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A trip to

Greenville

The Liberty Bridge at Falls Park is one of the defining architectural gems, transforming the City of Greenville into a highly desirable destination.

What Frederick might learn from this South Carolina town

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BY KATE MCDERMOTT uch like Downtown Frederick, Greenville, S.C., has earned scores of accolades lately and is often named a “must-see destination.” But before it staged its great comeback, this city of 67,000 struggled with significant blight and poverty in its downtown, which made its level of disinvestment even greater than Frederick’s following the downtown flood of 1976. Yet today the city is a bustling center for tourism and is also attracting new residents at a record pace, with the U.S. Census Bureau recently naming it the fourth fastest-growing city in the nation. To get a look behind Greenville’s success, a delegation of 12 members from Frederick County Chamber of Commerce’s Partners in Trust Program, representing local public and private entities, recently spent three days touring the city and its environs. During their visit, the Partners in Trust team met with Greenville’s mayor as well as local economic development and affordable housing representatives. “Greenville is somewhat similar to Frederick in terms of its size, so it was very interesting to see the challenges they overcame and the approaches they took in revitalizing their downtown and developing top-notch workforce development programs,” said Elizabeth Cromwell,

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Traveling Partners in Trust include, left to right, Kelly Beach, Hank Hyatt (Greenville C a er an ardner Frank lanc ard ic ard riffin eordie ilson inda Mor an Cat erine Mock ric oter a es ell elen ro eter ikki a onti itne a n and li a et Cro well

president and CEO of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce. As the county seat for Greenville County (pop. 483,000), Greenville provided several examples of how public-private partnerships have fueled its revitalization and growth. “One of the city’s first major projects was a Hyatt hotel and conference center,” Cromwell said. “It received financial support from a group of private investors as well as from

the city, which purchased the land, built the convention center and parking garage and leased the air rights for the hotel and office building. The hotel atrium is now considered a city park.” Like Frederick, Greenville had its own infrastructure challenges, including a four-lane highway that literally ran through its downtown, obstructing views of the picturesque waterfalls of the Reedy River. In another

P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

example of public-private cooperation, the local garden club and the City of Greenville worked together to create a new master plan for the area that resulted in the removal of the highway bridge and the installation of a new, curved pedestrian suspension bridge and gardens around the falls. Projects like these take creativity and capital. “Greenville has been very successful in identifying a steady stream of income to support many of its initiatives and has also benefited from consistent local leadership,” said Frederick County Executive Jan Gardner, who participated in the tour. She noted that the city’s use of regional tax increment financing has provided nearly 30 years of consistent revenue to support its redevelopment efforts. Much of the city’s success can also be attributed to its collaboration with major employers in the region, such as BMW Group and Clemson and Furman universities.“We were eager to learn more about best practices in workforce development, and Greenville has many successful business incubators as well as strong partnerships between the local colleges and employers like BMW,” Cromwell said. Now that Greenville has successfully “risen from the ashes,” the challenge the city faces is to ensure it remains affordable and

desirable for those who live and work there, and to recognize the impact of gentrification on the community. “One of the issues that we’ve identified as critical to our work here in Frederick County is the need for more diverse housing options with a wide variety of price points, so we were really impressed by what Greenville has accomplished,” Cromwell said. Greenville is working to preserve its existing affordable units while also acquiring property to support the production of new workforce housing. The City Council recently appropriated $2 million toward these efforts and work is underway to leverage an additional $1 million in philanthropic, corporate and charitable investments. The result of these partnerships is evident in a recent project in which the city has partnered with the local nonprofit Homes of Hope to create 27 new homes in a mixed-income development in one of the city’s most blighted neighborhoods. “Much of what we learned was the need for vision, foresight and patience,” said Linda Morgan, president of the Chamber’s board of directors. “We need to think about where we want Frederick to be in 10 years. Given the similarities between our cities, that was what made the visit so interesting. At times, it seemed like we were looking through a crystal ball to what we could achieve.”

ABOVE: Greenville Technical College’s Gene aas Center for Man fact rin nno ation is a s are foot s ace t at osts w at so e consider the best advanced manufacturing ed cation facilities in t e nation O : ea it eater at t e award winnin eace Center erfor in arts facilit in owntown reen ille is ad acent to Falls ark


A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST | P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7

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ABOUT PROGRESS A publication of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce 118 North Market Street, 2nd Floor, Frederick, MD 21701 301-662-4164 Elizabeth Cromwell, President & CEO

Welcome

Laura Lokey, Marketing Coordinator Produced by The Frederick News-Post 351 Ballenger Center Drive Frederick, MD 21703 301-662-1177 Geordie Wilson Publisher Connie Hastings Advertising and Marketing Director Anna Joyce Creative Director Kevin Berrier Multimedia Advertising Manager Debra Tyson Business Development Manager

ON BEHALF of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce Board and staff, welcome to the second issue of Progress, an innovative publication co-produced by the Chamber and The Frederick News-Post.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

As the Frederick County business landscape evolves, the Chamber is working tirelessly to create value and to provide opportunities for our members to tell their stories. Each of these stories is an important thread in an ever-growing tapestry of the Frederick County business community. Judging from the response to this publication, our members are eager to play a role in the Chamber’s — and the county’s — future. As the Chamber helps write the story of Frederick County’s future, our members’ voices are amplified through this publication and through other meaningful avenues.

Kate McDermott Erin Cunningham Gina Gallucci White Maritta Grau Scott Harris

Tripp Laino Matt Lee Jim Mahaffie Pepper Van Tassell

EDITORS

Comfort Dorn, Anna Joyce

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Lorraine Walker, The Frederick News-Post

ABOUT THE COVER

Cover photo by Bill Green and Graham Cullen, The Frederick News-Post Art direction and cover illustration by Anna Joyce, creative direction by Cecelia Lee Photographed April 13 at Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association - National Aviation Community Center Special thanks to the Maryland Ensemble Theatre for contributing costumes All featured businesses are paid advertisers and are Chamber members; all content is exclusive to Chamber members. To request extra copies, call the Chamber at 301-662-4164.

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We present this publication with the greatest of pride in our members, who are truly the backbone of our economy. If you’re not already a member but are interested in joining, please visit frederickchamber.org or give us a call at 301662-4164. We’d love to welcome you to the Chamber family! Best wishes for continued success.

Elizabeth Cromwell President & CEO Frederick County Chamber of Commerce

Linda Morgan President, Board of Directors Owner, Support Unlimited, Inc.

P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


Our Core

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

The Chamber’s strong core of volunteers ensures the organization runs smoothly and effectively for its members. Many businesses support the Chamber with expertise and investment, and the Chamber salutes those who contribute in many ways. 2017 BOARD OF DIRECTORS Linda Morgan, Chair Support Unlimited, Inc. Jon-Mikel Bailey, Vice Chair Wood Street, Inc. Jennifer Milas, Treasurer McLean, Koehler, Sparks & Hammond Jason Lee, Director Lee Building Maintenance Michelle Michael, Director AstraZeneca Biologics Theresa Alban Frederick County Public Schools Brad Benna Matan Companies Brandon Cannon * Ruppert Properties

Sean Morrissey Comcast

Briana Campbell Onelife Fitness

Kara Norman Downtown Frederick Partnership

Matt Doyle Plamondon Companies

Rich Pendleton * Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc.

Ellen Keyser 270net Technologies

Jean Peterson Jean Peterson Design, Inc.

Patti Maluchnik Georgetown Insurance

Michael Planz * Community Living, Inc.

Consie Meyers Woodsboro Bank

Helen Propheter Frederick County Office of Economic Development

Bethany Miller Habitat for Humanity

Don Schilling Frederick Regional Health System Eric Soter Rodgers Consulting

Andrea Chapdelaine Hood College

Paul Steckel McLean, Koehler, Sparks & Hammond

David Heimbrook Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc.

Geordie Wilson The Frederick News-Post

Matt Holbrook St. John Properties, Inc.

* Nonvoting member

Shabri Moore Moore Wealth, Inc.

CHAMBER AMBASSADORS Laura Beall Edward Jones Financial

Will Randall Randall Family LLC Jamaal Rashad LegalShield

COMMITTEES AND SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS ❖ Michael Planz, Chair Community Living, Inc. Leigh Adams Ausherman Family Foundation Shannon Aleshire Mental Health Association of Frederick County Mary Boswell Historical Society of Frederick County Nick Brown The Religious Coalition

Justin Saltzman Frederick Indoor Sports Center

Chris Bugher Marriage Resource Center of Frederick County, Inc.

Scott Shenton Apex Home Loans

Chris Colville YMCA of Frederick County

Leslie Sier LegalShield

Chuck Eicholz Global Wildlife Trust, Inc.

Lynn Smith NYMEO Federal Credit Union

Tonya Hatosy-Stier Woman to Woman Mentoring Ed Hinde SHIP of Frederick County

A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST | P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7

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Louise Kennelly The Frederick Arts Council Bethany Miller Habitat for Humanity Ken Oldham United Way of Frederick County Elin Ross Federated Charities Corporation of Frederick Wendy Errera Frederick County Chamber of Commerce, Liaison

❖ Public Policy Committee Eric Soter, Chair Rodgers Consulting Galen Clagett Clagett Enterprises, Inc. Frank Goldstein Law Office of Frank R. Goldstein LLC City of Frederick Office of Economic Development

Denise Jacoby Frederick County Building Industry Association Chris Kline Kline, Scott Visco Commercial Real Estate Bob Kresslein Offit Kurman PA Tom Lynch Miles & Stockbridge, PC Tom Meacham Triangle Motors Michelle Michael AstraZeneca Biologics Helen Propheter Frederick County Office of Economic Development

Wes Leatherman Frederick County Workforce Services David Lok Intertech Security, LLC Kris Miner M&T Bank Bailey Rankin Rehab2Perform Jennifer Runkles Express Marketing Design & Runkles Sign Service Laura Lokey Frederick County Chamber of Commerce, Liaison

❖ Thrive: Women in Business Alex Kelly, Chair Merrill Lynch

Bob Smariga Retired

Kimberly Dow Kalico Design/Sass Magazine

Rick Weldon Frederick County Chamber of Commerce, Liaison

Taitia Elliott Frederick County Bank

❖ Generation Connect Brandon Cannon, Chair Ruppert Properties Danielle Doll Downtown Frederick Partnership Ana Filopovic-Windsor TalentCMO

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CHAMBER AMBASSADORS Christy Butler Frederick County Chamber of Commerce Liaison

❖ Frederick County

Entrepreneur Council Darrick Bowens Colbert/Ball Tax Service Kathie Brady Frederick Innovative Technology Center, Inc. (FITCI) Sherman Coleman Frederick County Office of Economic Development Kathy Groover Frederick Community College Charlie Thomas SCORE Michael Kurtianyk Frederick County Chamber of Commerce, Liaison

❖ Chamber Marketing Committee

Stephanie Fitch Frederick County Bank

Jon-Mikel Bailey Wood Street, Inc.

Bonnie Swanson Musket Ridge Golf Club

Jennifer Gerlock The Temple: A Paul Mitchell Partner School

Meghan Sweigart Frederick Regional Health System Lana Veres Hood College

Beth Schillaci VillageWorks Communications, Inc. Shannon Swanson Swanson Solutions & Consulting LLC Laura Lokey Frederick County Chamber of Commerce, Liaison

❖ Business Health Committee Catherine Mock, Chair CorpOHS Jenn Alcorn Plamondon Companies Shannon Aleshire Mental Health Association of Frederick County Gloria Bamforth CorpOHS Angie Blair Frederick County Health Department Beth Carpenter Frederick Regional Health System Jeremy Cayer Healing Touch Chiropractic Ryan Diener Holistic Health Associates

Kimba Green White Lion Social

Mac Hobbs Business Health Services

Liza Hawkins State Farm Insurance Companies

Heather Kirby Frederick Regional Health System

P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


GENERATION CONNECT Joyce Kwamena-Poh United Way of Frederick County

❖ Partners in Trust Think Tank

Facilitated by Lisa Hammer and Dave Newman, Leadership Techniques

Denise Jacoby Frederick County Building Industry Association

Mindy Bankey Frederick County Public Schools

James Kelly Frederick County Public Libraries

Ron Cramer Habitat for Humanity of Frederick County

Brad Benna Matan Companies

Jason Lee Lee Building Maintenance

Frank Blanchard Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc.

Michelle Day Frederick County Workforce Services

Robin McConaughey Woodsboro Bank

Andrea Chapdelaine Hood College

Lisa Gorham Lisa Gorham Design

Michelle Michael AstraZeneca Biologics

Lisa Shuster WorkMoreHuman

Stacey Collins PNC Bank – Frederick

Linda Morgan Support Unlimited, Inc.

Scott Grove Grove Public Relations

Carrie Sprinkle Frederick County Government

Shawn Dewees Frederick Magazine

Kara Norman Downtown Frederick Partnership

Shannon Thompson Plamondon Companies

Taitia Elliott Frederick County Bank

Will Randall Randall Family LLC

Amy Vagnoni Frederick County Government

Dave Esworthy First United Bank

Nicole Verrier MedImmune

John Fieseler Tourism Council of Frederick County

Don Schilling Frederick Regional Health System

Jonathan Watkins Frederick Indoor Sports Center

Mark Friis Rodgers Consulting

Tom Werner Werner Web Design & Development

Brian Gaudet Battelle National Biodefense Institute

Michelle Michael AstraZeneca Biologics Susan Powell Community Health Charities Don Schilling CorpOHS Nan Sheridan-Mann Frederick County Chamber of Commerce

Katrina Wyand-Yurish Plamondon Companies Christy Butler Frederick County Chamber of Commerce, Liaison

Fred Genau PNC Bank – Frederick Whitney Hahn Digital Bard Zesty Video Marketing Dave Heimbrook Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc.

Laurie Ballow iHire

Amanda Haddaway HR Answerbox Monica Kolbay ArachnidWorks, Inc. Delegate Carol Krimm Maryland House of Delegates Kristine Pearl Frederick County Public Schools

Danny Severn St. John Properties, Inc.

