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PROGRESS ON BEHALF of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce

Board and staff, welcome to the premier issue of Progress, an innovative publication co-produced by the Chamber and The Frederick News-Post. As the Frederick County business landscape evolves, the Chamber is working tirelessly to create value and to provide opportunities for our members to tell their stories. Each of these stories is an important thread in an ever-growing tapestry of the Frederick County business community. Judging from the response to this publication, our members are eager to play a role in the Chamber’s—and the county’s—future. As the Chamber helps write the story of Frederick County’s future, our members’ voices are amplified through this publication and through other meaningful avenues. We launch this publication with the greatest of pride in our members, who are truly the backbone of our economy. If you’re not already a member but are interested in joining, please visit frederickchamber.org or give us a call at 301-662-4164. Best wishes for continued success, Elizabeth Cromwell President & CEO Frederick County Chamber of Commerce

Linda Morgan President, Board of Directors

2016 Board of Directors

Dr. Theresa Alban; Jon-Mikel Bailey (Vice Chair); Brad Benna; Daryl Boffman; Dave Esworthy; Brian Gaudet (Immediate Past Chair); Dr. David Heimbrook; Matt Holbrook; Jason Lee; Michelle Michael; Shabri Moore; Kara Norman; Jean Peterson; Helen Propheter; Don Schilling; Eric Soter; Paul Steckel (Treasurer); Geordie Wilson; Jennifer Milas; Michael Planz; Courtney Stauffer

about progress

editors

graphic design

A publication of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite B, Frederick, MD 21701 301-662-4164

Anna Joyce, The Frederick News-Post Stephanie Fitch, Frederick County Chamber

Anna Joyce, The Frederick News-Post Sam Yu, The Frederick News-Post, cover photo

contributing writers

more to know

Kate McDermott

Katherine Heerbrandt

Jim Mahaffie Kevin Madert Emily Holland Andrea Blackstone Matt Lee Will Franklin Pepper Van Tassell

Tripp Laino Shelby Newsome Dominique Marsalek Lisa Troshinsky Scott Harris Megan Parker Jeff Lyles

All featured businesses are paid advertisers and are chamber members; all content is exclusive to chamber members. To request extra copies, call the Chamber at 301-662-4164.

Elizabeth Cromwell, President & CEO Stephanie Fitch, Marketing Director Produced by The Frederick News-Post Niche Publications Department 351 Ballenger Center Drive Frederick, MD 21703 301-662-1177 Geordie Wilson, Publisher Brent Renken, Advertising and Marketing Director Kevin Berrier, Multimedia Advertising Manager Anna Joyce, Marketing & Niche Publications Manager

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foresight 2020 Like the businesses

we count in our membership, the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce continues to evolve, adjust and adapt to our ever-changing environment. Over the last several decades, our Chamber has had an impressive record of success in addressing the priorities set by our Board, our major employers and the entire Frederick County business community. The common thread, the key to our collective success, has been our ability to plan ahead, to anticipate, and to align our efforts around goals we can all embrace. Our 100th anniversary celebration foretold some significant achievements, but in no way defines our best days. In order to position the Chamber for the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead, Chamber CEO/President Elizabeth Cromwell and the Chamber Board of Directors have established the following priorities as a part of Foresight 2020, the Frederick County Chamber’s policy-setting initiative.

Foresight 2020 has three essential components: 1. BUILDING THE BUSINESS INFRASTRUCTURE OF THE FUTURE - From critical highways that connect our businesses, to land use zoning to facilitate job creation, to streamlining business regulations, to providing essential business travel amenities, the Chamber needs to be at the forefront of both planning and providing the civic infrastructure needed to attract and retain cutting-edge job creators. 2. MAKING THE CASE FOR FREDERICK AS THE DESTINATION FOR BUSINESS - As any effective marketing professional knows, the value isn’t only in the product, the true value is in the brand. Effectively communicating our most compelling qualities can position our community for continued economic growth and prosperity. In a competitive landscape, places that don’t compellingly tell their story risk having their stories shaped for them by competing communities. Frederick County has brilliantly marketed itself as a destination; the time is now to aggressively position the community as the place to do business in Maryland and beyond. The Chamber is uniquely capable of bringing together business, government and the community at large to help shape the message. 3. A WORKFORCE-PREPARED POPULATION - Regardless of the quality of our

underlying infrastructure, and even if we have a great story to tell, if we don’t have an educated and prepared workforce, our efforts to attract and retain high-paying and rewarding jobs will be wasted. CREST is an important start, but only a start. From K-12 to higher education, the Chamber of Commerce will advocate on behalf of our member employers and education partners to lead the region in developing a broad and deep talent pool for tomorrow’s economy. These three areas of focus will inform and guide all of our programs, committees and services. Foresight 2020 is the starting point for continuous improvement, for a common understanding of our collective efforts, and a strategic focus for our members, staff and partners as we prepare for our next 100 years. It’s a team effort, and if you’re not already a Chamber member, we invite you to join us as we write the story of the future of Frederick County!

In a competitive landscape, places that don’t compellingly tell their story risk having their stories shaped for them by competing communities.

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ADVERTISING & MEDIA Locally, advertising and media

companies recovered from the 2008 recession by having a diverse clientele, getting creative with digital marketing and adopting an entrepreneurial spirit to expand their reach and services. Trends in social media marketing— like using video content—are reflected in the changing membership dynamics of the American Advertising Federation – Greater Frederick. “Purely by membership trends, we can see the market is changing, that we are diversifying,” said Adrienne Lawrence, president of the advertising federation. Newer members, she said, include videographers, photographers and web-based companies that focus on SEO [search engine optimization]. The U.S. is by far the largest advertising market in the world, with the $180 billion spent in 2015 expected to reach $200 billion in 2016, according to ZenithOptimedia, a global media services outlet. Traditional print advertising venues that have remained successful have created new business models, according to Brent Renken, advertising and marketing director for The Frederick News-Post. “We operate from an entrepreneurial standpoint,” he said. “Instead of focusing on cost cutting, we are focusing on investing in areas that are going to add more value to readers and advertisers, moving beyond being ‘just a newspaper.’” The News-Post partners with local businesses

Digital Bard Digital Bard, a video marketing company, attributes its success to exceptional storytelling, a deep knowledge of Frederick culture and delivering a creative client experience. “We have a great understanding of the Frederick area, which gives us an edge,” said Whitney Hahn, managing partner, who co-founded the company in 2004 and now has eight employees. “Because of our long-standing membership in the community, we can easily reflect the vibe and swagger of our business clients.”

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“The difference before 2007

and after is that you can’t think in the same way about how you handle advertising.” and organizations to create community events through its burgeoning FNP Events division, has grown its digital advertising department, and has created a full-service ad agency to help advertisers attract business. “We continue evolving the ways we engage with the community, and work hard to be a valuable part of what makes Frederick, Frederick,” Renken said. Having to do more with less is the new reality, said Beth Schillaci, owner of VillageWorks Communications Inc. in Frederick. VillageWorks has been helping companies find the right mix of branding and tools to get their message out

“Through trusted relationships with businesses—nonprofits, government and the private sector—we are often in a position to get access to the people and locations an outsider may not be,” Hahn said. The company makes a point to give back to the community through guest presentations, student learning opportunities and donations. “We allocate at least 10 percent of our gross revenue to community service and sponsorships,” she said. Hahn sees only good things in Digital Bard’s future. “More and more, we are doing ‘tribe-building’ types of videos that build relationships, humanize companies and make connections between brands and their target audiences.”

to target audiences for 17 years. “The recession definitely changed things. Some people totally shut down marketing and others said, ‘We are going to keep going forward,’ and looked for a lot of tools that would make things budget friendly,” she said. Social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Snapchat help level the playing field for small businesses competing for consumer dollars. Digital Bard Zesty Video Marketing focuses on video marketing, but recognizes the value in the explosion of social media platforms. “We’ve seen good results for small budgets and targeted advertising through social media,” said owner Whitney Hahn. “As a consumer, I am terrified by the amount of information Facebook and Google know about me, but as a marketing person, I am thrilled by the opportunities for targeted, cost-effective marketing.” “The industry is healing and the difference before 2007 and after is that you can’t think in the same way about how you handle advertising, how you can communicate and the best way to reach niche markets,” Lawrence said. Businesses are also understanding that traditional families aren’t necessarily representative of their market. “We live in a more diverse world,” Schillaci said. “It’s cool to see companies embracing that.” –KATHERINE HEERBRANDT

5300 Westview Drive, #407 Frederick 21703 240-566-5931 | DigitalBard.com

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ADVERTISING & MEDIA

Randall Family, LLC

The Frederick News-Post he Oscar-winning film “Spotlight” brought home the impact that thorough, responsible journalism continues to play in our society today. As the movie so clearly illustrates, reporting stories of vital public interest is best done on a local level by reporters and editors who know their communities well. Regardless of the platform by which it is delivered, news—and especially local news—encourages a well-informed and engaged citizenship. In Frederick County, The Frederick News-Post (FNP) remains the go-to source for information about local politics, crime and growth issues. But it is also the place where people can get the scores and recaps of local high school games and where families can share with their friends and neighbors the good news of weddings and babies, and the sad news of a loved one’s passing. “That’s the essence of what it means to be a local news source and the reason we remain relevant today,” said William Randall CEO of Randall Family, LLC, which operates The Frederick News-Post. “With the advent of digital media, we can take all the same content that we create for our print format and share it with an even larger audience, making our impact even more significant.” Randall points out that The Frederick NewsPost employs the largest group of professional journalists in the county. “They are committed to reporting the news accurately and fairly,” he said. “They sit through long public hearings and legislative sessions so they can bring you the information that is most relevant to us in Frederick County today, and in a context that makes sense given local history and trends.” There is no doubt that the newspaper business has changed since William T. Delaplaine began publishing his paper, The News, which years later would become the News-Post, in

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1883. But the FNP is changing, too. “Our digital marketing services have completely redefined how we can help our customers advertise,” he said. “With access to scores of data, we can target messages to the specific audiences they wish to reach. And we can multiply the effectiveness of their messages when we offer them as a package through our print and digital formats.” Today, the company offers a “soup to nuts” menu of marketing services, ranging from traditional print ads to search engine optimization services (SEO). “We call it ‘consultative selling,’ and it’s opening doors to new clients every day,” Randall said. Along with its burgeoning special events marketing effort, known as FNP Events, the company is continually finding new ways to strengthen its bottom line. “Our Frederick Music Playlist events, like the Frederick Music Showcase, are generating a whole new level of excitement about our ability to reach new and expanding audiences.” Although some may question what special events and SEO have to do with local news, Randall said the answer is simple. “They enable us to continue to make local news possible. Everything we do is designed to help us stay financially sound and stable to keep our newsroom humming.” As the parent company of The Frederick News-Post, Randall Family, LLC, takes its commitment to quality local news coverage very seriously. “Our expansion into new events and digital marketing are all designed to ensure that we will continue to be Frederick’s Fourth Estate for the next 133 years,” Randall said.

“Everything we do is designed to help us stay financially sound and stable to keep our newsroom humming.”

351 Ballenger Center Drive Frederick 21703 301-662-1177 FrederickNewsPost.com

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WILLIAM Randall

CEO, Randall Family, LLC 130 employees

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ARTS, CULTURE & ENTERTAINMENT T H E A R T S are serious business in Frederick County. Whether it’s popular arts festivals such as the annual Festival of the Arts on Carroll Creek or Catoctin Colorfest, which regularly attracts as many as 100,000 people to Thurmont every fall, the arts are a significant contributor to the area’s economy. In fact, a 2016 report by the National Center for Arts Research put Frederick among the nation’s top 10 vibrant large arts markets, grouping it with Rockville and Silver Spring at No. 8. “The arts are an important economic engine for Frederick, attracting visitors, tourists, new residents and new businesses and employers,” said Louise Kennelly, executive director of the Frederick Arts Council. “Nonprofit arts and culture organizations are a $10 million industry in the City of Frederick. When you

add the for-profit creative economy participants—including those businesses and organizations that make or market products and services associated with innovation, aesthetics, design or culture—that number jumps much higher.” With scores of arts venues including the Delaplaine Visual Arts Education Center, the Weinberg Center for the Arts and cultural and historic attractions such as the National Museum of Civil War Medicine and Monocacy National Battlefield, Frederick County is a haven for those who enjoy and support arts and culture. “We attract about 30,000 people through our doors every year,” said David Price, executive director of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine. Although those visitors generally come with an interest in medicine or history, Price said they soon discover that Frederick County has much more to offer. “I would say that nine times out of 10, they leave here and immediately begin -SEE NEXT PAGE-

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“I have honestly heard of people who visited Frederick and the Delaplaine and then decided to move here.”

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ARTS, CULTURE & ENTERTAINMENT

Other Voices Theatre Other Voices is the resident theater company at The Performing Arts Factory at 244 S. Jefferson St. in Frederick. Other Voices was established in 1998 by Donna Grim as producing director and has expanded through the years with Susan Thornton as artistic theater director. Other Voices currently produces musicals, comedies, mysteries and children’s theater in The Performing Arts Factory’s 114-seat theater. The Easter weekend production of “The New Adventures of Alice in Wonderland” has been running since 1996 at the Weinberg Center for the Arts in Downtown Frederick. Other Voices also has a children’s theater touring company that takes productions to elementary schools and day care centers in the Frederick County area. Other Voices is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization. 244 S. Jefferson St., Frederick 21701 OtherVoicesTheatre.org

Frederick Children’s Chorus

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planning their next visit to Frederick to take in other arts- and culture-related events.” Many of those events occur at the Weinberg Center for the Arts, Frederick’s historic theater. Whether hosting the Frederick School of Classical Ballet’s annual production of “The Nutcracker,” community theater productions or the Frederick Speaker Series, the Weinberg attracts an estimated 70,000 people every year as its reputation as a regional arts venue grows. “More than 40 percent of what we present is in conjunction with community-based organizations,” said John Healey, executive theater manager for the Weinberg. “We often hear

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Children begin to sing naturally at an early age, even before language develops. The Frederick Children’s Chorus promotes and develops that early impulse, training young people in vocal artistry and music literacy. The result is a group of young performers with a professional sound and long list of performance experiences. Many children boast membership in the chorus for 10 or more years. Founded in 1985 by Montgomery County Public Schools music teacher Judy DuBose, the chorus accepts children in third grade through their senior year in high school. A primary program, Little Music Makers, provides early music experiences for children ages 3

through 8. Two week-long Summer Chorus Camps offer opportunities to sing and play together while preparing mini-concerts. The Frederick Children’s Chorus has been a member of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce since 2012. Anticipating inevitable transitions in leadership, DuBose sought guidance from the Chamber to provide the nonprofit organization with a board of directors dedicated to sustaining the organization for the next 30 years.

from people who have stepped on our stage through one of these programs that it was an experience they never forgot.” With 1,147 seats, the Weinberg may be the largest venue some of these local performers may ever see, but for the growing number of national and international performers and speakers who grace its stage, Healey said the venue is gaining in popularity as “a small, warm space” that is a great place to perform without the stress that sometimes accompanies larger venues. The Delaplaine Visual Arts Education Center is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year and has watched its attendance and programming increase every year. According to Catherine

Moreland, the Delaplaine’s CEO, more than 80,000 people visit the center each year to take in its gallery shows, special events and arts classes. “Frederick County is a pretty amazing place,” Moreland said. “We could not do what we do with the tremendous community support we receive.” Now that improvements along Carroll Creek Linear Park have expanded farther east, the Delaplaine is enjoying increased foot traffic—from both locals and visitors. “I have honestly heard of people who visited Frederick and the Delaplaine and then decided to move here,” she said.

10716 Etzler Mill Road Woodsboro 21798 301-845-2451 | fredcc.org officemanager@fredcc.org

—KATE MCDERMOTT

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AUTOMOTIVE U P D AT E Remember those days of vacations in the family RV? Maybe it was a little pop-up camper or one of Winnebago’s first motor homes, which were once considered the lap of luxury with their insulated walls, kitchen appliances and bathroom. Continued innovations in the recreational vehicle business have made today’s motor homes, pop-up campers and trailers seem like The Ritz-Carlton compared with their early ancestors. And although the equipment has changed, the lure of family vacations spent exploring the country by day and swapping stories by campfire at night has not. “There are a tremendous number of people who want this lifestyle,” said Kelly Shanholtzer, president of Beckley’s Camping Center in Thurmont. “When I started in this business 35 years ago, I would say the average age of our customer was 55 or older. Today, I’d say the average age is 35.” Beckley’s is the No. 1 recreational vehicle dealer in Maryland and draws customers from throughout the region, including from Harrisburg, Pa., and Washington, D.C. Shanholtzer’s customers range from families to outdoor enthusiasts and scout leaders. Their love of the great outdoors may explain why his sales are already ahead of this

time last year. It also helps that he has a growing rental business that attracts sports fans who want the comforts of home when they tailgate at their favorite teams’ games. Comfort and style also feature prominently in car buyers’ choices in 2016. Marisa and Mike Shockley, the sister and brother team that manages Shockley Honda in Frederick, said new technology continues to motivate car buyers. “Auxiliary ports for charging phones, navigation systems, backup cameras, lane assist and turn-signal sensors are very popular,” said Mike Shockley. They’re so popular that the dealership has hired product specialists whose sole responsibility is to help customers fully understand their new cars’ technology before and after delivery. Marisa Shockley said national, state and local trends indicate that car sales in 2016 will be among the highest over the last eight years, despite the fact that many car owners are holding on to their cars longer than in the past. “The average age of cars on the road today is 10.5 years,” she said, which explains why their service department is “very busy.” That’s the case for Rice Tire as well, where 40 percent of the business is in consumer sales and service, with the remainder dedicated to commercial

vehicles, including heavy trucks and trailers. Given the demand for vehicle maintenance, Chris Chase, Rice Tire’s CEO and president, said his business tried to rent another large, multibay facility in close proximity to their existing service center on Tilco Drive in Frederick, but the required environmental changes to the building would have been so costly that they decided to shelve the project. Those kinds of setbacks are what compel industry leaders to continue to work with local, state and federal legislators to find ways to support the automotive industry and its customers. Progress is being made on some fronts, as evidenced by a new law passed by the Maryland legislature during its 2016 session. Several years ago, legislation was passed that reduced the tax paid on a new car purchase when car buyers also traded in a vehicle. Instead of being taxed on the purchase price, the tax owed is calculated on the difference between the purchase price and the trade-in. The new legislation passed this session allows for the same treatment for trade-ins on leased vehicles. “That is certainly going to be a boon for the consumer,” Marisa Shockley said.

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–KATE MCDERMOTT

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AUTOMOTIVE

Dynamic Automotive No one survives, much less thrives,

for two decades in a given business without doing something right. For Dynamic Automotive, an award-winning, Frederick-area group of auto repair shops, it begins and ends with the people they serve. “We’ve been in Frederick County for over 21 years now,” said Dwayne Myers, co-owner of Dynamic Automotive. “The secret is definitely our relationship with the community. The automotive industry doesn’t always have the best reputation, but that can change if you care about the people you’re serving. Once you get their trust, it comes back to you…We give back to the community because they’re our lifeblood.” As the leaders of Dynamic Automotive continue to expand their business—they have locations in Frederick, Urbana, Libertytown and New Market—they also are expanding the ways in which they give back. Education is a key part of the business culture, with every employee having the opportunity to attend seminars, workshops and industry events. And that’s not just for auto technicians. From human resources to bookkeeping to oil changes, Dynamic Automotive employees make education a pillar of their work. For automotive training, Dynamic Automotive collaborates with other local businesses like Auto Plus, Advance (CTI), Parts Authority, the National Automotive Parts Association, and WORLDPAC. The business received the 2014 Motor Age Top Shop and the Head of the Class Award from the Auto Care Association for its commitment to training. That loop is completed when Dynamic Automotive employees attend community events like carnivals and hold car care clinics with free safety checks and education on basic car care procedures. Most recently, Dynamic Automotive created scholarships for local students. It’s a business that lives its motto: “Where Customers Become Friends! “According to Myers, however, there is another local group that has factored into the success of Dynamic Automotive: the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce. Membership in the Chamber, Myers said, pays big dividends when advice or counsel is needed. “With the Chamber, they focus on business,” Myers said. “If I need someone to work on my computers, or I need help with something like a zoning issue, they know how, or they know somebody. They’re another great resource in the community.”

