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ISSUE 12 2016/2017


TH E E TE RNAL MOVE ME NT Ulysse Nardin, from the movement of the sea to the perpetual innovation of Haute Horlogerie. For over 170 years, the powerful movement of the ocean has inspired Ulysse Nardin in its singular quest: to push back the limits of mechanical watchmaking, time and time again.

Marine Chronometer 60 hours power reserve Self-winding manufacture Silicium technology ulysse-nardin.com


24 HAVANA GOOD TIME

43 LAND & COUNTRY

There is something wild and exciting about the alluring coastal waters and hidden streets of Cuba, and thanks to the newly relaxed regulations for cruising and dropping anchor, it’s proving to be the hottest new destination for superyacht charters.

Once the beverage of choice for the kings of France, and enjoyed the world over for its distinctive taste and those delightful bubbles, champagne has always been in a league of its own. Now though, the meteoric rise of English sparkling wine is giving the ‘king of fizz’ a run for its money.

56 SWAN STYLE

 or Leonardo Ferragamo, F owner and chairman of Finnish shipyard Nautor’s Swan, sailing is a true passion.

 For pioneering American

comedic actor and groundbreaking filmmaker Jerry Lewis solace over the past 30 years has come in the form of Sam’s Place.

Typically Mediterranean but with its long-standing Balkan links, a summer foodie tour of traditional dishes cruising along the Montenegrin coastline encompasses Italian seafood, warming meat dishes, and a fiery taste of Rakia.

38 ON THE WINGS OF PRIVATE JETS What was once seen as the sky-high preserve of tycoons, politicians and the stars of sport and entertainment is now being transformed by new, tech-based business models that tune into today’s on-demand and sharing economies.

74 INTELLIGENT ACQUISITION A collection of articles that celebrate artisanal skill, unparalleled expertise and exceptional beauty by showcasing some of the most highly skilled craftsmen, fashionable handmade objets d’art and accomplished designers and artists the world over.

30 DINING IN THE ADRIATIC

18 HOOK, LINE AND SINKER

IN WITH THE OLD

For increasing numbers of superyacht guests, enjoying a unique and authentic cultural experience is the highlight of their visit to a new country.

 As owners continue to look further afield for new destinations to visit, it is no surprise that orders for some of the most exciting designs of explorer yachts ever conceived are on the rise.

 For some owners, the lure comes from oceans less travelled. For the last year and a half, the beautiful 46.7m Heesen M/Y My Secret has been roaming the globe, taking her owner, guests and crew on countless adventures, from Glacier Bay to the Great Barrier Reef and many places in between. Captain Remo Mayer shares some of the highlights of this epic journey.

If an out-of-the-ordinary adventure is what you’re after, head to the ends of the earth with the legendary and luxurious Hanse Explorer.

48 EXPLORE THE WORLD

02 THE SECRET TO ADVENTURE

10 INTO THE BEAUTIFUL UNKNOWN

68 OUT WITH THE NEW,

80 DEEP AND PRECIOUS

62 COUNTRY & GRANDEUR When it comes to restoring the large stately homes of England’s green and pleasant land, the most important element is understanding what makes the building unique, and making sure you don’t lose that.

 ith global fish catches W decreasing by a rate of two million every year for the past two decades, the aim of global marine charities right now is to focus on smaller areas of the ocean.

86 DESIGN IN MOTION

 ith a constantly expanding W client list and a penchant for interiors, Sabrina of Sabrina Monte-Carlo is riding high on the waves of design.


HAWAII FIRE DANCERS Hawaiian fire dancers put on a spectacular show. Page 68

Published by: Aquamarine Consultancy London United Kingdom

Printed by: CPI Colour © Copyright Fraser Yachts 2016. All rights reserved. Cover: Polar bear portrait – The Hanse Explorer. (page 10).

For all editorial and advertising enquiries, please contact caroline@aquamarine-consultancy.com

Watch a video from the Superyacht Gallery (from page 99) 1. Download the free Aurasma App from the App Store or Google Play

Many thanks to our contributors: Angela Audretsch, Ellie Brade, Harriet Constable, Rob Crossan, Gareth Rubin and Nigel Tisdall

2. Search for and “follow” the Fraser Yachts Channel

Special thanks to: Editor, Julia Zaltzman Illustrator, Michelle Dujardin and Graphic Designer, Neil Townsend

3. Point your device at any image marked by the video icon

see details on inside front cover

4. Watch it come to life (double tap for full screen)

At the time of publication, all the information contained herein is believed to be correct but cannot be guaranteed. Great care has been taken to ensure accuracy but neither Fraser Yachts nor the publishers can accept responsibility for any errors, inaccuracies or omissions. Charter rates are quoted on a weekly basis. The rates contained herein are believed to be correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change. No part of this publication may be reproduced or used in any form without permission from Fraser Yachts.


YOU NO LONGER HAVE TO CHOOSE BETWEEN AN SUV AND A MASERATI.

Levante. The Maserati of SUVs. The practicality and versatility of an SUV or the power and panache of a Maserati? Now you can enjoy both, courtesy of the new Levante. Featuring potent 3.0 V6 petrol and diesel engines, Q4 intelligent all-wheel drive system, an 8-speed ZF transmission and sophisticated air suspension, the Levante is every inch a refined SUV. Meanwhile, its exclusive Italian styling, luxurious interior and unique exhaust note affirm its Maserati DNA. So that’s one less difficult decision to make. Engine: V6 60° 2979 cm3 - max power: 430 HP at 5750 rpm - max torque: 580 Nm at 4500-5000 rpm - max speed: 264 km/h - 0-100 km/h acceleration: 5.2 secs - fuel consumption (combined cycle): 10.9 l/100 km - CO2 emissions (combined cycle): 253 g/km The data may not refer to the model represented.

www.maserati.com

CONCESSION MASERATI MONACO 6 Lacets Saint-Léon - Château Périgord II - 98000 Monaco Ph: +377 97 70 61 00


The secret to

adventure For some owners, the lure comes from oceans less travelled. For the last year and a half, the beautiful 46.7m Heesen M/Y My Secret has been roaming the globe, taking her owner, guests and crew on countless adventures, from Glacier Bay to the Great Barrier Reef and many places in between. Captain Remo Mayer shares some of the highlights of this epic journey. Words by Angela Audretsch

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THE SECRET TO ADVENTURE

"I would encourage more owners to get out and see the world"" Captain Remo Mayer

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hen the owner of M/Y My Secret took delivery from Heesen in late 2012, he was determined to take her beyond the usual yachting destinations and wasted no time preparing the yacht for an extraordinary voyage that would take almost two years, visit over 15 countries across the two hemispheres and create countless memories. Designed by Omega Architects with an interior by Bannenberg & Rowell, My Secret’s stylish profile and Californian cool interior ensure that she doesn’t look out of place in the South of France, but bely her sturdy reliability. “This yacht has been through some big storms and heavy seas during our trip,” says her captain, Remo Mayer, who has been with My Secret since April 2014. “But she is a quality yacht that handles everything really well. We always feel safe and importantly, she is still luxurious inside.”

In November 2014, My Secret fuelled in Gibraltar before heading via Lanzarote across the Atlantic to the Caribbean. Antigua provided a comfortable and familiar base to provision, refuel and cruise to some of the nearby island favourites, such as Barbuda, Guadeloupe, St Lucia and Grenada; a way to ease into the next part of the journey. “The Caribbean is obviously beautiful, but the whole point of this trip was to see new things,” says Captain Mayer. “The real adventure started when we went down to Panama and through the canal. It was an incredible sight, especially at night.”

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Previous spread: Serenity Lake in Alaska

From Panama, My Secret made her way 640nm to warm and welcoming Costa Rica, for a four-day rest stop for the crew, berthing at Marina Papagayo near the Nicaraguan border. San Diego, California was the next and last major provisioning stop before heading on to what has been the highlight of the whole tour. “I can’t say enough about Alaska,” says Captain Mayer. “It was my highlight, it was the owner’s highlight, it was unreal.” For three months, My Secret explored this fiercely beautiful part of the world, searching out glaciers, marvelling at wildlife and savouring the blissful isolation of the great white north. “We found ourselves in some bays in Alaska where there was not a single other soul,” he says. “In some areas, the local people still live very traditional lives, trading and paying with fish and surviving on what they can catch and gather. It is refreshing and humbling to see.”

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THE SECRET TO ADVENTURE

Nature was everywhere. Vast skies, majestic mountains, swathes of evergreen forests and impenetrably blue waters, all home to a breathtaking array of animals. Humpback whales, orcas, brown bears, black bears, sea lions, deer and bald eagles were all spotted from the yacht and with almost 20 hours of daylight each day, the owner and guests had plenty of time to keep a lookout. “Imagine whales breaching the surface of the flat calm water next to the boat,” says Captain Mayer. “When you see the whale flukes, the adults and their calves, just five metres away, or little seal pups looking up at you with their big eyes, you have to pinch yourself.”

The yacht meandered between Ketchikan, Petersburg, Juneau, Glacier Bay and Auke Bay, taking in calving glaciers and peaceful bays. While in Alaska, guests tried their hand at salmon and halibut fishing. “With halibut fishing, you need to know where to go. The boat is stationary and you can go mad sitting there for hours without a single bite,” he laughs. “Enlist the help of the locals; they know where to go.” For Captain Mayer, nothing compares to the taste of freshly caught salmon prepared on board.

This spread: Top: Alaskan bear feeds on the local salmon Left: My Secret manoeuvres through the ever changing Alaskan Glacier Below: The beautiful views of Glacier Bay, Alaska

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"the group were surrounded by 12 bull sharks, but in high season, you can find yourself with anywhere up to 60 sharks around you"

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THE SECRET TO ADVENTURE

From whales to whale sharks, My Secret left the wintery Alaskan wilds for the warmer waters of Mexico’s Bay of La Paz, arriving in August in time for whale shark season. “We were lucky enough to swim with these graceful giants,” he says. “They glide towards you with their mouths wide open and you can see the smaller fish sheltering inside.” Getting close to nature and wildlife has been a key theme of the trip. In Australia, the yacht berthed at Marlin Marina in tropical Cairns, finding crocodiles (in farms), kangaroos, gliding squirrels and koalas before heading to Port Douglas to the Great Barrier Reef. In Bali they dove with the gracious giants, manta rays, lingered over colourful reefs and visited the mighty dragons on the island of Komodo.

In the Philippines, My Secret stopped at Palawan Island, famous for its virgin forests, friendly locals and diving, and guests toured UNESCO’s PuertoPrincesa Subterranean River National Park and revelled in El Nido’s powderwhite sand beaches. In the Maldives, there were more mantas. And in Fiji, the adrenaline was pumping as they dived with sharks. “There is no cage, you sit on the floor of the ocean as the sharks swim around you,” says Captain Mayer. “The guides have a special connection with the sharks, and we saw three different species; bull sharks, black tips and silvertip reef sharks.” There at low season, the group were surrounded by 12 bull sharks, but in high season, you can find yourself with anywhere up to 60 sharks around you.

This spread: Left: Black and Silver tipped sharks patrol the reef Above: My Secret anchored at Palawan Island

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This page: Top: Viti Levu island, Fijian people in a small village in the countryside Photograph: Angelo Giampiccolo / Shutterstock.com Bottom: Traditional house of Navala village Photograph: Don Mammoser / Shutterstock.com Opposite page: Top: El Nido, Philippines

For Captain Mayer, the trip has taught them many things, but mostly to take time to appreciate what is around them, meet people and learn. “Everything in the west moves so quickly,” he says. “You can get caught up in life and forget to enjoy it. We have met some wonderful people on this trip; many with a lot less than us, who are still very happy. It’s so important to appreciate what you have.” The hospitable Fijians really embodied this ethos. They often invited those on board My Secret to their homes for dinner, where they would prepare a lovo, a feast cooked underground, and teach guests about the island. “And this wasn’t a one off,” says Mayer. “So many locals invited us into their homes, wanting to share their love of their country with us.”

"open your eyes to what is out there and to where your superyacht can take you."”

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THE SECRET TO ADVENTURE

By the end of the year, My Secret will have added the Seychelles and its picture-perfect beaches and turquoise waters to its destination list. After this, Captain Mayer flies back to Europe to oversee the final stages of the build on the owner's new yacht, a 74m at Amels in Holland. Having established a long-standing relationship with the owner over the course of 11 years, Fraser Yachts broker Antoine Larricq worked closely with the owner to find the best yacht for his requirements for his next world tour trip. The knowledge gained from providing yacht management services to My Secret since her launch and throughout her world tour has also been invaluable in planning the new build, says Chris Semmens, technical superintendent of My Secret, who is also managing the new build project, and it will have an identical operational profile, as well as key design features.

“The owner is very experienced and has also had a lot of input into design, particularly the helideck, modifying it to meet his requirements for safety. There have also been modifications to ensure better privacy in and around the owner’s areas, which is very important when staying on board for long periods of time. The new yacht will also have enhanced VSAT capability as the owner runs his business from the yacht.” Due for delivery early 2017, this yacht will be the host of the next world tour – taking in new places and old favourites like Alaska – for the owner in 2018. "I would encourage more owners to get out and see the world," says Captain Mayer. "Open your eyes to what is out there and to where your superyacht can take you."

Captain Mayer Favourite place: Alaska Best marina: San Diego’s Kona Kai Marina or Antigua Yacht Club Marina Friendliest people: Fiji and the Philippines Most isolated: The outskirts of Fiji or parts of Alaska Best diving: Around Bali or shark diving in Fiji Best place on board for wildlife watching: In front of the bridge and on the sundeck Secret to exploration success: Know what you want to see, be flexible and be open to new experiences.

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Into the beautiful unknown

If an out-of-the-ordinary adventure is what you’re after, head to the ends of the earth with the legendary and luxurious Hanse Explorer. Words by Harriet Constable

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INTO THE BEAUTIFUL UNKNOWN

"Whenever I go on board I feel at home.” Imke Harren

W

hen it comes to yachts, safety and adventure are two of the most important things to Peter Harren, owner of the 48m serious expedition motor yacht Hanse Explorer. Previously a captain himself, he had a vision to build a yachtsized ship seaworthy enough to travel anywhere in the world, and in 2006 his vision was realised when the incredible explorer vessel took to the water for her maiden voyage.

“The Hanse Explorer was built by a German shipbuilding company called Fassmer Werft,” explains Imke Harren, daughter of Peter, and commercial manager of the yacht. “They specialise in high-end, sophisticated rescue boats, research vessels, and patrol boats, which have to be incredibly reliable, and given safety has always been very important to my father it seemed the perfect fit.” The Hanse Explorer was not only built to the highest safety standards, but also with the ultimate adventurer in mind. Since her first voyage out she has been taking passengers to some of the most remote and beautifully desolate parts of the planet: Antarctica and the Arctic. A certified icebreaker yacht with an extra thick steel hull, she is able to cut through the pack ice of the northern and southern oceans with ease, and has earned a reputation as the toughest yacht of her size.