Secretary Kelly Schulz MD Secretary of Labor

Eric Soter Rodgers Consulting

Lisa Shuster WorkMoreHuman

Kate Surdez AstraZeneca Biologics

Michael Woods Airplane Owners & Pilots Association (AOPA)

❖ Think Tank Subject-Matter Experts participating as guests: Jon-Mikel Bailey Wood Street, Inc.

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About

E

ach year 30-40 local professionals from across industries and professional backgrounds unite in an exploration of Frederick County through this program of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce. An in-depth nine-month experience, Leadership Frederick provides a unique perspective on the problems, opportunities and issues facing Frederick County. And with an alumni network of more than 850 graduates, the connections continue for years to come. Part of Leadership Frederick County, the Leaders On Loan program is designed to make Frederick County a better place to live, work and play. Through a partnership between LFC and local nonprofits, class members receive experience working with nonprofits and develop an understanding of their scope and impact. In turn, these organizations receive assistance on a project. Last year, LFC class members donated their time and effort to The Child Advocacy Center of Frederick, Downtown Frederick Partnership, Frederick Arts Council, Habitat for Humanity of Frederick County, Marriage Resource Center and the Rotary Club of Carroll Creek.

For more information, contact Barbara Wagner: Leadership@frederickchamber.org or 301-662-4164 x204.

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LEADERSHIP FREDERICK COUNTY ALUMNI COUNCIL Rich Pendleton Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. Liza Hawkins State Farm Insurance Companies Deb Powell Frederick Community College Foundation Jenny Morgan Frederick Regional Health System Jillian DeShazer Data Management Services, Inc. Clark Briggs Frederick County Bank Brad Pingray M&T Bank Mary Ellen Mitchell Interfaith Housing Alliance, Inc. Martha Hirschman Ellen Keyser 270Net Technologies Jenn Alcorn Plamondon Companies Allan Mullendore Hendershot’s Sporting Goods Rick Weldon and Barbara Wagner Frederick County Chamber of Commerce

P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


Leaders Yearbook 2017

Charlene Collins Frederick County Bank AVP, Deposit Operations What was the last book you read? “Sleepless Nights – The NFL: A Business and Family” by Marques Ogden. I am not usually one that enjoys reading; however, a friend of mine wrote a book that I found I could not put down. I enjoyed reading as Marques shared his battles with financial struggles and his recovery.

Kellye Murphy Frederick County Bank Bank Center Manager What’s in heavy rotation on your playlist now and why? My playlist nowadays consists of quite a few podcasts. I love Reply All, Freakonomics, This American Life, Radiolab, and StartUp. I have an endless amount of curiosity and podcasts are a great way to satisfy my craving for new information daily. You can find one about anything that interests you.

Ryan Conner Frederick County Bank Bank Center Manager Trainee

Corey Dorsey Frederick County Bank Contact Center Manager and Security Officer

Last country you visited, and what did you like best about it?

What is your favorite video game and why do you enjoy it?

The last country I visited was Ireland. I went during elections, and was very impressed with the civic engagement of the younger generation. Politics were not taboo anywhere that I could see, but were actually encouraged to be discussed amongst everyone.

My favorite video game is “NFL Madden 2016.” The reason NFL Madden is my favorite game is because I may never see the Eagles win a Super Bowl except for in the game!

Kristie Scottlemyer Frederick County Bank AVP Senior Retail Banking Specialist

H Harry Weetenkamp, Jr.

What’s your favorite TV show (current or past) and why?

Most useful tech advancement in the last 40 years?

Growing up in the ’70s/’80s I was obsessed with watching “Charlie’s Angels.” As a child, it was just fun watching ladies catch the bad guys. I now see the characters as strong intelligent women utilizing teamwork to achieve a common goal, so relevant to our successes today!

Voice-to-text technology on cellphones. I’m one of the few people that never learned to type. My high school offered a typing class on the old manual typewriters, but I didn’t think I would ever need that. Fast forward to today; voice-to-text technology has been a godsend!

Frederick County Bank Senior Vice President & Chief Lending Officer

H PROUD GRADUATE

Jenny Hogg Frederick County Bank Human Resource Specialist What was the last book you read? “O Great One!” by David Novak. There aren’t many books where I have laughed, cried and been inspired to share the experience and lesson with others.“O Great One!” was that book.

Crystal Wiles Frederick County Bank SVP, Controller What was the last book you read? The last book I read was another excellent leadership “how to.” It lacked one important element: health and wellness. “Finding Balance,” by local doctors Monica Aggarwal and Jyothi Rao, is a holistic action plan on maintaining a healthy you. You can’t give your best if you’re not at your best.

A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST | P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7

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Leaders Yearbook 2017

Allen DeLeon, CPA, PFS, CITP DeLeon & Stang, CPAs and Advisors Partner

Richard Stang, CPA, ABV, CFF DeLeon & Stang, CPAs and Advisors Partner

Bradly Hoffman, CPA DeLeon & Stang, CPAs and Advisors Partner

What two things would you bring on a trip to Mars and why?

Where would a time machine take you?

Most unusual food you’ve eaten and your reaction?

The two things I would bring on a trip to Mars would be my golf clubs, since I always bring my golf clubs on a trip, as well as some oxygen.

If I had a time machine I would go back one hour. I’m sure at that time I was thinking about what I should have done yesterday or worrying about something happening tomorrow. Instead, I would focus on the present and try to make each minute better than the last.

The most unusual food I ever ate was rattlesnake. My brother killed it while we were on a camping trip. It was awesome!

Daniel Dellon, CPA, ABV, CFF DeLeon & Stang, CPAs and Advisors Partner

Clint Lehman, CPA DeLeon & Stang, CPAs and Advisors Principal

Michele Mills, CPA DeLeon & Stang, CPAs and Advisors Principal

Ryan Crabbs, CPA DeLeon & Stang, CPAs and Advisors Senior Manager

Beatles or Rolling Stones? Why?

What movie can you/do you quote the most?

What’s the best kept secret in Frederick County?

Beatles or Rolling Stones? Why?

Far and away, my favorite movie of all time and most quoted movie is “Tombstone.” All of the lines in the movie are fantastic, but the one-liners by Doc Holliday make the movie an all-time classic.

In this fast-paced world, we often dash through the day looking straight ahead. But on the streets of downtown Frederick, be sure to slow down and look up at the unique architecture. The craftsmanship that went into creating these beautiful buildings over a century ago is amazing. My advice: Look up!

I prefer The Beatles! I love the harmony, brightness and positivity of most of their lyrics. Every time I hear a Beatles tune I sing along. They are unique in the history of American music, and I enjoy their songs as much today as I did in my youth!

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Jeanie Price, AAAPM DeLeon & Stang, CPAs and Advisors Partner & Director of Administration Favorite TV show (current or past) and why? “Dancing with the Stars.” I love the music, dancing, the costumes and of course the beautiful sexy bods! Brings back the old-world glamour. And it’s just fun!

The Beatles. Just like Neil Armstrong, The Beatles got there first. Innovation is the key to success.

P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


H PROUD GRADUATE

H Joanna Norville

H Dave Hirschman

H Monica Kolbay

H Eric Johnson

Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Director, Human Resources

Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Editor at large

ArachnidWorks, Inc. President/CEO

Audio-Video Group, LLC President

What’s your guilty pleasure?

Best kept secret in Frederick County?

What’s the last country you visited?

Where would a time machine take you?

All the talented and dedicated staff members at AOPA! Plus who wouldn’t want to learn to fly for free?

I flew a Piper Super Cub to arctic Canada last summer and got stuck in a tiny town by bad weather. There, I attended a “meat raffle” at a local VFW post and ended up winning a slab of caribou steaks.

John Pierce Audio-Video Group, LLC Director of Operations

H Jennifer Grove

What’s in heavy rotation on your playlist now and why? Coldplay, Creed and Bethel Music. For some reason, I find myself lost in the music and secretly wishing I was the drummer in each one.

Bach & Associates Inc., Realtors Broker / Owner What’s the best kept secret in Frederick County? Frederick’s best kept secret is really right in front of us. You just need to stop and look. We have stunning views in Frederick of rolling hills with farmland and old barns—gorgeous all of the time, but especially in the soft light of the late afternoon.

When I have the luxury of time, I like to play “Warcraft!” I find the game to be a mindless escape of the stresses of everyday life. I enjoy leading groups of other players through challenges in the game - not too terribly unlike leadership in the real world, sometimes!

Back to the day my twins were born. Outside of my wedding, it was the highlight of my life, and I’d like to take it in all over again.

Dwayne Myers Dynamic Automotive Co-Owner / CFO

Lee Forman Dynamic Automotive Vice President

What’s the best kept secret in Frederick County?

Where would a time machine take you?

The best kept secret in Frederick County is the diverse culture and friendly atmosphere that are both conducive to business and life. Frederick County is the best place to build relationships in the business community and live in a community that cares.

To the early 1900s. Yes, the future is exciting and always changing, but in terms of family values and to see people truly care about one another and work together for the greater good more than the almighty dollar, I’d like to see the 1900s. I truly worry about the direction our world is heading.

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Leaders Yearbook 2017

Geordie Wilson The Frederick News-Post Publisher Where would a time machine take you? Of all moments in history, I would most like to witness the contact of the Spanish conquistadores and the Aztec empire in Mexico, when two rich and proud civilizations collided for the first time, with tragic and fascinating results.

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Elizabeth Cromwell Frederick County Chamber of Commerce President & CEO

David Heimbrook Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. President

What is the most unusual food you’ve eaten?

Most useful tech advancement in the last 40 years?

When attending Tulane University, I discovered Cajun and creole dishes that I had never tasted while growing up in New England: alligator po-boys, turtle soup, pompano en papillote, crawfish etouffee, and more! I loved everything.

The ability to rapidly and inexpensively sequence DNA has enabled us to analyze the human genome in a way that was almost unimaginable 40 years ago. It has already revolutionized the way we diagnose and treat human diseases, especially cancer, and we are really just beginning.

H PROUD GRADUATE

H Linda Morgan Support Unlimited, Inc. Owner Last country you visited and funny anecdote or what you liked best? Italy in 2016 with my father, 90, and son, 22. Lodging was an apartment in Rome that was very comfortable. All of us are coffee drinkers. I would make coffee using a 3-ounce espresso pot. It was ridiculous trying to make American-sized cups of coffee for three people!

P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


ADVERTISING & MEDIA

The Frederick News-Post he more things change, the more they stay the same. Never has that adage been truer than with the recent change in ownership at The Frederick News-Post. After more than 133 years as owners of Frederick’s community newspaper, the Randall family recently sold The News-Post to Ogden Newspapers of West Virginia. But while the names on the masthead may change, Geordie Wilson, publisher of The Frederick News-Post, believes not much else will. “This is a transition, but amid the change there is also a lot of continuity,” he said. “The Nutting family has owned Ogden Newspapers since 1890. They are committed to local newspapers. They believe in newspapers and like newspapers.” With its ownership of more than 40 newspapers in 14 states, Ogden Newspapers is significantly larger than Randall Family LLC, the official name of the FNP’s previous ownership group. As a result, the organization brings a position of financial strength to its new ownership of the paper. “Newspapers are capital-intensive businesses,” Wilson said, pointing out that modern printing presses alone require an investment of “millions and millions of dollars. Ogden Newspapers brings stability to The Frederick News-Post at a challenging time in a challenging industry.”

Wilson attributes much of Ogden Newspapers’ success to its ability to find communities where newspapers have a strong connection. “They recognized that people in Frederick rely on The News-Post and support it,” he said, noting that the paper’s print and digital memberships have remained stable while display advertising, digital products and its signature community events and specialty publishing efforts, such as “Progress,” have been growing. Wilson stressed that the paper’s new owners are committed to local news and local voices. “They do not have an imposed editorial vision from afar,” he said. “They believe in local papers as a reflection of the communities they serve.” At the same time, he added that the Nutting family is just that—a family—just like the FNP’s previous owners, the Randalls and Delaplaines. “This is not a remote or impersonal corporate behemoth. They recognize and respect the fact that The Frederick News-Post is an engrained part of Frederick’s community identity.” Wilson recalled that he was a newcomer to Frederick not so long ago himself, and as such, he has a unique perspective on what makes the community special. “Unlike other

communities in the greater Baltimore and D.C. region, Frederick is not a community of convenience. It is a community of intention,” he said. “Frederick has a really strong sense of place. It is truly a ‘place of distinction.’” Ogden Newspapers may be new in town, Wilson said, but they, like their predecessors, want to be part of the community dynamic. “They wanted to buy the paper for the right reasons. They recognize that The Frederick News-Post is a community institution, and they have every intention of continuing that tradition.” 351 Ballenger Center Drive Frederick 21703 301-662-1177 fredericknewspost.com

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ADVERTISING & MEDIA

Coronation Media

Sass Magazine

WITH THE MASSIVE RISE of social content, more and more organizations are looking to media production companies to help form and share their story. Coronation Media, a creative studio based in Emmitsburg, is helping clients both locally and nationally do just that. With specialization in video, animation and design, the firm brings professional production to organizations of every size. “Frederick County always had a special place in our story,” Gary Gasse, partner and creative director, said. “We started in a tiny office on North Market five years ago, and today our growing team occupies a much larger space in Emmitsburg.” Gasse’s alma mater, Mount St. Mary’s University, was one of the company’s early clients, and the firm recently produced an award-winning commercial for the university that aired nationally during the NCAA basketball tournament. William Phillips, partner and operations director, said the firm also is focused on developing local talent: “We’re looking to foster local talent through creative workshops at our office. Content is needed now more than ever, and we’re excited to help Frederick County creatives find their voice in the industry.”

