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Revealed is an initiative of the WA State Government through the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries; and the Australian Government through the Indigenous Visual Arts Industry Support program. Cover image: Lorna Dawson, Champagne Glass, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 45.5 x 35.5cm. Courtesy of Spinifex Hill Studio



Images on opposite page, top to bottom: Paintings by artists from Warakurna Artists. For details go to page 185. Judy Miller Collecting Tjanpi. Image courtesy of Ninuku Arts. Paintings by Desmond Taylor. For details go to Martumili Artists on page 79.

contents Click on the page number to jump to that section.

WARNING: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that this artwork contains images of deceased persons.


Image: Paintings from Martumili artist Derrick Butt. For details go to page 79. Images opposite page, top to bottom: Paintings by artists from Warmun Art Centre. For details go to page 215. Warakurna artist Donald Ferguson. Photograph courtesy of Warakurna & Kayili Artists. Ninuku Arts glass blowing in progress. Photograph courtesy of Ninuku Arts


revealed 2020 Presented by Fremantle Arts Centre, Revealed showcases the best new and emerging Aboriginal artists from across Western Australia through the annual Revealed Exhibition, Revealed Art Market and connected public programs. Revealed is an essential platform for nurturing and celebrating the next generation of Aboriginal artists, while allowing our audiences the opportunity to purchase affordable work directly from hundreds of WA Aboriginal artists.

Following the outbreak of the COVID 19 pandemic FAC had to be closed to the public and the Revealed Exhibition and Art Market were cancelled. In 2019 the combined sales of the Revealed Exhibition and Art Market were over $600,000. This is vital income for WA’s 25 Aboriginal art centres and independent Aboriginal artists, and the loss of this revenue in 2020 will be felt across the WA Aboriginal art sector.


Image: Paintings from Tjarlirli Art (page 157), Martumili Artists (page 79) and Ninuku Arts (page 129). Glasswork from Ninuku Arts.


Although FAC is currently closed to the public we have worked to bring the Revealed Exhibition to our audiences with this online catalogue, enabling all these artists to make sales. The Revealed 2020 Exhibition catalogue showcases over 100 of the best new and emerging Aboriginal artists from WA’s remote and regional art centres, as well as independent and Noongar artists from metropolitan Perth and the South West. Prior to FAC closing the full call-out and selection process was completed. This year’s selection panel comprised Carly Lane, Curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art at the Art Gallery of Western Australia, and Charlotte Hickson, Curator at the Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts. The selected artists have created new works for Revealed which span a breadth of styles and mediums including painting, installation, video, textiles, photography, print media, jewellery, carving and sculpture. Revealed showcases the wealth and diversity of Aboriginal art practices across our state. It is also a means for artists to develop their practices, and participating in Revealed can have a lasting impact on an emerging artist’s career:

"It’s opened my eyes to the arts industry and opportunities as an Aboriginal artist… I have gained some inspiring friends and mentors as a result." Cora Lynch – 2019 Revealed Exhibition & Art Market artist


Purchasing works from the Revealed Exhibition is a great way to support WA’s Aboriginal art centres and artists who have already been severely impacted by COVID-19, and who rely on artwork sales to support their communities. Almost all works in the catalogue are for sale, with 100% of sales going directly to WA Aboriginal art centres and artists, with FAC this year forgoing its usual gallery commission on sales from Revealed Exhibition. For information about how to purchase Revealed 2020 artworks please refer to Revealed is an initiative of the WA State Government through the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries; and the Australian Government through the Indigenous Visual Arts Industry Support program.

Images, from top to bottom: Paintings from Waringarri Aboriginal Arts artist Delany Griffiths. For details go to page 197. Warakurna artist Freida Lane. Photograph courtesy of Warakurna & Kayili Artists. Carvings from Waringarri Aboriginal Arts artist Nathan Thomas Image opposite page: Ninuku artist Rita Watson painting. Photograph courtesy of Ninuku Arts. For details go to page 129.



exhibiting artists 1 | ARTGOLD, Kalgoorlie Biddy Dimer Milton Hansen Carol Lundy Thompson Edie Ulrich-Buodoon 2 | INDEPENDENT ARTISTS, Perth Rory Charles Buffie Corunna Shandell Cummings Peter Farmer Jnr Odiya Pilot Samuel Pilot-Kickett Dougie Powers Kerry Stack Azmara Summers Julianne Wade Tyrown Waigana Wiló 3 | INDEPENDENT ARTISTS, South West Tahlia Bennell John Sara 4 | JULUWARLU ARTISTS' GROUP, Roebourne Wendy Hubert Denice Kelly Biju Tenellia Lockyer Joelene O’Meara Mitchell Tigan Sharona Walker Kim Whalebone Alison Woodley Wimiya Woodley 5 | KIRA KIRO ARTS PROJECT, Kalumburu Veronica Djanghara Matilda Oxtoby 6 | KU'ARLU MANGGA, Northampton Colleen Drage Mauretta Drage Beverley Peck Leanne Peck

7 | LANGFORD ABORIGINAL ASSOCIATION, Perth Jill Abdullah Priscilla Bradley Catherine Bynder Raelee Cook Shirley Harris Norma Morrison Robyn Mudaliar Anne Oxenham Leonie Pickett Marie Pryor Marie Rawson Beverley Riley Angela Ryder Addellamay Ryder-Bartley Lennett Sandy Sharon Turner 8 | MANGKAJA ARTS, Fitzroy Crossing Margaret Albert Natalie Davies Navarone Nargoodah Amy Palmer 9 | MARTUMILI ARTISTS, Newman Derrick Butt Lorna Linmurra Helen Samson Desmond Taylor Tamisha Williams 10 | MARUKU ARTS & CRAFTS, Uluru Ruth Bates Katie Brown Nancy Carnegie Lena Dawson Chriselda Farmer Sally Anne Foster Lillian Golding Elizabeth Holland Melissa Holland Adele Jennings Angaliya Mitchell Prudence Mitchell Debbie Nelson Donna Porter Corinne Shepard Delilah Shepard Lynette Smith Debra West Jodie West

11 | MINYMA KUTJARA ARTS PROJECT, Wingellina Lynette Brown Roma Peterman Butler Sally Foster Maureen Nelson 12 | MOWANJUM ABORIGINAL ART & CULTURE CENTRE, Derby Curtis Barunga Malcolm Jungine 13 | NAGULA JARNDU WOMEN'S ART & RESOURCE CENTRE, Broome Nikita Drummond Amanda Rose Lee 14 | NINUKU ARTS, Kalka Community Selinda Davidson Judy Miller Rita Watson Cassaria Young-Hogan 15 | SPINIFEX HILL ARTISTS, Port Hedland Lorna Dawson Gideon Gardiner 16 | TJANPI DESERT WEAVERS, Alice Springs Judith Yinyika Chambers Nora Nginana Davidson Janet Forbes Joyce Deandra James Paula Sarkaway Lyons Jennifer Mitchell Eliza Munroe Winifred Reid Amy Yilpi 17 | TJARLIRLI ART, Tjukurla Nola Bennett Adam Butler Sally Butler Henry Farmer Julieanne Farmer Jillian Giles Myra Giles Martha Protty Kanitja


18 | TJUKURBA ART GALLERY, Wiluna Margaret Anderson Marcia Ashwin 19 | WANGABA ROEBOURNE ART GROUP, Roebourne Dinah Injie Cliff Samson Kathy Samson 20 | WARAKURNA & KAYILI ARTISTS, Warakurna Donald Ferguson Elaine Lane Freida Lane 21 | WARINGARRI ABORIGINAL ARTS, Kununurra Delany Griffiths Nathan Thomas 22 | WARLAYIRTI ARTISTS, Balgo Amanda Lewis Dulcie Nanala Vincent Nanala 23 | WARMUN ART CENTRE, Warmun Marika Mung Eddie Nulgit Madelene Purdie 24 | WIRNDA BARNA ART CENTRE, Mount Magnet Laurie Little Margaret Simpson 25 | YAMAJI ART, Geraldton Roni Jones 26 | YINJAA BARNI ART, Roebourne Dawn Sandy Nina Smith


Image: Artist Carol Lundy Thompson. Photography by Billy Ray Stokes


artgold, kalgoorlie biddy dimer milton hansen carol lundy thompson edie ulrich-buodoon Artgold, formally Arts & Culture Goldfields Association, exists to serve and promote arts organisations, upcoming events and individual artists working in Kalgoorlie-Boulder. The association aims to raise the profile of all arts genres by actively promoting and supporting arts activities in the wider community.

KALGOORLIE


Edie Ulrich-Buodoon Bush Flowers / Blossoms, 2020 acrylic on canvas 80 x 170 cm $2,580 REV20-001

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edie ulrich-buodoon Edie Ulrich-Buodoon artworks most often depict her family in the bush collecting bush foods and celebrating the colours of wildflowers in spring. Her works are featured on murals in the City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder and at the Kalgoorlie Health Campus. Ulrich-Budoon also works as a Tjupan and Wongutha language teacher at schools and at the Goldfields Aboriginal Language Centre. Most recently she published a children’s book called Yaalu Yalkarnala Yankunapayi. In 2019 Ulrich-Buodoon presented a paper at UNESCO in Paris for the 2019 Year of Indigenous Language and collaborated with UN photographer Martine Perret on an exhibition of photographic works at the Australian Embassy in Paris. Her works have also been included as a part of the CKB Art Prize at the Goldfields Art Centre, the Rottnest Island Foundation Fundraiser at Janet Holmes à Court Gallery, and featured on the ABC’s Gardening Australia.


Milton Hansen Celebrating Land, Culture & Family, 2019 acrylic on canvas 60 x 90 cm $1,500 REV20-002

milton hansen Milton Hansen is a talented artist known for creating distinctive portraits of his family, ancestors and celebrating the culture of his Pitjantjatjara lands. Hansen has a passion for the animals and bush tucker found on the Country where he was raised. His works reference key political movements and events, including the effects of the Maralinga nuclear testing on his family in the South Australian Woomera area.

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Belinda Dimer Southern Australian Ocean, 2019 acrylic on canvas 56 x 76 cm $690 REV20-003

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belinda dimer Belinda Dimer is a Wongutha Ngadju artist from the Goldfields region of Australia. Her works often present scenes from the southern coastal areas of Australia and the sea creatures that give life to these water systems, including squids, turtles, sting rays, pipie shells and fish.


Carol Lundy Thompson Mums home, 2020 acrylic on canvas 60 x 80 cm $590 REV20-004

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carol lundy thompson Carol Lundy Thompson is a Wongutha artist from Kalgoorlie. For the Revealed exhibition Thompson has created a work which represents the Country where her mother was born. The work shows the Karlgurla, a native silky pear that grows on vines. The town of Kalgoorlie was named after the Karlugurla. This work is a gesture to the artist’s mother who had thirteen children, three of whom passed away.

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Image: Sharona Walker, Woman’s Grinding Stone, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 45 x 45 cm. Page 35


juluwarlu artists’ group, roebourne wendy hubert denice kelly biju tenellia lockyer joelene o’meara mitchell tigan

sharona walker kim whalebone alison woodley wimiya woodley

Based in Roebourne, Juluwarlu is an organisation dedicated to preserving, recording and promoting the culture of Yindjibarndi people. Works created at Juluwarlu span multiple platforms including audio, video, documents and photos, traineeships for local people in cultural preservation, trips on Country, artist residences, documentaries, radio, TV, producing and publishing books, as well as providing a gathering space for the community to relax, feel safe and come together.

ROEBOURNE


Wendy Hubert My Ngurra, 2019 acrylic on canvas 70 x 45 cm $560 REV20-005

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wendy hubert Wendy Hubert is a respected Yindjibarndi Elder, cultural custodian and linguist who has passionately supported the Roebourne and Yindjibarndi Community she lives and works in for more than 40 years. Having taken up painting 2 years ago, she uses her memories, the stories of Yindjibarndi culture and the cultural heroes she has worked with during her life. Hubert’s artworks celebrate Yindjibarndi’s 60,000 year-old culture and their continuing management and care of the west Pilbara tableland Country. Wendy says, “I know my Ngurra. I know its Laws. I am a Yindjibarndi Custodian, old now, but strong in my thinking and my life. So I have painted here, my Country after fire. The rain will come. When it comes everything will grow again. It has done this since the beginning of time and will go on doing this forever.”


Wendy Hubert Standing Stones, 2019 acrylic on canvas 75 x 45 cm $500 REV20-006

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Wendy Hubert Drought Country, 2020 acrylic on canvas 50 x 40 cm $450 REV20-007

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Wendy Hubert My Childhood Playground, 2020 acrylic on canvas 83 x 46 cm $450 REV20-008

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Denice Kelly Barrimirndi: Creation Sea Serpent, 2019 acrylic on canvas 59 x 72 cm $620 REV20-009

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denice kelly Denice Kelly is a young Yindjibarndi woman who has only recently taken up painting as a way of furthering her commitment to celebrating her culture and Country. Kelly’s first exhibited works explore the creation mythologies of Barrimirndi, the Creation sea serpent who created the Fortescue River in the Ngurra Nyujunggamu time when the world was soft, and Wara-Murruga, the fruit bats who search for fruit and live in the water adjacent to the caves and trees.