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Previous page: The Hanse Explorer was built with the ultimate adventure in mind This page: Left: Journeying to the Polar Regions on board the Hanse Explorer is a luxurious undertaking Below: A natural arch forms out of ice in Greenland Opposite page: Top and bottom: Guests can start their day with a freshly baked croissant on deck and finish it with a glass of wine in the lounge

The Polar Regions have been enticing the most adventurous spirits to their icy shores since humans discovered their existence, and for good reason. The first being the wildlife: a colossal tail breaching just metres from the yacht as a majestic humpback whale dives down to scoop up a ton or so of krill into its giant mouth; families of playful seals lazily circling the zodiac, while a flock of albatross call from the skies. Then there’s the everyday experiences: nimble zodiac boats passing under giant frozen archways; the groan of monolithic shards of ice crunching and crashing into the water below; and the chance to hike along expansive glaciers as the sun sparkles across the chilly surrounding waters.

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That’s not to mention the aesthetic appeal of myriad shades of blue and white harmoniously existing together; from electric azure waters to sapphire skies, tiffany blue waves lap over giant pearly icebergs silhouetted by turquoise hues where the frozen towering water meets the bitter melt beneath. Yet while the original adventurers to these barren icy lands visited in some considerable discomfort, making the journey on the Hanse Explorer is a different and altogether more luxurious undertaking. “Whenever I go on board I feel at home,” says Imke. “It’s comfy and cosy, and the crew make you feel so welcome.”


INTO THE BEAUTIFUL UNKNOWN

"Given that the ship can accommodate up to 12 guests, it’s also a very personal experience.” On board, guests can start their day with a freshly baked croissant and hot coffee on the deck, and finish it with a steam in the Finnish sauna, or a glass of wine in the lounge with panoramic views of passing Fjords and towering icebergs. Guests can personalise their time on board however they choose. “Given that the ship can accommodate up to 12 guests, it’s also a very personal experience,” adds Imke. There’s a library for the bookworm, TVs with DVD players in every room for the movie buff and a Bose entertainment system for the music lover. There are also unseen details to help make your journey more comfortable, like the anti-rolling system, which reduces the ship’s movements at sea. Originally used as a training vessel, the Hanse Explorer has maintained its ‘open ship philosophy’, which means guests are not only allowed, but also encouraged to explore all areas on board without restriction. “Wherever you go, you can peek over the crew’s shoulder and see what they’re up to!” says Imke. This, she explains, was the plan from the outset, with her father wanting people to “really experience what it’s like to go out to sea”. So, if guests enjoy sightseeing they can take in the expansive view from the bridge and watch the Captain manoeuvre the ship through ice. If they’re interested in mechanics, they can head down to the engine room and talk with the Chief Engineer. And if they’re hungry or just wondering what’s for dinner, they can visit the galley and meet the Chef, Sous Chef and Galley Assistant. 13


Once you’ve arrived in the world’s last great wildernesses, the opportunities for exploration on offer are more than a little exciting. Spend a night under the stars by camping out on the ice, or try kayaking along the pristine, reflective waters. If whales are on the horizon, jump onto one of the zodiac boats for a spontaneous ride to get up close to nature, or spend time ashore with a group of penguins.

Although it takes a few days from the moment of departure to reach the Polar Regions, the adventure begins from the moment you set foot on the Hanse Explorer. If travelling to Antarctica, expeditions depart from Ushuaia, the world’s southernmost city. Known as the gateway to the Antarctic, the journey takes two days across the Drake Passage – one of the world’s most unpredictable and legendary bodies of water - before reaching the Antarctic Peninsula. If it’s the Arctic you’re headed for, you can set sail from either North America, Europe or Russia, journeying through the renowned North West Passage. In a matter of days you will be experiencing midnight sunshine, polar bears, beluga whales and shimmering icebergs.

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One great advantage of the Hanse Explorer, explains Imke, is that “she can go into regions where bigger vessels are not allowed, like the small bays on the Antarctic peninsula. We’ve also made some successful explorations to the very remote islands of the South Pacific and Galapagos, as well as having crossed the famous North West Passage in her.” Currently being prepped for the next season, she’ll wind through the narrow passages of Norway’s fjords and then continue on to Iceland, Greenland and Canada.


INTO THE BEAUTIFUL UNKNOWN

she’ll wind through the narrow passages of Norway’s fjords and then continue on to Iceland, Greenland and Canada. Perhaps most importantly, the Hanse Explorer was fashioned for minimal environmental impact and uses clever technology such as the shaft generator, which produces the ship’s electricity while underway and saves considerable amounts of fuel. Further, a desalination plant is used to produce 20 tons of fresh water a day, and a biological wastewater treatment plant transforms sewage into grey water, which is safely released back into the sea to avoid polluting the environment.

Hanse Explorer

Hanse Explorer is for sale through Fraser Yachts, for further information please contact yachtsales@fraseryachts.com

They say that visiting the Polar Regions of Antarctica and the Arctic changes you; witnessing such beauty both in the landscapes and the surrounding wildlife is like nothing you have ever known. So, if a safe and comfortable life adventure is what you’re after, it seems the Hanse Explorer is just the ticket.

The Hanse Explorer is also a member of the International Antarctic Tour Operations Organization (IAATO), which was founded in 1991 to advocate, promote and practice safe and environmentally responsible privatesector travel to the Antarctic.

Opposite page: Top: Ushuaia, Argentina nestled in front of the Andes. Photograph: Jefferson Bernardes / Shutterstock.com Bottom: Once you’ve arrived in the world’s last great wildernesses, the opportunities for exploration on offer are more than a little exciting This page: Right: Naeroyfjord, a narrow fjord in Norway

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REAL AND PURE Pure nature meets architectural art at the most exclusive of standards. Chalet N is already in the international spotlight. Harmoniously integrated into the natural beauty of the mountain surroundings, Chalet N is considered to be among the finest chalets of its kind and has set a new benchmark for global luxury. The chalet is built to state of the art technical specifications. Secure and pampered, our international guests and friends enjoy a unique degree of privacy. The gourmet dining, the superb spa, and the chalet’s ‘ski-in/ski-out’ location right next to the slope and at the heart of Lech’s world-famous pistes complete the experience. Highlighted by a personalised butler service to international perfection.

ENQUIRIES & INFORMATION info@chalet-n.com • www.chalet-n.com


HOOK, LINE AND SINKER Words by Julia Zaltzman

W

hen a famous face remains in the spotlight for an inordinate amount of time, there comes a point when we, as an audience, feel as though we know them, on a familiar and friendly level, a personal one even. Their stage persona or character becomes their identity, the lines between public and private life are blurred, and it becomes increasingly hard for them to retreat or find a reprieve from the glare of the media. For pioneering American comedic actor and ground-breaking filmmaker Jerry Lewis, who has dedicated more than 80 years of his life in front of and behind the camera writing, acting and directing, receiving audience admiration has been something that he admits to thriving on. On the flipside of that, however, his downtime with family and his cherished private moments have become even more important, even more poignant, and very much needed. For Jerry, over the past 30 years or so, solace has come in the form of Sam’s Place. At a modest 19.8m in length, Sam’s Place is not one of the largest yachts on the ocean, but then space wasn’t a primary factor for Jerry when he first bought her in 1989. A lover of boats all his life, he decided to charter one in San Diego and spend a couple of weeks on board with second wife SanDee Pitnick (affectionately known as Sam), as part of their postwedding honeymoon period of bliss. “It was like a mosquito bit him, and he got the disease again!” says Sam, remembering Jerry’s joy at being on board a boat once again. After running into his long-standing yachting agent during the same trip, they decided it was fate and began the year-long search to find the right yacht, before finally opting for what was to become Sam’s Place, a 1959 Henry Grebe & Sons.

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HOOK, LINE AND SINKER

“I ABSOLUTELY WANTED A WOODEN BOAT,” SAYS JERRY, “BECAUSE THEY SIT BETTER IN THE WATER, THEY’RE MORE QUIET, AND I WANTED TO PUT OUR OWN PERSONAL TOUCHES ON IT."

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“I absolutely wanted a wooden boat,” says Jerry, “because they sit better in the water, they’re more quiet, and I wanted to put our own personal touches on it where maybe a fibreglass boat wouldn’t allow for that. From the moment we bought her we gutted the entire boat and took everything out.” Completely redesigning the boat from the ground up to fit his comforts, the few features that were kept were certain unique items that happened to appeal. “There was this beautiful chrome wheel on the bridge that when you turned it, it opened the window – we’d never seen anything like it before, and it’s details like that you just wouldn’t find on a modern boat, so we kept them,” he says. They introduced an array of stunning wood features – teak and mahogany – inside and out, as well as adding all of the required modern day conveniences, such as air conditioning and large televisions in each room (including the head). Vintage in design, but with contemporary appeal, the family set about enjoying life on board, and using it as a welcome break from the gruelling work schedule that Jerry kept to. Aside from a few special interviews that Jerry opted to do on the aft deck, the yacht became a work-free zone. “Sam’s Place became our favourite get away, where we could leave the office and business at home, and just go there,” he says. “Very few people had the phone number, especially related to business, and it was a totally shut up world. Our daughter Dani was practically raised on the boat; until she was about school age or slightly later, we would go down to Sam’s Place almost every month, and then spend the entire summer down there too, so it was a bonding place for the three of us.”

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"THE AFT DECK WAS THE PLACE WHERE WE LIVED. WE HAD A 180-DEGREE PANORAMIC VIEW."


HOOK, LINE AND SINKER

"SAM’S PLACE BECAME OUR FAVOURITE GET AWAY, WHERE WE COULD LEAVE THE OFFICE AND BUSINESS AT HOME, AND JUST GO THERE." Despite being more than capable of riding the high seas, and having crossed the Panama Canal en route to San Diego prior to Jerry acquiring her, Sam’s Place has enjoyed more of a quiet life with the Lewis family, mainly travelling up and down the coast of California, stopping off at Newport, and making the most of time enjoyed in San Diego. “We were so comfortable in San Diego,” comments Sam. “We would take the boat out for the day, maybe go fishing, and we loved to go over to the Hotel Del Coronado for brunch with a bunch of friends on board, or cruise the harbour,but we didn’t take it long distances, we had no need to. We loved the convenience of being connected to the hotel, we could order room service when we wanted, go to the pool, be catered for by the bellman if there was anything we needed – we were quite spoilt.” Moored at the Marriott Marquis marina, and often spending a week or two on board without ever leaving the dock, the people and staff around the marina became friends and allies who would “do anything in the world for us”. Protected by a double-gated marina entry, not to mention hotel security, it was refreshing to be able to take the opportunity to relax and watch the world go by. “The aft deck was the place where we lived. We had a 180-degree panoramic view, and we loved to moor close by to the beautiful park at Seaport Village, and just sit out there – it was so open and so big – and enjoy boats going by, everyone waving,” says Sam. “We had a big television out there, or we would spend our days reading – that was our most special area.”

Having first met on the set of Jerry’s film Hardly Working in 1980, where Sam auditioned as one of the dancers – “he did a silly, funny little vignette with me, and threw me around the dance stage, and from that moment on it was truly like love at first sight” – the couple have been inseparable ever since, travelling together around the world. “When our daughter was growing up it was a challenge to travel everywhere, but we never left Jerry’s side, we travelled as a family,” says Sam. “Not many people get to do that – we made a lot of memories.”

Previous spread: Sam’s Place, Jerry Lewis’ beloved yacht for the past 30 years Opposite page: Top: Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin show their support for the fight against Muscular Dystrophy Bottom: The foredeck of Sam’s Place, where the Lewis family enjoyed life on board This page: Top: Jerry Lewis, still laughing at 90 years of age

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HOOK, LINE AND SINKER

Jerry first stepped onto the stage at the tender age of five, having watched and learned from his parents, both vaudeville performers. His most notable professional partnership was with the late crooner Dean Martin, and their act is still recognised today as one of America’s all-time hottest comedy teams; they spanned a decade together before breaking up in 1956. He has worked tirelessly throughout his life, starring in more than 50 films as the lovable slapstick goon, as well as writing and directing more than 13 films. His enormous fundraising efforts for muscular dystrophy over the past 40 years have seen over $2 billion go to the charity, and seen Jerry himself awarded with an Oscar in 2009 in the form of the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, not to mention a 1977 nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize. In April 2016, Jerry Lewis turned the admirable age of 90. Showing no signs of slowing down, his latest film Max Rose in which he stars is set for release in September this year, the same month that he is engaged to perform in Las Vegas for a weekend, in addition to three engagements in November on the East Coast. To say he is passionate about his career is an understatement. But with the advent of age comes compromise, and sadly for Jerry and the family, that comes in the form of saying a fond farewell to Sam’s Place.

“That boat has been my pride and joy, it’s been our home, but there are so many stairs on board and they’re quite steep, so it just became unsafe for me in the end,” says Jerry. “It’s been a heart-breaking decision to sell, but it’s the logical thing to do. Besides, why let it sit there when someone else could enjoy it.” Keen to showcase the yacht’s celebrity history, the Lewis family have decided to include a number of personal photos, books and onboard memorabilia with the sale – “I figured that whoever should buy Sam’s Place would probably treasure the fact that it did belong to Jerry Lewis,” says Sam. And memories made on board have been plentiful, from private birthday celebrations to large parties with 20 cast members from the 1995 Broadway show Damn Yankees which Jerry starred in. Newark-born Jerry Lewis has rightly earned his legendary title as the king of comedy, but will he ever finally stop working? He replies: “To quote the world-renowned cardiac surgeon, Michael DeBakey, who created the first ever artificial heart, and who always used to say: “If you can find something that I will enjoy more in retirement, then I might consider quitting”.

Opposite page: Jerry Lewis performs with Dean Martin This page: Jerry Lewis has put on many a show to help raise millions of dollars for the Muscular Dystrophy Association

Sam's Place

Sam’s Place is for sale through Fraser Yachts, for further information please contact yachtsales@fraseryachts.com

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HAVANA GOOD TIME There is something wild and exciting about the alluring coastal waters and hidden streets of Cuba, and thanks to the newly relaxed regulations for cruising and dropping anchor, it’s proving to be the hottest new destination for superyacht charters. Words by Julia Zaltzman

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HAVANA GOOD TIME

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ndoubtedly one of the more colourful destinations when it comes to superyacht charter, Cuba boasts a fabulous coastline stretching for more than three and a half thousand miles with 289 natural beaches. The largest island in the West Indies chain it offers a pivotal ‘stepping stone’ gateway to Honduras, Belize, the Cayman Islands, Dominican Republic, the Bahamas, Florida and Jamaica. There is something wild and exciting about this extraordinary island, particularly in the early hours of the morning, when the old quarter of Havana exudes the heady scent of sweat, cigars and rum, salsa music reverberates through every back street and alley, and discordant TVs blare from open doors. In the last few years, Cuba has been opening up its wonderful cruising grounds and marinas to tourists, and the rush to experience the untouched remnants of a bygone communist era before it all changes is picking up pace. Now that President Obama has announced the easing of restrictions between the US and the island nation, it has attracted further attention from the yachting community, not to mention environmentalists and investors. Major elements of the revised regulations focus on travel and commerce, with increased contact between Americans and Cubans, and the support of civil society in Cuba. A recent announcement declared that a US embassy has been opened in Havana, Cuba’s capital city, whilst a Cuban embassy is being opened in Washington DC. And American Airlines have revealed a new flight schedule to Cuba due to start in September 2016. With hundreds of potential mooring spots, beautiful waters, a friendly population and virtually no crime, Cuba represents a strong rival to the usual Caribbean locations.

