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front porch T H E R E G I O N ' S free C O M M U N I T Y M A G A Z I N E L o c a l G o o d N e w s S i n c e 1 9 97

YEAR 16 • ISSUE 191 • MAY 2013

Frontporchfredericksburg.com

Bill’s Student

Our Cover 4

Patricia Beaulieu

Passion for Dance 5

Moms

Arch’s Tribute 7

Starving Artists

Post Recession Rebound 11

Roller Derby

New Hometown Team 19

Defining Moments

How We Face Them 22

Forward Motion

Our New Web Site 23

Purple Praise

Potters & Painters 24

Women Power

They THRIVE 30


contents

closeups 5

Patricia Beaulieu ....Her Heart Belongs to Ballet

18

Our Heritage... the crhc collection history’s stories.: federal hill

20

companion care: expect the unexpected

21

autoknown better: mini me

22

Senior Care: how will you respond?

23

our healthcare crisis

11

Beginning Anew ...Artists Seaver & Cannon

24

Art in the ‘burg the big purple: libertytown turns 10

26

Tanya Richey ....Artist & Emissary

25

scene & heard...in the ‘burg!

27

community link: stafford civil war park

28

my own path: love addiction the honeywells: giving back powerfully

29

porchlight: elective affinities

30

Holistic featival for women

31

SAT...get readt stat!

5

porch talk 3

When Pig Fly New on Caroline

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

6

continue our pride: riverfront park

7

Quiet moments: moms

8

Foodie’s tuscany adventure

10

retired on the back porch 3-daytripper: graves mtn bluegrass fest

12

Vino: white again libations: limoncello cocktail

13

season’s bounty: mairsy doats MMMM

15

on the house: draught beer done right

16-17

Calendar of Events

New On Caroline when pigs fly, it’s time to stop by By katie hornung sold Amway in California and used to “drag” her to hear motivational speaker, Zig Ziglar. The books she read growing up were The Magic of Thinking Big by David J. Schwartz, Ph.D. and The Power of Positive Thinking by Dr. Norman Vincent Peale. “My parents were always wanting to do more. They were school teachers, but then they made their own business. I inherited that entrepreneurial spirit.” While painting murals, Janese was struck with inspiration for a multitasking opportunity. A few customers asked her to paint old pieces of furniture in

19

...And more! 9

25

pop culture prevail’s at populuxe

14

taste of oil vinegar & spice

19

roller derby comes to fred

23

FPF new website...check it out! Cover art by anne kadis

When Pigs Fly, it’s time to stop by is the answer to Janese’s prayers. It’s a store where she has set loose her wonderful whimsical ideas and applied them to furniture. The store is symbolic of the idea that “Anything is possible, whether it be a lamp or an opportunity.“ Much of what you will see in the store are recycled and “upcycled” items. According to their creator, upcycled refers to recreating and elevating an item someone no longer wants, bettering it, making it beautiful but keeping the same structure. Recycled describes items that are melted down and made into something new - the construction of the item is changed. For example, a jar can become a beautiful vase or a covered drawer can become an end table. The store, which will open on First Friday, May 3rd, will carry Janese’s home décor creations. Each piece she discovers in a yard sale, second-hand store, or at the curb speaks to her in a way that dictates how she alters it. It is a droll collection, including shabby-chic and nontraditional pieces that range from the primitive to contemporary and funky.

“They’re conversational pieces,” she says with a smile. Janese likens the overall feel of the store to that of a candy shop. “Some people are going to like the hard candy, others the chocolate. Some will choose the soft-stuff, and others will gravitate to the licorice or the lollipop. All merchandise is eclectic, so there is no discernible organization. People are going to say,” Oh, look at that! That’s really neat! I never thought of doing that.’” For this new small-business owner, joining the prestigious grouping of established vendors in downtown Fredericksburg is a dream come true. It’s likely not the last dream she’ll see to fruition, however. Janese (“’Japanese’ with out the ‘pa’”, says Melvin) believes in reinvention in all aspects of her life: “You’re never done; you just keep growing.” After all, she says anything you put your mind to is possible: “If you think you can, you can.” Katie Hornung is a journalism and English comp teacher at JMHS, and a regular contributor to FP.

Spring On Down... Twelve years ago Janese Simunek started Wall Creations and since has created murals, faux finishes and other custom work in many Fredericksburg homes and businesses. Married to Melvin Brown of Fredericksburg Live, she has created scores of whimsical artwork pieces without the benefit of formal training but has thrived with natural talent. She loves the work and has made dozens of friends from her pool of customers. Janese, all energy and drive, is the product of her parents’ influence. They

Our Joe is Blooming!

2

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

addition to her mural work. It planted the seed that she could continue doing what she loved, painting and designing, but do it in a way that was easier on her body. She began finding really great furniture pieces that people didn’t want anymore and began to have fun repurposing them. Janese saw the potential of what the items could be, not just what they were. This year’ s 50th birthday and her discovery of furniture art, caused her to rechannel her energy and commercial spirit. Located at 1011 Caroline Street,

311 William Street 540-3 371-2 2727 www.lapetiteaubergefred.com Open for Lunch & Dinner Mon - Sat

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

3


contents

closeups 5

Patricia Beaulieu ....Her Heart Belongs to Ballet

18

Our Heritage... the crhc collection history’s stories.: federal hill

20

companion care: expect the unexpected

21

autoknown better: mini me

22

Senior Care: how will you respond?

23

our healthcare crisis

11

Beginning Anew ...Artists Seaver & Cannon

24

Art in the ‘burg the big purple: libertytown turns 10

26

Tanya Richey ....Artist & Emissary

25

scene & heard...in the ‘burg!

27

community link: stafford civil war park

28

my own path: love addiction the honeywells: giving back powerfully

29

porchlight: elective affinities

30

Holistic featival for women

31

SAT...get readt stat!

5

porch talk 3

When Pig Fly New on Caroline

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

6

continue our pride: riverfront park

7

Quiet moments: moms

8

Foodie’s tuscany adventure

10

retired on the back porch 3-daytripper: graves mtn bluegrass fest

12

Vino: white again libations: limoncello cocktail

13

season’s bounty: mairsy doats MMMM

15

on the house: draught beer done right

16-17

Calendar of Events

New On Caroline when pigs fly, it’s time to stop by By katie hornung sold Amway in California and used to “drag” her to hear motivational speaker, Zig Ziglar. The books she read growing up were The Magic of Thinking Big by David J. Schwartz, Ph.D. and The Power of Positive Thinking by Dr. Norman Vincent Peale. “My parents were always wanting to do more. They were school teachers, but then they made their own business. I inherited that entrepreneurial spirit.” While painting murals, Janese was struck with inspiration for a multitasking opportunity. A few customers asked her to paint old pieces of furniture in

19

...And more! 9

25

pop culture prevail’s at populuxe

14

taste of oil vinegar & spice

19

roller derby comes to fred

23

FPF new website...check it out! Cover art by anne kadis

When Pigs Fly, it’s time to stop by is the answer to Janese’s prayers. It’s a store where she has set loose her wonderful whimsical ideas and applied them to furniture. The store is symbolic of the idea that “Anything is possible, whether it be a lamp or an opportunity.“ Much of what you will see in the store are recycled and “upcycled” items. According to their creator, upcycled refers to recreating and elevating an item someone no longer wants, bettering it, making it beautiful but keeping the same structure. Recycled describes items that are melted down and made into something new - the construction of the item is changed. For example, a jar can become a beautiful vase or a covered drawer can become an end table. The store, which will open on First Friday, May 3rd, will carry Janese’s home décor creations. Each piece she discovers in a yard sale, second-hand store, or at the curb speaks to her in a way that dictates how she alters it. It is a droll collection, including shabby-chic and nontraditional pieces that range from the primitive to contemporary and funky.

“They’re conversational pieces,” she says with a smile. Janese likens the overall feel of the store to that of a candy shop. “Some people are going to like the hard candy, others the chocolate. Some will choose the soft-stuff, and others will gravitate to the licorice or the lollipop. All merchandise is eclectic, so there is no discernible organization. People are going to say,” Oh, look at that! That’s really neat! I never thought of doing that.’” For this new small-business owner, joining the prestigious grouping of established vendors in downtown Fredericksburg is a dream come true. It’s likely not the last dream she’ll see to fruition, however. Janese (“’Japanese’ with out the ‘pa’”, says Melvin) believes in reinvention in all aspects of her life: “You’re never done; you just keep growing.” After all, she says anything you put your mind to is possible: “If you think you can, you can.” Katie Hornung is a journalism and English comp teacher at JMHS, and a regular contributor to FP.

Spring On Down... Twelve years ago Janese Simunek started Wall Creations and since has created murals, faux finishes and other custom work in many Fredericksburg homes and businesses. Married to Melvin Brown of Fredericksburg Live, she has created scores of whimsical artwork pieces without the benefit of formal training but has thrived with natural talent. She loves the work and has made dozens of friends from her pool of customers. Janese, all energy and drive, is the product of her parents’ influence. They

Our Joe is Blooming!

2

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

addition to her mural work. It planted the seed that she could continue doing what she loved, painting and designing, but do it in a way that was easier on her body. She began finding really great furniture pieces that people didn’t want anymore and began to have fun repurposing them. Janese saw the potential of what the items could be, not just what they were. This year’ s 50th birthday and her discovery of furniture art, caused her to rechannel her energy and commercial spirit. Located at 1011 Caroline Street,

311 William Street 540-3 371-2 2727 www.lapetiteaubergefred.com Open for Lunch & Dinner Mon - Sat

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

3


ON THE PORCH Rob Grogan Myles Bigenwald

Photographer Archer Di Peppe Contributing Writers & Artists A.E.Bayne Melanie Bell Megan Byrnes Collette Caprara C.Ruth Cassell Lezlie Cheryl Arch Di Peppe Frank Fratoe William Garnett Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks Sue Henderson Katie Hornung Rob Huffman Lori Izykowski Karl Karch Anne Kadis Matt Kelly Sandra Manigault Jo Middleton Susan Carter Morgan Amy Millis Vanessa Moncure Jefferson Nazworth Amy Pearce Wendy Schmitz Victoria Scrimer Arnold Seboya Matt Thomas Christine Thompson Nancy Vance Rim Vining Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co., Inc. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Phone: 540-220-1922 E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2013 Olde Towne Publishing Co., LLC All rights reserved.

resilience and Resolve Windows open. Sweet botanical air flows in. Ceiling fans swirl. Fresh-cut flowers. The herbal-like scent of newly cut grass. It’s May! How resilient, the ground and rich soil. Flowers reappear after tolerating a cold, frosty dormancy. Green leaves pepper the trees, filling in visual gaps and quieting the manmade noise of highway and city life. The community stretches. No other season, perhaps, seeds positive thinking quite like spring, and no other month epitomizes resilience and resolve like the merry, merry month of May. Mother’s Day – what more of a sign could we ask for than the one special day we set aside each year to celebrate nature’s most wondrous invention – Mom! Mom, the nurturer, the backbone of family, the amazing sacrificer... Happy day to all moms (Archer Di Peppe’s Quiet Moments this month expresses the sentiment best)… Memorial Day – our tribute to the fallen, among the true heroes of American life throughout our nation’s history. Our troops — like Moms with valor — bravely deploying lethal weapons in our defense, at great personal risk, willing to make the ultimate sacrifice, for us and for our way of life. And in our community, one of the most moving displays of tribute in the world takes place every Memorial weekend at the National Cemetery on Lafayette Blvd. If you have yet to see the luminary tribute, you have not fully experienced

Fredericksburg, compliments of the National Park Service. May. A renewal of affirmations, meditations, and prayer for the future to hold a phenomenal potential for peace despite our high-risk world. Yes, we had Boston, but Boston proved to be Boston Strong. Our Fredericksburg has avoided a different form of terror since the horrors of war 150 years ago, and has rebuilt a community cemented by the resilience and resolve of its great heritage of people (a tip of my cap to the Okeson family in south Stafford and its four-generation legacy of embracing a life provided by the land around them, their own hard work, and their neighborly ways). Sleepless one recent night, I caught a 1 a.m. showing on TV of my favorite movie – The Shawshank Redemption. The film tells the story of Andy Dufresne (played by Tim Robbins), a banker who spends nearly two decades in Shawshank State Prison for the murder of his wife and her lover despite his claims of innocence. During his time at the prison, he befriends a fellow inmate, Ellis Boyd “Red” Redding (Morgan Freeman), and finds himself protected by the guards

messages

Rob,

Nice editorial in the April issue! Kindness is so often a neglected virtue today, and by that I mean REAL “loving kindness.” Anthea Poole, Fredericksburg Good Morning, I just wanted to say “Good Bye” and “Thank You” for all of the effort you did in the past years working with me, DRMI, and the Richard Johnston Inn. I have been in Fredericksburg for 12 yrs as manager of the Richard Johnston Inn and I am leaving to manage a new property that the corporation has bought in Melbourne Beach, Florida called the Windemere Inn by the Sea. If you are ever in the area, please come and stay with me. Thanks again, Bonnie DeLelys NOTE:

Robgwrites 4

May 2013

Patricia Beaulieu

Editor Associate Editor

And Thank You, Bonnie, for all you have done for Downtown. Best wishes on your new venture.

Front porch fredericksburg

I want to deeply thank you for your (April) On The Porch article. It was so beautifully written that it is like poetry. It holds the promise of good and light in a complicated world so very changed. How blessed we are to have a community that inspired your words of hope and faith and beauty. Thank you for the gift of your written words of the soul. May they encourage all who feel lost. The article on my shop, Under the Mango Tree, is so much appreciated. The article and the shop reflect your written piece. We try to make the world a bit better every day. The shop was created by God and is dedicated to Him with much love and gratitude. The people who find their way to this spot have given so much to the vision and the mission these past two years. All blessings, Vivian West, Under the Mango Tree Rob: The new (web site) layout looks amazing. It’s so easy to read online. I

my heart belongs to ballet by rob grogan form correctly while building confidence, having fun, getting exercise and find their inner dancer, we all have one. Your dance teacher should be able to help you reach your goals and keep you working towards them, but you may need to tell your teacher about your goals

after the warden begins using him in his money laundering operation. This film is a story of justice, of resilience, and of resolve, as well as caring, compassion, and hard work. Resilience and resolve, care and compassion, hard work – with that recipe, no community can lose its soul. So join us in our community’s celebration of Moms, Memorials, and May this month, and all of the resilience and resolve those special events imply. Go inside these pages and find a column of interest or a profile of someone to admire. Reawaken with us, cover to cover.

also want to thank you for the layout on my piece about poetry month. That looks fantastic! Kudos. Amy Bayne It’s always a treat each month to read your paper. It never fails to provide food for thought and a treasured sense of community. Fredericksburg is so fortunate to have it. Thank you, Rob. Betsy Glassie, Fredericksburg

About the Cover: Anne Kadis and her husband Biff found an old farmhouse in Stafford built around 1890. Anne’s painting, entitled “Frankie’s Porch” captures their front porch in summertime, and her beloved cat “Frankie” sleeping the afternoon away. Anne returned to her love of oil painting and began to study under Bill Harris at Liberty Town last year. She calls Bill “the master” and credits him with reconnecting her to her artistic roots. Anne has shown her work at LibertyTown, Fredericksburg Fine Arts Exhibit, and at kybecca.

She has a passion for all forms of dance, teaching Jazz, Lyrical and Ballet regularly, and the occasional session of Tap or Hip Hop to beginner or intermediate students. Trish Beaulieu has taught children from 2 years old to, “I think my oldest student was 85.” Right now most are ages 8-18 and learning beginners to advanced dancers, some of which are headed off to college this year to pursue careers in dance; “I feel like a proud mother of these kids.” Trish believes you can start dancing at any age: “Talent isn’t something defined by age. But generally speaking getting into classes, to seriously train, should begin as soon as possible maybe age 7 or 8 is good but 2-5 years old is even better. Yes I did say 2 years old. Children are amazing and resilient and can retain so much information starting at a young age; it certainly can’t hurt the motor skills and socialization.” Everyone comes to a dance class for some reason, whether they want to have fun, want to get exercise or try something new. “The idea is to give a student the skills to execute the dance

so they may help you attain them.” Trish also takes classes mostly at her main studio, Artistry Dance Center, with Melissa Cook, Thomas “TJ” Jacobs and Sian Packard. She also branches out for classes in town, up in DC, and “the very rare times I get to NYC to study with masters in Ballet, Jazz, Modern, Lyrical, Hip Hop; I love it all.” Trish is currently dancing with Dance Matrix a Dance Company in Fredericksburg run by Beverly Mendez and rehearsing for a kids show at Riverside Dinner Theater. “I am also working in

collaboration with my friend Rachel Shrader to produce the Nutcracker in a Steam Punk style.” Dance is definitely her lifestyle, “or my excuse to get away with wearing sweatpants more than I should. I have always been a very active person and for many years suffered emotionally. Dance has helped balance my energy and emotional well-being. As a dancer, it takes a lot to stay healthy from eating right to sustaining muscular, bone, tendon, and energy health. I really like Qi Gong, which I do on my own. Yoga at Zen Farm with Liz Eitt is amazing for my body and the amazing body savers at Natural Therapy have all kept me going for several years now, when I thought I was at an end in my dance career.” Dance is but one aspect of her approach to healthy living. “I NEVER eat fast food, say NO to soda, white sugar and aspartame, drink lots of water; I juice my

own fruits and vegetables, get plenty of rest and alone time. Time for one self is important for the participation in society as a nice person, kindness to self and whole body rejuvenation.” Her husband, musician Tom Beaulieu, teaches at Pickers Supply a couple of days a week, goes to some students’ houses for lessons and plays with Afro Funk All Stars regularly, including at the Rumba Cafe every other Thursday in D.C. Tom has also been recording with a local Christian artist on an album due out soon and was asked to go on tour with him. Trish is a good healthy person to know and talk with; she always brings a positive point to the conversation and wears her heartfelt passion for dance on those everyday sweatpants of hers . -RG

Days Gone By Courtesy of the William T. Garnett Collection

St. George's Episcopal Church on Princess Anne Street is one of the most photographed and painted downtown icons of all time. Inside, it is gorgeous, a respite for the soul..

Reach William T. Garnett Antiques at 540-424-2448.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

5


ON THE PORCH Rob Grogan Myles Bigenwald

Photographer Archer Di Peppe Contributing Writers & Artists A.E.Bayne Melanie Bell Megan Byrnes Collette Caprara C.Ruth Cassell Lezlie Cheryl Arch Di Peppe Frank Fratoe William Garnett Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks Sue Henderson Katie Hornung Rob Huffman Lori Izykowski Karl Karch Anne Kadis Matt Kelly Sandra Manigault Jo Middleton Susan Carter Morgan Amy Millis Vanessa Moncure Jefferson Nazworth Amy Pearce Wendy Schmitz Victoria Scrimer Arnold Seboya Matt Thomas Christine Thompson Nancy Vance Rim Vining Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co., Inc. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Phone: 540-220-1922 E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2013 Olde Towne Publishing Co., LLC All rights reserved.

resilience and Resolve Windows open. Sweet botanical air flows in. Ceiling fans swirl. Fresh-cut flowers. The herbal-like scent of newly cut grass. It’s May! How resilient, the ground and rich soil. Flowers reappear after tolerating a cold, frosty dormancy. Green leaves pepper the trees, filling in visual gaps and quieting the manmade noise of highway and city life. The community stretches. No other season, perhaps, seeds positive thinking quite like spring, and no other month epitomizes resilience and resolve like the merry, merry month of May. Mother’s Day – what more of a sign could we ask for than the one special day we set aside each year to celebrate nature’s most wondrous invention – Mom! Mom, the nurturer, the backbone of family, the amazing sacrificer... Happy day to all moms (Archer Di Peppe’s Quiet Moments this month expresses the sentiment best)… Memorial Day – our tribute to the fallen, among the true heroes of American life throughout our nation’s history. Our troops — like Moms with valor — bravely deploying lethal weapons in our defense, at great personal risk, willing to make the ultimate sacrifice, for us and for our way of life. And in our community, one of the most moving displays of tribute in the world takes place every Memorial weekend at the National Cemetery on Lafayette Blvd. If you have yet to see the luminary tribute, you have not fully experienced

Fredericksburg, compliments of the National Park Service. May. A renewal of affirmations, meditations, and prayer for the future to hold a phenomenal potential for peace despite our high-risk world. Yes, we had Boston, but Boston proved to be Boston Strong. Our Fredericksburg has avoided a different form of terror since the horrors of war 150 years ago, and has rebuilt a community cemented by the resilience and resolve of its great heritage of people (a tip of my cap to the Okeson family in south Stafford and its four-generation legacy of embracing a life provided by the land around them, their own hard work, and their neighborly ways). Sleepless one recent night, I caught a 1 a.m. showing on TV of my favorite movie – The Shawshank Redemption. The film tells the story of Andy Dufresne (played by Tim Robbins), a banker who spends nearly two decades in Shawshank State Prison for the murder of his wife and her lover despite his claims of innocence. During his time at the prison, he befriends a fellow inmate, Ellis Boyd “Red” Redding (Morgan Freeman), and finds himself protected by the guards

messages

Rob,

Nice editorial in the April issue! Kindness is so often a neglected virtue today, and by that I mean REAL “loving kindness.” Anthea Poole, Fredericksburg Good Morning, I just wanted to say “Good Bye” and “Thank You” for all of the effort you did in the past years working with me, DRMI, and the Richard Johnston Inn. I have been in Fredericksburg for 12 yrs as manager of the Richard Johnston Inn and I am leaving to manage a new property that the corporation has bought in Melbourne Beach, Florida called the Windemere Inn by the Sea. If you are ever in the area, please come and stay with me. Thanks again, Bonnie DeLelys NOTE:

Robgwrites 4

May 2013

Patricia Beaulieu

Editor Associate Editor

And Thank You, Bonnie, for all you have done for Downtown. Best wishes on your new venture.

Front porch fredericksburg

I want to deeply thank you for your (April) On The Porch article. It was so beautifully written that it is like poetry. It holds the promise of good and light in a complicated world so very changed. How blessed we are to have a community that inspired your words of hope and faith and beauty. Thank you for the gift of your written words of the soul. May they encourage all who feel lost. The article on my shop, Under the Mango Tree, is so much appreciated. The article and the shop reflect your written piece. We try to make the world a bit better every day. The shop was created by God and is dedicated to Him with much love and gratitude. The people who find their way to this spot have given so much to the vision and the mission these past two years. All blessings, Vivian West, Under the Mango Tree Rob: The new (web site) layout looks amazing. It’s so easy to read online. I

my heart belongs to ballet by rob grogan form correctly while building confidence, having fun, getting exercise and find their inner dancer, we all have one. Your dance teacher should be able to help you reach your goals and keep you working towards them, but you may need to tell your teacher about your goals

after the warden begins using him in his money laundering operation. This film is a story of justice, of resilience, and of resolve, as well as caring, compassion, and hard work. Resilience and resolve, care and compassion, hard work – with that recipe, no community can lose its soul. So join us in our community’s celebration of Moms, Memorials, and May this month, and all of the resilience and resolve those special events imply. Go inside these pages and find a column of interest or a profile of someone to admire. Reawaken with us, cover to cover.

also want to thank you for the layout on my piece about poetry month. That looks fantastic! Kudos. Amy Bayne It’s always a treat each month to read your paper. It never fails to provide food for thought and a treasured sense of community. Fredericksburg is so fortunate to have it. Thank you, Rob. Betsy Glassie, Fredericksburg

About the Cover: Anne Kadis and her husband Biff found an old farmhouse in Stafford built around 1890. Anne’s painting, entitled “Frankie’s Porch” captures their front porch in summertime, and her beloved cat “Frankie” sleeping the afternoon away. Anne returned to her love of oil painting and began to study under Bill Harris at Liberty Town last year. She calls Bill “the master” and credits him with reconnecting her to her artistic roots. Anne has shown her work at LibertyTown, Fredericksburg Fine Arts Exhibit, and at kybecca.

She has a passion for all forms of dance, teaching Jazz, Lyrical and Ballet regularly, and the occasional session of Tap or Hip Hop to beginner or intermediate students. Trish Beaulieu has taught children from 2 years old to, “I think my oldest student was 85.” Right now most are ages 8-18 and learning beginners to advanced dancers, some of which are headed off to college this year to pursue careers in dance; “I feel like a proud mother of these kids.” Trish believes you can start dancing at any age: “Talent isn’t something defined by age. But generally speaking getting into classes, to seriously train, should begin as soon as possible maybe age 7 or 8 is good but 2-5 years old is even better. Yes I did say 2 years old. Children are amazing and resilient and can retain so much information starting at a young age; it certainly can’t hurt the motor skills and socialization.” Everyone comes to a dance class for some reason, whether they want to have fun, want to get exercise or try something new. “The idea is to give a student the skills to execute the dance

so they may help you attain them.” Trish also takes classes mostly at her main studio, Artistry Dance Center, with Melissa Cook, Thomas “TJ” Jacobs and Sian Packard. She also branches out for classes in town, up in DC, and “the very rare times I get to NYC to study with masters in Ballet, Jazz, Modern, Lyrical, Hip Hop; I love it all.” Trish is currently dancing with Dance Matrix a Dance Company in Fredericksburg run by Beverly Mendez and rehearsing for a kids show at Riverside Dinner Theater. “I am also working in

collaboration with my friend Rachel Shrader to produce the Nutcracker in a Steam Punk style.” Dance is definitely her lifestyle, “or my excuse to get away with wearing sweatpants more than I should. I have always been a very active person and for many years suffered emotionally. Dance has helped balance my energy and emotional well-being. As a dancer, it takes a lot to stay healthy from eating right to sustaining muscular, bone, tendon, and energy health. I really like Qi Gong, which I do on my own. Yoga at Zen Farm with Liz Eitt is amazing for my body and the amazing body savers at Natural Therapy have all kept me going for several years now, when I thought I was at an end in my dance career.” Dance is but one aspect of her approach to healthy living. “I NEVER eat fast food, say NO to soda, white sugar and aspartame, drink lots of water; I juice my

own fruits and vegetables, get plenty of rest and alone time. Time for one self is important for the participation in society as a nice person, kindness to self and whole body rejuvenation.” Her husband, musician Tom Beaulieu, teaches at Pickers Supply a couple of days a week, goes to some students’ houses for lessons and plays with Afro Funk All Stars regularly, including at the Rumba Cafe every other Thursday in D.C. Tom has also been recording with a local Christian artist on an album due out soon and was asked to go on tour with him. Trish is a good healthy person to know and talk with; she always brings a positive point to the conversation and wears her heartfelt passion for dance on those everyday sweatpants of hers . -RG

Days Gone By Courtesy of the William T. Garnett Collection

St. George's Episcopal Church on Princess Anne Street is one of the most photographed and painted downtown icons of all time. Inside, it is gorgeous, a respite for the soul..

Reach William T. Garnett Antiques at 540-424-2448.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

5


Quiet Moments

CONTINUE OUR PRIDE

By archer Dipeppe

By matt kelly the park should be considered. Some thoughts are a canoe launch and or access for tubing. Using the existing dock should be incorporated in any plan for the park. While not discussed in this piece, cost is an important issue that must be addressed at some point. And these proposals could run afoul of regulations, although no one has yet given me a definitive “no” on anything proposed. I hope that my small effort will generate public discussion. One of Fredericksburg’s strengths is the wealth of experience and expertise in the community. In the coming months, I hope to hear comments, constructive criticism, and new ideas for the proposed riverfront park. Together we can advance a project that continues our pride of community.