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11 Byte Court, Suite D, Frederick 21702 301-685-0578 dynamicautomotive.net

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AUTOMOTIVE

Rice Tire

family business now led by its third generation, Rice Tire serves commercial and retail customers in Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania. With 10 Rice Tire service locations and a retread plant, it’s a big business, but the company is still deeply committed to the longtime principles of honesty, value and good service instilled by Donald B. Rice Sr., who first ran a Gulf Service Station on South Market Street in Frederick back in 1929. To accommodate his growing local market for large construction and commercial vehicle tires, Donald Rice began Donald B. Rice Tire Company in 1956. Ken Rice, the youngest of Donald Rice’s

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three sons, took over the company in 1975. Ken’s son-in-law Chris Chase leads the management team of the company today. Rice Tire’s growth has been very steady—and very satisfying, said Chase. “Our network of locations in the Baltimore-Washington area serves the needs of our regional commercial customers no matter what area they are working in,” he said. “We carry all kinds of automobile and service equipment tires, from small lawn and garden tires to earthmover tires that stand 9 feet tall!” Rice Tire leaders are proud to meet the needs of clients who want specialty tires, and also of the company’s long record of quality service to customers, which Chase credits

“Ten lucky customers will get to win a ride in the blimp.”

to a very experienced and loyal employee base. “Many of our employees have been with us 20 years or more,” he said. “That means they know our customers well, and our customers know us, too. You can’t put a dollar value on those kinds of relationships.” Rice Tire is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year, and the company is planning a big splash to celebrate. One of the highlights will be the famous Goodyear Blimp’s visit to Frederick in June. “Ten lucky customers will get to win a ride in the blimp,” said Chase. There’s already talk of a fourth generation coming along to lead Rice Tire in the future. Family businesses certainly helped to build Frederick commerce and will continue to play an important role. 909 N. East St., Frederick 21701 301-662-0167 ricetire.com customerservice@ricetire.com

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BIOMED U P D A T E As part of the Maryland research

triangle that includes Johns Hopkins University, the National Institutes of Health and Fort Detrick, Frederick County is invested in attracting and expanding the life sciences industry, including biotechnology. The biotech industry grew by 23 percent between 2001 and 2013 in Frederick County, and will continue to grow, according to Helen Propheter, Frederick County’s director of Economic Development. “All the things that are going on in the biomedical industry with technology are crazy. It’s amazing the changes that are coming, that are in demand,” she said. Being able to check your insulin levels on your watch, or text message your doctor and receive service are two examples, Propheter said. Among other advantages, Frederick County has a highly educated workforce, Propheter said, and a welcoming financial environment to attract and retain businesses, including commercial tax credits. “Those are just some reasons MedImmune originally picked Frederick and continued to expand in Frederick when they could have gone anywhere in the world,” Propheter said. “The workforce is really the sustainable piece, though. We have the level of knowledge base and scientists they need to grow,” she said. Medical device manufacturers and biotech companies comprise 27 percent of medical research in the U.S., according to a 2015 report

in the “Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).” But, the U.S. is slipping as the world leader in funding biomedical research, from 57 percent in 2004 to 44 percent in 2012, with Asia, particularly China, tripling investments between 2004 and 2012, according to JAMA. To maintain its leadership status in biomedical research, the U.S. needs new investment, according to the report. As global competition heats up in the field of biomedical research, a local biotech firm is there to provide systems and software to boost the research efforts of national and international clients. Founded by former NIH employees in 2006, RURO is headquartered in Frederick, and its software is used in more than 35 countries, including China. Its laboratory information solutions [LIMS] helps research laboratories manage inventory and workflow, and centralize, automate and secure information. RURO’s clients include medical research laboratories at hospitals and universities, big pharma and biobanks—biorepositories that store biological samples. The business has grown rapidly in the past five years from nine to 35 employees, according to Chief Operating Officer Tom Dolan. “LIMS does the same automating for everything, from sample risks to test prep and testing itself, and communicating test results,” Dolan said. “It dramatically cuts down on errors by creating a central place for all the

data in all the research processes.” In the future, Dolan said, he would like to see LIMS help research like that of the Undiagnosed Diseases Program at NIH. The UDP combines clinical intake with research in a process leading to clinical diagnosis. Without a high-functioning LIMS system, managing those processes and workflows would be difficult. “We have gone from offering six products to two, and we are trying to specialize more and more,” Dolan said. “I’d like to see, more than anything, translational science [like the UDP at NIH] better funded because it has an incredible role to play in the future of medical research.” –KATHERINE HEERBRANDT

Grifols Biomat USA In Frederick, you don’t have to be a doctor, a nurse or an EMT to save a life. That’s because every donor who walks into Grifols Biomat USA, Inc. Plasma Donor Center in Frederick plays a role in helping physicians treat their patients who suffer from rare, chronic and life-threatening conditions in areas such as pulmonology, hematology, immunology and neurology. Plasma is the clear, liquid portion of blood containing proteins and antibodies. Grifols extracts these proteins to be used in medicines to treat many illnesses. The challenge facing the Frederick Biomat plasma donation center right now, however, is an

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acute shortage of plasma donors. “It takes from 130 to 1,200 plasma donations to treat just one person who may need plasma medicines for one year,” said Emily Harris, manager of the Frederick center, noting that most patients require regular and lifelong treatment with these medicines. “We want to get the word out to our friends and neighbors in Frederick County about the vital role they can play in saving lives,” she said. Frederick Plasma Donor Center 1037 W. Patrick St., Frederick 21702 301-360-2400 grifolsplasma.com

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BUSINESS &

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

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he good news is that Frederick County’s unemployment rate was at 4 percent this spring, according to the 2015 Annual Report of the Frederick County Office of Economic Development. The bad news, for employers, is that low unemployment creates specific challenges for recruiting and retaining employees. The outlook for hiring and keeping qualified personnel requires creativity and “outof-the-box thinking,” according to Amanda Haddaway, managing director at HR Answerbox. “It’s important to develop a strategy on how to create a candidate pipeline when candidates are not coming to you,” she said. The Chamber’s business and professional services membership sector includes experts in human resources and staffing, like Haddaway, as well as accountants, attorneys, consultants and security professionals and others. Haddaway, and fellow Chamber members Lisa Coblentz of Manpower and Tammy Feaster of Spherion Staffing, LLC, have front-row seats to the employment landscape of Frederick County, past, present and future. Coblentz, vice president and owner of Manpower in Frederick, has been connecting employers and employees for nearly 30 years. Feaster, owner of Spherion, has offices in Frederick, Hagerstown, Chambersburg, Pa., and Martinsburg, W. Va. They are experts at identifying challenges and trends facing owners of businesses large and small, and helping them find ways to address obstacles and understand the driving forces behind recruitment and retention.

ONE OF THE BIGGEST HURDLES BUSINESS AND

professional services employers are coping with now, and will continue to confront, is a shrinking number of qualified workers. As baby boomers retire, the workforce is diminished because, according to Coblentz, “It’s a numbers game.” With the largest segment of the total population dropping out of the workforce, “a lot of talent is going away,” she said. The employment sector losing out most significantly is skilled trades. Manpower’s 2015 talent shortage sur-

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vey identified the largest worker gaps in skilled trades workers, CDL drivers and teachers. Beyond the mere numbers is a population that is going on to obtain post-graduate degrees instead of entering the workforce directly from college, according to Feaster. “It’s difficult to find workers who want to come in and learn from the ground up,” she said. “Because of their education, they want to come in at midlevel. For employers, it’s important to find people who want to come in learn the business through all its cycles.”

GIVEN THE LOW UNEMPLOYMENT RATE, SALARIES

are not as competitive as they should be. To address that, some employers are focusing on perks and benefits. For older workers, that may mean phased retirement, schedule flexibility, consulting or part-time work. The younger generation wants to be more mobile, dress more casually, and incorporate work with social networking opportunities, according to Feaster. “Creative hiring solutions have to come into play,” Haddaway said. In her work with small business owners and managers, Haddaway helps determine talent acquisition strategies. “It could mean they need better training and development plans, temporary placements instead of full-time hires, innovative programs like apprenticeships, or hiring folks who may have a criminal past that they have cleaned up,” she said.

seniors from both counties will participate in eligible career track occupations in science, technology, engineering and math and manufacturing, and will get training in job skills. Collaboration is key in developing workforce solutions, and the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce is a major force in bringing the economic community together, Coblentz said. “I am thankful to be in a community like Frederick where there is such a collaborative response to needs—where the nonprofit, the public sector and the for-profit businesses come together to address specific needs of our community.” –KATHERINE HEERBRANDT

ONE NEW AVENUE FOR EMPLOYERS IS A state-initiated pilot program designed to direct and help high school students into jobs early, Haddaway said. Apprenticeship Maryland, a partnership of state and local agencies and community business partners designed to augment the candidate pipeline, begins this summer in Frederick County. Frederick and Washington counties received state grants to participate, and, if successful, it will be offered statewide. Sixty high school juniors and

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BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Berman, Sobin, Gross, Feldman & Darby LLP

hen it comes to practicing law, the professionals at Berman, Sobin, Gross, Feldman & Darby LLP don’t mess around. A combination of timehoned skill and unparalleled commitment to the unique needs of individual clients allows their firm to provide quality legal representation in worker’s compensation and personal injury cases to residents of Frederick County and throughout Maryland and Washington, D.C. “I’ve personally been trying cases in Frederick County for over 25 years, and we opened our first offices here about 20 years ago,” said Ken Berman, one of the firm’s founding partners. “We haven’t just watched this area develop and grow; we’ve grown with it.” Ken Berman, Cliff Sobin, and Alan Gross founded the firm in February 1991 as a three-partner affair. They began with a small office in Gaithersburg staffed by three assistants and no associates. Even as they’ve expanded to more than 20 attorneys and 45 total staff across nine

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“We haven’t just watched this area develop and grow; we’ve grown with it.” offices, their commitment to providing quality representation tailored to the specific needs of each client hasn’t wavered. In the courtroom, Berman, Sobin, Gross, Feldman & Darby focuses primarily on personal injury and worker’s compensation, often representing union members and their families. With decades of experience among them, partners Berman, Gross, and Matt Darby devote much of their efforts to representing injured firefighters, police officers, teachers and others throughout the region. The firm offers counsel in cases ranging from motor vehicle and medical malpractice incidents to non-injury issues like social security disability, small business formation and elder law. No matter the issue, clients of the firm

can expect a one-on-one relationship with their attorney that’s uncommon in today’s legal arena. The partners all agree that each case is different; “There’s no one right way to do this,” said Berman. “Every one of my clients gets my private line. We receive calls almost daily from people dissatisfied with their current lawyer simply because they won’t return their calls.” Berman said. “It’s not a hard thing to do, but we know it’s an important one.” This level of dedication to the local community makes sense since a large percentage of the firm’s staff calls Frederick County home. With the March 2016 opening of an office in the heart of downtown, Berman, Sobin, Gross, Feldman & Darby is poised to proudly serve those needing legal representation in Frederick and beyond for many years to come. 30 W. Patrick St., Suite 105 Frederick 21701 800-827-2667 bsgfdlaw.com

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BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

DeLeon & Stang, CPAs and Advisors

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rederick County’s growing client base and strong employment pool influenced DeLeon & Stang’s decision to open an office here in the fall—expanding the premier Mid-Atlantic accounting firm to a location many of its employees already call home. With offices already in Gaithersburg and in Leesburg, Va., DeLeon & Stang plans to open a third office in Frederick sometime this fall. “The area continues to grow and be a great place for an accounting firm—or any business—to call home,” said Bradly Hoffman, CPA and partner. “Frederick is on the upside of what I see as one of the bigger booms in and around this area. It will be really cool for us to be a part of that as it’s happening, and I look forward to the next step in our relationship with the area.” DeLeon & Stang has built a reputation for more than 30 years for its approachable style and high-quality tax, audit, advisory, financial, business and professional services. “We aren’t your average accounting firm,” said Hoffman. “We have a great team that keeps us moving forward and is dedicated to creative solutions.” The firm works closely with Tom Hood, executive director for the Maryland Association of CPAs, who helps employees look to the future, stay at the forefront in the accounting industry and create strategic plans. DeLeon & Stang was recently named one of Fortune’s 50 Best Workplaces for Flexibility for its supportive environment and commitment

From left: Brad Hoffman, Allen DeLeon, Jeanie Price, Rich Stang, Dan Dellon

to the professional development and health of its employees. “Our team is the backbone of our business,” Hoffman added. “Their happiness is important to the firm because that translates into excellent service to our clients.”

100 Lakeforest Blvd., Suite 650 Gaithersburg 20877 301-948-9825 210 Wirt St., S.W., Suite 102 Leesburg, Va. 20175 571-442-5220 deleonandstang.com

Case Search, LLC

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bout a decade ago, a lawyer approached Lindsay Mickey with a request: Automate the tedious and time-consuming task of sifting through the Maryland Case Search website. As a result, Case Search was born. “Lawyers often need an entire team to accomplish what we can using our system,” Mickey said. “We pull the information off the state database and onto our own daily, then spit it back out in a manageable, ready-to-use format.” This streamlined process allows lawyers to

connect more efficiently with potential clients. Thanks to the huge amounts of data they collect and organize, Case Search is able to provide detailed demographic information that can be easily translated into personalized advertisements. “Essentially, we’re giving our customers unlimited targeted advertising,” Mickey said. In combination with their professional marketing services—including campaign development and priority postal delivery—Case Search seeks to provide a competitive edge to legal professionals for a modest price. “We’re even happy to

offer free trials to anyone interested,” Mickey said. “Confidence in our methods couldn’t be higher.” 410-871-8144 casesearchllc.com lindsay@casesearchllc.com

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BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Sandler Training

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ou might have heard it said that much of what we manage to accomplish in life is reducible to our habits—for better and for worse—and our professional lives are certainly part of that equation. Whether you believe this is true or false, Sandler Training has considered the possibility, and has carved out an enormous market share in the global sales training industry by focusing not on one-day seminars or supposed quick fixes, but on consistent reinforcement and changing sales teams’ behavior. Larry Van Sant, president of Sandler Training in Frederick, noted that Sandler is unique in its method of providing training and reinforcement to clients all the way through the processes of breaking counterproductive sales habits, developing good ones and maintaining them as those clients move forward. The company is also unique in that it approaches the act of making a sale from the inside out. “We teach a process that uses a great deal of understanding about how we think and how our clients are thinking, as well as how their prospects are thinking," Van Sant said. Success as a salesperson, he explained, relies a lot on “transactional analysis,” in which a salesperson assesses the prospect’s needs and communication style, and then decides how best to respond to them. It’s about

selling a solution rather than a product, Van Sant said. It’s also about engaging with prospects, finding out what their true needs are, and closing a sale at the end—if it is a good fit. Van Sant sees a lot of opportunities for Sandler Training in Frederick, as the city is becoming an increasingly more attractive location for biotech and software companies—tech companies in general—all of which have a need for an effective sales force. With 34 years of experience in the business world, Van Sant feels qualified to provide the insight companies need to turn over leads, and having used Sandler Training to improve his own business in the past, “I know that it works.” Many Frederick business owners and administrators he’s met through the Chamber also have a strong drive to improve. It’s a dynamic that signals a bright future for a solutions-oriented consultant. 5100 Buckeystown Pike, Suite 250 Frederick 21704 240-215-6428 (O) 301-748-1500 (C) Larry.Vansant@sandler.com vansant.sandler.com

LARRY Van Sant President Sandler Training Van Sant Consulting Group

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BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Miles & Stockbridge

Joseph S. Welty

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etween them, Joseph S. Welty and Thomas E. Lynch III have nearly 80 years of experience serving the people of Frederick County and surrounding communities. As the managing principal and a principal respectively, of the Frederick office of law firm Miles & Stockbridge, Welty and Lynch have a wealth of knowledge when it comes to the area and its history—indeed, for many residents and businesses, they are part of that history. But while their reputation is rooted in the past, the firm and its leaders are also embracing their prospects for the future. “We are best known for our comprehensive legal and business counseling and our success in helping all types of business succeed—from large manufacturers, entrepreneurs and real estate entities to financial institutions and family farms,” Welty said. “To be successful, we make it our job to understand how our clients’ businesses operate.” According to Welty and Lynch, Miles & Stockbridge offers a full spectrum of legal services, with extensive experience in commercial and

Thomas E. Lynch

“All of this could not have been possible without the county’s commitment to economic development with the support and encouragement of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce.” real estate transactions, business and estate planning and litigation. With more than 225 lawyers working in seven Mid-Atlantic offices, the firm provides deep experience in legal matters related to corporate counseling and transactions, labor and employment, intellectual property, government contracts, products liability and financial institutions. The future looks bright for the firm, as it is expanding its West Patrick Street offices in Frederick in anticipation of adding new lawyers to its team. Welty points to Miles & Stockbridge’s people as a key driver behind the firm’s success.

“We have very capable lawyers and staff who are proud to be a part of the rich legal history of the Frederick community,” he said. “Our lawyers are quite adept at working with our firm’s other offices across the region, and we have the client service commitment and technology in place to support these efforts well.” Lynch noted that the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce has played an integral role in supporting them over the years. “All of this could not have been possible without the county’s commitment to economic development with the support and encouragement of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce, the trusted voice for business in this county for more than 100 years.” 30 W. Patrick St., Suite 600 Frederick 21701-5665 301-662-5155 milesstockbridge.com

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BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Sandy Olson, Re/Max Results

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or Sandy Olson, it’s about more than real estate. With 115 employees in two offices, it’s clear the Re/Max agency Olson leads in Frederick knows how to help buyers and sellers of all stripes. With professional experience dating to 1999, she has a full breadth of knowledge in the field. Perhaps what truly sets her apart, though, is her success in a different area: success itself. As her business has grown, so, too, has her interest in teaching her charges about the principles that underlie success and effective professional performance. In this way, she is passing on what she has learned to employees. “The goal is to recruit good agents, train good agents and teach them to be really successful business people,” Olson said. “My passion is teaching people success principles and business principles.” Of course, real estate remains at the center of what Olson does, which is important given that it’s a huge investment for any household. But her focus on continuous learning and professional development shines through to clients. “A lot of real estate is building relationships with people and providing value,” Olson said. “When people want to work with you or join your office, you need to provide value and a high level of service and professionalism. It’s the tools of the trade but it’s also things like marketing. [Real estate is] more than just a transaction.” Already a certified mentor and trainer who is available to present workshops, Olson is training in Jack Canfield’s Principles for Peak Performance and, once certified, will be able to provide educational activities on those specific principles, as well. “I’m thinking about expanding [teaching] to other Realtors and businesses like title companies, or really anyone running their own business,” she said. The future looks bright for Olson, her team and, she said, Frederick as a whole. “I guess I would see things becoming more of a regional attraction and not just a local community,” Olson said of Frederick. “It’s a cosmopolitan destination. When we sell Frederick, that’s a big part of it…But our business is about listening and not talking. What do people want? The area fills a lot of needs.” 7210 Corporate Court Suite B Frederick 21703 240-629-3101 discoveroutstandingresults.com frederickhomesales.com A p u b l i c a t i o n o f t h e F r e d e r i c k C o u n t y C h a m b e r o f C o m m e r c e a n d T h e F r e d e r i c k N e w s - Po s t

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BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Linton Shafer Warfield & Garrett, P.A.

At the helm of LSWG are co-managing principals Kevin R. Hessler, CPA and Barbara J. Roman, CPA (seated); and principals Eva Webb, CPA, Edmond B. (“Ted”) Gregory, CPA, ASA; Jennifer P. Clingan, CPA; and Brian E. Rippeon, CPA.

ne of the first things Don Linton did after he acquired Lloyd Fogle’s bookkeeping practice in 1965 was to make sure his new accounting business joined the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce. It would prove to be the first of many important community connections that the firm would make throughout its long and distinguished history.