Denice Kelly Python Pool, 2020 acrylic on canvas 59 x 72 cm $620 REV20-010

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Denice Kelly Wara-Murnga: Fruit Bats, 2019 acrylic on canvas 91 x 61 cm $700 REV20-011

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Biju Tenellia Lockyer Diptych 1 & 2 How Dry My Ngurra, 2019 acrylic on canvas 51 x 76 cm $850 each or $1650 for both REV20-012 REV20-013

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biju tenellia lockyer Biju Tenellia Lockyer is a prolific young and emerging Yindjibarndi artist with strong cultural and environmental knowledge learned from her respective grandparents’ families. She began creating yarranga marni (carved boards) and acrylic paintings on canvas in 2017 as a part of Juluwarlu’s Nyinyart Yinda Water Artists Cultural Futures Residencies program. Lockyer’s practice reflects upon her relationships to ngurra (Country), the rain, yinda (deep permanent pools) and ijarri (spings) that bring life to the plants, animals, fish and insects that have nourished Yindjibarndi people for more than 2,000 generations. Her artworks have featured in curated exhibitions across Perth and the Pilbara, and are held in numerous private collections.

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Biju Tenellia Lockyer Jammi: Bush Medicine, 2020 acrylic on canvas 59 x 75 cm $950 REV20-014

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Biju Tenellia Lockyer Waterholes: Rain Dreaming, 2020 acrylic on canvas 43 x 56 cm $620 REV20-015

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Joelene O’Meara Millstream, 2019 acrylic on canvas 69 x 110 cm $700 REV20-016

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joelene o’meara Joelene O’Meara is an emerging Yindjibarndi artist who began painting and making yarranga marni carvings at the Juluwarlu Art Space in 2018. Since this time she has exhibited in exhibitions across Perth and the Pilbara. She often works collaboratively with other artists, and particularly likes to learn about Yindjibarndi law, Country and creation stories on field trips and artist camps on the Yindjibarndi tablelands.


Mitchell Tigan Cook House, Millstream Station (where Harry Mills was born), 2019 acrylic on canvas 76 x 120 cm $1,800 REV20-017

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mitchell tigan Mitchell Tigan is a respected Bardi Elder and cultural custodian from the north of Broome. Married to Yindjibarndi artist Janine Fredericks, the couple spend their time with family between the two communities. Working out of Juluwarlu, Tigan creates intricate yarranga marni (carved boards) and acrylic paintings based on his deep understanding of and relationship to his Kimberley homelands, the sea and culture. His carvings and paintings featured in previous Revealed exhibitions at Fremantle Arts Centre and in the 2018 Cossack Art Awards.

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Sharona Walker Bush Flowers, 2019 acrylic on canvas 40 x 73 cm $450 REV20-018

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sharona walker Sharona Walker is a young and emerging Yindjibarndi artist. She began creating yarranga marni (carved boards) and acrylic paintings in 2017 as part of Juluwarlu’s Nyinyart Yinda Water Artists Cultural Futures Residencies programs. Over the past 18 months, Walker has been producing artworks reflecting on her cultural knowledge, daily life and connection to Country. Her artworks have featured in exhibitions across Perth and the Pilbara and are held in numerous private collections.


Sharona Walker Woman’s Grinding Stone, 2019 acrylic on canvas 45 x 45 cm $350 REV20-019

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Sharona Walker Bunggaliyarra: Seven Sisters Dreaming, 2019 acrylic on canvas 56 x 66 cm $450 REV20-020

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Kim Whalebone Native Seeds, 2020 acrylic on canvas 62 x 73 cm $650 REV20-021

kim whalebone Kim Whalebone is an emerging Yindjibarndi artist who has established herself as an exciting new artist at Juluwarlu despite only joining in mid-2019.

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Alison Woodley Mulla Mulla, 2019 acrylic on canvas 69 x 66 cm $550 REV20-022

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alison woodley Alison Woodley is a young Yindjibarndi mother and painter who lives and works in the Ngurrawaana Aboriginal Community on the Yindjibarndi tablelands. Her artworks have featured in curated exhibitions in Perth. For Revealed 2020, Woodley shows the brilliance and delicacy of Mulla Mulla, one of the first plants to arise after rain in the Pilbara.


Wimiya Woodley Mapping my Ngurra, 2019 yarranga marni carving 60 x 60 cm $500 REV20-023

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wimiya woodley Wimiya Woodley is a young and emerging Yindjibarndi artist who has a passionate interest in his culture and all art forms including performance and dance. He has grown up in the midst of culture, camping and travelling his Yindjibarndi ngurra (Country) with Elders and family, gathering the meanings of places and the stories of his people. He has been exhibiting his art since 2019 and is currently studying Aboriginal Performance at Edith Cowan University.

JULUWARLU ARTISTS’ GROUP | 39


Image: Veronica Djanghara, Wandjin and Gwion Gwion, 2019, natural pigment on canvas, 45 x 45 cm. Page 43


kira kiro arts project, kalumburu veronica djanghara matilda oxtoby Kira Kiro Arts Project is the Kalumburu Community’s recognised art centre, located on the land of the Kwini people in north western WA. Kira Kiro or Kirri Kirri are Kwini spiritual figures featured in the rock art galleries around Kalumburu. The name was adopted by important senior artist Mary Punchi Clement, who is known for her intricate depiction of the region’s flora, fauna and associated stories.

KALUMBURU


Veronica Djanghara Wandjin and Gwion Gwion, 2019 natural pigment on canvas 45 x 45 cm $440 REV20-024

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veronica djanghara Veronica Djanghara was born in Kalumburu, when the nuns were also the nurses, and is one of fourteen children. Her Dreaming is the Porcupine (Echidna) that shouts out at night. Djanghara’s father was a stockman droving from Kalumburu to Landsdowne. He came to Kalumburu and met Djanghara’s mother at 16 and they were married there. He was also a skilled corroboree dancer. His brother Waigan Djanghara was a famous painter whose work is included in many national gallery collections. Veronica Djanghara began to paint in her 40s, inspired by Kalumburu artists and her sister Sylvia Djanghara.


Veronica Djanghara Wandjin and Gwion Gwion, 2019 natural pigment on canvas 45 x 45 cm $440 REV20-025

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Veronica Djanghara Wandjina and the Spirit People, 2020 natural pigment on canvas 60 x 60 cm $790 REV20-026

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Veronica Djanghara Wandjina and the Spirit People, 2020 natural pigment on canvas 60 x 60 cm $790 REV20-027

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Matilda Oxtoby The First Rain #1, 2020 natural pigment on canvas 120 x 45 cm $1,190 REV20-028

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matilda oxtoby Matilda Oxtoby was found in Dreaming by her first Mum, who fished for her, ate her and said ‘it tastes funny, this is a baby, but I am too old’. She gave me to my Mum who became pregnant with me”. Oxtoby is an established artist, who has recently started painting at Kira Kiro. Inspired by her sister Sylvia Djanghara and well known artist and Uncle Waigan Djanghara, Oxtoby’s works reflect and consider local rock art themes and the flora and fauna that inhabit the river and pristine coastline of the Kalumburu surrounds.


Matilda Oxtoby The First Rain #2, 2020 natural pigment on canvas 120 x 45 cm $1,190 REV20-029

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Matilda Oxtoby The First Rain #3, 2020 natural pigment on canvas 120 x 45 cm $1,190 REV20-030

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Matilda Oxtoby Wandjina and the Wunju #1, 2020 natural pigment on canvas 120 x 45 cm $1,240 REV20-031

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Matilda Oxtoby Wandjina and the Wunju #2, 2020 natural pigment on canvas 120 x 45 cm $1,240 REV20-032

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Matilda Oxtoby Wandjina and the Wunju #3, 2020 natural pigment on canvas 120 x 45 cm $1,240 REV20-033

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Image: Mauretta Drage at the printing press, making new work for Revealed.Photograph courtesy of Ku’arlu Mangga


ku’arlu mangga (good nest), northampton colleen drage mauretta drage beverly peck leanne peck Formally known as Northampton Old School Community Initiative, Ku’arlu Mangga is a community centre that provides assistance to Aboriginal residents in Northampton. Art and creative content runs through every project to promote positive cultural expression in the community with a focus on youth wellbeing.

NORTHAMPTON


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colleen drage Colleen Drage grew up in Ajana and on the Murchison River, then moved to Northampton for her high school education. She spent her early married life in Northampton and Tardun, raising five children and becoming involved in the Yakka program, which supported youth in the Mullewa area. Drage is the Community Coordinator and Founding Member for the Ku’arlu Mangga and was a Board member for the West Australian Aboriginal Advisory Council (2011-15).

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mauretta drage Mauretta Drage grew up in Northampton and Wandalgu. She is a special needs teachers’ assistant at Cable Beach Primary School and often works as a Supervisor for Northampton Old School Youth Program. Drage teaches wood burning and painting in the youth program and assists the cultural camps in the Murchison River near Kalbarri. Drage has been developing her painting practice with Ku’arlu Mangga since 2010 and since 2017 has been working with printmaking techniques.

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beverly peck Beverly Peck is a member of the Ku’arlu Mangga art team at Northampton Old School Community Initiative. Beverly also lived and worked in Wiluna, but now resides in Northampton. Peck enjoys making beautiful things from beads and recycled objects such as massed wildflowers from plastic bottles. She enjoys making prints with her daughter Leanne, with whom she shares her Goanna stories. Revealed is her first exhibition.

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leanne peck Leanne Peck is a member of the Ku’arlu Mangga artistic team at Northampton Old School Community Initiative. Peck grew up in Wiluna and is an artist who often uses recycled and found objects such as wildflowers and plastic bottles in her works. Since 2015, Peck has been developing her painting and print making practice with Ku’arlu Mangga. Revealed is her first exhibition.

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A | Colleen Drage Digging Sticks, 2020 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 57 x 75 cm $350 REV20-034

F | Mauretta Drage Turtles, 2020 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 38 x 57 cm $300 REV20-039 1/10 sold

K | Leanne Peck Bardi Grub, 2020 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 28 x 38 cm $200 REV20-044

B | Colleen Drage Pair Dig Sticks, 2020 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 28 x 38 cm $200 REV20-035

G | Mauretta Drage Turtles, 2020 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 38 x 46 cm $350 REV20-040 1/10 sold

L | Leanne Peck Bardi Grub, 2020 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 28 x 38 cm $200 REV20-045

C | Colleen Drage Wagadu, 2020 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 38 x 28 cm $200 REV20-036 2/10 sold

H | Beverly Peck Goanna, 2020 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 57 x 75 cm $350 REV20-041

M | Leanne Peck Bardi Grub (Pair of Bardi Grubs), 2020 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 38 x 56 cm $300 REV20-046

D | Colleen Drage Tjitcata, 2019 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 28 x 38 cm $200 REV20-037

I | Beverly Peck Goanna, 2020 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 57 x 75 cm $350 REV20-042

E | Mauretta Drage Wika, 2019 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 28 x 38 cm $200 REV20-038 1/10 sold

J | Leanne Peck Bardi Grub, 2020 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 28 x 38 cm $200 REV20-043

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N | Leanne Peck Bardi Grub (Pair of Bardi Grubs), 2019 300gsm sumerset satin, oil based ink 38 x 56 cm $300 1/10 sold REV20-047


Ku’arlu Mangga artists worked with Perth-based artist Rachel Salmon-Lomas, experimenting with print-making techniques to develop this new series of works for the Revealed Exhibition.

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WARNING: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that this artwork contains images of deceased persons.

langford aboriginal association, perth jill abdullah priscilla bradley catherine bynder raelee cook shirley harris norma morrison robyn mudaliar anne oxenham

leonie pickett marie pryor marie rawson beverley riley angela ryder addellamay ryder-bartley lennett sandy sharon turner

Langford Aboriginal Association is a Perth-based centre that delivers programs to benefit the local Aboriginal community. It provides services and programs to increase the health, wellbeing, cultural and social connections for Aboriginal people living and working in the Perth metropolitan region.

PERTH


WARNING: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that this artwork contains images of deceased persons.

Jill Abdullah, Priscilla Bradley, Catherine Bynder, Raelee Cook, Shirley Harris, Carolyn Mascall, Norma Morrison, Robyn Mudaliar, Anne Oxenham, Leonie Pickett, Marie Pryor, Marie Rawson, Sandra Rickards, Beverley Riley, Angela Ryder, Addellamay Ryder-Bartley, Lennett Sandy and Sharon Turner, in collaboration with Susie Vickery Djinanjiny Koodjookat Djinanjiny Moordin (Looking Ahead Looking Back), 2020 Digital prints, paper bark, paper, thread, fabric, gumnuts 80 x 120 cm each NFS

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langford aboriginal assocation Djinanjiny Koodjookat Djinanjiny Moordin (Looking Ahead Looking Back) was created by the Langford Aboriginal Association Group, Moorditj Yoka, Art and Yarning and My Time, in collaboration with Perth textile artist Susie Vickery. More than 15 artists from Langford came together for a series of mentoring workshops by Vickery, supported by the Revealed Metropolitan and Regional Exhibition Workshop Program. In these workshops the artists gathered stories, embellished photographs and wove together imagery related to their mothers, families and home. Created over several months, this artwork reflects the collective strength of Aboriginal people to create a home and hearth despite the complex obstacles faced by many in a time of continued dispossession and oppression. After its display at Revealed this artwork will be exhibited in the collections of the new Western Australian Museum due to open at the end of 2020. LANGFORD ABORIGINAL ASSOCIATION | 61


Image: Amy Palmer. Photograph courtesy of Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency

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mangkaja arts resource agency,

fitzroy crossing margaret albert natalie davey navarone nargoodah amy palmer Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency is a leading Aboriginal arts centre based in Fitzroy Crossing. Founded in 1981, Mangkaja represents the five language groups of the Fitzroy Valley including Bunuba, Nyikina and Gooniyandi of Martuwarra (River Country), and Walmajarri and Wangkajunga from the jilji, (Sand-hill Desert Country). Mangkaja supports over 100 artists through various inter-generational programs, with artists ranging from 5 to over 85.