Matt Kelly is a member of Fredericksburg City Council.

photo by alexis m. grogan

6

May 2013

For Our Oral History -A Fredericksburg Treasure

moms

riverfront park - community jewel

Fredericksburg needs a riverfront park. I reached this conclusion after months of interviewing city staff, interest groups, current and potential users, and reviewing all related plans and reports. Following are my ideas based on that research. Regulatory constraints exist. The proposal encompasses a Resource Protection Area (RPA) and a floodway, so we must consider restrictions on new structures, limits on grading, erosion runoff and impervious-surfaces issues. Could Fredericksburg use an events/concert venue? Space appears for a 4000-person entertainment center adjacent to Shiloh Baptist Church by installing a pad to accommodate a temporary stage between the church and the adjacent city lot. Water and electrical service would be expanded, and fencing constructed to comply with Commonwealth ABC laws (if alcohol is permitted) and to help with crowd control. After probable demolition of the old lodge building, a smaller building would accommodate adequate bathroom space. How would we use an “amphitheater?” Diligent effort has not answered that question. “The bowl” is small, prone to flooding, and current

Dearly Wanted: Fredericksburg's Oldest Residents

grading prevents comfortable seating. Suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Losses — reduced park usage and harm to downtown businesses — would occur with reduction in the 100 parking spaces currently located in the proposed park area. Difficulties would occur in staging vendors for Heritage Festival and other events. Solutions include widening Sophia Street to create angled parking while burying power lines. Soft curbs could help. These ideas would replace some parking while providing additional space for events along Sophia Street. Incorporating two other projects into the park design should also be considered. This section of Sophia Street is part of the city’s Downtown Loop bicycle trail as well as the East Coast Greenway a trail system from Key West to Canada. A promenade along Sophia Street could accommodate these plans as well as providing additional space for events. The remainder of the park would be for passive recreation — benches, picnic tables, and possibly a playground. We could consider a landscaping theme of plants and trees of Virginia with a trail and appropriate signage. This area would also be ideal for public art such as a sculpture garden. Finally, access to the river from

Front porch fredericksburg

May 12th Call for Reservations

Selections of Breakfast, Salads, Entrees with Carving Station and Desserts

New On Fridays May 10 & 24 June 14 & 28 Blues and Jazz Music In Mary Washington Room Cash cover charge 620 CAROLINE STREET FREDERICKSBURG VA 22401 540.373.8300

This column is to all the Moms out there, especially my mother and my wife. My mother is eighty-eight now, and I am extremely fortunate to still have her. My father passed away twenty years ago, so my mother is the living link to my childhood. It was wonderful one. My wife and I have been married for thirty-seven years. My mother has said many times that my wife is the only woman that could put up with me. She is right. Thank you, Mom, for reminding me. Mothers are the glue that holds the family together. They make sure all the things that are supposed to happen do happen. They are the center of the holidays. They not only know what their children want, but more importantly, what they need. Thank you.

They encourage and protect. They teach us to be honest with ourselves. Their lives embody patience. They teach us right from wrong. There are still a lot of things I won’t do because my mother wouldn’t like it. They see the best in us, even when we can’t see it. Thank you. They love us enough to say no when we need to hear it. I needed it a lot. I know that no matter what happens to me, Mom will be there. Confidence grows from having that kind of love. Thank you. Their lives are filled with ten thousand little things. They told us to comb our hair, wash our faces, and tuck in our shirts. They will do that a thousand times, if need be. They bandage the cuts, wipe away the tears, and give us hope. Thank you. They love us even when we don’t want to be loved in the way they love us. They tell us all the things we need to hear when we don’t want to hear them. They want us to be good for goodness sake. They mold us into the adults we become. They are short on excuses and long on accountability. Thank you. They are there at our bedsides when we are sick. My wife worked for thirty-two years and never took a sick day for herself. She saved them all to stay home when our children were sick. Moms are the lightest sleepers when the children are small. They have magic radar and know when something isn’t right before anyone else does. They say some people have a sixth sense. The average mother has a seventh, eighth, and ninth sense because they need them. Thank you.

My mother taught me to love to read. She always has a book with her. It is harder to read now, but that doesn’t stop her. At eighty-eight it’s harder to do many things, but that doesn’t stop her, either. There is a long metal staircase to the back door of her co-op. She negotiates the stairs with a cane in one hand and a bag of laundry in the other. There is an elevator, but she seldom uses it. It scares the hell out of me, but she says the stairs are good for her. We have given up trying to get her to come live with us. She wants her independence. Thank you for teaching me all about independence and self- reliance and personal responsibility and honesty and everything else. My wife has done the same thing for our children. This column is dedicated to the two Moms in my life who make me who I am and who won’t settle for anything less than the very best I can be. Happy Mother’s Day. I love you both, and THANK YOU Moms!

Front Porch is calling for Our Town's Ageless Citizens to let us know who they are so our writers can sit and hear their wonderful stories. We treasure your lives and memories.

Archer Di Peppe is author of the book, Quiet Moments, and is the official Johnny Appleseed of Front Porch.

We Are Seeking Stoneware With This Mark: And any other early Fredericksburg items: Stoneware, Furnitue, Clocks, Silver, Books, etc. CONTACT: bill@becksantiques.com or call 540-371-1766 708 Caroline St., Downtown Fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

7


Quiet Moments

CONTINUE OUR PRIDE

By archer Dipeppe

By matt kelly the park should be considered. Some thoughts are a canoe launch and or access for tubing. Using the existing dock should be incorporated in any plan for the park. While not discussed in this piece, cost is an important issue that must be addressed at some point. And these proposals could run afoul of regulations, although no one has yet given me a definitive “no” on anything proposed. I hope that my small effort will generate public discussion. One of Fredericksburg’s strengths is the wealth of experience and expertise in the community. In the coming months, I hope to hear comments, constructive criticism, and new ideas for the proposed riverfront park. Together we can advance a project that continues our pride of community.

Matt Kelly is a member of Fredericksburg City Council.

photo by alexis m. grogan

6

May 2013

For Our Oral History -A Fredericksburg Treasure

moms

riverfront park - community jewel

Fredericksburg needs a riverfront park. I reached this conclusion after months of interviewing city staff, interest groups, current and potential users, and reviewing all related plans and reports. Following are my ideas based on that research. Regulatory constraints exist. The proposal encompasses a Resource Protection Area (RPA) and a floodway, so we must consider restrictions on new structures, limits on grading, erosion runoff and impervious-surfaces issues. Could Fredericksburg use an events/concert venue? Space appears for a 4000-person entertainment center adjacent to Shiloh Baptist Church by installing a pad to accommodate a temporary stage between the church and the adjacent city lot. Water and electrical service would be expanded, and fencing constructed to comply with Commonwealth ABC laws (if alcohol is permitted) and to help with crowd control. After probable demolition of the old lodge building, a smaller building would accommodate adequate bathroom space. How would we use an “amphitheater?” Diligent effort has not answered that question. “The bowl” is small, prone to flooding, and current

Dearly Wanted: Fredericksburg's Oldest Residents

grading prevents comfortable seating. Suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Losses — reduced park usage and harm to downtown businesses — would occur with reduction in the 100 parking spaces currently located in the proposed park area. Difficulties would occur in staging vendors for Heritage Festival and other events. Solutions include widening Sophia Street to create angled parking while burying power lines. Soft curbs could help. These ideas would replace some parking while providing additional space for events along Sophia Street. Incorporating two other projects into the park design should also be considered. This section of Sophia Street is part of the city’s Downtown Loop bicycle trail as well as the East Coast Greenway a trail system from Key West to Canada. A promenade along Sophia Street could accommodate these plans as well as providing additional space for events. The remainder of the park would be for passive recreation — benches, picnic tables, and possibly a playground. We could consider a landscaping theme of plants and trees of Virginia with a trail and appropriate signage. This area would also be ideal for public art such as a sculpture garden. Finally, access to the river from

Front porch fredericksburg

May 12th Call for Reservations

Selections of Breakfast, Salads, Entrees with Carving Station and Desserts

New On Fridays May 10 & 24 June 14 & 28 Blues and Jazz Music In Mary Washington Room Cash cover charge 620 CAROLINE STREET FREDERICKSBURG VA 22401 540.373.8300

This column is to all the Moms out there, especially my mother and my wife. My mother is eighty-eight now, and I am extremely fortunate to still have her. My father passed away twenty years ago, so my mother is the living link to my childhood. It was wonderful one. My wife and I have been married for thirty-seven years. My mother has said many times that my wife is the only woman that could put up with me. She is right. Thank you, Mom, for reminding me. Mothers are the glue that holds the family together. They make sure all the things that are supposed to happen do happen. They are the center of the holidays. They not only know what their children want, but more importantly, what they need. Thank you.

They encourage and protect. They teach us to be honest with ourselves. Their lives embody patience. They teach us right from wrong. There are still a lot of things I won’t do because my mother wouldn’t like it. They see the best in us, even when we can’t see it. Thank you. They love us enough to say no when we need to hear it. I needed it a lot. I know that no matter what happens to me, Mom will be there. Confidence grows from having that kind of love. Thank you. Their lives are filled with ten thousand little things. They told us to comb our hair, wash our faces, and tuck in our shirts. They will do that a thousand times, if need be. They bandage the cuts, wipe away the tears, and give us hope. Thank you. They love us even when we don’t want to be loved in the way they love us. They tell us all the things we need to hear when we don’t want to hear them. They want us to be good for goodness sake. They mold us into the adults we become. They are short on excuses and long on accountability. Thank you. They are there at our bedsides when we are sick. My wife worked for thirty-two years and never took a sick day for herself. She saved them all to stay home when our children were sick. Moms are the lightest sleepers when the children are small. They have magic radar and know when something isn’t right before anyone else does. They say some people have a sixth sense. The average mother has a seventh, eighth, and ninth sense because they need them. Thank you.

My mother taught me to love to read. She always has a book with her. It is harder to read now, but that doesn’t stop her. At eighty-eight it’s harder to do many things, but that doesn’t stop her, either. There is a long metal staircase to the back door of her co-op. She negotiates the stairs with a cane in one hand and a bag of laundry in the other. There is an elevator, but she seldom uses it. It scares the hell out of me, but she says the stairs are good for her. We have given up trying to get her to come live with us. She wants her independence. Thank you for teaching me all about independence and self- reliance and personal responsibility and honesty and everything else. My wife has done the same thing for our children. This column is dedicated to the two Moms in my life who make me who I am and who won’t settle for anything less than the very best I can be. Happy Mother’s Day. I love you both, and THANK YOU Moms!

Front Porch is calling for Our Town's Ageless Citizens to let us know who they are so our writers can sit and hear their wonderful stories. We treasure your lives and memories.

Archer Di Peppe is author of the book, Quiet Moments, and is the official Johnny Appleseed of Front Porch.

We Are Seeking Stoneware With This Mark: And any other early Fredericksburg items: Stoneware, Furnitue, Clocks, Silver, Books, etc. CONTACT: bill@becksantiques.com or call 540-371-1766 708 Caroline St., Downtown Fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

7


Pop Culture

Foodie’s Tuscany Adventure By Sue Henderson “The Romans were party animals,” said Olive Garden Head Chef Paulo Lafuta (pictured) introducing Italian cooking lessons at the Culinary Institute of Tuscany to the Olive Garden/Colavita Olive Oil Sweepstakes winners. Surrounded by mountaintopfortress villages, olive groves and grapevines, the beautiful Rocca della Macie Winery hosted the winter Institute, and the makers of Colavita olive oil hosted a trip in Florence and Rome. At the Culinary Institute, we learned that the Roman Empire continued to influence food flavors and techniques after the empire’s dissolution in 400 AD. The sun and soil conditions encouraged regional specialties in isolated fiefdoms. Tuscan cooking celebrates “the local movement” which maximizes the benefits of the long growing season beginning with artichokes and kale in early March and working toward the olives and grapes in October and November. Add all these influences together, and you get fabulous food. As part of our prize-winning tour, we learned to make classic sauces. We were cautioned to make sure to add ingredients in the order listed and to take time to do it right. We were encouraged to use all our senses when cooking – watch the color change in the onions, listen for

the sizzle to know they are sweated out, lean in and smell for that distinctive onion scent. If the smell isn’t there, it isn’t ready for the next ingredient. You really should cook two of these wonderful recipes. Try them out, and use all of your senses.

Bolognese Sauce Yield: 1.75 gallons 6 oz Colavita extra virgin olive oil; ½ tsp black pepper; 3 Tbsp fresh garlic, minced; 1 ½ tsp salt; 8 oz yellow onion, minced; 8 oz red wine (quality Chianti recommended); 4 oz carrots, minced; 1 sm can tomato paste; 4 oz celery, minced; 1 lg can whole tomatoes; 4 lbs ground beef; 1 ½ lb ground pork. Heat oil to cover the bottom of a large pan on high heat. Add garlic, onions, carrots and celery. Saute for 10 min until dry and you can smell onion (minced vegetables are very finely minced to blend w/out being noticed). Add both beef and pork using a potato masher to break up clumps. Continue mashing and cooking until pink is no longer visible and the liquid is evaporated; Add wine and simmer for

Prevails at populuxe

5 min or until evaporated; Stir in tomato paste, salt & black pepper. Stir until meat mixture well coated, add tomatoes. Stir frequently until bubbling, reduce heat to simmer; Simmer 1 hour, 15 min stirring every 10 min; Bag, seal, label, refrigerate for freezing or immediate use. (Source: Olive Garden Culinary Institute of Tuscany)

By A.E.Bayne

Salsa di Pomodori Freschi (Fresh Tomato Sauce) Yield:

22 oz/ a generous serving for 6-8

1 oz Colavita extra virgin olive oil; 1 tsp garlic, chopped; 1 lb vine ripe Roma tomatoes, ½” chopped; 2 Tbsp fresh basil, chopped; ½ lb red cherry tomatoes, ½” chopped; ½ tsp salt; ½ tsp pepper. Wash, strain, randomly chop all tomatoes into ½ “ pieces. Heat sauté pan at medium heat, add extra virgin olive oil to cover bottom of pan. Add garlic, basil and stir. Add tomatoes, salt & pepper. Flip until well blended and you see tomatoes sweat. Sauté 10 min while pasta cooking. Remove pan from heat. (We were encouraged to cook paste halfway in water, strain, add to tomato mixture to complete

cooking in tomato juices.) (Source: Olive Garden Culinary Institute of Tuscany) You can buy Colavita olive oil in Fredericksburg grocery stores. And if you’re in Tuscany, visit the Rocca della Macie Winery and Fizzano Restaurant to see why we so fondly remember the amazing food and delightful hospitality of our hosts. Sue Henderson is an artist and traveling foodie with a studio overlooking the Rappahannock.

CHUCK HOFFMAN REALTOR, ABR, SFR, MBA I will provide professional help for both home buyers and sellers to accomplish your real estate objectives! TRUSTED & CANDID SERVICE FOR DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG & NEARBY COMMUNITIES Award Winning Service

www.yourFREDrealtor.com 540-370-0695 Direct 540-845-1468 Cell 540-373-0100 Office 540-370-0757 Fax choffman@cbcarriagehouse.com

520 William Street, Suite A, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 Chuck Hoffman is a licensed salesperson in the Commonwealth of Virginia

8

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Amidst the shops on lower William Street sits Populuxe, Fredericksburg’s newest pop culture emporium. Fashioned around the stylings of the 1950s and 60s, Populuxe proudly proclaims to be “where kitsch meets cool.” Owners Dom and Charlene Salemi have transformed the storefront into a welcoming space where visitors take a nostalgia trip to a time when leather was tuff, Hawaiian shirts denoted boss beach fashion, and vinyl was the only disc to spin. For Dom, Populuxe represents all things taboo from his childhood, “Horror films were banned, Rock & Roll records were not allowed, and cool 50s fashion, as exemplified by Elvis Presley, James Dean, and Marlon Brando, were forbidden. So, as soon as I got old enough to make my own decisions, I bought these things. I started gravitating toward Jack Kerouac and the beat writers. It progressed from there to so many wonderful places in my life.” Populuxe was recently located in Colonial Beach, where Charlene says she and Dom found it difficult to build a steady clientele. They noticed that many of their returning customers were traveling from Fredericksburg to visit the shop; and after becoming regulars at Fredericksburg’s First Friday art walks and befriending local artists, they decided to make the move. Charlene says they realized, “There must be some kind of underground movement in Fredericksburg. There was just this hip, edgy group of people that were trying to make the city into an interesting place in terms of music and art. Since we opened here in March, we have found the coolest, nicest, most talented people. It’s just amazing. There’s a lot of collaboration here; people help each other and nurture creativity. We wanted to be a part of it.”

And a part of it they are fast becoming! The Salemis hope to make Populuxe a fixture in Fredericksburg through monthly events and promoting their Brutarian magazine and music label. Charlene elaborates, “Definitely, we are participating in every art walk. We will have live music occasionally, from our label as well as local artists. We’re also planning a monthly movie night to show schlocky, pop culture type movies. The shows are free, just bring a lawn chair, and we’ll be selling popcorn and classic candies and soda to fit the Populuxe theme. We ask that only people over 18 attend.” As Dom explains, “The Fredericksburg Psychotronic Film Society is dedicated to showing cult films one simply cannot view on cable due to their obscurity or controversial subject matter.” This month they will show John Waters’ Pink Flamingos on Saturday, May 11 th, at 8 p.m. Though today they happily call Fredericksburg their home, the Salemis leave their mark on Colonial Beach with the Third Annual Colonial Beach Blues Festival to support the Organization for Autism Awareness, running from Friday, June 21 st through Sunday, June 23 rd. Charlene explains, “Just a few weeks ago we got the approval from the IRS and are now a 501(c)3 non-profit charitable organization, so we are thrilled by that. This year, we hope to create a Woodstockvibe by having vendors all along the boardwalk, in addition to the fifteen bands we have lined up. The last two years we’ve sold out every inn, B&B, and hotel in Colonial Beach and Dahlgren, and I expect to do the same this year.” As for Populuxe, the Salemis are well on their way to becoming an integral part of Fredericksburg’s arts community. As Dom puts it, “We try to keep prices way down so we can share the things we love. That’s the primary reason for the store, to share all the things we enjoy.” Visit Dom and Charlene any Tuesday through Sunday at Populuxe, 107 William Street, in downtown Fredericksburg. Find more information about the Brutarian magazine and music label, Fredericksburg Psychotronic Film Society, and the Colonial Beach Blues Festival on their Facebook page. A.E. Bayne is a teacher and writer who has lived and worked in Fredericksburg for fifteen years.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

9


Pop Culture

Foodie’s Tuscany Adventure By Sue Henderson “The Romans were party animals,” said Olive Garden Head Chef Paulo Lafuta (pictured) introducing Italian cooking lessons at the Culinary Institute of Tuscany to the Olive Garden/Colavita Olive Oil Sweepstakes winners. Surrounded by mountaintopfortress villages, olive groves and grapevines, the beautiful Rocca della Macie Winery hosted the winter Institute, and the makers of Colavita olive oil hosted a trip in Florence and Rome. At the Culinary Institute, we learned that the Roman Empire continued to influence food flavors and techniques after the empire’s dissolution in 400 AD. The sun and soil conditions encouraged regional specialties in isolated fiefdoms. Tuscan cooking celebrates “the local movement” which maximizes the benefits of the long growing season beginning with artichokes and kale in early March and working toward the olives and grapes in October and November. Add all these influences together, and you get fabulous food. As part of our prize-winning tour, we learned to make classic sauces. We were cautioned to make sure to add ingredients in the order listed and to take time to do it right. We were encouraged to use all our senses when cooking – watch the color change in the onions, listen for

the sizzle to know they are sweated out, lean in and smell for that distinctive onion scent. If the smell isn’t there, it isn’t ready for the next ingredient. You really should cook two of these wonderful recipes. Try them out, and use all of your senses.

Bolognese Sauce Yield: 1.75 gallons 6 oz Colavita extra virgin olive oil; ½ tsp black pepper; 3 Tbsp fresh garlic, minced; 1 ½ tsp salt; 8 oz yellow onion, minced; 8 oz red wine (quality Chianti recommended); 4 oz carrots, minced; 1 sm can tomato paste; 4 oz celery, minced; 1 lg can whole tomatoes; 4 lbs ground beef; 1 ½ lb ground pork. Heat oil to cover the bottom of a large pan on high heat. Add garlic, onions, carrots and celery. Saute for 10 min until dry and you can smell onion (minced vegetables are very finely minced to blend w/out being noticed). Add both beef and pork using a potato masher to break up clumps. Continue mashing and cooking until pink is no longer visible and the liquid is evaporated; Add wine and simmer for

Prevails at populuxe

5 min or until evaporated; Stir in tomato paste, salt & black pepper. Stir until meat mixture well coated, add tomatoes. Stir frequently until bubbling, reduce heat to simmer; Simmer 1 hour, 15 min stirring every 10 min; Bag, seal, label, refrigerate for freezing or immediate use. (Source: Olive Garden Culinary Institute of Tuscany)

By A.E.Bayne

Salsa di Pomodori Freschi (Fresh Tomato Sauce) Yield:

22 oz/ a generous serving for 6-8

1 oz Colavita extra virgin olive oil; 1 tsp garlic, chopped; 1 lb vine ripe Roma tomatoes, ½” chopped; 2 Tbsp fresh basil, chopped; ½ lb red cherry tomatoes, ½” chopped; ½ tsp salt; ½ tsp pepper. Wash, strain, randomly chop all tomatoes into ½ “ pieces. Heat sauté pan at medium heat, add extra virgin olive oil to cover bottom of pan. Add garlic, basil and stir. Add tomatoes, salt & pepper. Flip until well blended and you see tomatoes sweat. Sauté 10 min while pasta cooking. Remove pan from heat. (We were encouraged to cook paste halfway in water, strain, add to tomato mixture to complete

cooking in tomato juices.) (Source: Olive Garden Culinary Institute of Tuscany) You can buy Colavita olive oil in Fredericksburg grocery stores. And if you’re in Tuscany, visit the Rocca della Macie Winery and Fizzano Restaurant to see why we so fondly remember the amazing food and delightful hospitality of our hosts. Sue Henderson is an artist and traveling foodie with a studio overlooking the Rappahannock.

CHUCK HOFFMAN REALTOR, ABR, SFR, MBA I will provide professional help for both home buyers and sellers to accomplish your real estate objectives! TRUSTED & CANDID SERVICE FOR DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG & NEARBY COMMUNITIES Award Winning Service

www.yourFREDrealtor.com 540-370-0695 Direct 540-845-1468 Cell 540-373-0100 Office 540-370-0757 Fax choffman@cbcarriagehouse.com

520 William Street, Suite A, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 Chuck Hoffman is a licensed salesperson in the Commonwealth of Virginia

8

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Amidst the shops on lower William Street sits Populuxe, Fredericksburg’s newest pop culture emporium. Fashioned around the stylings of the 1950s and 60s, Populuxe proudly proclaims to be “where kitsch meets cool.” Owners Dom and Charlene Salemi have transformed the storefront into a welcoming space where visitors take a nostalgia trip to a time when leather was tuff, Hawaiian shirts denoted boss beach fashion, and vinyl was the only disc to spin. For Dom, Populuxe represents all things taboo from his childhood, “Horror films were banned, Rock & Roll records were not allowed, and cool 50s fashion, as exemplified by Elvis Presley, James Dean, and Marlon Brando, were forbidden. So, as soon as I got old enough to make my own decisions, I bought these things. I started gravitating toward Jack Kerouac and the beat writers. It progressed from there to so many wonderful places in my life.” Populuxe was recently located in Colonial Beach, where Charlene says she and Dom found it difficult to build a steady clientele. They noticed that many of their returning customers were traveling from Fredericksburg to visit the shop; and after becoming regulars at Fredericksburg’s First Friday art walks and befriending local artists, they decided to make the move. Charlene says they realized, “There must be some kind of underground movement in Fredericksburg. There was just this hip, edgy group of people that were trying to make the city into an interesting place in terms of music and art. Since we opened here in March, we have found the coolest, nicest, most talented people. It’s just amazing. There’s a lot of collaboration here; people help each other and nurture creativity. We wanted to be a part of it.”

And a part of it they are fast becoming! The Salemis hope to make Populuxe a fixture in Fredericksburg through monthly events and promoting their Brutarian magazine and music label. Charlene elaborates, “Definitely, we are participating in every art walk. We will have live music occasionally, from our label as well as local artists. We’re also planning a monthly movie night to show schlocky, pop culture type movies. The shows are free, just bring a lawn chair, and we’ll be selling popcorn and classic candies and soda to fit the Populuxe theme. We ask that only people over 18 attend.” As Dom explains, “The Fredericksburg Psychotronic Film Society is dedicated to showing cult films one simply cannot view on cable due to their obscurity or controversial subject matter.” This month they will show John Waters’ Pink Flamingos on Saturday, May 11 th, at 8 p.m. Though today they happily call Fredericksburg their home, the Salemis leave their mark on Colonial Beach with the Third Annual Colonial Beach Blues Festival to support the Organization for Autism Awareness, running from Friday, June 21 st through Sunday, June 23 rd. Charlene explains, “Just a few weeks ago we got the approval from the IRS and are now a 501(c)3 non-profit charitable organization, so we are thrilled by that. This year, we hope to create a Woodstockvibe by having vendors all along the boardwalk, in addition to the fifteen bands we have lined up. The last two years we’ve sold out every inn, B&B, and hotel in Colonial Beach and Dahlgren, and I expect to do the same this year.” As for Populuxe, the Salemis are well on their way to becoming an integral part of Fredericksburg’s arts community. As Dom puts it, “We try to keep prices way down so we can share the things we love. That’s the primary reason for the store, to share all the things we enjoy.” Visit Dom and Charlene any Tuesday through Sunday at Populuxe, 107 William Street, in downtown Fredericksburg. Find more information about the Brutarian magazine and music label, Fredericksburg Psychotronic Film Society, and the Colonial Beach Blues Festival on their Facebook page. A.E. Bayne is a teacher and writer who has lived and worked in Fredericksburg for fifteen years.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

9


3-DayTripper

Retired & Buck Naked

On The Back Porch

graves mountain bluegrass festival

wrap - as bad as rap

By arnold seboya

Beginning Anew: after recession, fxbg artists re-emerge By amy millis

by jo middleton

When you grow up on Bluegrass, you crave your vinyl collection and your calendar of Bluegrass festivals. One of the best is the Graves Mountain Festival (listed in 10 Great Places to go to bluegrass festivals by USA Today for 2012) held every year in Syria, VA in the heart of Madison County. Graves’ lineup for 2013 include bands performing for the first time here: The Darrell Webb Band, Don Rigsby & Midnight Call, Chris Henry & Hardcore Grass, The Newtown Band, Mark Johnson & Emory Lester, Clay Hess, Charlie Sizemore, and Mak & the Boys. Bands coming back after a brief absence are California Ramblers, Lorraine Jordan & Carolina Road, The Lonesome River Band, The Honakers, Russell Moore & IIIrd Tyme Out and the Steep Canyon Rangers. Returning from last year are the Dark Hollow Bluegrass Band, Jr Sisk and the Ramblers, Fredericksburg native son Mark Newton & Steve Thomas, The Cleverlys, and The Carolina Chocolate Drops. 2013 Ticket Prices: A 3-Day advanced purchase through May 17 is $85; 3-Day May 18 & at the Gate, $ 95; Thursday, May 30 – Day Ticket, $30; Friday, May 31 - Day Ticket, $35; Saturday, June 1 – Day Ticket, $40; Details Gravesmountain.com at or Graves Mountain, Rt. 670 Syria, VA 22743, 540923-4231. (There are great places to stay near Graves Mountain if you don’t want to camp on the site.) No Refunds; All Campers must have a 3-Day Ticket; Advance Camping

10

May 2013

$10 per day before Thursday May 31, 2013 Gates open for camping 8 AM on May 25, 2012; we reserve the right to open gates earlier. Must stay with your vehicle, if we open the gates early and you are not with your vehicle, you forfeit your place in line; $20 charge for golf carts; Children under age 11 free with adult with ticket; We reserve the right to refuse admission to anyone. At the well organized Graves, the rules are for everyone’s safety and comfort: Please respect your neighbor; Admission Wristbands must be worn at all times; Bring Chairs or Blankets; No ATV’s, Motorcycles or Dogs; No Coolers or Display of Alcohol in Concert Area; No Audio or Video Recording The story of Graves Mountain Cannery is the story the Lodge, a country get-away specializing in home-cooked meals, and of the Graves family itself. For generations the Graves family of Syria, VA has shared the beauty and the bounty of their farmland. Keeping travelers and visitors in their home, the Graves are well known for delicious meals and generous hospitality. To experience Graves is to hear bluegrass as it should be — in a Virginia setting.