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More than 50 years later, LSWG continues to be a leader in Frederick County, both as a highly regarded public accounting and business consulting firm, and also as a major contributor of time, talent and resources to scores of community organizations. “Frederick County runs through our veins,” said Kevin Hessler, co-managing principal of the firm. “What Don started, both by immediately

joining the Chamber and then by being one of the founders of the Community Foundation and the Greater Frederick Development Corporation, (the precursor to today’s Downtown Frederick Partnership), shows not only his vision as a business leader, but his commitment to his community. It’s a philosophy that we continue to embrace a half century later.” Hessler said being headquartered in Frederick gives LSWG a distinct advantage when it comes to recruiting top-notch talent. “We really get the best of the best,” he said, noting that the majority of the firm’s 37 employees live in Frederick County. “They know they can enjoy a very high quality of life without the hassle of a long, tiring commute.” With a client list that includes large and small businesses, as well as local nonprofits and public agencies, LSWG’s employees take great pride in supporting their friends and neighbors, both as volunteers and as dedicated professional advisors. “We love being here,” Hessler said. 201 Thomas Johnson Drive Frederick 21702 301-662-9200 LSWGcpa.com

Cowork Frederick Inspired by the global coworking

movement, Glen and Julia Ferguson opened Cowork Frederick in 2012 to provide a place for freelancers, entrepreneurs and telecommuters to come together to work, share ideas and learn. Forty people, representing 32 businesses, now work out of Cowork Frederick. Members have access to shared workspace, desks, meeting rooms, a break room with coffee and snacks, printers and high-speed Internet in a renovated historic building in Downtown Frederick. But Cowork Frederick is more than a great building and amenities. When someone joins Cowork Frederick, they connect with other

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motivated, smart, creative people in a wide variety of professions. “Coworking creates opportunities for ‘accelerated serendipity,’” according to the Fergusons. “Almost daily, one member discovers another who has knowledge or a skill they need.”

Memberships are available part- or full-time, with no long-term contracts. Day passes are available and meeting rooms can also be reserved by nonmembers. Cowork Frederick also hosts events open to the public, including Frederick Web Technology Group presentations, Frederick Startup Community meetings, and Show & Tell lunches. AIGA Blue Ridge also holds board meetings, workshops and classes there. 122 E. Patrick St., Frederick 21701 301-732-5165 coworkfrederick.com info@coworkfrederick.com

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BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

12oneLLC - Accounting Services

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ou’re en route to another soul crushing day at the office when it hits you: “What am I doing with my life?” If you’ve always wanted to be your own boss, but simply don’t know where to start, look no further. 12oneLLC provides strategic CFO and accounting solutions to new and emerging businesses in Frederick County. If you’re considering starting a business or have just started one, then 12oneLLC is the unique support partner that you need. The company is focused on helping its clients grow and maximize their business profits. From business plans and budget development, to pricing, sales, marketing and financial result analysis, 12oneLLC is there to help

you succeed. They are so certain they can help you that they’ll provide services to new businesses for little or no fee. Instead, they look for the opportunity that your future success can present. The company and its founder have over 30 years of experience working with highly profitable companies. With 12oneLLC, you get to focus on what matters: your business and your customers. Join 12oneLLC on the cutting edge and grow together. 22115 Fair Garden Lane Clarksburg 20817 301-503-4096 12onellc.com | browe@12onellc.com

Thrasher’s Cleaning Service If you’re always jittery about germs when you go out to

412 Pine Ave. Frederick 21701 301-846-0959 | Fax: 240-556-0322 thrasherscleaning.com

public places or appointments, rest assured, you’re not the only one. Thrasher’s Cleaning Service of Frederick opened because owner Timika Thrasher feels the same way. “We started our cleaning business because our son has severe allergies,” Thrasher said, and being a self-described “germophobe,” she worried every time she or her husband Greg took him to a potentially contagious environment. When Greg observed that they wouldn’t have to worry if she could clean other places the way she cleaned their house, “It was like a light went off,” she said. Now Thrasher’s Cleaning Service has 28 employees and uses green cleaning products to service commercial spaces all over Frederick. Every product they use, except for disinfectant—for which no “green” version exists, Thrasher said—is certified by the independent nonprofit Green Seal and has minimal negative impact on the environment. The products are also hospital-grade, allowing for the highest possible germ-exterminating effectiveness.

Galaxy Control Systems

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nvision a technology company that views its clients as humans, not numbers. Picture calling them any time, day or night, and hearing a fellow human on the other end of the line. Welcome to Galaxy Control Systems. “We’re not driven by a board of directors. We’re not beholden to public shareholders,” Executive Vice President Rick Caruthers said. “Most of our competition has been bought by multibillion-dollar corporations, but we’re still privately held and client-focused.” As a result, GCS excels as a local company

with global ambitions. Clients and dealers from 60 countries enlist their services, yet the access control products they sell are manufactured in Walkersville. Free training programs are also offered at these offices, ensuring customers are equipped to utilize the hardware and software they’ve purchased. “In this industry, you have to be able to react quickly to emerging technology. Because we’re able to do that, we can beat our competition to the shelf,” Caruthers said.

The data backs Caruthers’ confidence, as GCS has seen record growth each of the last three years. In a burgeoning industry, Galaxy Control Systems stands at the forefront of innovation while still holding the client in the highest regard. 3 N. Main St. Walkersville 21793 800-445-5560 galaxysys.com info@galaxysys.com

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BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Kalico Design K

im Dow, owner of Kalico Design, a green-certified  graphic design firm, founded her company in 2008. Kalico specializes in the health and wellness, women-oriented, and pet-related industries. Kim and her employees not only have knowledge of their subject matter, but they are also passionate about it. “These niches are near and dear to our hearts,” she said. Dow believes the key to her company’s success is a collaborative approach with clients. “We’re good at listening to their needs. We meet with a client and ask a lot of questions. We figure out what they want, how they can use it and how to make it cost-effective.”

She credited her success to “parents who instilled a very good work ethic. And my husband who challenges and supports me.” Not one to shy away from a full schedule, Dow is also founder and publisher of Sass Magazine, sister company of Kalico Design. Frederick lays an ideal foundation for the creativity it takes to run more than one business. “Frederick supports new ideas and unique, niche businesses.” 125 E. Patrick St., Suite 3 Frederick 21701 240-243-9065 kalicodesign.com | sassmagazine.com kim@kalicodesign.com

Constellation Building Systems t’s 10 on a Saturday night and the air conditioner fails. Your employees and customers are complaining. This could be a disaster, and you could lose business as a result. Will your HVAC technician be available to make the repair? Can they come out right away? If you have a contract with Constellation Building Systems, someone will be there to answer the phone and make the repair. David Keelan, Constellation’s general manager, prides himself on his company’s equipment service and replacement capabilities, emphasizing that Constellation does the job well at a competitive price and gets it done right the first time—with true 24/7 service, as well. Part of a larger group, Constellation can

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bring in energy-efficient solutions from parent and sister companies Exelon and BGE Home. Trusted by Starbucks, Anne Arundel Medical Center, Jos. A. Bank and the Plamondon Hospitality Partners network, Constellation is a marquee choice in commercial HVAC equipment maintenance and replacement throughout Maryland’s Capital Region. 1409A Tangier Drive, Baltimore 21220 1-877-427-2003 ConstellationBuildingSystems.com customerservice@ constellationbuildingsystems.com

Support Unlimited, Inc. inda Morgan, owner of Support Unlimited, INC., works with startups and small businesses on an array of bookkeeping services, personalized to the clients’ individual needs. What’s helped? Fort Detrick and biotech companies that are located in Frederick. “Seeing the overlap between those two major employers here in Frederick has fostered a tremendous amount of growth in the business industry,” she said. Morgan provides services to businesses supporting major employers. Her clients come from referral or word of mouth. She also credited the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce.

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“My membership in the Chamber is what kept me in business through the recession,” she said. “The relationships that I had made and continued to make at the Chamber are how I was able to continue to grow and maintain my business.” As industry trends favor software programs, Morgan said there’s still a need for bookkeepers. “Business owners want to go do what they do, make their widgets. They don’t want to do the rest and they’re hiring people to do the rest for them.” 3 W. Frederick St., Suite A  Walkersville 21793  301-845-0766 supportunlimitedinc.com

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COMMUNICATIONS

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elecommunications, the communication of information over distances and the technology that deals with that, is a massive industry, encompassing phone, radio, television, wireless and computer networks and more. The field continues to evolve as demand for cost-effective, more tightly integrated technologies grows. “Integrated” is the key word, regardless of the specific platform. Radio has gone digital. Phone and security systems combine a full complement of features, including Internet-based technologies. But not every business has the same needs, and that’s where technological advances can help telecommunications companies provide customized solutions, especially in a field where evaluating and implementing those solutions can be a complex process. Simply buying and selling software and hardware isn’t enough. Consumers want methods of integrating their phones, computer, security systems and more.

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A decades-long tech industry veteran who began his career in the 1970s with IBM, Mike Koenig, owner of The Answer Group in Thurmont, said his experience is valuable in this arena. “I can figure out what my clients need and am I am pretty good at solving problems and finding answers,” he said. “There are no perfect, packaged solutions.” The Answer Group, a telecommunications and technology business, is mostly a one-man show, with Koenig on the front lines, a fact that his small-

Radio activates the consumer, and digital captures them.”

business clientele can appreciate, he said. His business, serving the Frederick and Washington, D.C., areas, is taking off as his clients’ companies regain their footing after the 2008 recession. Although the short-term employment outlook for telecommunications installation, maintenance and repair is stable, the industry projects healthy growth through 2022, according to state occupational data from Projection Central, part of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The key to running a successful telecommunications company is staying on the cutting edge of new developments. Neil Glessner of Glessner Technologies in Hagerstown prefers to call it “the bleeding edge” because it’s not always easy to stay ahead of the game, especially when you task yourself with being the one to lead the charge on technological advances. Started by his parents in 1972 as a security alarm system venture, as the years passed, Glessner Technologies has responded to marketplace changes in large part by -SEE NEXT PAGE-

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COMMUNICATIONS

Datastream Communications “W

hether you need a small or medium-sized business phone system, a basic setup, or a complex setup with an array of features, we have you covered,” said Erik Doll, CEO of Datastream Communications. One of the many companies benefiting from the continued influx of corporate growth and businesses relocating to the Frederick area, Datastream provides phone solutions and increased awareness of Hosted VoIP technology. “We understand the challenges facing small businesses—we are one ourselves,” he said. “This gives us a tremendous advantage over other larger providers. Being so agile, we’re not restricted by corporate protocols, complicated pricing and contracts, and automated customer service call centers.” Doll said Datastream is proud to be reliable and flexible with customers, and also to provide future-proof technology. “Being smaller allows us to customize solutions, implement changes quickly and respond faster and in person to every one of our customers,” he said. Located in Eldersburg, the company serves business customers in Maryland, Washington, D.C., Southern Pennsylvania and Northern Virginia. It designs custom solutions from the ground up for clients, and makes sure

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acquiring a computer technology company. Glessner now encompasses alarm systems, telecommunications and computer technology, focusing on integrating those three disciplines. Those moves helped the company grow during the recession because customers were looking for ways to do more with less. Redundant jobs could be replaced with technology; security cameras interfaced with computers, phones and video became more prevalent as businesses looked to more advanced security systems. “When the economy goes down, crime goes up,” Glessner said. “We are very good at coming up with creative solutions.”

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“We handle every customer as if they were our only customer.” it all works together, personalizing phone systems, voice and fax solutions for specific needs. Datastream also handles business needs for cabling, network monitoring and small call centers. “In any business, voice technology is vital—for customers, clients and providers. We like to keep things simple and take the phone burden off the customer,” he said. “That’s a big part of our quality and service commitment. We handle every customer as if they were our only customer.” 219 Adam Smith St. Suite B Eldersburg 21784 410-220-2020 www.datastreamip.com

ERIC DOLL CEO, Datastream Communications 5 years with the company

Radio

Radio, despite dire predictions for its future, reaches 90 percent of everyone over age 12 on a weekly basis, according to Nielsen Media Research. Radio is successful because it, too, has developed a symbiotic relationship with the digital age. Manning Media is home to stations The Eagle 106.9 FM (WWEG), Key 103 FM (WAFY), WARK 98.9 FM, and 102.1 MORE FM. Formerly Manning Broadcasting, the company today looks very different than it did when it started in 1982. “We work with a lot of small and medium-sized businesses to find the proper media mix,” said Fred Manning, president and CEO.

Clients want a return on their investment for their advertising dollars, and combining Internet and radio marketing helps them achieve that, and gives them the tracking capability they need to know the message is being received. “Radio activates the consumer, and digital captures them,” Manning said. The arrival of Pandora, Spotify and YouTube in an already crowded market didn’t faze Manning. “One of the things that those can’t touch is our community involvement,” he said. “They will never have local employees, or local on-air personalities, involved in local activities, talking about their local areas.” –KATHERINE HEERBRANDT

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COMPUTERS, IT & TECHNOLOGY

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rederick County is throwing open its doors to information technology gurus by providing a space to cultivate IT innovation. Building on a modest but growing presence of small to midsized computer and technology businesses, Frederick County Government is turning one of its downtown properties into an IT incubator, which will be an offshoot of the business incubator Frederick Innovative Technology Center [FITCI]. FITCI is getting a boost in funding, new space and a new director. “We are building on the story we already have, with several IT companies already located, or planning to locate, in Downtown Frederick,” said Helen Propheter, Frederick County’s director of Economic Development. “What we need is a workforce.” The county building at 118 N. Market St. was on the market with no takers, so County Executive Jan Gardner decided to revitalize FITCI by designating the ground floor of the three-story building as an IT incubator. Propheter set up a series of charettes to help configure the space, which will include a stage for tech talks, and a bike tree where cyclists can secure their bikes indoors. “There’s a drive to keep people living and working on our main streets, and bring more businesses downtown, along with more millennials,” Propheter said.

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She expects that the process of refitting the building, which is in the initial planning stage, could take up to a year.

In 2014, Maryland was ranked first

in the nation in “Entrepreneurship and Innovation” by the U.S. Department of Commerce for the third year in a row, according to the Maryland state website. Maryland also ranked first for concentration of businesses and jobs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, with the fourth highest concentration of tech employment in the nation. With so much neighboring competition in Montgomery County, the City of Baltimore and Washington, D.C., Propheter said it’s incumbent upon the county “to get it right” to attract businesses and potential employees. Having a pool of qualified workers to help IT companies stay current is a challenge. Keeping abreast of ever-changing technology, said Cory Moskowitz, vice president of sales at Innovative Inc., is key to an IT company’s success. The company has locations in Frederick and Hagerstown. One way to do that is to create an environment where engineers and programmers can be creative. “We embrace innovation and help our engineers to create workshops at home,” Moskowitz said. Billed as a strategic service provider, Innovative doesn’t just sell and maintain hardware and software. “Today it’s about having the best technological strategy,”

he said. In essence, Innovative functions as an IT department for its clients. Helping clients craft business strategies to achieve their goals is a model that is still evolving, Moskowitz said, and has helped Innovative stay competitive. As the computer/IT market grew more crowded, buyers became more demanding in their expectations. “They needed us to be more strategic, to solve real-world business problems, rather than be reactive to issues,” he said.

While IT companies like Innovative serve the IT function for a wide variety of businesses, others, like Essential Systems Solutions in Frederick, have a specialized clientele. Founded by Michael Tash and Jason Thompson, Essential Systems offers Point of Sale systems to restaurants and retail stores. The industry, Tash said, has grown the most in the past 5 to 10 years. Essential sells the equipment, and installs and maintains it for restaurant and retail businesses nationwide. Customers use the system to ring up sales, do inventory, track payroll and credit cards—“anything to do with money,” he said. As consumers become more tech savvy, they want online ordering and other extras offered through applications on their mobile devices, including tracking loyalty points, and recommendations based on individual preferences. –KATHERINE HEERBRANDT

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COMPUTERS, IT & TECHNOLOGY

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Innovative Inc.

he current competitive and global business landscape demands that technology play an integral part in short and long-term strategies for companies. The challenge that many business owners and managers face is keeping up with various technology strategies, applications and systems and overall trends that assist with operationalizing their company’s mission, products and services. Sometimes keeping the doors open and managing growth is hard enough! Any modern organization that has growth in its business model must invest in and leverage technology to successfully execute its goals. Historically, Frederick County-based businesses have looked to the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area for the high-level technical expertise required to accomplish this. This meant not only paying metropolitan rates (including travel time), but also slower response times—which often meant that these businesses were “lowest on the totem pole” because of larger metropolitan corporations demanding top resources from service providers. With Innovative Inc.’s Frederick location passing the second year anniversary mark, this has now changed. Since 2001, Innovative Inc. has provided strategic technology solutions and

“Focus on what you do best, we’ll handle the rest.”

exceptional customer experiences to more than 500 businesses in Western Maryland, Central Pennsylvania and the West Virginia Panhandle region, including clients with headquarters and branch offices in Frederick County and in eastern areas. Frederick County businesses can now get the best of both worlds: an agile, high-touch, locally-owned business with the expertise and capabilities of a large Baltimore-Washington metropolitan firm. Innovative’s Frederick office has experienced tremendous growth over these last two years, something that Cory Moskowitz, vice president of sales, said coincides with the Frederick market in general. A native of Frederick, Moskowitz describes the growing city as “up and coming and evolving. Frederick has started to merge small-town with a metropolitan vibe, resulting in a very unique market.” The technology industry is evolving and

growing too, which only validates Innovative’s growing presence in the Frederick region. Moskowitz is seeing a shift occurring in the market; more people will be accessing Innovative’s brand of strategic services and proactive approaches instead of reactive, break fix, and other lower value propositions. Innovative Inc. focuses on strategy, experience, and technology—specifically in that order. “When we focus on strategic long-term goals first, and fully deliver on those strategies with our highly experienced team next, technology is simply along for the ride,” he said. Business owners, CEOs, and other high-level decision makers now have a local resource that can strategically leverage technology to assist them with growing their Frederick County businesses. “Focus on what you do best, we’ll handle the rest,” Moskowitz said. 2100 Old Farm Drive, Suite C Frederick 21702 240-578-4127 innovativeinc.net 

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FINANCE & INSURANCE

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echnology has enabled consumers to bank, invest and even shop for insurance 24/7. But online rate quotes and investing cannot offer the personal touch that people want when it comes to protecting their money and other assets, as evidenced by a 2015 Harris Poll that found 86 percent of Americans would prefer to do at least some banking in person. “Even though the days of people relying strictly on brick-and-mortar banking are going away, there will always be a need to balance technology with good old-fashioned relationships,” said Taitia L. Elliott, senior vice president of commercial banking for Frederick County Bank. “ATMs and Internet banking will never replace the personal relationship between a banker and his or her customers that is so crucial to helping people achieve their financial dreams.” She pointed out that Frederick County is a heavily saturated banking community, with 17 institutions serving the area’s nearly 246,000 residents. Yet that number is lower than it has been in the past, due to consolidations and some banks moving out of the market. “Since the consumer confidence crisis of ’08, there has been a huge pendulum swing to-

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ward regulatory burden and there are a lot of increased costs associated with meeting those regulations,” she said. “I think it takes real creativity and commitment to survive and thrive in banking today.” Elliott believes there will always be room for national, regional and community banks in Frederick County because the public is savvy at comparison shopping. “Consumers come in knowing what they want and what options are available to them,” she said. Understanding clients’ pain points, their struggles and their dreams for college, homes and businesses, is a pivotal part of a financial planner’s job. That’s why after his industry was marred by the actions of some, Brad W. Young, CFP, president and CEO of Maryland Financial Planners, Ltd., is committed to ensuring people approach their financial investments carefully and with due diligence. “Do business with people you can trust,” he said, noting that at a minimum, clients should seek out financial planners who carry one or more of the industry’s various professional designations, including Certified Financial Planner (CFP) or Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA). Qualified planners will stay on top of all changes to the tax laws that could impact their clients—both now and in the future. “For

instance, Maryland’s estate tax affects estates of $2 million or more, even though the federal threshold is $5.36 million,” Young explained. “So people need to plan accordingly so they can avoid Maryland’s lower threshold.” Although legislation has been signed into law that will bring Maryland’s threshold into line with the federal amount, that will not happen in full until 2019. For those in the professional services industries, one of the biggest challenges can be simply helping their clients see that the best deal or rate does not necessarily represent their best interests, whether that be for loan rates, investment fees or insurance. “I am seeing insurance agents who will omit coverages or not properly assess and advise clients in order to sell a policy,” said Kathy Schultze, a State Farm Insurance agent in Frederick. “But I can tell you that in my 32 years as an insurance agent, I have never had one customer call me after an accident and say, ‘How much was I paying?’ What they do ask me is: ‘Am I covered?’ And the problem is that often times the lowest price does not provide an adequate amount of coverage to protect their assets.” Whether in banking, financial planning or insurance, the mantra is the same: “Do not assume the lowest price is the best deal,” she said. –KATE MCDERMOTT

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FINANCE & INSURANCE

Middletown Valley Bank At a time when many independent community banks are

disappearing, Middletown Valley Bank is enjoying a period of tremendous growth and success, continuing its proud tradition of serving the financial needs of customers throughout mid-Maryland since 1908. Michael Hill, executive vice president and chief operating officer, attributes much of the bank’s recent success to the leadership of BJ Goetz, who joined the bank in 2012 as president and CEO. A graduate of Frostburg State University and the Maryland Banking School’s advanced management program, Goetz is committed to balancing risk with sustainable growth and profitability. Under his leadership, the bank underwent a major rebranding effort in 2014 and has added many new services, including remote deposit capture, cash management services and ACH origination services, which enable employers and their employees to direct-deposit payroll. “BJ has had us add a whole new suite of services for our small business customers,” Hill said. As a result, the bank’s assets grew by 36 percent from 2014 to 2015. Middletown Valley Bank ended 2015 with $238 million in assets and grew another

“Because we’re a community bank, our customers are able to deal directly with a decision maker, and often we can be more flexible than some of the large banks.”