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For those still hoping to discover Cuban Havana cigars rolled on a virgin’s thigh, disappointment may be ahead, but for the more entrepreneurial visitors business opportunities could soon present themselves once the lack of infrastructure available to superyachts is more widely recognised. The owner of the elegant 44m motor yacht L’Albatros is no stranger to the alluring Cuban waters, having first visited Santiago de Cuba some eight years ago. After returning in 2016 aboard L’Albatros, the original appeal of the fascinating island and its inhabitants remains clear.

Previous spread: Salsa music reverberates through every back street and alley in Havana. This page: Above: Cayo Largo, a natural Cuban island paradise where you can feel a little like Robinson Crusoe.

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“We started in Cienfuegos – a south west part of Cuba known as the Pearl of the South – and we were scheduled to spend at least two months cruising with a daily itinerary planned in advance,” he says. “We mainly explored in the south, as the north is very windy, sometimes with rough seas, and it’s better to go to places like Cayo Largo [Long Cay, a small resort island in Cuba off the south coast of the northwestern part of the main island] and Cayo Rosario,

both of which are near to Isla de la Juventud [The Isle of Youth, Cuba’s least developed corner]. Here there are many areas where you can swim and dive, and all these areas are great for yachts around L’Albatros’ size.” Only managing to call into port at Trinidad, a town in the province of Sancti Spíritus in central Cuba, part of a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1988, the planned trip was regretfully cut short after just three weeks, hindered by Cuba’s lack of infrastructure, particularly for superyachts. While keen to welcome tourists to their waters, the Cubans are on a steep learning curve, and even the most experienced of travellers need to tread carefully in places to avoid frustration and drawbacks.


HAVANA GOOD TIME

Cuba’s revolutionary and socialist past has been a troubled one, and the Cuban people themselves are still struggling for independence, fortune and freedom. It is, therefore, highly advisable to have a Cuban-based yacht services contact in place ahead of any visit to obtain authorisation and assist with paperwork, and it’s best to bear in mind the restricted access to certain places, particularly around the southeast peninsula where a heavy military presence remains thanks to the 1961 Bay of Pigs Invasion. Despite all the potential difficulties, however, there is joyous, untamed enthusiasm from visitors about the Cuban people that is highly unique, not to mention the lush, fertile countryside, and the astounding mixture of Spanish baroque, neo-colonial and Soviet brutalist architecture. Although a little dilapidated around the edges, Cuba still manages to have a magnetic, fascinating draw, says Gina Robertson, Charter Broker In The Fraser Yachts Fort Lauderdale office.

This page: Top: Cuban flag and Che Guevara painted on an old back street wall Photograph: Kamira / Shutterstock.com Left: Cigars are Cuba’s most famed global export.

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“Cuba is the ‘new yet old’ destination for charter in the Caribbean. While amenities are limited in the marinas and groceries are scarce the desire to charter in Cuba is there,” she says. “Charterers are fascinated to participate in educational programmes such as SeaKeepers, and these waters have been untouched for years making the diving and snorkelling fantastic.” Founded in 1998 by a group of boat owners, the International SeaKeepers Society promotes oceanographic research, conservation and education. Its mission is to encourage scientific discovery and overall knowledge about the oceans, as well as raise awareness about important issues related to the oceans by closely collaborating with the yachting industry as an indispensable part and contributor to ocean research, education and conservation efforts.

In 2014, the International SeaKeepers Society received the Fabien Cousteau Blue Award, an accolade given out by the International Superyacht Society to honour stewardship of the marine environment. With programmes such as these in place, uncluttered bays and beaches are a haven for the few yachts in the area, and agents and facilitators are in place to help make the visit uncomplicated, adds Robertson. More good news is that visa restrictions for visitors are minimal, private jet entry is welcomed, VIP handling at the airport is inexpensive (and strongly recommended for both guests and crew members alike) and direct flights are available from Europe and Canada. “The 52m luxury motor yacht Big Eagle is ready and prepared to meet guests at Marina Hemingway and cruise around the island exploring this new charter destination,” says Robertson.

“Cuba is the ‘new yet old’ destination for charter in the Caribbean."

This page: Mojitos and daiquiri were Hemingway’s tipples of choice. Opposite page: Grandiose period architecture and outlandishly old automobiles hold up a vanishing mirror to a bygone era.

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HAVANA GOOD TIME

The eponymous Marina Hemingway, the largest marina in Cuba with an official capacity of up to 400 vessels (although only around 100 slips are usable), is so-called after the famous writer himself, Ernest Hemingway, first stepped foot in Cuba in 1928. Over the course of several years Hemingway continued to visit Cuba, learning to fish the annual Marlin run aboard a boat called Anita. His two favourite watering holes in Havana, La Floridita and La Bodeguita del Medio, still stand today, both more bustling than ever thanks to his endorsement. On a small plaque in La Floridita hangs Hemingway’s signed quote: “My mojito in the Bodeguita del Medio and my daiquiri in the Floridita”. With a history for attracting the more adventurous types, Cuba undoubtedly represents an intriguing cruising and charter destination. It’s a magical place where you can still experience firsthand the vibrant music, bars and grandiose period architecture, together with some outlandishly old automobiles and the unmistakably Latin spirit of a country that today holds up a vanishing mirror to a bygone era.

Placido Sanchez General Manager Mega Yacht Services Havana-based Mega Yacht Services Inc. is a specialist company providing superyacht shore-side support to captains and owners visiting Cuba as an international yachting destination. Its dedicated Cuban yachting agent, Placido Sanchez, gives FRASER the low down on the best places to cruise and peruse when visiting the exciting waters of Cuba. “Cuba is a country that is undergoing significant and rapid change, and it is a difficult task to keep up with evolving regulations, the condition of local marinas and harbours, as well as the best restaurants, and new destinations,” says Sanchez. “Because Mega Yacht Services is based in Cuba with Cuban staff, we have established personal relationships with key entities throughout the maritime world and have the agility to resolve issues quickly and with minimal interruption.”

Top cruising destination: Without a doubt, Havana. It is by far the largest city in Cuba, with European and Cuban art museums, galleries, restaurants, theatres and opera, as well as hot night life. Top snorkelling and diving: Maria La Gorda in the far western tip of Cuba in the Bahia de Corrientes is surrounded by the Guanahacabibes National Park. The water can be so clear that snorkelling can feel like soaring 100 feet above the ocean bottom. Best restaurant: Río Mar is located on the waters of Almendares Bay, near Miramar is known for its modern take on seafood, international cuisine and Cuban favourites, while O´Really 304 is a small, hopping place with an edgy, backstreet feel, a full bar and run by young Cuban chefs. Best bar: The Madrigal Bar and Café - with its bohemian feel, this full service bar has become a favourite with Cubans and foreigners alike. operations@megayachtcaribbean.com megayachtcaribbean.com Tel: +1 5352795264

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DINING ADRIATIC IN THE

Typically Mediterranean but with its long-standing Balkan links, a summer foodie tour of traditional dishes cruising along the Montenegrin coastline encompasses Italian seafood, warming meat dishes, and a fiery taste of Rakia. Words by Gareth Rubin

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DINING IN THE ADRIATIC

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uzzing over the Bay of Kotor in a small blue helicopter, my pilot, Laura, and I look down on the stunning superyachts moored in the marina. It is only from the air that you can appreciate the immensity of their strength and ambition, cutting through the peagreen waters that brought the Romans, Venetians, Ottomans and a host of other empires here, to the tiny jewel-box of a nation that is Montenegro. The boats below us glisten in the spring sun, while level with us, just a few kilometres away, mountain peaks topped with stone monasteries sit covered in snow. Turn your head and you can pick out the ancient town of Kotor with winding streets and old aristocratic houses; or, a few miles along the Adriatic coast, the medieval city of Budva with its now glitzy nightclubs and casinos, not to mention some of the best beaches on the coast.

That’s the thing about Montenegro: you have all the history, all the landscape, all the culture of a major nation packed into a country covering less than 15,000 sq km. And Montenegrin cuisine reflects this unique mix with its strong and unforgettable tastes from the north and light and salty smells of the south. The strong influence of Turkish and Ottoman culture can be felt with every bite of moussaka, sarma (minced meat), cheese pies and other northern delights. Montenegrin southern cuisine is built upon strong Italian gastronomic influences such as prosciutto, wine, olive oil and fish dishes. Dry figs and other Mediterranean fruits also play an integral part of this type of cuisine.

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Previous spread: Evening view of the Superyacht Rendezvous This page: The Bay of Kotor is known for its blue waters and delicious cuisine Opposite page: Top: Familyowned wineries thrive in southern Montenegro Bottom: Priganice, deep-fried doughnuts dunked in sugar

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During my visit I spend some time at the impressive Porto Montenegro, the country’s five-star marina complex, and have the opportunity to sample the nation’s Italianesque seafood at restaurant ONE, at the foot of Porto Montenegro’s Jetty 1. Its proudly presented house special is homemade Foie Gras terrine, served with a fig confit, but I opt for the highly appetising black squid ink risotto, followed by a classic tiramisu – another Italian dish with zest readily embraced by the Montenegrin chefs (albeit a relatively modern one).

Porto Montenegro facilities

Number of berths: 450 (including 127 for superyachts)

If the Italians brought the seafood, the Orthodox Slavs who arrived overland from the north brought the drink. Rakia is a traditional type of fruit brandy that permeates southeastern Europe. In Serbia and Romania it is made from plums (also known as slivovica), but in Montenegro they laugh at slivovica’s standard 40 per cent proof; here it is made from grapes and hits 50 per cent.

Jetty length: 400m Leisure facilities: Spa with ‘rejuvenation package’ at €200; Art gallery; Wine shop; Naval museum Restaurants: Italian, Adriatic, Japanese and Lebanese Yacht services: Chandlery; supermarket; crew placement; cleaning. Fuel dock with tax and duty-free fuel for yachts up to 250m with a 15m draft; Yacht and sports clubs

Fraser Yachts currently has four berths for sale in Porto Montenegro, for more information please contact: yachtsales@fraseryachts.com


DINING IN THE ADRIATIC

The Dining Room restaurant, reported to be one of 15 best hotel restaurants in the world and the heart of the Regent Hotel in Porto Montenegro’s food and beverage operations is where I dine for dinner. The knowledgeable sommelier, Vlada, explains how to enjoy Rakia, their regional delight. “We drink it for breakfast,” he says. “First a sip of olive oil, then honey, then Rakia.” I’m happily informed that it’s “good for circulation” and will “keep me healthy”, which is comforting to know as the fiery liquid slips down my throat. The south of Montenegro, in and around its surrounding valleys, is also home to wine-country and its indigenous fruity Vranac grape, as well as other grape varieties, such as Krstač, Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay. The familyowned Mašanović winery, located in Orahovo polje in Crmnica near the fertile soils of Lake Skadar, has a century-long family tradition of wine production. The owner, Zarko, hands me a glass of his most popular wine, Dionis, a 2012 Barrique blended from Vranac, Marselan and Petit Verdot grapes. It is a deep

red with purple tints, and sweet fruit emerges from the flavour of burnt oak. We drink it along with the foods with which visitors are traditionally welcomed to a Montenegrin house: tightly rolled prosciutto, soft white cheese and priganice, deep-fried doughnuts dunked in sugar or honey.

hill under which the town nestles. Climb them and you come to the church of Our Lady of Health, built as an offering to save the town from the Black Death. It seems to have worked and the town is now a thriving destination, with tourists attracted by the series of little squares in which you sit out in the evening to chat until night time.

The winery is not too far from Kotor, the little Venetian town that has long guarded this strip of coastline. Kotor is a pretty place enclosed within curious city walls that stretch up the side of the

“WE DRINK IT FOR BREAKFAST, FIRST A SIP OF OLIVE OIL, THEN HONEY, THEN RAKIA.” 33


FOR AN EVEN MORE INTIMATE DESTINATION, THE ISLAND VILLAGE OF SVETI STEFAN HAS BEEN THE PLAYGROUND OF THE RICH AND FAMOUS SINCE 1934. For an even more intimate destination, the island village of Sveti Stefan has been the playground of the rich and famous since 1934 when the Yugoslavian Royal Family built their summer villa on the mainland opposite. The village perches on a rock in the sea (now connected to land by a narrow road) like a bird waiting to pluck fish from the water. In the sixties and seventies Sveti Stefan hosted Sophia Loren, Orson Welles, Elizabeth Taylor and others. It was neglected for a long time until the

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Aman group recently developed the village and Villa Miločer, with its formal gardens and vine-draped restaurant terrace overlooking the beach, into perhaps the finest heritage resort in the Balkans. Miločer’s spa alone, a favourite with passing yachtsmen, drains all the tension from your bones and leaves you blissfully rejuvenated. Covered in steep green mountains that slip beneath ancient fortresses and enchanting old cities to the glinting

Adriatic below, Montenegro makes for an awe-inspiring sight. An upand-coming yachting paradise, this fascinating country rewards travellers with charismatic towns, deep rafting canyons and smooth fjords, and a vastranging modern Adriatic cuisine that delights at every turn. Touted as the East Mediterranean’s answer to Monte Carlo, Montenegro is quiet, relaxing, yet lively enough to support a colourful and consuming way of life.


DINING IN THE ADRIATIC

FRASER YACHTS’ SELECTION OF YACHTS TO CHARTER IN MONTENEGRO For more information please contact: yachtcharter@fraseryachts.com

Emotion

Luxury charter yacht 43m M/Y Emotion and her crew are well acquainted with the Adriatic sea. Having berthed in Porto Montenegro in July this year before embarking on a Montenegrin cruise with guests on board, she then headed to Corfu via Albania and onto the Greek Islands via the Corinth Canal. Speaking of his Montenegrin experiences aboard M/Y Emotion this year, Captain Sam Srour says: “The whole Dalmatian coast is stunning! Nature, crystal clear waters, intriguing villages and towns dating back from Roman and Venetian times. It’s all extremely well preserved, the people are nice and friendly, the food is natural and tasty, and the nightlife is fun and safe. Croatia and Montenegro are ‘must see’ places for yacht aficionados."