FITZROY CROSSING


Margaret Albert Jinup Stingray, 2020 acrylic on 3mm polycarbonate 60 x 60 cm $660 REV20-048

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margaret albert Margaret Albert is a Nyul Nyul and Bardi Jawi woman living in Jimbalagudnj in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. She has three sons and is married to Navarone Nargoodah. She is also daughter-in-law to master bush dyer Eva Nargoodah, and currently employed at Mangkaja Arts as an arts worker and administration assistant. Albert makes bush dyed scarves, seed and bead jewellery, and has recently learnt block and screen printing. Albert’s experiences of living near saltwater and freshwater, and travelling throughout the Kimberley, continue to inform her practice. She has developed sophisticated drawing skills, creating etched tins that were exhibited at Fremantle Art Centre’s Revealed 2018. More recently she has started exploring the medium of acrylic on Perspex, works which are shown here for Revealed 2020.


Margaret Albert Baby Stingrays Feeding, 2020 acrylic on 3mm polycarbonate 60 x 60 cm $990 REV20-049

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Margaret Albert Jinup Stingray, 2020 acrylic on 3mm polycarbonate 60 x 60 cm $990 REV20-050

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natalie davey Natalie Davey is an artist and traditional owner from Bunuba Danggu Muway in Fitzroy Crossing, with Bunuba, Walmjarri, Scottish and English heritage. Beginning at a young age Davey practiced art making, writing and storytelling. Growing up between Broome and Derby, she returned to Fitzroy Crossing in 2010 and began her professional arts practice which has helped her reconnect to her languages and Country. Davey works across a variety of mediums including drawing, bronze casts and jewellery. Davey’s works for Revealed are a collection of jewellery based animals developed from techniques learnt from Perth jeweller Jessica Jubbs.

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Natalie Davey Gayi Freshwater Crocodile Ring, 2019 cast bronze 2.7 x 2.9 x 1.8 cm Price on application REV20-051

Natalie Davey Banguli Bat Ring, 2020 cast bronze 2.5 x 5 x 1.5 cm Price on application REV20-052

Natalie Davey Gayi Freshwater Crocodile Brooch, 2019 cast bronze 4 x 3.8 x 0.02 cm Price on application REV20-053

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Natalie Davey Galwayi Sawfish Pendant, 2020 cast bronze 6.1 x 2.2 x 0.01 cm Price on application REV20-054

Natalie Davey Jirigi -Bird Track Earrings, 2020 cast bronze 5.5 x 3.5 x 0.01 cm Price on application REV20-055

Natalie Davey Gayi Freshwater Crocodile Pendant, 2020 cast bronze 7 x 4.2 x 0.05 cm Price on application REV20-056

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Natalie Davey Galwayi Sawfish, 2019 cast bronze 8.1 x 3.4 x 0.04 cm Price on application REV20-057

Natalie Davey Galwayi Sawfish Brooch, 2020 cast bronze 4 x 3.8 x 0.02 cm Price on application REV20-058

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Navarone Nargoodah Night Owl, 2020 acrylic paint and etching on metal/ enamel spray 60 x 60 cm $880 REV20-059

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navarone nargoodah Navarone Nargoodah is a 27-year old emerging artist, who was born in Derby and grew on his ogee (Father’s Mother) community, Jimbalakudunj and in Kupartiya on his Jupi (Mother’s Father’s) Country. Both his father, Johnny Nargoodah and mother, Eva Nargoodah are important members and lead artists with Mangkaja Arts. Watching his parents from a young age, Nargoodah was encouraged to take up an arts practice, and is most often inspired by imagery that comes to him in his dreams. Nargoodah lives with his wife and three sons.

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Navarone Nargoodah Frogmouth owl totem and Little Murungkurr, 2020 acrylic paint and etching on metal/ enamel spray 80 x 60 cm $660 REV20-060

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Navarone Nargoodah Rukaji Little Murrangurr Owl, 2020 etching on metal/ enamel spray 90 x 90 cm $1,200 REV20-061

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Amy Palmer My Mother’s Country, 2020 acrylic on canvas 120 x 120 cm $2,200 REV20-062

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amy palmer Amy Palmer resides at Wangkajungka Community in Western Australia where she lives with her husband. Palmer paints stories about her mother and uncle’s Country Nyaru out near Kiwirrkurra and Lake Mackay on the Pintubi side. Her mother was esteemed Warlayirti artist the late E. Nyumi. Palmer has been developing her own painting style to tell stories about women hunting and gathering bush foods as they travel over Country during the different seasons. Recently she has begun to paint her mother’s stories which have been passed on to her, mapping the terrain and describing the plants, flower, sand hills and waterholes in her works. Amy says, “I am thankful for my uncle and my mother for painting…they went to galleries and overseas, everywhere. I want to be like them, for my paintings to go to other places and galleries and I want to pass it on to my kids and grandkids to get painting.”


Amy Palmer Mangarri Bush Tucker, 2020 acrylic on canvas 120 x 90 cm $1,600 REV20-063

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Amy Palmer Desert Flowers, 2020 acrylic on canvas 120 x 90 cm $1,600 REV20-064

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“This is my mother’s and father’s Country, south of Lake Mackay near Jupiter’s Well. The desert flowers are blooming after the rain and there’s a waterhole hidden under the grass. This is my Mother and her father’s country Nyaru.” Amy Palmer


Image: Lorna Linmurra painting in Warralong community, WA. Photograph courtesy of Martumili Artists


martumili artists, newman derrick butt helen samson lorna linmurra desmond taylor tamisha williams Martumili Artists was established by Martu people living in the communities of Parnpajinya (Newman), Jigalong, Parnngurr, Punmu, Kunawarritji, Irrungadji and Warralong. The artists and their families are the traditional custodians of vast stretches of the Great Sandy, Little Sandy and Gibson Deserts as well as the Karlamilyi (Rudall River) area. Martumili draws on the strong influence of Aboriginal art history and artists practice across a range of styles and mediums.

NEWMAN


Derrick Butt Kulyakartu, 2019 acrylic on linen 91 x 61 cm $923 REV20-065

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derrick butt Derrick Butt is a Karimarra man and artist born in 1976 in Parnngurr, Western Australia.


Derrick Butt Kulyakartu, 2019 acrylic on canvas 91 x 61 cm $923 REV20-066

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Derrick Butt Kulyakartu, 2019 acrylic on canvas 91 x 61 cm $923 REV20-067

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Helen Samson Untitled, 2019 acrylic on canvas 91 x 91 cm $1,076 REV20-068

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helen samson Helen Samson is the younger sister of Lily Long and Amy French, but unlike her sisters, she was born in Jigalong mission and has no memory of her parents. She grew up in the dormitory at Jigalong, but spent her weekends and holidays in the bush with her extended family. Once married, she lived around Puntawarri, walking and hunting around there, and she also worked on Mundawindi and Sylvania Stations. She knows many places that her ancestors travelled in that area and greatly enjoys painting the stories for those places. She paints her traditional Country around Karlamilyi and also places she has lived, such as Kapartila, Nyarungarku and Nyiyanguya, which are all significant water bodies around Puntawarri.

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Helen Samson was born in Jigalong mission and has no memory of her parents‌ She knows many places that her ancestors travelled‌ She paints her traditional Country around Karlamilyi and also places she has lived, such as Kapartila, Nyarungarku and Nyiyanguya, which are all significant water bodies around Puntawarri.


Helen Samson Puntawarri, 2019 acrylic on canvas 121 x 91 cm $1,461 REV20-069

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Lorna Linmurra Untitled, 2019 acrylic on linen 121 x 76 cm $1,230 REV20-070

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lorna linmurra Lorna Linmurra was born in Port Hedland and grew up in the Marble Bar area. Today she lives between the Shaw and De Grey rivers at Warralong Community with her family.


Desmond Taylor Niminjarra, 2020 acrylic on arches paper (unframed) 102 x 66 cm $1,035 REV20-071

desmond taylor Desmond Taylor was born in 1964 close to the Oakover River. Two years later his family moved into Jigalong and were amongst the last Martu to live entirely in the desert with access to rations. Taylor went to school in Nullagine and Perth and now works as a professional translator and educator as well as an artist. Taylor primarily paints his family’s Country around Karlamilyi (Rudall River) and the creation stories for that Country, especially the Ngayarta Kujarra Dreaming.

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Desmond Taylor Niminjarra, 2020 acrylic on arches paper (unframed) 105 x 75 cm $1,211 REV20-072

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"Niminjarra is the two brothers transforming into a snake so they can go back home to Ngayartakujarra (Lake Dora). They were in training for ceremony, those two brothers, but they were kept too long and nobody was there to release them. They waited then they decided to transform into snakes to travel back to where they came from, because their mother was waiting for them. This is Jukurrpa (Dreaming story)" Desmond Taylor


Desmond Taylor Niminjarra, 2020 acrylic on arches paper (unframed) 101 x 66 cm $1,025 REV20-073

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Tamisha Williams Love Heart, 2019 giclee print on Canson Platine Fibre Rag 310gsm (unframed) 54 x 74 cm $250 (edition of 3) REV20-074

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tamisha williams Tamisha was born in Port Hedland hospital in 1996 and grew up around Newman where she attended Newman Primary School and Newman Senior High School. Her mother grew up around Jigalong Community and her father in Wiluna. Alongside spending a large part of her youth vising these areas with her six brothers and sisters, Williams often hunted for bush tucker in the swamp area of Yurlparirra and spent time learning family traditions and culture from her Nanna and Pop. Williams has been painting with Martumili since she was eight years old and has recently started helping the art centre in Newman with sales and events. Williams also works with Martu youth for the YMCA. She is an emerging artist and role model for young people and is proud to be passing on her own cultural traditions and practices. martumili artists | 91


Tamisha Williams Chilling out Ngurra, 2019 giclee print on Canson Platine Fibre Rag 310gsm (unframed) 94 x 134 cm $600 (edition of 3) REV20-075

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Tamisha Williams Feel Home, 2019 giclee print on Canson Platine Fibre Rag 310gsm (unframed) 54 x 74 cm $250 (edition of 3) REV20-076

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maruku arts & crafts, uluru ruth bates katie brown nancy carnegie lena dawson chriselda farmer sally anne foster lillian golding elizabeth holland melissa holland adele jennings

angaliya mitchell prudence mitchell debbie nelson donna porter corinne shepard delilah shepard lynette smith debra west jodie west

Maruku is owned and operated by Anangu people from the Western and Central Deserts of Australia. As one of the largest art centres, approximately 900 Anangu artists are part of the collective. Artists at Maruku are particularly well known for their punu – expertly carved wooden objects. Maruku aims to share knowledge with future generations of artists and make culture accessible in an authentic way to those that seek a more in-depth understanding.

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maruku arts & crafts Ruth Bates, Katie Brown, Nancy Carnegie, Lena Dawson, Chriselda Farmer, Sally Anne Foster, Lillian Golding, Elizabeth Holland, Melissa Holland, Adele Jennings, Angaliya Mitchell, Prudence Mitchell, Debbie Nelson, Donna Porter, Corinne Shepard, Delilah Shepard, Lynette Smith, Debra West, Jodie West. This installation has been developed by a group of emerging artists and minyma yarnangu (Aboriginal women). Each artist is from a different community in the remote desert regions of the Ngaanyatjarra Lands of Western Australia and Pitjantjatjarra Lands on the South Australian tristate border. These communities include Tjuntjuntjara, Warakurna, Warburton and Blackstone.

Traditional punu–making has been passed down from generation to generation for thousands of years. These artworks are alive (punu literally means “living wood”). Punu are not made only as artefacts, but as living expressions of Country. Shown here is a collection of piti, wiras and mimpus, or a variety of bowls, traditionally produced for daily use. Created in the last year by artists who learned their skills watching and assisting their female relatives, these bowls revive old traditions, with the shape of the bowls responding to the structure of the wood, and the marks reflecting forms and patterns found in nature. Accompanied by the wana (digging stick) these artists reflect and reminiscence on the working tools of old, used in the time before the invasion of Aboriginal land. Presented here is the next generation of women punu carvers whose works show contemporary simplicity and sophisticated use of materials, textures and mark-making.