9.4 percent in the first quarter of 2016. The bank raised nearly $7 million in capital beginning in 2014, which has allowed it to grow while maintaining a strong capital position. With that strong position, Middletown Valley Bank is awaiting regulatory and shareholder approval to merge with Woodsboro Bank to create a new, stronger financial services organization, First Heritage Community Bank. As a native of Boonsboro, Goetz knows local markets well and has used his 15 years of banking experience in Washington and Frederick counties to build relationships with both personal and commercial banking customers. “Because we’re a community bank, our customers are able to deal directly with a decision maker, and often we can be more flexible than some of the large banks,” Goetz said. “In many cases, if you don’t fit in their ‘box’ they find it difficult to lend to you. But because we are local and work very hard to build relationships with our customers, we are able to consider a lot of intangibles and mitigating factors that allow us to invest in local businesses in a way that other banks cannot.” Establishing and cultivating relationships that span generations is one of Middletown Valley Bank’s core values and drives its commitment to providing what the bank calls an “absolutely exceptional experience.” “We have a team of 65 amazing, talented employees who are committed to listening to our customers and finding ways that we can meet their needs,” Goetz said, noting that they are also personally invested in the communities the bank serves, as evidenced by the nearly 1,000 volunteer hours they contribute to local events and charities each year. 24 W. Main St. Middletown 21769 301-371-6700 mvbbank.com

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FINANCE & INSURANCE

Insurance Associates he Affordable Care Act is 6 years old, but in terms of employer-sponsored health insurance regulations, it’s still fairly new. As a business owner, how are you going to ensure that you’re in compliance? As a client of Insurance Associates, located in Rockville, you could rest at ease. The firm, celebrating its 60th anniversary this year, is unique in its consultative nature, high quotient of intellectual capital and partnership with United Benefit Advisors. Troy Snyder, vice president, said that to remain in the forefront of the insurance industry, firms have to stay on top of the latest developments

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in technology and employee benefit regulations. That’s precisely what Insurance Associates does best, working closely with clients to guide them through the process of not only structuring their benefits, but also, when appropriate, communicating these benefits to employees as well. A Frederick County Chamber of Commerce member for 15 years, Insurance Associates looks forward to continuing growth in the expanding Frederick marketplace, Snyder said. And Frederick businesses can only benefit from the expertise of an insurance firm with Insurance Associates’ long, productive history and client-centered approach.

21 Church St., #100 Rockville 20850 301-838-9400 insassoc.com troys@insassoc.com

Moore Wealth, Inc. oore Wealth is a comprehensive wealth management firm dedicated to assisting small business owners, executives and high-net-worth families with retaining and growing their wealth. The team is led by Shabri Moore, a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Professional, Accredited Investment Fiduciary®, and Certified Divorce Financial Analyst.™ She works closely with Financial Planning Manager Amy Bolstridge, Financial Operations Manager Beth Stuckey-Ellis and Client Communications Manager Jennifer Cruz, who all bring a wealth of knowledge, experience and, most importantly, heart to the team’s holistic approach to financial planning.

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“Our mission is to build financial strategies that empower our clients to live their best lives,” Moore said. “Helping our clients realize their hopes and dreams is the most fulfilling part of our job. As an independent wealth management firm, we strive to provide objective guidance with the highest level of honesty, integrity and overall excellence possible.” 50 Carroll Creek Way, Suite 335 Frederick 21701 301-631-1207 MooreWealthInc.com info@MooreWealthInc.com

THE FINANCIAL PROFESSIONALS AT MOORE WEALTH OFFER SECURITIES AND ADVISORY SERVICES THROUGH COMMONWEALTH FINANCIAL NETWORK, MEMBER FINRA/SIPC, A REGISTERED INVESTMENT ADVISER.

Georgetown Insurance Service, Inc. G

eorgetown Insurance Service, Inc. is taking full advantage of Frederick’s healthy business climate. “The growth of companies in Frederick has been explosive, which means more opportunities for us to help meet the insurance needs of these new ventures, as well as established companies,” said Account Executive Patti Maluchnik. Her company, which focuses mainly on property and casualty insurance and commercial bonds, offers a range of services including contract review, loss control programs, cash flow options and cost-effective insurance solutions. Georgetown Insurance’s formula for success

is honesty, knowledge and superior customer service. “Our clients are our most important resource. They have first-hand knowledge of the benefits we provide, so they consistently refer others to us,” she said. Maluchnik said her CEO, Remmie Butchko, is her role model because he “supports education, contracts with top insurance carriers so we can provide the best coverages and premiums to our clients, has the best resources available to help us grow our family of clients, and consistently promotes doing whatever is best for the customer.” The future looks even better for George-

town Insurance. “We anticipate big growth by providing our insurance expertise to Frederick businesses and actively participating in community events,” she said.  5300 Westview Drive, #106 Frederick 21703 301-696-8104, ext. 308 georgetownins.com

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Now more than ever, you should be able to have the same kind of trusted relationship with your banker that you have with your physician.”

Damascus Community Bank E

ven though its name makes it clear that Damascus Community Bank has Montgomery County roots, Bill Kincaid Jr., the bank’s president and CEO, said the institution is proud to be a member of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce. “I grew up in Frederick County, so I know the value people there place on relationships,” he said. “We believe that membership in the Chamber gives the bank an opportunity to create connections that support our business and community values.” Making those connections is especially important today since the number of community banks is shrinking. “It’s becoming more difficult for customers to actually know the bankers who are taking care of their money,” Kincaid said. “Yet now more than ever, you should be able to have the same kind of trusted relationship with your banker that you have with your physician. You need to have frank, honest conversations with your doctor to ensure the correct medication is prescribed for wellness. It’s the same way in banking. Whether it’s for commercial or personal banking, we need to understand all aspects of your financial picture, both good and bad, so that we can recommend the appropriate financial products and services for you.” And just like the old days when doctors used to make house calls, Kincaid and his team will meet with customers in their own living rooms if it makes it easier to serve them. He recalls the case of a family-owned business. The founders were getting older and wanted to pass the business on to the next generation. “We met with the entire family so that we could make sure that we understood what they wanted,

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WILLIAM “Bill” Kinkaid Jr. President & CEO 75 employees

could address any concerns and ensure a smooth transition.” That’s one of the joys of community banking, Kincaid added. “We have the time to devote to our customers that many of the mega-banks don’t. That means we can get to know them better and can offer products and services suited to their needs.” Damascus Community Bank was established in 1988 to serve the residents of Damascus and its surrounding areas. Over the years, it has expanded to include additional branches in Mount Airy, Green Valley, Clarksburg and Gaithersburg. Although its growth may make the “Damascus” in its name seem a little deceiving, Kincaid said it’s the “Community Bank” part that

really matters. “Our employees live and work in the communities we serve,” he said. “We believe that getting to know our customers is the most rewarding part of being a community banker today.” 26500 Ridge Road Damascus 20872 301-253-1000 yourdcb.com

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FINANCE & INSURANCE

Frederick County Bank F

rederick County Bank (FCB), an independent community bank headquartered in the City of Frederick, was founded in October 2001 to fulfill the financial needs of local residents, businesses and nonprofit organizations. We’re celebrating our 15th anniversary this year and we’re still just as committed to making Frederick County the best place to live, work and play. At FCB, we really do care

about each individual, each business and our community as a whole. We pride ourselves on our combination of cutting-edge banking products and experienced local bankers to provide the best service for both personal and business clients. Visit us online, call, or stop by any of our five convenient bank centers to experience the FCB difference today. Visit our newest bank center on the Square

Corner in the heart of downtown Frederick. We look forward to serving you! 9 N. Market St., Frederick 21701 301-620-1400 fcbmd.com

Frederick Mutual Insurance Company Founded more than 160 years ago,

Frederick Mutual offers insurance for homeowners, renters, businesses and artisan contractors through a network of independent insurance agents. In his tenure, Doug Fisher, Secretary, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer of Frederick Mutual Insurance Company, has seen the business grow as Frederick and business opportunities have grown, as well. “There are so many more homes and businesses in the area in need of insurance protection, and that's great for us,” he said. “We are a mutual organization, owned by our

policyholders, and we have a high commitment to customer service and satisfaction.” With years of dedication to the community and its policyholders, the company is deeply committed to the area, and that’s why it’s also a longtime Frederick County Chamber of Commerce member, Fisher said. “Like us, the

Chamber is an advocate for local businesses, and totally committed to supporting the Frederick community. It helps to make Frederick attractive to people who live here and may want to locate here.” Frederick Mutual has policyholders in both Maryland and Pennsylvania, and has over $47 million in assets. 57 Thomas Johnson Drive Frederick 21702 301-663-9522 | 800-544-8737 www.frederickmutual.com djfisher@fredmut.com

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Sandy Spring Bank

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rom ovens to warehouses, to medical offices and fire equipment, Sandy Spring Bank has helped many Frederick County businesses and organizations get the financial support they need to open their doors or expand. When you bank at Sandy Spring Bank, you’re not just another business or account number. They take the time to get to know you and your business objectives. Their expertise, combined with a full array of commercial banking products and services, can help you simplify finances, leverage opportunities and meet your unique goals. Their consultative nature sets them apart in the market, and helps give your business the competitive advantage it needs to grow. Sandy Spring expanded into Frederick County nearly 15 years ago. “Our employees are very active within the Frederick community—committed to local causes and businesses.

They strive to make our communities a better place to live, work and raise a family,” said Cynthia Palmer, vice president and commercial relationship manager for Sandy Spring Bank in Frederick. Today, Sandy Spring has grown to include branches in Downtown Frederick, on the Golden Mile and in the Ballenger Creek area, as well as in Urbana and Mount Airy. Sandy Spring Bank was founded in 1868 when residents and business owners decided to form a new institution that would serve the interests of their community. Today, the bank has more than 40 branches throughout Maryland, Northern Virginia and the District of Columbia and its assets have grown to $4.7 billion. It has been recognized by Forbes magazine as one of the top 50 “Most Trustworthy’’ corporations in America for 10 consecutive years and has been named a Top Workplace by The Washington Post and Baltimore Sun.

“Frederick is a perfect fit for us,” Palmer said. “It has a culture of community service that aligns with our guiding principals.” The bank’s employees actively serve in some capacity in a wide variety of nonprofit organizations from churches to little league teams, local boards to food banks. The bank has also been a sponsor of Celebrate Frederick for 15 years, providing support for special programs and events that include In the Street and Frederick’s 4th of July celebration. “We appreciate what Frederick County offers and are proud to be a part of it,” Palmer said. 30 W. Patrick St., Suite 590 Frederick 21701 301-695-0786 sandyspringbank.com

(L to R) P.W. Shaffer, market relationship manager; Cynthia Palmer, commercial relationship manager; James Bear, commercial relationship manager; Clark Snow, treasury management

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FINANCE & INSURANCE

Wealth Advisors Group

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recent survey of small business owners by Securian Financial Group revealed that even though 83 percent of those who responded said they expect to leave their businesses within the next 10 years, 72 percent do not have a plan for exiting the business or for how they’ll fund their own retirement. Financial planning for small businesses is critical, yet only a few financial planners tend to specialize in this particular area. David Urovsky, president of Wealth Advisors Group in Frederick, is one of those specialists. Over the course of his nearly three decades in the financial planning business, Urovsky has developed expertise in crafting customized executive benefit plans, group benefit plans and retirement plans for small businesses. Through its relationship with Lincoln Financial Advisors, Wealth Advisors Group can offer a suite of tailored products for small business owners, including a relatively new product called new comparability profit sharing plans. These plans enable small business owners to divide their profit-sharing-plan participants into two or more classes that have different contribution rates for each, usually based on the employees’ level of compensation. “These plans meet all IRS guidelines because they require a minimum contribution for all employees, but by ‘carving out’ different levels of compensation, business owners can provide themselves and other highly compensated employees with a higher percentage contribution than under traditional profit-sharing plans,” Urovsky said. “These plans tend to be more complicated, but also very effective for the business owner.” New comparability profit-sharing plans can be incorporated into a comprehensive benefit package, but Urovsky said because of their complexity, they might not be included in many of the one-size-fits-all plans being sold today. “There are certainly off-the-shelf plans that small businesses can choose from, but they don’t allow the business owner to customize the plan to reflect the unique aspects of his or her business,” Urovsky said. “We help our clients tailor their plans based on the many individual products to choose from, including things like group health coverage, short- and long-term disability insurance, tax-deferred flexible savings and health saving accounts and college savings plans that maximize pretax savings.” Urovsky is licensed to offer his clients a variety of financial products, including investment in tax-deferred life and long-term care insurance. In addition, he is fully committed to new United States Department of Labor rules that require retirement investment advisers to act as fiduciaries who must provide impartial advice that puts their client’s best interest first. “Whether we are working with a small business owner or an individual, our goal is the same: develop a comprehensive plan that supports their future financial security,” he said.

“Whether we are working with a small business owner or an individual, our goal is the same: develop a comprehensive plan that supports their future financial security.”

Wealth Advisors Group 50 Carroll Creek Way, Suite 270 Frederick 21701 301-695-7366 wealthadvisorsgrp.com

DAVID UROVSKY IS A REGISTERED REPRESENTATIVE OF LINCOLN FINANCIAL ADVISORS CORP., A BROKER/DEALER (MEMBER SIPC) AND REGISTERED INVESTMENT ADVISOR. WEALTH ADVISORS GROUP IS NOT AN AFFILIATE OF LINCOLN FINANCIAL ADVISORS CORP. CRN-1482883-042616

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ABOUT

GOVERNMENT & EDUCATION

Frederick Community College graduation; Winchester Hall

IT

has been 85 years since a small airfield with a grass landing strip became a cadet pilot training center for the Maryland National Guard. Named after Maj. Frederick L. Detrick, a New Market native and squadron surgeon who served in World War I, Fort Detrick, then known as Detrick Field, opened in 1931. Today, that same small piece of land has grown to become a 1,200-acre installation that is known for its role in biomedical research and defense. Fort Detrick supports five cabinet-level agencies, including the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Health & Human Services and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Service members from all branches of the U.S. military are assigned to the post, and quickly become involved in the Frederick community by participating in everything from Color Guard presentations at special events to volunteering with local organizations. With nearly 11,000 federal and contract employees, including members of the U.S. Army, the National Cancer Institute and numerous other tenants, Fort Detrick is the largest employer in Frederick County. Farther north in

Emmitsburg, the National Emergency Training Center, home to the National Fire Academy, FEMA, and other agencies, employs close to another 600 people. Together with the more than 2,000 employees of Frederick County and another 850 employed by the City of Frederick, government agencies continue to provide the lion’s share of employment in Frederick County. “One out of every six jobs in Frederick County is in the public sector,” said Frederick County Executive Jan Gardner. “Fort Detrick is an economic engine in terms of jobs and investment in science research. The base contributed $7 billion to our economy between 2008 and 2012. This investment allows us to leverage innovation and technology to create private sector jobs. We call this tech transfer, and it is shaping Frederick County into a cutting-edge biotech hub.” Part of what makes Frederick County such a desirable place for biotech research is its highly educated work force. Frederick County Public Schools (FCPS) continues to be recognized as among the best in the state. FCPS reports that its achievement exceeds Maryland averages with scores that consistently surpass national averages on the College Board SAT and 99 percent of more than 1,000 employers in a

survey cited by FCPS indicated that FCPS students met or exceeded workplace readiness standards. According to statistics provided by FCPS, 62 percent of the seniors who graduated in 2015 planned to pursue some form of higher or continuing education, including two- or four-year degrees or career training through technical schools. Thanks to institutions such as Mount St. Mary’s University, Frederick Community College (FCC) and Hood College, many of those students can continue their education in Frederick County. Those schools, along with FCPS and numerous private elementary and high schools, not only educate thousands of students, but they also contribute significantly to Frederick County’s employment base. FCPS employs nearly 5,700 people, and FCC provides jobs to 1,055. Although public sector employment declined nationwide following the 2008 financial crisis, Frederick County continues to benefit from the presence of federal, state and local jobs that held the county’s unemployment rate to 4.5 percent at the end of 2015, below both state and national averages.

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–KATE MCDERMOTT

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City of Frederick,

Department of Economic Development he City of Frederick’s Department of Economic Development is uniquely experienced to assist business owners with resources to help businesses locate, grow and thrive. “Every day, our office connects entrepreneurs and companies with resources and start-up information,” said Richard Griffin, director of Economic Development for The City of Frederick. Frederick continues to grow as an attractive community for businesses of all sizes, said Griffin. “In Frederick, businesses find a talented and well-educated workforce, easy access to

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both D.C. and Baltimore, and a quality of life that is outstanding,” he added. The city’s vibrant economic climate is bolstered by a concentration of bioscience and advanced technology companies, professional services and tourism. Historic Downtown Frederick, with a variety of shops and restaurants, serves as a hub for residents, businesses and visitors. “We are here to support all businesses that want to open and grow in Frederick,” said Griffin. Contact Frederick’s Department of Economic Development to learn how its team can help your business thrive.

101 N. Court St., Frederick 21701 301-600-6360 businessinfrederick.com thrive@cityoffrederick.com

TransIT Services of Frederick County Bus Shelter Program

or over 20 years, TransIT has been an integral part of Frederick County’s growth and development. As our community expands, bus routes consistently help people from all walks of life connect to jobs, medical facilities, school, shopping and more. To further improve customer convenience, TransIT’s bus shelter program is underway and will provide new, attractive bus shelters at stops throughout the service area. Business owners with a location near a bus stop benefit by having customers and employees delivered

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to their location. Adding a bus shelter to a stop provides convenience, safety, comfort and protection, and makes a business a more attractive destination for potential customers and employees alike. Shelter maintenance, including cleaning, and snow and trash removal, is provided through TransIT. Did you know that every $1 invested in public transportation generates $4 in economic returns? Get on board! When TransIT reaches out to your business to install a free shelter say, “Yes!”

TransIT Planner/Project Manager Carrie Watters CWatters@frederickcountymd.gov 301-600-2065 1040 Rocky Springs Road Frederick 21702 frederickcountymd.gov/105/TransIT

Employer Connection A Program of TransIT T

he dreaded rush hour commute can be made less intimidating with TransIT’s Employer Connection program. This free service allows employers throughout Frederick County to streamline their employees’ journey to and from the office, making for a much happier and more productive workforce. We encourage companies to take advantage of strategies such as teleworking, vanpooling, and installing bike racks to reduce the daily commute and the stress that accompanies it. Contractors work directly with businesses to design a travel program that best fits the needs of each company and its staff. Ultimately, the Employer Connection pro-

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gram can lead to reduced parking expenses and help the environment by cutting down on carbon emissions. Participants are eligible for a pretax payroll deduction—up to $255 per month—benefitting both the employee by reducing taxable income and the employer by reducing taxable payroll. TransIT utilizes a vast database of commuter analytics to connect drivers throughout the greater metropolitan area, from Central Maryland to Northern Virginia. Are you prepared for the next weather related or other emergency? Let the Employer Outreach program assist you with setting up a telework program to keep your business running in an emergency!