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For more information please contact: yachtcharter@fraseryachts.com

Ulysses

Lumiere

FOR CHARTER

FOR CHARTER

FOR CHARTER

Length: 56m

Length: 43.6m

Length: 49.9m

Built/Refit: 2012

Built/Refit: 2009 / 2015

Built/Refit: 1999 / 2014

Guests: 6 cabins / 12 guests

Guests: 5 cabins / 10 guests

Guests: 6 cabins / 12 guests

SUMMER CHARTER: Croatia, West Med: €280,000 per week high, €255,000 per week low

SUMMER CHARTER: West Med: €160,000 per week high, €160,000 per week low

SUMMER CHARTER: Croatia, Med: €185,000 per week high, €175,000 per week low

WINTER CHARTER: Caribbean: $300,000 per week high, $270,000 per week low

WINTER CHARTER: West Med: €160,000 per week high, €160,000 per week low

WINTER CHARTER: Caribbean: €185,000 per week high, €175,000 per week low

Antara

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Harmony III

Ionian Princess

Cyrus One

FOR CHARTER

FOR CHARTER

FOR CHARTER

Length: 46m

Length: 45.7m

Length: 34.3m

Built/Refit: 1991 / 2016

Built/Refit: 2005 / 2016

Built/Refit: 2008 / 2014

Guests: 4 cabins / 10 guests

Guests: 6 cabins / 12 guests

Guests: 4 cabins / 8 guests

SUMMER CHARTER: Croatia, Med: €125,000 per week high, €125,000 per week low

SUMMER CHARTER: Croatia, Med: €165,000 per week high, €145,000 per week low

SUMMER CHARTER: Croatia, Med: €70,000 per week high, €65,000 per week low

WINTER CHARTER: Caribbean: €125,000 per week high, €125,000 per week low

WINTER CHARTER: Croatia, Med: €145,000 per week high, €125,000 per week low

WINTER CHARTER: Croatia, Med: €65,000 per week high, €60,000 per week low


To new horizons in the Mediterranean… With 4 countries, 3 seas and 11 marinas.

Photographer: Candaş Arın

n o z i r o h r u o y n i d r n a a p M x E wit h D


What was once seen as the sky-high preserve of tycoons, politicians and the stars of sport and entertainment is now being transformed by new, tech-based business models that tune into today’s on-demand and sharing economies. Words by Nigel Tisdall

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ON THE WINGS OF PRIVATE JETS

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f there’s one phrase that sums up the sublime joy of travelling by private jet it is surely the wise words of Aldo Gucci, the eldest son of Guccio Gucci who founded one of Italy’s best known luxury brands after starting life as a lift boy at London’s Savoy hotel. “Quality is remembered long after the price is forgotten,” he observed, and the chance to whizz around this wonderful planet in our own small and superlative plane, flying when and where we please with a minimum of hassle, has to be one of the most perfect experiences money can buy.

Not surprisingly, more and more of us are finding the means and schemes to hop on a private jet. What was once seen as the sky-high preserve of tycoons, politicians and the stars of sport and entertainment is now being transformed by new, tech-based business models that tune into today’s on-demand and sharing economies. In the past you either owned an aircraft or chartered it. Now you can buy a share in a jet (fractional ownership), sign up for a card guaranteeing so many hours of instant jet travel, join a club offering discounted seats on popular routes, and make use of vacant repositioning flights.

It’s not just about the comfort and ease, the 15-minute check-in time or the chance to take pets and all manner of luggage. There’s the more serious issues of privacy and security, and the efficient use of our time – and of course, flying in PJs is damn good fun too.

“Most of our bookings are made between 48 and 72 hours before take-off,” says Antony Rivolta, co-founder of the Monaco-based empty leg specialist Jetpartner.net. Another company catering to the app-powered lifestyle is JetSmarter, pioneered in Fort Lauderdale but now also in London, which runs an Uber-like service that offers regular jet shuttles and seat-only deals at the touch of a smartphone.

“QUALITY IS REMEMBERED LONG AFTER  THE PRICE  IS FORGOTTEN.”

All this is good news for those of us who like to fly in style to and from that dream yacht moored in the warmth and sunshine. “The seasonality of superyacht and private jet charter is incredibly similar,” reflects Clive Jackson, chief executive officer of the London-headquartered private jet charter company Victor. “We see a lot of members flying to Mediterranean and Caribbean hotspots every summer – this includes attending events like the Monaco Yacht Show or connecting with charters in Nice, Cannes, Ibiza, Miami, St Barths and St Maarten.” Over half of the company’s charter bookings are now made with the help of its iOS app, with clients often calling the captain of a yacht to arrange for it to meet them close to where they will land.

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In tandem with this, leisure travellers are increasingly enjoying the benefits of what has traditionally been seen as a corporate privilege. Twenty-one years ago Seattle-based TCS World Travel launched an innovative round-the-world trip using a reconfigured Balair jet to visit a cavalcade of bucket-list wonders from the Amazon to Papua New Guinea. Today the company has an additional London office and its escorted group tours feature the Four Seasons Private Jet and cruises with Seadream Yacht Club. Abercrombie & Kent has its own lavish programme of private jet journeys, while in Africa Elewana Collection’s ‘Sky Safari’ of Tanzania, which whisks passengers around on a Grand Cessna Caravan fitted with club class seats, recently expanded into Kenya. We can expect a lot more of these ‘aerial-hopping’ holidays in future, if only because once you’ve experienced the bliss of touring by private jet or VIP turbo-prop, you can never go back. A further boost to this seductive market is the increasing power and sophistication of the aircraft now cruising the heavens. The forthcoming HondaJet promises to be “a highly cost-effective small jet to rival existing contenders”, says Carol Cork from the St Albans-based booking service PrivateFly. She also expects Embraer’s Legacy 450, with its full digital flight controls, large stand-up cabin and interiors by BMW, to create a lot of interest.

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For Clive Jackson, today’s golden tickets are aboard the latest ultra-long-range aircraft. “The Bombardier Global 5000 and 6000, and Gulfstream G550 and G650, are among our hottest charter requests,” he reports. The last, in its extended range version, can carry eight passengers up to 6,400 nautical miles without a fuel stop, travelling just under the speed of sound.


ON THE WINGS OF PRIVATE JETS

A FURTHER BOOST TO THIS SEDUCTIVE MARKET  IS THE INCREASING POWER AND SOPHISTICATION OF THE AIRCRAFT NOW CRUISING THE HEAVENS. There’s plenty more to come as aircraft manufacturers strive to find the perfect balance between speed, style and efficiency. Currently in development, Bombardier’s 13-passenger Global 8000 jet will have a range of 7,900 nautical miles, so you can whisk your party from London to a superyacht in California, Brazil or Indonesia in one simple hop. Meanwhile, the twin joys of air and water have been brought together in Embraer’s 1000Q Skyacht One, which poses the exciting question ‘what if a yacht could fly?’ Featuring a hand-painted trompe l’oeil mahogany ‘hull’ and a rudder-like stabiliser, with navigation-themed interiors and bathroom taps designed like powerboat throttles, it marries the exclusive thrills of a private jet flight with the shimmering realm of oceangoing luxury. Other head-turning glimpses of the future include windowless jets fitted with high definition projection screens offering a real-time 360-degree view, and Lilium, a German-designed two-passenger electric jet with vertical take-off that’s set to launch in 2018. Then there’s the holy grail of commercial supersonic flight, ideally without the boom, which has been frustratingly absent since the demise of Concorde in 2003.

The Spike S-512 supersonic jet now being developed by Boston-based Spike Aerospace promises speeds of up to Mach 1.6, while another enticing prospect is the Aerion AS2 from the Nevada-headquartered Aerion Corporation, which will cut the flight time from London to New York to four-anda-half-hours. When it comes to the wonders of modern t

Previous spread An open vista above the clouds Photograph: ©Rob Allen/ coolairphotography.com

This page: Top: The Skyacht One designed by Sotto Studios Photograph: ©Sottostudios/ Embraer

Opposite page: Top: Bombardier Global 6000 is one of Victor’s hottest charter requests Left: Private jet charter company Victor sees a lot of members flying to Mediterranean and Caribbean hotspots every summer

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Be TRANSPORTED Sailing an endless expanse of crystal-blue waters, you can get lost in time. Soaring high above the clouds at record-setting speeds and in absolute comfort of Gulfstream, you’ll find all the time you need. With every nautical mile, be transported.

To contact a Gulfstream sales representative in your area, visit gulfstream.com/contacts.

GULFSTREAM.COM


LAND & COUNTRY

LAND & COUNTRY Once the beverage of choice for the kings of France, and enjoyed the world over for its distinctive taste and those delightful bubbles, champagne has always been in a league of its own. Now though, the meteoric rise of English sparkling wine is giving the ‘king of fizz’ a run for its money. Words by Julia Zaltzman

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F

or most, champagne is the epitome of luxury and success. It’s a celebration of the finer things in life, an indulgence to be appreciated and savoured on the palate, and a fitting way to toast or mark an occasion. For the remaining few it is the moniker of extravagance, often sprayed in excess by Formula One podium winners, but then champagne has always been the preferred choice of the elite. The vineyards in northeast France date back to the 5th century when the Romans first set about planting them. The wine produced was traditionally served as part of the French kings’ coronation festivities when anointed in Reims, and this royal link has

same chalky soil, has been heating up in a beneficial way, but is it a true match for the stalwart champagne houses? For pioneering brands such as LaurentPerrier - whose radical approaches at both blending and technical level have resulted in its now signature style for delicacy, elegance and freshness the terroir found in Tours-sur-Marne, where its heritage is firmly rooted, is unsurpassed. “We are very much attached to our region, our wine growing partners, and to the fantastic name of champagne,” says Richard Arnaud, Laurent-Perrier’s marketing and communications manager. “If you are outside of our

"THE WINE PRODUCED WAS TRADITIONALLY SERVED AS PART OF THE FRENCH KINGS’ CORONATION FESTIVITIES WHEN ANOINTED IN REIMS." been successfully leveraged by the champagne houses ever since. The family-owned champagne house Laurent-Perrier founded in 1812 — one of the foremost brands — promoted its vintage in late 1890 as a favourite of Leopold II of Belgium, George I of Greece and the Marchioness of Cambridge, to name but a few. The English have always been great wine drinkers, and champagne has traditionally been a firm favourite, but it is only in recent years that the British wine-making industry has started to flourish. It remains extremely small – accounting for around one per cent of the domestic market – but sparkling wine is doing particularly well. The famously cold Champagne region is now warmer than it was a generation ago while even chillier southern England, which has the

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terroir it’s no longer champagne, so it’s not a priority for us to buy or develop outside of the region. Of course we take the very best care at monitoring climate change, but we need to wait for the long-term to really know what will happen.” Not all champagne houses share Arnaud’s viewpoint, however. Global consciousness of the quality of English bubbly got a huge boost when French champagne house Taittinger announced in December 2015 that it had bought 69 hectares of farmland in Kent, southern England, in a venture referred to as a ‘Franco-British alliance’. As the first champagne house to buy up UK soil, its plan is to make English sparkling wine under the Domaine Evremond label as part of a multi-million-pound investment over the next 10 years.


LAND & COUNTRY

“We have dreamt for a number of years of working with our dear friends in the UK,” said Pierre Emmanuel Taittinger, president of his namesake champagne house. “Our aim is to make something of real excellence in the UK’s increasingly temperate climate, and not to compare it with champagne or any other sparkling wine.”

Classic champagne grape varieties chardonnay, pinot noir and pinot meunier will be planted on the newly acquired land at Stone Stile Farm, a former apple orchard near to Chilham, but it will be around eight years before its first Domaine wine is produced. After that, it reportedly aims to produce 300,000 bottles of English sparkling wine annually.

Taittinger’s investment comes amid a boom in English sparkling wine production. Burgeoning demand for brands such as Nyetimber, Chapel Down, Camel Valley, Coates & Seely and Ridgeview is turning parts of the South Downs and beyond into an English Épernay after a doubling of the amount of land devoted to vineyards in the past seven years and a 43 per cent rise in wine production last year. Chapel Down raised £4 million via a crowdfunding exercise in 2014 to back expansion into a further 326 acres of vineyard in Kent over five years, while Nyetimber have their sights firmly set on the export market, says Rosie Clarkson of Vins Sans Frontières (VSF). “English sparkling wine is most certainly an up-and-coming wine category and is starting to earn a name for itself outside of the UK as more is being exported,” she says. “There have been a number of blind tastings held against champagne and recently English sparkling wine brand Nyetimber was voted better than several of the Grandes Marques. As word is getting out that the quality of English sparkling wines rivals that of champagne, there has definitely been an increase in demand.” Experts at provisioning superyachts with fine wines and food, VSF holds stock of tens of thousands of bottles of the world’s best wines – from the everyday to the once-in-a-lifetime – in its ideal temperature-controlled storage in Sophia Antipolis.

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“ENGLISH SPARKLING WINE IS MOST CERTAINLY AN UP-ANDCOMING WINE CATEGORY AND IS STARTING TO EARN A NAME FOR ITSELF OUTSIDE OF THE UK”

Previous spread: Left: An English vineyard in southern England Right: Cuvée Rose from the ever popular Laurent Perrier

Opposite page: Top and left: Fine wines in storage at Vins Sans Frontières’ impressive temperaturecontrolled facilities This page: The harvesting of wine-making grapes

“We started working with Nyetimber earlier this year following their move to start focusing on targeted export markets,” says Clarkson. “They have already had huge success in the Balearics and are in all the right places so we are looking forward to seeing the same results on the Cote d’Azur.” Nyetimber was the first vineyard planted for sparkling wines in the UK, and is widely considered to produce one of the best sparkling wines that England has to offer. It has also recently become the first English wine to be traded on Liv-ex (a global marketplace for professional buyers and sellers of wine), which will further increase recognition and demand for the range. “We believe that we are going to see huge success with the brand on board yachts as it offers exceptional quality in very premium packaging,” adds Clarkson. While the proof is certainly in the pudding, the cost of land in the UK is also driving its wine-making appeal. A single hectare of vineyard land in England is estimated to cost around £25,000, compared to vineyard prices in Champagne, which were reported to be in the region of £870,000 per hectare in 2014.

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The competition is certainly proving to be healthy, with champagne house Duval-Leroy choosing to diversify its existing offering by introducing the ultimate tour in which you can create your own blend, which will be delivered in engraved bottles, with a minimum order of 1000 bottles at a cost of 40,000 Euros. Only time will tell whether or not English sparkling wine will ever share the same level of prestige as its French counterpart, but no matter what your preferred tipple, it should always be consumed with a dash of daring originality. In the words of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Gatsby Girls: “I'll drink your champagne. I'll drink every drop of it, I don't care if it kills me.”


No PASSIoN WIthoUt RISK ... ... LeAve the RISK to US.