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A | Prudence Mitchell Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 99 x 4 x 5 cm $122 REV20-077

B | Sally Anne Foster Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 90 x 4 x 4 cm $210 REV20-078

C | Sally Anne Foster Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 82 x 4 x 4 cm $210 REV20-079

D | Sally Anne Foster Wana – Digging Stick, 2019 Wanari – mulga wood 63 x 4 x 4 cm $244 REV20-080

E | Sally Anne Foster Wana – Digging Stick, 2019 Wanari – mulga wood 80 x 4 x 4 cm $210 REV20-081

F | Lynette Smith Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 121 x 4 x 4 cm $152.50 REV20-086


G | Lynette Smith Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 126 x 4 x 4 cm $244 REV20-087

M | Debra West Wana – Digging Stick, 2019 Wanari – mulga wood 119 x 4 x 4 cm $137.86 REV20-099

S | Nancy Carnegie Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 76 x 4 x 4 cm $91.50 REV20-107

H | Adele Jennings Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 143 x 3 x 3 cm $244 REV20-090

N | Debra West Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 99 x 4 x 4 cm $137.86 REV20-100

T | Nancy Carnegie Club, 2020 Dead finish 76 x 4 x 4 cm $152.50 REV20-108

I | Adele Jennings Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 145 x 3 x 3 cm $244 sold REV20-091

O | Debra West Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 126 x 4 x 4 cm $122 REV20-101

U | Nancy Carnegie Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 91 x 4 x 4 cm $152.50 REV20-109

J | Adele Jennings Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 159 x 3 x 3 cm $244 REV20-092

P | Angaliya Mitchell Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 152 x 4 x 4 cm $122 REV20-102

V | Nancy Carnegie Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 119 x 4 x 4 cm $107.36 REV20-110

K | Adele Jennings Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 170 x 3 x 3 cm $122 REV20-093

Q | Elizabeth Holland Wana – Digging Stick, 2019 Wanari – mulga wood 135 x 4 x 4 cm $122 REV20-103

L | Ruth Bates Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 96 x 4 x 4 cm $107.36 REV20-098

R | Elizabeth Holland Wana – Digging Stick, 2020 Wanari – mulga wood 99 x 4 x 4 cm $122 REV20-104

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Corinne Shepard Piti – Collecting Bowl, 2019 Itara – river red gum 46 x 23 x 11 cm $366 REV20-082

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Debbie Nelson Piti – Collecting Bowl, 2019 Kataya – limestone wattle 51 x 19 x 16 cm $610 REV20-083

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Debbie Nelson Piti – Collecting Bowl, 2019 Mangata – Desert Quandong 30 x 19 x 16 cm $305 REV20-084

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Melissa Holland Piti – Collecting Bowl, 2019 Itara – river red gum 38 x 17 x 10 cm $457.50 REV20-085

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Katie Brown Kunilpa – Winnowing Bowl, 2020 Kataya – limestone wattle 38 x 11 x 5 cm $244 REV20-088

Adele Jennings Piti – Collecting Bowl, 2020 Itara – river red gum 65 x 34 x 22 cm $1,525 REV20-089

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Delilah Shepard Piti – Collecting Bowl, 2019 Itara – river red gum 57 x 21 x 13 cm $610 REV20-094

Jodie West Piti – Collecting Bowl, 2019 Itara – river red gum 63 x 33 x 10 cm $823.50 REV20-095

Donna Porter Wira – Small Bowl, 2019 Itara – river red gum 38 x 9 x 8 cm $305 REV20-096

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Lillian Golding Piti – Collecting Bowl, 2019 Muur-Muurpa – Desert bloodwood 92 x 32 x 14 cm $762.50 REV20-097

Chriselda Farmer Piti – Collecting Bowl, 2016 Itara – river red gum 40 x 13 x 8 cm $366 REV20-105

Lena Dawson Piti – Collecting Bowl, 2019 Muur-Muurpa – Desert bloodwood 64 x 33 x 9 cm $457.50 REV20-106

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Image: Kapi Ungkuypayi. Minyma Kutjara Arts Project supports the creativity of Irrunytju artists and the Wingellina Community as a whole, promoting health and wellbeing. Photograph courtesy of Minyma Kutjara Arts Project.


minyma kutjara arts project, wingellina lynette brown roma peterman butler sally foster maureen nelson The Minyma Kutjara Arts Project was initiated by the people and artists of Irrunytu. Irrunytju, or Wingellina Community is a small, very remote community located 10 kilometres from the tri-state border of WA, NT and SA. Established in 1975, Irrunytju is part of the Ngaanyatjarra Lands and is home to over 150 Anangu (people) who primarily speak Pitjantjatjara language. The Minyma Kutjara Arts Project is a centre for dynamic and culturally important artwork which brings together contemporary painting techniques and media with ancient visual language and Tjukurpa (Dreaming).

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Lynette Brown Old Model, 2020 metal, plastic, acrylic paint 23 x 34 x 57 cm $976 REV20-111

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lynette brown Lynette Brown was born at Malara, west of Kanpi Community in the APY Lands of South Australia. Her parents were travelling by donkey and camel from Amata towards Mount Davis when Lynette was born. She now lives in Irrunytju (Wingellina) Community and belongs to the Pitjantjatjara language and cultural group. She is the daughter of well-known artist Anmanari Brown, and is a senior artist with the Minyma Kutjara Arts Project. Brown’s sculptural works and painting are narrative-based, telling the stories of life on Country and in community.


"In the early days, the white people came out here in their old model cars. They would drive around looking for people to pick up. There was a big bomb coming and they were taking the people to Warburton Mission so they could be safe. They didn’t want the people to get sick from the bomb." Lynette Brown


Sally Foster Mamu Truck, 2020 metal, plastic, acrylic paint 24 x 27 x 72 cm $1,098 REV20-112

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sally foster Sally Ann Wipana Foster was born in in 1972. Her mother and father are highly respected elders from the Ngaanyatjarra Lands of Western Australia. Foster lives in Irrunytju (Wingellina) Community and belongs to the Pitjantjatjara language and cultural group and is a mid-career artist with the Minyma Kutjara Arts Project. Foster is an innovative artist who works across a variety of mediums. The narratives in her works include stories of community life and the Country around Irrunytju Community. She also makes tjanpi (grass) sculpture and carves punu (wood) artefacts.


Roma Peterman Butler Minyma Kutjara truck, 2020 metal, plastic, acrylic paint 24 x 27 x 72 cm $1,098 REV20-113

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roma peterman butler Yangyangkari (Roma Peterman) Nyutjangka Butler was born in 1959 at Wilu rockhole on the kanyala (euro kangaroo) tjukurpa track. She spent her early years at Ernabella mission in South Australia before travelling by camel to Warburton in Western Australia, where she went to school and learnt to read and write. Yangyangkari now lives in Irrunytju, her grandfather’s brother’s Country where she is a senior artist for Minyma Kutjara Arts Project. She also works with Ngaanyatjarra Media presenting a radio program of local music and news. Yangyangkai was taught to paint and tell tjukurpa (stories) by the minyma pampa (old women), especially Kuntjil Cooper. She also practices traditional cultural activities including hunting and gathering bush foods, singing and dancing inma (ceremony), and works with tjanpi (grass). MINYMA KUTJARA ARTS PROJECT | 109


"I called this car Joyrider because it takes me everywhere, swimming, out bush, funerals, Pipalyatjara and Kalka; to all my favourite places." Maureen Nelson


Maureen Nelson Joyrider, 2020 metal, plastic, acrylic paint 26 x 32 x 74 cm $1,098 REV20-114

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maureen nelson Maureen Tjalumi Nelson was born in Amata in 1973 and now lives in Irrunytju, Wingellina Community in Western Australia. An emerging artist of Minyma Kutjara Arts Project, Nelson works in both sculpture and painting to tell stories of her local community and Country. She belongs to the Pitantjara language and cultural group and is the eldest daughter of Rene Nelson, a senior artist with exceptional bush skills.

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Image: Malcolm Jungine and Leon Jorda bring the Wandjina's under shelter after the first rains of the Kimberley. Photography courtesy of Mowanjum Art and Culture Centre


mowanjum aboriginal art & culture centre, derby curtis barunga malcolm jungine Mowanjum is a creative hub for the Worrorra, Ngarinyin and Wunumbal tribes, who make up the Mowanjum Community outside Derby, Western Australia. These three language groups are united by their belief in the Wandjina as a sacred spiritual force and the creators of the land. They are the custodians of Wandjina law and iconography. The centre hosts exhibitions, workshops and community projects, as well as the annual Mowanjum Festival, one of Australia’s longest running indigenous cultural festivals.

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Curtis Barunga Wandjina and Ungud, 2019 acrylic on canvas 60 x 60 cm $590 REV20-115

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curtis barunga Curtis Barunga is the third child in his family and the son of Gordon Barunga who is a senior artist at the Mowanjum Art and Culture Centre. In turn, he’s the grandson of the renowned and highly respected Albert Barunga, an Elder and community leader of the Worrorra people at ‘old’ Mowanjum. Barunga was born in Derby and grew up out in Mowanjum watching his father and the other elders painting and learning about the Wandjina that represents the three tribes of his community. He is Worrorra from his father’s side and Ngarinyin from his mother’s side. Barunga now lives in Derby with his own family and is an emerging artist who paints his traditional culture in a distinctive contemporary style. He also regularly participates in the annual Mowanjum Festival, helping the old people sing and dance Junba.


Curtis Barunga Rimmijbudda and Ungud, 2019 acrylic on canvas 60 x 60 cm $590 REV20-116

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Curtis Barunga Wandjinas, 2019 acrylic on canvas 45 x 45 cm $400 REV20-117

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Curtis Barunga Three Tribes, 2019 acrylic on canvas 30 x 60 cm $370 REV20-118

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Malcolm Jungine Wandjina and Ungud, 2019 acrylic on canvas 30 x 60 cm $370 REV20-119

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malcolm jungine Malcolm Jungine was born in Derby and is the second eldest of his siblings. In his early years Jungine grew up out on Gibb River Station with his father and mother, and all the families that lived there. Later his parents and siblings moved to Mowanjum. Malcolm is Ngarinyin from both sides of his parents and has grown up knowing the stories of the Wandjinas of the three tribes; the Worrorra, Ngarinyin and Wunumbul. He was taught culture and law from his elders and is now an emerging artist at the Mowanjum Art and Culture Centre. He positions landscapes behind traditional cultural images bringing a depth that distinguishes his work within the Centre. Besides painting Malcolm loves to draw and is a keen and enthusiastic ďŹ sherman and football player.


"The Wandjina is the creator spirit that belongs to us (the Wororra, Ngarinyin and Wunumbul people). He is the one that created everything, he also gave us our culture, law and songs and even the Dreaming of each child before they are born." Malcolm Jungine


Image: Nagula Jarndu artists and staff at their Revealed Art Market stall in 2019. Left to right: Leweenah Smith, Eunice Yu, Maxine Charlie and Lyn Yu-Mackay


nagula jarndu women’s art & resource centre, broome nikita drummond amanda rose lee Nagula Jarndu was established in 1987 as an indigenous women’s resource centre by Yawuru women. As an arts and textiles business, training is offered to artists across screen printing and dressmaking and producing fabrics for clothing and home wares. The organisation gives Aboriginal women the opportunity to produce distinctive hand crafted textiles and textile products with motifs and colours sourced from the unique Broome landscape.


Nikita Drummond Bush Passionfruit, 2019 3 colour block print on silk 300 x 137 cm $549 REV20-120

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nikita drummond Nikita Drummond is a Yawuru woman from Broome who spent her childhood years between Broome and South Hedland. Drummond’s artworks reflect her connection to Country and culture though flora and fauna, and the unique natural environment of the Kimberley and Pilbara regions.


Nikita Drummond Magabala Buru (Bush Banana on Pindan), 2019 2 colour block print on silk 300 x 137 cm $549 REV20-121

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Nikita Drummond Spinifex, 2019 3 colour block print on silk 300 x 137 cm $549 REV20-122

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Amanda Rose Lee Nagula (Saltwater) Gurlibil (Turtle), 2020 2 colour block print on silk 300 x 137 cm $549 REV20-123

amanda rose lee A Yawuru woman living in Broome, Amanda Rose Lee’s artworks are inspired by the land, sea and stories from her elders. She loves fishing, hunting, gathering and being on Country, as this is part of her Yawuru heritage.

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Amanda Rose Lee Nagula, 2020 1 colour block print on silk 300 x 137 cm $549 REV20-124

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Amanda Rose Lee Gujurra Jurru (2 snakes), 2019 2 colour block print on silk 300 x 137 cm $549 REV20-125

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Image: Cassaria Young-Hogan. Photograph courtesy of Ninuku Arts Community


ninuku arts, kalka community selinda davidson judy miller rita watson cassaria young-hogan Ninuku Arts supports artists from two communities - Pipalyatjara and Kalka. Each have populations of around 100-150 Anangu people and the majority are Pitjantjatjara speakers – Anangu means ‘people’ in Pitjantjatjara. Both communities are located in the far north western corner of South Australia, near the tri-state border of South Australia, Western Australia and Northern Territory. The art centre prides itself on its inclusivity by providing opportunities for all generations and embracing individuality in artists.

KALKA COMMUNITY


Selinda Davidson Walka Wiru, 2020 blown glass 26 x 19.5 x 19.5 cm $1,120 REV20-126

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selinda davidson Selinda was born in 1994 in Alice Springs where she went to primary school. As a teenager she moved to Irruntyju and then Pipalyatjara. After Davidson finished school she became a member of Ninuku Arts Centre painting regularly as well as working as an arts worker. Davidson works alongside her grandparents Jimmy Donagan and Molly Miller at Ninuku Arts and has learnt from them how to paint tjukurpa (Dreamtime), translating stories into her designs and traditional mark-making. Her family’s Country is in Warburton in Western Australia and she speaks both Pitjantjatjara and English.