Arnold Seboya is a Bluegrass lover and a picker from the Valley.

Front porch fredericksburg

Ah, the Merry Month of May! Time to get out for my constitutional, without flannel-lined jeans, a fleece jacket, wool socks, and a pair of Manitobah Mukluks. My fall through winter garb hearkens back to my days of wearing snow suits. I wore snow suit pants through grade six. They kept me warm, but I hated them since they were not worn by girls in my class, who also wore saddle oxfords and not the brogans my father insisted would grow healthy feet, as demonstrated by the shoe x-ray machine to confirm proper fit in the Buster Brown Shoe Store. I should have had him with me when I bought those pointed-toe high heels, which grew corns, bunions, calluses, and sore feet. Thanks to those torture heels, the only shoes I wear today are Birkenstocks, summer and winter. They deliver as promised, unlike the vaunted running shoes which have arches in all the wrong places, making me walk with a decided list to the starboard. This time of year I used to walk to the soda fountain at People’s Drugs, or Woolworth’s five and dime, where I ordered an egg salad sandwich, a co-cola, and a side of chips. Sometimes I got fried bologna. It smelled delicious because it had nitrites or some sort of preservatives that keep the opened package fresh for four months rather than four days when it gets that non-preserved slimy look and odor. It’s hard to find a soda fountain anymore. The few that exist charge $5.00 for a milkshake, and $7.00 for all sandwiches, which look like they were mashed by a cast iron sandwich press usually used for grilled cheese sandwiches. Chips extra. Nowadays sandwich places are either tacos or wraps, unless you want window burgers with, as an old pal of mine used to say, “those potatoes.” Wraps are designer sandwiches. They contain odd combinations. Tuna salad with raisins. Chicken salad with basil and maple Creole cranberry mustard. These remind me of Bill Bryson, my other favorite author besides Barbara Holland. Both give me the chortles on the most depressing days. Bryson wrote a book, Neither Here Nor There, which are his hilarious adventures traveling in Europe. In Locarno, Switzerland he

thought he was buying a sausage roll (oh, the British make them best). He was famished, and his big bite let him know it was mashed figs, which “tasted like tea leaves soaked in cough syrup.” Did I mention you never read Bryson with a sip of coffee in your mouth! Open mouth laughter doesn’t contain the coffee. But his description of the mashed figs is my impression of tuna with raisins, or chicken salad with basil and weird mustard. Iced lemongrass tea is a favorite beverage to accompany designer sandwiches, which is like drinking Ipecac Syrup, with equal effect. Ah well, I’ll just go fix a grilled cheese with a co-cola and have my repast out here retired and buck naked on the back porch. Jo Middleton is back and living in the ‘Burg in time for a new grand-baby!

When the global economy descended into the Great Recession, the Fredericksburg arts community experienced its own microcosmic decline; the once steady flow of tourists and prospective buyers into galleries dwindled, and many artists found themselves struggling to grapple with the financial effects on their creative pursuits. In order to fulfill needs and duties, many artistic lives were forced to be put aside. As the city slowly recovered, many of these

artists have resurfaced. The compounded responsibilities of parenthood and financial survival have the potential to impede progress and stall creative projects - yet local artists insist these struggles enriched and taught them. Local painter Jessica Cannon (pictured in white dress) is one such artist. Cannon, who had a successful April solo show at Art First, says the recession caused difficulties as she worked to carve space for herself in the arts world. “Within the time period that I graduated from college and pursued the hard-to-sell marketing of my artwork, the economy has been very challenging. Overcoming this has allowed me to refine my craftsmanship skills pertaining to the presentation of my work and the voice behind the artist, i.e., selling one’s self. A fresh and new perspective of an uplifting pursuit of art has allowed me to retain the motivation to succeed, and I predict a bright future for the art market to turn around at a gradual pace. I have discovered the best remedy is to never lose the spark to create but to always have the faith to see oneself through the challenging times that can carry one from day to day.”

Elizabeth Seaver (pictured at easel), known for her fascinating, whimsical collages, and paintings, was powerfully drawn to art at a young age. After years of honing her skills, she was dead set on her pursuit of an artistic career, but there were obstacles, however welcome they may have been: “Along the way, I was blessed with the gift of two children. Art and parenthood collided, seemingly drawing on the same well of creativity. By the time I was done with the one on any given day, I had no juice for the other. So, I put off the development of my creative life until parenting didn’t need all I had.” Seaver eventually came here to raise her children. Though her career was put on hold for a time, she does not regret it; she had the supportive arts community to aid and nurture her return to the world of art: “I do not think I’d have the artfilled life I have now if I hadn’t moved to Fredericksburg 13 years ago. What an amazing place this is with a generous supportive public, and a cadre of talented fellow artists who welcome newcomers to the scene and nurture them in an

atmosphere and spirit of creativity.” Another local artist, Lynette Reed, shares a similar story: “When I entered college for a degree in Fine Art I was going to take the world by storm. Instead, I fell in love and spent the next 28 years raising a family and traveling the world. I dabbled but did not pursue art to any extent.” After so much time away from painting, Reed was concerned about reentering the arts community: “When I plunged back into the art world, I was worried that I had been out for too long.” In the end, with the same nurturing support that helped bring Elizabeth Seaver back, Reed established herself as a prominent and respected artist in the city: “I found the confidence to begin anew in Fredericksburg’s art community.” Amy Millis is a Fredericksburg-based writer and art critic.

Your Place for Confirmation and First Communion Gifts My First Holy Communion sets First Communion Porcelain Rosary boxes Confirmation Prayer boxes Appropriate Charms Assortment of Crosses 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5 front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

11


3-DayTripper

Retired & Buck Naked

On The Back Porch

graves mountain bluegrass festival

wrap - as bad as rap

By arnold seboya

Beginning Anew: after recession, fxbg artists re-emerge By amy millis

by jo middleton

When you grow up on Bluegrass, you crave your vinyl collection and your calendar of Bluegrass festivals. One of the best is the Graves Mountain Festival (listed in 10 Great Places to go to bluegrass festivals by USA Today for 2012) held every year in Syria, VA in the heart of Madison County. Graves’ lineup for 2013 include bands performing for the first time here: The Darrell Webb Band, Don Rigsby & Midnight Call, Chris Henry & Hardcore Grass, The Newtown Band, Mark Johnson & Emory Lester, Clay Hess, Charlie Sizemore, and Mak & the Boys. Bands coming back after a brief absence are California Ramblers, Lorraine Jordan & Carolina Road, The Lonesome River Band, The Honakers, Russell Moore & IIIrd Tyme Out and the Steep Canyon Rangers. Returning from last year are the Dark Hollow Bluegrass Band, Jr Sisk and the Ramblers, Fredericksburg native son Mark Newton & Steve Thomas, The Cleverlys, and The Carolina Chocolate Drops. 2013 Ticket Prices: A 3-Day advanced purchase through May 17 is $85; 3-Day May 18 & at the Gate, $ 95; Thursday, May 30 – Day Ticket, $30; Friday, May 31 - Day Ticket, $35; Saturday, June 1 – Day Ticket, $40; Details Gravesmountain.com at or Graves Mountain, Rt. 670 Syria, VA 22743, 540923-4231. (There are great places to stay near Graves Mountain if you don’t want to camp on the site.) No Refunds; All Campers must have a 3-Day Ticket; Advance Camping

10

May 2013

$10 per day before Thursday May 31, 2013 Gates open for camping 8 AM on May 25, 2012; we reserve the right to open gates earlier. Must stay with your vehicle, if we open the gates early and you are not with your vehicle, you forfeit your place in line; $20 charge for golf carts; Children under age 11 free with adult with ticket; We reserve the right to refuse admission to anyone. At the well organized Graves, the rules are for everyone’s safety and comfort: Please respect your neighbor; Admission Wristbands must be worn at all times; Bring Chairs or Blankets; No ATV’s, Motorcycles or Dogs; No Coolers or Display of Alcohol in Concert Area; No Audio or Video Recording The story of Graves Mountain Cannery is the story the Lodge, a country get-away specializing in home-cooked meals, and of the Graves family itself. For generations the Graves family of Syria, VA has shared the beauty and the bounty of their farmland. Keeping travelers and visitors in their home, the Graves are well known for delicious meals and generous hospitality. To experience Graves is to hear bluegrass as it should be — in a Virginia setting.

Arnold Seboya is a Bluegrass lover and a picker from the Valley.

Front porch fredericksburg

Ah, the Merry Month of May! Time to get out for my constitutional, without flannel-lined jeans, a fleece jacket, wool socks, and a pair of Manitobah Mukluks. My fall through winter garb hearkens back to my days of wearing snow suits. I wore snow suit pants through grade six. They kept me warm, but I hated them since they were not worn by girls in my class, who also wore saddle oxfords and not the brogans my father insisted would grow healthy feet, as demonstrated by the shoe x-ray machine to confirm proper fit in the Buster Brown Shoe Store. I should have had him with me when I bought those pointed-toe high heels, which grew corns, bunions, calluses, and sore feet. Thanks to those torture heels, the only shoes I wear today are Birkenstocks, summer and winter. They deliver as promised, unlike the vaunted running shoes which have arches in all the wrong places, making me walk with a decided list to the starboard. This time of year I used to walk to the soda fountain at People’s Drugs, or Woolworth’s five and dime, where I ordered an egg salad sandwich, a co-cola, and a side of chips. Sometimes I got fried bologna. It smelled delicious because it had nitrites or some sort of preservatives that keep the opened package fresh for four months rather than four days when it gets that non-preserved slimy look and odor. It’s hard to find a soda fountain anymore. The few that exist charge $5.00 for a milkshake, and $7.00 for all sandwiches, which look like they were mashed by a cast iron sandwich press usually used for grilled cheese sandwiches. Chips extra. Nowadays sandwich places are either tacos or wraps, unless you want window burgers with, as an old pal of mine used to say, “those potatoes.” Wraps are designer sandwiches. They contain odd combinations. Tuna salad with raisins. Chicken salad with basil and maple Creole cranberry mustard. These remind me of Bill Bryson, my other favorite author besides Barbara Holland. Both give me the chortles on the most depressing days. Bryson wrote a book, Neither Here Nor There, which are his hilarious adventures traveling in Europe. In Locarno, Switzerland he

thought he was buying a sausage roll (oh, the British make them best). He was famished, and his big bite let him know it was mashed figs, which “tasted like tea leaves soaked in cough syrup.” Did I mention you never read Bryson with a sip of coffee in your mouth! Open mouth laughter doesn’t contain the coffee. But his description of the mashed figs is my impression of tuna with raisins, or chicken salad with basil and weird mustard. Iced lemongrass tea is a favorite beverage to accompany designer sandwiches, which is like drinking Ipecac Syrup, with equal effect. Ah well, I’ll just go fix a grilled cheese with a co-cola and have my repast out here retired and buck naked on the back porch. Jo Middleton is back and living in the ‘Burg in time for a new grand-baby!

When the global economy descended into the Great Recession, the Fredericksburg arts community experienced its own microcosmic decline; the once steady flow of tourists and prospective buyers into galleries dwindled, and many artists found themselves struggling to grapple with the financial effects on their creative pursuits. In order to fulfill needs and duties, many artistic lives were forced to be put aside. As the city slowly recovered, many of these

artists have resurfaced. The compounded responsibilities of parenthood and financial survival have the potential to impede progress and stall creative projects - yet local artists insist these struggles enriched and taught them. Local painter Jessica Cannon (pictured in white dress) is one such artist. Cannon, who had a successful April solo show at Art First, says the recession caused difficulties as she worked to carve space for herself in the arts world. “Within the time period that I graduated from college and pursued the hard-to-sell marketing of my artwork, the economy has been very challenging. Overcoming this has allowed me to refine my craftsmanship skills pertaining to the presentation of my work and the voice behind the artist, i.e., selling one’s self. A fresh and new perspective of an uplifting pursuit of art has allowed me to retain the motivation to succeed, and I predict a bright future for the art market to turn around at a gradual pace. I have discovered the best remedy is to never lose the spark to create but to always have the faith to see oneself through the challenging times that can carry one from day to day.”

Elizabeth Seaver (pictured at easel), known for her fascinating, whimsical collages, and paintings, was powerfully drawn to art at a young age. After years of honing her skills, she was dead set on her pursuit of an artistic career, but there were obstacles, however welcome they may have been: “Along the way, I was blessed with the gift of two children. Art and parenthood collided, seemingly drawing on the same well of creativity. By the time I was done with the one on any given day, I had no juice for the other. So, I put off the development of my creative life until parenting didn’t need all I had.” Seaver eventually came here to raise her children. Though her career was put on hold for a time, she does not regret it; she had the supportive arts community to aid and nurture her return to the world of art: “I do not think I’d have the artfilled life I have now if I hadn’t moved to Fredericksburg 13 years ago. What an amazing place this is with a generous supportive public, and a cadre of talented fellow artists who welcome newcomers to the scene and nurture them in an

atmosphere and spirit of creativity.” Another local artist, Lynette Reed, shares a similar story: “When I entered college for a degree in Fine Art I was going to take the world by storm. Instead, I fell in love and spent the next 28 years raising a family and traveling the world. I dabbled but did not pursue art to any extent.” After so much time away from painting, Reed was concerned about reentering the arts community: “When I plunged back into the art world, I was worried that I had been out for too long.” In the end, with the same nurturing support that helped bring Elizabeth Seaver back, Reed established herself as a prominent and respected artist in the city: “I found the confidence to begin anew in Fredericksburg’s art community.” Amy Millis is a Fredericksburg-based writer and art critic.

Your Place for Confirmation and First Communion Gifts My First Holy Communion sets First Communion Porcelain Rosary boxes Confirmation Prayer boxes Appropriate Charms Assortment of Crosses 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5 front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

11


Libations

Vino white again

the season’s 1st limoncello coctail

Season’s Bounty mairzy doats & dozy doats

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Street Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540.370.4105

By jefferson nazworth Italian Sunrise (Highball) 1 1/4 oz. Ketel One 1/4 oz. Limoncello 1/4 oz. Campari Splash OJ House Sour Shake Garnish with orange speared with umbrella Limoncello (Italian pronunciation) is mainly produced in Southern Italy, especially in the region around the Gulf of Naples, the Sorrentine Peninsula, and the coast of Amalfi and islands of Procida. It is also produced in Sicily, Sardina, and Menton FR, Malta, and the island of Gozo. Though there is debate about the exact origin of the drink, it is at least one hundred years old. Traditionally, it is made from the zest of Femminello St. Teresa lemon, also known as Sorrento or Sfusato lemons. Lemon zest, or peels without the pith, are

steeped in grain alcohol until the oil is released. The resulting yellow liquid is then mixed with simple syrup. Clarity and viscosity are affected by factors like the relative temperatures of the two liquids. Most lemons, including the more-common Eureka lemon, will produce satisfactory limoncello. Limoncello is traditionally served chilled as an after-dinner digestivo. Along the Amalfi Coast, it is usually served in small ceramic glasses themselves often chilled, the Amalfi coast being a center of both ceramics and limoncello production. This tradition has been carried into other parts of Italy. Limoncello is the second most popular liqueur in Italy but has recently become popular in other parts of the world. Restaurants, such as Bistro Bethem, are increasingly offering limoncello on their beverage and house! dessert menus. Ours is made in-h In the United States, commercial producers using California lemons (which comprise of over 90% of lemon crops in the US) have introduced USA commercial made limoncello, including Rometti Limoncello, Ventura Limoncello, and Fabrizia Limoncello. Limoncello is an increasingly popular ingredient in cocktails, like our own Italian Sunrise. Limoncello imparts a strong lemon flavor without the sourness or bitterness of lemon juice. Enjoy! –Source: wikpedia

Bistro Bethem’s own house-made limoncello recipe comes to us compliments of bartender/server Jefferson Nazworth of the Bistro, 309 William, 371-9999, bistrobethem.com

The Griffin Bookshop & Coffee Bar Introducing Bag Lunches! Fresh Sandwiches Tastefully Priced Scrumptiously Delicious New & Used Books/Coffee 723 Caroline Street 540-899-8041

12

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

By matt thomas

May is a good month to start drinking white wines again. The weather is warm and our inclination turns to something light and crisp, plus this is around the time that the 2012 vintages are being released so they’re nice and fresh. If you like white wines I recommend trying those from Spain, where many different styles of white are produced in a style distinct to each region and are often incredible values. This month I’ll talk about a few types that you may not have tried but that are great this time of year. One region famous for their whites is the Basque country in the north, which produces a white called Txakoli (pronounced chok-oli). It is light, acidic, dry, and usually slightly effervescent. It has flavors of green apples and citrus. I love these wines because they aren’t quite like anything else, are easy to drink and like, whet the appetite, and are inexpensive. I highly recommend them for barbeques and other outdoor gatherings for this reason; there’s a good chance you will get quite a few comments about the wine if you use it. I particularly like the Mokoroa Txakoli. Another better-known Spanish white is the Albariño. This grape is grown in the northwest region of Galicia. Albariños come in different styles but they are usually medium-bodied, unoaked or lightly oaked, and with mild fruit flavors like melon and tropical fruit. I frequently pick Albariños for dinner guests who want something bold and interesting but also a bit different. For something really different try the Pedrolonga Albariño, which is also made naturally without the use of sulfites. It’s more full-bodied and less fruity than more typical examples but pairs very well with food. You can also find Portuguese wines using this grape, where it is called Alvarinho. A white that has enjoyed a resurgence in recent years is the white

Rioja. The Rioja region is much better known for its reds made from Tempranillo and for some wineries making whites was an afterthought. But others have made some impressive whites from the Viura grape that sell for less than the reds. They aren’t quite as uniform in style as whites from other regions either. For example, the Lar de Paula Rioja Blanco is quite oaky and would be a good choice for somebody who likes oaky Chardonnays. On the other hand, the Rioja Blanco from the Lopez de Heredia family is austere, minerally, and even slightly oxidized. It is for the adventurous or tradition-minded only. You can also get unoaked, very light white Riojas for not very much money that are great “every day” whites. As with so many other Spanish wines, it’s hard to match the value even with domestic wines.

Matt Thomas of kybecca offers a menu of wine for consumption at the restaurant.

Do Your Knives Make the Cut? Sharpening Services at

374-0443 www.shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

By vanessa moncure

And liddle lamsy divey… Shari Lewis sang these immortal words to the puppet Pork Chop, part of a nonsensical song that always reminds me of greening spring, gamboling lambs, and a puppeteer smiling out of a 1950s black and white Magnavox. My herb garden is planted, I’m determined to get at least ONE tomato from the 50# infomercial upside-down plant, and I’ll let you know in a few years how my grape arbor is coming along. A kiddley ivey too, wouldn’t you? May is for tender lamb, freshly made goat cheese and making your own chile oil.

GRILLED LAMB KEBABS Butchers will prepare and sell you cubed lamb, ready for the skewer. If purchasing your own, trim the fat from a whole or half leg of lamb and debone. Cube lamb into at least one-inch cubes, otherwise they could easily overcook. Marinate 30 minutes at room temp (covered) in a mixture of two cloves minced garlic, 1/3 c. olive oil, juice and rind of one lemon, S&P, oregano, dash of thyme and one fresh rosemary stem. If you have rosemary stalks in your garden, or can find some at the farmer’s market

www.oldetownebutcher.com

or grocery, grill with them instead of skewers! Use a skewer to make a hole in the lamb cubes, then thread the rosemary through the holes, leaving about 1/2-inch on each end. (Or just use presoaked bamboo skewers or regular metal). Roast over hot coals or medium-high gas, turning until each side is grilled, about a minute per side for medium rare. It’s always best to grill vegetables on their own skewers, as it’s hard to roast the meat correctly without charcoaling the vegs. Make sure your vegetables are parboiled (potatoes, asparagus, spring onions,brussels sprouts) if needed - a nice kebab would be a small potato, cherry tomato, mushroom, squash, onion, repeat. Or just place a selection of vegetables and let guests skewer their own. Asparagus can be skewered individually, as well as spring onions. Brush with a mixture of pesto sauce and olive oil, roast just til vegs are browned.

GOAT CHEESE PLUS Goat cheese, or chevre, is delightfully tangy and very versatile. A delicious salad dressing over mesclun greens is 4 oz. of goat cheese blended with 1 c. buttermilk - herbs as desired. I really love it on baguette crisps (slice baguette into 1/4” slices, brush w/ olive oil and bake at 350F til crisp and just colored) with chile oil. Chile oil is SO easy to make, and it’s not hot like Tabasco, but with heat and a depth of flavor.

CHILE OIL

Open: 9am - 9pm Monday through Saturday 11am - 6pm Sunday Lee Russell Proprietor

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family

Jake & Mike’s Restaurant Great Food, Excellent Service, In a Relaxing Upscale Atmosphere Open for Lunch, Dinner and Sunday Brunch 10% off one Entree with this Ad 806 William Street (540)-370-4590

Using one package of ancho chiles, brown them on the grill in a cast iron skillet (avoid in the house unless you have a great exhaust system). Remove stems and seeds, place in blender with 1/2 teaspoon of salt and 1/2 c. canola oil. Blend until smooth, then strain through cheesecloth and sieve to remove chile bits - keep refrigerated in a squirt bottle. For this appetizer, spread baguette crisp with goat cheese, then squirt a bit of chile oil to taste. And try it on devilled eggs!! It will change your life! Or at least your taste buds....

Vanessa Moncure says, “If the words sound queer or funny to your ear, a little bit jumbled and jivey - Just sing ‘Mares eat oats and does eat oats, and little lambs eat ivy.’ ”

(540) 371-2008

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

13


Libations

Vino white again

the season’s 1st limoncello coctail

Season’s Bounty mairzy doats & dozy doats

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Street Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540.370.4105

By jefferson nazworth Italian Sunrise (Highball) 1 1/4 oz. Ketel One 1/4 oz. Limoncello 1/4 oz. Campari Splash OJ House Sour Shake Garnish with orange speared with umbrella Limoncello (Italian pronunciation) is mainly produced in Southern Italy, especially in the region around the Gulf of Naples, the Sorrentine Peninsula, and the coast of Amalfi and islands of Procida. It is also produced in Sicily, Sardina, and Menton FR, Malta, and the island of Gozo. Though there is debate about the exact origin of the drink, it is at least one hundred years old. Traditionally, it is made from the zest of Femminello St. Teresa lemon, also known as Sorrento or Sfusato lemons. Lemon zest, or peels without the pith, are

steeped in grain alcohol until the oil is released. The resulting yellow liquid is then mixed with simple syrup. Clarity and viscosity are affected by factors like the relative temperatures of the two liquids. Most lemons, including the more-common Eureka lemon, will produce satisfactory limoncello. Limoncello is traditionally served chilled as an after-dinner digestivo. Along the Amalfi Coast, it is usually served in small ceramic glasses themselves often chilled, the Amalfi coast being a center of both ceramics and limoncello production. This tradition has been carried into other parts of Italy. Limoncello is the second most popular liqueur in Italy but has recently become popular in other parts of the world. Restaurants, such as Bistro Bethem, are increasingly offering limoncello on their beverage and house! dessert menus. Ours is made in-h In the United States, commercial producers using California lemons (which comprise of over 90% of lemon crops in the US) have introduced USA commercial made limoncello, including Rometti Limoncello, Ventura Limoncello, and Fabrizia Limoncello. Limoncello is an increasingly popular ingredient in cocktails, like our own Italian Sunrise. Limoncello imparts a strong lemon flavor without the sourness or bitterness of lemon juice. Enjoy! –Source: wikpedia

Bistro Bethem’s own house-made limoncello recipe comes to us compliments of bartender/server Jefferson Nazworth of the Bistro, 309 William, 371-9999, bistrobethem.com

The Griffin Bookshop & Coffee Bar Introducing Bag Lunches! Fresh Sandwiches Tastefully Priced Scrumptiously Delicious New & Used Books/Coffee 723 Caroline Street 540-899-8041

12

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

By matt thomas

May is a good month to start drinking white wines again. The weather is warm and our inclination turns to something light and crisp, plus this is around the time that the 2012 vintages are being released so they’re nice and fresh. If you like white wines I recommend trying those from Spain, where many different styles of white are produced in a style distinct to each region and are often incredible values. This month I’ll talk about a few types that you may not have tried but that are great this time of year. One region famous for their whites is the Basque country in the north, which produces a white called Txakoli (pronounced chok-oli). It is light, acidic, dry, and usually slightly effervescent. It has flavors of green apples and citrus. I love these wines because they aren’t quite like anything else, are easy to drink and like, whet the appetite, and are inexpensive. I highly recommend them for barbeques and other outdoor gatherings for this reason; there’s a good chance you will get quite a few comments about the wine if you use it. I particularly like the Mokoroa Txakoli. Another better-known Spanish white is the Albariño. This grape is grown in the northwest region of Galicia. Albariños come in different styles but they are usually medium-bodied, unoaked or lightly oaked, and with mild fruit flavors like melon and tropical fruit. I frequently pick Albariños for dinner guests who want something bold and interesting but also a bit different. For something really different try the Pedrolonga Albariño, which is also made naturally without the use of sulfites. It’s more full-bodied and less fruity than more typical examples but pairs very well with food. You can also find Portuguese wines using this grape, where it is called Alvarinho. A white that has enjoyed a resurgence in recent years is the white

Rioja. The Rioja region is much better known for its reds made from Tempranillo and for some wineries making whites was an afterthought. But others have made some impressive whites from the Viura grape that sell for less than the reds. They aren’t quite as uniform in style as whites from other regions either. For example, the Lar de Paula Rioja Blanco is quite oaky and would be a good choice for somebody who likes oaky Chardonnays. On the other hand, the Rioja Blanco from the Lopez de Heredia family is austere, minerally, and even slightly oxidized. It is for the adventurous or tradition-minded only. You can also get unoaked, very light white Riojas for not very much money that are great “every day” whites. As with so many other Spanish wines, it’s hard to match the value even with domestic wines.

Matt Thomas of kybecca offers a menu of wine for consumption at the restaurant.

Do Your Knives Make the Cut? Sharpening Services at

374-0443 www.shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

By vanessa moncure

And liddle lamsy divey… Shari Lewis sang these immortal words to the puppet Pork Chop, part of a nonsensical song that always reminds me of greening spring, gamboling lambs, and a puppeteer smiling out of a 1950s black and white Magnavox. My herb garden is planted, I’m determined to get at least ONE tomato from the 50# infomercial upside-down plant, and I’ll let you know in a few years how my grape arbor is coming along. A kiddley ivey too, wouldn’t you? May is for tender lamb, freshly made goat cheese and making your own chile oil.

GRILLED LAMB KEBABS Butchers will prepare and sell you cubed lamb, ready for the skewer. If purchasing your own, trim the fat from a whole or half leg of lamb and debone. Cube lamb into at least one-inch cubes, otherwise they could easily overcook. Marinate 30 minutes at room temp (covered) in a mixture of two cloves minced garlic, 1/3 c. olive oil, juice and rind of one lemon, S&P, oregano, dash of thyme and one fresh rosemary stem. If you have rosemary stalks in your garden, or can find some at the farmer’s market

www.oldetownebutcher.com

or grocery, grill with them instead of skewers! Use a skewer to make a hole in the lamb cubes, then thread the rosemary through the holes, leaving about 1/2-inch on each end. (Or just use presoaked bamboo skewers or regular metal). Roast over hot coals or medium-high gas, turning until each side is grilled, about a minute per side for medium rare. It’s always best to grill vegetables on their own skewers, as it’s hard to roast the meat correctly without charcoaling the vegs. Make sure your vegetables are parboiled (potatoes, asparagus, spring onions,brussels sprouts) if needed - a nice kebab would be a small potato, cherry tomato, mushroom, squash, onion, repeat. Or just place a selection of vegetables and let guests skewer their own. Asparagus can be skewered individually, as well as spring onions. Brush with a mixture of pesto sauce and olive oil, roast just til vegs are browned.