PANtAeNIUS.Co M

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EXPLORE THE

W RLD

As owners continue to look further afield for new destinations to visit, it is no surprise that orders for some of the most exciting designs of explorer yachts ever conceived are on the rise. Words by Ellie Brade

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EXPLORE THE WORLD

T

he most important thing about an explorer yacht is that it has to be able to do what it says on the tin; explore. Robust enough to be taken to all corners of the globe, while still functioning as a luxury vessel, the creative approaches that designers have taken to achieving this goal are wide and varied. Thanks to advances in ‘explorer’ designs, unforgettable destinations are now more accessible than ever before. The question is, which design to choose?

SeaXplorer For Damen, an explorer platform was a natural progression from their hugely popular Sea AxeYacht Support vessels, driven by growing client demand. The company developed its new SeaXplorer range of 65-100m to offer luxury expedition vessels capable of visiting the world’s most challenging waters. “The SeaXplorer is a crossover design that combines the best of the luxury of traditional Amels superyachts with the capability and reliability of the Damen vessels and is able to carry a huge selection of toys, including its own submarine and a hangar-stored helicopter,” says Victor Caminada, marketing manager at Amels, part of the Damen Group.

“THIS NEW MARKET DOESN’T JUST WANT TO RELAX IN THE SUNSHINE; THEY WANT MORE FROM THEIR YACHTS, DIFFERENT LOCATIONAL EXPERIENCES.”

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Previous page: The majestic Damen SeaXplorer This page: Polar cruising with the SeaXplorer Opposite page: Top left and bottom: The Nigel Irens trimaran designs boast spacious deck space Top right and middle: Renderings of the Origin 575 and Xplore 70 concepts

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The team wanted to create a range of yachts that would be at the top end of the market for both polar and tropical cruising. To help achieve this, Damen partnered with EYOS Expeditions, which specialises in yachting in remote destinations like the Antarctic, North West Passage, tropical waters and diving hotspots, in order to draw on their experience gained from decades of expeditions. “They provided hundreds of operational and design input features based around the essentials for safe and enjoyable expeditions, that were all incorporated into the end design,” says Caminada. “There is currently no ideal vessel for these types of expeditions so the EYOS team have to shape their itineraries around the vessel. With the SeaXplorer designs they will be able to do the opposite and take owners and charterers to all the places and in absolute superyacht-quality luxury.”

As well as looking good the SeaXplorer has been designed with practicality in mind, with huge storage capacity which gives her a 40-day autonomy facilitating travel to those hard to reach destinations. Another point of difference will be compliance with the Polar Code B, allowing proper access into the ice and all the sights and wildlife this offers. “We believe that there is no other yacht on the market built to Polar Code B standard with the capability, top-end luxury and toys/equipment that SeaXplorer has,” concludes Caminada. “We see this standard as the minimum for owners to be able to have a proper experience in these harsher environments, and this includes remote spectacular tropical settings.” With the first yacht now sold, engineering work is well underway.


EXPLORE THE WORLD

Trimarans Those looking for something a little different need look no further than the two explorer trimaran concepts – 57.5m Origin 575 and 70m Xplore 70 – released in early 2016 by Nigel Irens Design in partnership with CMN Shipyard. These dramatic designs boast spacious accommodation and deck and garage space for a fleet of watercraft including a submarine.

The Irens team has decades of experience with trimarans and believes their long range, fuel-efficient, seaworthy properties are an obvious fit for an explorer platform and the perfect response to increased client demand for long range vessels. Although offering the equivalent volume (and price tag!) of a smaller monohull, the added length offers huge gains in performance and seakeeping. Ideal for covering large distances, making them perfect for spaced out destinations like the Pacific or Asia, the real sell of the trimaran is its ability to travel in impressively fast time, stepping up the speed when necessary without any negative impact.“A trimaran has effortless performance at any speed and can operate equally happily at 18 knots or 30 knots without any strain,” says Irens. “The designs have got a wonderful flexibility and smooth performance curve and simply speaking they can achieve speeds and ranges that a conventional boat won’t even come close to.” By example the trimaran could travel from San Diego to the Galapagos via Baha (a total of 3,300nm) in just seven days averaging 19 knots. At lower speeds the 70m design is an impressive 25 per cent more efficient than an existing efficient 50m monohull model. Although geared towards carbon or aluminium construction, should clients wish to take it to polar waters, steel construction and a bigger model would be a viable option.

“We have found that the designs are appealing to a new generation of owners who just want to get out and go somewhere,” says Nigel Irens, founder of Nigel Irens Design. “It’s a different take on yachting and the same goes for all kinds of explorer yachts, they are for going places. This is not the kind of boat you would buy to sit in Monaco harbour with!”

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“THE ULTIMATE REASON IS THE CAPABILITY TO EXPLORE THE WORLD IN TOTAL SAFETY IN LUXURY.”

Hawk Yachts Visiting some unforgettable sights, including Scott’s Hut in Antarctica, led Captain Matthias Bosse, president of Hawk Yachts, to question what the ultimate purpose of owning a superyacht is. He concluded that “the ultimate reason is the capability to explore the world in total safety in luxury,” and this led to the founding of Hawk Yachts, which offers three explorer designs – flagship 102m Sea Hawk, 75m Sky Hawk and 56m Cape Hawk – with more in development. “The current superyacht fleet lacks the capability to do much more than cruise the Mediterranean,” says Bosse, who believes that few of the explorer yachts being marketed are actually capable enough to take on extreme situations and varied challenging conditions. “Sea Hawk is beautiful enough to be just as at home in the most prestigious ports of the world as well as capable in the very harshest conditions.” Drawing on huge reams of experience and nearly three quarters of a million sea miles, Bosse has used his expertise to create vessels that he knows will stand up to any test. Like the Irens team, he believes that explorer yachts are perfect for a new generation of buyers. “This new market doesn’t just want to relax in the sunshine; they want more from their yachts, different locational experiences.”

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For owners aspiring to reach new and different destinations, a Hawk design means the world opens up. All of the models on offer are Polar Class 6 ice classed, but also well suited to any climate, with the team citing the Amazon, which is navigable more than 2,000nm upstream as one extreme environment the yachts could visit. From the Antarctic to the rainforest to everywhere in between these striking yachts have been designed for the owner who wants to see it all.


EXPLORE THE WORLD

Pelagic Expeditions At the smaller end of the market Pelagic Expeditions, led by Whitbread veteran Skip Novak, is proof that having a smaller yacht needn’t restrict where you can take it. Models including a 23m and a new 25m on the way, developed in conjunction with Tony Castro Design, have been borne from considerable hands-on experience in remote destinations including the Arctic, Antarctic, Cape Horn and Greenland. “Our experience has translated into our designs to ensure they are more than capable of tackling these regions,” says Novak. Focus is on performance, with the models tried and tested

Opposite page: Top: Hawk Yachts’ stunning flagship 102m Sea Hawk Middle: The imposing 75m Sky Hawk pictured in polar regions Bottom: 56m Cape Hawk is just as at home in the most prestigious ports as it is capable in the very harshest of conditions

during nine-month charters in these unforgiving regions. “To enjoy Polar expeditions you want to have a boat that allows you to get properly into the ice and be creative in your navigation and get close to shore but the average boat is probably much too fragile to be able to do that,” says Novak. “The specification [of our models] is definitely simpler than a normal luxury yacht of that size but when you are away from support structures your yacht needs to be easy to repair and use so you put in what is necessary to be warm, comfortable and have a safe, seaworthy vessel, and beyond that try to eliminate from the design rather than add on.”

This page: Top: Whitbread veteran Skip Novak, and founder of Pelagic Expeditions, at sea Left: Pelagic’s 23m design is borne from hands-on experience in remote destinations

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Ocean Voyager Taking a similar approach, Ocean Voyager’s designs combine the practicality of a workboat with the comfort of a more traditional superyacht. Retrofitting yachts to suit extreme cruising, past projects have included the well-known 32m luxury expedition yacht Pink Shrimp. Latest project 27.4m Rogue, previously used for ocean mapping, boasts the same qualities with features including

This page: Top: Ocean Voyager’s latest venture, 27.4m Rogue Right: Rogue is a work boat on the outside, but is more like a luxury yacht in the inside

Opposite page: Rogue boasts features including a 7,000nm range, solar power and battery banks and a huge crane for tender lifting.

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a 7,000nm range, solar power and battery banks and a huge crane for tender lifting. “Our boats look like rough work boats on the outside, but on the inside they

are more like a normal luxury yacht, albeit with interiors that are simple and functional, rather than over the top,” says Sam Connor, director of Ocean Voyager.


EXPLORE THE WORLD

Designed to be incredibly self sufficient, while also endeavouring to be as green as possible, “our projects usually go to quite adventurous owners and have undertaken amazing trips to destination including the Congo, Easter Island and New Zealand, while one was a support vessel for remote fly-fishing,” says Connor. “They are a platform for adventure and for people who want to do something different, look for treasure, or dive in exotic places.” With so many capable explorer and expedition designs now on offer the world is, quite literally, your oyster.

CHARTER OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE ADVENTURER

Force Blue

Exuma

Global

FOR CHARTER

FOR CHARTER

FOR CHARTER

Length: 63.3m

Length: 49.9m

Length: 67.06m

Built / Refit: 2002 / 2009

Built / Refit: 2010

Built / Refit: 1982 / 2008

Guests: 6 cabins / 12 guests

Guests: 9 guests / 5 cabins

Guests: 12 guests / 6 cabins

SUMMER CHARTER: The Med: €245,000 per week high, €235,000 per week low

SUMMER CHARTER: Northern Europe: €189,000 per week

SUMMER CHARTER: Bahamas: $150,000 per week high, $150,000 per week low

WINTER CHARTER: West Med: €245,000 per week high, €235,000 per week low

WINTER CHARTER: West Med: €189,000 per week

WINTER CHARTER: Bahamas: $150,000 per week high, $150,000 per week low

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SWAN STYLE

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SWAN STYLE

" . . .taking inspiration from our glorious heritage and its core values that are still fundamental to our company: heritage , craftsmanship, excellence and expertise . "” Feruccio Ferragamo

F

or Leonardo Ferragamo, owner and chairman of Finnish shipyard Nautor’s Swan since 1998, sailing is a true passion. In 2015 he took delivery of his seventh Swan, 35m Solleone, but he first discovered the sport when his elder brother, Feruccio, took him sailing off the coast of Tuscany when he was very young. “I immediately fell in love with the sport and I’ve been sailing ever since,” he says. Quickly developing a fondness for Swan yachts, his first Swan was a Swan 51 called Marlin Blue which he bought in 1988, ten years prior to eventually acquiring the shipyard itself. 2016 sees the yard celebrating 50 years in business, a momentous milestone with more than 2,000 yachts built in that time, and Solleone and the Swan 115 model represent the pinnacle of that half-century of experience. “This major anniversary is the perfect moment to look at our future, taking inspiration from our glorious heritage and its core values that are still fundamental to our company: heritage, craftsmanship, excellence and expertise,” says Ferragamo. The yard has released a new design, the ClubSwan 50, to mark the anniversary. “The design represents a totally innovative concept and a Class programme that is entirely new.”

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Of course the Ferragamo name is best known for high-end fashion with Ferragamo’s late father, shoe-designer Salvatore, founding his self-named luxury brand in the 1920s. As well as his work with Nautor’s Swan, Ferragamo is equally devoted to the family business, playing an active role alongside his five siblings. With plenty of logical crossover between the worlds of sumptuous fashion and yacht design, Ferragamo uses his creative expertise to become involved in the creative development process at Nautor’s Swan. “Where I feel most active and involved is in the collaboration with the Swan designers, both for the interior and exterior layout, to create new models,” he says. “My contribution derives from my experience as a sailor and yacht owner, and is also related to lifestyle and taste, two fields in which I have been involved all my life through the different worlds I have had the honour and pleasure to play a part in.” The clear link between Ferragamo’s family business and Nautor’s Swan is, of course, his unwavering belief in the importance of heritage. “In Nautor’s Swan, I found the same core values that, though in an entirely different sector, distinguish my family’s company: innovation, performance, durability, comfort, style and quality,” he says. “Incomparable value derives from the use of quality materials coupled with traditional craftsmanship, expert design and construction. These are essential to product credibility and generate customer loyalty in shoes as in yachts.” Many of the Swan family share Ferragamo’s passion for heritage with the owners of Tarantella, the first ever Swan sailing yacht to be built, recently approaching the yard looking to restore her. “The restoration of Tarantella by the same

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people who produced her 50 years ago was a project that struck me powerfully,” says Ferragamo. “Tarantella’s owners came forward voluntarily this year, and asked us to restore her to her original beauty. This is something amazing and tells you so much of the spirit, the passion, and the skills that we have in our company.”


SWAN STYLE

Previous spread: Feruccio Ferragamo, son of fashion label founder Salvatore Ferragamo, at Palazzo Spini in Florence, Italy Opposite page: Top: Tarantella, the first Swan 36 to be constructed Photograph: ©Nautor’s Swan Bottom: The Salvatore Ferragamo shoe museum in Tuscany, Italy

This page: Top: Salvatore Ferragamo (18981960) Italian shoe designer at his Via Manelli workshop in Florence Bottom: Leonardo Ferragamo and colleague celebrating the Nautor’s Swan 50th anniversary Photograph: ©Nautor’s Swan

According to Ferragamo, many lessons learned from working at the family-owned fashion house apply to the Swan brand too. “For iconic quality brands the biggest challenge is always to preserve and nurture the credibility with which they have earned their success,” he says. “Never take anything for granted, always look for one’s own evolution and improvement, with the goal of surpassing yourself year after year.” In this spirit, Ferragamo and the yard team are always working on new things, with an even bigger model on the cards. “I must be honest and tell you we are working on a larger model, a 140ft yacht of which, at the moment, I can say no more,” he says conspiratorially. No doubt, the next 50 years hold highly exciting times.

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Sail the high seas on board a Nautor ' s Swan

Mystery

Solleone III

FOR SALE

FOR SALE AND CHARTER

Length: 34.34m

Length: 27.77m

Built/Refit: 2000/2015

Built/Refit: 2009

Guests: 4 cabins / 8 guests

Guests: 4 cabins / 9 guests

Price: €4,000,000

Price: €5,300,000

Sedna

Solleone

SUMMER CHARTER: West Med: €42,000 per week high, €38,000 per week low WINTER CHARTER: West Med: €42,000 per week high, €38,000 per week low

Clevelander

FOR CHARTER

FOR CHARTER

FOR SALE

Length: 24.99m

Length: 35.20m

Length: 24.89m

Built/Refit: 2009/2016

Built/Refit: 2015

Built/Refit: 2004/2014

Guests: 4 cabins / 8 guests

Guests: 4 cabins / 9 guests

Guests: 4 cabins / 8 guests

SUMMER CHARTER: New England: $39,000 per week

SUMMER CHARTER: West Med: €95,000 per week high, €80,000 Per Week Low

Price: €1,950,000

WINTER CHARTER: Caribbean: $45,000 per week high, $39,000 per week low

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For more information please contact: yachtsales@fraseryachts.com or yachtcharter@fraseryachts.com

WINTER CHARTER: West Med: €95,000 per week high, €80,000 per week low


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COUNTRY

&

Grandeur When it comes to restoring the large stately homes of England’s green and pleasant land, the most important element is understanding what makes the building unique, and making sure you don’t lose that. Words by Gareth Rubin

P

.G Wodehouse, the English comic author who spent his life writing about country estates and their charmingly clownish inhabitants, once wrote: “The cup of tea on arrival at a country house is a thing which, as a rule, I particularly enjoy. I like the crackling logs, the shaded lights, the scent of buttered toast, the general atmosphere of leisured cosiness.” If there is anything more British than a big country pile made of stone and surrounded by fine lawn gardens, it’s hard to think what it could be. In recent times, changing circumstances for the families that have traditionally owned these great buildings has meant that many have been purchased by new owners from the UK and overseas, bringing new blood and energy to these homes. “It’s part of a lifestyle, with a house in Knightsbridge and a chalet in St Moritz. It completes the stable,” explains Ed Sugden, director for the country houses team at the prestige estate agency Savills. “Some people are buying to create a dynasty, others like to feel that they are preserving that history for the next generation.”