Selinda Davidson Walka Wiru, 2020 blown glass 26 x 19.5 x 19.5 cm $1,120 REV20-127

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Judy Miller Ngayuku Ngurtjuku Ngurra, 2020 acrylic on canvas 122 x 91 cm $2,200 REV20-128

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judy miller Judy Miller was born in 1964 in Amata, a remote community in South Australia. Her mother is Molly Nampitjin Miller, the founding director of Ninuku Arts Centre. During the 1970s and the Homeland Movement, the family moved to Pipalyatjara before moving to Kalka. Today, Judy continues to live in Kalka with her family. Like many other Anangu women, Judy has learnt skills in punu (wood carving and burning) and tjanpi (grass weaving), where she has proven to be extremely proficient. Her paintings often depict designs associated with Kungkarrakalpa Tjukurpa (the Seven Sisters Dreamtime story) and her bush tucker knowledge. Judy is an extremely dedicated artist and key member of Ninuku Arts Centre where she also works as both a retail assistant and arts worker.


Judy Miller Ngayuku Ngurtjuku Ngurra, 2020 acrylic on canvas 122 x 91 cm $2,200 REV20-129

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Rita Watson Ilrupa, 2019 acrylic on canvas 122 x 91 cm $1,740 REV20-130

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rita watson Rita Watson was born in 1964 in Warburton, a remote community in Western Australia. She is the daughter of renowned Irrunytju artist, Tjuruparu Watson. During her younger years she spent a lot of time travelling across the NPY Lands, particularly between Irrunytju and Amata. Today she lives in Kalka with her husband. As an artist Rita is extremely passionate, dedicated and hard-working. Her artworks are heavily influenced by her father’s Country, Illurpa, from which she paints striking, iconographic designs using a combination of soft, feminine colours with bold graphics.


Rita Watson Ilrupa, 2020 blown glass 23 x 18 x 18 cm $1,940 REV20-131

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Rita Watson Ilrupa, 2020 blown glass 23 x 18.5 x 18.5 cm $1,940 REV20-132

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Cassaria Young-Hogan Bush Trip, 2020 acrylic on canvas 122 x 122 cm $1,440 REV20-133

cassaria young-hogan Cassaria Young-Hogan was born is Alice Springs. Her mother is Susan Young. Young-Hogan grew up in Kalka Community and attended school in Pipalyatjara. She has two sisters and now lives with the Young family in Pipalyatjara Community.

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Cassaria Young-Hogan Tjukulua Tjuta, 2020 blown glass 24 x 22 x 22 cm $1,120 REV20-134

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Cassaria Young-Hogan Bush trip, 2020 blown glass 18 x 17 x 17 cm $960 REV20-135

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Image: Lorna Dawson painting Champagne Glass. Photograph courtesy of Spinifex Hill Artists. Page 144


spinifex hill artists, port hedland lorna dawson gideon gardiner Spinifex Hill Studio is located in South Hedland on Kariyarra Country in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Established in 2008, it is home to one of the youngest Aboriginal art collectives in the north west of Australia. Spinifex Hill Studio works with artists from many different language groups and is renowned for showcasing contemporary works across a breadth of styles.


Lorna Dawson Watching the ships come in, 2020 acrylic on canvas 31 x 41 cm $580 REV20-139

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lorna dawson Lorna Dawson was born in Port Hedland and raised in Perth. She returned to Port Hedland in her teenage years and is the mother to four children, and a sister to fourteen siblings. She describes the reason for her starting painting as a personal journey, “I picked up a few skewers (used for dot paintings) and it helped me get through my bad days. I just paint in dots. I dabble in dots as I like to say. Sometimes I paint animals. Sometimes I paint the Country.�


Lorna Dawson Port Hedland Salt, 2020 acrylic on canvas 31 x 41 cm $580 REV20-140

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Lorna Dawson Champagne Glass, 2019 acrylic on canvas 46 x 36 cm $650 REV20-141

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Gideon Gardiner Annunciation, 2018 copic marker on paper (framed) 42 x 60 cm $280 REV20-142

gideon gardiner Gideon Gardiner is the son of Spinifex Hill artists Nyaparu (William) Gardiner and Kae Nalgood, and comes from a family where both his sisters and brother also love to paint. Gardiner started drawing in the Spinifex Hill studio in 2017 and is also a successful guitarist who plays in rock bands.

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Gideon Gardiner Agreement, 2018 copic marker on paper (framed) 57 x 77 cm $520 REV20-143

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Gideon Gardiner Rainbow Serpent, 2019 copic marker on paper (framed) 42 x 60 cm $280 REV20-144

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“I was watching dad doing his paintings of his life and that inspired me… I’m still going on a journey through life but I like to draw all my memories and my experiences of hunting and lore and initiation…” Gideon Gardiner


Gideon Gardiner Learning to break a horse, 2019 copic marker on paper (framed) 42 x 60 cm $280 REV20-145

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Image: Jennifer Mitchell collecting grass with an axe. Photograph courtesy of Tjanpi Desert Weavers


tjanpi desert weavers, alice springs judith yinyika chambers nora nginana davidson janet forbes joyce deandra james paula sarkaway lyons

jennifer mitchell eliza munroe winifred reid amy yilpi

Tjanpi Desert Weavers is a social enterprise of the Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yakunytjatjara (NPY) Women’s Council, working with women in the remote Central and Western Desert regions who earn an income from contemporary fibre art. Tjanpi (meaning grass in Pitjantjatjara language) represents over 400 Anangu and Yarnangu women artists from 26 remote communities on the NPY lands. While out collecting grass, women are also able to spend time on Country and maintain their culture through gathering food, hunting, performing inma (cultural song and dance), and teaching their children.

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A | Judith Yinyika Chambers Pinytjataarn, 2019 tjanpi (wild harvested grass), raffia, wire 2 x 70 x 50 cm $660 sold REV20-146

B | Nora Nginana Davidson Broom-Broom-pa, 2019 tjanpi (wild harvested grass), raffia, wire 2x 75 x 45 cm $495 sold REV20-147 D

C | Janet Forbes Camp Papa, 2019 tjanpi (wild harvested grass), raffia, wire 2 x 85 x 50 cm $396 sold REV20-148

D | Joyce Deandra James Yellow Pinytjataarn, 2019 tjanpi (wild harvested grass), raffia, wire 2 x 59 x 54 cm $462 REV20-149

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E | Joyce Deandra James Kamurlpas, 2019 tjanpi (wild harvested grass), raffia, wire 2 x 58 x 68 cm $478.50 REV20-150

G | Jennifer Mitchell Stumpy Pinytjataarn, 2019 tjanpi (wild harvested grass), raffia, wipya (emu feathers), wire 2 x 90 x 55 cm $478.50 sold REV20-152

H | Eliza Munroe Kamurlpa, 2019 tjanpi (wild harvested grass), raffia, wire 2 x 55 x 56 cm $363 REV20-153

I | Winifred Reid Ninu, 2019 tjanpi (wild harvested grass), raffia, wire 2 x 70 x 65 cm $462 sold REV20-154

J | Paula Sarkaway Lyons Wipiya Tjulpu, 2019 tjanpi (wild harvested grass), raffia, wipya (emu feathers), wire 2 x 70 x 50 cm $495 sold REV20-155

K | Amy Yilpi Toyota, 2019 tjanpi (wild harvested grass), raffia, wire 2 x 61 x 39 cm $462 REV20-156

F | Joyce Deandra James Kamurlpas, 2019 tjanpi (wild harvested grass), raffia, wire 2 x 58 x 88 cm $594 sold REV20-151

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judith yinyika chambers

joyce deandra james

Judith Yinyika Chambers was born in the bush at a place called Mika near Jameson Community in 1958. Chambers’ mother was well-known Tjanpi artist and painter Carol Maatja Golding and her father was Billy Golding. Chambers went to school at the Warburton Mission and later at Docker River. Once she finished school she began working with Ngaanyatjarra Health. She later married and had three sons. Judith now lives in the remote community of Warakurna, Western Australia, 1700 kilometres north-east of Perth with a population of approximately 200 Ngaanyatjarra people. As such, Chamber’s is fluent in both Ngaanyatjarra and English. She is an accomplished weaver, making both baskets and fibre sculptures from desert grasses that grow close to her home in Warakurna. Chambers is renowned for her flat sculptural works which tell stories of ancestral figures and the Ngaanyatjarra Lands, both historical and contemporary. She draws inspiration from the animals of her Country, including camp dogs, birds, goannas, porcupines and rabbits. Chambers also paints with Warakurna Artists.

Joyce Deandra James is a young woman living in Warakurna, Western Australia. Born in Laverton, James spent her childhood between Kaltukatjara (Docker River) in Northern Territory and Warakurna. She grew up watching her grandmother, esteemed artist Tjuakpa James, making tjanpi. She is now married to the son of senior Tjanpi artist Dianne Golding and has been making tjanpi baskets and sculptures since 2018.

paula sarkaway lyons

Nora Nginana Davidson was born at Multju near Mantamaru (Jameson) in Western Australia. Today she lives with her family at and her family hold the story for Ilurrpa.

Born in Kalgoorlie, Western Australia in 1980, Paula Lyons, also known by her bush name Sarkaway, spent her early years in Papulankutja, travelling with her mother, Edith Lyons, from whom she learnt about her Ngaanyatjarra culture, heritage and language. She later went to school in Papulankuja, where she learnt her second language, English. With her formal education completed Lyons stayed in Papulankutja working in the community school and raising her young daughter Neisha. Lyons has been involved with Tjanpi since she was a young woman, being one of the artists who created the Tjanpi Toyota that won the 2005 Telstra Art Awards. More recently she was one of the artists involved in making Kungkarrangkalnga-ya Parrpakanu (Seven sisters are flying) exhibited at the National Museum of Australia (2017).

janet forbes

jennifer mitchell

Janet Forbes is a Ngaanyatjarra woman from Papulankutja (Blackstone) Community which lies 100 kilometres west of the Western Australian, Northern Territory and South Australian borders. Forbes was born in 1962 at Warburton Mission. Her father was Nyunma from Tawulbalyana, a very famous Traditional Owner for the region around Papulankutja, and her mother, Yuminiya, was from Waltjatjara near Blackstone. Forbes’ mother was a very strong woman who was involved with initiating the Ngaanyatjarra Council and worked with NPY Women’s Council. After attending the mission and school at Warburton, Forbes later moved to Norseman where she married Craig Morrison and had three children. She currently paints at Papulankutja Artists, where her works often depict the nganur (bush turkey) story or the papulankutja (two lizards) stories. Janet learnt to make baskets from her older sister Ruby Reid and was taught to make artefacts by her mother. More recently she has taken to making tjanpi sculptures with great enthusiasm.

Jennifer Mitchell was born near Irrunytju Community at Kala Tjuti in approximately 1950. She travelled all across the NPY lands with her mother during her childhood, and was near Maralinga during the rocket testing in the fifties. During that time she and her family had to hide in their shelters. Her grandfather became ill from the radioactive smoke and later died and was buried at Oodnadaa, South Australia. Mitchell has been making baskets since 1995, and both she and her mother, Mrs Woods, have a reputation for creating extremely well crafted and strong baskets. She is also an accomplished sculptor and makes animated dogs and figures out of grass and coloured wools. Mitchell is one of Tjanpi’s chief ambassadors and she works closely with the Tjanpi office and contributes her expertise to numerous areas of the organisation, including the annual Law and Culture camp. She is an erudite public speaker and has represented Tjanpi and presented at regional and national conferences.

nora nginana davidson

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eliza munroe Eliza Munroe was born in Jameson, Western Australia, and moved to her husband’s community of Blackstone where she now resides. She grew up watching her grandmothers Stacia Lewis and Rene Nelson make wonderful tjanpi baskets and is now a talented young artist in her own right. Munroe recently participated in a three-day workshop where she learnt to make the flat sculpture works on display here.

winifred reid Winifred is an artist belonging to the Ngaanyatjarra language and cultural group in Western Australia. Born on the Ngaanyatjarra Lands in 1963, she spent her childhood travelling around with her family. Reid settled in Warakurna in the 1970s during the homeland movement. Here she raised her two children with her husband Clint and in 2017 welcomed her first grandchild. Primarily working with traditional tjanpi materials, including wool, raffia and minarri grass, Ried’s works focus on depicting local desert animals and traditional artefact shapes. She first exhibited with Tjanpi at Desert Mob Exhibition in Alice Springs, Northern Territory (2016) and has since also exhibited at Revealed (2018). Reid is also an accomplished painter represented by Warakurna Artists and punu (wood) carver represented by Maruku Arts.

amy yilpi Amy Yilpi is a Pitjantjatjara woman from Mimili Community, South Australia. She was born in Alice Springs, Northern Territory in 1972 but later returned to Mimili for schooling. Yilpi continues to reside in Mimili with her husband Michael Butler and their three children. As her husband is related to the Butler’s of Warakurna, she regularly travels there for extended periods of time. It was on one of these trips in 2018 that Yipli began to learn to weave from her sister-in-law Ruth Bates. Very quickly, she became both an astute artist and business woman, producing a high volume of wellmade, brightly-coloured animal sculptures. Prior to weaving, Yipli has also been an accomplished painter and punu (wood) carver.