SASS MAGAZINE is a new breed of women’s lifestyle publication featuring unique and edgy stories about leading female professionals who are making a difference in our community. In addition to covering fashion, beauty and wellness, Sass also highlights the stories of real women working in fields that people may not typically expect, from female motorcyclists and weightlifters to women in extreme sports and the military. Sass founder and publisher Kim Dow dreamt of having a magazine since childhood. With Sass, she saw a perfect opportunity to engage an audience that is too often overlooked. “There are so many amazing women in Frederick County,” she said. “There really wasn’t an outlet to showcase them, so I decided to fill that void.” Since 2015, Sass has expanded into a quarterly print publication as well as a website. Readers are encouraged to submit nominations for the “Woman to Watch” and “Inspire/Empower” features, which cover both rising local talent and unsung heroes who have overcome adversity. Hearing these stories is a constant reminder for Dow about what constitutes leadership, she said. “I hope that Sass inspires not just future leaders but existing leaders to really stand out and not be afraid to tell their story.”

17750 Creamery Road, Suite A2 Emmitsburg 21727 301-447-4128 coronationmedia.com contact@coronationmedia.com

125 E. Patrick Street Frederick 21701 301-360-5417, ext. 4 info@sassmagazine.com sassmagazine.com

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P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


ADVERTISING & MEDIA

ArachnidWorks, Inc. AS A FULL-SERVICE marketing, business development, and technology firm, ArachnidWorks, Inc. has a strategic approach to accomplishing their clients’ short- and long-term goals. ArachnidWorks strives to best understand and identify their clients’ mission, vision and values, in order to provide a cohesive voice in all areas related to branding, website development, collateral design, advertising strategy, business development and internet marketing. By creating well-rounded campaign strategies, ArachnidWorks, Inc. achieves numerous development goals for large and small businesses and organizations in a long-term, sustainable way. Creating positive momentum within the organization and community defines leadership for ArachnidWorks. The agency, founded in 1998, leads not only as a community partner with a number of local nonprofits but also within an array of service organizations. 5104 Pegasus Court, Suite B Frederick 21704 240-285-9844 arachnidworks.com info@arachnidworks.com

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P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


AGRICULTURE

New Market Plains Vineyards ong before Susan Wilson earned a master’s degree in library science and became president and CEO of the library management firm Wilson Information Services Corp., she was a farm girl. Wilson grew up on her family’s farm in New Market, a property that dates to 1760 and was the former estate of her sixth great-grandfather Nicholas Hall Sr., who co-founded New Market. She grew up learning all about how to preserve fruits from the orchards. And even as her business career took off, she maintained her agricultural roots. She even contributed to the agriculture day portion of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce Leadership Frederick program, of which she is a graduate. For Wilson, the lessons she learned in businesses and through Leadership Frederick have proven to be invaluable in her latest endeavor as co-winemaker (along with her husband, Howard) for New Market Plains Vineyards. As an estate winery, New Market Plains only makes wine from grapes grown on site. “We do not bring in outside fruit or juice,” Wilson said. She has had to call upon all the leadership skills she has acquired in business and in life. “Leaders are courageous and it takes courage to do what we do,” she said. “Every year is different, every day is different because of the weather. But that also makes it exciting.” Leaders, she added, know when to admit mistakes and learn from them. “We’ve been growing grapes since 1995, but we had to learn how to do it wrong before we learned how to do it right,” she said. In fact, they planted an entirely new 17-acre vineyard in 2012, which was harvested in 2014 and bottled in 2015 to produce the vineyard’s first release that included chardonnays and rosé. Today, New Market Plains produces 14 different wines made from seven varieties of grapes, including cabernet franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, chardonnay, merlot, Muscat blanc, Petit Verdot and Syrah. The Wilsons get a lot of support from their peers in the Maryland Grape Growers Association and the Maryland Wineries Association. “We are curious and always learning. We are also not afraid to ask questions and ask for help,” Wilson said. “We are lucky because winemaking is one of the most collaborative businesses we’ve ever worked in.” She and Howard don’t view other winemakers as competitors, since everyone is working with different materials and different growing conditions. Whether dealing with the art, science and math involved in making wine or dealing with the production challenges of broken equipment or weather-related disruptions, Wilson is reminded that problems present opportunities for those who are willing to look for them. “Leaders look at problems as challenges,” she said. “We solve problems every day, whether that means improvising when a machine breaks down or going to ‘plan B’ when there are supply challenges. We are good jugglers.” Because New Market Plains only produces wine from the fruit it grows on-site, what its vintages may lack in quantity they make up for in quality. “Our vineyard practices are sustainable; for example, using mechanical cultivation instead of herbicides to manage weeds,” Wilson said. “That makes our work harder, but it also makes our wines better.”

“LEADERS ARE COURAGEOUS AND IT TAKES COURAGE TO DO WHAT WE DO.”

11111 W. Baldwin Road New Market 21774 240-674-2859 newmarketplains.com info@newmarketplains.com

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AUTOMOTIVE, AVIATION & UTILITIES

Dynamic Automotive ow do you earn a coveted reputation as “That’s on purpose,” Bueso said. “We want peo“WE ARE BIG BELIEVERS an honest and responsive automotive reple to know us as a neighborhood fixture and we pair company in this day and age? If you’re want to be interconnected with our customers and IN EDUCATING Dynamic Automotive, you commit to a few critical community.” OURSELVES, OUR TEAM, business principles over time and reap the rewards. The company sponsors and partners with comOUR CUSTOMERS munity initiatives such as Second Chance Garage, “We are big believers in educating ourselves, the Greater Urbana Food Bank, Animal Welfare our team, our customers and our community,” said AND OUR COMMUNITY.” League of Frederick County and others. They Jose Bueso, one of the company’s founders. At all work to help build a great workforce through the four locations, mechanics are Automotive Service public schools and Frederick County’s Career and Excellence (ASE) certified and use state-of-theTechnology Center, and Jose Bueso is president art technology and tools. “You shouldn’t have to of the Mechanical Trade Foundation. Also active go to a dealership for stuff like factory scheduled on the national level in technical careers and edmaintenance or complex repairs,” Bueso said. ucation, the partners headed to San Antonio in Ongoing education is essential, and Dynamic now boasts one of the most highly qualified technicians in the entire country. May to work on U.S. educational initiatives. Dynamic Automotive is a true leader. They were named to The FredPartners Bueso and Lee Forman mentor many apprentices today, just as they themselves were mentored. The late Glen King was a leader at General erick News-Post’s Best of the Best list for 2016. Nationally, they’re one Motors and also taught applied science at Catonsville Community College. of Motor Trend’s American Top Shops, a Head of the Class Winner of Bueso and Forman credit King with amazing support over the years. When the Auto Care Association and Best of Automotive Service Centers by they were first opening in 1995, King tipped them off to a superstar named Vehicles for Change. “We began our business not only working on cars, but also operating Dwayne Myers in one of his classes. “The kid is something else,” he said. In 1996, they hired Myers and he rocketed up the ladder at Dynamic. Now a shop that was respected and able to be relied upon,” Bueso said. “We chief financial officer, Myers was just recognized by ASE and the Auto Care work on all makes and models of cars, trucks, SUVs, minivans, fleet and Association as a World Class Technician, a status shared by only 17 other diesel vehicles, but we also want to be close with our customers.” automotive technicians in the entire U.S. The award requires 22 ASE certifications and Myers now has 27 — and counting. Frederick Libertytown “It’s really miraculous,” Bueso said. “All of us are ASE master techni- 11 Byte Court 10601 Main Street cians. But he’s younger than we are and already surpassed us.” Frederick 21702 Libertytown 21762 “Recipients of the World Class Technician Award are the best of the best,” said 301-662-3300 301-694-6250 Bill Hanvey, president and CEO, Auto Care Association. “Passing 22 ASE tests is a jbueso@dynamicautomd.com Urbana dynamicautomotive.net monumental achievement requiring exceptional knowledge and skills.” 8824 Urbana Church Road The learning never stops for management and employees, and neither does New Market Frederick 21704 their commitment to the community. Each of Dynamic’s four locations, in Fred- 10601 Old National Pike 301-874-8833 erick, Libertytown, Urbana and New Market, is tucked into its neighborhood, New Market 21774 301-694-5460 not next to competition.

Industry leaders on a recent trip to Aruba: (left to right) Henry Buckley (CEO & president of Uni-Select) and his wife; Jose Bueso and his wife, Laura; Dwayne Myers; Brent Windom (president and CEO of IEH Auto Parts, LLC); Karen Myers; Molly and Lee Forman (managing and founding partner, Dynamic Automotive).

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P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


AUTOMOTIVE, AVIATION & UTILITIES

The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association

THE AIRCRAFT OWNERS AND PILOTS ASSOCIATION (AOPA) exists to protect and grow the incredible privilege called general aviation. Whether it is through educating the public about the fun and the utility that aircraft can provide, preparing resources and training material to enhance the skills of pilots everywhere, or advocating for aviation within government agencies, it is AOPA’s job to maintain the strength and vitality of the flying community. “A lot of what we can do is simple but powerful,” said AOPA President Mark Baker. “We are making airports more welcoming and accessible. We invite everyone we can to give aviation a try—millions of people want to fly but don’t know how to get started or don’t believe they can do it. We are changing that. General aviation has a lot to offer, and we have the power to share the fun, the freedom and the amazing opportunities that come with being a pilot,” he added. AOPA is a national membership organization, and the world’s largest civil aviation association, with hundreds of thousands of members who are pilots, aircraft owners and aviation enthusiasts. The association, headquartered right at the Frederick Municipal Airport, was formed in 1939 and employs

nearly 200 people in its Frederick offices. In 2014, AOPA worked with the City of Frederick to create a prototype project demonstrating how underutilized assets can be repurposed to promote the health of airports. At that time, AOPA converted a little-used hangar at Frederick Municipal Airport into the AOPA National Aviation Community Center. Since then, that center has attracted thousands of people from both the surrounding community and from out of town to take part in events that have ranged from fly-ins to a weeklong aviation-themed scouting camp. This year, AOPA will expand on the success of this approach by converting an office building it owns at 411 Aviation Way into the You Can Fly Academy. Basic and applied research related to flight training and aviation safety will be a primary function at the academy. The

new Academy will also become a premier destination for all things related to flight training, including safety education, student pilot training, instructor training, recurrent and specialty training for pilots, and other forms of aviation education. In addition, the academy will serve as a home base for AOPA’s national high school education program, which brings STEM-based aviation education to high school students around the country. To create an exceptional aviation education experience, AOPA will invest in developing first-class training and meeting facilities, a distance-learning studio and office space for staff. The You Can Fly Academy is expected to host several thousand visitors each year, all of whom will need lodging, food, entertainment and more. “We believe the development of the academy on our Frederick campus will not only help advance our mission as an organization, but also enhance the use of the airport, create a positive economic impact on the city, and bring new people and businesses to Frederick,” said Baker. 421 Aviation Way Frederick 21701 800-USA-AOPA aopa.org memberassistance@aopa.org

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AUTOMOTIVE, AVIATION & UTILITIES

Clearview Car Care FOR ALMOST A DECADE, Clearview Car Care has served local customers by providing something many people no longer expect from auto mechanics: transparency. “It comes right down to the name,” Clearview co-owner Steve Duckson said. “We have a clear view of your car’s needs. We don’t recommend things you don’t need, and we don’t use scare tactics. We don’t have fine print here.” Clearview has had locations in downtown Frederick since 2008 and in south Frederick since 2011, and its technicians have more than 30 years of combined experience. The company’s goal in each customer encounter is to give that customer all the information necessary to make an informed decision about car service. Honest interactions and out-the-door pricing—a concept that is gaining popularity now but has been in effect at Clearview for some time—give customers peace of mind when it comes time for a repair, large or small. That commitment to transparency as well as quality is the backbone of Clearview’s success—and the key ingredient in the many accolades and five-star reviews it has received from the community. “You hear the old adage about treating

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“WE DON’T RECOMMEND THINGS YOU DON’T NEED, AND WE DON’T USE SCARE TACTICS. ” people how you want to be treated, and we’ve built a reputation on that,” Duckson said. In that spirit, Duckson said Clearview attempts to give back to community members and businesses in a variety of ways. “If someone gets sick, maybe we’ll do something for them without anyone asking,” Duckson said. “When things go wrong, you make good on them and make them right. We’re like an old barbershop. We have children of customers coming in. Everything is local.” 102 S. Wisner Street Frederick 21701 301-631-9292 Clearviewcarcare.com Steve@clearviewcarcare.com

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COMMUNICATIONS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Miles & Stockbridge

he Frederick-based lawyers of the mid-Atlantic law firm of Miles & Stockbridge have long been recognized for their efforts to help global, national, local and emerging business clients preserve and create value by helping them solve their most challenging problems. That trajectory continues, as new leaders thrive and grow in the office, as well as across the Frederick community at large. Miles & Stockbridge’s Frederick office was established in 1987 through a merger with longtime area law practice Rosenstock, Burgee & Welty, PA. Roots in the community date back to the 1920s. Lawyers then and now have offered extensive local and regional experience in complex transactional matters, commercial litigation, commercial real estate, business and estate planning and land use. With Fort Detrick and biomedical businesses so close by, Miles & Stockbridge lawyers team with life science and biotech partners to provide an extensive array of global services to these businesses on a local basis. Among the firm’s newest rising stars are Laura Melia and Jeremy Scholtes, two lawyers who have worked extensively with local businesses individually as well as with the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce to more broadly serve the area’s market. In fact, Scholtes is just the most recent of several Miles & Stockbridge lawyers to participate in the chamber’s Leadership Frederick program. A true Maryland native, Melia had served in private practice, representing clients in a wide range of matters—from business and estate planning and estate administration to real estate and contract negotiations—for almost 25 years. Before joining Miles & Stockbridge in 2015, she maintained a solo practice, and she is a respected contributor on a wide variety of legal issues to multiple professional and charitable organizations. “The unique nature of my practice affords me the opportunity to exhibit—and bear witness to—leadership in all its varied shapes and sizes,” Melia said. “You don’t need to be a CEO, or at the top of a traditional hierarchal structure, to affect meaningful change around you.” Melia is a member of the Maryland State Bar Association, the Frederick County Bar AsFrederick office: 30 W. Patrick Street Frederick 21701 301-698-2315 milesstockbridge.com

“YOU DON’T NEED TO BE A CEO, OR AT THE TOP OF A TRADITIONAL HIERARCHAL STRUCTURE, TO AFFECT MEANINGFUL CHANGE AROUND YOU.”

sociation and the Professional Advisory Council of the Community Foundation of Frederick County. Additionally, she serves on the board of directors of Frederick Memorial Hospital and Monocacy Health Partners. U.S. Army veteran Scholtes served three tours in Iraq in his 13 years of active duty, and after settling in Frederick with Miles, he transitioned into the Army Reserve as a Judge Advocate General officer and now serves with the 13th Legal Operations Detachment-Expert in Upper Marlboro. At Miles & Stockbridge, beyond his general commercial and business litigation work, he also serves in an outside legal counsel capacity, providing a multitude of small and mid-sized technology, construction and other business clients with general legal advice. With particular experience in government contracts and still holding a security clearance, he also assists clients with various government contract and classified matters.