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Richard Compton, president of the Historic Houses Association, and owner of Newby Hall, an eighteenth-century house designed by Sir Christopher Wren (who also designed St Paul’s Cathedral), adds that the appeal lies as much in the future as in the history: “Owners of historic houses, castles and gardens preserve these wonderful places in the interests of the nation and for future generations. These special places, with a strong sense of history, often have outstandingly beautiful architecture, parkland and gardens.” In one sense, buying a £10 million house in the Oxfordshire countryside is no different to buying a £500,000 flat in London. Angus Harley, who runs the country house consultancy for estate agency Knight Frank, says: “The legal principles are the same, but the complexities and liabilities are magnified. Country houses can have more in the way of issues with the building, the boundaries, the third-party rights of way [rights to walk or drive across the land] and historic covenants regarding what you can and can’t do with the land.”


COUNTRY AND GRANDEUR

In addition, many such houses have Listed status, which means they are of historical value and legally protected from architectural change without approval from the authorities. “The pitfalls and restrictions of doing it wrong can be considerable,” says Harley. “Prospective buyers need to understand the nature of the listing and what can be improved or altered before going through with the purchase and discovering that turning it into the house of their dreams becomes an impossibility.” Harley says that some architectural periods, such as Georgian, are always popular, but others, like Victorian Gothic “aren’t everybody’s cup of tea”. The Georgian style is a direct descendent of the neo-classical look created by the Italian renaissance architect and father of western architecture, Andrea Palladio. Elegant straight lines, beautifully proportioned facades and porticos, and majestic Greco-Roman columns abound. It made the Georgian era of the 18th and 19th centuries, when almost all country homes were built to his aesthetic ideals, undoubtedly the greatest period for

English architecture. Even today, many are still built to his principles. One way in which the buying process differs from buying a smaller property is that it is common for prospective purchasers to employ a buying agent, much in the same way that prospective yacht owners seek out a trusted yacht broker. As well as helping to find the right house, he or she will steer the legal process. Buying agents will usually cost around two to three per cent of a sale price, and they can be an important element because “in some parts of the country a high proportion of available properties aren’t advertised, and unless you have a buying agent you won’t know what you’re missing,” says Harley. It’s once the sale has gone through, however, that the real work begins: “The complexities of running a house like this can be akin to running a small hotel,” adds Harley. When many of these houses were built they often had large estates, with land rented to local farmers. That income stream has become a trickle, but in recent years more imaginative ways have been found to make these buildings pay for themselves.

“It’s once the sale has gone through that the real work begins.”

Above: Newby Hall, an eighteenth-century house designed by Sir Christopher Wren

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Filming for popular TV series such as Downton Abbey can bring in money - but Sugden warns that there will be major disruption: “I went to a house the other day and they were creating a period drama. They had painted trompe l’oeil all over the walls and the owners thought this was actually rather pretty and wanted to keep it. But it was a lot of disturbance.”

Many large estates have become venues for leisure activities. Knebworth House in Hertfordshire, for instance, hosts huge rock music festivals, while Longleat in Wiltshire and Port Lympne in Kent have wild animal parks. However, although a few owners open their doors to the paying public, most prefer to maintain their privacy.

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If the new owner doesn’t plan to live in the property, it can be turned into a hotel or conference centre. One other popular measure for those who want the best of both worlds is to let the house for weddings at weekends. Isabel Smith, who runs a consultancy for wedding venues, says the aesthetic of the house is vital: “Some people love shambolic, charming, rustic looks; others like the flawless Blenheim Palace look - gorgeous inside and out. But the easiest to sell is a classic exterior and modern interior. You can’t take something untouched since the 50s and make millions out of it - you have to invest.”

George Saumarez Smith, director of ADAM Architecture, one of Britain’s foremost firms for country houses, says that the important thing when restoring such a property is “understanding what makes the building unique, and making sure you don’t lose that”. He explains: “I often say to people that places can be ruined by having too much money spent on them more than they can be by having not enough spent on them.”

This page: Below: Longleat is now famed for its wild animal park Opposite page: Top: Blenheim Palace Water Terrace. Photograph: Amra Pasic / Shutterstock.com Bottom: Blenheim Palace is the only non-royal non-episcopal country house in England to hold the title of palace


COUNTRY AND GRANDEUR

“The best architect is someone who understands the traditions of a house and the area in which it’s found.” Mary Miers, architectural writer for London-based magazine Country Life, says there is nothing wrong with updating these grand old houses and it is entirely possible to maintain the historical character while doing so. “A good architect can turn it into something very modern but it must be with sympathy with the original fabric of the house,” she says. “The best architect is someone who understands the traditions of a house and the area in which it’s found. Someone who will take the care and understanding over what you’re working with.” She continues: “Since the 1990s there has been a great revival in country houses. I think the best use for them is the use for which they were built – and that’s to live in. But that’s not always possible and sometimes you need to find other uses. There is no need to preserve it as is forever.”

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EDITOR'S PICK OF THE UK'S TOP FOUR

Stately Homes Little Sodbury Manor, Little Sodbury, South Gloucestershire ÂŁ8 million The Manor has an illustrious and fascinating history with intriguing links to British royalty spanning over 500 years. This fine stone built Cotswold Manor house has impressive medieval origins complimented by the elegance that comes with the architecture associated with the reign of Queen Anne.

Spains Hall Estate, Finchingfield, Essex ÂŁ8 million An Historic Elizabethan country house in an unspoiled parkland setting. For the first time in more than 250 years the property is offered for sale along with 70 acres. The naming of Spains Hall Estate commemorates a former owner, Hervey de Ispana whose family held the original house from the time of the Conquest in 1066 to the reign of Henry II at the end of the 12th Century. It is unusual for a house that has been rebuilt many times since then to have retained its name. This adds further to the sense of place that greets any visitor.

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COUNTRY AND GRANDEUR

Manor Hall, Withington, Gloucestershire Lot 1 guide price £7.95 million Manor Hall is a late 15th century medieval house of exquisite beauty. The Manor of Withington was originally owned by the Bishop of Worcester who reserved the house for his use when he visited the manor. From the 17th century, the house was part of Bennett’s Farm, until it was sold to R.J. Gunther, who enlarged and restored Manor Hall, as he renamed it, between 1926 and 1928 in the fashion of the Arts and Crafts movement of the era. The earliest buildings on the estate were Roman in origin. The villa and accompanying bath house were listed as a National Monument in 2012, along with a villa on the neighbouring estate.

Duntisbourne House, Duntisbourne Abbots, Near Edgeworth, Gloucestershire £15 million

The elegant gardens to duntisbourne House have been re- landscaped by the current owners with prestigious designer,and Chelsea multi-award winner, Tom Stuart-Smith. A westfacing stone terrace with renewed stone balustrade sits before a formal lawn enjoying panoramic views of the Frome Valley beyond.

Savills Country Department: +44 (0)20 7016 3780

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OUT WITH THE NEW,

in with the old A

s morning sprays colours all around Bourayne Bay’s surrounding cliffs, a repeated call comes from afar. Hep...hep...hep... Yooo. Several low canoes are rowing all together towards a yacht and the call precedes the six men in the canoes switching the paddle to the other side each time. Locals teaching a visiting yacht about Va’a, a traditional Tahitian outrigger canoe, is just one of the many authentic cultural experiences available to superyacht guests in Tahiti according to Etienne Boutin of Asia Pacific Superyachts Tahiti. For yacht owners and guests alike, immersive authentic encounters are fast becoming one of the most popular aspects of a yacht’s itinerary when visiting a new country.

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OUT WITH THE NEW, IN WITH THE OLD

For increasing numbers of superyacht guests, enjoying a unique and authentic cultural experience is the highlight of their visit to a new country. Words by Ellie Brade

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Previous spread: Hawaiian fire dancers put on a great show This page: Top: Looking onto the Otemanu mountain on the tropical island of Bora Bora, near Tahiti Bottom: A Hawaiian outrigger riding the waves, Oahu, Waikiki Photograph: Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA) / Tor Johnson Opposite page: Top: Ancient Polynesian style tiki wooden carvings greet visitors to Ki'i Pu'uhonua O Honaunau National Park Hawaii. Bottom: Close up of floral hair pieces from Hawaii Island, Kohala Coast Photograph: Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA) / Tor Johnson

Humans have been exploring the world by sea since prehistoric times, discovering and interacting with new countries and their people. Today nothing has changed and thanks to their transient nature, superyachts are able to gain unprecedented access to cultures around the world. Almost every country offers access to a version of its traditions but, with tourism such a major source of income for many, finding an authentic experience can sometimes prove a challenge. Luckily, connecting visiting yachts with these practices is a speciality for many onshore specialists and agents in cultural hot spots. As these are often highly personal and spiritual experiences, the agents working with boats will usually try and tailor them to be unique to the visitors, calling upon the right people and experts to bring the experience alive for them.

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OUT WITH THE NEW, IN WITH THE OLD

The way of life here has been protected and preserved for centuries by its elders. Hawaii is one example of a kingdom that manages to hold its place in the modern world as the fiftieth US state while retaining its ethnic roots. “The way of life here has been protected and preserved for centuries by its elders and it is still intact with the original language and stories of its past despite it now being a modern state,” says Chadwick Allenbaugh, founder of Hawaii Yachts / Global Ocean Club, which specialises in creating unique events for visiting yachts. “The authenticity of Hawaiian culture is still pure and true and Hawaiian cultural themes can be related to by anyone in the world; you can see the country as the first settlers would have.” Allenbaugh and his team, which includes specialist guides descended from Hawaiian royal families, are careful to make selections that will resonate with the individual yacht. “We base our plans on genuine aloha [love], giving a part of yourself to others in a real way,” he says. “The concept of aloha is still genuinely special here, there is magic in the island; the gift we give is the kind of experience where your hairs stand on end – a natural feeling of connection to the authenticity of the culture.” Aloha is based on 19 traditional values including Ohana (family) and Kuleana (personal sense of responsibility). Experiences provided by the Hawaii Yachts team generally fall into three camps: ‘celebration’, ‘wellness’ and ‘adventure’. Activities include witnessing a traditional luau [dance and song], a Kava ceremony, or being taken to sacred spots by guides and learning about the celestial navigation that first led people to Hawaii.

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"We connect our guests with experts who help to immerse them in Maori culture.”

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The South Pacific is a particularly popular destination for yachts seeking traditional encounters, as it too is home to many countries that still have their original cultures either intact or coexisting successfully in the modern world. Almost every island in the Pacific has its own interpretation of regional traditions with songs, dances and traditional food all on offer in a local setting. Watching and taking part in a Fijian Meke [traditional song and dance] is just one example of the experiences to be had, which can be as simple as attending a Pacific island church service, with guests actively welcomed to join and share in this pure and joyful form of worship.

special allure and there are plenty of anchorages where you can visit historic sites, see local art and dancing and get to know the people of the islands,” he says.

Undoubtedly there is no better way to do it than to meet and talk with the people of the country and learn their ways first hand. Having spent significant time in the South Pacific, New Caledonia is a highlight for Greg Palmer, captain of 30m Espiritu Santo. “Cultural diversity adds spice to New Caledonia’s

“Our experiences cannot be bought online,” says Lidgard. “We connect our guests with experts who help to immerse them in Maori culture.” Activities include a traditional hangi [underground oven] on a beach, or a journey to sacred tribal houses via waka [canoe] guided by tribe leaders.

New Zealand’s Maori culture is alive and well within the country and has long been a pull for many visitors. “Our cultural itineraries are tailored to suit the needs of individual guests, whether it be an interest in art, history, food or the outdoors,” says Duthie Lidgard, managing director of Asia Pacific Superyachts New Zealand. With their team and guides being of Maori descent, it is this intrinsic knowledge that sets their offer apart.


OUT WITH THE NEW, IN WITH THE OLD

Opposite page: Top: A traditional Fijian Meke dance on Robinson Crusoe island Photograph: Nadezda Zavitaeva / Shutterstock.com This page: Top: Koh Panyee settlement built on stilts, Phang Nga Bay, Thailand

Like the South Pacific region, Asia is also rich with customs. Asia Pacific Superyachts Koh Samui owner agent, Captain Charlie Dwyer, suggests that a truly Thai experience is a visit to Thailand’s second largest island, Koh Samui, and the Gulf of Siam: “One way of learning the history behind some of Thailand’s customs is a visit to Wat Phra Yai, the ‘Big Buddha temple' home to a towering 12-metre seated golden Buddha sitting majestically on a small rocky island.” A local guide leads guests through the temple, explaining customs including the Wai [greeting gesture] and introducing them to monks for a personal reading. With the advantage of water travel, many cultural sites around Asia can be reached with ease. A good example of living culture is Koh Panyee, a floating fishing village in Thailand’s Phang Nga, near to Phuket, which was built on stilts in the 18th century by nomadic Indonesian fisherman. Home to around 1,600 people, with a mosque and even

its own floating football pitch built by local children, guests can dock up by tender and visit the village’s market. Adding to the appeal of a visit, near to the village is Khao Khien, a prehistoric rock art site featuring beautiful figures, including dolphins, monkeys and people, painted onto a cliff side. As always, this is enhanced by a guide familiar with the area’s history and traditions in order to give context and understanding. For those willing to seek and learn, the opportunities for cultural interactions around the world, particularly for those far flung locations easily accessible by yacht, are endless. When looking for authenticity, the overriding advice is to seek out local experts who can help bypass the commercialisation of tourist hubs and in turn create a priceless memory. Email info@asia-pacific-superyachts.com for more information or visit www.asia-pacific-superyachts.com

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INTELLIGENT ACQUISITION WORLD IN MOTION Words by Julia Zaltzman

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aper, adhesives, watercolours and the skilled touch of a craftsman’s hands; those four simple components form the basis of what it takes to create one of the most complex and thought-provoking works of art out there – a handmade globe, accurately depicting the world itself, but mastered so artfully that moreover it becomes an objet d’art. Dreamers and travellers alike marvel at them, appreciating the curves and nooks of vast sprawling continents and swathes of endless ocean juxtaposed with minuscule detail of Arctic icebergs and tropical islands. Bellerby & Co have transformed a once necessary record of our planet into something spectacularly magical.