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Image: Tjarlirli artists Dennis Brown, Doreen Bennett, Henry Farmer, Julieanne Farmer and Myra Giles just over the WA border, west of Kaltukatjarra, 2019. Troopy artwork: Carol Giles, Minyma Tjukurla, 2019. Images courtesy of Tjarlirli Art Inc


tjarlirli art, tjukurla nola bennett sally butler adam butler jillian giles myra giles martha protty kanitja henry farmer julieanne farmer Tjarlirli Art Centre represents the artists of Tjukurla in the Ngannyatjarra lands of Western Australia and Kaltukatjara in the Northern Territory. Established in 2006 Tjarlirli Art has been recognised as a source of culturally significant work produced by elders and has many young artists who are keen to carry on in the same traditions. The artwork created at Tjarlirli has strong links with the Papunya Tula movement of the 1970s.

TJUKURLA


Martha Protty Kanitja Kungka Kutjara, 2019 acrylic on canvas 149 x 178 cm $2,400 REV20-157

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martha protty kanitja Martha Protty Kanitja is a senior law woman of the lands extending west of Kaltukatjara. She draws inspiration from the ranges and rockhole system which trace the journey of the two sisters. Kungka Kutjara is significant Tjukurrpa (Dreaming) to all women of the Western Desert. For generations Protty’s family have lived and travelled along the Peterman Ranges. She is respected by all community members as a key elder who holds the knowledge of inma (Ceremony) songs. Her paintings encapsulate the vibrancy and energy Protty experiences in the sharing of sacred stories with the young women who are to inherit the land. She often sings and taps to inma songs while painting, offering a rhythm for her brush.


Sally Butler Minyma Tjukurla, 2019 acrylic on canvas 76 x 102 cm $1,000 REV20-159

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sally butler Sally Butler’s works show the waterholes of Ngamurru, her mother’s ngurra (Country). The desert iconography of tali (sandhills) and kapi (rockhole) has been depicted by Butler with bright and loose expression. Ngamurru is not like a spring – the waterhole dries out after some time. At these waterholes many women would often gather to collect, cook and eat the wanpurru (bush tucker) which grows on the sandhills.

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Sally Butler Wangurnu Sally, 2019 acrylic on canvas 91 x 122 cm $1,400 REV20-160

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Sally Butler Wangurnu Sally, 2019 acrylic on canvas 91 x 122 cm $1,400 REV20-161

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Nola Bennett Irriya Nola, 2019 acrylic on canvas 41 x 56 cm $200 REV20-162

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nola bennett Nola Bennett’s paintings highlight the colours of the bushland after rainfall – the glowing whites and purples of the wildflowers and the rows of tali (sandhills) which are a predominant feature of the desert landscape.


Nola Bennett Irriya Nola, 2019 acrylic on canvas 41 x 76 cm $300 REV20-163

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Adam Butler Kurlkurta Adam, 2019 acrylic on canvas 91 x 122 cm $1,400 REV20-165

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adam butler Adam Butler depicts his father’s Country, the sandhill Country of Kurlkurta which lies to the west of Tjukurla Community. Kurlkurta is the site of Tingarri Tjukurrpa (Dreaming) which is of great significance to the Western Desert and surrounding lands. Butler’s father John Tjakamarra was one of the original Papunya artists. Tjakamarra was instrumental in the homelands movement back to the Ngaanyatjara lands from Papunya to establish the Tjukurla Community. The establishment of water bores from Tjukurla to Kurlkurta by Tjakamarra and his family is honoured in Butler’s painting as it allows for the current and hopefully future generations to continue accessing their sacred homelands.


Kurlkurta is the site of Tingarri Tjukurrpa (Dreaming) which is of great significance to the Western Desert and surrounding lands...

...The establishment of water bores from Tjukurla to Kurlkurta by Tjakamarra and his family is honoured in Butler’s painting as it allows for the current and hopefully future generations to continue accessing their sacred homelands.


Myra Giles Minyma Tjukurla, 2019 acrylic on canvas 122 x 147 cm $2,000 REV20-158

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jillian giles & myra giles Jilian and Myra Giles paint the tjukurpa (Dreamtime) of their mother, a story of two women travelling across the Country east through Tjukurla, dancing and singing. Both of the works shown here for Revealed bring together this story and the memory of their mother. They say, “She has passed away, so now it is our time, our responsibility to paint that story�.


Jillian Giles Minyma Tjukurla, 2019 acrylic on canvas 147 x 147 cm $2,100 REV20-164

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Henry Farmer Ronnie Allen and Brownie, 2019 digital photograph on paper (unframed) 38 x 52 cm $75 REV20-167

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kaltukatjara artists with Henry Farmer and Julieanne Farmer Ngayuku Papa (My Papa) Pira ka Kukalta and Ngayuky Papa is a collaborative artwork and installation by Kaltukatjara artists alongside photographs from Henry Farmer and Julieanne Farmer. The artists say, “Papa’s or ‘Our Dogs’ are important to us. There is special dreaming for them but we can’t share that. Our papa’s keep us company, scare away bad things and help us hunt; they are family. They follow us everywhere – to the shop, to the art centre, everywhere. They chase after us when we drive around, they try to eat their share of our lunch, they sit asleep behind us to feel our company. Sometimes family have other animals like camels or horses as pets”.


Julieanne Farmer Caring and Playing – Joy, Casey and Lara, 2019 digital photograph on paper (unframed) 38 x 52 cm $75 REV20-168

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Image: Marcia Ashwin, Bush Food, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 68 x 80 cm. Page 174


tjukurba art gallery, wiluna margaret anderson marcia ashwin Located in Wiluna, 440km south of Newman, Tjukurba is translated from Martu to mean “Dreaming�. The gallery provides local artists with the space to dream and embrace creativity. Artists draw inspiration from the stunning landscape in the region that can be seen along the Canning Stock Route and Gunbarrel Highway. Local artists are also inspired by their own experiences and memories from places like the clay pans, at rock holes such as North Pool and Bowanoo, as well as the local bush foods and wildflowers.

WILUNA


Margaret Anderson Martu Woman gathering Wookutu (Honey Ants), 2020 acrylic on canvas 194 x 73 cm $4,000 REV20-169

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margaret anderson Margaret Anderson was born in Mt Magnet, attending Wiluna and Karalundi Schools in her primary years, then various schools in her secondary years. She returned to Wiluna to work, spending some time at the Desert Gold farm picking oranges and the Emu Farm. Anderson began painting with the establishment of the Tjukurba Gallery in 2007. Her works often depict gathering bush tucker on her Country.


Marcia Ashwin Echidna and Honey Ants, 2019 acrylic on canvas 45 x 65 cm $2,500 REV20-170

marcia ashwin Marcia Ashwin was born in Perth but has lived all her life in Wiluna. She has a daughter and likes to spend time in the bush. She started painting in 2000 and her works often depict the echidna (porcupines), the Canning Stock Route and bush tucker.

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Marcia Ashwin Bush Food, 2019 acrylic on canvas 68 x 80 cm $1,500 REV20-171

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Marcia Ashwin Quandong, 2019 acrylic on canvas 62 x 43 cm $1,200 REV20-172

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“When one dreams of a porcupine in the forest, this is representative of the need for the dreamer to get out into the forest and to connect with the creatures there for the purpose of finding grounding... When one dreams that they are the porcupine, this is a sign that the dreamer is on the defensive and wishes to find comfort in being able to trust those around them‌â€? Marcia Ashwin


Marcia Ashwin Porcupine Dreaming, 2019 acrylic on canvas 121 x 91 cm $4,500 REV20-173

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Image: Cliff Samson, Bush Medicine, 2020 acrylic on canvas, 89 x 53 cm. Page 180


wangaba roebourne art group, roebourne dinah injie cliff samson kathy samson Located in WA’s north west, Wangaba Roebourne Art Group represents Ngarluma, Yindjibarndi, Guruma, Banjyima, Marthuthunira and Torres Strait Islander artists. Artists paint their stories – from “when the world was soft” before creation, to contemporary pieces reflecting the reality of life today in one of the country’s most remote and toughest places to live.

ROEBOURNE


Cliff Samson Bush Medicine, 2020 acrylic on canvas 89 x 53 cm $2,000 REV20-137

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cliff samson Cliff Samson is an artist currently living in Roebourne. Samson started art making when his sister Loreen invited him to come into the Roebourne Art Centre. He joins both his mother Violet and sister Kathy as practicing artists. His works are influenced by bush life, his Country, wildflowers and traditional medicines. He says, “I am a new artist and a strong artist, and like to carry my culture too; sometimes I paint my culture stories�.


“My artwork is where my heart is, the bush life and seeing the Country that I love in my spirit. I am a new artist and a strong artist, and I carry my culture.� Cliff Samson


Dinah Injie Bush Fire, 2020 acrylic on canvas 80 x 89 cm $1,500 REV20-136

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dinah injie Dinah Injie is a Yinjibarndi woman from Roebourne. She paints works about the jirriwi, the bala munda, her Country and totems.


Kathy Samson Ngarluma Country, 2020 acrylic on canvas 84 x 84 cm $3,000 REV20-138

kathy samson Kathy Samson is a Ngarluma woman who was born in Roebourne in 1964. She paints works about the Ngarluma seaside and the coast line. Her works reference seasonal bush tucker and seeds known across the lands of the Ngarluma people.

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Image: Eunice Porter and Elaine Lane painting at Warmun. Photograph courtesy of Warakurna Artists


warakurna & kayili artists, warakurna donald ferguson elaine lane freida lane Warakurna is an art centre located in the Ngaanyatjarra Lands, approximately 330km from Uluru near the borders of Western Australia and the Northern Territory. Established in 2005, Warakurna Artists offers men and women, young and old, the opportunity to paint and share Tjukurrpa (traditional law and culture) and contemporary stories. Passing on these important stories to young people is a critical means of keeping culture vital and strong. Paintings produced at Warakurna are vibrant and diverse, reflecting each artist’s unique style, stories and connection to Country.

WARAKURNA


Donald Ferguson Caterpillar Dreaming, 2019 acrylic on canvas 76 x 31 cm $280 REV20-174

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donald ferguson Donald Ferguson is a resident at Wanarn Aged Care, and participates in the Painting Therapy Program Warakurna Artists runs once a week at the centre. Ferguson is a man from Irrunytju (Wingellina) and paints the caterpillar dreaming, also known as the badi (witchetty grub) dreaming, and the Country of Antara. Before moving to Wanarn, he was a practicing pastor. Ferguson is a very passionate painter and is very proud to pass his important stories on for future generations.


Donald Ferguson is a man from Irrunytju (Wingellina) and he paints tjukurrpa (Dreaming) connected to his country. This painting depicts an important caterpillar dreaming, but nothing more can be said.


Donald Ferguson Caterpillar Dreaming, 2019 acrylic on canvas 38 x 51 cm $230 REV20-175

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Freida Lane Tjukurla Pirni (Many Rockholes), 2019 acrylic on canvas 51 x 51 cm $345 REV20-176

freida lane Freida Lane is an artist originally from Blackstone now residing in Wanarn with her sister Elaine Lane.

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Freida Lane Tjukurla Pirni (Many Rockholes), 2019 acrylic on canvas 31 x 51 cm $180 REV20-177

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Freida Lane Tjukurla Pirni (Many Rockholes), 2019 acrylic on canvas 39 x 51 cm $230 REV20-178

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Elaine Lane Papulankutja Dreaming, 2019 acrylic on canvas 76 x 102 cm $1,925 REV20-179

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elaine lane Elaine Lane is a senior artist from Papulankutja Community who paints with Warakurna Artists through the Painting Therapy Program run once weekly out of Wanarn Aged Care. Lane paints about the Country around Blackstone. She is the sister of renowned artists Jimmy Donegan and Mary Pantjiti McLean.


Elaine Lane Papulankutja Dreaming, 2019 acrylic on canvas 38 x 76 cm $725 REV20-180

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Elaine Lane Papulankutja Dreaming, 2019 acrylic on canvas 76 x 38 cm $725 REV20-181

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Elaine Lane Papulankutja Dreaming, 2020 acrylic on canvas 51 x 102 cm $1,275 REV20-182

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Image: Delany Griffiths at work. Photography courtesy of Waringarri Aborignal Arts


waringarri aboriginal arts, kununurra delany griffiths nathan thomas Waringarri Arts is located in the Kimberley region and is one of the oldest continuously operating art centres in Australia. The centre operates artists’ studios and galleries, and supports more than 100 artists as painters, printmakers, wood carvers, boab engravers, sculptors and textile artists. Â

KUNUNURRA


“I like working and painting. I like to spend time with my family... I will keep painting and printing textiles and keep learning the stories from my grandparents.� Delany Griffiths


Delany Griffiths Goorrdim and Woorrilbem, 2020 natural pigment on canvas 45 x 45 cm $264 REV20-196

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delany griffiths Delany Griffiths was born in Broome and spent most of her life living in Kununurra and Wyndham. She began painting in 2008 and within her short artistic career she has proved herself to be a highly skilled artist. Griffiths has been taught and mentored by her grandfather, senior artist Alan Griffiths and grandmother Peggy Griffiths. Alan is a respected law and culture man for both his traditional Country near Timber Creek and for Miriwoong culture in Kununurra. Peggy has an arts career spanning 25 years throughout which she has exhibited widely. Delany Griffith’s art practice involves ochre painting, ceramics and textiles. In recent years she has developed a successful career in textile printing.Â

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Delany Griffiths Goorrdim and Woorrilbem, 2020 natural pigment on canvas 45 x 45 cm $264 REV20-197

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Delany Griffiths Goorrdim and Woorrilbem, 2020 natural pigment on canvas 45 x 45 cm $264 REV20-198

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Delany Griffiths Goorrdim and Woorrilbem, 2020 natural pigment on canvas 45 x 45 cm $264 REV20-199

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Nathan Thomas King Brown Snake, 2020 carved and burned ironwood 16 x 110 x 7 cm $1,850 REV20-200

nathan thomas Nathan Thomas was born and raised in Halls Creek. His grandmother, Lorna Thomas, was an artist at Warmun who inspired him to paint and create artworks since he was a young boy. His grandfather too made artefacts and animal sculptures from wood. Both these influences are seen in his arts practice. Thomas works across wood carving, boab nut painting, painting on canvas and drawing. Most recently he has become involved in animation at Waringarri Arts which he finds both interesting and different.