Laura Melia lmelia@milesstockbridge.com 301-698-2319

“One thing I’ve learned from my time in the military: Success doesn’t happen in a vacuum,” said Scholtes. “And day to day, I find myself invigorated not just by the opportunity to collaborate with colleagues, but with the leaders and trailblazers all across Frederick.” He earned a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and graduated cum laude from the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. In 2017, he was recognized with the firm’s Pro Bono Advocate Award for his work with Platoon 22, a traveling memorial started by the Frederick-based nonprofit organization 22 Needs a Face to increase awareness of suicide among veterans and encourage them to seek help. He also volunteers time and expertise to the Downtown Frederick Partnership, YMCA Capital Campaign Committee, Rotary Club of Carroll Creek and Mount Airy Youth Athletic Association.

Jeremy Scholtes jscholtes@milesstockbridge.com 301-698-2318

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COMMUNICATIONS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Audio-Video Group

HR Answerbox

AUDIO-VIDEO GROUP specializes in the integration of highend and commercial audiovisual systems. Their experienced team works directly with clients to design, build and install custom AV solutions. “We get to know our clients,” said John Pierce, Audio-Video Group director of operations. “We make sure to understand their voice and vision during the first stage of each project.” From teleconferencing for offices and interactive whiteboards at universities to church installations of all sizes, Audio-Video Group offers streamlined implementation of cutting-edge technology. Additionally, the company operates a rental and event division, as well as a service department for upkeep and repairs. Initial consultations and post-installation training ensure that clients maximize the AV potential of their space. For Pierce, being an industry leader means guiding customers to the best choice. “I look at leadership as taking people not necessarily where they want to go, but where they need to go,” he said. “We help them understand how this technology will help them communicate their mission.”

AMANDA HADDAWAY has more than 18 years of experience in human resources. About a year ago, she formed her own boutique consultancy, HR Answerbox, which provides HR consulting and corporate training for small businesses. Haddaway, the firm’s managing director, said she also helps companies engage and retain quality employees. “I really believe that leadership is about unlocking people’s potential to become better, so from an HR perspective, that means growing your employees. You want your employees to become the next leaders of your organization,” she said. Haddaway serves as the chairperson of the Frederick County Workforce Development board and deputy director of the Maryland Society for Human Resource Management State Council, which oversees the 10 chapters across the state. Locally, Haddaway also assists a number of nonprofit organizations with their HR challenges.

8415 Progress Drive, Suite G Frederick 21701 301-668-4448 audiovideogroup.com info@audiovideogroup.com

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240-394-9439 hranswerbox.com amanda@hranswerbox.com

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COMMUNICATIONS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Scott M. Alexander

COTT M. ALEXANDER advises his clients to “look for opportunities to be hit, kicked and knocked to the ground.” But he is not giving them instructions on how to play rugby. Alexander’s advice is meant for business leaders—or aspiring business leaders. It is through the hits and kicks, he said, “that you will learn the most.” Alexander brings more than 30 years of experience in business and a passion for martial arts to his work as an executive business coach and consultant. Throughout the course of his career, he has worked with Fortune 500 companies, mid-size organizations and startups. He is recognized as a sought-after keynote speaker at training conferences, where he often uses his fifth-degree black belt credentials to encourage business leaders to model the discipline, focus and integrity that ancient martial arts espouse. His book “Lead like a Black Belt” has been recognized by politicians, education leaders and C-level executives as a toolkit for leading in the 21st century. “Leadership, much like martial arts, requires us to submit to an all-encompassing process, or journey,” Alexander said. “It starts with our

“LEADERSHIP, MUCH LIKE MARTIAL ARTS, REQUIRES US TO SUBMIT TO AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING PROCESS, OR JOURNEY.” innate abilities and transforms us as we move along the path from doing to being.” The transformation often begins with overcoming self-doubt and second guessing. “Confidence isn’t the absence of fear,” he said. “It’s being able to take action in spite of fear.” Calling up the skills he acquired through his mastery of karate, Alexander works with his clients to develop confidence by employing strategies and tactics that can be learned with practice and discipline. By coaching his clients to push the limits of their attributes and abilities every day, Alexander said he is encouraging them to excel at what they do, even down to the smallest details. “Focusing on the details makes your business stand out,” he said. “It’s the difference between people who paint and people who are artists, between people who play an instrument and people who are true musicians.”

Alexander is a Frederick native, and graduated from Frederick High School in 1983. He earned his bachelor’s degree from James Madison University before completing his master’s degree in psychology at Boston College. Although his work has taken him all over the country, he is happy to be back in mid-Maryland, where he is actively involved in local organizations, including the Rotary Club of Frederick and the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce. “I find tremendous satisfaction in working with our area’s small to medium-size businesses,” he said. “Helping them create strategic plans and ensuring they have the right people and processes in place to implement those plans is very rewarding.” Although his clients represent a variety of fields and industries, Alexander calls upon his black belt training to help all his clients reach higher levels of success. “Successful leaders pursue perfection with precision and intention,” he said. “Although perfection is unattainable, they create a workplace culture where everyone is focused on the ideal, and that creates perpetual transformation.” 301-471-4992 scottmalexander.com scott@scottmalexander.com

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COMMUNICATIONS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Support Unlimited, Inc. Phase 2 Solutions LLC LINDA MORGAN KNOWS that entrepreneurs are big on ideas, but short on time. Since 1989, her business, Support Unlimited, Inc., has been helping owners of small businesses in Frederick County and the D.C./Baltimore region make the most of their precious time by providing critical bookkeeping services that free them up to concentrate on other aspects of growing and running their organizations. “We offer everything from bookkeeping consultations to day-today management of company finances, including payroll, accounts payable and receivables, and balance sheet reconciliations,” Morgan said. Her firm also offers Quickbooks software installation, setup and training, as well as administrative support services. Support Unlimited services are customized to the specific needs of each client. “Whether a business needs us daily, weekly, monthly or quarterly, we provide hands-on support that reflects each client’s unique situation,” Morgan said. “Our focus is on managing our clients’ money so they focus on making more money.” 877-905-2628 301-845-0766 240-367-7664 (cell) supportunlimitedinc.com

DIANNE LEWIS’ LOVE for senior citizens was inspired by her own grandmother. “My grandmother had to deal with major life changes” as she aged with Alzheimer’s, Lewis said, and that was the “catalyst for me to develop empathy and to better understand the challenges seniors face.” In 2011, Lewis formed her Frederick-based company, Phase 2 Solutions LLC, which provides compassionate, personalized services to elder clients and their families. “We help them to navigate the second phase of their life,” she said. That can include financial services, such as assistance with paying monthly bills. Lewis, a certified senior adviser and real estate agent, also assists clients with aging in place or the sale of their home, moving, paying taxes, budgeting and more. Lewis is a strong advocate for her clients. She makes sure to include a client’s family in the discussion but always prioritizes the senior’s independence. “We tailor our goals to meet their needs,” she said. 617 W. Patrick Street Frederick 21701 301-686-8309 phasetwosolutions.com dlewis@phasetwosolutions.com

SENIORS EMBRACING LIFE CHANGES

MaxLife, LLC FEDERAL AND STATE LAWS require employers to provide a safe workplace, which includes protecting employees from harassment, discrimination and violence. Associates of MaxLife, LLC, a training and executive coaching organization, engage a workforce in what are often deemed uncomfortable and difficult yet vital conversations necessary to achieve safe places and maximize organizational success. Our team combines information sharing with active, nonjudgmental listening skills to facilitate conversations on topics of diversity, inclusion, biases, sexual harassment, workplace violence, and leadership and employee development. Through meaningful dialogue and training that includes why, what and how, MaxLife strategizes with leaders and employees of companies, government agencies, educational institutions and other organizations to develop inclusive, agile cultures to consistently meet changing markets, customer needs and demographics, and the requirements of the law. MaxLife also positions clients for regional and global growth and sustainability. “We are a positive force for change,” said Toni Bowie, founder of MaxLife. 301-305-0443 maxlifellc.com Info@maxlifellc.com

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COMMUNICATIONS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

C

Classic Landscaping

lassic Landscaping is a family affair, both literally and figuratively. Started in 1979 by Scott Hall and overseen by Hall until his passing last fall, the company is now operated by his wife, CEO Sandie Hall, and their daughter, President Ashleigh Hall. “We are family-owned and managed, and it’s our family atmosphere that really differentiates us,” said Sandie. “We value the relationships we build both within and outside of the organization. We pursue that relationship element; it’s not just business.” Classic Landscaping is based in Woodsboro and serves clients across Frederick County, reaching as far south as Montgomery County and as far north as Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The company manages large and complex landscape sites, including homeowners and condominium associations, apartment complexes, hospitals, colleges and commercial and public facilities. Classic Landscaping offers grounds management, tree and shrub care, hardscaping and snow and ice removal, among other services. The Halls’ familial mindset is perpetuated among the company’s employees. This mindset promotes stability within the organization, which is demonstrated by the average length of service of its employees. Of the 20 supervisors and managers who operate from Classic Landscaping’s Frederick branch, 14 have been with the company for five years or more. Perhaps even

“WE BELIEVE GREATLY IN EMPOWERING OUR EMPLOYEES TO UTILIZE THEIR EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE TO MAKE DECISIONS.” more impressively, 11 have been with Classic for 15 years or more. With low turnover of key employees, the company can cultivate rich industry knowledge and deep relationships with vendors, clients and properties. Though loyalty and stability are important indicators in any business, Classic’s is more than simply a feel-good story for the company and its employees. “We all enjoy what we do every day,” Sandie said. “From string trimming to executive officers, that joy that we feel in our work carries over. People perceive that. They are valued and they know it. The executives are readily available, and we want to know what our employees think. We seek to be proactive with our clients. We like to be in front of things, and the relationships we have with our clients help us do that.” The family atmosphere also translates into great service for the customer and a better flow of ideas from the front line to the C suite. “We believe greatly in empowering our employees to utilize their experience and knowledge to make decisions,” said Ashleigh Hall. “This gives employees a great sense of appreciation, value and commitment, as they have

authority to make decisions. It also allows us to better serve our clients and their properties.” The mother and daughter team at the helm of Classic Landscaping serves as a leader in the community in a distinctive way. “As women, we bring unique skills and perspective to the industry and to Classic, which can serve as an inspiration.” Ashleigh likens Classic Landscaping’s business practices to those of a modern restaurant that subscribes to the “farm-to-table” theory, which emphasizes the importance of nearby producers and ingredients, positioning Classic Landscaping as a community leader in another fashion: commitment to utilizing local resources. “Our history is very local,” Ashleigh said. “Classic was founded in Frederick County, and I grew up in the community alongside the company. We have and will continue to grow. Whenever we can, we hire local people, we use local vendors. We love Frederick, we live in the area, and we’ve grown along with Frederick. We want to keep in step with the cultures and values of the community.” 11834 Creagerstown Road Woodsboro 21798 301-898-3700, 800-257-3952 classiclandscaping.com

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FINANCE & INSURANCE

N

Northwestern Mutual

orthwestern Mutual, located in the heart of downtown Frederick, includes managing director and wealth management advisor Josh Parish, JD, MBA; wealth management advisor Dan Schiffman, CLU, CFP, CLTC; and financial representatives Cindy Ash, Tyler Bell and Natalie Melendez. The group at Northwestern Mutual, a financial services firm, works with owners of closely held businesses and key employees to help them achieve financial security in various areas of financial planning. “We take a lot of pride providing great personalized planning and access to world-class products and services when we partner with a business owner to help them achieve long-term financial security,” Schiffman said. “Experiencing the impact of a successful business continuation and transitioning the value of someone’s business into retirement income, college funding, charitable giving or multigenerational needs with a client is both gratifying and humbling,” he said. While the financial part of planning is important, he said, a lot of what they do is more akin to coaching. “Good financial security planning has to have passion, purpose and partnership — it takes all three of these aspects of leadership to achieve any meaningful outcome. Yes, there’s a lot of math and finance to successful financial planning, but it is coaching, leadership and relationship that achieve the goals of any plan — financial or otherwise.” One way the group at Northwestern stands apart is having the expertise to plan, lead and coach clients successfully through three

Back row: Josh Parish, Kristie Kirby, Kimberly Hawryluk, Denise Sparks, Annette Tinder and Dan Schiffman; Front row: Cindy Ash, Tyler Bell and Natalie Melendez.

major areas that impact owners of closely held businesses: wealth accumulation, risk management and wealth distribution. “We have the ability to work at both the kitchen table and the conference table,” Schiffman said. “For most people, successful financial planning tends to include important areas such as retirement, college funding, survivorship planning and charitable giving, and those same areas are also important to our clients that own businesses. However, success in these areas is largely dependent on the ability to translate, protect and transfer the value of their business from their conference table over to their kitchen table at some point in time.”