GOAT CHEESE PLUS Goat cheese, or chevre, is delightfully tangy and very versatile. A delicious salad dressing over mesclun greens is 4 oz. of goat cheese blended with 1 c. buttermilk - herbs as desired. I really love it on baguette crisps (slice baguette into 1/4” slices, brush w/ olive oil and bake at 350F til crisp and just colored) with chile oil. Chile oil is SO easy to make, and it’s not hot like Tabasco, but with heat and a depth of flavor.

CHILE OIL

Open: 9am - 9pm Monday through Saturday 11am - 6pm Sunday Lee Russell Proprietor

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family

Jake & Mike’s Restaurant Great Food, Excellent Service, In a Relaxing Upscale Atmosphere Open for Lunch, Dinner and Sunday Brunch 10% off one Entree with this Ad 806 William Street (540)-370-4590

Using one package of ancho chiles, brown them on the grill in a cast iron skillet (avoid in the house unless you have a great exhaust system). Remove stems and seeds, place in blender with 1/2 teaspoon of salt and 1/2 c. canola oil. Blend until smooth, then strain through cheesecloth and sieve to remove chile bits - keep refrigerated in a squirt bottle. For this appetizer, spread baguette crisp with goat cheese, then squirt a bit of chile oil to taste. And try it on devilled eggs!! It will change your life! Or at least your taste buds....

Vanessa Moncure says, “If the words sound queer or funny to your ear, a little bit jumbled and jivey - Just sing ‘Mares eat oats and does eat oats, and little lambs eat ivy.’ ”

(540) 371-2008

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

13


MMMMM

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS

the tastes of taste

It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

draught beer done right

by lori izkowski

Taste. It’s a verb. And at Taste Oil Vinegar and Spice that is exactly what Jan and George Farrar are hoping you will do…taste the amazing oils and balsamic vinegars that line either side of the narrow but warmly decorated space they occupy on Caroline Street. On each side of the shop there are stainless steel urns holding fresh olive oils from various regions, specialty oils (nuts, seeds, and truffle), flavor-infused olive oils (garlic, butter, chipotle…oh, the choices!) and balsamic vinegars, traditional and flavored, and white balsamic vinegars, also flavor-infused. Each urn has a spigot and some plastic cups (yes, they are communion cups…), and customers are encouraged to taste any that appeal to them, as well as combining oils and vinegars in the cup, mixing and matching. And that is where the fun is…tasting, sharing, exchanging ideas about recipes, and how best to use this oil or that vinegar. I can attest to the fun aspect of Taste. I worked there during the busy holiday shopping season this past year, and I never tired of watching new customers come in, timid about tasting at first, and then watching their expressions as they tasted one after another sample, then sharing their favorites with their spouse or friend or parent…and then to see them come back the next week, with a friend or family member in tow, giving our spiel like old pros and delighting in the inevitable reactions once the tasting begins. The Farrars started Taste with their Culpeper store almost two years ago, when Jan decided she had had enough of

14

May 2013

commuting back and forth for her job in Crystal City, and George had recently resigned his position at the University of Mary Washington. Originally hoping to make hard cider, they quickly realized that the process would be too physically demanding. But another idea was bubbling up, one that was inspired in part from their travels in the U.S. and abroad, visiting little specialty shops and talking to the owners: an olive oil tasting shop. Further research soon had Jan connected with a supplier who had high quality olive oils and balsamic vinegars. “The thinking was, this is unique but not strange…and definitely healthy. The products are Mediterranean diet oriented. The oils are fresh and have good chemistry, so they won’t break down up to about 400 degrees. And in addition to adding popping flavor to food, balsamic vinegars aid digestion.” Soon the Culpeper store was up and running, and a big hit…so much so that customers were coming from surrounding towns, including Fredericksburg. So Jan and George decided to pay a visit to our sweet little town, and knew almost immediately that Taste would be a perfect fit. And indeed it was. Jan and George couldn’t be happier with their new occupation as shop owners, and they are thrilled to be a part of the Fredericksburg community. As the oneyear anniversary approaches, Jan says it was definitely a good move: “It feels like home.” In the year since the Fredericksburg shop opened, they have introduced residents and visitors alike to a fun and different way to shop, established a regular and repeat customer base, and partnered with Scarlett Pons in developing decanters and dipping dishes to sell along with the oils, vinegars, and spices. “The products taste fabulous and are very healthful. It’s good for the community, it’s a family friendly experience, and it’s fun. To quote a customer, it’s like wine tasting for Southern Baptists.” Can I get an Amen? Lori Izykowski loves good food and good people.

Front porch fredericksburg

On The House by matt thomas

Cinco De Mayo Celebration!!!

Michael “Lucky” Dean at

The Virginia Wine Experience Upstairs Art Gallery: “People, Places, Moments” April thru June

$5.00 Specials $3.00 Imported Beer $5.00 Margaritas Gifts and lots of Fun!!

3’x4’ Impasto-Style Paintings from photos of 1970’s-’80s living in Fairview Beach

Tues to Sat 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm Phone: 540-899-0969

826 Caroline Street Call Renee Gauvin (847-9231) for more information

E-mail: soupntaco@yahoo.com

Home of great Food & great Art! 720 Littlepage Sunkenwelltavern.com

EAT WELL DRINK WELL LIVE WELL

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~ Biological Terrain Assessment ~VoiceBio Analysis ~Aura Photography ~Body Cleanse Foot Detox We Carry Home Brewing Supplies ! Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

Now that I’ve completed my transition from retailer to restaurateur I’ve had to change the way I sell beer. This has turned out to include many things but the biggest one is selling beer on draught. I’ve been selling beer for seven years and over that time I’ve become very familiar with customer preferences, brands, and styles. But draught beer is something I’ve only encountered as a consumer until now, so this month I thought I would share what I’ve learned about selling beer in keg form. For one, it requires a sizable investment up front. The biggest reason to sell beer on draught other than to increase your selection is that the margins are better since you’re paying less for a particular volume of beer. However, the equipment does not come cheap. First there’s the kegerator, which is basically just a refrigerator with some water lines running out (and maybe in) it. I decided to buy new since with used it’s hard to tell what you’re getting and repairs can be expensive. Then you need a CO2 tank. The beer is already carbonated but you need CO2 to power the beer out of the keg through the lines. These are heavy and you periodically have to take them to an air supplier (those exist) to refill them. They can also be finicky and you have to get the pressure right for the beer to pour correctly. This can be very frustrating as I have come to find out. The only regular maintenance required is to periodically clean the lines. If this isn’t done bacteria and debris will build up and contaminate the beer, both in terms of germs and flavor. This has to be done once every month and a half or so. Beer distributors will do this for you

sometimes but that can be unreliable. I can tell you now that I’ve seen how the whole thing works I won’t ever drink beer on draft that I’m not sure is clean. A good way to tell is by the overall cleanliness of the bar. If it’s generally dirty the lines are probably dirty. Dirty lines are one reason that it’s sometimes preferable to buy bottles. Aside from that, though, it’s not true that beer always tastes better on draft. Some beers, especially Belgian ales and other bottle conditioned ales, still taste better in the bottle. In general it is true that beer on draught is better, particularly lagers, pale ales, or beers that aren’t going to evolve in the bottle at all. Most beer, in other words. In case you’re thinking of ever getting a small kegerator for your home, I wouldn’t recommend it. It turns out that you have to have both the air pressure and temperature almost exactly correct for the beer to pour without waste and I’m pretty sure buying a small fridge second hand and attaching a CO2 tank and small tap is not going to cut it. Sure it looks cool, but it will be less cool when all the beer pours are foam. Probably the biggest thing I’ve taken away from learning about kegs is that it is a lot of work. So the next time you’re at a bar and the draft beer pours correctly and tastes clean remember it took a lot of effort to make that happen.

Matt Thomas looks forward to pouring you a clean cold one at kybecca.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

15


MMMMM

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS

the tastes of taste

It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

draught beer done right

by lori izkowski

Taste. It’s a verb. And at Taste Oil Vinegar and Spice that is exactly what Jan and George Farrar are hoping you will do…taste the amazing oils and balsamic vinegars that line either side of the narrow but warmly decorated space they occupy on Caroline Street. On each side of the shop there are stainless steel urns holding fresh olive oils from various regions, specialty oils (nuts, seeds, and truffle), flavor-infused olive oils (garlic, butter, chipotle…oh, the choices!) and balsamic vinegars, traditional and flavored, and white balsamic vinegars, also flavor-infused. Each urn has a spigot and some plastic cups (yes, they are communion cups…), and customers are encouraged to taste any that appeal to them, as well as combining oils and vinegars in the cup, mixing and matching. And that is where the fun is…tasting, sharing, exchanging ideas about recipes, and how best to use this oil or that vinegar. I can attest to the fun aspect of Taste. I worked there during the busy holiday shopping season this past year, and I never tired of watching new customers come in, timid about tasting at first, and then watching their expressions as they tasted one after another sample, then sharing their favorites with their spouse or friend or parent…and then to see them come back the next week, with a friend or family member in tow, giving our spiel like old pros and delighting in the inevitable reactions once the tasting begins. The Farrars started Taste with their Culpeper store almost two years ago, when Jan decided she had had enough of

14

May 2013

commuting back and forth for her job in Crystal City, and George had recently resigned his position at the University of Mary Washington. Originally hoping to make hard cider, they quickly realized that the process would be too physically demanding. But another idea was bubbling up, one that was inspired in part from their travels in the U.S. and abroad, visiting little specialty shops and talking to the owners: an olive oil tasting shop. Further research soon had Jan connected with a supplier who had high quality olive oils and balsamic vinegars. “The thinking was, this is unique but not strange…and definitely healthy. The products are Mediterranean diet oriented. The oils are fresh and have good chemistry, so they won’t break down up to about 400 degrees. And in addition to adding popping flavor to food, balsamic vinegars aid digestion.” Soon the Culpeper store was up and running, and a big hit…so much so that customers were coming from surrounding towns, including Fredericksburg. So Jan and George decided to pay a visit to our sweet little town, and knew almost immediately that Taste would be a perfect fit. And indeed it was. Jan and George couldn’t be happier with their new occupation as shop owners, and they are thrilled to be a part of the Fredericksburg community. As the oneyear anniversary approaches, Jan says it was definitely a good move: “It feels like home.” In the year since the Fredericksburg shop opened, they have introduced residents and visitors alike to a fun and different way to shop, established a regular and repeat customer base, and partnered with Scarlett Pons in developing decanters and dipping dishes to sell along with the oils, vinegars, and spices. “The products taste fabulous and are very healthful. It’s good for the community, it’s a family friendly experience, and it’s fun. To quote a customer, it’s like wine tasting for Southern Baptists.” Can I get an Amen? Lori Izykowski loves good food and good people.

Front porch fredericksburg

On The House by matt thomas

Cinco De Mayo Celebration!!!

Michael “Lucky” Dean at

The Virginia Wine Experience Upstairs Art Gallery: “People, Places, Moments” April thru June

$5.00 Specials $3.00 Imported Beer $5.00 Margaritas Gifts and lots of Fun!!

3’x4’ Impasto-Style Paintings from photos of 1970’s-’80s living in Fairview Beach

Tues to Sat 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm Phone: 540-899-0969

826 Caroline Street Call Renee Gauvin (847-9231) for more information

E-mail: soupntaco@yahoo.com

Home of great Food & great Art! 720 Littlepage Sunkenwelltavern.com

EAT WELL DRINK WELL LIVE WELL

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~ Biological Terrain Assessment ~VoiceBio Analysis ~Aura Photography ~Body Cleanse Foot Detox We Carry Home Brewing Supplies ! Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

Now that I’ve completed my transition from retailer to restaurateur I’ve had to change the way I sell beer. This has turned out to include many things but the biggest one is selling beer on draught. I’ve been selling beer for seven years and over that time I’ve become very familiar with customer preferences, brands, and styles. But draught beer is something I’ve only encountered as a consumer until now, so this month I thought I would share what I’ve learned about selling beer in keg form. For one, it requires a sizable investment up front. The biggest reason to sell beer on draught other than to increase your selection is that the margins are better since you’re paying less for a particular volume of beer. However, the equipment does not come cheap. First there’s the kegerator, which is basically just a refrigerator with some water lines running out (and maybe in) it. I decided to buy new since with used it’s hard to tell what you’re getting and repairs can be expensive. Then you need a CO2 tank. The beer is already carbonated but you need CO2 to power the beer out of the keg through the lines. These are heavy and you periodically have to take them to an air supplier (those exist) to refill them. They can also be finicky and you have to get the pressure right for the beer to pour correctly. This can be very frustrating as I have come to find out. The only regular maintenance required is to periodically clean the lines. If this isn’t done bacteria and debris will build up and contaminate the beer, both in terms of germs and flavor. This has to be done once every month and a half or so. Beer distributors will do this for you

sometimes but that can be unreliable. I can tell you now that I’ve seen how the whole thing works I won’t ever drink beer on draft that I’m not sure is clean. A good way to tell is by the overall cleanliness of the bar. If it’s generally dirty the lines are probably dirty. Dirty lines are one reason that it’s sometimes preferable to buy bottles. Aside from that, though, it’s not true that beer always tastes better on draft. Some beers, especially Belgian ales and other bottle conditioned ales, still taste better in the bottle. In general it is true that beer on draught is better, particularly lagers, pale ales, or beers that aren’t going to evolve in the bottle at all. Most beer, in other words. In case you’re thinking of ever getting a small kegerator for your home, I wouldn’t recommend it. It turns out that you have to have both the air pressure and temperature almost exactly correct for the beer to pour without waste and I’m pretty sure buying a small fridge second hand and attaching a CO2 tank and small tap is not going to cut it. Sure it looks cool, but it will be less cool when all the beer pours are foam. Probably the biggest thing I’ve taken away from learning about kegs is that it is a lot of work. So the next time you’re at a bar and the draft beer pours correctly and tastes clean remember it took a lot of effort to make that happen.

Matt Thomas looks forward to pouring you a clean cold one at kybecca.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

15


may 2013… in fullbloom wednesday, may 1

Heard In The Burg: Tix on sale at Sunken Well Tavern! Larry Keel, Hackensack Boys, Big Daddy Love, Elby Brass, and www.heardintheburg.com for June 8 show at FXBG Fair Grounds. VIP tickets available only at the Well. Info: heardintheburg.com. Some proceeds to Community Outreach *Riverside Dinner Theater: Main Stage: Legally Blonde, opens May 3 through June 16; Children’s Theater, Current Show: The Secret Garden, through May 18; Upcoming: Pinkalicious, The Musical, May 25-July 13. Lunch N Show (Sat, some Tues/Thurs). Wed matinee: arrive 1130A, show 130P; Sun matinee: arrive 1P, show 3P; Thurs., Fri., Sat: arrive 6P, show 8P. Tix: 730-4300; riversidedt.com Bill Harris: New Paintings. 7P-10P. Sunken Well Tavern. Show runs thru May 11 *Spotsylvania Farmers Market at Spotsy Regional Medical Center. 3-7P, 4600 Spotsy Parkway. Every Wed through early fall The hospital’s Health Drive Team will be giving free blood pressure checks and calculating BMI on May 1, 22, June 12 and July 17. In addition, the final weigh in for “Lose Big, Win Big” will occur on May 1. Please visit www.thefarmersmarket.co for more information, or contact 540/845-4267 Register for Walk: Individuals, teams, orgs and donors for “Sixth Annual Walk for Mental Wellness”. Mental Health America of FXBG (MHAF). Online til May 2: mhafred.org/walk2013 for May 4 event

CALENDAR of events

*CommonWealth Slam Poetry Open Mic 7-10P. Read All Over Books, 307 William. Acoustic performers, singers encouraged to perform. Weekly! $5; free w/ student I.D *Music every Thurs live at Kenmore Inn 8-11P

first friday, may 3

5th Annual LibertyTown Patrons’ Show! 5-9P. To Benefit LibertyTown! Artwork donated by Local Artists. 5-8P. libertytownarts.com PONSHOP Studio/Gallery Opening Reception: RACSB’s Ninth Annual “The Art of Recovery” exhibit featuring artwork by adults w/ mental illness England Run Library Poetry Readings each Fri. 4P. Share your favorite published poems, original work, or just come listen. Info: Lee Criscuolo, 540899-1703 ext 242 Populuxe First Friday art event 5-9P at 107 William *FCCA Opening Reception 6P-9P. 373-5646. 813 Sophia. fccava.org. Wed-Mon 12-4P, Sat 11-4P. See Ad “A Duet of Color” thru May 26. First Friday Reception 6-9P. Featured Artists Ceebs and Medina Roberts eclectic interpretations of color. Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline. Daily 11-5P *Fridays@The Last Resort. St. George’s Church Reception: 810 Weekend Gallery at 810 Caroline. 10-6 Fri & Sat.; 1-4 Sun. 371-8100 Western Impressions; America’s Mystical Landscape. New work by Chris O’Kelley on display entire month at The Scenter of Town, 907 Charles. Reception 5-7P

saturday, may 4

Rappahannock Adult Activities Plant Sale at Mayfest Free PRIDE Training sessions 9A-5P. UMFS, 305 Charlotte. Call 540-898-1773 before May 3 to preregister. Become a Foster Parent. www.umfs.org

“Fifth Annual Ladysmith Day” celebration along Library Boulevard at Clara Smith St. Ladysmith Village on the Village Green, opposite Caroline County’s Ladysmith Library. Festival 11A-4P FXBG’s Expanded Farmer’s Market at Hurkamp Park, William at Prince Edward. Art in the Park 7A2P featuring Sonja Wise (sonjawise.com) and others. Every First Sat “Sixth Annual Walk for Mental Wellness”. Mental Health America of FXBG (MHAF). mhafred.org/walk2013 FCCA Poetry Group first Sat monthly 1P. Free FXBG Area Museum w/ Hallowed Ground Tours: third season of walking tours of historic downtown. Bricks and Boards in the ’Burg. Every Sat, 10A. $5/adults $2/child, students. Info: 540809-3918 “Pamper Me” Tea & Wine 1230P. ebmedia.eventbrite.com

sunday, may 5

*AM1230 WFVA “Community Link” 8-830A. Battle of Chancellorsville. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net Soup & Taco Cinco De Mayo Celebration! Including $5 Specials, $3 imported beer and All Margaritas $5 plus gifts and fun *Kenmore Inn, 1200 Princess Anne, 3717622/•kenmoreinn.com: Elegant Sun. Brunch, 1130A-230P

*Jams: Colonial Tavern: Jazz 7P; *Sunken Well Tavern: Bluegrass 7P

Artful Dimensions Gallery, 911 Charles: “Ballerina Massacre” sculpture. 48” x 40” wall-hung relief in Carrera Marble by Jay D. Anderson

*FAM & CC Breakfast with the Curator series. 9A. Today: Edward Andrews, Operations Manager of VA Air Museum. Series continues June 4, July 23

Pet Aupair Service

For Special Attention All Year Round Call Alexis Grogan at 540 - 903 - 0437 Serving 22401 & 22405 16

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

friday, may 10

*Courtyard Marriott - Blues and Jazz Music in Mary Washington Rm. Cash cover charge. 620 Caroline

saturday, may 11

UMW Commencement. Ball Circle. 9A Intro to Aromatherapy 10A-12N. $15. Essential oils 2-hour intro. The Scenter of Town, 907 Charles Celebrating first mother Mary Bell Washington. 2P. MW Monument grounds, Washington Ave. Lecture followed by tour of Caretaker’s Cottage; refreshments at MW House. Free. “Tell” monthly show at Horseshoes & Hand Grenades? Ren Fields and other teachers from Healing Arts Yoga offer every Saturday morning drop-in classes in James Monroe Museum garden! All ages and skill levels. Bring your yoga mat. First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move! Museums & Gardens initiative! Through June 29 Enjoy trails of Belmont, Ferry Farm, and new Rappahannock Heritage Trail. Germanna Volkssport Association 5k and 10k walking. Register: at Belmont, 224 Washington, Falmouth, 8:30A-1P. Finish by 3P. AVA credit available. http://walkfredericksburg.com or www.ava.org.

John and Mary Vreeland Live at Bistro Bethem: $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials! All ages, no cover. 8-11P

Art First Gallery:featuring works of Kenneth Moore. Original artwork from 33 local member artists. 6P-9P. Thru June 3. Daily 11A-5P

Wags & Purrs

Riverside Writers at Salem Church Library, 1-4P. Dr. Barry Amis The Potomac Poets. Open to public

Virginia Gentlemen’s Spring Dance and Beach Party featuring Band of Oz. FXBG Eagles Club, 21 Cool Springs. Benefits Big Brothers Big Sisters. 8P12MN. Tix: $60/couple (singles $30); beer and set-ups. BYOL; light snacks permitted. rbbbs.org or 371-7444

*Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

Live Music @ Courtyard Marriott - Wave on Wave every First Friday

thursday, may 9

tuesday, may 7

Gardens at Little Egypt, Tappahannock Artists Guild: “The Garden as an Art Form” class

*FXBG Jazz Collective’s open jazz jam twice monthly: 1st & 3rd Thurs. Live bebop, Latin jazz, fine cocktails. Musicians, bring instruments (no large amps). fredericksburgjazzcollective.org

Aromatherapy Meetup @ The Scenter of Town 907 Charles. 5-7P. Local folks interested in Essential oils. No charge, all welcome! Also May 22

74-voice audition-only Rappahannock Choral Society (RCS) Mother’s Day Concerts. Civil War and Sesquicentennial: period pieces expressing soldiers in battle and at rest; music from home front, songs from Broadway’s “Shenandoah.” “Battle Hymn of the Republic.” Tix: $8/door, $5/seniors (60+); kids/students free. 8P Sat, 3P Sun. Chancellor High, 6300 Harrison. rappahannock-choralsociety.org

Kenmore Inn Spring Wine Dinner, 7P. Executive Chef Jaquelin Hartman. Food that inspires: May Day morel Dinner.

thursday, may 2

wednesday, may 8

*Courtyard Marriott: Every Sunday Brunch 9A-2P

FXBG Area Iris Society Annual Spring Iris Show & Artistic Competition. Chancellor Ruritan Club, 5994 Plank Rd (Rt, 3 West). 1230P-4P. Free. (703) 349-9211 or (540) 582-5799

sunday, may 12

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Kathy Anderson-Empower House. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net FXBG Area Iris Society Open Garden Day: Member gardens open to public showcase iris and variety of flowers, plants. Locations/directions: (540) 5825799 or (540) 659-6202 Valya Karcher Pilates mat class weekly at “The 810 Loft” above Jabberwocky, 810 Caroline. 78P. Drop-in $15; 10 classes for $100

tuesday, may 14

Free health seminar by Children’s Hospital of Richmond of VCU at Belmont, 224 Washington Evening with an Expert lecture series: Johnny Johnson will discuss his artwork. Mansard Gallery 7P. 1001 Princess Anne. famcc.org. *John Wiley & Friends - Live music with $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials. All ages welcome, no cover. 8-11P

wednesday, may 15

disAbility Resource Center workshops: “Life’s Lessons Learned from M & M’s” light-hearted, coping w/ stress. Bring sense of humor. 1030A12N. tgratz@cildrc.org 409 Progress Commemoration of 150th Anniversary of Battle of Chancellorsville: Losing Lee’s Right Arm: The Death and Legacy of Stonewall Jackson, Hanover Museum of the Confederacy Free Lunch & Learn at 12N. Bring bag lunch, join us for 30-min discussion on rewards of growing plants w/ youth. Focus on Lemon Balm, safe/effective herb. UMFS, 305 Charlottewww.umfs.org

friday, may 17

3rd Fri, 830A business ladies’ free networking “TIPS”. Ellen Baptist, 548-0652 *2013 Annual Greek Festival - Homemade Greek food, pastries, vendors. Entertainment - Greek music, dancers, kid zone (Sat/Sun) carnival w/ balloon animals, face art, bounce houses

*FAM & CC summer long concert series: Sounds of Summer. Various genres including jazz, country, bluegrass, blues, classical, pop. Free. Every Friday

saturday, may 18

Fork It Over Festival 1P-5p. Downtown Greens Upper Garden: Music, Silent Auction, yard sale, plant sale. Donations gladly accepted. 206 Charles *Equine Rescue League Spring Open House weekend. 10A-4P. Loudoun Spring Farm Tour Healthy Families: “Safety First Regional Car Seat Campaign” 9A-3P at GEICO on 17 north *Free Vegetarian Cooking class every 3rd Sat. 2330P. Meditation 4-5P. Porter Library Ingleside Vineyards Ladies Only Wine Class. 1-5P. Reservations required; space limited. Admission includes souvenir wine glass, tastings, treats FCCA Art Guild of VA meets third Sat 10-Noon. $15/year

tuesday, may 21

Blairs West: Live music. Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials. All ages welcome, no cover. 8-11P

thursday, may 23

Stafford High School Fine Arts Departments presents Little Shop of Horrors. 7P-930P

friday, may 24

*Courtyard Marriott - Blues and Jazz Music in Mary Washington Rm. Cash cover. 620 Caroline. 3738300

saturday, may 25

Reiki 1: 10A-2P. $100. Learn about Reiki in your life. Level 1 class. The Scenter of Town, 907 Charles

sunday, may 26

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Rappahannock Council on Sexual Assault. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net Memorial Day Poppy event. 604-7624

LOW Lioness Flea Market 830-1230P. New Locust Grove MS (6368 Flat Run, Rt. 601). Baked goods, Lion’s Sight/Hearing Van

monday, may 27

“Americans in Paris: Diplomatic Adventures of James and Elizabeth Monroe,” Talk and Reception. Sister City Association French-themed evening in museum garden. French wine/cheese 6-830P. Tix: $30/person. 654-1043 or auphaus@umw.edu

tuesday, may 28

River Easement Paddle/ Hike through riverside land holdings; importance of conservation, riparian forest buffers. You will get wet! Bring lunch for England Run Falls. Min age 10. 930A-2P. $35. Meet at Motts Run

sunday, may 19

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Stafford Civil War Park. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net Summer Gear Shopping! Barbecues, beach bags, handbags, jewelry, cards, scrapbooking. A.D.S. Meeting/Training Ctr, 107 Westwood Office Park behind Lone Star. 1-4P. 540-429-2651 *Chamber Music Series: “Beautiful Music in a Beautiful Space.” 3P. $10/person; students free. St. George’s, 905 Princess Anne. stgeorgesepiscopal.net. Third Sun monthly thru May

Memorial Day festivities – go to events calendar at fredericksburgva.gov

*Live music at Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials. All ages welcome, no cover. 8-11P

wednesday, may 29

“Artifacts after Dark,” Talk and Reception glimpse into James Monroe Museum’s extensive collection! RSVP: 654-1123 or auphaus@umw.edu. Repeats June 12 & 26 disAbility Resource Center workshops for community: “Becoming a Personal Attendant: What’s it All About?” Learn to be a ConsumerDirected Assistant to help individual w/disability to live in community. 10A-12N. klett@cildrc.org409 Progress

If you are reading this 191st issue of FP, thank an advertiser! If you are an advertiser, list your event. Deadline for June’s 16 th anniversary issue is May 20. Paste your event in an email to frntprch@aol.com or go to the new frontporchfredericksburg.com to post for both print and e-e editions.