A collection of articles that celebrate artisanal skill, unparalleled expertise and exceptional beauty by showcasing some of the most highly skilled craftsmen, fashionable handmade objets d’art and accomplished designers and artists the world over.

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“Globes to me are a constant inspiration and reminder of where we are,” says Peter Bellerby, founder of Bellerby & Co. “They allow you to geographically place the history of the planet.” What started out as a short-term hobby making a globe as a gift for his father soon snowballed into a thriving commercial business of bespoke madeto-order commissions. “Many of our


INTELLIGENT ACQUISITION

In fact, one of the only external factors is their source of inspiration. The stunning globes made by 16th century Dutch cartographer Willem Blaeu have always been a particular favourite, while collaborations with contemporary artists, such as Mathias Hahn, Yinka Shonibare MBE and Ahsayane on both globes and bases have proved to be highly successful. “We collaborated with a young man called Massimo Pietrobon on making a one-off Pangea globe for a customer,” says Bellerby. “He made a flat map and we took it from there to warp it into 'gores' [segments of a curved surface].” designs reflect the imagination and creativity of our customers, as well as the input from our team,” says Bellerby. His colourful creations now extend to the handcrafted bases made from wood and metal, the designs for which are inspired by “beautiful pieces of furniture” or architecture and nature. Varying greatly in size, it can take from a few weeks to construct the smaller 23cm globes and up to six months to create the impressive 127cm Churchill globe, so-called after the two 50 inch globes presented to Sir Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II. Closely modelled on its original namesake in terms of appearance and size it combines the classic techniques used in the making of the original with the technology and durability of modern construction. Introduced to the collection in 2012, there will only be 40 of the Churchill globes ever made, at a rate of one a year. “The first Churchill that we made stands out to me as our biggest challenge, and remains one of my favourite globes,” says Bellerby. “It took close to two years to conceive and complete to a quality as close to perfect as possible.” Having first begun making all the globes by hand on his own, the team of skilled artisans now extends to a cartographer, four painters, two woodworkers, and four globe-makers including himself, as well as a part-time engraver. All of the globe-makers undergo six months of

training to make the 23cm globes, and then a further few months for every size up from there, says Bellerby. “It’s a big commitment on both sides, and a long process to build a team,” he says. “We hire talented artists and passionate ‘makers’ and train them from there, developing the job around their specific interests and strengths.” Doubling up on skills, one globe-maker also produces all the hand-drawn illustrations that clients often request. It’s a passion for the job that keeps the ideas fresh and unique, as well as Bellerby’s keen interest in constructing things by hand, “figuring out how things work and creating”. While a love for the job has spurred on the company to expand organically, his focus is very much on keeping all the elements handcrafted in the UK, down to the smallest of details like creating their own threads within the metal components using the “tap and die method”. “All the engineering is carried out in the UK, mainly in our studio,” he says. “We use hand cast metals in a local foundry, hand-engravings, hand-mixed watercolours, hand-turned wood, and hand-painted cartography. We don’t make our own paper because handmade paper is actually not great for globe-making, we experimented for a couple of years to make sure!”

Booked through to mid-2017 with orders, they are currently working on a remake of the original Coronelli celestial globe for the Louvre museum in Paris. First made for Louis XVI, it is complete with the original copper plates for the gores, which have been stored for over three centuries and are in almost flawless condition. With most globes also including bespoke cartography and personalisation, such as illustrations, tracking and tracing people’s lives and travels, each and every creation is a oneoff says Bellerby, and every commission brings new and exciting ideas. “There are new challenges every day and we are always altering how we do things and looking to do new and exciting projects,” he says. “Everyone can always better what they create and I am excited to see the next decade unfold and what is to come next.”

This spread: Left: A close-up of a cartographer’s delicate work Above: Peter Bellerby, founder of Bellerby & Co Photography: Stuart Freedman

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As part of his more traditional approach, he takes his time over a canvas where younger artists often use rough dabs of paint thrown at speed onto the picture. “My work is quieter. I was brought up in the country under a less metropolitan way of life,” he explains. And there is certainly something of the gentility of the English romantic era about his work – his subjects are comfortable in their surroundings; seen at peace, rather than engaged in dynamic pursuits or forcing their way out of the canvasses. Family portraits are going through something of a renaissance in popularity as a new generation discovers that a traditional form of artwork can be perfectly suited to relaxed compositions and scenes from everyday modern life. Foster paints a few family groups per year. What makes for an appealing scene? “You’re looking for a certain something, that when we’re dead and gone someone will say, ‘That’s my grandparents. They were an interesting lot of people painted in an interesting way’.”

STROKE OF GENIUS

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Words by Gareth Rubin

painting should be natural, somehow, not fiddledup, nor dashed-off. Somewhere in the middle is the perfect spot where it just happens and you know that it’s right,” says portrait artist Richard Foster as he considers a bright, unfinished portrait in his Kensington studio. Foster is one of Britain’s leading artists in his field. A former vice president of the Royal Society of Portrait Artists, his subjects include HRH the Duke of Edinburgh and HRH the Prince of Wales, whom he also accompanied on a 2009 tour of South America as the trip’s official artist. He works mostly in oils, but tries to keep his hand in with watercolours and exhibits most years at the Royal Academy. “I’m a bit of a leftover,” he chuckles. “My forebears, artistically, are Sir Anthony Van Dyck and people like him. My style is quite romantic, whereas younger artists’ work can be quite photographic.” Now 71, he trained at Studio Simi in Florence in between Harrow and Oxford, and later at the City & Guilds of London Art School. His style encompasses subtle strokes, but not to the point of over-prettifying the picture. The tonal contrasts in his work tend to be gentle rather than stark; they allow a viewer to find them, rather than drawing attention to themselves. His work suits – and hangs in – Palladian country houses and Queen Anne cottages, rather than converted warehouses in East London.

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Once contacted by a potential subject, he will normally visit them in their home – presuming that is where the painting will take place. He thinks very much in terms of scenes, like a theatre director putting together a show. He takes photos of different compositions, and returns to his studio in Kensington (a nineteenth-century artist’s house with huge windows to let in the natural light), decides on a scene and sketches it on canvas. After that the sittings begin. How many and how long they last depends on simple factors such as the size of the canvas and the number of subjects, who will probably sit separately. For a large picture, he normally takes a few visits of three days each, working from morning to evening. A 150cm x 100cm oil painting will cost around £20,000. “People prefer oil,” he says. “It doesn’t fade and has more body to it than watercolour.” In other words, it feels like it will last. People always have, and always will, want family portraits in the most lasting medium because they want to capture a moment that is fleeting – when the sons and daughters are


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small, or when there are three generations together. And capturing that moment in a natural way, without dragging attention to it, is the artist’s skill. Choosing the right materials is another key. Foster always uses Winsor and Newton paint because “it just seems to fit”. His studio sports large bundles of brushes – some the length of a pencil, others as long as his outstretched arm. For the bolder strokes he uses round brushes with a point made from stiff Chinese hog-hair. For more delicate work it is smaller sablehair brushes. “Sable is much finer and softer so it’s better for detail,” he explains. He favours the traditional approach of staying with his easel, instead of running back and forth between the sitter and easel, as many younger artists do, meaning his paintings are smooth, even and unified. Like his historical forebears, he chooses beauty over raw energy.

But why do people choose Foster? It is often because his style is suited to the surroundings in which the painting will hang. “It’s what they want in their house,” he says. “Not everybody wants the high-key photographic work. If you’ve got Van Dycks on the wall, you don’t want a David Hockney next to it. One would be dark and soft, and the other bright and harsh.” And how does he capture the essence of his subjects? He thinks for a moment. “As Sargent said, you don’t need to try to bring out someone’s character. It comes out in the way they dress, the way they stand. You make them look the best they can, but their character will come out on its own.”

This spread: Left top: Portrait by Richard Foster Left middle: Once contacted by a potential subject, Foster will normally visit them in their home to set the composition Above: Family portrait ‘Rockingham’ by Foster

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ALL THINGS THAT GLITTER Words by Julia Zaltzman

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assementerie is the art of creating elaborate trimmings such as tassels, fringes and ornamental cords, often embellished with beads, for decoration on furniture and clothing. Originating from the French word for lace ‘passement’, the Guild of Passementiers was founded in France in the 16th century. Back then, an apprenticeship of seven years was required to become a master, and the long, rich tradition of a skilled artisanal approach remains the benchmark of this extraordinarily detailed product today. Showcasing its diverse range of bejewelled button tufts, ornate trimmings and delicate ropes at its London-based showroom in Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour, the heart of Nada Designs’ lies at its factory in the silk regions of Egypt, where the tradition of passementerie has been passed through generations. “Each product is handmade to the tiniest detail; every thread is handprepared,” says founder of Nada Designs Sherine Awadallah. “Our craftsmen train for several years as apprentices, and each one will have a specialty; from dying the silk to carving a core of wood, or weaving the intricate braids. They work as a team to bring the elements together.” In addition to using mercerised cotton, Egyptian silk, and fine wool to create one-of-a-kind designs, a local yarn made with the seeds of the cotton flower to give it a shiny effect is a particular favourite thanks to its natural qualities, says Awadallah. “We take a very holistic approach to production, where everything is manual and organic. In place of machines we prefer the finish of a handloom to produce a superior product.”

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Offering a choice between contemporary and more traditional designs, Awadallah works closely with the client to determine the required size, shape, colour and lustre in order to conceive something truly bespoke, a crafted work of art that co-ordinates perfectly with any design scheme. Often requested to carry out work on board superyachts, the variety of styles available, from the very traditional to the uber modern make it the perfect finishing touch of luxury, she says: “The traditional designs are often more ornate and decorative. We look to archives from palaces such as Versailles to get this look, and often more is more! Contemporary designs, on the other hand, tend to be more paired back with a focus on a texture or material.” Having started the business as a young mother using her family home as a base, Awadallah soon realised that there was a large market for bespoke passementerie, the bolder the better, and her vision was transformed from an idea on paper to a world of crystals and silks, where the creations of each designer are given a lease of life and turned into something exciting yet delicate, unimaginably beautiful and yet tangible.

While most client requests are to add a flourish of detail or a finishing touch to an already completed piece of furniture, some of the more memorable commissions are perhaps a little more adventurous with their brief, says Awadallah. “We once filled an Arabic tent to the brim with striking and elaborate fringes and tassels,” she recalls animatedly. “It was full of colour, and boasted the most intricate design, beautifully decorated with crystal beads, diamanté and amazing oversized tiebacks. The concept was inspired from an old movie that I watched as a girl, and it was incredible to be able to bring a fantasy like that to life.”

This page: Top: Passementerie is the art of creating elaborate trimmings


N AV I G AT I N G T H E W O R L D O F F I N E W I N E F O R COLLEC TOR S AND CONNOISSEUR S Justerini & Brooks. Portfolio, expertise and personal service. Justerinis.com


Deep and precious With global fish catches decreasing by a rate of two million every year for the past two decades, the aim of global marine charities right now is to focus on smaller areas of the ocean. Words by Rob Crossan

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ost people are largely unaware of the importance of the role of the ocean. With every breath you take, every drop of ocean you drink, the ocean is there as a primary source.” So says Dr Sylvia Earle, known to many as ‘Her Deepness’ and one of the most prominent and experienced divers and campaigners at the forefront of the immense challenges facing the world’s oceans and their inhabitants. Marine charities are booming right now with at least 30 trusts and campaign groups existent in the UK alone and these are only the ones that focus on dolphins and whales. But, as Charles Clover, executive chairman of the Blue Marine Foundation explains, the survival of the ‘big beasts’ of the ocean is far from the only critical issue.

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“The most destructive daily impact upon marine ecosystems in most places is caused by over-fishing, which wipes out millions of organisms every day,” he explains. “We think that by making ecosystems more resilient, by reducing fishing pressure and destructive fishing methods and by creating marine reserves, the oceans should or will be able to evolve to meet the challenges, just as healthy coral reefs in remote places such as the Chagos have proved more resilient to coral bleaching. Other than ocean acidification, which is the elephant in the room, most pollution sources are relatively local, whereas over-fishing is global and presently still the most destructive influence upon the marine ecosystems.”


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Previous spread: A shoal of Bigeye Trevally fish Opposite page: A view of Port Roig in the Balearic Islands This page: Top: Underwater photo of fish Photograph: Paul Colley Bottom: Charles Clover, shot by Mattias Klum, Nat Geo filmmaker and photographer, in the Pelagos whale sanctuary

With global fish catches decreasing by a rate of two million every year for the past two decades, the focus for both the Blue Marine Foundation and for Dr Sylvia Earle’s charity Mission Blue has been to focus on smaller areas of the ocean. Earle recently announced her first ‘Hope Spot’, an attempt to create a global network of marine protected areas to safeguard 20 per cent of the world’s oceans by 2020. Late last year, the Balearic Islands became the debut ‘Hope Spot’ as Earle explains: “It’s a concept that pays dividends. It’s a step in the direction of expanded protection that is sanctioned by rules and regulations or government action of some sort, but we don’t have to wait for that to make a difference. When people care, good things happen and that is what’s happening here with the work of so many people. Some areas are officially designated but we must grow that concept and share the benefits of protecting the assets of the Balearic Islands and the ocean at large and understanding how they connect back to people in every walk of life.” For Clover and the Blue Marine Foundation, the focus is on protecting the oceans surrounding Britain’s 14 overseas territories ranging from the Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic to Pitcairn Island in the Pacific. These islands and their surrounding waters cover an area 30 times the size of the UK and contain 94 per cent of the UK’s biodiversity.

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DEEP AND PRECIOUS

“We achieved a commitment to create ‘blue belts’ around the OTs in the 2015 Conservative manifesto which is now a government commitment,” says Clover. “Obviously a lot needs to be done to flesh out what a ‘blue belt’ means for territories with widely differing populations and problems but the initial focus is upon Pitcairn in the Pacific and Ascension in the Atlantic, where we brokered a deal that will create the largest marine reserve in the Atlantic, hopefully in 2017.” Alongside dynamic innovations like these lies the work of the more established marine charities such as the Marine Conservation Trust. Their current campaigns include the Great British Beach Clean, which shows an alarming rise in rubbish on the shores of the UK. As Clare Fischer from the Trust explains, this is becoming a major issue in their pioneering work. “We have asked retailers and manufacturers to stop putting microbeads (tiny bits of plastic) in personal care products like shower gels and toothpaste,” says Fischer, and in June 2016 the UK government finally heard these pleas and have agreed to a ban. “Along with a rise in these tiny bits of plastics we have also seen an increase in sewage related debris on our beaches – things that are being flushed down the loo rather than binned, like nappies and cotton bud sticks. Plastic bottles have also increased and we are supporting the introduction of a nationwide bottle deposit return scheme.”