Financial planning impacts a variety of areas and not just the clients directly, but also their communities. The group enjoys the opportunity to set people up for a successful financial future, especially knowing the far-reaching effect it will have on the community as a whole. “When you think about it, that’s an incredible amount of impact, all of the financial stability that gets created in a community by having a part in preserving, growing and creating the capital to have people retire successfully, employ people, pay for college, give charitably and more. Helping to provide some leadership one client at a time, that has such a

long-term impact in our community and is something I know we are proud of,” Schiffman said. “Our favorite part about working with clients is seeing the direct impact the group has on our clients’ lives and futures. Our work can have a lasting effect on a family and also on a community for generations. “Even the first meeting that somebody has with us could be one of the most important meetings they’ve ever had. That’s fulfilling work.” 50 Citizens Way, Suite 303 Frederick 21701-6025 301-302-8730 frederick.nm.com

Northwestern Mutual is the marketing name for The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, Milwaukee, WI (NM) (life and disability insurance, annuities, and life insurance with long-term care benefits) and its subsidiaries. Joshua Parish and Dan Schiffman are Representatives of Northwestern Mutual Wealth Management Company® (NMWMC), Milwaukee, WI (fiduciary and fee-based financial planning services), a subsidiary of NM, and federal savings bank. Joshua Parish is a District Agent of NM. Joshua Parish, Dan Schiffman, Cindy Ash, Tyler Bell, and Natalie Melendez are Representatives of NM and Northwestern Long Term Care Insurance Company, Milwaukee, WI, (long-term care insurance) a subsidiary of NM. Joshua Parish and Dan Schiffman are Registered Representatives of Northwestern Mutual Investment Services, LLC (NMIS) (securities), a subsidiary of NM, broker-dealer, registered investment adviser and member FINRA (www.finra.org) and SIPC (www.sipc.org).

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FINANCE & INSURANCE

Georgetown Insurance Services “INSURANCE ISN’T JUST BUSINESS,” said Patti Maluchnik, CIC, CBIA. “It represents family.” Maluchnik’s father owned a large insurance agency, so joining the family business and getting into the industry was a natural fit. After starting her career at her dad’s company, she joined the Georgetown Insurance Services team, an agency owned and operated by father and son Ray and Remmie Butchko. “I love the company’s dedication to its clients and its community,” she said. “It felt like home from the very start.” Maluchnik enjoys working in Frederick and getting to know the local people and business owners. She loves how genuinely nice people are and that Frederick hasn’t lost its small-town feel. Georgetown Insurance encourages its employees to be involved in the communities they serve and to build relationships, not just sell. “I really agree with that sentiment,” she said. “As an ambassador to the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce, a member of the Frederick County Building Industry Association and a member of the Rotary Club of Frederick, I frequently connect with local business owners and

gain insight and understanding into their particular challenges.” She recalls a time when she persistently recommended that one of her clients purchase directors and officers coverage. Eventually, her client agreed and enrolled in the coverage. They recently had an issue arise that could have cost them an out-of-pocket expense of over $1 million had they not followed Maluchnik’s recommendation. “That kind of experience is what makes my job so rewarding,” she said. “Protecting my clients is always my top professional priority.” 5300 Westview Drive, Suite 106 Frederick 21703 301-696-8104, ext. 308 georgetownins.com pattis@georgetownins.com

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P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


FINANCE & INSURANCE

“WE PUT GREAT VALUE ON OUTSIDE-THE-BOX THINKING.”

DeLeon & Stang or more than 30 years, DeLeon & Stang, certified public accountants and advisors, has been one of the Mid-Atlantic’s premier accounting firms. The organization employs more than 40 accounting professionals, providing tax, audit, financial, business and professional services to more than 3,500 clients. They also offer advisory services, counseling primarily small businesses in all facets of their organization, including identification of hard and soft trends and creating a plan for future growth. With offices in Gaithersburg and Leesburg, Va., DeLeon & Stang is excited to be expanding to Frederick, with their new office slated to open in July. Brad Hoffman, a partner who joined the firm and opened the Leesburg branch in 2012, said the firm’s vision in opening its third location at the historic Monocacy Valley Cannery building in downtown Frederick was based upon a dedication to and desire for “openness.” He described the open-concept floor plan as a visual representation of how DeLeon & Stang operates. “We are a unique organization, much like the [Cannery building] we are moving into,” said Hoffman. “We’re not a traditional accounting firm— we’re a business that happens to do accounting.” Part of what sets DeLeon & Stang apart is its culture, explained Jeanie Price, partner, who has been with the firm for 26 years. “At DeLeon & Stang, we think differently than a lot of other accounting firms,” she said. “We put great value on outside-the-box thinking.” For example, staff members are heavily involved in the organization’s strategic planning; when the firm partners identified the need for the

development of stated principles of their business, rather than doing it themselves, they charged the frontline staff with the task. “A lot of accounting firms don’t include their staff in tasks like that,” said Price, “but that’s part of the leadership style here—making sure that everyone is involved.” Excitement about the new offices, and the bright future of DeLeon & Stang in general, is clearly evidenced by the attitudes of the firm’s representatives. According to Hoffman, what it boils down to is this: “No one else is this ahead of the curve. No one else is trying to win the race to the millennial market. The newer staff is going to be the future of our organization. We are aiming to be first to market with a firm that this new generation of accounting professionals will want to be a part of.” 150 S. East Street, Suite 103 Frederick 21701 301-948-9825 deleonandstang.com bhoffman@deleonandstang.com

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FINANCE & INSURANCE

Frederick Mutual Insurance Company and chief executive officer of Frederick Mutual Insurance Company one year ago, she discovered that the 174-year-old company—the third-oldest mutual insurance company in the state—needed to hit the refresh button, and operate as a startup business. Frederick Mutual was founded in 1843 as a way to insure homes and small businesses against fire. Newmister—who arrived with more than 30 years of experience in the property casualty insurance industry, most recently as senior vice president and chief underwriting officer for Berkley Mid-Atlantic Group—said she wanted to develop a forward-thinking strategy that would challenge its old ways. Frederick Mutual’s quiet and respected presence was not widely known, leading Newmister to reintroduce the company by offering relevant insurance products and services for homeowners and local commercial businesses. The company will launch a new product line this summer, and is developing a digital solution that will make it easier for its agents and policyholders to request quotes and information online. Frederick Mutual Insurance Company is a property and casualty insurance company—rated A- (Excellent) by A.M. Best—that operates through independent agencies in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia, offering coverage for 300 types of business for more than 21,000 policyholders. Newmister plans to ensure agents and policyholders know about the

competitive coverage Frederick Mutual offers to those in the Frederick County area and beyond, citing its metropolitan proximity as a great indicator of the company’s potential growth. “Our team is focused on the future,” Newmister said. “We want to add to our rich history and serve our customers by delivering cutting-edge products.” 57 Thomas Johnson Drive Frederick 21702 301-663-9522 frederickmutual.com info@frederickmutual.com

Woodsboro Bank AS A STRONG, INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY BANK, Woodsboro Bank has been dedicated to serving Frederick County residents since its founding in 1899. Offering quality financial products along with personal service from a well-trained team, Woodsboro Bank has seven branches throughout the county along with online banking and a network of more than 55,000 surcharge-free ATMs located worldwide with more than 30 in the Frederick area. Supporting a wide variety of philanthropic, cultural and charitable organizations is one way Woodsboro Bank is leading in the community. You’ll find many of our dedicated staff members donating their time to help those in need. One of our team members is senior credit analyst Doug Murphy. He leads by example as an active member of the Rotary Club of Carroll Creek, the Community Foundation of Frederick County’s scholarship committee and on the board of St. John’s Cemetery. 50 Carroll Creek Way, Suite 310 Frederick 21701 301-695-0268 www.woodsborobank.com

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FINANCE & INSURANCE

McCaskill Financial or 35 years, the Frederick County community has looked to 220 W. Patrick St. and its community-oriented financial advisors as leaders and experts in the retirement and financial planning arena. Every day—at 4:08 p.m. and 5:08 p.m.— WFMD Radio 930AM airs the “Closing Bell Market Report” with Scott McCaskill, president and a Certified Financial Planner (CFP) at McCaskill Financial, who answers questions about stocks and the market. Every month, Frederick Magazine publishes a column called “Ask McCaskill” that explores a topic of financial interest submitted by readers. “We get a lot of questions from the community,” McCaskill said. “They really view us as the local experts for financial planning and investment questions.” Over the years, McCaskill Financial has worked to repay Frederick County’s devotion through service to the community. McCaskill serves on the advisory board for the Community Foundation of Frederick County, and sits on an investment committee that oversees the City of Frederick pension fund. Along with its commitment to numerous local charities and nonprofits, McCaskill Financial’s work with WFMD and WFRE radio helped raise over $140,000 for Christmas Cash for Kids in 2016. “Frederick County has been very good to us over the years and because of that, we want to give back to the community as much as possible,” McCaskill said. The professionals at the firm specialize in retirement planning—from helping young adults begin saving for retirement, to helping people prepare and transition into retirement, and finally helping them manage their income and investments while in retirement. “There are really two sides to our company… the financial planning side, and the investment management side,” McCaskill explained. Comprehensive investment strategies help clients navigate stocks, bonds, mutual funds, annuities, real estate and tax-efficient vehicles and more. The firm offers a variety of investment management programs, including an Assets Under Management Program, Separately Managed Accounts and a Wealth Builder program. “We’re an independent firm, so we’re not

tied to any large banks or brokerage houses,” he said. “We’re not biased regarding one type of investment or another…our goal is to do what’s best for our client.” McCaskill has been designated a Certified Financial Planner (CFP) by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards in Washington, D.C., and has presented at their National Financial Planning Conference and at the Library of Congress. He has been named “Top Advisor” by Reuters, “Top 100 Wealth Manager” by Bloomberg, “Top 40 Maryland Professionals” by The Daily Record and “Best of Frederick” by Frederick Magazine. He said that the firm prides itself in its comprehensive service to clients, and clients show deep loyalty to the firm. McCaskill said that 90 percent of their clients have been with them for more than 10 years, and many of their clients have introduced their children—and in turn their grandchildren—to the firm for multigenerational planning. “The reputation we have is that we really take care of our clients,” he said. “For that reason, I think our clients enjoy working with us, and refer us to their friends and family. That truly is the greatest compliment we can receive.” 220 W. Patrick Street Frederick 21701 301-668-7366 mccaskill-financial.com Securities offered through Kestra Investment Services, LLC member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisory services offered through Kestra Advisory Services, LLC. McCaskill Financial is not an owned affiliate of Kestra Services.

“WE’RE NOT BIASED REGARDING ONE TYPE OF INVESTMENT OR ANOTHER…OUR GOAL IS TO DO WHAT’S BEST FOR OUR CLIENT.”

❖ NAMED “TOP ADVISOR” BY REUTERS

“TOP 100 WEALTH MANAGER” BY BLOOMBERG

“TOP 40 MARYLAND PROFESSIONALS” BY THE DAILY RECORD

“BEST OF FREDERICK” BY FREDERICK MAGAZINE

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FINANCE & INSURANCE

Frederick County Bank rederick County Bank opened its doors in October 2001, at a time when the entire country was shaken, questioning and unsure. The banking industry was experiencing consolidation and community banks were disappearing. But the team at FCB persisted because we were inspired by the vision of a strong, thriving community. We saw a Frederick where local businesses and families could grow, neighbors would be supported, and people would invest in the future of their hometown. We saw a community that desired a personal touch and relationship with their bank. That’s true community banking, and FCB was intent on bringing it back. FCB is a strong and independent organization that helps develop and support the economic and social health of our community. For 16 years, our team has been inspired by Frederick County because that’s where we live, work and play. Having grown from 35 employees and just two bank centers to nearly 80 employ-

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ees and five locations, we focus on helping local businesses and nonprofits, partnering with individuals and volunteering. With modern bank centers designed for conversation-style banking and more traditional spaces for a classic approach, no matter where you visit, team FCB is warm, friendly and knowledgeable. Whether you want to start a business, purchase or renovate your home, or just ask questions, FCB has answers and solutions. Banking is changing, and FCB is a community bank in motion. In the ever-changing online and payment realms, we continue to introduce and invest in the new technologies, products and services our clients want and deserve. FCB is a leader in commercial banking and lending. We help Frederick businesses start, grow and thrive. We help individuals learn, plan and succeed. We collaborate with local organizations and nonprofits and celebrate the multitude of services they provide to meet the needs of our community.