~ Peggy Wickham Art ~ Companionship Meal Preparation Medication Reminders Laundry

Light Housekeeping Shopping/Errands Personal Care Flexible Hours

Call for a free, no-obligation appointment

Each HomeInstead Franchise Office is Independently Owned & Operated

Peggy Wickham Art at “All Members Show” at Brush Strokes in May 2191 Sebastian Road Fredericksburg, VA 22405 540-446-5639

540.899.1422

1722 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on

homeinstead.com front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

17


may 2013… in fullbloom wednesday, may 1

Heard In The Burg: Tix on sale at Sunken Well Tavern! Larry Keel, Hackensack Boys, Big Daddy Love, Elby Brass, and www.heardintheburg.com for June 8 show at FXBG Fair Grounds. VIP tickets available only at the Well. Info: heardintheburg.com. Some proceeds to Community Outreach *Riverside Dinner Theater: Main Stage: Legally Blonde, opens May 3 through June 16; Children’s Theater, Current Show: The Secret Garden, through May 18; Upcoming: Pinkalicious, The Musical, May 25-July 13. Lunch N Show (Sat, some Tues/Thurs). Wed matinee: arrive 1130A, show 130P; Sun matinee: arrive 1P, show 3P; Thurs., Fri., Sat: arrive 6P, show 8P. Tix: 730-4300; riversidedt.com Bill Harris: New Paintings. 7P-10P. Sunken Well Tavern. Show runs thru May 11 *Spotsylvania Farmers Market at Spotsy Regional Medical Center. 3-7P, 4600 Spotsy Parkway. Every Wed through early fall The hospital’s Health Drive Team will be giving free blood pressure checks and calculating BMI on May 1, 22, June 12 and July 17. In addition, the final weigh in for “Lose Big, Win Big” will occur on May 1. Please visit www.thefarmersmarket.co for more information, or contact 540/845-4267 Register for Walk: Individuals, teams, orgs and donors for “Sixth Annual Walk for Mental Wellness”. Mental Health America of FXBG (MHAF). Online til May 2: mhafred.org/walk2013 for May 4 event

CALENDAR of events

*CommonWealth Slam Poetry Open Mic 7-10P. Read All Over Books, 307 William. Acoustic performers, singers encouraged to perform. Weekly! $5; free w/ student I.D *Music every Thurs live at Kenmore Inn 8-11P

first friday, may 3

5th Annual LibertyTown Patrons’ Show! 5-9P. To Benefit LibertyTown! Artwork donated by Local Artists. 5-8P. libertytownarts.com PONSHOP Studio/Gallery Opening Reception: RACSB’s Ninth Annual “The Art of Recovery” exhibit featuring artwork by adults w/ mental illness England Run Library Poetry Readings each Fri. 4P. Share your favorite published poems, original work, or just come listen. Info: Lee Criscuolo, 540899-1703 ext 242 Populuxe First Friday art event 5-9P at 107 William *FCCA Opening Reception 6P-9P. 373-5646. 813 Sophia. fccava.org. Wed-Mon 12-4P, Sat 11-4P. See Ad “A Duet of Color” thru May 26. First Friday Reception 6-9P. Featured Artists Ceebs and Medina Roberts eclectic interpretations of color. Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline. Daily 11-5P *Fridays@The Last Resort. St. George’s Church Reception: 810 Weekend Gallery at 810 Caroline. 10-6 Fri & Sat.; 1-4 Sun. 371-8100 Western Impressions; America’s Mystical Landscape. New work by Chris O’Kelley on display entire month at The Scenter of Town, 907 Charles. Reception 5-7P

saturday, may 4

Rappahannock Adult Activities Plant Sale at Mayfest Free PRIDE Training sessions 9A-5P. UMFS, 305 Charlotte. Call 540-898-1773 before May 3 to preregister. Become a Foster Parent. www.umfs.org

“Fifth Annual Ladysmith Day” celebration along Library Boulevard at Clara Smith St. Ladysmith Village on the Village Green, opposite Caroline County’s Ladysmith Library. Festival 11A-4P FXBG’s Expanded Farmer’s Market at Hurkamp Park, William at Prince Edward. Art in the Park 7A2P featuring Sonja Wise (sonjawise.com) and others. Every First Sat “Sixth Annual Walk for Mental Wellness”. Mental Health America of FXBG (MHAF). mhafred.org/walk2013 FCCA Poetry Group first Sat monthly 1P. Free FXBG Area Museum w/ Hallowed Ground Tours: third season of walking tours of historic downtown. Bricks and Boards in the ’Burg. Every Sat, 10A. $5/adults $2/child, students. Info: 540809-3918 “Pamper Me” Tea & Wine 1230P. ebmedia.eventbrite.com

sunday, may 5

*AM1230 WFVA “Community Link” 8-830A. Battle of Chancellorsville. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net Soup & Taco Cinco De Mayo Celebration! Including $5 Specials, $3 imported beer and All Margaritas $5 plus gifts and fun *Kenmore Inn, 1200 Princess Anne, 3717622/•kenmoreinn.com: Elegant Sun. Brunch, 1130A-230P

*Jams: Colonial Tavern: Jazz 7P; *Sunken Well Tavern: Bluegrass 7P

Artful Dimensions Gallery, 911 Charles: “Ballerina Massacre” sculpture. 48” x 40” wall-hung relief in Carrera Marble by Jay D. Anderson

*FAM & CC Breakfast with the Curator series. 9A. Today: Edward Andrews, Operations Manager of VA Air Museum. Series continues June 4, July 23

Pet Aupair Service

For Special Attention All Year Round Call Alexis Grogan at 540 - 903 - 0437 Serving 22401 & 22405 16

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

friday, may 10

*Courtyard Marriott - Blues and Jazz Music in Mary Washington Rm. Cash cover charge. 620 Caroline

saturday, may 11

UMW Commencement. Ball Circle. 9A Intro to Aromatherapy 10A-12N. $15. Essential oils 2-hour intro. The Scenter of Town, 907 Charles Celebrating first mother Mary Bell Washington. 2P. MW Monument grounds, Washington Ave. Lecture followed by tour of Caretaker’s Cottage; refreshments at MW House. Free. “Tell” monthly show at Horseshoes & Hand Grenades? Ren Fields and other teachers from Healing Arts Yoga offer every Saturday morning drop-in classes in James Monroe Museum garden! All ages and skill levels. Bring your yoga mat. First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move! Museums & Gardens initiative! Through June 29 Enjoy trails of Belmont, Ferry Farm, and new Rappahannock Heritage Trail. Germanna Volkssport Association 5k and 10k walking. Register: at Belmont, 224 Washington, Falmouth, 8:30A-1P. Finish by 3P. AVA credit available. http://walkfredericksburg.com or www.ava.org.

John and Mary Vreeland Live at Bistro Bethem: $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials! All ages, no cover. 8-11P

Art First Gallery:featuring works of Kenneth Moore. Original artwork from 33 local member artists. 6P-9P. Thru June 3. Daily 11A-5P

Wags & Purrs

Riverside Writers at Salem Church Library, 1-4P. Dr. Barry Amis The Potomac Poets. Open to public

Virginia Gentlemen’s Spring Dance and Beach Party featuring Band of Oz. FXBG Eagles Club, 21 Cool Springs. Benefits Big Brothers Big Sisters. 8P12MN. Tix: $60/couple (singles $30); beer and set-ups. BYOL; light snacks permitted. rbbbs.org or 371-7444

*Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

Live Music @ Courtyard Marriott - Wave on Wave every First Friday

thursday, may 9

tuesday, may 7

Gardens at Little Egypt, Tappahannock Artists Guild: “The Garden as an Art Form” class

*FXBG Jazz Collective’s open jazz jam twice monthly: 1st & 3rd Thurs. Live bebop, Latin jazz, fine cocktails. Musicians, bring instruments (no large amps). fredericksburgjazzcollective.org

Aromatherapy Meetup @ The Scenter of Town 907 Charles. 5-7P. Local folks interested in Essential oils. No charge, all welcome! Also May 22

74-voice audition-only Rappahannock Choral Society (RCS) Mother’s Day Concerts. Civil War and Sesquicentennial: period pieces expressing soldiers in battle and at rest; music from home front, songs from Broadway’s “Shenandoah.” “Battle Hymn of the Republic.” Tix: $8/door, $5/seniors (60+); kids/students free. 8P Sat, 3P Sun. Chancellor High, 6300 Harrison. rappahannock-choralsociety.org

Kenmore Inn Spring Wine Dinner, 7P. Executive Chef Jaquelin Hartman. Food that inspires: May Day morel Dinner.

thursday, may 2

wednesday, may 8

*Courtyard Marriott: Every Sunday Brunch 9A-2P

FXBG Area Iris Society Annual Spring Iris Show & Artistic Competition. Chancellor Ruritan Club, 5994 Plank Rd (Rt, 3 West). 1230P-4P. Free. (703) 349-9211 or (540) 582-5799

sunday, may 12

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Kathy Anderson-Empower House. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net FXBG Area Iris Society Open Garden Day: Member gardens open to public showcase iris and variety of flowers, plants. Locations/directions: (540) 5825799 or (540) 659-6202 Valya Karcher Pilates mat class weekly at “The 810 Loft” above Jabberwocky, 810 Caroline. 78P. Drop-in $15; 10 classes for $100

tuesday, may 14

Free health seminar by Children’s Hospital of Richmond of VCU at Belmont, 224 Washington Evening with an Expert lecture series: Johnny Johnson will discuss his artwork. Mansard Gallery 7P. 1001 Princess Anne. famcc.org. *John Wiley & Friends - Live music with $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials. All ages welcome, no cover. 8-11P

wednesday, may 15

disAbility Resource Center workshops: “Life’s Lessons Learned from M & M’s” light-hearted, coping w/ stress. Bring sense of humor. 1030A12N. tgratz@cildrc.org 409 Progress Commemoration of 150th Anniversary of Battle of Chancellorsville: Losing Lee’s Right Arm: The Death and Legacy of Stonewall Jackson, Hanover Museum of the Confederacy Free Lunch & Learn at 12N. Bring bag lunch, join us for 30-min discussion on rewards of growing plants w/ youth. Focus on Lemon Balm, safe/effective herb. UMFS, 305 Charlottewww.umfs.org

friday, may 17

3rd Fri, 830A business ladies’ free networking “TIPS”. Ellen Baptist, 548-0652 *2013 Annual Greek Festival - Homemade Greek food, pastries, vendors. Entertainment - Greek music, dancers, kid zone (Sat/Sun) carnival w/ balloon animals, face art, bounce houses

*FAM & CC summer long concert series: Sounds of Summer. Various genres including jazz, country, bluegrass, blues, classical, pop. Free. Every Friday

saturday, may 18

Fork It Over Festival 1P-5p. Downtown Greens Upper Garden: Music, Silent Auction, yard sale, plant sale. Donations gladly accepted. 206 Charles *Equine Rescue League Spring Open House weekend. 10A-4P. Loudoun Spring Farm Tour Healthy Families: “Safety First Regional Car Seat Campaign” 9A-3P at GEICO on 17 north *Free Vegetarian Cooking class every 3rd Sat. 2330P. Meditation 4-5P. Porter Library Ingleside Vineyards Ladies Only Wine Class. 1-5P. Reservations required; space limited. Admission includes souvenir wine glass, tastings, treats FCCA Art Guild of VA meets third Sat 10-Noon. $15/year

tuesday, may 21

Blairs West: Live music. Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials. All ages welcome, no cover. 8-11P

thursday, may 23

Stafford High School Fine Arts Departments presents Little Shop of Horrors. 7P-930P

friday, may 24

*Courtyard Marriott - Blues and Jazz Music in Mary Washington Rm. Cash cover. 620 Caroline. 3738300

saturday, may 25

Reiki 1: 10A-2P. $100. Learn about Reiki in your life. Level 1 class. The Scenter of Town, 907 Charles

sunday, may 26

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Rappahannock Council on Sexual Assault. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net Memorial Day Poppy event. 604-7624

LOW Lioness Flea Market 830-1230P. New Locust Grove MS (6368 Flat Run, Rt. 601). Baked goods, Lion’s Sight/Hearing Van

monday, may 27

“Americans in Paris: Diplomatic Adventures of James and Elizabeth Monroe,” Talk and Reception. Sister City Association French-themed evening in museum garden. French wine/cheese 6-830P. Tix: $30/person. 654-1043 or auphaus@umw.edu

tuesday, may 28

River Easement Paddle/ Hike through riverside land holdings; importance of conservation, riparian forest buffers. You will get wet! Bring lunch for England Run Falls. Min age 10. 930A-2P. $35. Meet at Motts Run

sunday, may 19

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Stafford Civil War Park. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net Summer Gear Shopping! Barbecues, beach bags, handbags, jewelry, cards, scrapbooking. A.D.S. Meeting/Training Ctr, 107 Westwood Office Park behind Lone Star. 1-4P. 540-429-2651 *Chamber Music Series: “Beautiful Music in a Beautiful Space.” 3P. $10/person; students free. St. George’s, 905 Princess Anne. stgeorgesepiscopal.net. Third Sun monthly thru May

Memorial Day festivities – go to events calendar at fredericksburgva.gov

*Live music at Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials. All ages welcome, no cover. 8-11P

wednesday, may 29

“Artifacts after Dark,” Talk and Reception glimpse into James Monroe Museum’s extensive collection! RSVP: 654-1123 or auphaus@umw.edu. Repeats June 12 & 26 disAbility Resource Center workshops for community: “Becoming a Personal Attendant: What’s it All About?” Learn to be a ConsumerDirected Assistant to help individual w/disability to live in community. 10A-12N. klett@cildrc.org409 Progress

If you are reading this 191st issue of FP, thank an advertiser! If you are an advertiser, list your event. Deadline for June’s 16 th anniversary issue is May 20. Paste your event in an email to frntprch@aol.com or go to the new frontporchfredericksburg.com to post for both print and e-e editions.

~ Peggy Wickham Art ~ Companionship Meal Preparation Medication Reminders Laundry

Light Housekeeping Shopping/Errands Personal Care Flexible Hours

Call for a free, no-obligation appointment

Each HomeInstead Franchise Office is Independently Owned & Operated

Peggy Wickham Art at “All Members Show” at Brush Strokes in May 2191 Sebastian Road Fredericksburg, VA 22405 540-446-5639

540.899.1422

1722 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on

homeinstead.com front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

17


history’s stories

OUR HERITAGE

Federal Hill By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

things you never think about

I have always found interest in the story of General Thomas Reade Rootes Cobb who was killed during the Battle of Fredericksburg on December 13th, 1862. The same age (39) as Stonewall Jackson, who would be killed a few months later at Chancellorsville, Cobb was in command of the Confederate line below Marye’s Heights. He was born in Georgia in 1823, the son of John Cobb and Sarah Rootes Cobb, who was from the Rootes family which owned Federal Hill on Hanover Street. Sarah moved to Georgia when she married John Cobb, a wealthy Georgian. Thomas graduated from the University of Georgia and established a law practice. Cobb became a leader of the secessionist movement in Georgia and established his own regiment early at the outbreak of the civil war and fought in many of the eastern campaigns, earning a promotion to brigadier general in the fall of 1862. General Cobb was excited about the march to Fredericksburg to join with the Army of Northern Virginia as he wanted to meet old friends. He would never know the fate that awaited him on December 13th. Upon his arrival, his regiment was placed at the base of Marye’s Heights in the Sunken Road, a rutted, dirt lane behind a waist high stone wall directly in front of the main Union forces. He would write home in a letter to his wife, “We have a magnificent position, perhaps the best on the line.” Cobb’s line was one of the most perilous and dangerous facing the main force of the Union attack and blast from the close range of Union artillery. At the time the Union attack approached, Cobb could be seen looking out over the plain toward the edge of town. The large white frame home known as “Federal Hill” — the birthplace and childhood home of his mother Sarah Rootes. He may have been thinking of the happy times he spent there as a boy with his family and grandparents. Now the home was under Union control as Union artillery was moved into the yard at “Federal Hill” to fire upon the Southern troops. The account of his death has several versions. One such story was that Cobb was pacing the line giving commands of encouragement to his troops as thousands of Union soldiers charged the stone wall, when he fell mortally wounded struck in the upper leg by a shell fragment that may have been fired from the cannon on Federal Hill. He would die from the loss of blood from the wound. Today, there is a lone stone marking the place of this death a short walk from his mother’s home where he once played as a young boy. Tuffy Hicks dedicates “this story and our prayers for the speedy recovery of Rob Grogan.”

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center 18

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

May 2013

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

Fredericksburg seems to dodge the full impact of an economic bullet. We get grazed but never laid out. In recent times, our large military presence has kept our local economy above water. In 1930, our cowboy in the white hat was the American Viscose Corporation’s Sylvania Plant in Spotsylvania. It opened in May of that year and less than a decade later, it saved us from the full force of the Great Depression. Coming across notebooks dated 1930, I felt like Harrison Ford in Raiders of the Lost Ark discovering secret artifacts. Titles like “Caustic soda analysis” and “Cellophane production” ran throughout the pencil-written journals of Sylvania engineer Thomas J. Higgins. Stuff you never think about… But we should think about, and remember, the impact of a place like Sylvania and its peak employment of 2,700 persons then at today’s Bowman Center. The plant produced cellophane, which came from pulp producers in the American northwest. The plant in Fredericksburg chemically reduced pulp sheets to a liquid of refined pulp, then transformed them into sheets and rolls of cellophane. Sylvania’s “Bulletin #3115”, which I got my hands on, published “The story of Fredericksburg”, “Familiar uses of Sylvania products”, a “Success story – cellophane style”, and delivered such factoids as marshmallow sales jumped 1,000% and handkerchiefs went up 94% when wrapped in cellophane. Who knew? But we should know in order to appreciate commerce and innovation. Not only did

Sylvania manufacture cellophane, its Fredericksburg plant was a “quality performance testing laboratory” under the scientific minds of people like Mr. Higgins. I may suggest to Josh Cameli at the Sunken Well Tavern a few questions for his weekly Trivia Night. Did you know, Josh, that “cellophane” is coined from “cellulose” and the Greek “phaneros” meaning “clear”? That two in ten Fredericksburgers were dependent on Sylvania’s $8 million annual payroll? That the plant produced enough cellophane in one year to run a 30-foot wide highway three times around the world? [Photo is of the last pump house, now a home owned by Bill and Susan Beck.] There are many more things you probably never think about, and many you should, available for consumption at the CRHC on Barton Street. -RG

Roller Derby: inside the oval of feminine designs

By victoria scrimer take to the oval track. When the whistle blows, both jammers fight their way through the pack, assisted by their blockers with pushes, whips and offensive blocks. The jammers race around the track for the two-minute jam and for every opposing player they pass they score a point for their team. I love baseball Cherry Blossom Bombshell jammer Victoria Scrimer (at far and football, but for me left) takes a whip off of teammate Ridin’ Dirty roller derby is special because it is a different Gone is the hair pulling, cat fighting and manufactured drama of the kind of sport. Right down to its oval track sports entertainment version of roller roller derby’s very structure as a sport derby. Today’s roller derby seems to have seems to reflect traditionally feminine brought back little from the WWF-style designs. Most popular sports (baseball, spectacle that was 1980s derby. Leagues football, soccer and basketball) seem to in the US and abroad are putting mirror a linear masculine pattern of athleticism and the DIY ethic front and continuous play culminating in a single exciting climax like a touch down, or goal. center. Conversely, roller derby is cyclical and Leagues in the Baltimore, seems to mirror a labored birthing Washington DC and Virginia areas are process as the jammer breaks free from flourishing including the DC Rollergirls the pack. In fact, in derby lingo, the which was established in 2006 and now jammer is often referred to as “the baby.” has nearly one hundred skaters making up I have always been attracted to four home teams. Their public games attract anywhere between one and three the fringe aesthetic of roller derby, but the physical challenge and friendships thousand fans on a monthly basis. Locally, the exciting news is that have kept me skating for years. I am often Fredericksburg now has its own hometown struck by the way most coverage of roller derby tends to emphasize and even marvel roller derby team, the 540 Rollergirls (catch their promo video at at the fact that the women playing the vimeo.com/50022478) These women just sport are “lawyers, bank tellers, moms, hosted their second home bout of the and artists” as if a any cross section of season at Rollerworks Family Skating women would reveal that most women do not have a variety of jobs. It is true that center in Bealeton, VA. Rollerderby coming to women who play roller derby come from Fredericksburg is great news for the every conceivable walk of life and community. I started skating with the DC represent all body types and personalities. As derby players, we rename ourselves and Rollergirls in 2009 and speak from experience when I say Fredericksburg is in step out onto the track and embrace a different side of our identity as women. for a lot of fun. But it is also exciting The beautiful thing about roller derby is because roller derby is a community that it is a reminder that a woman can be dominated by women and its local or do more than one thing or even have presence has and will continue to conflicting identities. contribute to a public discourse on With this in mind, I urge feminism, identity, LGBT issues, and individuality, which can enrich and Fredericksburg to support your local teams. Help them find a happy home and enlighten a community. Prior to playing, I believed roller be an excited fan. You will be doing derby involved women in fishnets yourself and community a service by aimlessly hitting each other while roller supporting this incredible sport. skating in a circle, so laying down some Victoria Scrimer is a UMW graduate, basics of the game is key to understanding Vice President of DCRG, the sport and knowing what to expect at a Greenpeace employee and occasional game. Roller derby is in fact a fast paced, contributor to Front Porch Magazine. To donate to DCRG, visit full contact sport, which does involve http://www.crowdrise.com/dcrollergirlsw quite a bit of hitting. A roller derby game arehouse/ is called a “bout” and a bout is made up of two-minute “jams.” During a jam four Photo by James Calder: blockers and one jammer from each team front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

19


history’s stories

OUR HERITAGE

Federal Hill By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

things you never think about

I have always found interest in the story of General Thomas Reade Rootes Cobb who was killed during the Battle of Fredericksburg on December 13th, 1862. The same age (39) as Stonewall Jackson, who would be killed a few months later at Chancellorsville, Cobb was in command of the Confederate line below Marye’s Heights. He was born in Georgia in 1823, the son of John Cobb and Sarah Rootes Cobb, who was from the Rootes family which owned Federal Hill on Hanover Street. Sarah moved to Georgia when she married John Cobb, a wealthy Georgian. Thomas graduated from the University of Georgia and established a law practice. Cobb became a leader of the secessionist movement in Georgia and established his own regiment early at the outbreak of the civil war and fought in many of the eastern campaigns, earning a promotion to brigadier general in the fall of 1862. General Cobb was excited about the march to Fredericksburg to join with the Army of Northern Virginia as he wanted to meet old friends. He would never know the fate that awaited him on December 13th. Upon his arrival, his regiment was placed at the base of Marye’s Heights in the Sunken Road, a rutted, dirt lane behind a waist high stone wall directly in front of the main Union forces. He would write home in a letter to his wife, “We have a magnificent position, perhaps the best on the line.” Cobb’s line was one of the most perilous and dangerous facing the main force of the Union attack and blast from the close range of Union artillery. At the time the Union attack approached, Cobb could be seen looking out over the plain toward the edge of town. The large white frame home known as “Federal Hill” — the birthplace and childhood home of his mother Sarah Rootes. He may have been thinking of the happy times he spent there as a boy with his family and grandparents. Now the home was under Union control as Union artillery was moved into the yard at “Federal Hill” to fire upon the Southern troops. The account of his death has several versions. One such story was that Cobb was pacing the line giving commands of encouragement to his troops as thousands of Union soldiers charged the stone wall, when he fell mortally wounded struck in the upper leg by a shell fragment that may have been fired from the cannon on Federal Hill. He would die from the loss of blood from the wound. Today, there is a lone stone marking the place of this death a short walk from his mother’s home where he once played as a young boy. Tuffy Hicks dedicates “this story and our prayers for the speedy recovery of Rob Grogan.”

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center 18

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

May 2013

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

Fredericksburg seems to dodge the full impact of an economic bullet. We get grazed but never laid out. In recent times, our large military presence has kept our local economy above water. In 1930, our cowboy in the white hat was the American Viscose Corporation’s Sylvania Plant in Spotsylvania. It opened in May of that year and less than a decade later, it saved us from the full force of the Great Depression. Coming across notebooks dated 1930, I felt like Harrison Ford in Raiders of the Lost Ark discovering secret artifacts. Titles like “Caustic soda analysis” and “Cellophane production” ran throughout the pencil-written journals of Sylvania engineer Thomas J. Higgins. Stuff you never think about… But we should think about, and remember, the impact of a place like Sylvania and its peak employment of 2,700 persons then at today’s Bowman Center. The plant produced cellophane, which came from pulp producers in the American northwest. The plant in Fredericksburg chemically reduced pulp sheets to a liquid of refined pulp, then transformed them into sheets and rolls of cellophane. Sylvania’s “Bulletin #3115”, which I got my hands on, published “The story of Fredericksburg”, “Familiar uses of Sylvania products”, a “Success story – cellophane style”, and delivered such factoids as marshmallow sales jumped 1,000% and handkerchiefs went up 94% when wrapped in cellophane. Who knew? But we should know in order to appreciate commerce and innovation. Not only did

Sylvania manufacture cellophane, its Fredericksburg plant was a “quality performance testing laboratory” under the scientific minds of people like Mr. Higgins. I may suggest to Josh Cameli at the Sunken Well Tavern a few questions for his weekly Trivia Night. Did you know, Josh, that “cellophane” is coined from “cellulose” and the Greek “phaneros” meaning “clear”? That two in ten Fredericksburgers were dependent on Sylvania’s $8 million annual payroll? That the plant produced enough cellophane in one year to run a 30-foot wide highway three times around the world? [Photo is of the last pump house, now a home owned by Bill and Susan Beck.] There are many more things you probably never think about, and many you should, available for consumption at the CRHC on Barton Street. -RG

Roller Derby: inside the oval of feminine designs

By victoria scrimer take to the oval track. When the whistle blows, both jammers fight their way through the pack, assisted by their blockers with pushes, whips and offensive blocks. The jammers race around the track for the two-minute jam and for every opposing player they pass they score a point for their team. I love baseball Cherry Blossom Bombshell jammer Victoria Scrimer (at far and football, but for me left) takes a whip off of teammate Ridin’ Dirty roller derby is special because it is a different Gone is the hair pulling, cat fighting and manufactured drama of the kind of sport. Right down to its oval track sports entertainment version of roller roller derby’s very structure as a sport derby. Today’s roller derby seems to have seems to reflect traditionally feminine brought back little from the WWF-style designs. Most popular sports (baseball, spectacle that was 1980s derby. Leagues football, soccer and basketball) seem to in the US and abroad are putting mirror a linear masculine pattern of athleticism and the DIY ethic front and continuous play culminating in a single exciting climax like a touch down, or goal. center. Conversely, roller derby is cyclical and Leagues in the Baltimore, seems to mirror a labored birthing Washington DC and Virginia areas are process as the jammer breaks free from flourishing including the DC Rollergirls the pack. In fact, in derby lingo, the which was established in 2006 and now jammer is often referred to as “the baby.” has nearly one hundred skaters making up I have always been attracted to four home teams. Their public games attract anywhere between one and three the fringe aesthetic of roller derby, but the physical challenge and friendships thousand fans on a monthly basis. Locally, the exciting news is that have kept me skating for years. I am often Fredericksburg now has its own hometown struck by the way most coverage of roller derby tends to emphasize and even marvel roller derby team, the 540 Rollergirls (catch their promo video at at the fact that the women playing the vimeo.com/50022478) These women just sport are “lawyers, bank tellers, moms, hosted their second home bout of the and artists” as if a any cross section of season at Rollerworks Family Skating women would reveal that most women do not have a variety of jobs. It is true that center in Bealeton, VA. Rollerderby coming to women who play roller derby come from Fredericksburg is great news for the every conceivable walk of life and community. I started skating with the DC represent all body types and personalities. As derby players, we rename ourselves and Rollergirls in 2009 and speak from experience when I say Fredericksburg is in step out onto the track and embrace a different side of our identity as women. for a lot of fun. But it is also exciting The beautiful thing about roller derby is because roller derby is a community that it is a reminder that a woman can be dominated by women and its local or do more than one thing or even have presence has and will continue to conflicting identities. contribute to a public discourse on With this in mind, I urge feminism, identity, LGBT issues, and individuality, which can enrich and Fredericksburg to support your local teams. Help them find a happy home and enlighten a community. Prior to playing, I believed roller be an excited fan. You will be doing derby involved women in fishnets yourself and community a service by aimlessly hitting each other while roller supporting this incredible sport. skating in a circle, so laying down some Victoria Scrimer is a UMW graduate, basics of the game is key to understanding Vice President of DCRG, the sport and knowing what to expect at a Greenpeace employee and occasional game. Roller derby is in fact a fast paced, contributor to Front Porch Magazine. To donate to DCRG, visit full contact sport, which does involve http://www.crowdrise.com/dcrollergirlsw quite a bit of hitting. A roller derby game arehouse/ is called a “bout” and a bout is made up of two-minute “jams.” During a jam four Photo by James Calder: blockers and one jammer from each team front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

19


Companion Care

Full Service Hospital featuring: Grooming Salon Canine Boarding in Our Indoor/Outdoor Runs Dog Training & Behavioral Consults with certified dog trainer Feline Boarding in Our Spacious Multi-room Condos

expect the unexpected by melanie bell, DVM

AutoKnown Better mini me By Rim Vining

online: www.save7lives.org

Tech Talk:

When playing with your puppy or kitten, handle their feet, ears, and mouth regularly. This way, nail trims, ear car, dental care, and grooming will be less stressful. - Liz Wiley, LVT Stacy L. Horner, DVM; Gary B. Dunn, DVM; Melanie Bell, DVM; Sandi L. Pepper, DVM; Melissa A. DeLauter, DVM ; Arlene Evans, DVM; Jennnifer Skarbek, DVM It was cold outside, below freezing. We had recently finished dinner. My husband is taking our daughter to a friends’ for the evening. I am just arriving home. I open the door and a fog of steam rolls out of the house. After the fog clears I can see a new waterfall where my staircase used to be, the floor is a new pond with two inches of water everywhere. “Oh my, what could possibly be going wrong?!” I follow the waterfall up the stairs where it seems to be originating from the bathroom. The bathroom door is shut, but wait, I left that door open! I open the door and my lab bolts past me surfing a small wave of water. He had gone into the bathroom and the door shut. In his panic he had turned on the bathtub faucets and flooded the house. What a mess to clean up! Opening the doors to air out the dampness leads to an ice skating rink in the kitchen. It’s a good thing I love that dog! This was an email from my niece who lives in Wyoming. Life with animals always seems to be an adventure. They do the unexpected and take advantage of us when we are tired and lazy. That same lab used to open the cabinet door and spin the daisy wheel, take out his biscuits, eat a few and then return the box and shut the cabinet door. He had his talents that dog. My niece always blamed her husband and daughter for feeding him-she had to apologize to them when she snuck up and watched him thieving the biscuits himself. We have had adventures at my house as well. The new kitten that I adopted is a piece of work. He has a lengthy repertoire of sounds he uses to communicate his displeasure of how fast he is fed, how little you have petted him, his offended sensibilities about not being

20

May 2013

allowed outside to hunt, and the list goes on. Somewhere he found a bunch of rubber bands that I had no idea I owned and ate them. He ended up in the hospital and luckily he passed them without having to have surgery. My dogs are not innocent either. The eldest, when he was a youngster, was training to work off lead. He loves the water. We happened to walk within sight of the river; he was gone like a shotstraight over a 60-foot drop. I was pretty sure he would be dead when I got to him. I found a place to get down the cliff and when I got to the beach he was nowhere to be found. I called his name and here he came running down the beach with only a small abrasion under his eye. The next time we went to the beach he went running to the water and then locked it up and sat at the same visual distance he was when he went over the cliff. I had to convince him that there wasn’t going to be a drop this time. Animals make me laugh; they make me cry, mostly, they make me feel more complete. I wouldn’t want to live without them. Just remember; they are children that never grow up. Get down on their level to help disaster-proof your house. Also, if you are going to pick up a stray be very cautious; rabies is active in our area. Pets are expensive and always finding new ways to spend your money for you. They bring a ton of enjoyment and laughs; bright stars that pass all too quickly through our lives!

