ of artists to the 2008 event in Barcelona, where they

covered huge surfaces with graffiti – a job that brought the agency to the attention of a host of prospective clients. “It’s all down to confidence, isn’t it?” Hardy says. “Everyone needs a good pat on the back. Until you get it, you shy away, you don’t want to pick up the phone. But as soon as you get the recognition, you feel untouchable. You feel like you can just pick up the phone and speak to anyone, because that’s one of the first things you mention – you’re event partners with Bread & Butter. Back then, the people we were targeting, everyone knew Bread & Butter. That moment was the real breakthrough. Everything else seemed to slot into place.” Hardy’s modesty shouldn’t be misread. There was a lot of work leading up to the Bread & Butter gig, and even more to get to where FACTORY311 is now. The studio founder is entirely self-taught – though he gives new meaning to the term. His

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Left to right: Mike Love, Jon Pickering, Victoria Hwang, Tamzin Lillywhite, Remy Green, Nicholas Hardy, Tom Mac, Guy Soulsby, Marina Kerr, Nikolay Biryukov and James Ross.

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P ro c e s s

_PROJECT

Freezer icebergs campaign for Bosch This niche print ad for one of the world’s biggest home appliance brands depicts striking icy landscapes inside a freezer compartment _ L I V E D AT E

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AT A G L A N C E PROJECT OUTLINE: Raise awareness of the fact that Bosch’s new ‘NoFrost-Technology’ freezer can save energy and is better for the environment A G E N C Y: DDB Tribal Berlin www.ddb-tribal.com PHOTOGRAPHER: Szymon Plewa www.plewa-photodesign.de C L I E N T: Bosch www.bosch.com

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C o loph on

C   OLOPHON Future Publishing Ltd, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath BA1 2BW Phone 012 25 4 42 24 4 Fax 012 25 732 275 Email computerarts@futurenet.com We b w w w. c o m p u t e r a r t s . c o . u k

KITSCH NITSCH Global Design “For your enjoyment and benefaction we humbly put before you a comprehensive and meticulous body of work, written with the sincerity of our hearts and focusing on accurately portraying the daily goings-on and the behind-the-scenes eccentricities and obscenities of the creative people of our home town of Ljubljana.”

SYM A TA R I Q Process section “Creating and designing the new issue of Aperture magazine entailed a lot of consideration and talent on and off the page, which is why Londonbased A2/ SW/HK were taken on board. The rest of the Process section follows a variety of inspirations – from platform games for Christian Aslund to old fridge-freezers for DDB Tribal.”

EDITORIAL

MARKETING

N I C K C A R S O N Editor nick.carson@futurenet.com

Philippa Newman Group marketing manager philippa.newman@futurenet.com

A N N A M C G E E Acting art editor

Alexandra Geary Marketing executive alexandra.geary@futurenet.com

Production IAN EVENDEN R UTH H A M I LTO N CHARLOTTE M ART YN G A R Y E V A N S Staff writer gary.evans@futurenet.com J I M M C C A U L E Y Network editor jim.mccauley@futurenet.com PHOTOGRAPHY FACTORY311, Steven Brahms ILLUSTR ATION Stephen Cheetham, My Name Is Wendy SPECIAL THANKS TO Elizabeth Elliot, Luke O’Neill (good luck at T3!), Karen Lewis, Jo Gulliver, Davina Rungasamy, Alun Pughe, Adrienn Major and Trevor Witt in Multimedia Studio

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178 GARRICK WEBSTER Timothy Saccenti interview

TOM DENNIS Industry Focus

The day I went to Brooklyn to interview Timothy Saccenti it was raining so hard water was coming down the subway stairs like Niagara Falls. It didn’t help that I had a hole in my shoe and no umbrella. But the photographer/director offered me dry socks, before demonstrating one of his video synth experiments.”

“What’s a photographer in today’s creative industry? I spent this issue asking myself this a lot, then asking photographers who shoot video, and filmmakers who shoot commercial photography, the same thing. I was left with a real sense of something new: visual artists for whom stills and video are two sides to the same coin.”

LUKE O’NEILL Departing art editor

N IC HO L A S H A R DY Studio Project

“This is the last issue of Collection I’ve had a hand in as art editor, and it’s an unusual feeling not knowing exactly how every page in the Photography issue has turned out. Launching Collection with Nick and art editing ten issues is without doubt the thing I’m proudest of in my career to date, and I know that the CA team will continue to deliver excellent design and content in what is a great mag.”

“2013 is the year I’m finally accepting that anything is possible if you got the balls to go for it! CA Collection approached us to come up with a cool project. So we had a think, and thought… ‘What the hell – let’s make a clothing line!’ So that’s exactly what we did. We spent three solid weeks pulling it all together, and making it happen – and we are super pleased with the results.”

Dan Oliver Editor-in-chief Steve Gotobed Group art director Robin Abbott Creative director Jim Douglas Editorial director

ADVERTISING Laura Watson Account manager laura.watson@futurenet.com Charlie Said Ad sales director charlie.said@futurenet.com

PRINT AND PRODUCTION Vivienne Turner Production co-ordinator Nola Cokely Ad production manager Karen Flannigan Commercial buyer CIRCUL ATION Chris Day Direct marketing executive chris.day@futurenet.com Daniel Foley Trade marketing manager daniel.foley@futurenet.com Richard Jefferies International account manager richard.jefferies@futurenet.com FUTURE PUBLISHING Declan Gough Publisher Nial Ferguson Group publishing director Cover printer: Philtone Cover finishing: Celloglas Text printer: William Gibbons A5 two-colour booklet: ESP Colour Paper: 350gsm Precision Special Gloss (cover), 130gsm Galerie Fine, Chorus Silk 130gsm matt art (A5 booklet), 70gsm GraphoInvent Typefaces: Simplo, Akkurat, S-L, Courier Distributed by: Seymour Distribution Ltd, 2 East Poultry Avenue, London EC1A 9PT 0207 429 4000

Future produces high-quality multimedia products which reach our audiences online, on mobile and in print. Future attracts over 50 million consumers to its brands every month across five core sectors: Technology, Entertainment, Music, Creative and Sports & Auto. We export and license our publications.

© Future Publishing Limited 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Future Publishing Limited (company number 2008885) is registered in England and Wales. The registered office of Future Publishing Limited is at Beauford Court, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath BA1 2BW. All information contained in this magazine is for information only and is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Future cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. Readers are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price of products/services referred to in this magazine. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Future a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk and, although every care is taken, neither Future nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage.

We are committed to only using magazine paper which is derived from well managed, certified forestry and chlorine-free manufacture. Future Publishing and its paper suppliers have been independently certified in accordance with the rules of the FSC (Forest Stewardship Council).

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Computer Arts Collection Photograply  
Computer Arts Collection Photograply