Improve your business! Improve employee commutes and parking! Let TransIT’s Employer Connection be the FREE solution. 301-600-2065 1040 Rocky Springs Road, Frederick 21701 frederickcountymd.gov/105/TransIT TransitRideshare@Frederickcountymd.gov 301-600-RIDE

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GOVERNMENT & EDUCATION

Frederick Community College As the employment needs of

Frederick County shift amid a growing economy, Frederick Community College is adapting and evolving in stride. FCC focuses its program development on providing students the skills and education they need to productively and confidently enter the competitive job market. “As a connected partner to local businesses, we respond to the evolution of essential job skills in today’s workplace,” said Patricia Meyer, executive director of workforce training for FCC. “We craft programming based on local economic priorities, so that the education we provide best supports the interests of students and the needs of employers.” More than 85 degree and certificate programs make up the extensive and comprehensive learning offerings. New programs include STEM, Cybersecurity and Radio Frequency Technician, all resulting from growing industry demand combined with rising student interest. A new Hospitality, Culinary, and Tourism Institute is in development. Course flexibility and diversity prove instrumental in accommodating learners with different needs and preferences. “Online and accelerated courses—as well as day, evening and weekend instruction on campus–help students balance the priorities of busy lives,” said Meyer. “Career and transfer programs for degree-seeking students are available, as well as certifications, enrichment courses and highly-concentrated business trainings.” The Mid-Atlantic Center for Emergency Management at FCC is a nationally-recognized, specialized hub that includes a transfer degree, conversion of FEMA independent study courses into college credits and online courses for working professionals around the country. “We build flexible and dynamic options that are conducive to life,” said Meyer. “Technology is interwoven into nearly all career programs.” The Dual Enrollment and Open Campus Program provides opportunities for current high school students to earn college credit early, in a timely and affordable way. Adult Education is administered for students to attain their G.E.D. and increase general proficiencies. Both programs are expanding exponentially in scope, interest and participation.

“We build flexible and dynamic options that are conducive to life. Technology is interwoven into nearly all career programs.”

“By keeping a pulse on what’s happening within our community, we are able to remain agile in how and why we create programs,” Meyer said. In its 58-year history, nearly 200,000 students have taken a course at Frederick Community College. Success is measured by identifiable metrics like student achievement data, as well as by intrinsic stories of personal accomplishments. “When students and employers reach their goals, we succeed,” she said. “Success requires listening to our community, and then responding with quality, timely and affordable options. Communication and engagement are essential.” 7932 Opossumtown Pike, Frederick 21702 301-846-2400 Frederick.edu PMeyer@frederick.edu

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GOVERNMENT & EDUCATION

Mount St. Mary’s University Frederick Campus Of the 17 academic programs offered at the

Mount’s Frederick Campus, more than half are relatively new, a testament to the popularity of the offerings and the location of the satellite campus. Tucked behind the Francis Scott Key Mall near Interstates 270 and 70, the campus is ideal for working adults who want a graduate degree or certificate, or who want to finish an undergraduate degree. “We have grown immensely since we opened more than a decade ago,” Associate Director of Marketing Lauren Hagan said. “In the last five years particularly, we have seen our programs really take off, with an emphasis on new graduate programs.” The Mount’s convenient location, affordability, program offerings and schedule attract students within a 60-mile radius. The accelerated programs are ideal for busy adults, allowing them to finish a semester-long class in five to eight week sessions. Most classes are offered one night a week from 6 to 9:30 p.m. In designing courses of study, the Mount surveys workforce needs in Frederick and the greater Washington, D.C., region. Frederick and the surrounding metro area are quickly becoming a biotechnology hub. To meet workforce needs and prepare students for professional growth, the Mount is at the forefront, updating and adding programs like the Master of Science in Biotechnology and Management.

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The cross-disciplinary program gives students the skills to excel in careers in product development, marketing and management. Other graduate degree programs include sport management, business administration, health administration, education, teaching and a one-year Emerging Leaders MBA program. Graduate certificates are one-year programs, including government contracting, logistics and supply chain management, organizational development, project management, technology facilitation and advanced studies in reading. Undergraduate programs are offered in business, criminal justice, elementary education and human services. Students at the Mount’s Frederick Campus have access to all the services offered at the main campus, including career guidance like resume writing, internships and job search assistance. The Frederick Campus also offers contemporary conference and meeting space at the Frederick Conference Center.

“In the last five years particularly, we have seen our programs really take off, with an emphasis on new graduate programs.”

5350 Spectrum Drive Frederick 21703 301-682-8315 msmary.edu/Frederick inquiry@msmary.edu

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ABOUT

HEALTH CARE

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mid all the debate on how to best control health care costs, there is one point on which there is nearly universal agreement: the best way to keep them down is to focus on illness and disease prevention. To do that, Frederick Regional Health System, which includes Frederick Memorial Hospital (FMH), has established a new care coordination program designed to help patients manage their medical care and access community-based resources—ideally before their health care needs require a trip to the hospital. Care coordinators can provide the handson assistance some patients need to navigate the system, said Melissa Lambdin, Frederick Memorial Hospital’s (FMH) director of marketing and communications. This includes assistance with prescription medications, help finding a primary care physician, transportation to and from physician appointments, and addressing social issues such as hunger, housing or employment. “Our goal is to help them get the care they need, when they need it and not have them rely on coming to the hospital to access resources,” she said. “We take those resources to them.” With 15 case managers working in the hospital with its inpatient population, four case managers devoted solely to the emergency department, plus five case managers embedded in primary care practices in the community and a few case managers who exclusively perform community-based care, the goal is to help Frederick County’s population improve its ability to live well and get regular, preventive care. “If someone is frequently coming to the emergency room because they don’t have insurance or even a primary care physician, we’ll work with them to see if they are eligible to receive insurance through other programs and help them find a doctor with whom they can establish a long-term relationship,” Lambdin explained. “If a patient is not eligible for insurance through any of the available resources, then we contact our community partners such as Mission of Mercy or the Frederick Community

Action Agency to arrange for them to get care.” Mission of Mercy, the nonprofit organization devoted to providing free medical care to the underand uninsured, runs a shared patient program with FMH that enables physicians at the hospital to work with the organization’s medical staff to identify patients who could use Mission of Mercy’s services for their follow-up care. “Right now, even with the passage of the Affordable Care Act, we are still serving many patients who either cannot afford the deductibles or co-pays associated with their purchased insurance or who cannot afford the cost of their medications, especially since many of them have chronic health conditions that require multiple visits to health care providers,” said Linda Ryan, Mission of Mercy’s executive director. Providing care that prevents hospitalizations or unnecessary emergency room visits is critical to reducing costs in all sectors of health care, including mental health. “We added a behavioral health walk-in center two years ago,” said Shannon Aleshire, CEO of the Mental Health Association of Frederick County. “Today, we estimate that anywhere from 25 percent to 30 percent of those patients would be utilizing the emergency room if not for this service.” But Frederick County clearly needs more mental health providers. “Several months ago we decided to expand our services by adding a psychiatrist, but we’ve received only one resume for the position,” she said in April. As public perceptions about mental health continue to change, the need for additional providers is sure to grow. “During my 17 years with this agency, I have seen a slow but sure shift in the way people view mental health,” Aleshire said. “It doesn’t have quite the same stigma it has had in the past, but we still have a long way to go.” –KATE MCDERMOTT

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HEALTH CARE

CorpOHS IF

an employee gets injured on the job, the top priority for both the employee and employer is to return to work as safely and quickly as possible. That’s where CorpOHS comes in. It offers health care and wellness solutions for businesses in the Frederick community, including wellness programs, flu shots and assistance with regulatory compliance issues and regulations, as well as occupational health. The company often works with public safety officers, whether from police, fire or EMT, and provides respirator exams. Medical director Dr. Stephan C.B. Mann’s extensive medical background sets CorpOHS apart from other health care providers in the area. Dr. Mann is board certified in occupational medicine and family practice, and is a certified

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Our goal is to always have options for the employees to be able to go back to work.”

medical review officer, independent medical examiner and aviation medical examiner. He has more than 30 years of medical experience, including 20 in occupational medicine. “If you think about health care for employees, we want you to think of CorpOHS,” Dr. Mann said. “Whether you have one employee or more than 5,000, CorpOHS can provide whatever occupational medicine services are needed.” When patients arrive with workplace injuries, the goal is to provide patient care as quickly and efficiently as possible. The average time between arrival and exit is under an hour. CorpOHS, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Frederick Health Services Corp., that opened in 1993, also focuses on helping employees return to work as quickly and safely as possible, which might include suggestions on how to modify tasks to avoid injury, or a different temporary assignment.

“We have a return-to-work philosophy, which is important for worker’s compensation,” Dr. Mann said. “The true cost is the lost work time. Our goal is to always have options for the employees to be able to go back to work.” As a Chamber member and Mission-level Partner in Trust, Dr. Mann said the organization believes it’s important to be an asset, answering questions about health and health care for Chamber businesses, members and their families. 490-L Prospect Blvd., Frederick 21701 240-566-3001 CorpOHS.com info@corpohs.com

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HEALTH CARE

Frederick Regional Health System

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ver the last 25 years, Frederick County’s population has grown by nearly 40 percent, representing an increase of an estimated 95,000 people. To keep pace with that growth, the area’s leading health care provider has expanded significantly, as well. For many Frederick County residents, “Frederick Memorial” is synonymous with the hospital on Seventh Street, yet that facility is actually the hub of the much larger Frederick Regional Health System (FRHS), which includes: l Two FMH Immediate Care facilities in Frederick and Urbana l FMH Rose Hill—imaging, lab and rehabilitation services l FMH Crestwood Women’s Services l Hospice of Frederick County l FMH Regional Cancer Therapy Center l Parkview Medical Group Primary Care in Frederick, Mount Airy and Myersville l ProMotion Fitness+ l CorpOHS—wellness services FRHS also includes Monocacy Health Partners, an affiliation of practices representing primary care, family medicine and a wide range

of specialties that include endocrinology, urology, internal medicine, breast care and orthopaedics, to name a few. “These practices and member physicians work together to share information so patients receive comprehensive and coordinated care,” said Melissa Lambdin, marketing and communications director for Frederick Memorial Hospital (FMH). “They discuss the need for diagnostic tests, confer about results, plan recovery and rehabilitation programs, and ensure that all medicines prescribed are compatible with the overall treatment plan.” That kind of collaborative care helps contain costs for both the patient and the hospital, since serving people closer to their homes throughout the county frees up hospital staff to care for patients who are truly in need of emergency treatment or hospitalization. “Our focus is on keeping people well,” Lambdin said. “By expanding out into the community, we can provide care where people live and work, instead of directing them to the hospital for care.” FRHS maintains a focus on delivering quality care. Several service lines have received accreditations and quality awards over the years,

and Healthgrades recently ranked FMH as one of its Distinguished Hospitals for Clinical Excellence for 2016. With nearly 2,700 employees, FRHS is one of the county’s largest employers. Recent renovations to the hospital campus have improved patient and visitor access. Despite the expansion, however, FRHS remains firmly committed to the vision of the hospital’s founder, Emma Smith, who more than 110 years ago wanted to provide her family, friends and neighbors with “a place that would care for the sick, comfort the injured, and provide peace of mind to all who live in a town called Frederick.” 400 W. Seventh St. Frederick 21701 240-566-3300 fmh.org

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HEALTH CARE

Maryland Vision Center Frederick residents no longer have to travel to Washington, D.C., or Baltimore for specialized medical and surgical eye care since Maryland Vision Center was founded three and a half years ago, said Medical Director and Owner Suni Thadani, M.D., F.A.C.S. Frederick has changed and grown significantly in the last five years, which has helped the health care field, Thadani said. “We are seeing an influx of new businesses and young professionals; a great balance of individuals working in

multiple industries including the federal government. This includes the best in health care,” he said. For example, Maryland Vision Center performed Frederick’s first minimally invasive corneal transplant in 2013, and then in 2015, offered the city’s first laser-assisted cataract surgery, Thadani said. “Patients usually had to go to larger academic centers for those procedures, but now we offer them on a regular basis,” he said. “In the future, Frederick will be a beacon for innova-

tive health care for the entire region.” With seven employees, Thadani said his business’ biggest asset is the talent that works for him. “You can have excellent resources in terms of the best technology, but you need really strong people on your team who care about patient care, have a strong work ethic and customer service skills.” 195 Thomas Johnson Drive Frederick 21702 240-575-9580 MarylandVisionCenter.com

Amber Hill Physical Therapy Amber Hill Physical Therapy, now marking its 30th anniversary, offers physical and occupational therapy services for adults and children in Frederick and Montgomery counties, with an emphasis on general orthopedics and specialty pediatrics. We operate five clinics in the area, conveniently located in Frederick, Jefferson, Damascus, Thurmont and Urbana. Each office is easily accessible and offers plenty of parking. Our New Market location, which will offer aquatic physical therapy, is coming soon. Amber Hill PT is a physical-therapist-ownedand-operated practice that emphasizes com-

fortable one-on-one patient care delivered by a team of highly qualified physical and occupational therapists who hold advanced degrees and specialty training. Therapy is offered in private rooms to allow maximum comfort and discretion. In each clinic, patients also have access to advanced rehabilitation and fitness equipment that allows a wide range of conditioning, strengthening and rehabilitation exercises to be incorporated in each patient-specific treatment plan.

Frederick: 301-663-1157 Thurmont: 301-271-9230 Urbana: 240-529-0175 New Market: 301-732-4771 amberhillpt.com

YMCA of Frederick County As Frederick County residents seek to live healthier lifestyles and make healthy choices, YMCA Frederick continues to help offer wellness options. “We’re in the business of healthy living, youth development and social responsibility so all our programs and services fall into one, if not multiple, categories,” said Chris Colville, CEO of YMCA of Frederick County.   Meeting the needs of that health conscious demographic, the YMCA—the largest childcare provider in the county—has seen growth in summer camp enrollment, aquatic programs, horseback and other outdoor centric programs.

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Colville said YMCA’s success comes down to establishing strong community relationships and ensuring the community feels valued. Networking through the Frederick Nonprofit Alliance, coordinated by the Chamber, helps establish connections to meet countywide goals, Colville said. “What sets us apart is we’re definitely family oriented, as we basically serve people from birth to death,” said Colville, adding that the community helps inform programming. As a result, YMCA

is working to complete a $13.5M campaign to build a facility in the south part of the county with a state-of–the-art aquatics center. 1000 N. Market St., Frederick 21701 301-663-5151 frederickymca.org

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The Frederick County Chamber of Commerce Thanks Our

2016 PARTNERS IN TRUST MISSION PARTNERS - $20,000 Investment

PLATINUM PARTNERS - $15,000 Investment

GOLD PARTNER - $10,000 Investment

SILVER PARTNERS - $5,000 Investment Comcast First United Bank & Trust Flying Dog Brewery Frederick County Bank Hood College Lee Building Maintenance Matan Companies, LLLP McLean, Koehler, Sparks & Hammond

Morgan-Keller, Inc. PNC Bank - Frederick Rodgers Consulting The City of Frederick Woodsboro Bank COPPER PARTNERS - $1,000 Investment Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. Frederick County Building Industry Assn Jim Bass Group, Real Estate Teams, LLC Keeney & Basford P.A. Funeral Home Keller Stonebraker Insurance, Inc. Leadership Techniques Lighthouse Wealth Management McCaskill Financial Advisers, LLC Northwestern Mutual Financial Network Support Unlimited, Inc. The Law Office of Jeanne F. Singer, P.A.

Partners in Trust invest in the events, programs and the advocacy efforts of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce through financial contribution. For more information about joining the Partners in Trust Program, contact Elizabeth Cromwell ecromwell@frederickchamber.org.

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HEALTH CARE

Robinwood Orthopaedic Specialty Center

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obinwood Orthopaedic Specialty Center recently welcomed podiatrist Dr. Rachel Tuer to its practice of orthopedic providers. Raised in Hagerstown, Dr. Tuer is a board certified podiatrist who returned to the area to be closer to her roots and join a thriving practice with a lot of growth opportunity. She sees patients in both the Frederick and Hagerstown locations. “This is a growing area and I appreciate that the city is trying to both control and sustain that growth,” said Dr. Tuer. “The community has farmers, soldiers, researchers and both blue collar and white collar government workers. It offers a great mix of backgrounds and personalities and we are really enjoying getting to know the area again. I hope that as the population grows, the green spaces and farms are protected. Dr. Tuer is an accomplished specialist whose resume includes work at the University of Maryland, R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center; a prestigious surgical podiatric residency at Temple University Health System, and advanced training in adult and childhood podiatric diseases that encompassed an array of foot and lower leg trauma and complicated infections. She was chief resident of podiatry her last year of her medical residency and gained experience with many advanced surgical procedures. She has spent most of the last decade working in Cecil County, Md., and Delaware, enjoying a busy practice of surgery, sports medicine and wound care. She is certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery in foot surgery and by the American Board of Podiatric Medicine in podiatric medicine. She serves as Maryland’s director of Fit Feet of the Special Olympics. She is also a fellow of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Dr. Tuer practices podiatric medicine and

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DR. RACHEL TUER

Podiatrist 1 year with Robinwood Orthopaedic

“I want to practice the best medicine possible and do the best for my patients.” foot and ankle surgery. She enjoys working with athletes and the challenges of returning patients to a high level of activity without pain. “Seeing a variety of conditions–from plantar fasciitis to fractures to a soft tissue mass–is fun. It keeps me thinking and challenging myself. I want to practice the best medicine possible and do the best for my patients.” She and her husband, who works in Baltimore with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, are raising their children, taking advantage of the excellent Frederick school system. “Our kids have always had great teachers, but I think that the teachers in this county have more resources than we have had in the past.”

187 Thomas Johnson Drive, Suite 1 Frederick 21702 301-378-9421 11110 Medical Campus Road Suites 205 & 211 Hagerstown 21742 301-665-4950 robinwoodortho.com rtuer@robinwoodortho.com

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ABOUT

HOME & GARDEN W

hen consumers want to spend money on their homes and when they have to spend money on their homes says a lot about the state of the economy. Making homes more comfortable, either through improvements or upgrades, encompasses a variety of home and garden related industries, including heating and air-conditioning, landscaping and remodeling. During the fallout from the 2008 recession, people tucked in and spent sparingly on home and garden improvements, said Steve Schmidt, owner of Frederick Air. Schmidt has been in business since 1992, providing mostly residential service and installation of heating and air equipment. Generally, heating and air-conditioning is no longer tied to the financial ups and downs of the building industry like it used to be. Dave Schmidt, Steve’s son and employee, attributes that shift to consumer trends, which are now focused more on personal comfort and energy efficiency. Landscaping is another industry where levels of services may depend on the state of the economy. Consumers are more lavish when not faced with economic uncertainty. The maintenance jobs and the unavoidable repairs are the staples of rocky financial times, while patios, lighting and more costly garden projects are in demand during more stable periods. Since the recession, the field of landscaping is gaining “slowly but steadily,” according Lawn & Landscape magazine’s State of the Industry 2014 survey. According to that report, the average company employs 15 people year-round, has $1 million in revenues and has a net profit of 10 percent.

Like HVAC, the home remodeling business weathered the 2008 recession fairly well because, during tough times, “People may not buy a new house, but they will maintain the one they have,” said Donna Dorman of Dorman Home Remodeling Inc. in Frederick. “Those were some of our best years ever because people were prioritizing where they were going to spend their money, and that was in retaining the value of their main asset, their home,” Dorman said. Consumers invested in updating or renovating bathrooms and kitchens in favor of having major additions built. Thanks to the popularity of HGTV and home-and-garden-related websites, consumers today are much more savvy about the possibilities for their home. In the business of design, construction and remodeling for 30 years, Dorman Home Remodeling, which is based in Mount Airy, opened a showroom in Frederick about five years ago to give consumers an up close and personal look at what they are seeing on TV and the web. “Too much information can be a daunting thing,” Dorman said. “You really do have to touch and see it before putting in your home.” Technology has also been a big boon to the home remodeling business by facilitating the creation of less expensive, quality materials, like quartz countertops that look and feel like marble, or stone facades that would have cost thousands more 15 years ago than they do today, Dorman said. When Dorman Home Remodeling opened its Frederick showroom, it also joined the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce. Meeting people who can talk about trends in banking, construction, and other related industries is the biggest benefit, Dorman said.