Melanie Bell, DVM, practices veterinary medicine at white Oak Animal Hospital.

Front porch fredericksburg

www.woahvets.com

540/374-0462

10 Walsh Lane

There seems to be a tear in the fabric of the universe that is letting the Mini expand its presence. The Mini is in the news and in the Guinness Book of World Records. It is also working on the psyche of this Mini writer. All the cars I have owned in the past 35 years, including sports cars, have had to pass the twoguitar test. If it won’t hold two guitars and my sweetheart I can’t use it as a daily driver. My introduction to the Mini was riding with Chris Tubbs in his ’64 Mini blasting around the two lanes in the west end of Richmond. I was maybe 12 and Chris was a friend of my older brothers and the Mini was tiny and amazing. This is pre-Mustang. There is no pony car craze. There are no muscle cars. VW bugs, Austin Healey and the Porsche 356 rule as exotics. There are The also MG’s, Triumphs and Minis. Honda Super 90 and the Vespa are acceptable motorcycles. (Horseshoes &

ROXBURY F

ARM

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

Hand-Grenades on Princess Anne Street has a nice Honda 160 in their window) Since then I have driven a few Minis including an extremely underpowered 850cc example with an automatic transmission. Zero to Sixty was measured in time zones. Slow took on a new meaning. Street-sweepers were honking to get me out of their way. But how slick is this? Slick has changed all that. I am not making this up. My sons play music and their drummer for gigs in Jersey and New York is a very nice young man named Slick and he sells new Minis. So in my driveway a few weeks ago appears a new MiniCooper S with a six-speed tranny and 185 HP. There is no slow button. I of course drive it and since they now make a MiniClubman version that just happens to hold two guitars and my sweetheart we are at an impasse… conundrum… MGB GT or new Mini with A/C and air bags? Hmmmm. A car that has real heat

and stops on a dime or the 95 HP, rides like a truck, leaks like a sieve MG? Hmmmm? Adding more Mini fever to the sweat lodge, ‘Tim’ shows up with a ’69 Mini that he is building for his ‘wife’ that has a few tricks all its own. He throws me the keys and says, “Do you want to drive it?” To be clear - for the uninitiated - a ‘60’s vintage Mini is a tin box with a steel dashboard ‘shelf’, one gauge cluster for the speedo, and it has plexi-glass sliding windows. Talk about leaks. Into this archaic tin box this friend has now stuffed a modern Honda VTEC engine, a five-speed tranny and a full gauge cluster. Of course it still has a steel dash shelf and poor seat belts. We also have 150 HP and a screamer of a little car. After all of this prompting if you still need a Mini experience check out this link to the new world record holders for parallel parking in the tightest spot. You take a vintage style Mini and using nothing but the gas pedal, the steering wheel and the emergency bake you slide the car into a space only 5 inches longer than the car.http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com /news/2013/3/video-brothers-both-beattightest-parallel-parking-record-47748/ Really, there is some problem with the fabric of the universe. I’ve been driving MGB GT’s for 35 years and a water pump costs $39.95. A new Mini? Lucky if I can check the oil. What do I do? I autoknown but I don’t. Rim Vining is maxing out his brain power on this decision. What would you do, reader? Email autoknown@aol.com

in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Front Porch Fredericksburg

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

& GARDEN CENTER

Since 1929

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Wild Bird Feeders/ Bird Baths Organic Gardening Products Home Brewer & Vintner Supplies American Made Tools

FREDERICKSBURGCOLLABORATIVE

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

21


Companion Care

Full Service Hospital featuring: Grooming Salon Canine Boarding in Our Indoor/Outdoor Runs Dog Training & Behavioral Consults with certified dog trainer Feline Boarding in Our Spacious Multi-room Condos

expect the unexpected by melanie bell, DVM

AutoKnown Better mini me By Rim Vining

online: www.save7lives.org

Tech Talk:

When playing with your puppy or kitten, handle their feet, ears, and mouth regularly. This way, nail trims, ear car, dental care, and grooming will be less stressful. - Liz Wiley, LVT Stacy L. Horner, DVM; Gary B. Dunn, DVM; Melanie Bell, DVM; Sandi L. Pepper, DVM; Melissa A. DeLauter, DVM ; Arlene Evans, DVM; Jennnifer Skarbek, DVM It was cold outside, below freezing. We had recently finished dinner. My husband is taking our daughter to a friends’ for the evening. I am just arriving home. I open the door and a fog of steam rolls out of the house. After the fog clears I can see a new waterfall where my staircase used to be, the floor is a new pond with two inches of water everywhere. “Oh my, what could possibly be going wrong?!” I follow the waterfall up the stairs where it seems to be originating from the bathroom. The bathroom door is shut, but wait, I left that door open! I open the door and my lab bolts past me surfing a small wave of water. He had gone into the bathroom and the door shut. In his panic he had turned on the bathtub faucets and flooded the house. What a mess to clean up! Opening the doors to air out the dampness leads to an ice skating rink in the kitchen. It’s a good thing I love that dog! This was an email from my niece who lives in Wyoming. Life with animals always seems to be an adventure. They do the unexpected and take advantage of us when we are tired and lazy. That same lab used to open the cabinet door and spin the daisy wheel, take out his biscuits, eat a few and then return the box and shut the cabinet door. He had his talents that dog. My niece always blamed her husband and daughter for feeding him-she had to apologize to them when she snuck up and watched him thieving the biscuits himself. We have had adventures at my house as well. The new kitten that I adopted is a piece of work. He has a lengthy repertoire of sounds he uses to communicate his displeasure of how fast he is fed, how little you have petted him, his offended sensibilities about not being

20

May 2013

allowed outside to hunt, and the list goes on. Somewhere he found a bunch of rubber bands that I had no idea I owned and ate them. He ended up in the hospital and luckily he passed them without having to have surgery. My dogs are not innocent either. The eldest, when he was a youngster, was training to work off lead. He loves the water. We happened to walk within sight of the river; he was gone like a shotstraight over a 60-foot drop. I was pretty sure he would be dead when I got to him. I found a place to get down the cliff and when I got to the beach he was nowhere to be found. I called his name and here he came running down the beach with only a small abrasion under his eye. The next time we went to the beach he went running to the water and then locked it up and sat at the same visual distance he was when he went over the cliff. I had to convince him that there wasn’t going to be a drop this time. Animals make me laugh; they make me cry, mostly, they make me feel more complete. I wouldn’t want to live without them. Just remember; they are children that never grow up. Get down on their level to help disaster-proof your house. Also, if you are going to pick up a stray be very cautious; rabies is active in our area. Pets are expensive and always finding new ways to spend your money for you. They bring a ton of enjoyment and laughs; bright stars that pass all too quickly through our lives!

Melanie Bell, DVM, practices veterinary medicine at white Oak Animal Hospital.

Front porch fredericksburg

www.woahvets.com

540/374-0462

10 Walsh Lane

There seems to be a tear in the fabric of the universe that is letting the Mini expand its presence. The Mini is in the news and in the Guinness Book of World Records. It is also working on the psyche of this Mini writer. All the cars I have owned in the past 35 years, including sports cars, have had to pass the twoguitar test. If it won’t hold two guitars and my sweetheart I can’t use it as a daily driver. My introduction to the Mini was riding with Chris Tubbs in his ’64 Mini blasting around the two lanes in the west end of Richmond. I was maybe 12 and Chris was a friend of my older brothers and the Mini was tiny and amazing. This is pre-Mustang. There is no pony car craze. There are no muscle cars. VW bugs, Austin Healey and the Porsche 356 rule as exotics. There are The also MG’s, Triumphs and Minis. Honda Super 90 and the Vespa are acceptable motorcycles. (Horseshoes &

ROXBURY F

ARM

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

Hand-Grenades on Princess Anne Street has a nice Honda 160 in their window) Since then I have driven a few Minis including an extremely underpowered 850cc example with an automatic transmission. Zero to Sixty was measured in time zones. Slow took on a new meaning. Street-sweepers were honking to get me out of their way. But how slick is this? Slick has changed all that. I am not making this up. My sons play music and their drummer for gigs in Jersey and New York is a very nice young man named Slick and he sells new Minis. So in my driveway a few weeks ago appears a new MiniCooper S with a six-speed tranny and 185 HP. There is no slow button. I of course drive it and since they now make a MiniClubman version that just happens to hold two guitars and my sweetheart we are at an impasse… conundrum… MGB GT or new Mini with A/C and air bags? Hmmmm. A car that has real heat

and stops on a dime or the 95 HP, rides like a truck, leaks like a sieve MG? Hmmmm? Adding more Mini fever to the sweat lodge, ‘Tim’ shows up with a ’69 Mini that he is building for his ‘wife’ that has a few tricks all its own. He throws me the keys and says, “Do you want to drive it?” To be clear - for the uninitiated - a ‘60’s vintage Mini is a tin box with a steel dashboard ‘shelf’, one gauge cluster for the speedo, and it has plexi-glass sliding windows. Talk about leaks. Into this archaic tin box this friend has now stuffed a modern Honda VTEC engine, a five-speed tranny and a full gauge cluster. Of course it still has a steel dash shelf and poor seat belts. We also have 150 HP and a screamer of a little car. After all of this prompting if you still need a Mini experience check out this link to the new world record holders for parallel parking in the tightest spot. You take a vintage style Mini and using nothing but the gas pedal, the steering wheel and the emergency bake you slide the car into a space only 5 inches longer than the car.http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com /news/2013/3/video-brothers-both-beattightest-parallel-parking-record-47748/ Really, there is some problem with the fabric of the universe. I’ve been driving MGB GT’s for 35 years and a water pump costs $39.95. A new Mini? Lucky if I can check the oil. What do I do? I autoknown but I don’t. Rim Vining is maxing out his brain power on this decision. What would you do, reader? Email autoknown@aol.com

in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Front Porch Fredericksburg

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

& GARDEN CENTER

Since 1929

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Wild Bird Feeders/ Bird Baths Organic Gardening Products Home Brewer & Vintner Supplies American Made Tools

FREDERICKSBURGCOLLABORATIVE

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

21


Senior Care

The New FP on the Web & FB!

how will you respond?

Our new web site, created by Sonja Wise of sowise.co, is our latest example of forward motion here at Front Porch fredericksburg Magazine.

By Karl Karch

“We are entering our 17th year and keeping it market-fresh, constantly adapting to what readers want,” says Publisher Virginia B. Grogan. “We like the broad appeal of various columns and topics that draw a wide audience of quality readers favorable to our advertisers. The idea is to appeal to them, not necessarily to what Rob and I like personally.” “What this means is a wide range of people-focused and lifestyle topics – all good news; you may not like to read about beer, but there are also recipes, history, wellness, humor, personality profiles, pet care, senior care, and of course our beloved arts community. It’s about the rich culture of Fredericksburg,” says Editor Rob Grogan.

Several recent events have moved me to write this article, one being the Boston Marathon terrorist bombing. I am not a philosophical person by DNA, but rather an engineer by training. There are times, however few and scary they are for me, when stepping away from the logic of engineering is needed to bring balance in my life. I believe it’s safe to say that some time in our lives we’ve either faced, or will face, one or more defining moments. Maybe it’s the loss of a job or loved one, a financial crisis, a life threatening disease, or having to care for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or other terminal illness. People confronted by adversity respond in different ways. I am continually amazed and marvel at those that dig deep and gain inner strength emotionally, spiritually, and physically. It’s not our abilities or inabilities that define us, but the choices we make that are the differentiators. Do we go into the depths of despair; rise to new heights, or somewhere in between? Do we take on new challenges in a positive way, or crumble under such heavy burdens? How do you define yourself? For most of my career, I worked long hours, sometimes at the expense of my family. I rationalized that it was necessary to provide a better quality of life for my family. But, reflecting back, was that the main driver or was I selfishly trying to define myself by my career advancement and job title. Thankfully, I now see my grown children having more balance in their lives. In our homecare business, we see the struggles clients and their families go through when faced with growing care needs, quality of life decisions, and the

22

May 2013

associated financial costs of providing care. For the most part, our elders have been the patriarch or matriarch of the family, fiercely independent, the Rock of Gibraltar. From an elder’s perspective, it’s difficult to admit frailty and needing help. They don’t want to let their children know how vulnerable they really have become. From the children or other family caregiver’s perspective, they want to help, but may not know how or are torn by other family responsibilities. Often a crisis, such as the loss of a loved one or disease diagnosis, is needed to break down the barriers built up over the years. Regardless of how or what brings families and friends together, the significant issue is how people respond to life-changing situations. Look at this as a time to revitalize or strengthen relationships. As a family caregiver, look to provide encouragement and support to your loved one. There’s only so much support you can provide. So, be careful not to burn yourself out. Seek friends, church family, neighbors, or hire additional support. Be aware of your emotions and don’t let the negative emotions surface. Emotions are contagious, so how you conduct yourself is very important. Listen and respond with empathy and understanding. In any given situation, you always have a choice as to how you act. And, remember that how you respond will help define you, and your relationship. So…. how will you respond? Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services. go to www.homeinstead.com/FredericksburgVA

Front porch fredericksburg

Wellness

Forward Motion

In its third year on facebook, the FP page also feeds the new web site with a rotating description of events, and it updates fb likers with breaking event news, reminders, and previews of the coming issue. “The new web site has much more to offer our readers and advertisers than the original site,” says Rob. He adds that they are tweaking the Calendar submission process (with your own user log-in and password) and will soon offer advertising on the web as well as in print. “Sonja,” says Rob, “ has been incredible to work with.” “The value-added to our advertisers is growing exponentially,” says Virginia. Call Rob for details at 540-220-1922 or email frntprch@aol.com, and visit the new frontporchfredericksburg.com - SM

our health crisis By christine h. thompson, D.C. The current healthcare crisis is complex and multi-faceted, but I think its roots go deeper than just our healthcare system. While concerns about access to affordable healthcare and the urgency of these issues to those past mid-life or encountering significant health issues is more than understandable, I think the larger issue at the root of the problem is our concept of where health comes from. Let’s start by looking at America’s statistics on disease. Here are some facts from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (www.cdc.gov). Not only is heart disease the leading cause of death in the U.S., it has been so since 1910. Cancer was the eighth leading cause of death in 1910, but rose to the position of number two by 1933 and has stayed there to date. Back in the 1850’s the leading cause of death was infectious diseases. I wonder if we have defeated tuberculosis and cholera only to struggle with heart disease and cancer. According to the CDC, in 1935 1.09% of the population died and about 22% of those were from heart disease. In 2010, 0.79% of the population died and about 25% of those were from heart disease. I couldn’t find statistics for the 1850’s so I don’t know if we have actually improved the total death toll compared to then, but we certainly haven’t improved it much since 1935, despite all our medical advances. I would like to suggest that fighting disease may not lead to health. As Ghandi so aptly put it, “What you resist, persists.” What if instead we all focused on getting healthier? To put it bluntly, we are all going to die of something, but how well are we living now? Interestingly, the CDC started recording a new statistic in

1993 called Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL). People from all over the U.S. were asked questions related to their health and quality of life. Unfortunately according to the CDC’s tabulated results, our self-rated quality of life is going down. In 1993 the percentage of those polled who rated themselves with fair or poor

health was 13.4% and in 2010 that number rose to 16.1%. While unsure of the accuracy of this survey, I believe self-rating statistics sometimes tell us more than fancy tests. I recognize I may have a skewed view of the health status of our country since I am predominantly seeing those who are in

pain, but these HRQOL statistics corroborate what I am witnessing. In an era where our knowledge of human anatomy and physiology is growing by leaps and bounds, technology is soaring to what I call “star trek reality” and the miracles that doctors and surgeons are able to perform are astounding, it is sober to acknowledge that more people feel their health status and quality of life is less than good. I don’t believe that technology, more research or even more knowledge will solve this completely. Yes, technology and advances in healthcare are amazing and can be used to create healing and improved quality of life. But this can happen only if we take charge of our health and make changes. Healthcare is in a crisis, but not any more of a crisis than we are personally and individually. Crisis provides us with an opportunity to make the simple, yet difficult changes needed – changes to our dietary habits, our daily activity levels, our self-responsibility, our self-care and health priorities and our internal dialogue with our own bodies. We need to get back in touch with ourselves and understand what our bodies are trying to tell us. They really do talk to us – sometimes very loudly!

Dr. Christine Thompson leads us to better health at Whole Health Chiropractic on Bridgewater Street, 899-9421.

Healthcare For the Whole Person SPECIALIZING IN: ` Gentle, Individualized Chiropractic Care ` Cranio-Sacral Balancing (Sacro

online: www.save7lives.org in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Occipital Technique - SOT) ` Addressing Your Total Health Needs with Natural, Holistic Treatment Methods ` Detoxification/Weight Loss Nutritional Programs

Your Hot Yoga Studio 540-659-0777 staffordhouseofyoga.com

Dr. Christine Thompson

971 Garrisonville Rd Stafford

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

23


Senior Care

The New FP on the Web & FB!

how will you respond?

Our new web site, created by Sonja Wise of sowise.co, is our latest example of forward motion here at Front Porch fredericksburg Magazine.

By Karl Karch

“We are entering our 17th year and keeping it market-fresh, constantly adapting to what readers want,” says Publisher Virginia B. Grogan. “We like the broad appeal of various columns and topics that draw a wide audience of quality readers favorable to our advertisers. The idea is to appeal to them, not necessarily to what Rob and I like personally.” “What this means is a wide range of people-focused and lifestyle topics – all good news; you may not like to read about beer, but there are also recipes, history, wellness, humor, personality profiles, pet care, senior care, and of course our beloved arts community. It’s about the rich culture of Fredericksburg,” says Editor Rob Grogan.

Several recent events have moved me to write this article, one being the Boston Marathon terrorist bombing. I am not a philosophical person by DNA, but rather an engineer by training. There are times, however few and scary they are for me, when stepping away from the logic of engineering is needed to bring balance in my life. I believe it’s safe to say that some time in our lives we’ve either faced, or will face, one or more defining moments. Maybe it’s the loss of a job or loved one, a financial crisis, a life threatening disease, or having to care for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or other terminal illness. People confronted by adversity respond in different ways. I am continually amazed and marvel at those that dig deep and gain inner strength emotionally, spiritually, and physically. It’s not our abilities or inabilities that define us, but the choices we make that are the differentiators. Do we go into the depths of despair; rise to new heights, or somewhere in between? Do we take on new challenges in a positive way, or crumble under such heavy burdens? How do you define yourself? For most of my career, I worked long hours, sometimes at the expense of my family. I rationalized that it was necessary to provide a better quality of life for my family. But, reflecting back, was that the main driver or was I selfishly trying to define myself by my career advancement and job title. Thankfully, I now see my grown children having more balance in their lives. In our homecare business, we see the struggles clients and their families go through when faced with growing care needs, quality of life decisions, and the

22

May 2013

associated financial costs of providing care. For the most part, our elders have been the patriarch or matriarch of the family, fiercely independent, the Rock of Gibraltar. From an elder’s perspective, it’s difficult to admit frailty and needing help. They don’t want to let their children know how vulnerable they really have become. From the children or other family caregiver’s perspective, they want to help, but may not know how or are torn by other family responsibilities. Often a crisis, such as the loss of a loved one or disease diagnosis, is needed to break down the barriers built up over the years. Regardless of how or what brings families and friends together, the significant issue is how people respond to life-changing situations. Look at this as a time to revitalize or strengthen relationships. As a family caregiver, look to provide encouragement and support to your loved one. There’s only so much support you can provide. So, be careful not to burn yourself out. Seek friends, church family, neighbors, or hire additional support. Be aware of your emotions and don’t let the negative emotions surface. Emotions are contagious, so how you conduct yourself is very important. Listen and respond with empathy and understanding. In any given situation, you always have a choice as to how you act. And, remember that how you respond will help define you, and your relationship. So…. how will you respond? Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services. go to www.homeinstead.com/FredericksburgVA

Front porch fredericksburg

Wellness

Forward Motion

In its third year on facebook, the FP page also feeds the new web site with a rotating description of events, and it updates fb likers with breaking event news, reminders, and previews of the coming issue. “The new web site has much more to offer our readers and advertisers than the original site,” says Rob. He adds that they are tweaking the Calendar submission process (with your own user log-in and password) and will soon offer advertising on the web as well as in print. “Sonja,” says Rob, “ has been incredible to work with.” “The value-added to our advertisers is growing exponentially,” says Virginia. Call Rob for details at 540-220-1922 or email frntprch@aol.com, and visit the new frontporchfredericksburg.com - SM

our health crisis By christine h. thompson, D.C. The current healthcare crisis is complex and multi-faceted, but I think its roots go deeper than just our healthcare system. While concerns about access to affordable healthcare and the urgency of these issues to those past mid-life or encountering significant health issues is more than understandable, I think the larger issue at the root of the problem is our concept of where health comes from. Let’s start by looking at America’s statistics on disease. Here are some facts from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (www.cdc.gov). Not only is heart disease the leading cause of death in the U.S., it has been so since 1910. Cancer was the eighth leading cause of death in 1910, but rose to the position of number two by 1933 and has stayed there to date. Back in the 1850’s the leading cause of death was infectious diseases. I wonder if we have defeated tuberculosis and cholera only to struggle with heart disease and cancer. According to the CDC, in 1935 1.09% of the population died and about 22% of those were from heart disease. In 2010, 0.79% of the population died and about 25% of those were from heart disease. I couldn’t find statistics for the 1850’s so I don’t know if we have actually improved the total death toll compared to then, but we certainly haven’t improved it much since 1935, despite all our medical advances. I would like to suggest that fighting disease may not lead to health. As Ghandi so aptly put it, “What you resist, persists.” What if instead we all focused on getting healthier? To put it bluntly, we are all going to die of something, but how well are we living now? Interestingly, the CDC started recording a new statistic in

1993 called Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL). People from all over the U.S. were asked questions related to their health and quality of life. Unfortunately according to the CDC’s tabulated results, our self-rated quality of life is going down. In 1993 the percentage of those polled who rated themselves with fair or poor

health was 13.4% and in 2010 that number rose to 16.1%. While unsure of the accuracy of this survey, I believe self-rating statistics sometimes tell us more than fancy tests. I recognize I may have a skewed view of the health status of our country since I am predominantly seeing those who are in

pain, but these HRQOL statistics corroborate what I am witnessing. In an era where our knowledge of human anatomy and physiology is growing by leaps and bounds, technology is soaring to what I call “star trek reality” and the miracles that doctors and surgeons are able to perform are astounding, it is sober to acknowledge that more people feel their health status and quality of life is less than good. I don’t believe that technology, more research or even more knowledge will solve this completely. Yes, technology and advances in healthcare are amazing and can be used to create healing and improved quality of life. But this can happen only if we take charge of our health and make changes. Healthcare is in a crisis, but not any more of a crisis than we are personally and individually. Crisis provides us with an opportunity to make the simple, yet difficult changes needed – changes to our dietary habits, our daily activity levels, our self-responsibility, our self-care and health priorities and our internal dialogue with our own bodies. We need to get back in touch with ourselves and understand what our bodies are trying to tell us. They really do talk to us – sometimes very loudly!

Dr. Christine Thompson leads us to better health at Whole Health Chiropractic on Bridgewater Street, 899-9421.