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Nathan Thomas Rock Pigeon, 2019 Engraved boab nut 6 x 10 x 8 cm $90 REV20-201

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Nathan Thomas Freshwater Black Bream, 2020 Engraved boab nut 6 x 17 x 7 cm $90 REV20-202

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Image: Vincent Nanala painting at Balgo. Photograph courtesy of Warlayirti Artists


warlayirti artists, balgo amanda lewis dulcie nanala vincent nanala Warlayirti Artists is located in the community of Wirrimanu (Balgo) in the south east Kimberley. With a reputation for vibrant colour, bold brush strokes and distinctly individual art works, Warlayirti Artists represents more than 200 artists across the three communities in the Kutjungka region - Kururrungka (Billiluna), Mulan and Wirramanu (Balgo).

BALGO


Amanda Lewis Mina Mina, 2019 acrylic on canvas 120 x 80 cm $1,800 REV20-183

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amanda lewis Amanda Lewis is an emerging artist with Warlayirti Artists, having only begun painting in the last 18 months. Already in this short time she has developed her own complex and distinctive practice.


Amanda Lewis Mina Mina, 2019 acrylic on canvas 120 x 80 cm $1,800 REV20-184

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Dulcie Nanala Karlyapilyirra, 2019 acrylic on canvas 120 x 65 cm $1,350 REV20-185

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dulcie nanala Dulcie Nanala has been painting with Warlayirti Artists for many years. In the last 12 months she has developed a new way of working which integrates many different painterly techniques.


Dulcie Nanala Karlyapilyirra, 2019 acrylic on canvas 120 x 65 cm $1,350 REV20-186

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“Snake coming. He saw people and kids dancing. Women and men dancing around the camp fire. Dancing and making a big noise, and he was looking at them. He ate them. Whole lot. He bin eat them all. After that his tummy get bigger and bigger and they were tickling him. After he bin spit the whole lot of them out, vomit them up. Some came out his mouth and some came out his arse. And they were still dancing.” This is Vincent Nanala’s fathers Country called Marua, a long way south of Balgo this side of Kiwirrkurra.


Vincent Nanala Marua, 2019 acrylic on linen 152 x 102 cm $3,200 REV20-187

vincent nanala Vincent Nanala is the son of renowned Warlayirti artist Ningie Nanala and Tjumpo Tjapanangka (deceased). Learning his optical desert paintings from his father, he paints in the distinctive Pintupi style.

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Image: Madeleine Purdie holding Warrambany of Warmun. Photograph courtesy of Warmun Art Centre. Page 223


warmun art centre, warmun marika mung eddie nulgit madelene purdie Warmun Art Centre is located in a small community of the same name in the Kimberley region of northern Western Australia. Warmun is owned and governed by the Gija people. The centre was established in 1998 by the late founding members of the contemporary painting movement in Warmun, such as Rover Thomas, Queenie McKenzie, Madigan Thomas and Hector Jandany, so they could support, maintain and promote Gija art, language and culture.

WARMUN


Marika Mung Sand Goanna Dreaming, 2019 natural ochre and pva adhesive on canvas 180 x 90 cm $2,750 REV20-188

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marika mung Marika Mung is a young Warmun painter who lives in Frog Hollow. She is the youngest daughter of renowned Warmun artist Beerbee Mungnari. Mungnari was Mung’s teacher and mentor and she paints the Country her father mustered cattle through as a young man. Mung’s traditional Country on her mother’s side is Texas Downs which she often visits. She knows many Ngarranggarni (Dreaming) stories from Texas Country which she takes as subjects for her paintings. Mung is one of Warmun’s talented emerging artists.


Marika Mung Purnululu, 2019 natural ochre and pva adhesive on canvas 90 x 100 cm $1,720 REV20-189

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Eddie Nulgit Warranany and Wanggarnal Ngarranggarni, 2019 natural ochre and pva adhesive on canvas 70 x 90 cm $416 REV20-190

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eddie nulgit Eddie Nulgit is Charlene Carrington’s son. He is one of a group of very young Warmun artists who currently attends Ngalangangpum Community School in Warmun. Like his sister April, Nulgit has taken to painting only recently but has natural talent. Nulgit has been told many of the Ngarrangkarni stories associated with his family’s Country. He has also been taught the techniques of ochre painting by his great grandmother, Bey Carrington, and great grandfather, Hector Jandany.


Eddie Nulgit Three Wise Men, 2019 natural ochre, acrylic pigment and pva adhesive on canvas 120 x 120 cm $773 REV20-191

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Eddie Nulgit Three Wise Men, 2020 natural ochre and pva adhesive on canvas 100 x 100 cm $732 REV20-192

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Madelene Purdie Violet Valley Ngarranggarni, 2019 natural ochre, acrylic paint and pva adhesive on canvas 100 x 80 cm $535 REV20-193

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madelene purdie Madelene Purdie was born in Wyndham. She attended Ngalangangpum Primary School in Warmun and completed her secondary education in Broome. Until recently, Purdie worked at Werra Werra Daam, the Warmun Women’s Centre. Purdie takes her traditional Country as the subject of her paintings including her mother, Shirley Purdie’s Country. She also paints Ngarrangkarni stories from her grandmother and grandfather’s Country in Norton Bore, Violet Valley and Argyle. She continues to paint the Ngarrangkarni stories told to her by her older family members. Puride is also an accomplished carver and makes bird sculptures from boab nuts and jarlalu wood.

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Madelene Purdie Kangaroo Rock Dreaming, 2020 natural ochre, acrylic paint and pva adhesive on canvas 120 x 120 cm $773 REV20-194

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Madelene Purdie Warrambany of Warmun, 2020 natural ochre, acrylic paint and pva adhesive on linen 90 x 90 cm $535 REV20-195

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Image: Laurie Little, Spiritual Dreaming in the Sky, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 76 x 126 cm. Page 226


wirnda barna art centre, mount magnet laurie little margaret simpson Wirnda Barna Art Centre is located in Mount Magnet and managed by the Badimia Land Aboriginal Corporation. The centre supports and represents Aboriginal artists from Badimia and Wajarri Country based in Mount Magnet and Yalgoo. Wirnda Barna offers a creative environment where artists can meet and work together to share skills and knowledge, connect with their language and culture, and generate income through the sale of their artworks.

MOUNT MAGNET


Laurie Little Spiritual Dreaming in the Sky, 2020 acrylic on canvas 76 x 126 cm $900 REV20-203

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laurie little Laurie Little was born in Perth and is currently living in Mount Magnet with his partner and children. He started painting in 2013 and his works reference the vast landscapes and skies of his home.


Margaret Simpson Murgoo Homestead, 2020 acrylic on canvas 91 x 91 cm $2,260 REV20-204

margaret simpson Margaret Simpson was born in Mullewa, Western Australia in the 1950s. She is an Aboriginal woman of the Wadjarri people of the Mid-west region where she has lived most of her life. In 2002 she moved to Yalgoo, where most of her family live, in 2002. She has four sisters, four brothers, six daughters, nineteen grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren. Simpson completed a Certificate III in Art and is supported as an artist by the Yagu, the local women’s art group and by Wirnda Barna Art Centre. Simpson is the current Artist in Residence at the Yalgoo Arts and Cultural Centre.

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Image: Roni Jones, Wetj Nyininy, 2020, ceramic, emu feathers, 20 x 30 x 20 cm. Page 230


yamaji art, geraldton roni jones Yamaji Art is an emerging Aboriginal art centre in Geraldton, in Western Australia’s mid-west. Yamaji represents artists from more than five cultural groups from the region; Amangu, Nhanagardi, Naaguja, Badimaya, Wajarri, Wilunyu. As a contemporary urban based art centre, they also represent other Aboriginal artists currently residing in the Geraldton region, including Nyoongar, Yinggarda and Ngaanyatjarra artists. Artworks from Yamaji have a focus on sustaining culture, with works produced in a variety of mediums including painting, textiles, weaving, print-making, design and performance.


Roni Jones Wetj Nyininy, 2020 ceramic, emu feathers 20 x 30 x 20 cm $259.20 REV20-205

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roni jones Roni is an emerging artist who also works as a Manager of Yamaji Art Centre. Having worked primarily in various government roles full time, as well as raising a family, she is only just now ďŹ nding time to explore her arts practice. Jones favours three-dimensional works such as weaving, installations and public art, as well as painting and street art. She draws inspiration from her love for her family and current issues impacting Aboriginal people in Australia.


Roni Jones TBC, 2020 ceramic, beadwork 3 x 16 x 3 cm $158.40 REV20-206

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Image: Nina Smith, Bush Potato Gulya (Bamjima), 2020, acrylic on canvas, 45 x 61 cm, Page 236


yinjaa barni art, roebourne dawn sandy nina smith Yinjaa-Barni Art is located in Roebourne and consists of a group of artists that predominantly belong to the Yindjibarndi language group and whose ancestral homelands are around the Millstream Tablelands in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. While Yinjaa-Barni artists have strong individual styles, all share the common desire to depict what is dear to their hearts – their Country, their culture and the plant life that is typical of their region.

ROEBOURNE


Dawn Sandy Running Rivers, 2020 acrylic on canvas 91 x 99 cm $3,900 REV20-207

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dawn sandy Dawn Sandy was born in Roebourne in 1976 and is the daughter of Yindjibarndi artist, Celia Sandy. She started painting at the end of 2006 with the Yinjaa-Barni Art group and has completed a TAFE short course in painting and design. Sandy is a confident artist whose ideas flow freely and easily on to the canvas; she is naturally gifted in design and has a sure sense of colour. The inspiration for her paintings comes from spending time on her Country at different times of the year. Within her works you can see the rich colours of rocks, the river and bush flowers. She mostly paints from an aerial perspective and has developed a number of styles to depict her various subjects. Sandy most enjoys painting alongside her family and friends.


Dawn Sandy Pilbara Hills, 2019 acrylic on canvas 33 x 92 cm $1,586 REV20-208

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Nina Smith Bush Potato Gulya (Bamjima), 2020 acrylic on canvas 45 x 61 cm $979 REV20-209

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nina smith Nina Smith was born in Wittenoom in 1961 and lived there until she was five. She then moved to join her parents, older brothers and sisters in Roebourne and has lived there ever since. Smith started painting in the first half of 2010 and has since this time been a frequent visitor to YinjaaBarni Art, often experimenting with a variety of techniques and colours. The subjects she paints are based on her personal history, including childhood memories of collecting bush potatoes, honey ants and other bush foods with her mother, a well-respected elder. Smith’s works also often depict native medicine plants from her home Country around Wittenoom and Tom Price.


The subjects she (Nina) paints are based on her personal history, including childhood memories of collecting bush potatoes, honey ants and other bush foods with her mother, a well-respected elder.


Image: Tahlia Bennel, Noongar Boodja Wagyl Bilya Connections (Noongar Country Rainbow Serpent River Connections), 2019, acrylic on canvas, 76 x 61 cm. Page 242


independent, perth & south west tahlia bennell rory charles buffie corunna shandell cummings peter farmer jnr odiya pilot samuel pilot-kickett dougie powers john sara kerry stack azmara summers julianne wade tyrown waigana wilรณ

PERTH SOUTH WEST


Tahlia Bennel Kwobidak Noongar Boodja (Beautiful Noongar Country), 2020 acrylic on canvas 75 x 75 cm $600 REV20-210

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tahlia bennell Tahlia Bennell is a Wardandi and Balladong emerging Noongar artist from Bunbury. Bennell first started painting around the age of six, learning culture, language, family stories and connections to Noongar Boodja (land) from her father Troy Bennell and other family members. Bennell’s artworks are mostly based on the ocean and the saltwater (Maambakoort). The patterning and colours in her works often reference coral – the oldest skeletal organism on earth. She is also interested in passing on language, land and cultural practices to the younger generations and incorporates traditional artistic practices into her contemporary style.