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–KATHERINE HEERBRANDT

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HOME & GARDEN

Dorman Home Remodeling

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orman Home Remodeling opened its Frederick showroom in 2012, and Donna Dorman, who works in client services, points to the showroom— awarded best in Frederick in 2014 by Frederick County Building Industry Association—as part of what sets Dorman apart from other home remodeling services. “It’s extremely personalized, and kind of a unique process,” she said. “We really understand where the client is coming from and help them realize what they want through their own stylistic filter.” Dorman said the showroom helps clients to get a feel for their new room or addition, and the company to understand their clients. “We get to know the clients really well,” Dorman said. “The result of that is a fantastic project and I think the clients appreciate that, as well. It’s definitely not a big-box store expe-

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rience. I think our clients enjoy having a place to come and talk remodeling.” Dorman’s husband, CJ, has been in the building industry for more than 30 years, first constructing decks and then moving to home building and remodeling. In that time, the business has evolved tremendously. Donna Dorman said part of that evolution is that clients are coming in very informed about what they want to see in their homes. The showroom, she said, along with technology, then helps them hone that vision. “We also have the technology to show them their new room in a photorealistic rendering. It really helps drive the point home. In the old days, it was a one-dimensional line drawing, but today we can make it come alive for the client—we can show them what the finished space is going to look like.” Dorman said being a Chamber member is

helpful for the business, citing the example of hearing about residents taking out loans to put additions on their homes, and then marketing that part of their business. “It’s great to get together with other people and talk about trends going on,” she said. “We hear where other businesses are and that helps us totally gauge what the near future might look like. That’s good information to have and it’s hyperlocal. I’m hearing what’s happening in our community, and that’s really vital.” 8415 Progress Drive, Suite D Frederick 21701 240-651-5096 DormanHomeRemodeling.com

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HOME & GARDEN

Frederick Air

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teve Schmidt is president and owner of the residential and light commercial heating and air-conditioning company Frederick Air, Inc. Armed with an engineering degree, sales experience and a commitment to do whatever it takes to serve customers, he began servicing and replacing existing HVAC (heating, ventilation and air-conditioning) equipment in 1992. As the HVAC industry continues to evolve, protecting and enhancing the indoor environment has become a focal point. Dave Schmidt, Steve’s son and the company sales manager, explained that new technology can now be used to fix problems that customers previously had for decades. “Our goal is to make people comfortable living in their homes and to do it in the most cost-effective way possible, so this means we now do things like home performance work, energy auditing and home automation,” Dave said. Over the last three years, with its solid reputation as a trusted company, Frederick Air has doubled in size, and employs 29 people. Steve said those who join his team are Frederick Air’s most valuable resource. Exhibiting integrity and being motivated to serve customers are important shared values. “It seems like we care about what we’re doing here, and the reason why it seems that way is because we do,” Steve said. “We have worked hard to provide a very good and high-quality customer experience, so when people receive that quality of service, it brings them back, over and over.” Dave added that customers expect more professionalism and customer service from businesses in 2016. Locally, Frederick Air’s customer referral record and excellent ratings indicate that it is still leading the way. “Customers are not only requiring more professionalism, but they are saying they want to be treated better than ever before. They are seeking out companies and restaurants and lawyers and other businesses that have the ability to provide high-quality service and customer experience, matched with cutting-edge technology,” Dave said. Steve agreed. “We have a wonderful online reputation. We have a wonderful community reputation. And I am proud that if you’re somebody who lives in our community, and you want heating and air-conditioning services, whether you ask your neighbors in-person or you ask them online, most likely people are going to respond, ‘Hey, you should check out Frederick Air.’”

STEVE Schmidt

President and Owner 29 employees

3 King Ave. Frederick 21701 301-663-0300 frederickair.com A p u b l i c a t i o n o f t h e F r e d e r i c k C o u n t y C h a m b e r o f C o m m e r c e a n d T h e F r e d e r i c k N e w s - Po s t

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HOME & GARDEN

Hawkins Landscaping For more than 40 years, Hawkins Landscaping has been shaping the exteriors of Frederick homes and businesses. For president and owner Dave Hawkins, who started the business fresh out of high school in 1974, the reason behind that longevity is simple: a reputation for quality work. “It’s basically just bearing out the good times and the bad times, being true to your word and standing behind your work,” he said. Hawkins Landscaping provides design, installation and maintenance for lawns, gardens and patios. Hawkins cited their maintenance division as a major source

Interior Plants LLC Since 1984, Interior Plants LLC has been beautifying offices with living plants. “There is no substitute for the beauty that plants bring to an otherwise stark environment,” said Ellen Hendrickson, owner and managing partner. “Interior plants add color and enhance a building’s appearance. Studies have shown employee morale is improved with the addition of plants and plants improve indoor air quality.” Hendrickson started her company, which she runs with the help of her seven employees, because of her love of horticulture and her desire to give women jobs with a flexible work schedule so they have the option to be the primary caretakers of their children and homes. Her daughter, Katie Jackson, is involved with the company now.

of growth—the company provides regular, scheduled maintenance to keep clients’ homes in top shape. Hawkins Landscaping is a family affair; Hawkins’ son, David Hawkins III, and daughter-in-law, Kristi Hawkins, are involved in the business, and he joked that their young son, David Hawkins IV (who turns 2 in May) will be getting involved soon, too. Hawkins Landscaping has been a Chamber member for about nine years, and Hawkins is a founder of the Frederick Area Landscape Contractors and Nurserymen Association and a member of the Maryland Green Industry Council.

8408 Links Bridge Road Thurmont 21788 301-898-3615  HawkinsLandscaping.com

“I caught the entrepreneur spirit from my dad, Michael Croghan Jr., and because I grew up in a family business (Hotel Frederick),” she said. “Frederick has grown significantly since we began. More opportunities now exist for us to provide interior plant-scaping services,” she said. “This has made us fine-tune our operations so we can respond to the new opportunities.” What’s in her future? Vertical plant walls, a new trend the company has a head start on, having installed the first plant wall in Frederick’s TownePlace Suites by Marriott, Hendrickson said. 5235 Westview Drive, Suite 100 Frederick 21703 301-662-5005 interiorplantsmd.com

The Yard Barber

301-607-1099 theyardbarberllc.com

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Gwen Bounds owns and manages The Yard Barber, LLC, a commercial and residential landscaping business that offers more than 40 years of collective landscaping experience serving Frederick County and surrounding areas. Frederick has been an ideal spot for her business to thrive because the “growth and expansion continues to provide opportunities for businesses of all sizes and services.” The Yard Barber’s success can be attributed to her employees, she said. “A great team extends the values, vision and mission of our company.”  The business makes it a point to be

regularly available to its customers, offering year-round landscaping maintenance and snow removal services. From pruning and weeding in the spring to leaf removal, seeding and aeration in the fall, The Yard Barber accommodates an extensive range of needs to keep clients’ outdoor areas in topnotch condition all year. The Yard Barber’s commercial clients include homeowners’ associations, churches, hotels and municipal properties. Customers need not be concerned about the scope of the services they require, because, as the Yard Barber’s website states, “Big or small, we do it all!”

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INDUSTRIAL &

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ix years ago, the unemployment rate in Frederick County was 7 percent. At the end of January this year, it was down to 4.3 percent—positive news for many that has actually created a difficulty for the county’s manufacturing business. “One of our challenges is finding enough people,” said Ron Peppe, vice president of legal and human resources for Canam Steel Corporation, whose U.S. headquarters is located in Point of Rocks. “There is a lot of competition for skilled workers. We need welders and machine operators, but because so much of what we do now involves computers, we need people who can learn how to read plans, follow directions and use computers.” It’s a problem shared by Jim Caruso, CEO and general partner of Flying Dog Brewery in Frederick. “We need semiskilled workers because we operate a fair amount of complex machinery,” he said. The company tries to recruit talent from within 30 minutes of the brewery, but given its tremendous growth since it moved to Frederick County 10 years ago, combined with the low unemployment rate, that has a challenge. Caruso said his workforce has grown from 24 employees to 130, yet he still needs more help. According to the Frederick County Office of Economic Development, manufacturing represents approximately 6 percent of private

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“Given its location, Frederick County is the best kept secret in manufacturing.” sector employment in Frederick County, with 175 manufacturing businesses accounting for more than 5,000 local jobs. Both Caruso and Peppe said their companies are poised to expand, but in order to do so, they must address some legislative and permitting hurdles. For Caruso, those hurdles involve helping local and state leaders recognize how special events hosted by the brewery, such as tastings, support economic development throughout county. “Breweries have been booming for about 25 years and have become very much a part of industrial tourism,” he said, noting that Flying Dog will attract between 50,000 and 60,000 to the brewery this year for its events that include concerts, tastings and its Flying Dog University, which teaches the finer points of beer making. That number could go as high as 100,000 once the brewery moves to its new, larger facility that will be located near Frederick Municipal Airport.

Canam Steel wants to grow, too, but Peppe said finding suitable land in Frederick County for heavy manufacturing has been difficult, especially given the environmental permitting process. “But we are seeing a new effort on the part of the county and the state to work with us,” he said. “We are finding that people are very approachable and that you can pick up the phone and talk to the person in charge.” Transportation bottlenecks are also a concern for Canam Steel, which moves its structural components to sites around the U.S., including to the new twin-span Tappan Zee Bridge replacement under construction in New York and to the Atlanta Falcons’ new stadium in Georgia. Improving local interchanges and reducing traffic congestion is crucial for the company, since trucks that are stuck idling in traffic waste manpower and fuel and delay the delivery of its products to time-sensitive construction projects. Yet despite these challenges, Caruso believes conditions in Frederick County are very favorable. “I think that given its location, Frederick County is the best kept secret in manufacturing,” he said. “It’s in the heart of the mid-Atlantic region, surrounding by major population areas.” Although his business is often aggressively recruited by other states, he’s happy to stay put. “We see nothing but the upside of doing business here.”

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–KATE MCDERMOTT

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INDUSTRIAL & MANUFACTURING

SAM Vitale

Managing Partner 15 Years with the Company

Complete Document Solutions

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classically trained opera singer with a degree in musical performance and a U.S. Air Force veteran, Sam Vitale has helped build one of the largest and most successful Xerox agencies in the country. “Businesses always look for ways to reduce their costs, and their document printing budget had been a big focus,” Vitale said. “They’re looking for a trusted partner that can do a solid analysis of their needs and provide the right solution. Being locally owned with direct ties to Xerox has allowed us to leverage Xerox’s resources to give our customers exactly what they need.” Vitale started with Complete Document Solutions (CDS) as a sales executive in 2001 in lower Manhattan. “Our building was across the street from the World Trade Center, and going

to work after 9/11 was tough,” he said. He later became a sales manager in New Jersey, and then was made a partner in Frederick, where he moved his family and has helped grow the business to become the biggest Xerox Authorized Agency in the U.S. The personal touch of Vitale, his partners, and more than 35 employees has encouraged customers to maintain long, mutually fruitful business partnerships. “The best technology in the world wouldn’t help a company if they didn’t have the right people to implement it,” Vitale said. “We give our people world-class training directly with Xerox so they’re able to provide our customers with outstanding support.” In March 2014, CDS MD moved to new office space on Pegasus Court, doubling its office space and warehouse presence in Frederick. “Being in the Chamber has allowed us to introduce ourselves to other businesses so that we can show them the value we offer,” said Vitale.

The future looks promising, too. “We provide value to businesses by offering custom solutions,” he said. “No one simply makes copies today. They want a document management solution that will help improve their individual workflows.” Vitale still sings, too, as a member of The Sicilian Tenors. Late comedian Joan Rivers dubbed them “The Three Tenors meets The Rat Pack.” He is on the board of directors for the Weinberg Center for the Arts. He and his wife Leesha have four children and live in Frederick. 5104 Pegasus Court, Suite N Frederick 21704 301-825-9220 cdsxrx.com svitale@cdsxrx.com

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LODGING, TRAVEL &

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ith an estimated 1.7 million people having visited Frederick County in 2014, it’s safe to say that Robert Frost’s proverbial “road less traveled” does not pass through here. That’s good news since tourism dollars provide high-octane fuel for the local economy. A recent report revealed visitors spent about $1.04 million a day in Frederick County during 2014, totaling about $380.4 million for the entire year. “Our efforts to improve our ranking in the state as a tourism destination over the last 15 years have resulted in an additional $1 billion invested in our county during that time,” said John Fieseler, executive director of the Tourism Council of Frederick County. The tourism industry supports nearly 6,500 jobs in Frederick County, including hospitality employees, retailers, tour operators and more.

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According to Fieseler, that represents nearly one of every four jobs in the area. Local tourism job growth is also a reflection of the fact that Frederick is known for its outstanding attractions. “You can have the greatest marketing in the world, but you also need quality products to support it,” he said. Although heritage tourism continues to attract thousands of visitors every year, several subsegments of the industry are tapping into other demographics. Those include the burgeoning areas of agricultural, industrial and culinary tourism. Sarah Kurtanich is the self-described chief eating officer of Taste Frederick Food Tours. She began the business four years ago and has seen a steady increase in the number of people participating in her food tours, which include a mix of history and culture along with tastings at numerous eateries in Downtown Frederick. “Culinary tourism shows no signs of slowing -SEE NEXT PAGE-

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LODGING, TRAVEL & TOURISM

Best Western Historic Frederick AS

Frederick continues to grow into an overnight destination, Mare Flanagan, director of sales at Best Western Historic Frederick, said that so does her business. “We try to really cater to a lot of our guests with some of the comforts from home,” Flanagan said. She pointed to the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce and the Frederick Visitor Center as salient business resources. “They’re always trying to ensure guests stay local instead of going to D.C. or Baltimore,” she said. Best Western fosters community through

its use of local products and services. Its renovations have created a still more inviting environment for guests. There’s a fresh new logo in the works. And, as the industry relies more heavily on new technologies, Flanagan is planning new services. “We’re going to have an iPad on the wall next to the front desk that is loaded with the local restaurants that are partnering with us. And our guests can use their room key and get the discounts from those restaurants,” she said. Flanagan welcomes all to stay and experience the “local flair” of Frederick.

Tourism Council of Frederick County ohn Fieseler, executive director of the Tourism Council of Frederick County for the past 18 years, has found great success in his industry. “I thoroughly enjoy sharing this community with people…the job is really about telling the story of this place, from its history through present day,” he said. It’s all about passion for the destination. In almost two decades of serving the Frederick community, Fieseler has found that the continued expansion of attractive shopping and dining venues, as well as the emergence of local production venues such as breweries, wineries and distilleries, aligns well with trends in domestic and international travel.

The birth of the Tourism Council, also known as Visit Frederick, in 1976 began with the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce. With their partnership and collaboration, Visit Frederick has continued to grow and flourish. Fieseler has seen the

down,” Kurtanich said. “We’ve had people on our tours from places as far away as Thailand, France and Germany.” Downtown Frederick, with its vibrant mix of restaurants, shops and entertainment options, is the area’s largest draw. Downtown Frederick Partnership reports that its First Saturday promotions alone attract an average of 14,000 people each month and infuse more than $6 million into the local economy on an annual basis. Many of those who attend events downtown are from out-of-town, making the need for a downtown hotel and conference center all the more pressing. With more than 400 hotels rooms in Frederick County, Plamondon Hospitality

Partners is the largest hotelier in the county and will be the developer of the proposed hotel and conference center on Carroll Creek. “What will make the downtown property different from the others we operate in the county, as well as from those who operate under different brands, is that this will be Frederick County’s first upper upscale full-service hotel, which in our industry means it will have multiple food and beverage operations as well as banquet and meeting space,” said Pete Plamondon, the company’s co-president. The project, which has been on the drawing board for two years, is not without risk for the company, but Plamondon said his company

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420 Prospect Blvd.  Frederick 21701  301-695-6200 bestwesternfrederick.com

(Visit Frederick) role of the local tourism industry evolve from simply selling a destination to also taking part in the development of the community. Currently, the council is advocating for a full-service downtown hotel and conference center. According to Fieseler, the expansion of the market from this project “is the next game changer for Frederick.” Over the years, Fieseler credits his board of directors for the vision and guidance to set and reach newer and bolder goals. 151 S. East St. Frederick 21701 301-600-4041 visitfrederick.org

believes Frederick has reached a point in its maturation that it is ready for this kind of property, especially given data from the Tourism Council that reveals that the number of visitors staying overnight in the county rose to 784,200 in 2014 (the most recent year for which statistics are available), making overnight stays nearly as popular as day trips. “We have conducted several feasibility studies and we understand the challenges we face, but we also continue to believe that Frederick, given its growing reputation as a both a business and tourist destination, can support this kind of hotel,” he said.

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—KATE MCDERMOTT

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ABOUT

NONPROFITS N onprofits are the largest membership group in the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce, and make up 8 percent of the county’s workforce. Between 2006 and 2011, nonprofits boasted a 15 percent job growth rate, while employment dropped 4 percent in the for-profit sector, according to Maryland Nonprofits. The advocacy group is updating those statistics, said President and CEO Heather Iliff, but even though it looks as if nonprofit growth is now more in line with growth in other sectors, it still has a slight edge. The job growth is largely driven by sectors where nonprofits have the most employees, including health care and education, Iliff said. “It���s telling from that job growth in the nonprofit sector and the eight that closed their doors [due to the economic downturn of 2008], that we are more efficient with the number of nonprofits that we have,” said Josh Pedersen, outgoing CEO of the United Way of Frederick County. As a result of tough economic times, nonprofits had to become some of the leanest businesses around, using donated office equipment and supplies and paying less than the for-profit employers, Pedersen said. Government depends on nonprofits to fill needs for services that it does not. “Nonprofits can do a lot of good without as much money,” he said. “But even though we hunkered down, there were limits to our ability to be proactive and deliver services.” To survive and still fill the needs, the sector had to collaborate by pooling resources, working together to avoid duplication of re-

sources. The Chamber has been instrumental in this effort, said Michael Planz, who is CEO of Community Living, Inc., which serves those with intellectual and physical disabilities, and chair of the Frederick Nonprofit Alliance, a

“There is a true willingness here to come together to create an economically viable and vibrant community. It’s almost breathtaking.”

program of the Chamber. In addition to staff support for the Alliance, the Chamber, under President and CEO Elizabeth Cromwell, has supported nonprofits with training, seminars and other events, including the Touching Lives in Frederick County Annual Awards. One of the newest Chamber members is SHIP—Student Homelessness Initiative Project—which helps homeless students. A nonprofit for just over a year and a half, it has steadily gained support in the community, mostly through social networking. Director of Operations MaryLynn Hinde and Executive Director Ed Hinde wanted to increase visibility, partnerships and support by joining the Chamber, which they did in early March. “We are new, we are young and we are very grassroots,” Hinde said. “[Joining the Chamber is] a natural progression.” The pair attended a Chamber charity event sponsored by Generation Connect, and came home with 15 business cards, and more importantly new connections with those who want to help SHIP after hearing about the 700plus homeless students in the county. Trade associations are included in the same category as nonprofit organizations in the Chamber business divisions. Denise Jacoby, executive officer of the Frederick Building Industry Association, said the partnership between the Chamber and trade associations is a valuable one. “The Chamber is a trusted voice of business in the Frederick community, and we are a trusted voice of the building industry.” Solutions are found when groups work together on joint projects. “There is a true willingness here to come together to create an economically viable and vibrant community,” she said. “It’s almost breathtaking.”