Healthcare For the Whole Person SPECIALIZING IN: ` Gentle, Individualized Chiropractic Care ` Cranio-Sacral Balancing (Sacro

online: www.save7lives.org in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Occipital Technique - SOT) ` Addressing Your Total Health Needs with Natural, Holistic Treatment Methods ` Detoxification/Weight Loss Nutritional Programs

Your Hot Yoga Studio 540-659-0777 staffordhouseofyoga.com

Dr. Christine Thompson

971 Garrisonville Rd Stafford

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

23


BIG PURPLE

Art In The ‘Burg The Expanded Farmers Market

Downtown Centerpiece Turns 10

By Susan Carter Morgan

Have you noticed the big purple building at 916 Liberty Street in downtown Fredericksburg? For 10 years now, LibertyTown Arts Workshop, inspired by Dan Finnegan’s vision, has become home to painters, potters, and other creative fine artists. To celebrate this milestone, Dan and the other artists will hold a daylong event, one you won’t want to miss. Join folks at LibertyTown on Saturday, June 1, from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Try your hand at spinning and weaving or throwing a pot. The kids won’t be left out, either. Planned activities include chalk art, drawing, and painting. There will also be demonstrations in woodworking, Chinese watercolor, pottery, and more. And, of course, food! Visitors are encouraged to walk into the studios and chat with artists as they create. There are more than 50 emerging and established artists whose work is on display each First Friday as well as year-round in the studios. Over the years, LibertyTown has added Patron Art shows, fundraising events, and visiting artists to the mix. Neal Reed, a potter who has been at LibertyTown since the doors opened, finds the workshop to be a great place to

She added, “People often say, ‘I have to come in and get my art fix.’’’ the

Susan Carter Morgan heads up the Downtown Writing Studio. Downtownwriting.com

Betsy Glassie STUDIO: LIBERTYTOWN 916 LIBERTY ST. FREDERICKSBURG, VA

BETSYGLASSIE.COM BGLASSIE@AOL.COM

540-899-6556

24

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

by megan byrnes

By Lezlie Cheryl

work and to sell his pottery. You’ll find him there most days, creating plates, bowls, or vases and happy to chat. He, like others, has found a second home at LibertyTown. “I’ve met a lot of nice people I consider my friends, like-minded people,” he said. If you’ve ever thought about taking a class, come June 1 to check out the opportunities for pottery, painting, and summer camps for children and adults. Artists will be available to answer questions and show you their work. Neal is not the only artist who is happy LibertyTown has lasted and been Elizabeth supported all these years. Seaver, a mixed media artist, said, “The studios are approachable—not sterile or hands off.”

Curious? Come join festivities and meet the artists!

Watch It!

First Saturdays are back Expanded at the newly Fredericksburg Farmers Market at Hurkamp Park, and “Art in the Park” returns for its third season. On First Saturdays through October, Prince Edward at the park will be closed to traffic, offering an even greater downtown open-air farmer’s market with more space for new specialty vendors, more local artisans and crafters, live music and other events. “Art in the Park” is open 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Saturdays, May 4, June 8, July 6, Sept. 7 and Oct. 5, rain/shine. “Art in the Park,” presented by the City of Fredericksburg, enriches our community by combining creative, entertaining and healthy activities. Stroll the grounds, browse the exhibits and vendor booths, and enjoy a casual, familyfriendly marketplace. Select from a wide array of rich garden delights, goods fresh from the farm, fruits, vegetables, meats, eggs, cheeses, breads, pies, and pastries galore from regional farmers. Local artists offer fine arts and such crafts as pottery, ceramics and sculpture, glass, metal works, drawings, paintings (Photo: “Not Meat” by the author), photography, jewelry, fiber arts and more. Interested artists must register with Parks & Rec by the Thursday before each exhibit date. For info, call 372-1086 or visit fredericksburgva.gov. The majority of Market products come from within 75 miles of the city. A small fraction from elsewhere is clearly marked. This year brings 28 vendors to market, including Clyde Howard’s Farm, C & T Produce, Wildwood Farm, Four Seasons Seafood, Great Harvest Bread Co., and the Master Gardeners’ Association of Central Rappahannock. For a complete list, visit thefarmersmarket.co/fredericksburgfarmers-market. In addition to “Art in the Park,” First Saturdays offer interesting events: May 4: “Health & Wellness Fair,” with featured winery, Rogers Ford Farm…June 8: music by Home by Midnite, and the “Kids Market” featuring young vendors (ages 8-15 years old) marketing their own homemade food, beverages, home-grown produce, plants, handmade crafts and more...July 6: “Watermelon Festival,” and featured winery, Castle Gruenberg...August 3: “Kick Off Restaurant Week in the City”; featured winery, Mattaponi…September 7: “Dog Days at the Market”; featured brewery, Blue & Gray…October 5: “Harvest Festival” and music by Marenje. The Park is at 900 Prince Edward, bordered by George and William, public parking on city streets and lot adjacent to Ristorante Renato. Through the Buy Fresh Buy Local Token Program, Visa, Mastercard, and

Scene:

a beat when it came to keeping calm and carrying on. The Fredericksburg Iris Society needs you to put your nose the ground (hah) and help them scout out the locations of any and all irises in the area. The group is putting together an iris walk, you see, and as always – the more the merrier. Think of it as a sort of botanist’s Where’s Waldo. If you’ve got the deets, call Eileen Secrest at 540-376-4495 and share!

Petite Sally Struthers

strutting out of La Petite Auberge on a balmy April evening with a small group of friends and sparkly shoes.

SNAP EBT Cards are welcome at all local farmers markets – FXBG, Spotsylvania and King George. Purchase tokens at the Market Manager’s Tent, April through October. They’re treated as cash and never expire. Learn more about local farmers markets, regional food initiatives, and the Nutrition Incentive Program at thefarmersmarket.co. Says Market Manager Gayle Price, “It’s not about selling, that’s not what we’re about. It’s a community-centric place where you see your neighbors, get to know your farmer, and strengthen community ties.” Lezlie Cheryl is publicity director for the FCCA and a patron of all the galleries.

Now through May 18 All In Stock Watches On Sale !! 20% Off: Citizen, Seiko, Pulsar & Fredericksburg Time Company 50% Off Tissot Brand Watches 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5

Gabe Pons (above) doing a collaboration with the WWF? Yes, it’s true! No, not that WWF. The World Wildlife Fund, natch. Gabe created a painting, lettering and line work that ultimately became the graphics for a limited edition t-shirt for the WWF’s “Hands Off My Parts” campaign which is part of an effort to stop wildlife crime. Celebs like Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo, Alyssa Milano and Ian Somerhalder are also a part of the campaign. Cute celebs and a great cause? Sign me up!

Seen:

The UMW Department of Art and Art History announced winners of the student awards at the opening of the Annual Student Art Show in the duPont Gallery. Senior Rachael Juhan and Junior Sidney Mullis received the Melchers Gray Purchase Award for their piece, “Dale.” Senior Annie Lynch received the Emil Schnellock Award in Painting for her work “Nothing Satisfies So Many People in So Many Ways, and Cheryl Elliott (above) won the Anne Elizabeth Collins award for her handmade book, “Untitled”. Congrats to all the ladies who brought home the big awards!

Heard:

which former

Seen:

Chris O’Kelly has started

to hang artwork (and sell prints!) at the Natural Path. Madison Wolf was rubbing elbows with celebs last month at a charity function in Chicago hosted by Jenny McCarthy. Word is her new album launches later this year, so keep your eyes and ears peeled!

The

Fredericksburg Rock Lotto was held last month at Colonial Tavern. Dave Robinson and his crew – the Screaming Van-Damns – came in 2nd to Undead Fred (as Dave says, zombies always win). Joelle Gilbert, Erin Moran, Sarah Jennings, Tara Jacobs, Ryan Beverly and Karen Young came out to support their friends and favorite musicians.

Kirkwood Hall sipping an

extra hot, extra shot Americano at Hyperion Espresso; Katherine Washington shopping downtown; Brandon Newton and fam [photo] back in Martha’s Vineyard for the warm months; Mikaela Terese and Jonathan Burkett at DAR Constitution Hall to see comedian Aziz Ansari perform his latest stand-up; Kadeana Langford, Nick Cadwallender and Ian Soper at the Sunken Well for the premiere of Stephen Graham’s film about the making of a Bill Harris painting.

Blind item:

Fredericksburg musician and contractor is coming back to the burg for a one-nightonly reunion tour at his favorite resto in June?

Happy April birthdays to Claire Ellinger, Andrew Hellier, Bill Harris, Ashley Carpenter, and Sarah Lapp. I also celebrated last month with a room full of nearest and dearest at Kybecca in their new lounge and bar space (above). Betsy and Ben Park, Laura and Mike Craig, Danielle and Mike Payne, Jacquie Damm, Drew Fristoe, Kellie Walsh, Brooke Farquhar, Kristin Vinagro, Andrew Coulter, Blake Bethem, Ben Powell, cAlex Capshaw-T Taylor were but a handful on hand to help usher me into my 3rd decade.

(just barely)

Seen:

Mark and

Candis Wenger (above) enjoying an unplanned candlelit dinner at Bistro Bethem post-first-big-storm-of-the-season. While Bistro may have lost power with a full house, neither diner nor server missed

My business partner and separated-at-birth twin, Alicia Austin Morgan, also recently celebrated a birthday with sangria, cheeseburgers and Brian Lam, Will Mackintosh, Corinne Marghella, Lilly BR, Cristina Martinez, Tom Byrnes and Jake Morgan on a gloriously beautiful spring afternoon.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

25


BIG PURPLE

Art In The ‘Burg The Expanded Farmers Market

Downtown Centerpiece Turns 10

By Susan Carter Morgan

Have you noticed the big purple building at 916 Liberty Street in downtown Fredericksburg? For 10 years now, LibertyTown Arts Workshop, inspired by Dan Finnegan’s vision, has become home to painters, potters, and other creative fine artists. To celebrate this milestone, Dan and the other artists will hold a daylong event, one you won’t want to miss. Join folks at LibertyTown on Saturday, June 1, from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Try your hand at spinning and weaving or throwing a pot. The kids won’t be left out, either. Planned activities include chalk art, drawing, and painting. There will also be demonstrations in woodworking, Chinese watercolor, pottery, and more. And, of course, food! Visitors are encouraged to walk into the studios and chat with artists as they create. There are more than 50 emerging and established artists whose work is on display each First Friday as well as year-round in the studios. Over the years, LibertyTown has added Patron Art shows, fundraising events, and visiting artists to the mix. Neal Reed, a potter who has been at LibertyTown since the doors opened, finds the workshop to be a great place to

She added, “People often say, ‘I have to come in and get my art fix.’’’ the

Susan Carter Morgan heads up the Downtown Writing Studio. Downtownwriting.com

Betsy Glassie STUDIO: LIBERTYTOWN 916 LIBERTY ST. FREDERICKSBURG, VA

BETSYGLASSIE.COM BGLASSIE@AOL.COM

540-899-6556

24

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

by megan byrnes

By Lezlie Cheryl

work and to sell his pottery. You’ll find him there most days, creating plates, bowls, or vases and happy to chat. He, like others, has found a second home at LibertyTown. “I’ve met a lot of nice people I consider my friends, like-minded people,” he said. If you’ve ever thought about taking a class, come June 1 to check out the opportunities for pottery, painting, and summer camps for children and adults. Artists will be available to answer questions and show you their work. Neal is not the only artist who is happy LibertyTown has lasted and been Elizabeth supported all these years. Seaver, a mixed media artist, said, “The studios are approachable—not sterile or hands off.”

Curious? Come join festivities and meet the artists!

Watch It!

First Saturdays are back Expanded at the newly Fredericksburg Farmers Market at Hurkamp Park, and “Art in the Park” returns for its third season. On First Saturdays through October, Prince Edward at the park will be closed to traffic, offering an even greater downtown open-air farmer’s market with more space for new specialty vendors, more local artisans and crafters, live music and other events. “Art in the Park” is open 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Saturdays, May 4, June 8, July 6, Sept. 7 and Oct. 5, rain/shine. “Art in the Park,” presented by the City of Fredericksburg, enriches our community by combining creative, entertaining and healthy activities. Stroll the grounds, browse the exhibits and vendor booths, and enjoy a casual, familyfriendly marketplace. Select from a wide array of rich garden delights, goods fresh from the farm, fruits, vegetables, meats, eggs, cheeses, breads, pies, and pastries galore from regional farmers. Local artists offer fine arts and such crafts as pottery, ceramics and sculpture, glass, metal works, drawings, paintings (Photo: “Not Meat” by the author), photography, jewelry, fiber arts and more. Interested artists must register with Parks & Rec by the Thursday before each exhibit date. For info, call 372-1086 or visit fredericksburgva.gov. The majority of Market products come from within 75 miles of the city. A small fraction from elsewhere is clearly marked. This year brings 28 vendors to market, including Clyde Howard’s Farm, C & T Produce, Wildwood Farm, Four Seasons Seafood, Great Harvest Bread Co., and the Master Gardeners’ Association of Central Rappahannock. For a complete list, visit thefarmersmarket.co/fredericksburgfarmers-market. In addition to “Art in the Park,” First Saturdays offer interesting events: May 4: “Health & Wellness Fair,” with featured winery, Rogers Ford Farm…June 8: music by Home by Midnite, and the “Kids Market” featuring young vendors (ages 8-15 years old) marketing their own homemade food, beverages, home-grown produce, plants, handmade crafts and more...July 6: “Watermelon Festival,” and featured winery, Castle Gruenberg...August 3: “Kick Off Restaurant Week in the City”; featured winery, Mattaponi…September 7: “Dog Days at the Market”; featured brewery, Blue & Gray…October 5: “Harvest Festival” and music by Marenje. The Park is at 900 Prince Edward, bordered by George and William, public parking on city streets and lot adjacent to Ristorante Renato. Through the Buy Fresh Buy Local Token Program, Visa, Mastercard, and

Scene:

a beat when it came to keeping calm and carrying on. The Fredericksburg Iris Society needs you to put your nose the ground (hah) and help them scout out the locations of any and all irises in the area. The group is putting together an iris walk, you see, and as always – the more the merrier. Think of it as a sort of botanist’s Where’s Waldo. If you’ve got the deets, call Eileen Secrest at 540-376-4495 and share!

Petite Sally Struthers

strutting out of La Petite Auberge on a balmy April evening with a small group of friends and sparkly shoes.

SNAP EBT Cards are welcome at all local farmers markets – FXBG, Spotsylvania and King George. Purchase tokens at the Market Manager’s Tent, April through October. They’re treated as cash and never expire. Learn more about local farmers markets, regional food initiatives, and the Nutrition Incentive Program at thefarmersmarket.co. Says Market Manager Gayle Price, “It’s not about selling, that’s not what we’re about. It’s a community-centric place where you see your neighbors, get to know your farmer, and strengthen community ties.” Lezlie Cheryl is publicity director for the FCCA and a patron of all the galleries.

Now through May 18 All In Stock Watches On Sale !! 20% Off: Citizen, Seiko, Pulsar & Fredericksburg Time Company 50% Off Tissot Brand Watches 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5

Gabe Pons (above) doing a collaboration with the WWF? Yes, it’s true! No, not that WWF. The World Wildlife Fund, natch. Gabe created a painting, lettering and line work that ultimately became the graphics for a limited edition t-shirt for the WWF’s “Hands Off My Parts” campaign which is part of an effort to stop wildlife crime. Celebs like Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo, Alyssa Milano and Ian Somerhalder are also a part of the campaign. Cute celebs and a great cause? Sign me up!

Seen:

The UMW Department of Art and Art History announced winners of the student awards at the opening of the Annual Student Art Show in the duPont Gallery. Senior Rachael Juhan and Junior Sidney Mullis received the Melchers Gray Purchase Award for their piece, “Dale.” Senior Annie Lynch received the Emil Schnellock Award in Painting for her work “Nothing Satisfies So Many People in So Many Ways, and Cheryl Elliott (above) won the Anne Elizabeth Collins award for her handmade book, “Untitled”. Congrats to all the ladies who brought home the big awards!

Heard:

which former

Seen:

Chris O’Kelly has started

to hang artwork (and sell prints!) at the Natural Path. Madison Wolf was rubbing elbows with celebs last month at a charity function in Chicago hosted by Jenny McCarthy. Word is her new album launches later this year, so keep your eyes and ears peeled!

The

Fredericksburg Rock Lotto was held last month at Colonial Tavern. Dave Robinson and his crew – the Screaming Van-Damns – came in 2nd to Undead Fred (as Dave says, zombies always win). Joelle Gilbert, Erin Moran, Sarah Jennings, Tara Jacobs, Ryan Beverly and Karen Young came out to support their friends and favorite musicians.

Kirkwood Hall sipping an

extra hot, extra shot Americano at Hyperion Espresso; Katherine Washington shopping downtown; Brandon Newton and fam [photo] back in Martha’s Vineyard for the warm months; Mikaela Terese and Jonathan Burkett at DAR Constitution Hall to see comedian Aziz Ansari perform his latest stand-up; Kadeana Langford, Nick Cadwallender and Ian Soper at the Sunken Well for the premiere of Stephen Graham’s film about the making of a Bill Harris painting.

Blind item:

Fredericksburg musician and contractor is coming back to the burg for a one-nightonly reunion tour at his favorite resto in June?

Happy April birthdays to Claire Ellinger, Andrew Hellier, Bill Harris, Ashley Carpenter, and Sarah Lapp. I also celebrated last month with a room full of nearest and dearest at Kybecca in their new lounge and bar space (above). Betsy and Ben Park, Laura and Mike Craig, Danielle and Mike Payne, Jacquie Damm, Drew Fristoe, Kellie Walsh, Brooke Farquhar, Kristin Vinagro, Andrew Coulter, Blake Bethem, Ben Powell, cAlex Capshaw-T Taylor were but a handful on hand to help usher me into my 3rd decade.

(just barely)

Seen:

Mark and

Candis Wenger (above) enjoying an unplanned candlelit dinner at Bistro Bethem post-first-big-storm-of-the-season. While Bistro may have lost power with a full house, neither diner nor server missed

My business partner and separated-at-birth twin, Alicia Austin Morgan, also recently celebrated a birthday with sangria, cheeseburgers and Brian Lam, Will Mackintosh, Corinne Marghella, Lilly BR, Cristina Martinez, Tom Byrnes and Jake Morgan on a gloriously beautiful spring afternoon.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

25


Tanya Richey

COMMUNITY LINK

P. Rose Gallery

Courtesy of WFVA and Front Porch

Posters From the Private Collection of Paula Rose

artist and emissary

stafford civil war park

By collette caprara

“Olde Fredericksburg Dock” When some folks in Germany and Virginia wanted to form a Sister-City alliance, they found their perfect match with Fredericksburg and Schwetzingen. The two cities are of comparable size and situation—both are located near a major city (DC and Heidelberg) and both strive to stimulate tourism through the arts. Then, having established a sistercity relationship, the two groups sought to create some form of cultural exchange, and, again, they found a perfect emissary—in local artist Tanya Richey. Tanya will be featured in a twofold exhibit of her art in a project dubbed “Fred-Zingen.” In May, she will be traveling to Germany where she will be introducing the flavor and charm of the

Burg in an exhibit of her paintings of our locale in Schwetzingen’s Rathaus (town hall). While abroad, Tanya will be creating a series of paintings of sites and streets of her host city, which will be featured in an exhibit in Fredericksburg in June. While at the Rathaus, Tanya will also be communicating with visitors and passersby as she completes a 4’x 8’ painting of Schwetzingen, which she will present as a gift to the town. Tanya is no stranger to travel and adventure. She recalls her childhood with her mom—a “free spirit” ahead of her time, who, after the death of her husband, would willingly follow her wanderlust. “We traveled around quite a bit when I was a young child,” said Richey,

by amy pearce “I remember when we were in Indianapolis and my mom announced ‘It’s to cold here.’ And there we were on a Greyhound bus to Miami! When we got to a city, my mom would look through the want ads and find a job, and then she’d tell my brother and me to go find a school!” Richey started experimenting with art relatively later in life when her daughter, April, was in kindergarten. Then her husband’s assignment with a corporation in Heidelburg provided a launch pad for international travels, exploration, and creation, and the spiral staircase to their apartment was an ideal gallery for her. Today, visitors to Tanya’s Caroline Street studio who drop in to watch her paint or gather for conversation around her inviting picnicstyle table may be unaware that Richey has sold more than 3,000 paintings in the course of her career, which now hang in virtually every state in the nation and numerous countries throughout the world. Richey is humble about the breadth of her numerous international ventures in art. But information will trickle out in response to queries about items in her gallery: The series of humorous brush-and-ink panda musician drawings? “Oh yes, those began when I traveled to China with the director of the Marine Band.” Photos of paintings reminiscent of impressionists? “From my art-history studies in Paris.” Albums of street scenes she painted of Egypt and Russia? “Brings back memories of travels—and of the time we thought we were being kidnapped in Moscow!” Not only in experience but also in temperament and depth of heart, Tanya is well equipped to serve as our city’s emissary in Germany. She sees art as an ideal vehicle for communication across all boundaries. “Art is an expression of the spirit,” she says, “With color and image you don’t need to have the same language or words, because it connects with what is inside people. The deeper you go inside yourself, the more you connect with the outside: And that is what art is all about.” (For more information call 540 841-7344, visit www.tmrart.com, or drop in Tanya’s studio/gallery at 817 Caroline Street.)

Collette Caprara is a local writer and artist.

26

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Opening First Friday 6-9 9pm 709 Caroline Street 371-8 8499 www.prosegallery.com

THE POETRY MAN - BY FRANK FRATOE

Advanced Dental Care of Fredericksburg 540-891-9911

You make everything all right. – Phoebe Snow

Apotheosis The sky has turned translucent into a stained-glass cathedral which opens its roof to unite worshippers & what made them. An arbor overhung with fuchsia is now a belfry upon the hill and swallowtails hover nearby airing hymns of praise to dawn.

Frank Fratoe lives and writes in Fredericksburg.

$79

Unlike most Civil War parks created at a battlefield, Stafford Civil War Park is at a well-preserved campsite where the Union Army nursed itself in 1862-63. The park is scheduled for completion in October. The preservation of the park was important to the Civil War Trust and so it bequeathed a $150,000 pledge in exchange for a conservation easement on the site. The county, solid waste management board, Virginia National Guard and suppliers of gravel and pipe made additional contributions. Historically, the winter of 186263 was a bleak time between the Army’s losses at nearby Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville and prior to its chase of Lee’s army into Pennsylvania for the Union victory at Gettysburg. The Accokeek Creek site in northern Stafford County includes four earthwork fortifications, the campground, a bridge abutment at Accokeek Creek and part of a corduroy road. The National Guard’s engineers cleared and “grubbed” 4.02 acres; cleared

and grubbed 175,000 square feet of road measuring 3,500 feet long by 50 feet wide; made 118 hauls carrying 1,115 tons of gravel, driving a total of 3,780 miles; made 250 hauls for debris, driving a total of 1,547 miles. Civilian contractors will do an estimated $70,000-80,000 more work to complete the project. That money remains to be raised. To raise money for the asphalt phase of the project, the FSCWS seeks donations via its Web site and raises funds by giving tours of the site. Other than those tours, the site is closed to the public and closely monitored for trespassing and relic hunting. For more information, or to make a donation, see www.fscws.org. Listen in at 8 a.m. on Sunday, May 19 on NewsTalk 1230 WFVA to learn more about the Stafford Civil War Park with host Ted Schubel on Community Link. And get to an AM radio or listen live to the program at newstalk1230.net Amy Pearce is a monthly contributor to Front Porch. Background for this story from The Stafford Sun.

$650

New Patient Special Includes Exam, X-Rays and Cleaning

Per Arch Full AcrylicDenture or Partial

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 6/1/13 A $239.00 Value

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 6/1/13 A $1100.00 Value

Because we care for you! 10524 Spotsylvania Ave. Ste #104 Fredericksburg, VA front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

27


Tanya Richey

COMMUNITY LINK

P. Rose Gallery

Courtesy of WFVA and Front Porch

Posters From the Private Collection of Paula Rose

artist and emissary

stafford civil war park

By collette caprara

“Olde Fredericksburg Dock” When some folks in Germany and Virginia wanted to form a Sister-City alliance, they found their perfect match with Fredericksburg and Schwetzingen. The two cities are of comparable size and situation—both are located near a major city (DC and Heidelberg) and both strive to stimulate tourism through the arts. Then, having established a sistercity relationship, the two groups sought to create some form of cultural exchange, and, again, they found a perfect emissary—in local artist Tanya Richey. Tanya will be featured in a twofold exhibit of her art in a project dubbed “Fred-Zingen.” In May, she will be traveling to Germany where she will be introducing the flavor and charm of the

Burg in an exhibit of her paintings of our locale in Schwetzingen’s Rathaus (town hall). While abroad, Tanya will be creating a series of paintings of sites and streets of her host city, which will be featured in an exhibit in Fredericksburg in June. While at the Rathaus, Tanya will also be communicating with visitors and passersby as she completes a 4’x 8’ painting of Schwetzingen, which she will present as a gift to the town. Tanya is no stranger to travel and adventure. She recalls her childhood with her mom—a “free spirit” ahead of her time, who, after the death of her husband, would willingly follow her wanderlust. “We traveled around quite a bit when I was a young child,” said Richey,

by amy pearce “I remember when we were in Indianapolis and my mom announced ‘It’s to cold here.’ And there we were on a Greyhound bus to Miami! When we got to a city, my mom would look through the want ads and find a job, and then she’d tell my brother and me to go find a school!” Richey started experimenting with art relatively later in life when her daughter, April, was in kindergarten. Then her husband’s assignment with a corporation in Heidelburg provided a launch pad for international travels, exploration, and creation, and the spiral staircase to their apartment was an ideal gallery for her. Today, visitors to Tanya’s Caroline Street studio who drop in to watch her paint or gather for conversation around her inviting picnicstyle table may be unaware that Richey has sold more than 3,000 paintings in the course of her career, which now hang in virtually every state in the nation and numerous countries throughout the world. Richey is humble about the breadth of her numerous international ventures in art. But information will trickle out in response to queries about items in her gallery: The series of humorous brush-and-ink panda musician drawings? “Oh yes, those began when I traveled to China with the director of the Marine Band.” Photos of paintings reminiscent of impressionists? “From my art-history studies in Paris.” Albums of street scenes she painted of Egypt and Russia? “Brings back memories of travels—and of the time we thought we were being kidnapped in Moscow!” Not only in experience but also in temperament and depth of heart, Tanya is well equipped to serve as our city’s emissary in Germany. She sees art as an ideal vehicle for communication across all boundaries. “Art is an expression of the spirit,” she says, “With color and image you don’t need to have the same language or words, because it connects with what is inside people. The deeper you go inside yourself, the more you connect with the outside: And that is what art is all about.” (For more information call 540 841-7344, visit www.tmrart.com, or drop in Tanya’s studio/gallery at 817 Caroline Street.)

Collette Caprara is a local writer and artist.

26

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Opening First Friday 6-9 9pm 709 Caroline Street 371-8 8499 www.prosegallery.com

THE POETRY MAN - BY FRANK FRATOE

Advanced Dental Care of Fredericksburg 540-891-9911

You make everything all right. – Phoebe Snow

Apotheosis The sky has turned translucent into a stained-glass cathedral which opens its roof to unite worshippers & what made them. An arbor overhung with fuchsia is now a belfry upon the hill and swallowtails hover nearby airing hymns of praise to dawn.

Frank Fratoe lives and writes in Fredericksburg.

$79

Unlike most Civil War parks created at a battlefield, Stafford Civil War Park is at a well-preserved campsite where the Union Army nursed itself in 1862-63. The park is scheduled for completion in October. The preservation of the park was important to the Civil War Trust and so it bequeathed a $150,000 pledge in exchange for a conservation easement on the site. The county, solid waste management board, Virginia National Guard and suppliers of gravel and pipe made additional contributions. Historically, the winter of 186263 was a bleak time between the Army’s losses at nearby Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville and prior to its chase of Lee’s army into Pennsylvania for the Union victory at Gettysburg. The Accokeek Creek site in northern Stafford County includes four earthwork fortifications, the campground, a bridge abutment at Accokeek Creek and part of a corduroy road. The National Guard’s engineers cleared and “grubbed” 4.02 acres; cleared

and grubbed 175,000 square feet of road measuring 3,500 feet long by 50 feet wide; made 118 hauls carrying 1,115 tons of gravel, driving a total of 3,780 miles; made 250 hauls for debris, driving a total of 1,547 miles. Civilian contractors will do an estimated $70,000-80,000 more work to complete the project. That money remains to be raised. To raise money for the asphalt phase of the project, the FSCWS seeks donations via its Web site and raises funds by giving tours of the site. Other than those tours, the site is closed to the public and closely monitored for trespassing and relic hunting. For more information, or to make a donation, see www.fscws.org. Listen in at 8 a.m. on Sunday, May 19 on NewsTalk 1230 WFVA to learn more about the Stafford Civil War Park with host Ted Schubel on Community Link. And get to an AM radio or listen live to the program at newstalk1230.net Amy Pearce is a monthly contributor to Front Porch. Background for this story from The Stafford Sun.