Tahlia Bennel Koomba Wooyan Maambakoort Coral (Big Blue Saltwater Coral), 2019 acrylic on canvas 76 x 61 cm $350 REV20-211

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Tahlia Bennel Noongar Boodja Wagyl Bilya Connections (Noongar Country Rainbow Serpent River Connections), 2019 acrylic on canvas 76 x 61 cm $500 REV20-212

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Tahlia Bennel Noongar Boodja Connections (Noongar Country Connections), 2019 acrylic on canvas 73 x 53 cm $300 REV20-213

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Tahlia Bennel Djinda Djildjil Maambakoort Connection (Starfish Saltwater Connection), 2020 acrylic on canvas 75 x 75 cm $1,500 REV20-214

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Odiya Pilot Community Spirit, 2019 acrylic paint and white marker on paper (framed) 29 x 40 cm $350 REV20-236

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odiya pilot Odiya Pilot is a proud 19 year old Wonguthar and Torres Strait Islander woman from Kalgoorlie. Her Wonguthar blood line extends throughout the Goldfields region from Kalgoorlie, Leonora, Laverton, Meekatharra, Wiluna and up to the Ngaanyatjarra Lands. The Saisarem Tribe from Erub (Darnley Island) is her Torres Strait Islander Heritage. Erub is located in the top eastern section of the Torres Straits. She started painting and drawing in Year 8 visual arts class and has since this time received the Visual Art Award at Baldivis Secondary College (2016), participated in the AIME Mentoring Program, and was selected to take part in the Bunga Barrabuga WMBB Summer Camp Program at the University of Sydney (2018).

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Rory Charles Kalumbaru, 2018 gel paint pen on black paper 46 x 59 cm NFS

rory charles Rory Charles is a Wunambal Gaambera, Nyikina, Balanggarra and Gooniyandi man from the Kimberley who is currently based in Perth and attending Trinity College. The Wunambal Gaambera people are one of the three tribes responsible for caretaking the ancient Wandjina rock art in the Kimberley; a continuing connection to culture which is reflected in Charles’ works. Charles has won several awards including first prize at Glenelg Hopkins Catchment Management Youth Art Award (2018), Youth Drawing, Darlington Art Festival (2017), and Winner Aboriginal Artist, Emerging Artist Award, City of South Perth (2019).

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Rory Charles Three Wandjinas, 2020 gel paint pen on black paper 48 x 36 cm $400 REV20-216

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Rory Charles The Creation Wandjina, 2019 gel paint pen on black paper 48 x 36 cm $400 REV20-217

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Rory Charles Five Wandjina, 2020 gel paint pen on black paper 46 x 56 cm $450 REV20-218

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Rory Charles Four Wandjina, 2020 gel paint pen on black paper 46 x 56 cm $450 REV20-219

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Rory Charles Large Wandjina, 2020 gel paint pen on black paper 76 x 56 cm $550 REV20-220

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Rory Charles Wandjina Dreaming, 2019 gel paint pen on black paper 36 x 48 cm $400 REV20-221

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Rory Charles Gyorn Gyorn Dancers, 2020 gel paint pen on black paper 24 x 32 cm $350 REV20-222

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Buffie Corunna Koort Dreaming, 2020 giclee print on Canson Edition Etching Rag 310gsm (unframed) 74 x 74 cm $400 REV20-223

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buffie corunna Buffie Corunna is a Noongar artist, born in Albany, Western Australia, with family connections from Gnowangerup. Her artworks are greatly influenced by family, her three children, cultural connections, emotions and her personal relationships. Her practice spans a variety of mediums and in 2018 she began an arts business under the name of Gungurra.


Buffie Corunna Djet Djet, 2020 giclee print on Canson Edition Etching Rag 310gsm (unframed) 74 x 74 cm $400 REV20-224

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Shandell Cummings Colours 5 – When Paths Meet, 2019 acrylic on canvas 120 x 40 cm $950 REV20-225

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shandell cummings Shandell Cummings is an Aboriginal woman with ties to Menang Country on the south coast of Western Australia, Ngadju Country extending to Israelite Bay, Geraldton and Carnarvon. Cummings has been a practicing artist for many years and has recently collaborated on two major public art projects for the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attraction in Albany, and a second project with four artists rejuvenating a garden area in central Albany. Cummings is a wife, mother, foster mother, grandmother, student, youth worker and a passionate cultural educator.


Shandell Cummings Colours 6 – Routine, 2019 acrylic on canvas 60 x 30 cm $600 REV20-226

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Shandell Cummings Layers of Blue, 2019 acrylic on canvas 60 x 30 cm $600 REV20-227

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Shandell Cummings Layers of Green, 2020 acrylic on canvas 60 x 30 cm $600 REV20-228

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Peter Farmer Jnr Hannah, 2020 digital print on canvas 90 x 120 cm $2,200 REV20-229

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Peter Farmer Jnr Klilbardie (Magpie), 2020 digital print on canvas 80 x 50 cm $600 REV20-230

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Peter Farmer Jnr Kwilena (Dolphin), 2020 digital print on canvas 30 x 120 cm $1,200 REV20-231

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Julianne Wade Lizard Dreaming, 2019 acrylic on canvas 81 x 107 cm $750 REV20-249

julianne wade Julianne Wade is a Whadjuk Nyoongar woman and artist who was born in Subiaco, raised in New Zealand, and is now based in Perth. She is the daughter of Sandra Egan and niece of well-known artist Sharyn Egan. She is a mother and previously worked in the early childhood education sector. Today she continues working on art projects with young people and often works with Urban Indigenous and Bindi Bindi Dreaming. Wade also recently completed the Women’s Leadership program with Yorga Djenna Biddi. Although a recent practicing artist, her paintings have been sold to private buyers in Melbourne and France. Her works are inspired by her Country and nature.

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Wiló Waarlitch, 2019 acrylic on canvas 101 x 121 cm $1,500 REV20-232

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wiló Wiló is a self-taught artist living in Perth who paints and makes craft objects. Her father is Noongar and her mother is Yuet and Yaburara. Wiló’s paintings are filled with stories passed onto her through her family. Each of her works contains imagery from the natural world, as well as unseen spiritual knowledge. Looking closely you can see a variety of bushfoods in her paintings and the symbols for people, campfires, tracks and waterholes.


Wilรณ Totem Dreaming, 2019 acrylic on canvas 93 x 123 cm $4,000 REV20-233

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Wilรณ Magical Waterhole (secret and forbidden), 2019 acrylic on canvas 51 x 51 cm $450 REV20-234

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Wilรณ Perpetual Sanctuary, 2019 acrylic on canvas 51 x 51 cm $400 REV20-235

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Samuel Pilot-Kickett Boodjah Dreaming, 2020 spray paint on canvas 75 x 100 cm $1,000 REV20-237

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samuel pilot-kickett Samuel Pilot-Kickett is a Whudjuk Nyungah and Mirrum Mir Torres Strait Islander man with family history directly linked to the Perth area. He has been painting for several years and has had works purchased and exhibited in Paris and Madrid. Pilot-Kickett works with a variety of mediums including spray paint, and his practice focusses on sharing culture.


Samuel Pilot-Kickett Beach Sunset, 2020 spray paint on canvas 75 x 100 cm $1,000 REV20-238

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Samuel Pilot-Kickett Beerlo, 2020 spray paint on canvas 61 x 92 cm $1,000 REV20-239

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CONTENT WARNING: Please be advised that this video contains explicit language. To view the animation visit youtube.com/fremantleartscentre

Tyrown Waigana Mostly Brown People, 2018-2020 digital animation, length: 2min 7sec NFS

tyrown waigana Tyrown Waigana is an emerging artist and designer with both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage, through the Noongar people from the south west of Western Australia, and Saibai Island in the Torres Strait. Growing up, Waigana was surrounded by creativity, watching his family decorate didgeridoos. Waigana completed a Bachelor of Art with a double major in graphic design, advertising, illustration and photography. Practicing under the brand and business Crawlin Crocodile, Waigana’s work combines both artist production and design services including, painting, sculpture, illustration, animation, graphic design, branding and advertising.

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Dougie Powers Goanna Cycle, 2013 ochre on canvas 76 x 56 cm $980 REV20-240

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dougie powers Dougie Powers is a Gija man now living in Perth, with family from Turkey Creek, Mabel Downs and Violet Valley in the Kimberley. He has been painting on and off for 20 years. He began in high school, and later on used painting as a way of dealing with depression and connecting with his Country. His paintings explore his cultural background, family and the landscapes he grew up on, and use ground pigments and natural ochres. Revealed is his first official exhibition.


Dougie Powers Goanna Cycle, 2017 ochre on canvas 62 x 80 cm $980 REV20-241

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Dougie Powers Spirit Creating Country, 2016 acrylic and ochre on canvas 90 x 110 cm $2,400 REV20-242

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Dougie Powers Untitled, 2019 ochre on hard hat dimensions variable cm $800 REV20-243

Dougie Powers Untitled, 2019 ochre on hard hat dimensions variable cm $800 REV20-244

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John Sara The Wargal (Rainbow Serpent) and the Yondock (Mythical Crocodile), 2018 acrylic on canvas 101 x 101 cm $6,200 REV20-245

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john sara John Sara is an Aboriginal artist who lives in Dunsborough, Western Australia. His people are Whadjuk Balardong Noongar on his mother’s side and Nyiyaparli on his father’s side. Sara has been drawing and painting for as long as he can remember and over the years has developed his own unique style and painting techniques. He is deeply influenced by his family and his Country. His paintings tell stories about Aboriginal people, their culture, their dreaming and spirituality, their lands and waterways.


John Sara Noongar People and Culture, 2019 acrylic on canvas 120 x 120 cm $8,600 REV20-246

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Azmara Summers Pop 2, 2015 oil on canvas 91 x 122 cm NFS

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azmara summers Azmara Summers' paintings document the life of her grandfather, a Ballardong man from Quairading named Everett Kickett. Kickett worked as the first Aboriginal police constable in Western Australia. This family history is a great source of pride for Summers who has stayed true to the grainy, black and white news photography she based her paintings on. In one painting Kickett stands out as the only Aboriginal officer in his 1971 police force graduation ceremony. In the other, the now experienced Constable Kickett cruises on his motorbike as a police traffic escort at a major Aboriginal land rights march. Summers developed these paintings in 2019 as part of her year 12 ATAR visual art project.


Azmara Summers Pop 1, 2015 oil on canvas 61 x 92 cm NFS

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acknowledgements FAC would like to acknowledge it operates on the traditional lands of the Whadjuk people and that we respect their spiritual relationship with their country. We also acknowledge the Whadjuk people as the Traditional Owners of the greater Walyalup area and that their cultural and heritage beliefs are still important to the living Whadjuk people today.

revealed advisory group Chad Creighton, CEO Aboriginal Art Centre Hub Western Australia Glenn Iseger-Pilkington, artist and curator Esther McDowell, artist and curator

fremantle arts centre project staff Director Jim Cathcart General Manager Marcus Dickson Special Projects Curator & Revealed Coordinator Erin Coates Revealed Exhibition Coordinator Katherine Wilkinson Exhibitions Install Coordinator Tom Freeman Exhibition Install Staff Emma Buswell Damian Capone Phoebe Clarke Angela Ferolla Liam Kennedy Rob Kettels Hugh Thomson Phoebe Tran Zev Weinstein

Learning Coordinator Deborah Byrne Silvia Ferolla Events Coordinator David Craddock Communications Manager Andrea Woods Communications Officer Liz Walker Graphic Designer Sofia Antonas Photography Susie Blatchford (Pixel Poetry) Zev Weinstein Finance Officer Christine Lofthouse Finance Assistant Julia Remmert Reception & Sales Officer Sheridan Hart


purchasing artworks

shipping information

To purchase an artwork please email sheridanc@fremantle.wa.gov.au including the following information: • Your full name and phone number • The title, artist and REV code number of the artwork(s) you would like to purchase • The organisation or collection you represent, if applicable Once your purchase request has been received, the artwork will be reserved for you until payment. Requests will be processed on a first-come basis. A sales officer will phone you within 2 business days of your email. We will be in touch between 9am and 11am AWST Mon-Thu to process payment. We accept MasterCard and VISA payments only. Payment is required in full and a receipt and confirmation of sale will only be issued when full payment has been received.

By purchasing a Revealed artwork, you agree to cover any additional packaging and freight costs incurred. The cost of freighting artwork outside the Perth metropolitan area is in addition to the prices listed in the catalogue. The final cost for this will be calculated upon closure of the exhibition and the artwork won’t be posted until full purchase and freight price is paid. Artworks will be sent with TNT or Australia Post, depending on the size and location of recipient. Tracking details will be sent to the buyer. Artworks will be packed and posted within 3 weeks of the closure of the Revealed Exhibition, subject to payment completion. Postage times will vary depending on service and location. If you live in the Perth metropolitan area, you will be able to pick up your artwork from FAC at no charge.

Organisations and collections may purchase works by invoice. Please include this in your initial email request. Please note: Artworks will only be available for collection and/or shipping when Fremantle Arts Centre re-opens and after the Revealed Exhibition has closed. All buyers will be advised when a date for collection is known.

Revealed is an initiative of the WA State Government through the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries; and the Australian Government through the Indigenous Visual Arts Industry Support program.

Fremantle Arts Centre | 1 Finnerty Street, Fremantle, Western Australia | fac.org.au This program is available on FAC’s website and can be requested in alternative formats such as large print, electronic, hard copy, audio or braille via artscentre@fremantle.wa.gov.au