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KATHERINE HEERBRANDT

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NONPROFITS & COMMUNITY

FC Frederick utside of the United States, soccer is a way of life. It doesn’t matter what country you live in, how much money you have (or don’t), or how old you are, soccer players and fans are just as passionate as Americans who love football. Maybe more. The truth is soccer is no longer a fringe sport in the United States. Its popularity has grown in leaps and bounds throughout the past few decades and the fascination only continues to grow. Since 1989, FC Frederick has grown into one of the premier youth soccer clubs in the region, having placed more than 500 players onto college rosters, more than 280 players onto Olympic Development Program teams, and thousands of players onto high school varsity and junior varsity teams. According to Bo Eskay, executive director for FC Frederick, new soccer fields that have been built in the area have created more opportunities for youth to play. “A number of the high schools have turf fields now, and the county recently built one at Ballenger Creek Park. These are very helpful for

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Soccer players and fans are just as passionate as Americans who love football. Maybe more. a club like ours because it allows us to play in the winter and also if it’s poor weather,” Eskay said. “We would still like to see more because we’re so far behind neighboring counties, but it’s nice to see in the past few years more turf fields becoming available.” FC Frederick has programs for just about every age group—from elementary school through high school. According to Eskay, “the arrival of exciting Minor League Soccer to Frederick County last summer allowed us to complete the developmental pyramid.” The FC Frederick PRO program lets college players and local

standouts continue their development, and players with professional aspirations showcase their talents. “The club is full service in every sense of the term,” Eskay said. “If a boy or girl has an interest in the game, we have every level of play, from introductory all the way up to very talented players who go on to play collegiately. It’s a benefit knowing you can come to one organization and with their staff, history, experience and success, your interaction with that one organization can carry you through your child’s entire interest in the game.” Although FC Frederick has only three fulltime employees, the club maintains a very large roster of coaches and assistants to help each young athlete succeed. “The players who do the best with us come with an openness and willingness to learn and accept feedback,” Eskay said. P.O. Box 1163 Frederick 21702 301-471-4610 fcfrederick.com beskay@fcfrederick.com

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NONPROFITS & COMMUNITY

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he Family Resource, Information & Education Network for Down Syndrome (F.R.I.E.N.D.S.) is 501(c)3 nonprofit re-formed in 2000 that acts as a support group and social network for families in the tristate area. “We’re strong advocates for the Down syndrome community as a whole,” said Dennis Weikert, a F.R.I.E.N.D.S. founder, board member and treasurer. “Whether a newborn or someone in their 70s, we’re trying to protect their rights and provide a better lifestyle for them through advocacy and awareness within our communities.” F.R.I.E.N.D.S. holds several awareness-building events, such as an annual conference designed to give teachers new techniques and skills for helping students with Down syndrome in the general education classroom; a bike camp to teach children with special needs how to ride; and a Buddy Walk with entertainment at Baker Park. F.R.I.E.N.D.S. will celebrate its 15th annual walk in September. “The idea behind the Buddy Walk is to raise awareness in our community about Down syndrome,

“Whether a newborn or someone in their 70s, we’re trying to protect their rights and provide a better lifestyle...”

and it has become our primary fundraiser as well,” Weikert said. “We try to get the information out and engage the community, and it helps raise the money for us to continue our programs.” As a member of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce, one of the nonprofit’s goals is to identify employment opportunities, open doors to employers and encourage them to hire people with Down syndrome. “We’re just not an organization that sits back and just acts as a social club,” he said. “We’re a nonprofit that tries to be very active in the community. Our mission is to establish a better life for our kids and adults.” For more information about F.R.I.E.N.D.S., please visit us at friendsoffredco.org. P.O. 641, Middletown 21769 301-676-4420  friendsoffredco.org GuideStar listed since 2007

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he American Diabetes Association, Maryland Chapter, along with Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal’s Frederick Division, rally hard against the disease with the annual fundraiser Step Out Frederick. “In Frederick County, 16,000 people have diabetes,” said Rachel Guzman, ADA spokesperson. “Step Out Frederick is one of Frederick’s largest fundraising events, raising a quarter of a million dollars for education, research and advocacy. The Frederick walk has been around since 1999.” “Step Out participants commit to walk and raise money in this inspirational event not only because nearly 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, but because they more

than likely know someone who is living with the everyday challenges of diabetes,” according to ADA’s Step Out website. “Kalkreuth, an exterior envelope contractor, has a few people impacted personally by having diabetes. I’m one of them,” said David Hesse, Kalkreuth vice president. “We were looking to be involved [in fundraising]

in a corporate way and thought the ADA walk would be a great cause to support,” he said. “We’ve enjoyed a great relationship along the way with the ADA and raised $3,500 last year in a few short weeks with their help.” This year’s walk is Oct. 9. Interested in forming a team in your company? Contact Rachel Guzman at rguzman@diabetes.org. 2002 Clipper Park Road, Suite 110 Baltimore 21211 410-265-0075 diabetes.org diabetes.org/stepoutfrederick

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NONPROFITS & COMMUNITY

Downtown Frederick Partnership D owntown Frederick Partnership, an economic development nonprofit established in 1990, works hard to make Downtown Frederick vital, according to Executive Director Kara Norman. “Downtown Frederick has seen a lot of growth in the retail sector, in both new and established businesses, in the past year,” Norman said. “Specialty retaileres, including home goods, food and gifts, all have more to offer to the downtown customer.” A hub of culture, commerce and government, Downtown Frederick offers a thriving commercial

mix—from eclectic stores and restaurants to professional firms and organizations. More than 3,000 employees work in Downtown Frederick at nearly 700 businesses and organizations, she said. “Our goal is to make Downtown Frederick more active and thriving for retail, office, residential living and entertainment,” Norman said. “The people who live here and work here make us cool, reflecting a diversity of ethnicities, lifestyles, ages and incomes.” Recent projects of the Partnership include working to support the recent funding milestone

MedSource M “Businesses are open to employing the disabled, educational institutions are more accommodating, and it’s more socially acceptable in the community.”

edSource provides residential choices and support for disabled Marylanders around Frederick and Prince George’s counties. Managed by Jay Balint for the past 29 years, the nonprofit provides an invaluable resource to the community. Balint is quick to commend his staff. “They’re often under-recognized,” he said. “They’re an essential resource and support for so many developmentally challenged individuals and their families.” With the area’s growth has come increasing acceptance and awareness, said Balint. “Communities are better in recognizing agencies like ours. Businesses are open to employing the disabled, educational institutions are more accommodating, and it’s more socially acceptable in

for the downtown hotel and conference center and completing a strategic plan to guide the Partnership’s work through 2020. Downtown Frederick Partnership thrives on a staff of four and about 300 volunteers to carry out about 80 projects, events and initiatives each year, Norman said. 19 E. Church St. Frederick 21701 301-698-8118 downtownfrederick.org

the community. In the beginning we weren’t welcome, but it’s not a stigma anymore.” Delivering consistent care and stability is always a challenge, as the organization is constantly navigating funding and regulatory challenges and keeping housing sites licensed. MedSource is proud to be an institution–but it’s far from institutional. “Staff upholds each person’s individual needs as much as possible,” Balint said. “We do our best to help those we serve fit in next door.” 308 W. Main St., Middletown 21769 301-371-3775 medsourceservices.org jaybalint@gmail.com

Habitat for Humanity of Frederick County E xecutive Director Ron Cramer has been leading the local affiliate organization for eight years and cites Jimmy Carter as a role model for his work. “Carter exemplifies who we are both as a Christian-based organization and as a homebuilder.”  Cramer credits Habitat’s local success to volunteers who follow in Carter’s footsteps. “Our volunteers help people who wouldn’t have a home, have a home.” In addition to volunteers, “success requires a good business sense, a good strategy, and strong planning and implementation,” Cramer said. So, what is the most important attribute that Habitat volunteers possess? “It a takes a heart,” Cramer said.

With the ever-evolving workforce in Frederick, Habitat aims to eliminate the commute for those working in Frederick but living elsewhere. “Forty to 50 percent of those who work in Frederick are commuters right now.”  Despite all of the building services Habitat offers, Cramer makes it clear: “We don’t want people to feel like they’re getting charity. We’re giving a hand-up, not a handout.” 2 E. Church St., 3rd floor Frederick 21701 301-698-2449 frederickhabitat.org

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ABOUT

PERSONAL CARE Personal care services in Frederick

encompass professions in a number of industries, from childcare to residential nursing care, from spa services to funeral services. But ultimately what they have in common is a focus on the consumer, and a passion for working with the public. The spa and beauty services industry is also devoted to giving clients a customized experience that is emotionally and technically satisfying. The Temple: A Paul Mitchell Partner School in Downtown Frederick, offers a 1,500-hour cosmetology program, and clinics where nonlicensed students hone their skills on clients who pay discounted prices for a variety of services, including hair, nails, skin and makeup. Temple students are taught that 80 percent of the reason a client returns for services is

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dependent on how they are treated on their first visit. “It’s about the experience you provide, not always about the technical aspect you deliver,” said Sharon Riser, co-owner of The Temple. “It’s about how you make the guest feel.” Riser emphasized that services should include educating the client about how to maintain their new look, and follow-up via thank-you notes.

Funeral staffers must guide families

through the worst time in their lives with quiet confidence and sensitivity. Not only have they lost a loved one, but mourning families may also be tasked with planning a huge life event in just a few days. Personalizing and taking care of the details of the funeral and burial process clears the way for families and

friends to focus on their loss. “That’s why we do as much as we can to make it easier for them to grieve,” said Courtney Stauffer of Stauffer Funeral Homes. Stauffer, a family business since 1973, has six locations throughout the county. Stauffer has expanded its services in the past year to include catering. In the early 2000s, Stauffer Funeral Homes offered inhouse cremation services at its Frederick crematory. Cremation is growing in popularity, and Stauffer wanted to be responsive to demand. “We want to treat our clients like family members, and it’s comforting to know that, if they do choose cremation, their loved one never leaves our care,” she said. Some businesses in personal care services, like funeral homes and nursing -SEE PAGE 69-

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PERSONAL CARE

Massage Envy - Frederick N ancy Boone began a new journey to help people to de-stress, manage pain and improve their overall health and wellness in 2011, when she opened Massage Envy-Frederick. Her daughter, Tracy Hochhalter, is the multi-unit manager who oversees a great team of professional massage therapists and estheticians. “We’ve been open for almost five years now and Frederick has just steadily grown since we’ve been there,” Hochhalter said. “I also think that the people of Frederick trust the Chamber a lot, so [its] members are trusted more.”

While the 60-minute customized massage is Massage Envy’s most popular service with those who patronize the membership-based company, Murad Sensitive Skin, acne, anti-aging and vitamin C facials are also in demand, as are home-care products to support skin maintenance. “A lot of people see Massage Envy and think only massages, but we do have a skin care aspect to our company,” Hochhalter said. “We’re also a franchise, so that helps with keeping our cost lower, as opposed to a stand-alone spa that needs to charge more for services.”

Nancy Boone

7820 Worman’s Mill Road Suite G Frederick 21701 240-397-2333 massageenvy.com/clinics/ MD/Frederick.aspx

Real Comfort Systems R eal Comfort Systems is a family-owned and operated business that has more than 16 years of experience servicing all heating and cooling makes and models for customers in the City of Frederick, Frederick County, West Virginia and surrounding areas. “People place their trust in us when we come into their homes, so we take our commitment to quality service seriously,” said William Harris, Real Comfort Systems president and owner, who noted that each of his staff members undergoes thorough background checks. Real Comfort Systems technicians average 14 years of experience and participate in weekly training sessions to discuss energy- and money-saving

ways to approach heating and air-conditioning services so they can save their customers money. Real Comfort Systems also provides indoor air quality products, ranging from UV air purifiers to whole-house humidifiers and duct cleaning services. “Clean air contributes to the overall health of you and your home, especially since poor indoor air quality can cause headaches, dry eyes, nasal congestion, nausea and fatigue,” Harris said. Harris is so sure of his quality service and products that Real Comfort Systems Heating and Cooling guarantees its repairs with a five-year parts and labor warranty.

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the industry increased 43 percent, compared with 27 percent for U.S. nonfarm employment overall, according to a 2016 report by PricewaterhouseCoopers on the economic and social contributions of the industry. The services segment experienced the most substantial growth, with a 62 percent increase in employment during that period. Although the state of the economy has little impact on the need for funeral services, during down times, families might not spend as much as they would during more prosperous times. Funeral directors must still be cognizant of the trends in services, and stay at the forefront

homes, are mostly immune to the vagaries of economic downturns, while others, like spa and beauty services, are more attuned to the economic landscape. The Temple thrived during the 2008 recession because when people lose their jobs, many head to school to learn a new profession. The school, which pulls students from around the country, opened campuses in Annapolis and Miami. Demand for stylists has doubled in the past few years, and The Temple boasts a 97 percent placement rate, one of the highest in the country. Between 1990 and 2014, employment in

3886 Roundtree Road, Unit 1 Jefferson 21755 301-662-3661 realcomfortsystems.com

of meeting consumer demand, Stauffer said. Customized caskets and green burials are steadily gaining in popularity, but Stauffer has not seen much demand yet locally. Within the spa and salon industry, male clients now want the same pampering and experience that women have enjoyed for years, including skin care, scalp massages and precision cuts. “The men side of the industry has really exploded; product lines have quadrupled,” Riser said. “Men want the same experience as women and will pay for that experience.”

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ABOUT

PETS &

VETERINARY CARE

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that nearly three-quarters of U.S. households own pets, and very little is spared when it comes to pampering those pets. Americans spent approximately $61.4 billion on their pets in 2011, which is an average of more than $500 per household on everything from food to veterinary services. That doesn’t surprise Dr. Derek Wilson of Old Farm Veterinary Hospital in Frederick. In the nearly 18 years that he has been practicing, he has seen owners become willing to invest more and more money in their pets’ overall care. The result is that many pets—like humans—are living longer than ever before. “I have a number of canine patients who are in their upper teens, something I wouldn’t have seen even just 10 years ago,” Wilson said. As is true of the human species, improved health care and disease prevention is a big reason for that, and Wilson noted that a heightened awareness of the importance of dental care in animals is leading to a reduction in other health issues. “My patients that have better dental care have fewer chronic, degenerative conditions.” Animal health has also benefited from new vaccine protocols that take into consideration factors such as the pet’s lifestyle and living conditions. And a growing number of vets are choosing to specialize in specific areas, such as orthopedics to treat bone and ligament injuries. The improved health of pets also contributes to the health of their owners. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, pets can lower their owners’ blood pressure and cholesterol and triglyceride levels, while also decreasing feelings of loneliness, espe-

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cially since pets increase opportunities for exercise and socialization. Frederick Countians annually demonstrate their devotion to animals through their support of the Frederick Animal Control and Adoption Center (FACAC) on Rosemont Avenue

in Frederick. In 2015, 1,179 animals were adopted from the shelter, while another 622 were returned to their owners. Unfortunately, however, because the FACAC accepts all unwanted, injured, stray and sick animals in the county, it is often unable to find homes for all the pets in need. In 2015, 2,000 animals had to be euthanized. To encourage successful pet placement, the FACAC works with those who are interested in adopting to find out how they live and what they want in their pet. Pets from the shelter are neutered prior to adoption and a counselor works with new owners to review important information on proper training and what to expect, especially during the first few days. Linda Shea, division director for Frederick County Animal Control, said that animal adoptions are similar to human relationships: once the immediate infatuation with a cute puppy or kitten passes, adopters need to be willing to work to make the relationship last. “When people come in and want to adopt, we know they love the animal, but we want to make sure they are committed to making it part of their life forever,” she said. “Our goal is to make sure this is the animal’s last adoption ever.” Part of that hard work to make the relationship work involves exercising restraint—even when there is a big set of brown eyes and floppy ears staring at you. For those owners who like to spoil their furry friends with extra treats and bigger bowls of food, animal experts caution against the dangers of excess. “Being overweight really takes a toll on animals, especially later in life,” Wilson said. –KATE MCDERMOTT

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PETS & VETERINARY CARE

CARE Veterinary Center

P

ets have become a staple in our modern-day lives. For a majority of us, our pets are more than just animals, they’re family. Just like with any family member, sometimes pets get sick, hurt, or worse. Fortunately, help is just a quick car ride away. CARE Veterinary Center has so much more to offer than what its name implies. With board-certified specialists and veterinarians, the team works in collaboration with the region’s primary care veterinarians, delivering advanced care to diagnose and treat complex medical, surgical or emergency conditions in companion animals. Each member of the CARE Veterinary staff cares deeply about all animals, and it is that passion that guides them when something happens to your pet. “One of the things that CARE is really working on this year is customer service and making sure that (the owners) are comfortable,” said Dr. Kelly Gellasch, who founded CARE Veterinary Center in 2010. “We all treat the pets like they’re our own.” The center is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Gellasch said their internal medicines doctors are available on the weekends for complicated cases and their surgeons are on-call for any advanced surgeries that are necessary. According to Dr. Stephanie Phillips, CARE has made many valuable connections within the community. “We’ve really garnered a relationship with the Downtown Frederick Partnership and we’ve expanded beyond pet events to things that are for families and the community,” Phillips said. “We try to branch out and have a bigger presence, and we’ve really gotten support back, as well.” Pet owners grow attached to their furry family, so when something bad happens, it can be earth-shattering. It’s not easy for the veterinarians, either. Not being able to help a sick or dying pet sometimes takes a toll on them. However, the CARE team members have their hearts lifted by the sheer amount of thank-yous and photos from families with healthy, happy pets. “Pictures and cards and emails just pour in, and it’s really rewarding,” said practice manager Becky Clawson. “Some of the doctors get monthly updates from some of the successful cases. It’s really cool to see, even months and years later. A moment in time for the hospital as a whole makes such a lasting impact on any given family.” For CARE Veterinary Center, being a part of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce has afforded them the opportunity to make lasting connections and become a greater part of the community. “We deeply value the partnerships we’ve formed with Chamber members. Some we’ve worked with professionally as well as treating their personal pets, and while we have a service we hope they don’t need often, when they do have an emergency or a pet that’s very sick or ill, we appreciate the top-of-mind awareness the Chamber brings,” Clawson said. 1080 W. Patrick St., Frederick 21703 301-662-2273 carefrederick.com A p u b l i c a t i o n o f t h e F r e d e r i c k C o u n t y C h a m b e r o f C o m m e r c e a n d T h e F r e d e r i c k N e w s - Po s t

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REAL ESTATE U

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the years since the housing bubble burst in 2008, the Frederick County real estate market, like much of Maryland and the nation, has been slowing recovering from the crisis, which at its nadir in July 2010 saw up to 50 percent of the homes on the market in the county categorized as distressed sales, meaning they were either foreclosures or short sales. Today, both the commercial and residential segments are showing signs of growth, signaling to many in the field that the worst days are indeed behind us. Rocky Mackintosh, president, owner and broker for MacRo, Ltd., which specializes in land and commercial real estate, reported that the median price for farmland in Frederick County is up 22 percent since 2013 and that commercial real estate sales topped $300 million in 2015, up 15 percent from 2014, with the industrial sector accounting for nearly a third of that increase. But the local market for office space is still struggling. “It was overbuilt and there is still a tremendous amount of inventory available,” he said. Environmental restrictions, permitting requirements and impact fees have made it more expensive to develop properties in Frederick County today, according to Mackintosh, yet, “All

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“We have about a threemonth supply of homes in the inventory, which to me represents a balanced market.” in all, there is a lot more interest in growth and expansion in the land and commercial market.” On the residential side, Jim Bass, associate broker and owner of Jim Bass Group of Real Estate Teams, reported that 2015 sales were up 20 percent over 2014, and 2016’s pending sales were up 12 percent over the same period last year as of March. “I think we have finally turned the corner,” he said, noting in early April that Frederick County had more than 1,000 homes for sale. “We have about a three-month supply of homes in the inventory, which to me represents a balanced market.” The average sale price of a home in Frederick County this spring was $288,117, a figure that Bass believes was somewhat depressed by the last wave of distressed sales and foreclosures, which represent about 15 percent of homes on the market today. Bass said he is seeing more and more baby boomers joining millennials in a desire for urban

living, while young families are purchasing homes in the suburbs with yards and proximity to neighborhood schools. There is also a growing segment of the market that is trying to blend two or more generations under one roof. “We are seeing a lot of clients who have parents who can no longer stay in their own homes. But after looking into the cost of senior living facilities, they decided to invest the money in improvements to their own homes so their parents could live with them,” said Bob Deluliis, president of Talon Construction in Frederick. Even those who are not taking in older adults are thinking ahead. Deluliis has noted a desire to “age in place” is growing as well. “I would estimate that anywhere from 25 percent to 35 percent of our master bath remodels include barrier-free showers. People want wider hallways in case someday they may be in wheelchair. [They] want more space around their kitchen islands, too.” Like Mackintosh, Deluliis said additional permitting requirements on everything from home insulation to septic systems are making it more expensive to build or remodel homes in the county. But even with that, “Things are much better today than they were even a year ago,” he said. –KATE MCDERMOTT

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REAL ESTATE

Rich Phillips, Re/Max Never forget where you came from. It’s a time-honored phrase, and Rich Phillips lives it every day. Born and raised in Frederick County, Phillips now introduces current and prospective residents to their homes in the county as a Realtor with Re/Max Results. “The City of Frederick is a great place to live,” Phillips said. “Through my work, I get to sell the Frederick area every day. That’s what I really like.” During his decade-plus of experience in D.C.-metro-area real estate, Phillips has honed his craft, developing the qualities and skills that go into being an excellent Realtor. He cites professionalism, integrity, marketing savvy and effective negotiation skills as important characteristics of a successful Realtor. Perhaps the most important, however, are the ability to network effectively and knowledge of our local market. Phillips has both of those. You can hear pride in his voice as he ticks off the benefits of the community, from its own unique personality to its proximity to other places. “Frederick is just a quick drive to the areas including D.C., Baltimore and Northern Virginia,” he said. “There’s the beauty and history of the community itself. It’s a little big city situated in the mountains. You have outdoor activities and then all the fantastic restaurants of Downtown Frederick.” In his own way, Phillips is helping the community, but the opposite has also been true over the years. Phillips is a graduate of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce Leadership Frederick County program. Each year, Chamber officials accept 30 to 40 local professionals for a nine-month program that delves into the opportunities, challenges and trends in the county. With the population of both the city and county expected to continue growing, good things are ahead for the region’s real estate market, Phillips said. “We’re getting back to a healthy supply of homes on the market. With the job growth that is projected in the county, the amount of people coming in is remaining steady. I’m optimistic and very excited to welcome new families to our wonderful area.”