Our team is committed to helping Frederick continue to be a great place to live and work, to start a business or a family. Being an advocate, a connector, a trusted partner and an integrated part of our hometown is TRUE community banking. Where you choose to bank matters. It’s your voice on what’s important to you and an opportunity to be a part of a larger local movement. Together we can continue the success and prosperity of our community. FCB… More Than A Bank 7 N. Market Street Frederick 21701 301-620-1400 fcbmd.com support@fcbmd.com

P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


FINANCE & INSURANCE

Keller Stonebraker Insurance KELLER STONEBRAKER INSURANCE INC. is a regional, full-service, independent agency providing clients with solutions that protect both personal and corporate assets, reduce risks and deliver uncompromising results. With more than 115 years of experience, KSI has been protecting some of the region’s most successful businesses — both large and small. “With that tenure comes experience,” said John Latimer, Keller Stonebraker’s executive vice president. “If you look at what we offer our clients, what separates us from other insurance agencies, it is our organizational depth and scale. We have the ability to meet the needs of our clients, no matter their size or complexity. Keller Stonebraker has many resources normally associated with a national agency, but because we are locally owned and vested in the communities we serve, the client enjoys a sophisticated approach, but with a very personal touch.” Protecting your family is also a priority. A diverse suite of auto, home and life products enables our team to design a plan that fits your lifestyle and guarantees your peace of mind. And, the company is locally owned so deci-

Ric Buchannan 301-712-9222 ric@ksiinc.com

Andrea Willem 301-712-9228 andrea@ksiinc.com

sions are made locally. With six offices in three states, including locations in both Frederick and Hagerstown, KSI has the size, scale and expertise to meet the needs of all its clients. And while the company’s significant footprint allows KSI to be a true resource for its customers, it’s Michael Cum-

Michael Cumberland 301-712-9224 mike@ksiinc.com

berland, Ric Buchanan and Andrea Willem who deliver the personalized service and advocacy you and your business deserve in Frederick. Who better to understand your personal and business insurance needs than your neighbor and local business colleagues? Frederick Office: 47 E. South Street, #103 Frederick 21701 kellerstonebraker.com

The Frederick County Chamber of Commerce’s

FIRST ANNUAL

Family-Owned Business Conference Monday, November 6, 2017

Workshops include: • Leadership, Legacy and Leaving: succession planning for sustainability • Multi-generational communication • Growing opportunities for non-family members • Multi-cultural teamwork • CEO’s under 30 • Reigniting entrepreneurship within established companies

Save the date

Check frederickchamber.org regularly for event registration, speaking and sponsorship opportunities

A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST | P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7

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GOVERNMENT & EDUCATION

Mount St. Mary’s University

WORKING ADULTS KNOW that pursuing a bachelor’s or master’s degree while juggling a career and family obligations requires perseverance, commitment and flexibility. Through its adult and graduate school offerings, including its popular MBA program, Mount St. Mary’s University has prepared more than 3,000 students who today live or work within about 40 minutes of its Frederick campus. These professionals are now leaders in fields that range from banking to government to education. In an effort to meet the needs of the increasing number of adults who wish to pursue degrees, the Mount has added more than a dozen new

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adult and graduate programs during the last 10 years, including degrees in the biotechnology, human services and health care professions. Degree and certificate offerings currently stand at 18 academic programs. Graduate and undergraduate programs at the Frederick campus offer evening classes and accelerated five- and eight-week classes that enable students to earn their degrees more quickly than through traditional college semester schedules. Life experience can count as well, since undergraduate students may even earn credits for learning demonstrated through standardized tests or military experience. The Frederick campus also offers graduate certificate programs in areas such as government contracting, logistics and supply chain management, project management, forensic accounting and fraud investigation, and organizational development. These programs are completed within 10 months. Regardless of student’s specific area of study, all Mount classes call upon the school’s rich Catholic traditions to develop ethical decision makers who reflect the school’s mission to “cultivate a community of learners formed by faith, engaged in discovery, and empowered for leadership.” Frederick Campus 5350 Spectrum Drive Frederick 21703 301-682-8315 msmary.edu/frederick

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GOVERNMENT & EDUCATION

Town of Emmitsburg

WHEN IT COMES TO BEING A LEADER IN SUSTAINABILITY, Emmitsburg is the little town that could. Nearly 95 percent of the town’s government facilities, including its wastewater treatment plant, are powered by solar energy, and all its streetlights use energy-saving LED light bulbs. The town has also installed a new voltage optimization system that saves on power consumption by reducing excess voltage. These efforts have enabled Emmitsburg to cut its energy bills in half. A new solar-powered algae filtration system at Rainbow Lake should reclaim nearly 642,000 gallons of water a month and reduce the town’s reliance on local wells. It will also significantly reduce Emmitsburg’s use of water treatment chemicals. Emmitsburg’s efforts at sustainability extend beyond power consumption, however. The town has launched a campaign to bring more pedestrian- and bicycle-friendly amenities to the area around its main intersection at Seton Avenue and Main Street. The “Let’s Move” effort calls for more than 3,000 linear feet of new sidewalks in and around the Town Square, as well as new nearby mountain bike trails and a dog park. In recognition of these efforts, Emmitsburg has been named a certified Maryland Sustainable Community by Sustainable Maryland and has received the 2017 Maryland Green Registry Leadership Award. “Our goal is to use what we need so we can save for future generations,” said Mayor Donald N. Briggs. “We like to say that, in Emmitsburg, every day is Earth Day.”

Frederick County Teachers Association

300A S. Seton Avenue Emmitsburg 21727 301-600-6300 www.emmitsburgmd.gov info@emmitsburgmd.gov

City of Frederick

Department of Economic Development

EVERY TEACHER IS A LEADER, according to Missy Dirks, president of the Frederick County Teachers Association. Dirks—who is in her second year of a four-year term—said FCTA’s core mission is to empower the county’s educators to ensure an excellent and equitable public education for all students. That is accomplished, in part, she said, through free professional development opportunities available to FCTA’s nearly 2,800 members. Dirks, a longtime elementary school art teacher, said FCTA holds an annual leadership retreat to help grow the next generation of FCTA leadership and provide teachers with the tools they need to succeed in the classroom. Other than Dirks, members of the organization’s board are fulltime teachers. “Leadership is about how you can make those around you be their best and achieve their highest potential,” she said. “We are constantly working to help all of our members be the best that they can be.”

THE CITY OF FREDERICK’S Department of Economic Development is uniquely experienced to assist business owners with resources to help businesses locate, grow and thrive. “Every day, our office connects entrepreneurs and companies with resources and start-up information,” said Richard Griffin, director of Economic Development for The City of Frederick. Frederick continues to grow as an attractive community for businesses of all sizes, said Griffin. “In Frederick, businesses find a talented and well-educated workforce, easy access to both D.C. and Baltimore, and a quality of life that is outstanding,” he added. The city’s vibrant economic climate is bolstered by a concentration of bioscience and advanced technology companies, professional services and tourism. Historic Downtown Frederick, with a variety of shops and restaurants, serves as a hub for residents, businesses and visitors. “We are here to support all businesses that want to open and grow in Frederick,” said Griffin. Contact Frederick’s Department of Economic Development to learn how its team can help your business thrive.

1 Wormans Mill Court, Suite 16 Frederick 21701 301-662-9077 mdirks@mseanea.org myfcta.org

101 N. Court Street Frederick 21701 301-600-6360 businessinfrederick.com thrive@cityoffrederick.com

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GOVERNMENT & EDUCATION

Frederick Community College “THE FACULTY AND STAFF ARE INCREDIBLY DEDICATED TO SERVING THE STUDENTS AND DO AN EXCEPTIONAL JOB KEEPING STUDENTS AT THE CENTER OF THEIR MISSION.”

J

OHN-PAUL LEGARE, a recent Frederick Community College graduate and outgoing Student Government Association president, credits his development as a leader to his FCC experience. He describes his role as a student-leader as challenging, formative and illuminating. “At FCC, I met so many different people and learned so much from them,” LeGare said. “I have been so inspired by the college’s leadership, and that has helped me grow into a more confident and capable leader.” LeGare’s resume reveals a well-disciplined and motivated student with exemplary test scores, impressive academic grades and roles in the Honors Program and numerous student clubs. In person, he registers as wise and articulate beyond his young age. His confident delivery and compassion reinforce the public speaking awards

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he’s received over the years. LeGare believes that leadership starts with communication. “I like to talk with other students about their academic and career ambitions,” he said. “This conversation helps students recognize their goals, and it inspires me to support them however I can.” FCC President Elizabeth Burmaster described LeGare as an excellent representative of the college. “Throughout his time at FCC, John-Paul has proven himself to be a motivated leader who finds countless ways to get involved,” Burmaster said. “It has been a joy to get to know him and watch him grow as a leader. We are proud to call him an FCC graduate and know he will continue to accomplish great things.” What is perhaps LeGare’s most striking trait is the earnest pride he shows in supporting the suc-

cess of others. He values his peers and finds it rewarding to help others grow to their full potential. “In my first semester, I met a student who was going through a lot of challenges in his life that were affecting his studies,” LeGare said. “He particularly struggled with talking to new people. Together, we worked on developing his social skills so he could find a sense of belonging and integrate with his peers. With a newfound confidence, he earned academic success, became the leader of a student club and graduated this May.” LeGare believes that good leaders are eloquent speakers, but great leaders are also engaged listeners. “So many of my peers achieve amazing things such as attending prestigious honors and STEM conferences, playing in the college World Series and winning technology competitions,” LeGare said. “As a leader, I share pride and excitement for their success. This builds a stronger community where we celebrate achievements together.” Leaders may receive popular acclaim for visionary changes, but LeGare finds that leaders also bring dimension and conviction to support roles. He doesn’t think of himself as a leader who needs to make changes. Instead, he would rather inspire others and use his position to help them realize their vision for FCC. LeGare was moved by how much he learned at FCC, both in and out of the classroom. “The faculty and staff are incredibly dedicated to serving the students and do an exceptional job keeping students at the center of their mission,” LeGare said. “Leadership can be taught in a lot of ways and many places. FCC gave me the chance to experience leadership firsthand, and that’s something I’ll take with me forever.” 7932 Opossumtown Pike Frederick 21702 301-846-2400 frederick.edu

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GOVERNMENT & EDUCATION

Hood College SINCE ITS FOUNDING IN 1893, Hood College has been educating the future leaders of Frederick County, the nation and the world. And now, with the addition of two new doctoral programs, students can develop leadership skills that can take them to the highest levels of their organizations and their communities. Developed in consultation with members of the business, government, education and nonprofit sectors, Hood College Graduate School’s doctoral program in organizational leadership offers two degree options: a doctorate in organizational leadership and a doctorate in business administration. The doctorate in organizational leadership (DOL) is ideal for professionals who hold or aspire to leadership positions in fields such as public and private education, training and development, the government, military or nonprofits. An integrated curriculum explores how candidates can meet personal and professional challenges by leading with a commitment to responsibility, value and service. The doctorate in business administration (DBA) educates today’s business and industry

professionals on how to make decisions based not only on financial performance but also on social and environmental criteria. Students are challenged to use benchmarking and evidence-based research to improve organizational effectiveness and efficiency. Hood’s doctoral candidates explore how the pillars of leadership excellence—mindfulness, resource stewardship, systems thinking and community commitment—are critical to guiding organizations and communities in the 21st century. “Our doctoral programs, although relatively new, are rooted in Hood College’s long and rich history as a liberal arts institution where students are encouraged to be lifelong learners who embrace collaborative skills, self-assessment and critical thinking,” said Hood College President Andrea E. Chapdelaine. Hood College Graduate School Kathleen Bands, PhD Program Director 401 Rosemont Avenue Frederick 21701 301-696-3818 bands@hood.edu

Riverside Midwifery LLC RIVERSIDE MIDWIFERY LLC is a practice of certified nurse midwives providing comprehensive homebirth and well-woman-care services to women and families in parts of West Virginia, Northern Virginia and Maryland. Nannette Jenkins, CNM, founded the Buckeystown-based company in 2010. Services include VBAC, water birth and other supportive home birth choices. There is a strong emphasis on relationship-based care and informed consent with a unique mix of individual, group and home prenatal and postpartum care. Our high-quality, evidence-based care offers you the best of both worlds: the age-old practice of midwives being with women melded with modern skills and knowledge. Home birth attended by certified nurse midwives is a wonderful opportunity to experience the birth of your child in a warm, intimate and safe setting. Riverside Midwifery is a member of the Midwives Alliance of North America and the American College of Nurse-Midwives. 3620 Buckeystown Pike P.O. Box 69 Buckeystown 21717 240-341-4974 riversidemidwifery.com riversidemidwifery@gmail.com A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST | P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7

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HEALTH CARE

Frederick Memorial Hospital “RECEIVING THESE AWARDS ACROSS SEVERAL SERVICE LINES HELPS US EVALUATE THE SUCCESS OF OUR MISSION TO SERVE THE NEEDS OF OUR COMMUNITY.”

or the information needed to understand, compare and evaluate hospital performance, many health care consumers look to Healthgrades, the nation’s leading independent evaluator of hospitals and physicians. Healthgrades independently analyzes more than 4,500 short-term acute care hospitals in the U.S., using statistical models that compare actual versus predicted performance for specific patient outcomes. In 2017, Healthgrades recognized Frederick Memorial Hospital as “best in class” among more than 4,500 hospitals across the country and specifically within the Washington-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia region. Frederick Memorial Hospital’s top honors include: Distinguished Hospital Award for Clinical Excellence: FMH was recognized for performance across 32 procedures and conditions, putting it in the top 5 percent of all hospitals in the nation. Of the 29 eligible Maryland hospitals, Frederick Memorial Hospital is one of only six to earn this designation in 2017 and one of only four hospitals in the state to achieve this distinction for a second consecutive year. Patients treated in hospitals that received the Distinguished Hospital Award for Clinical Excellence had a 26 percent lower risk of dying than if they were treated in a non-recipient hospital. America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Coronary Interventional Procedures: Awarded for a third 38

consecutive year, FMH is the only hospital in the region to receive this distinction in 2017. Patients treated at hospitals that received the America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Coronary Interventional Procedures Award averaged a 45 percent lower risk of dying. America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Critical Care: Critical care includes sepsis, respiratory failure, diabetic emergencies and pulmonary embolism. FMH is the only hospital in the region to receive this distinction. Patients treated at hospitals that received the America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Critical Care Award averaged a 30 percent lower risk of dying. America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Gastrointestinal Care: Gastrointestinal care includes bowel obstruction, gastrointestinal bleed, pancreatitis, esophageal/stomach surgeries, small intestine surgeries, colorectal surgeries and gallbladder surgical care. FMH is one of only four hospitals in the region to receive this distinction. Patients treated at hospitals that received the America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Gastrointestinal Care Award averaged a 27 percent lower risk of experiencing a complication or dying. America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Pulmonary Care Award: Pulmonary care includes the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pneumonia. FMH is one of only two hospitals in the region to receive this distinction. Patients treated at hospitals that received the

America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Pulmonary Care Award averaged a 52 percent lower risk of dying. America’s 100 Best Hospital for Stroke Care Award: FMH is one of only two hospitals in the region to receive this distinction in 2017. Patients treated at hospitals that received the America’s 100 Best Hospital for Stroke Care Award averaged a 34 percent lower risk of dying. “This recognition from Healthgrades reflects our ongoing commitment to offering our patients the highest quality of care while being able to stay close to home,” said Thomas Kleinhanzl, president and CEO of Frederick Regional Health System. “Receiving these awards across several service lines helps us evaluate the success of our mission to serve the needs of our community.” To read more about Frederick Memorial Hospital’s awards, visit fmh.org/quality. 400 W. Seventh Street Frederick 21701 240-566-3300 fmh.org

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NONPROFITS

SHIP of Frederick County

(Student Homelessness Initiative Partnership) GOOD IDEAS can come from anywhere. When Cathleen Cullen, Homeless Education Program administrator for Frederick County Public Schools, sought to create a summer development program for homeless students, she referenced a successful model in Baltimore County. She then promoted her idea to individuals and organizations invested in helping homeless youth, including Frederick County Workforce Services and SHIP of Frederick County, a local nonprofit charity and Frederick County Chamber of Commerce member. After further collaboration with the YMCA and United Way of Frederick County, Cullen’s idea became a reality with the creation of New Horizons Frederick, a five-week summer program where students receive academic training and credit recovery in morning sessions followed by

job skills training and actual work experience with local employers in the afternoon. The goal of the program: help these high schoolers rise above their circumstances to graduate from high school, better position themselves for future success and break the cycle of poverty they’ve come to know. The inaugural New Horizons took place at a single area high school in the summer of 2016. For summer of 2017, New Horizons will expand to include two sites and students from three area high schools. The job experience component of the program is fundamental to the benefits provided to participating students. Through the initiative of the county’s workforce services department, teens are able to earn a wage, begin building a résumé, explore careers and experience onthe-job learning.