$650

New Patient Special Includes Exam, X-Rays and Cleaning

Per Arch Full AcrylicDenture or Partial

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 6/1/13 A $239.00 Value

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 6/1/13 A $1100.00 Value

Because we care for you! 10524 Spotsylvania Ave. Ste #104 Fredericksburg, VA front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

27


My Own Path

The Honeywells: giving back powerfully By amy pearce

We got lucky in this region! Lottery Powerball jackpot winners and Stafford residents Dave and Nancy Honeywell have established a $4 million "Honeywell Charitable Fund" at The Community Foundation. From the beginning of their winnings, the philanthropic couple wanted to share a portion with the community, according to their tax advisor. In February, after winning the second largest Virginia Powerball jackpot, the Honeywells received $96 million net of withholding taxes. "They chose to establish a fund at the foundation because the money would be carefully invested and continue to grow

GIFTS PEANUTS BOOKS SAUCES

while they took the time needed to analyze what charitable organizations will benefit from them in the future," said R. Leigh Frackelton Jr., tax attorney and C.P.A. In the past six months, 11 other new funds have been established at The Community Foundation of The Rappahannock Region (cfrrr.org) by local philanthropic individuals, families and estates. "Donors choose The Community Foundation because it is easy to establish a fund and they're not burdened by the annual IRS reporting because we take care of it. Our fund options are flexible to fit their philanthropic goals and our funds are permanent, creating lasting value to the charities they care about," said Executive Director Teri McNally. In addition to the Honeywell Charitable Fund, the most recent funds established at the foundation include: The Calvin Burns Family Fund The Mary Carter Frackelton Scholarship Fund The Richard C. Hayden Family Scholarship Fund The Hicks Family Fund The Kallay Family Endowment Fund The K-T Charitable Fund The Nicky Seay Charitable Fund The Share Our Selves Fund The Taczak Family Endowment Fund The Mary B. and Perry A. Thompson Scholarship Fund The Kenneth T. Whitescarver III Memorial Scholarship Fund The Community Foundation of the Rappahannock Region now administers 89 charitable funds, valued at $15 million. Proceeds from these funds provide annual grants to nonprofit organizations and scholarships to deserving students. We are lucky to have both the Foundation and the Honeywells in our region. Amy Pearce felt lucky to write this and will play the next Powerball coming up.

WINE HAMS SOUVENIRS GIFT BASKETS CLOTHING SPECIALTY BEERS Made In Virginia Store 920 Caroline Street (540) 371-2030 (800) 635-3149 to order by phone madeinva.com to shop online Monday to Thursday 9:30a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Friday & Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Sunday 10:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

28

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

the tempest of love addicition By c. ruth cassell Rushing to revive a lost tug living just below the surface. Rigged to another sputtering engine. A rudderless race. Roving with no true destination. Hitched to another’s helm for survival. Love addiction. An addiction in its truest form: an anticipation of revelry, a fix realized, and the relief that follows. Without constant reassurance the love is there, the thirst builds. Thirst for love, as with thirst for drink or thirst for money, can become an unquenchable desire. I think of myself as a recovering love addict, and recovering comes with blunders of judgment and blows to the ego. I realize true happiness comes from steering my own ship, to knowing my destination and facing the storm and sun with equal vibrancy. Years ago, I hitched myself to another for happiness. Without direction or determination, we sailed through seven years and the crash rushed toward us faster than we could hunker against the storm. Burdens of reliability and personal responsibility crushed us and we both escaped to maneuver on our own. As I floated, somewhat aimlessly, in the aftermath of the crash, I struggled to feel my own warmth under my skin. Over time I realized the eagerness I felt for another’s attention starved me of what I truly needed—an anchor within myself so I could stop and start as I pleased. Within the cycle of love addiction, I strongly disregard my own needs. The more I sacrifice to hold on to a ship that’s either already sailed or firmly run aground, the deeper my need becomes to save it so I don’t approach the journey alone. The temporary quench subsides. The parched anticipation returns. I’ve spent years recovering from this addiction that I know I must conquer. I’ve anchored myself, claiming only me capable of making me happy. I’ve scoped out what I want from a co-captain, what I will allow and not allow, and what I will offer. I’ve

Porch Light

For Sale Now at Amazon.com

Stories that shine a light on life

elective affinities By rob huffman

navigated through turbulent times by remaining positive and constantly sailing forward. As with any dark skies, the storm of love addiction takes many forms. It doesn’t always roar in with loud warnings and flashing red flags. Sometimes it brews under the surface, disguised as a summer shower. Once it finally opens, torrents fall on the exposed surface, and there is no time for reflection. There is only time for escape. I realize, more each day, that these voyages are a choice. There is no requirement that I jump aboard any vessel. The only thing I must do is keep struggling against the current that urges me back into the cycle of love addiction. Today, I find myself again floating, a solitary sight on the edge of dark. I am again resisting the desire to catch the next wave. I am again refusing the urge to take another tumultuous ride. I rely on purposeful resistance and constant reassurance. I fuel my engine by loving myself, my friends, my child, my family. I affix my rudder and set my sights on the obstacles ahead. I ignore the lost tug living below the surface, as it does not bode well for the spirit gliding above. Ruth Cassell, a UMW grad and Bistro Bethem veteran, now finds her path in Roanoke, VA. She blogs about similar topics as addressed in My Own Path in her personal blog at attentionanonymous.wordpress.com

Any regular reader of online newspapers knows how rich the blogs attached to stories can sometimes be. This is particularly true of political blogs. The discussions at such sites can be vigorous, heated, and emotionally all over the map. And maybe this type of political involvement is a good sign that the body politic continues to enjoy good health. But firing off partisan ripostes at vague digital others can quickly degenerate into a vapid and onanistic ad hominem belligerence. Honest and respectful debate on such blogs is rare; the point seems to be mere partisan bickering, a kind of poetry slam minus the poetry. And while bickering can be fun, I decided to get more directly involved in the political process. So, boots to the ground, I enlisted as a foot soldier in the door-knocking army of campaign volunteers. Not that I’ve had no interest in politics before. I’ve voted in all elections since gaining suffrage at age eighteen; I dutifully slog through the political op-eds on Sunday mornings to keep abreast of what the so-called cognoscenti are thinking; I reverently pause at C-SPAN when surfing the channels. I try to be a moderately informed citizen. So, feeling like an Intro to Civics nerd – some front row-sitting fellow who waves his hand at every question – I picked up my packet of campaign literature from the field office. After parking my truck in an unfamiliar, but friendly-seeming, neighborhood, I organized my clipboard and contact list, and began knocking on doors. In truth, the whole enterprise was at first a little strange, bringing back memories of boyhood paper routes: dogs barking and muffled footsteps. Would somebody’s dad answer the door and yell at me!? Remember when neighbors used to stop by each other’s house? To ask if

they could pick something up for you at the grocery store. Or let you know your kid was playing in the street again. Or just to borrow something. Now although as a canvasser I wasn’t there to borrow the proverbial cup of sugar, I most certainly hoped to borrow something: The homeowners’ time. His ears. A few moments of John and Jane Q. Public’s undivided attention. And honestly, all the folks I talked to were kind and welcoming. No one was rude. Even those whose political views were clearly the polar opposite of mine heard me out and simply indicated that one of my candidate’s brochures could perhaps be more profitably dropped off elsewhere. At no point was I called any names. Perceived deficiencies in my I.Q. were not commented on. The exchanges were universally civil. And isn’t this a pretty good model of what we hope for as citizens of this great and diverse land? To communicate with our neighbors. To be treated with respect. To have our thoughts and ideas heard and considered, even if ultimately our neighbor doesn’t agree with us. To be part of a community. And by knocking on someone’s door and soliciting his or her opinion, we are tacitly but clearly indicating that his or her opinion matters. But ours, too. It’s the quid pro quo of participatory democracy. The exchanges at the door were generally brief. And that was fine. Good neighbors realize other people have busy lives. There’s not always time for protracted conversation. Backyard conversations used to last as long as it took to take laundry off the clothesline and fold it. Or as long as borrowing that cup of sugar took. The important thing was those few minutes were respectful and a certain unspoken decorum was

honored. In stark contrast to the blogosphere, no one ever called his neighbor stupid or uninformed. The important thing was talking face to face with one’s neighbors. With civility. The strangest thing about neighborhoods now is the utter absence of talk. Central air conditioning units hum and the screens of giant TVs flicker behind closed blinds. Those aforementioned dogs bark. But people? Not enough, and not to their neighbors. Of course, folks continue to have their opinions. Strong opinions. Many (Most? Some?) still troop to the polls to vote for candidates they vehemently support. But the civil discourse preceding elections – goodnatured banter on issues small and large – doesn’t happen much. Until, that is, you knock on somebody’s door and ask him what he thinks.

Author: J Robert Du Bois Edited by Rob Grogan

Rob Huffman is a civil citizen and thoughtful writer.

Give a Child Something to Think About Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

Larry Keel Hackensack Boys Big Daddy Love Elby Brass Tickets available at Sunken Well Tavern or www.heardintheburg.com June 8th at the Fredericksburg Fair Grounds VIP tickets available only at Sunken Well Tavern Info at heardintheburg.com or call 5403700911 Percentage of proceeds go to Community Outreach front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

29


My Own Path

The Honeywells: giving back powerfully By amy pearce

We got lucky in this region! Lottery Powerball jackpot winners and Stafford residents Dave and Nancy Honeywell have established a $4 million "Honeywell Charitable Fund" at The Community Foundation. From the beginning of their winnings, the philanthropic couple wanted to share a portion with the community, according to their tax advisor. In February, after winning the second largest Virginia Powerball jackpot, the Honeywells received $96 million net of withholding taxes. "They chose to establish a fund at the foundation because the money would be carefully invested and continue to grow

GIFTS PEANUTS BOOKS SAUCES

while they took the time needed to analyze what charitable organizations will benefit from them in the future," said R. Leigh Frackelton Jr., tax attorney and C.P.A. In the past six months, 11 other new funds have been established at The Community Foundation of The Rappahannock Region (cfrrr.org) by local philanthropic individuals, families and estates. "Donors choose The Community Foundation because it is easy to establish a fund and they're not burdened by the annual IRS reporting because we take care of it. Our fund options are flexible to fit their philanthropic goals and our funds are permanent, creating lasting value to the charities they care about," said Executive Director Teri McNally. In addition to the Honeywell Charitable Fund, the most recent funds established at the foundation include: The Calvin Burns Family Fund The Mary Carter Frackelton Scholarship Fund The Richard C. Hayden Family Scholarship Fund The Hicks Family Fund The Kallay Family Endowment Fund The K-T Charitable Fund The Nicky Seay Charitable Fund The Share Our Selves Fund The Taczak Family Endowment Fund The Mary B. and Perry A. Thompson Scholarship Fund The Kenneth T. Whitescarver III Memorial Scholarship Fund The Community Foundation of the Rappahannock Region now administers 89 charitable funds, valued at $15 million. Proceeds from these funds provide annual grants to nonprofit organizations and scholarships to deserving students. We are lucky to have both the Foundation and the Honeywells in our region. Amy Pearce felt lucky to write this and will play the next Powerball coming up.

WINE HAMS SOUVENIRS GIFT BASKETS CLOTHING SPECIALTY BEERS Made In Virginia Store 920 Caroline Street (540) 371-2030 (800) 635-3149 to order by phone madeinva.com to shop online Monday to Thursday 9:30a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Friday & Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Sunday 10:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

28

May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

the tempest of love addicition By c. ruth cassell Rushing to revive a lost tug living just below the surface. Rigged to another sputtering engine. A rudderless race. Roving with no true destination. Hitched to another’s helm for survival. Love addiction. An addiction in its truest form: an anticipation of revelry, a fix realized, and the relief that follows. Without constant reassurance the love is there, the thirst builds. Thirst for love, as with thirst for drink or thirst for money, can become an unquenchable desire. I think of myself as a recovering love addict, and recovering comes with blunders of judgment and blows to the ego. I realize true happiness comes from steering my own ship, to knowing my destination and facing the storm and sun with equal vibrancy. Years ago, I hitched myself to another for happiness. Without direction or determination, we sailed through seven years and the crash rushed toward us faster than we could hunker against the storm. Burdens of reliability and personal responsibility crushed us and we both escaped to maneuver on our own. As I floated, somewhat aimlessly, in the aftermath of the crash, I struggled to feel my own warmth under my skin. Over time I realized the eagerness I felt for another’s attention starved me of what I truly needed—an anchor within myself so I could stop and start as I pleased. Within the cycle of love addiction, I strongly disregard my own needs. The more I sacrifice to hold on to a ship that’s either already sailed or firmly run aground, the deeper my need becomes to save it so I don’t approach the journey alone. The temporary quench subsides. The parched anticipation returns. I’ve spent years recovering from this addiction that I know I must conquer. I’ve anchored myself, claiming only me capable of making me happy. I’ve scoped out what I want from a co-captain, what I will allow and not allow, and what I will offer. I’ve

Porch Light

For Sale Now at Amazon.com

Stories that shine a light on life

elective affinities By rob huffman

navigated through turbulent times by remaining positive and constantly sailing forward. As with any dark skies, the storm of love addiction takes many forms. It doesn’t always roar in with loud warnings and flashing red flags. Sometimes it brews under the surface, disguised as a summer shower. Once it finally opens, torrents fall on the exposed surface, and there is no time for reflection. There is only time for escape. I realize, more each day, that these voyages are a choice. There is no requirement that I jump aboard any vessel. The only thing I must do is keep struggling against the current that urges me back into the cycle of love addiction. Today, I find myself again floating, a solitary sight on the edge of dark. I am again resisting the desire to catch the next wave. I am again refusing the urge to take another tumultuous ride. I rely on purposeful resistance and constant reassurance. I fuel my engine by loving myself, my friends, my child, my family. I affix my rudder and set my sights on the obstacles ahead. I ignore the lost tug living below the surface, as it does not bode well for the spirit gliding above. Ruth Cassell, a UMW grad and Bistro Bethem veteran, now finds her path in Roanoke, VA. She blogs about similar topics as addressed in My Own Path in her personal blog at attentionanonymous.wordpress.com

Any regular reader of online newspapers knows how rich the blogs attached to stories can sometimes be. This is particularly true of political blogs. The discussions at such sites can be vigorous, heated, and emotionally all over the map. And maybe this type of political involvement is a good sign that the body politic continues to enjoy good health. But firing off partisan ripostes at vague digital others can quickly degenerate into a vapid and onanistic ad hominem belligerence. Honest and respectful debate on such blogs is rare; the point seems to be mere partisan bickering, a kind of poetry slam minus the poetry. And while bickering can be fun, I decided to get more directly involved in the political process. So, boots to the ground, I enlisted as a foot soldier in the door-knocking army of campaign volunteers. Not that I’ve had no interest in politics before. I’ve voted in all elections since gaining suffrage at age eighteen; I dutifully slog through the political op-eds on Sunday mornings to keep abreast of what the so-called cognoscenti are thinking; I reverently pause at C-SPAN when surfing the channels. I try to be a moderately informed citizen. So, feeling like an Intro to Civics nerd – some front row-sitting fellow who waves his hand at every question – I picked up my packet of campaign literature from the field office. After parking my truck in an unfamiliar, but friendly-seeming, neighborhood, I organized my clipboard and contact list, and began knocking on doors. In truth, the whole enterprise was at first a little strange, bringing back memories of boyhood paper routes: dogs barking and muffled footsteps. Would somebody’s dad answer the door and yell at me!? Remember when neighbors used to stop by each other’s house? To ask if

they could pick something up for you at the grocery store. Or let you know your kid was playing in the street again. Or just to borrow something. Now although as a canvasser I wasn’t there to borrow the proverbial cup of sugar, I most certainly hoped to borrow something: The homeowners’ time. His ears. A few moments of John and Jane Q. Public’s undivided attention. And honestly, all the folks I talked to were kind and welcoming. No one was rude. Even those whose political views were clearly the polar opposite of mine heard me out and simply indicated that one of my candidate’s brochures could perhaps be more profitably dropped off elsewhere. At no point was I called any names. Perceived deficiencies in my I.Q. were not commented on. The exchanges were universally civil. And isn’t this a pretty good model of what we hope for as citizens of this great and diverse land? To communicate with our neighbors. To be treated with respect. To have our thoughts and ideas heard and considered, even if ultimately our neighbor doesn’t agree with us. To be part of a community. And by knocking on someone’s door and soliciting his or her opinion, we are tacitly but clearly indicating that his or her opinion matters. But ours, too. It’s the quid pro quo of participatory democracy. The exchanges at the door were generally brief. And that was fine. Good neighbors realize other people have busy lives. There’s not always time for protracted conversation. Backyard conversations used to last as long as it took to take laundry off the clothesline and fold it. Or as long as borrowing that cup of sugar took. The important thing was those few minutes were respectful and a certain unspoken decorum was

honored. In stark contrast to the blogosphere, no one ever called his neighbor stupid or uninformed. The important thing was talking face to face with one’s neighbors. With civility. The strangest thing about neighborhoods now is the utter absence of talk. Central air conditioning units hum and the screens of giant TVs flicker behind closed blinds. Those aforementioned dogs bark. But people? Not enough, and not to their neighbors. Of course, folks continue to have their opinions. Strong opinions. Many (Most? Some?) still troop to the polls to vote for candidates they vehemently support. But the civil discourse preceding elections – goodnatured banter on issues small and large – doesn’t happen much. Until, that is, you knock on somebody’s door and ask him what he thinks.

Author: J Robert Du Bois Edited by Rob Grogan

Rob Huffman is a civil citizen and thoughtful writer.

Give a Child Something to Think About Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

Larry Keel Hackensack Boys Big Daddy Love Elby Brass Tickets available at Sunken Well Tavern or www.heardintheburg.com June 8th at the Fredericksburg Fair Grounds VIP tickets available only at Sunken Well Tavern Info at heardintheburg.com or call 5403700911 Percentage of proceeds go to Community Outreach front porch fredericksburg

May 2013

29


East Meets West holistic festival For Women & Girls tattoo! (In case some of your daring abandons you by the end of the day, the henna tattoo will readily wash off. The washing off is not free; you have to do that yourself.) Who could be so nice that they provide all of this for girls and women? Thrive that’s who! Thrive ... the people at the healing center. Thrive... the ones who are sponsoring this free Holistic Wellness and Healing Arts Celebration for Women and Girls. Thrive... is presenting this celebration of health at Goodwill Industries, Lee’s Hill Center Store, 4701 Market Street in Fredericksburg.

Girls! Women! Learn and practice some yoga! For you only! Free! You are invited! No charge! Free music, too! Want to learn some interesting new dance moves? Also free! How about joining in on a group power walk? It’s all free, and after exerting so many muscles, you certainly will be interested in indulging yourself with a free chair massage or even a chiropractic screening (Did we mention that this screening is free?) Once your sore muscles are tended to, you may be hungry. Be sure to sample the available healthy and tasty foods — FREE! Then you might want to celebrate the fun that you have been experiencing... by doing something that is just TOO daring... receive a free henna

Thrive... is looking forward to welcoming you lucky women and girls to their festivities on Saturday, June 1 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thrive is indebted to the Office of Women’s Health which has provided funding for the event. The important purpose of this one-day activity is to introduce women and girls to holistic solutions to stress by providing opportunities to observe demonstrations and engage in informal discussions with physical, mental health and healing arts professionals. All of this is shared in a fun, safe and comfortable environment...Thrive would have it no other way. After all, fun, safety and comfortable environment are good ways to start reducing stress. Here’s more... from Thrive: THRIVE, The Healing Center, provides the pathway for women seeking prevention, healing and wellness of mind, body and spirit, through an integrative and collaborate community approach. “Our vision is to be the premier center for evidence-based education and support for women and their families, provided by a professional, multidisciplinary team. Offering a connection between medical, holistic and community based resources, Thrive empowers those engaged to reach their full potential. Thrive reaches out to all women by offering therapeutic and support groups as well as health and wellness workshops especially for those suffering trauma or are challenged by the stress of day-to-day living. Thrive supports women who seek to grow, learn, and make positive changes in their lives. For more information contact the Thrive office at (540) 361-1331.

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May 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Miche liquidation sale! All in-stock Miche Bags and accessories 40% off.

SAT 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

get ready STAT!

www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesday 10-6:30

by sandra manigault

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Often we find ourselves discussing the discrepancy between a student’s GPA and SAT/ PSAT scores with frustrated parents. This is a matter to which we have given a great deal of consideration. A striking realization has occurred to me. That high GPA, although something to be admired and respected, is a result of a student’s willingness to study: That is to organize and memorize significant amounts of information from a variety of disciplines. That is what will also propel a student through those rigorous four undergraduate years. But the SAT does not measure what a student has memorized. Nor does it test material exactly the way it is presented in a textbook. It is a test that measures a student’s ability to reason. Unfortunately, memorization has little to do with reasoning. Hence the discrepancy between the GPA and the SAT score. Our SAT prep course is designed to enhance analytical thinking and creative problem

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Front Porch Fredericksburg

solving. If you have a student who is a junior or even a sophomore, it is time to begin thinking about how he or she will prepare for the SAT. If you have not seen our brochure or examined our website, please do so at your first opportunity. I cannot tell you how important it is NOT to allow your child to take that first SAT “cold.” Very few students do well on a test for which they have not prepared, and the SAT is no exception. We also have some good news to report. Last fall we had a 6th student get a score of “800” on one section of the SAT. He became the 6th student of ours to do so within the past three years. (His “800” was in math, and his critical reading and writing scores were “700” each.) These six exceptional students came to our class and worked very, very diligently. Although we do not expect these results from everyone, they are indicative of what might be accomplished with the right instruction and guidance, and serious commitment on the part of the student. Please know that our next SAT Prep Course will begin in the summer starting July 13th. It will be taught at the Comfort Inn, in Stafford, Saturdays and Wednesdays, from 8 AM - 2 PM, for the balance of July. In addition to our SAT Summer Intensive our regular fall course will begin on September 21st for a total of six Saturdays. If someone you know could benefit from our excellent program, please write or call us for more information. We look forward to helping as many students as we can to maximize their performance on this rigorous test. If you wish to receive our brochure or a copy of my free article, “The Truth About Testing,” please request it. To learn how the ACT differs from the SAT, please visit our website or give me a call. We are also available to discuss these matters with groups and interested organizations upon request. We look forward to being of service to you. Thank you for your interest in advancing educational potential.

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

Every Child Deserves A Family

301-587-4400 Cradle of Hope Adoption Center

ARCHER DI PEPPE CAGA

CERTIFIED APPRAISER

Insurance Riders Estate Settlements Divorce Cases Damage Claims Oral or Written Appraisals SPECIALIZING IN ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

Certified Appraiser Certified Appraiser’s Guild of America

adipeppe@aol.com

(540) 373-9636

Sandra and Donald Manigault own and operate The Manigault Institute, 540-720-0861.

front porch fredericksburg

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East Meets West holistic festival For Women & Girls tattoo! (In case some of your daring abandons you by the end of the day, the henna tattoo will readily wash off. The washing off is not free; you have to do that yourself.) Who could be so nice that they provide all of this for girls and women? Thrive that’s who! Thrive ... the people at the healing center. Thrive... the ones who are sponsoring this free Holistic Wellness and Healing Arts Celebration for Women and Girls. Thrive... is presenting this celebration of health at Goodwill Industries, Lee’s Hill Center Store, 4701 Market Street in Fredericksburg.

Girls! Women! Learn and practice some yoga! For you only! Free! You are invited! No charge! Free music, too! Want to learn some interesting new dance moves? Also free! How about joining in on a group power walk? It’s all free, and after exerting so many muscles, you certainly will be interested in indulging yourself with a free chair massage or even a chiropractic screening (Did we mention that this screening is free?) Once your sore muscles are tended to, you may be hungry. Be sure to sample the available healthy and tasty foods — FREE! Then you might want to celebrate the fun that you have been experiencing... by doing something that is just TOO daring... receive a free henna

Thrive... is looking forward to welcoming you lucky women and girls to their festivities on Saturday, June 1 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thrive is indebted to the Office of Women’s Health which has provided funding for the event. The important purpose of this one-day activity is to introduce women and girls to holistic solutions to stress by providing opportunities to observe demonstrations and engage in informal discussions with physical, mental health and healing arts professionals. All of this is shared in a fun, safe and comfortable environment...Thrive would have it no other way. After all, fun, safety and comfortable environment are good ways to start reducing stress. Here’s more... from Thrive: THRIVE, The Healing Center, provides the pathway for women seeking prevention, healing and wellness of mind, body and spirit, through an integrative and collaborate community approach. “Our vision is to be the premier center for evidence-based education and support for women and their families, provided by a professional, multidisciplinary team. Offering a connection between medical, holistic and community based resources, Thrive empowers those engaged to reach their full potential. Thrive reaches out to all women by offering therapeutic and support groups as well as health and wellness workshops especially for those suffering trauma or are challenged by the stress of day-to-day living. Thrive supports women who seek to grow, learn, and make positive changes in their lives. For more information contact the Thrive office at (540) 361-1331.

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Miche liquidation sale! All in-stock Miche Bags and accessories 40% off.

SAT 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

get ready STAT!

www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesday 10-6:30

by sandra manigault

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Often we find ourselves discussing the discrepancy between a student’s GPA and SAT/ PSAT scores with frustrated parents. This is a matter to which we have given a great deal of consideration. A striking realization has occurred to me. That high GPA, although something to be admired and respected, is a result of a student’s willingness to study: That is to organize and memorize significant amounts of information from a variety of disciplines. That is what will also propel a student through those rigorous four undergraduate years. But the SAT does not measure what a student has memorized. Nor does it test material exactly the way it is presented in a textbook. It is a test that measures a student’s ability to reason. Unfortunately, memorization has little to do with reasoning. Hence the discrepancy between the GPA and the SAT score. Our SAT prep course is designed to enhance analytical thinking and creative problem

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solving. If you have a student who is a junior or even a sophomore, it is time to begin thinking about how he or she will prepare for the SAT. If you have not seen our brochure or examined our website, please do so at your first opportunity. I cannot tell you how important it is NOT to allow your child to take that first SAT “cold.” Very few students do well on a test for which they have not prepared, and the SAT is no exception. We also have some good news to report. Last fall we had a 6th student get a score of “800” on one section of the SAT. He became the 6th student of ours to do so within the past three years. (His “800” was in math, and his critical reading and writing scores were “700” each.) These six exceptional students came to our class and worked very, very diligently. Although we do not expect these results from everyone, they are indicative of what might be accomplished with the right instruction and guidance, and serious commitment on the part of the student. Please know that our next SAT Prep Course will begin in the summer starting July 13th. It will be taught at the Comfort Inn, in Stafford, Saturdays and Wednesdays, from 8 AM - 2 PM, for the balance of July. In addition to our SAT Summer Intensive our regular fall course will begin on September 21st for a total of six Saturdays. If someone you know could benefit from our excellent program, please write or call us for more information. We look forward to helping as many students as we can to maximize their performance on this rigorous test. If you wish to receive our brochure or a copy of my free article, “The Truth About Testing,” please request it. To learn how the ACT differs from the SAT, please visit our website or give me a call. We are also available to discuss these matters with groups and interested organizations upon request. We look forward to being of service to you. Thank you for your interest in advancing educational potential.

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

Every Child Deserves A Family

301-587-4400 Cradle of Hope Adoption Center

ARCHER DI PEPPE CAGA

CERTIFIED APPRAISER

Insurance Riders Estate Settlements Divorce Cases Damage Claims Oral or Written Appraisals SPECIALIZING IN ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

Certified Appraiser Certified Appraiser’s Guild of America

adipeppe@aol.com

(540) 373-9636

Sandra and Donald Manigault own and operate The Manigault Institute, 540-720-0861.

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May 2013 - Front Porch Fredericksburg