“There’s the beauty and history of the community itself. It’s a little big city situated in the mountains.”

7210 Corporate Court, Suite B Frederick 21703 301-698-5005 richphillipshomes.com richphillips@remax.net A p u b l i c a t i o n o f t h e F r e d e r i c k C o u n t y C h a m b e r o f C o m m e r c e a n d T h e F r e d e r i c k N e w s - Po s t

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REAL ESTATE

Bach & Associates, Inc., Realtors As Frederick continues to grow in exciting

new ways, Bach & Associates has remained a consistent force during its 34 years in the real estate industry. Whether you’re buying or selling a home in Frederick, this dedicated team of real estate professionals always puts the customer first. With a combined total of 140 years of experience, Bach & Associates has assisted thousands of satisfied customers. Owners Jennifer and John Grove credit their knowledgeable agents with the company’s longevity. Cecilia Bach founded the family-owned, highly regarded agency under the guiding

principle of putting people before transactions. That philosophy has not changed. Even as technology plays an increasingly important role in real estate, the personal touch a Bach agent shares with clients is an integral part of making dreams a reality. A Frederick County Chamber of Commerce member for 34 years, Bach & Associates recognizes that positive working relationships among businesses help the community thrive. As group of avid volunteers, they understand that giving back to the community is as important as working in it.

Jeanette Sulzen, Lori Duke, Matt Aspey, Sharon Oland, Lettie Golden, Sherry Burgee, Jim Southam, Bob Golden, Jennifer Grove Missing from photo: Evelyn Holmes, Kristen Wallace, Alan Haga, John Grove

5301 Buckeystown Pike #105 Frederick 21704 800-394-2224 301-695-9600 BachRealEstate.com

Turning Point Real Estate Turning Point Real Estate is a region-

al commercial and residential real estate company serving customers throughout Frederick and the Greater Washington, D.C., metro area. “What makes us unique is our diverse expertise,” said Joe Anselmo. “We have assembled a powerful team of specialists in various market sectors such as land development, commercial sales and leasing, strategic planning, negotiation, construction, residential real estate and marketing.” The company takes a collaborative approach when working with clients. “We see our clients as partners,” added

Charles Seymour. “Our focus is not merely resolving their immediate needs, but developing long-term strategies and solutions critical to the specific achievement of every client’s goals.” Frederick’s growth has attracted new and better businesses bringing a more diverse workforce, which Turning Point Real Estate attributes to more creative land planning and development. This change has allowed the firm to promote the benefits of both living and doing business in Frederick County. Their outlook is optimistic and they are enthusiastic about developing creative solutions for their clients in the future.

Charles Seymour, Joe Anselmo and Aric Rudden, owners/principals 301-831-8232 8923 Fingerboard Road Frederick 21704 TurningPointRealEstate.com

L.P. Calomeris Realty, LLC “It’s a very exciting time to be a part of Down-

town Frederick and the new north end,” said Georgette Calomeris, broker of L.P. Calomeris Realty, LLC. Located in the heart of the City of Frederick, L.P. Calomeris Realty has offices in an historic duplex built in 1890. The company was founded over 50 years ago by the late Louis Peter Calomeris. Georgette has been broker of record since 2006. The company’s true passion is providing the best one-on-one service available to clients as they embark upon the most significant yet exciting financial decision of their lives, said Calomeris, who has been in real estate for 20 years. “Our agents are seasoned professionals who hold high standards of service, foster trust and work in a

collaborative culture,” she said. “We cultivate cooperation among lenders, title companies, attorneys, home inspectors, appraisers and everyone involved in the sale or purchase of a home. “Whether we’re working with a first-time homebuyer, repeat purchaser or investor, every move we make is geared toward helping clients achieve their goals. If you’re ever on Market Street, stop in and say, ‘Hello.’ We always welcome visitors.” 514 N. Market St. Frederick 21701 301-698-1958 calomeris.com georgette@calomeris.com

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Matan Companies he construction market slowed considerably during and following the economic recession that began in 2007. Now, however, the economy is on the road to recovery, and the real estate market is recovering along with it. Matan Companies, one of the region’s premier commercial real estate and development firms, headquartered in Frederick, is capitalizing on this time of growth. Matan, which is known for its industrial assets, now has several projects in the industrial, retail and residential pipelines. However, although it may be a time of growth, that growth comes with a tentative mindset, given that the recession is still visible in the market’s rearview mirror, according to Matan officials. “There was a real lull in development, and that was a function of the depth of the downturn,” said Brad Benna, who handles the leasing for Matan’s Frederick portfolio. “Now things are coming back, but there’s a real thoughtfulness. You had an uptick in vacancies, and now the vacancies are down, but we want to be thoughtful about what we do.” On the industrial front, Matan’s development focus is headed by Wedgewood West, a six-building, 672,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art, Class A high-bay warehouse development. Situated in a prime Route 85 corridor location and not far from Interstates 70 and 270, the industrial park will begin

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delivering buildings in September 2016 and has buildto-suit opportunities available, with unique park amenity enhancements. For retail space, construction is underway for the massive, new 190,000-square-foot Wal-Mart Supercenter. Scheduled to open its doors in fall 2016, the new Frederick supercenter will be located on the corner of Monocacy Boulevard and Route 26. Three additional pad sites on the front of the project space will complete the redevelopment project, featuring Starbucks, Chic-fil-A, and a yet to be determined third tenant. Last but not least, in the residential sector, there is the brand new Urban Green Apartments, which Benna touts as the first, and only, luxury apartment community in the Urbana. What makes the eight-building complex and its 352 housing units unusual for the area is its blend of luxury and premium amenities with the simplicity and ease of countryside living. At Matan, it all adds up to opportunity. “We’re optimistic,” Benna said. “We’re looking forward to the future.”

“You had an uptick in vacancies, and now the vacancies are down, but we want to be thoughtful about what we do.”

4600 Wedgewood Blvd., Suite A  Frederick 21703 301-694-9200 mataninc.com info@mataninc.com

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ABOUT

RESTAURANTS Years ago, restaurateur Phil Bowers got some sound business advice, which he resolutely ignored. “When I told people, including those in a class on starting your own business, I wanted to start a restaurant, they said, ‘Don’t do it.’” Even the instructor tried to talk him out of it. And with good reason. The estimated percentage of restaurants that fail within the first year of business varies—anywhere between 26 percent and 60 percent—but one truth prevails: owning a successful restaurant requires a fortitude that owning many other businesses might not. The profit margin for a restaurant is small, and the work is never done, said Hannah Politis, who directs marketing and events at Beans in the Belfry in Brunswick, which opened in 2004 as a coffee house. Proprietor and creator Melanie DiPasquale figured out early on that they needed to offer more than coffee and pastries to stay in business, Politis said. They beefed up the menu, added events and music, and are always on the lookout for ways to entice new customers and win their loyalty. “You constantly have to invest in the restaurant, and so many things can go wrong in the hospitality business,” Politis said. Beans in the Belfry, located in a 100-yearold church, offered Brunswick a unique

location, and a community gathering place, pulling in locals and MARC train commuters alike. In the restaurant biz, location is everything. Bowers, who opened Brewer’s Alley 20 years ago, is president of Fountain Rock Management Corp., which oversees five downtown restaurants, including Brewer’s, Isabella’s Taverna & Tapas Bar, Ayse Meze Lounge, Pistarro’s and relative newcomer Reina. He and his group located restaurants downtown because of its rocketing popularity and ability to attract local traffic during the week and visitors on the weekend. Elizabeth Cromwell, president and CEO of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce, cited the strong restaurant business sector as a leading indicator of the county’s economic vitality. “The breadth of dining options is vast for a community of this size, and they are patronized by both locals and visitors. A fine or casual dining experience usually tops off an afternoon of shopping, and our shops, restaurant and entertain-

ment venues work together to maximize the consumer experience.” With five restaurants within a few miles of each other, Bowers said he and his group of investors were careful to ensure that the they were distinctive. “We definitely didn’t want to cannibalize ourselves, so they are all different in style, menu and décor. People like variety.” Restaurant owners have to be adept at reacting not only to trends in food and service, but also to changes in clientele. With more competition in an area saturated with eateries, workweek traffic is not as bustling as it once was, while weekend traffic is booming. In response, Brewer’s is adding more seats to accommodate the massive weekend crowds, and closing some rooms during the week, Bowers said. Constant vigilance is part of a restaurateur’s job, according to Politis. “You always have to improve,” she said. “You want to have the freshest products and ingredients, the music people like, the latest IT equipment. It can all be very challenging,” she said. Looking back on his decision to ignore the naysayers early on, Bowers said he has no regrets, but the business is not for everyone. “If you don’t mind working hard, you should go for it, but it is a tough business.”

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Upcounty Donuts LLC

(Dunkin’ Donuts) H ard work, passion and community outreach are three traits Brent Fauntleroy attributes to his success. Fauntleroy, along with his business partner Michael Kaminski, has seven Dunkin’ Donuts locations in Frederick County and has recently acquired five new locations in Houston, Texas. “When [Michael] was a child, his father would take him to Dunkin’ Donuts every Sunday and it was his dream [to own one],” said Fauntleroy, Upcounty Donuts LLC owner/ president and partner. As the growth of Frederick increases, it helps businesses, as community ties strengthen as well, said Fauntleroy. “We do a lot of things throughout the community and that’s where we get a lot of our resources from.” Their active participation includes partnering with local radio station WFRE, sponsoring sports teams, partnering with local businesses and membership in the Chamber. Fauntleroy said they also hire people from within the community to establish their outstanding teams, and that has boosted their success. “Our West Patrick location is one of the top locations in Maryland, Washington, D.C., Virginia and Pennsylvania.” Fauntleroy said that his business’

tremendous success has brought competition to Frederick. Other franchisees have scouted Frederick with the hopes of realizing the same.

To stay on top, he continues to ensure customers enjoy good coffee and donuts, fast service, clean locations and ongoing innovation.

“It’s not that you can just put up a store and make that kind of money,” he said. “It’s a lot of hard work. It takes a lot of good teamwork with our people here amongst our employees. It takes a lot of community effort and being a part of the community and helping out. That goes a long way. People recognize that.”

Within five years, the community can expect five to seven more locations within Frederick County, he said. “It’s a good story,” he said of his journey. “We started off with three stores and now we’re expanding to another state with five to who knows—30, 50 stores—with the foundation of just being part of the community.”

Dunkin’ Donuts 1296 W. Patrick St. 301-846-7991

Dunkin’ Donuts/ Baskin-Robbins 500 E. Baltimore St. 410-756-5674

Dunkin’ Donuts/ Baskin-Robbins 130 Frederick Road 301-288-8456

Dunkin’ Donuts/ Baskin-Robbins 1896 Urbana Pike 301-874-2727

Baskin-Robbins 1023 W. Patrick St. 301-694-3331

Dunkin’ Donuts/ Baskin-Robbins 11715 Old National Pike 301-865-1509

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Dunkin’ Donuts/ Baskin-Robbins 4969 Westview Drive Scheduled to open May 2016

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RESTAURANTS

Rocky Point Creamery For those who enjoy the simpler pleasures

in life—fresh air, green pastures, and homemade ice cream—Rocky Point Creamery is closer than you think. Situated in historic Tuscarora alongside the scenic Potomac River, Rocky Point Creamery does a whole lot more than make ice cream. Owner Chuck Fry and his wife Paula operate the business on farmland that has been in their family since 1883. With hundreds of cows on 1,500 acres, this local dairy has been serving the community for generations. The Frys opened their ice cream shop five years ago as a means

of sustainability. By using milk from their own cows, the good folks at Rocky Point are able to

make some of the freshest ice cream around. The Frys never compromise on sourcing locally grown ingredients. In addition to their old-fashioned treats, Rocky Point offers 100 percent natural, farm-raised beef. Come taste the difference for yourself as you stroll through beautiful Maryland countryside while nibbling on a banana split or sipping a delicious milkshake! 4323A Tuscarora Road Tuscarora 21790 301-874-5005 rockypointcreamery.com

Canapés Catering Chances are that if you’ve attended a

philanthropic event in Frederick County, you’ve had the pleasure of sampling the good taste of M.L. Carroll. Her catering company, Canapés, is regularly asked to participate in fundraisers to support community organizations ranging from the United Way to Hospice of Frederick County and the Delaplaine Visual Arts Education Center, to name just a few. With a reputation for providing the freshest ingredients, innovative recipes and flavor pairings, coupled with exquisite presentation, Canapés has earned a reputation as one of the

“Over the course of my 27 years in this business, I have seen a lot of trends come and go,” Carroll said. “But the fact that we are still around—and thriving—tells me we have been able to adapt to the times while never sacrificing our commitment to quality, outstanding service and unforgettable flavor.”

region’s finest caterers. Canapés has been the exclusive caterer to ThorpeWood in Thurmont since 2007 and has been voted Frederick’s No. 1 caterer in Frederick Magazine’s annual “Best of Frederick” issue for three consecutive years.

550 Highland St., Suite 103 Frederick 21701 301-663-8220 canapescatering.com

Sadia Anderabi & Syed Hasan Anderabi Enterprises (McDonald’s) Owners of five McDonald’s restaurants

across the area, Syed and Sadia Anderabi work closely together as business partners and husband and wife. Both originally from Pakistan, Sadia is a clinical psychologist by training and Syed has an MBA in economics. “We really value each other’s input and complement each other,” said Syed. “It’s been 26 years, the business is doing well and we’re still together,” he said with a laugh. Anderabi Enterprises has never really had a downturn in all that time. “We’ve always

reinvested and remodeled when it was needed,” Syed said. “We not only put money back into our business, but we also invest in our communities, too.” Members of Frederick Memorial Hospital’s Corporate Honor Roll

and Good Samaritan programs, they were big supporters in the development of the FMH Regional Cancer Therapy Center. They also sponsor North Frederick Elementary School and Thomas Johnson High School. “Every day is a challenge,” said Syed, citing commodity costs. “But there are so many advantages in this area, new efficiencies available, and a wonderful product with McDonald’s.” Head office: 301-620-9696 Fax: 301-620-9699

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SHOPPING &

SPECIALTY RETAIL rederick County retailers weathered the economic recession better than their counterparts, in part because of the county’s location near public service employment hubs, including Washington, D.C. “We are lucky, in the D.C. metro area, that the economy remains stronger than other areas in the country,” said Cassie Bustamante, co-owner of Sweet Clover Vintage Barn Sales, a monthly tag sale near Adamstown that features home décor items. Downtown shop owners who rented space ultimately benefited from a flailing real estate market. In 2008, building prices were barreling out of control, and Kara Norman, executive director of Downtown Frederick Partnership, wondered where and how it would all end. “The prices people were paying for buildings were going through the roof, and that had a negative impact on retail,” Norman said. “… One positive thing is that it [the recession] put a halt to buying buildings at costs the rental rates could not support.” Pat Latkovski’s Alicia L boutique of women’s fashion had a home somewhere downtown for over 30 years, but high rents drove her to the Francis Scott Key Mall for a few years.

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While there, she amassed more loyal customers, and subsequently moved back downtown because it’s where she, and her business, belong, she said. The demand for high-end, specialized stores is growing as Frederick becomes more popular, and those stores are not restricted to downtown. Relative newcomer Oil & Vinegar, a gourmet food shop, is part of a franchise, but one with only 20 shops across the country. The franchise guidelines prohibit opening in a downtown location, so co-owner Sharon Streb looked to the wealthy Loudoun County, Va., initially, but landed in Westview Promenade. “It’s such a gem of a shopping center,” Streb said. While foot traffic was much higher before the 2008 downturn, according to her Westview neighbors, business has been good at Oil & Vinegar, which opened in 2014. Streb expects traffic to increase when a high-end subdivision is built behind the shopping center. Until then, she plans events and sales to attract customers, and has joined the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce, as networking with other business owners helps hers grow, she said. Sarah Hurwitz Robey, co-owner of Colonial Jewelers in downtown Frederick, said that the

competition posed by online shopping is real because people look to the web for bargains. But, especially with fine jewelry, you get what you pay for, she said. Fortunately for the brick-and-mortar businesses, a 2014 survey by TimeTrade on retail spending habits found that a majority of consumers prioritize personal service, and will continue to shop primarily in a store. Colonial Jewelers, family-owned for 68 years, counts on quality products and personalized service in a traditional setting—including hand-written receipts and an old-school cash register—to connect to customers. “That gives us an edge and personal quality, and that’s an advantage,” Hurwitz Robey said. –KATHERINE HEERBRANDT

Natural Fusion Hair Studio ou can go to any salon for a haircut, but what happens to all of the dyes, hair and chemicals that can hurt the environment? Natural Fusion Hair Studio, located in Frederick, focuses on great style and service while protecting our planet—beautifully. “What sets Natural Fusion apart from other salons is when you walk in you feel like family, but are treated like a rock star,” said co-owner and master stylist Earl Pindar. “We pride ourselves on the ‘edgy sophistication’ and highest quality

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standards we extend to each client.” Natural Fusion opened its doors in 2007 and recently became a certified partner of Green Circle Salons—the first and only in Maryland—allowing them to recycle and reduce salon waste by 95 percent. Being a member of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce has helped Natural Fusion facilitate meaningful relationships. “We love being part of the Chamber,” said Kelly Chapin, co-owner of Natural Fusion. “We feel like part of a community within a community. It’s great.”

246 E. Sixth St., Frederick 21701 301-662-1766 Naturalfusionhairstudio.com info@naturalfusionhairstudio.com

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Petersen’s Carpet & Flooring riving down West Patrick Street, you might see a sign in front of a little carpet store that says something cute, or funny, or thought provoking, that puts a little smile on your face. Much like the sign, that “little” carpet store, Petersen’s Carpet & Flooring, is full of surprises. Founded in 1983 by David Petersen, the family-owned business has focused not only on quality work, but also on treating each and every person who walks through the door as one of the family. “I believe this from the bottom of my toes, the customers are the reason why I’m here— they’re the reason I got up this morning,” said Gayle Petersen, part owner and general manager. “Our culture is the customer is A-1, our top priority. If we’re not taking care of the customer, then why are we here?” What seems like a small storefront on the outside quickly becomes a surprisingly vast area filled with samples, displays and friendly folks waiting to greet you. However, Petersen’s Carpets & Flooring does so much more than, well, carpets and flooring. The company offers a wide variety of services, from repairs and installing carpet and flooring, to cabinetry, bathrooms, gorgeous walk-in showers and full, relaxing baths, and even the kitchen of your dreams. If you can think it, the staff at Petersen’s Carpets & Flooring can help you achieve it. “We stand behind what we do,” Petersen said. “We’re an advocate for our customers … There are people who’ve come into our store and I’ve asked them how they’ve heard about us, and they’ve given us their experiences, and I’ve said, ‘Well, didn’t [the other store] help you?’ And they’ve said, ‘No, they really

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didn’t help us.’ That’s the unique thing about us. We’re here to help.” Back outside, above the sign that always catches your attention, and above the company logo, there’s a smaller sign that reads, “We WILL Find a Way to Help.” Everyone at Petersen’s Carpet & Flooring takes those words to heart. For the last several years, Petersen’s has held the “Bras for the Cause,” event, which raises money for The Red Devils, a group that supports families dealing with breast cancer. Last year, according to Petersen, the store’s walk-in shower display was filled with donated bras. Petersen’s also has an annual winter coat and clothing drive that helps children and adults throughout the area. “There’s just a lot of heart here. There really is,” Petersen said.

“I believe this from the bottom of my toes, the customers are the reason why I’m here— they’re the reason I got up this morning.” 1060 W. Patrick St., Frederick 21703 301-698-4789 petersenscarpet.com

A p u b l i c a t i o n o f t h e F r e d e r i c k C o u n t y C h a m b e r o f C o m m e r c e a n d T h e F r e d e r i c k N e w s - Po s t


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Progress - Frederick County Chamber of Commerce