P.O. Box 1629 Frederick 21702 240-415-8971 ShipFrederick.com info@ShipFrederick.com

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NONPROFITS

Rotary Club of Carroll Creek

S

“OUR MEMBERS ARE LEADERS WHO COME FROM MANY DIFFERENT BACKGROUNDS, PROFESSIONALLY AND PERSONALLY.”

CROLL THROUGH the membership rolls of the Rotary Club of Carroll Creek and you might think you’re looking at the alumni association of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce Leadership Frederick program. Over the course of RCCC’s 23-year history, scores of current and former members have graduated from Leadership Frederick. They are now applying the insights and knowledge they acquired through the program to lead and implement their club’s many community service initiatives. Through its signature fundraising projects, such as Tour de Frederick and Oktoberfest, as well as numerous other initiatives, club members donate their time and energy to improve the quality of life in Frederick County. During the last year alone, RCCC has awarded $80,000 in community service grants to 24 local nonprofit organizations and awarded $2,500 to local students through its new Frederick County Scholarship Awards. The club has also lent a hand to some of Rotary’s international initiatives by contributing $16,000 to projects in Cyprus, Thailand, South Africa and Cambodia.

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RCCC members also volunteered more than 2,500 hours during the past year to programs such as RISE (Rotarian Initiative for Successful Employment) which works with qualified public housing residents to develop mentorships, professional training, networking and job opportunities. And the club was proud to recognize members of the Frederick Police Department through its Officer of the Month and Officer of the Year programs. This spring, members donned waders and gloves to help prepare, plant and position the aquatic plants that adorn Carroll Creek as part of the Color on the Creek project. Others participated in the club’s annual bike collection drive, which gathered more than 1,000 donated bikes that will be shipped to developing nations. There they will be refurbished through local job training programs and used as vital transportation to school, work and medical care. In total, RCCC has collected and donated more than 3,000 bikes since launching its bike collection initiative. “Our members truly take the Rotary mission to heart,” said Tiffany Ahalt, the club’s president. “They embody the belief that we can — and

should — contribute to improving health and education and alleviating poverty.” In addition to their generous donations of time and talents, 114 members of the club who have given $1,000 cumulatively to the Rotary Foundation have been named Paul Harris Fellows in honor of Rotary International’s founder. An additional 15 RCCC members belong to the prestigious Paul Harris Society in recognition of contributions that exceed more than $1,000 annually. The Rotary Club of Carroll Creek was chartered in 1993 with 47 members. Since then, its membership has grown to more than 150 Rotarians who represent a broad spectrum of professionals, active citizens and service-minded individuals throughout the Frederick community. “Our members are leaders who come from many different backgrounds, professionally and personally,” Ahalt said. “But they share a common desire to have a deep and lasting impact on Frederick — and the world.” P.O. Box 39 Frederick 21705 carrollcreekrotary.org

P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


NONPROFITS

Bar-T Mountainside FOR MORE THAN 50 YEARS, Bar-T has been offering extracurricular programs to enrich the lives of countless children in the Maryland area. Founded in 2006, Bar-T Mountainside in Urbana is the perfect setting for young ones to directly connect with nature and, most importantly, have fun and learn while doing it. The 115-acre farm features a ropes course and 700-foot zip line, giant swing, climbing wall, playground and swimming pool. Founder of Mountainside and owner, Joe Richardson, has made it his mission to engage children with the natural world. “I want to get kids outside,” said Richardson. “I tell these kids, ‘You’re never going to look at a stream the same way again.’” The staff at Mountainside practices child-directed play, where campers themselves are allowed to imagine, create and problem solve. Richardson, a member of the Frederick County Sustainability Commission, strives to be an ecological advocate for future generations. “We’re building community by teaching kids about the environment,” he said. As an activist, Richardson is overseeing

the installation of a new solar-powered geothermal meetinghouse, which will utilize cutting-edge smart grid technology to be a sustainable building. At Mountainside, children can enroll in a plethora of specialty summer camps, from basketball and soccer to fishing and hiking. One of the most popular new camps has been Harvest and Cooking, where children grow, pick and cook their own vegetables. “Summer camp has changed,” Richardson said. “More than just making memories, parents want children to succeed and learn.” Now, with a $2.5 million wetlands restoration grant, students will be able to oversee engineering and construction of local streams for three years. Richardson wants to instill eco-conscious values in our community’s future leaders by example. “Don’t talk about it. Do it,” he said. “Find something you’re passionate about, and take advantage of the incredible resources surrounding you.” 2914 Roderick Road Urbana 21704 301-370-4982 mountainside@bar-t.com

Women’s Business Network of Frederick THE NONPROFIT Women’s Business Network of Frederick informs, encourages and supports women in growing their professional careers or businesses. Membership includes women in mid- to upper-level management of many professional occupaKaren Smith, WBN past president, left, and tions, from marketing executives Sharon Riser, the Women’s Giving Circle. to entrepreneurs. We promote networking activities and business education through monthly interactive workshops, provide leadership and involvement in the local community, contribute annually to local organizations to fund women’s educational programs and offer scholarships for Leadership Frederick participation, each year choosing a qualified individual serving on our board of directors. WBN hosts 10 monthly networking luncheons, featuring guest speakers, at a local restaurant. At our May Business Showcase, members can display information about their businesses and can network with other members and guests. As well as monthly membership meetings, our annual full-day program, “Steps to Success,” models the tools necessary to achieve success in business and for personal growth. Facilitators direct participants in exploring various topics, such as leadership, team building and mapping life goals, and in developing plans to put those goals into action. P.O. Box 3032 Frederick 21705 wbnfrederick.org

Frederick County Society for Human Resources Management (FCSHRM) FCSHRM, A LOCAL CHAPTER OF SHRM, the world’s largest HR professional society, has served HR professionals in the Frederick community since 1975. Our mission is to “Serve the HR Professional and Advance the Profession”—providing educational and networking opportunities to assist in professional development and advancing the profession by ensuring that HR and business leaders have access to the most up-to-date HR practices, regulations and ideas. FCSHRM is led by a volunteer board of directors who share their time and talent to support this mission while working in their “real jobs” as HR practitioners, consultants and business owners. Our 120 members represent more than 95 Frederick area companies. Through our nine monthly chapter meetings and an annual conference, we keep HR leaders informed about HR legislative issues, best practices and trends. We engage with other community partners to help businesses build workplaces that attract and retain employees and remain compliant with the complicated and ever-changing employment regulatory environment. P.O. Box 1516 Frederick 21702 info@fcshrm.org fcshrm.org

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NONPROFITS

United Way of Frederick County ver the past three years, nine Frederick County nonprofit organizations have received nearly $200,000 annually thanks to the United Way of Frederick County’s Community Impact Partner program. As the nonprofits prepare to enter their fourth and final year of the current grant cycle, Malcolm Furgol, director of Community Impact at United Way, said that the value of the program goes far beyond the dollar amount. The grants went to the YMCA of Frederick County, Housing Authority of the City of Frederick, Boys & Girls Club of Frederick County, Interfaith Housing Alliance, Goodwill Industries of the Monocacy Valley Inc., Frederick Rescue Mission, Heartly House Inc., Wells House @ Gale Recovery and the Mental Health Association of Frederick County. United Way fights for the health, education and financial stability of every person in every community, and the United Way’s Community Impact Partner grants provide funding for collaborative partnerships that address specific goals related to education, financial stability and health, with an emphasis on organizations that advocate and mobilize volunteers to implement systemic and long-lasting results. Already, there are signs of progress, Furgol said. The organizations have shared individual success stories made possible through the grants, 42

including those of a domestic violence victim who received the counseling she needed and an 8-year-old who received mental health support. “The whole idea,” Furgol said, “is instead of putting Band-Aids on problems, you find longterm solutions.” United Way of Frederick County is at the forefront of this type of work. Goals under the Community Impact Partner program include ensuring that children are ready to begin school and improving the ontime high school graduation rate in Frederick County. Long-term, the program also works toward ensuring the availability of affordable housing, safe neighborhoods and access to health care for Frederick County residents. The Community Impact Partner grants work to bring participating nonprofit groups together as partners. Nonprofits receiving the grants already are collaborating in new, innovative ways, Furgol said. That includes a community forum planned for late September on the topic of substance abuse and mental health. It is being coordinated by the three health nonprofits that are part of the Community Impact Partner Grant program. In addition, United Way of Frederick County operates the LIVE UNITED grant program, which expects to grant about $25,000 in one-

time funding to nonprofit organizations during the 2016-17 fiscal year that ended June 30. The grants are announced four times each year. Other popular programs funded through United Way of Frederick County include a free income tax preparation program, which assisted more than 700 households this year, bringing back over $1 million in tax refunds. United Way also supports the Prosperity Savings Account program, in which savers receive $3 for every $1 they invest in their post-secondary education, to buy a home or to develop a small business. Since its inception, five savers have used the accounts to purchase a home, a car or enroll in college. Both of these programs are part of the Prosperity Center, an initiative to improve the financial stability of Frederick County residents (prosperitycenter.org). More than 100 teens also completed more than 3,600 volunteer hours through United Way’s Summer Serve program last year. Over the past three years, the program has provided 10,000 service hours to the Frederick community. Summer Serve is a service learning and leadership development summer day camp for 12- to 17-year-olds in Frederick County. 629 N. Market Street Frederick 21701 301-663-4231 unitedwayfrederick.org info@uwfrederick.org

P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


PERSONAL SERVICES & VETERINARY

Mount Olivet Cemetery STEEPED IN COMMUNITY PRIDE and American patriotism, Mount Olivet is considered one of the most beautiful and distinguished burial grounds in the country. The cemetery is located in historic downtown Frederick and has provided final resting places for generations of residents since its inception in 1854. The grave sites of local, state and national leaders are located within the cemetery, including those of such notables as Francis Scott Key, Gov. Thomas Johnson Jr., Margaret S. Hood, Joseph D. Baker, James H. Gambrill Jr., Claire McCardell Harris, Charles V. Main and Sen. Charles M. Mathias. Now In its 163rd year, Mt. Olivet Cemetery continues to be a place of comfort and rest for Frederick County residents and their families. “We are well-versed in providing service and care to families in need of immediate arrangements, along with those simply planning for the future,” said Rick Reeder, sales and grounds manager. The cemetery offers an array of interment options ranging from traditional in-ground burial to mausoleum and niche entombment, as well as memorialization products such as monuments, markers and urns. Mt. Olivet’s board of directors is comprised of local business and civic leaders who share a commitment to serving those who grieve today, while also preserving the cemetery’s rich history. They recently hired Chris Haugh, an award-winning researcher and documentarian, to serve as the cemetery’s historic preservation manager. Haugh is creating educational and tourism opportunities around the cemetery’s monuments and distinguished heritage, including “Stories in Stone,” a weekly blog chronicling the lives of various Mount Olivet inhabitants and their relationship to Frederick’s history.

515 S. Market Street Frederick 21701 301-662-1164 mountolivetcemeteryinc.com

1-800-GOT-JUNK?

BY SAVING BILLIONS OF POUNDS FROM THE LANDFILL, 1-800-GOTJUNK? helps people feel good about letting go of their stuff. We are dedicated to responsible environmental practices by donating and recycling more than 60 percent of collected items, such as used appliances, old furniture, electronics and much more. Whether you are moving, downsizing or just needing more space, 1-800-GOT-JUNK? is ready to help you let go of your unwanted things, whether in your home or at your business. We value your time. Appointments can be scheduled the same day or the next after you call. Our uniformed professionals provide volume-based, no obligation quotes whether you need one item removed or an entire house packed full. “We really want the opportunity to stop by, take a look around, connect with our customers, and really work with them on their budget. Once they are happy, we will get right to work,” said Gregory Frank, franchise partner. 1-800-GOT-JUNK? Frederick 1-800-468-5865 1800GOTJUNK.com A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST | P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7

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REAL ESTATE & TOURISM

Bach & Associates Realtors

V

iewers of popular home and real estate TV shows could easily be led to believe that a Realtor’s main job is to simply show eager buyers a couple of homes and then help them negotiate their offer before they take the keys and, presumably, live happily ever after. While it is true that licensed Realtors need to be skilled facilitators and negotiators, Jennifer Grove, broker and owner of Bach & Associates Realtors, said the best real estate professionals possess a variety of other soft skills that are crucial to home buyers and sellers. “We certainly pride ourselves on the fact that our agents are excellent negotiators and communicators,” Grove said. “But given all the emotions that surround buying or selling a home, we also really focus on listening, flexibility and empathy. The needs of a couple who are saying goodbye to the home they raised their children in are going to be different from those of first-time home buyers.” As an independent, locally owned real estate company that was founded in 1982, Bach & Associates has a long history in Frederick County. All the company’s agents are longtime local residents who have an unsurpassed knowledge of the marketplace, local towns and neighborhoods. 44

With a combined 140 years of experience in residential real estate, Bach & Associates bring extensive industry knowledge to each client they work with. “We know that no two real estate transactions are the same,” Grove said. “Our agents turn to each other for collaborative insights that resolve challenges and develop creative solutions that get homes sold.” Creative thinking has led Bach & Associates to be on the forefront of using technology in real estate. The firm has moved to paperless document storage so that clients can now access, view and sign documents, offers and other forms from wherever they are, whenever it’s convenient for them. In addition, Grove said her firm is committed to staying on top of the latest in Maryland real estate law and requirements so

that their agents are thoroughly prepared to act in the best interests of their clients. “As a boutique agency of only 10 agents, our clients are more to us than simple business transactions,” Grove said. “These are people who will be our neighbors, people we may see in the community at soccer games or participating in the many initiatives we are engaged in to support the community. We view every client as a new neighbor or, when we are selling a home, someone with whom we share a common bond: Frederick County.” Both Grove and her business partner and husband, John, are graduates of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce Leadership Frederick program, and they continually apply the lessons learned there to Bach & Associates. “We know that leaders are responsible and responsive,” Grove said. “Our phones are answered by real people, and our clients always deal directly with an agent. Our goal is personal service that reflects the financial and emotional investment our clients are making in selling or buying a home.” 5301 Buckeystown Pike, Suite 105 Frederick 21704 301-695-9600 bachrealestate.com

P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7 | A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


REAL ESTATE & TOURISM

Tourism Council

of Frederick County (Visit Frederick) JOHN FIESELER, executive director of the Tourism Council of Frederick County for the past 19 years, has found great success in his industry. “I thoroughly enjoy sharing this community with people…the job is really about telling the story of this place, from its history through present day,” he said. It’s all about passion for the destination. In almost two decades of serving the Frederick community, Fieseler has found that the continued expansion of attractive shopping and dining venues, as well as the emergence of local production venues such as breweries, wineries and distilleries, aligns well with trends in domestic and international travel. The birth of the Tourism Council, also known as Visit Frederick, in 1976 began with the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce. With their partnership and collaboration, Visit Frederick has continued to grow and flourish. Fieseler has seen the role of the local tourism industry evolve from simply selling a destination to also taking part in the development of the community. Currently, the council is advocating for a full-service downtown hotel and conference center. According to Fieseler, the expansion of the market from this project “is the next game changer for Frederick.” 151 S. East Street Frederick 21701 301-600-4047 visitfrederick.org

A PUBLICATION OF THE FREDERICK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST | P R O G R E S S 2 0 1 7

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SPORTS, ENTERTAINMENT & RESTAURANTS

Plamondon Companies

Flanked by his sons, Jim (left) and Peter Jr. (right), Peter Plamondon Sr. of Roy Rogers Restaurants accepts the Brice & Shirley Phillips Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017 from the Restaurant Association of Maryland.

ACCORDING TO PETER AND JIM PLAMONDON, leadership continuously develops as you grow a business. “We promote from within, as our managers understand the expectations, mission, and culture, thereby delivering the best service to our guests,” said Peter Plamondon. Founded in 1980 and headquartered in Frederick, the Plamondon Companies encompasses restaurants and hotels. Peter Sr. worked as an executive with Marriott Corporation and led the Roy Rogers brand, and then became a Roy Rogers franchisee. Peter Jr. and Jim joined their father and took the reins in 1998. They purchased the Roy Rogers trademark and today own/operate 24 corporate restaurants and franchise 30 restaurants throughout the Mid-Atlantic.

In 1996, they opened the first Marriott-branded hotel in Frederick, the Fairfield Inn & Suites. Today, Plamondon Hospitality Partners (PHP) owns/ operates nine hotels in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Georgia. Four Marriott-branded hotels in Frederick make PHP the largest hotelier in the county. Peter Jr. and Jim’s belief in their company mission, “The Values You Respect,” is evident in their work and with their community involvement. Jim is a past president of Families Plus and the Restaurant Association of Maryland, and is a board member of Frederick Brick Works. Peter Plamondon Jr. is on the board of directors for the Georgetown Preparatory School, the National Museum of Civil War Medicine and Revere Bank. He is also active with Frederick Community College’s hospitality program. “We don’t just want to work in our communities,” said Peter Plamondon Jr. “We live here, too, and want to make them better.” 4991 New Design Road, Suite 109 Frederick 21703 301-695-5051 RoyRogersRestaurants.com PlamondonHospitalityPartners.com

Tuscarora Tennis Club

Maryland Ensemble Theatre

TUSCARORA TENNIS CLUB is a family-run business founded by Joyce and Aubrey Dixon in Frederick more than 45 years ago. This first-class tennis facility houses a wide variety of premium services. Whether you are a longtime player or new to the sport, you’ll find Tuscarora Tennis Club has something for everyone, living up to their motto: “The Best in Tennis.” The club features four indoor hard courts with Versa-Turf for extra cushioning. Additionally, there are two unique outdoor Har-Tru courts, which are the only clay courts in the area. A private practice space, observation deck, locker rooms and a fully stocked pro shop are also all available to patrons. With a plethora of play options for singles and doubles, the club offers private and group lessons for players of all ages, as well as a summer tennis camp. Their highly experienced tennis professionals are there to coach you every step of the way, with the flexibility to match your schedule and skill level. “There is a pro here for everyone,” General Manager Patti Hagemann said. “It’s all about inspiring others to be the best that they can be.”

CELEBRATING 20 YEARS, Maryland Ensemble Theatre continues to delight, challenge and entertain audiences. Alongside mainstage productions, MET offers family theater programming through its Fun Company branch and late night comedy with its resident improv troupe, the Comedy Pigs. Over the years, its mission has always been bringing communities together through thought-provoking, high-quality theater. MET has a vision of vitalizing tomorrow’s artists and arts leaders with the skills they need. With an extensive arts and education program, both in-house and at schools throughout Frederick County, MET has touched countless students of all ages. “We’re leading towards growth through inspiration and motivation,” said MET Managing Director Christine Mosere. Tad Janes, founding artistic director, has always been a huge proponent of ensemble building, bringing together a diverse team of artists with a common goal and aesthetic in order to build something bigger. “Early on, I realized that hearing options and opinions from all parties may be tiresome but ultimately leads to having the most input and ownership, which leads to strong decision making,” Janes said. “Consensus building is a huge part of my work as a theater artist, and building a collective vision with input from multiple partners is key.”

5216 Renn Road Frederick 21703 301-473-5050 tuscaroratennis.com tuscaroratennis@comcast.net

31 W. Patrick Street Frederick 21701 301-694-4744 marylandensemble.org contact@marylandensemble.org

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SHOPPING & SPECIALTY RETAIL

“HMART FREDERICK WILL BE A DESTINATION WHERE CUSTOMERS CAN TRULY ENJOY ‘GOOD FOOD FOR ALL.”

Hmart ONE OF FREDERICK COUNTY’S NEWEST BUSINESS, Hmart may sound decidedly American, but its full name, “Han Ah Reum,” means “one arm full of groceries” in Korean. For its customers, however, it simply means good, fresh food. The Asian-inspired supermarket opened its new store in the Westridge Square Shopping Center at 1063 W. Patrick St. on May 26. The grand opening celebration of the new 55,000square-foot location featured a traditional Korean folk dance and a Chinese lion dance as well as sales specials and product tastings. The Golden Mile is Hmart’s fifth location in Maryland, joining the chain’s other stores in Wheaton, Catonsville, Gaithersburg and Ellicott City. Hmart now operates more than 90 stores in 13 states, spanning the country from California to Texas to New York, where the business was founded 1982. In 2014, Hmart was recognized as one of the fastest growing retailers by the National Retail Federation, and in 2016, Supermarket News listed Hmart as one of the

Top 50 Small Chains and Independents in the United States and Canada. Hmart’s strong growth can be attributed to its unique and specialized products, including everything from Indian bitter melon to Korean nori spring rolls. In addition to its wide selection of international items, Hmart has built its growing popularity on a commitment to also offering local fresh produce, meat, poultry, fish and seafood. The Frederick store also features six food court areas, where shoppers can savor a variety of ready-to-eat items that can be enjoyed on site and to take home, such as kimchi, side dishes and soups. “As we expand, we like to think that we are reinventing the way people eat through our robust and unique food culture that also promotes a rich and healthy lifestyle to all,” said Brian Kwon, the company’s president. “Our food is our pride, and through its quality we will do our absolute best to maintain our continuous movement towards providing our customers with the joy that comes from it.”

Kyung Sang Su, who will manage Hmart’s new Frederick store, said he hopes the store will become known as the “one-stop shopping” place where culture and quality as well as superb service and value inspire shoppers to look at food shopping in a new way. “Hmart is confident that people in Frederick and the surrounding communities will be very pleased by our opening,” he said. “Hmart Frederick will be a destination where customers can truly enjoy ‘good food for all.’” It is a message Hmart’s Kwon echoes. “We sincerely thank you for gathering around the table and sharing the joy our food brings.” 1063 W. Patrick Street Frederick 21702 hmart.com

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TECHNOLOGY

Lumos Networks

umos Networks is a leading fiber-based service provider in the Mid-Atlantic region serving carrier, enterprise and data center customers with custom network solutions, offering end-to-end connectivity in 26 markets in Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Ohio and Kentucky. With a fiber network of 10,907 fiber route miles and 503,616 total fiber strand miles, Lumos Networks connects more than 1,306 unique fiber to the cell sites, more than 1,600 total FTTC connections, more than 2,100 onnet buildings and over 3,400 total on-net locations. The company also connects 43 total data centers, including five data centers acquired from DC74, two acquired from Clarity Communications and seven company owned co-location facilities. In December 2016, the company announced that it named Frederick as its 25th enterprise market. “Lumos currently has several key enterprise customers in Frederick, representing multiple industries, including health care and education, and we expect continued demand in Frederick in the future,” said Timothy G. Biltz, president and CEO of Lumos Networks. The company previously included Frederick in its Martinsburg, West Virginia-Hagerstown market, but after an updated analysis, decided to separate Frederick into its own market in order to maximize its growth potential. “We believe that the Frederick market fits well into our ‘Large Locals’ strategy of pursuing enterprise accounts within our more than 10,000mile fiber footprint,” said Joseph E. McCourt, the company’s chief revenue officer. Biltz said Lumos Networks wants to be the first to bring to regional markets technology and services originally introduced in metropolitan areas by national service providers. “Our goal is to deliver communications services with excellence, innovation and integrity,” Biltz said. “Our team understands that long-term customer relationships, reliability and accountability are the foundations of our company’s success.” Lumos Networks stockholders recently approved a merger agreement

“LUMOS CURRENTLY HAS SEVERAL KEY ENTERPRISE CUSTOMERS IN FREDERICK, REPRESENTING MULTIPLE INDUSTRIES, INCLUDING HEALTH CARE AND EDUCATION, AND WE EXPECT CONTINUED DEMAND IN FREDERICK IN THE FUTURE.” with EQT Infrastructure investment strategy (“EQT Infrastructure”). “We look forward to working with EQT Infrastructure as Lumos continues to innovate and expand its network, products and service offerings to our customers,” Biltz said. “We are committed to local relationships and measure our performance by the prosperity of our communities and the business success of our customers,” Biltz said. “We live and work in the areas where our customers do business. Our Lumos Networks engineers, service technicians and customer advocates work side-by-side with local businesses to provide customized network solutions and implementation support. We listen. We care. We are trusted advisors.” Scott Austin Enterprise Sales Manager 717-495-7414 www.lumosnetworks.com austins@lumosnet.com

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TECHNOLOGY

Quiacle Technology and Consulting Inc. QUIACLE TECHNOLOGY AND CONSULTING INC. is a managed services provider specializing in project management, IT help desk support and the construction of software-defined data centers. Founded in 2014 by Rafi Soule, Quiacle has serviced a diverse array of international clients as a federal contractor for the U.S. government. Quiacle provides technical and program management expertise in the areas of information technology network design and configuration, network monitoring and management, information security and privacy, as well as system development lifecycle management for information management systems. “We do the consulting, the admin, and the technical part,” Soule said. “You’re not just buying the configuration of a network or computer system. We maintain it and train end users as well.” Soule’s vision is to build a company out of people who have the same ownership mindset that she does. At Quiacle, she has embraced the spirit of collaboration. “A leader is somebody who is not afraid to say, ‘I don’t know,’” she said. “Let’s come together with different ideas and figure this out.” 112 Boxgrove Way Frederick 21702 703-899-5793 quiacle.com

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1. Linda Morgan Support Unlimited, Inc.

9. Taitia Elliott Frederick County Bank

18. Jan Gardner Frederick County Executive

2. Frank Blanchard Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc.

10. Richard Griffin City of Frederick Office of Economic Development

19. Katherine Schneider Battelle National Biodefense Institute

11. Cheryl Bass Jim Bass Group of Real Estate Teams

20. Mark Roso Frederick Mutual Insurance Company

12. Michael Layman Northwestern Mutual

21. Geordie Wilson The Frederick News-Post

13. Dina Davis Morgan-Keller, Inc.

22. Andrea Chapdelaine Hood College

14. Dave Newman Leadership Techniques, LLC

23. Denise Phelps First United Bank & Trust

15. Stacey Collins PNC Bank

24. Denise Jacoby Frederick County Building Industry Association

3. Robin McConaughey Woodsboro Ban 4. James Kelly Frederick County Public Libraries 5. Whitney Hahn Digital Bard Zesty Video Marketing 6. ElizabethCromwell Frederick County Chamber of Commerce 7. Brad Hoffman DeLeon & Stang, CPAs & Advisors 8. Brad Benna Matan Companies

16. Jim Sears Potomac Edison 17. Laura Melia Miles & Stockbridge

25. Michelle Michael AstraZeneca Biologics

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Progress 2017  

Frederick County Chamber of Commerce

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