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Having managed to create around 50 marine conservation zones themselves in UK waters, it would appear that an incremental approach to improving marine life is the approach that is getting the most tangible results. But what can one individual do immediately in order to make a contribution without dedicating their lives to it? Fischer has a few pieces of advice: “We urge the public to question where their fish is coming from and avoid relying on what have been seen as safe choices – the top five of salmon, cod, tuna, prawns and haddock. There

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are lots of great alternatives. A few more good tips are to look for the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) logo and avoid eating deep water fish and sharks. “We would urge everyone to have a go at our Plastic Challenge – giving up single use plastic. It’s a tough one but even if you only manage a few days it highlights just how reliant we are on the stuff that has created gyres of rubbish in our oceans. So if we stopped flushing the wrong things down the loo, used products that didn’t contain microbeads and only ate fish from sustainable sources, our seas may just start to recover.”


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Over at the Blue Marine Foundation, Clover’s attempts to raise funds are now including the superyacht community in the form of the Blue Marine Yacht Club, which encourages yacht owners to give something back and ensure that there are still pristine and special areas of the world’s oceans left to visit. As for more subtle changes we can all make, he is typically forthright.

Despite some deeply disturbing statistics, there are signs of hope that perhaps we still do have time to save the destruction of our most valuable resource. As Sylvia Earle herself said last year: “We’re the only creatures on the planet that have the capacity, first of all to change the planet, and secondly, to know what’s going on and then to do something about it. But first you have to know.”

“What each of us can do is support marine reserves and make sure that we buy only sustainably-caught seafood as defined by the Marine Conservation Society's Good Fish Guide in the UK or by the Monterey Bay Aquarium guide in the US,” he insists. “We advise people to use the Good Fish Guide, which rates fish on its sustainability. Green rated is Fish to Eat, red rated is Fish to Avoid. We work hard with the industry to promote better labelling and supply chain transparency.”

For more information, to get involved or to donate please visit the following sites: www.mcsuk.org www.mission-blue.org www.bluemarinefoundation.com

Opposite page: White chalk cliffs and aerial view of the Beachy Head lighthouse Eastbourne East Sussex-England This page: The aim of global marine charities is to ensure that there are still pristine and special areas of the world’s oceans left.

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Previous spread: A shoal of Bigeye Trevally fish Opposite page: A view of Port Roig in the Balearic Islands This page: Top: Underwater photo of fish Photograph: Paul Colley

"We’re the only creatures on the planet that have the capacity, first of all to change the planet, and secondly, to know what’s going on and then to do something about it." With global fish catches decreasing by a rate of two million every year for the past two decades, the focus for both the Blue Marine Foundation and for Dr Sylvia Earle’s charity Mission Blue has been to focus on smaller areas of the ocean. Earle recently announced her first ‘Hope Spot’, an attempt to create a global network of marine protected areas to safeguard 20 per cent of the world’s oceans by 2020. Late last year, the Balearic Islands became the debut ‘Hope Spot’ as Earle explains: “It’s a concept that pays dividends. It’s a step in the direction of expanded protection that is sanctioned by rules and regulations or government action of some sort, but we don’t have to wait for that to make a difference. When people care, good things happen and that is what’s happening here with the work of so many people. Some areas are officially designated but we must grow that concept and share the benefits of protecting the assets of the Balearic Islands and the ocean at large and understanding how they connect back to people in every walk of life.” For Clover and the Blue Marine Foundation, the focus is on protecting the oceans surrounding Britain’s 14 overseas territories ranging from the Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic to Pitcairn Island in the Pacific. These islands and their surrounding waters cover an area 30 times the size of the UK and contain 94 per cent of the UK’s biodiversity.

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Bottom: Charles Clover, shot by Mattias Klum, Nat Geo filmmaker and photographer, in the Pelagos whale sanctuary


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“We achieved a commitment to create ‘blue belts’ around the OTs in the 2015 Conservative manifesto which is now a government commitment,” says Clover. “Obviously a lot needs to be done to flesh out what a ‘blue belt’ means for territories with widely differing populations and problems but the initial focus is upon Pitcairn in the Pacific and Ascension in the Atlantic, where we brokered a deal that will create the largest marine reserve in the Atlantic, hopefully in 2017.” Alongside dynamic innovations like these lies the work of the more established marine charities such as the Marine Conservation Trust. Their current campaigns include the Great British Beach Clean, which shows an alarming rise in rubbish on the shores of the UK. As Clare Fischer from the Trust explains, this is becoming a major issue in their pioneering work. “We have asked retailers and manufacturers to stop putting microbeads (tiny bits of plastic) in personal care products like shower gels and toothpaste,” says Fischer, and in June 2016 the UK government finally heard these pleas and have agreed to a ban. “Along with a rise in these tiny bits of plastics we have also seen an increase in sewage related debris on our beaches – things that are being flushed down the loo rather than binned, like nappies and cotton bud sticks. Plastic bottles have also increased and we are supporting the introduction of a nationwide bottle deposit return scheme.”

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Having managed to create around 50 marine conservation zones themselves in UK waters, it would appear that an incremental approach to improving marine life is the approach that is getting the most tangible results. But what can one individual do immediately in order to make a contribution without dedicating their lives to it? Fischer has a few pieces of advice: “We urge the public to question where their fish is coming from and avoid relying on what have been seen as safe choices – the top five of salmon, cod, tuna, prawns and haddock. There

are lots of great alternatives. A few more good tips are to look for the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) logo and avoid eating deep water fish and sharks. “We would urge everyone to have a go at our Plastic Challenge – giving up single use plastic. It’s a tough one but even if you only manage a few days it highlights just how reliant we are on the stuff that has created gyres of rubbish in our oceans. So if we stopped flushing the wrong things down the loo, used products that didn’t contain microbeads and only ate fish from sustainable sources, our seas may just start to recover.”

"Most people are largely unaware of the importance of the role of the ocean. With every breath you take, every drop of ocean you drink, the ocean is there as a primary source."

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DEEP AND PRECIOUS

Over at the Blue Marine Foundation, Clover’s attempts to raise funds are now including the superyacht community in the form of the Blue Marine Yacht Club, which encourages yacht owners to give something back and ensure that there are still pristine and special areas of the world’s oceans left to visit. As for more subtle changes we can all make, he is typically forthright.

Despite some deeply disturbing statistics, there are signs of hope that perhaps we still do have time to save the destruction of our most valuable resource. As Sylvia Earle herself said last year: “We’re the only creatures on the planet that have the capacity, first of all to change the planet, and secondly, to know what’s going on and then to do something about it. But first you have to know.”

“What each of us can do is support marine reserves and make sure that we buy only sustainably-caught seafood as defined by the Marine Conservation Society's Good Fish Guide in the UK or by the Monterey Bay Aquarium guide in the US,” he insists. “We advise people to use the Good Fish Guide, which rates fish on its sustainability. Green rated is Fish to Eat, red rated is Fish to Avoid. We work hard with the industry to promote better labelling and supply chain transparency.”

For more information, to get involved or to donate please visit the following sites: www.mcsuk.org www.mission-blue.org www.bluemarinefoundation.com

Opposite page: White chalk cliffs and aerial view of the Beachy Head lighthouse Eastbourne East Sussex-England This page: The aim of global marine charities is to ensure that there are still pristine and special areas of the world’s oceans left.

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Design in motion With a constantly expanding client list and a penchant for interiors, Sabrina of Sabrina Monte-Carlo is riding high on the waves of design. Words by Rob Crossan

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abrina Monteleone is a woman in demand. From the minuscule principality of Monaco on the French Riviera, her interiors company Sabrina Monte-Carlo is, at any one time, working on over 40 projects for uber luxurious chalets, private jets and beach houses. But the majority of her dynamic business is in yachting, namely keeping abreast of the latest trends and demands in the luxury yachting world and designing the interiors and exteriors of some of the most exquisite yachts on the planet. “I grew up around yachts and there have been some big changes in what people desire,” explains Monteleone. “The yachts get bigger and bigger every year. They’re more like houses in their dimensions at the higher end now, so my clients want everything from a dining room to a hair salon to a gym. This is a huge change from five or six years ago.”

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As a born and bred Monegasque (the title for a native of Monaco), you would expect Monteleone to have yachting hardwired into her DNA. Her marriage with Norwegian yacht designer Espen Oeino, plus the fact that her parents worked in fashion, have all combined to create her vision to take yacht design into realms of taste and quality that continue to innovate and surprise. As she explains, interior design for yachts that really makes a mark takes more than just a love of being by the sea. “It’s really all about detail, detail, detail with the clients that we have,” says Monteleone. “We work with stylists, designers and decorators, so that when the client’s yacht is finished the furnishings, tables and chairs all fit together. Everything from the sofa to the soap has to be the right combination. What we do is a real one-stop-shop.”


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Setting up her first store 19 years ago, Monteleone initially concentrated on stocking high-end fashion brands and homeware. However, struggling to find elegant outdoor furniture for the terrace of her own apartment led her to begin her adventures in yachting interiors and exteriors. “A few years ago outdoor furniture often looked rather cheap,” says Monteleone. “Step-by-step we’ve been expanding what we do so that we can really focus on exterior furniture and tableware; and now every element of a yacht both inside and outside as well. “Luckily, there is an increasing number of designers today who are able to create products on a level that is compatible with the interiors of some of the most fantastic yachts – this didn’t always used to be the case. The expansion of new, beautiful fabrics for outdoors is fantastic and I’m always keeping my eye out for new tableware in particular. It’s a lifetime pursuit really, but nothing works unless it fits together with everything else.”

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Monteleone’s meticulous eye for detail and her exhaustive research for the latest innovations means that her client list is constantly expanding. When asked about the most recent project that she’s worked on that has given her the most amount of pride, she instantly exhorts her company’s work on a luxury yacht in Montenegro. “We just finished work on the 70m Heesen Galactica Super Nova, and were in Montenegro for the photoshoot. It’s a great combination as we did absolutely everything inside and out. It’s extreme in its elegance and its quality but you still feel like you’re on holiday when on board. It’s finding that way of combining a sense of home with that insistence on quality which our clients like – very light but still with warmth. There were only three of us working on this project and I really enjoy that as we can be so close in unifying our vision for the boat in an intimate way. That always yields the best results.”

Previous spread: Top: 70m Heesen Galactica Super Nova sun deck Bottom: Ready for entertaining in a relaxed setting Photographs: ©Yvan Grubski This page: The Master Suite on board the spectacular Ester III Photograph: ©Klaus Jordan Opposite page: Top: Luxurious cushions with on trend Tropical prints Bottom: Sabrina Monteleone Photographs: ©Yvan Grubski


DESIGN IN MOTION

“It’s really all about detail, detail, detail with the clients that we have,” says Monteleone.

Another project close to Monteleone’s heart is the spectacular Ester III, now currently for sale with Fraser Yachts. Designed by her husband and launched by Lurssen in 2014, Monteleone worked closely with him, the owner and the interior designer, Reymond Langton, to fit out the interior. She took care of all the accessories and loose items, as well as all exterior furnishings from Paola Lenti. In addition to new builds, Monteleone specialises in updating yachts that are sold on the brokerage market. Monteleone is adept at quickly and easily giving a yacht a completely new look by updating the soft furnishings and loose items on board, all of which can be done in a matter of weeks and very cost effectively.

Having decorated over 90 yachts to date, Monteleone’s focus on quality outdoor fabric has put her in the vanguard, one which luxury brands are finally catching up with. “All the brands are doing them now, 10 years ago there was nothing,” she says. “Tropical prints are huge this year, as are stripes, flowers and sea shell designs. I find it really fun to mix and match, and with the help of modern technology all these materials are also resistant to water, humidity and salt, as well as being anti-flammable.” Being able to harness unique and individual brands that her clients request and which she then combines with other premium designers is yet another element of the business that Monteleone enjoys. “For outdoor furniture I love to combine Paola Lenti’s furniture with more ornate cushions from Pierre Frey or Manuel Canovas,” she says. “I also adore Matthew Williamson’s Cubano collection with its crazy flamingo prints!” In a demanding landscape where personalised customisation is so pivotal, the sheer range of requests that Monteleone receives is, as she admits, one of the most stimulating aspects of her career. And, unsurprisingly, as someone born, bred and now married in Monaco, she has no plans to leave one of the international hubs of the yachting world anytime soon. “Monaco is the capital of yachting. It means that clients are very happy to come and visit us as it’s such a pleasant place to be all year round. It's luck that I’m born and bred in Monaco but the work is so rewarding that I really just couldn’t be better placed.”

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NEWS TAKING THE HELM Fraser Yachts welcomed Raphael Sauleau, as the new CEO of the company earlier this year. Prior to joining the group, Raphael worked for 15 years at VShips, the world’s largest global maritime service provider, first as Executive Director of Crew Operations for the worldwide leisure division and then in the Cargo Division where he was in charge of 60 shore staff and 6,500 crew members. In 2013 he became CEO of a family office, operating several properties for the Parkview Private Collection in St Tropez, Monaco, London and Beijing plus several yachts including Saluzi. Upon joining Fraser Yachts, Raphael said: “People are definitely our company’s greatest asset. It doesn’t make any difference whether the product is cars, jewellery or yachts. A company is only as good as its people. These initial months meeting our team around the world has really comforted me with the fact that Fraser Yachts’ strength lies within its workforce. It is not a coincidence that we have been recognised as the leading brokerage company for the last six years. That being said, our industry is extremely competitive so we must strengthen our market share for our all-round services and be perceived as the reference in yachting going forward. All our systems, processes and overall attitude must be geared towards this one and ultimate goal to position ourselves ahead of the pack for the years to come, making transparency, ethicality and attention to detail as part of our DNA” Roberto Giorgi, the Executive Chairman, spent a considerable amount of time looking for the right candidate and wanted to ensure that the new CEO would continue to build on the company’s success as the world’s leading luxury yacht services provider. Roberto said: “Having worked with Raphael for many years, I have always appreciated his work commitment, creative attitude, team spirit, ethics and passion. My goal will be to coach, guide and mentor Raphael and ensure that he continues to develop the new strategies for the company that I have been working on with the Board of Directors for the past 18 months.

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ADDITIONS TO THE CHARTER FLEET

NEW ARRIV ALS 2016

The Fraser Yachts charter fleet welcomed a number of impressive additions this year. For any enquiries, please contact yachtcharter@ fraseryachts.com VICTORY, 51m

ANTARA, 46m

GLOBAL, 67m

VICTORIA , 43m

EMOTION, 42m

SOLLEONE, 35m

QUID PRO QUO, 30m

SOLLEONE III, 27m

FINISH LINE, 36m

WHERE’S WALDO, 30m

WHEELS , 49m


FRASER YACHTS NEWS

ACHIEVEMENTS – OHANA The following week the St. Barth’s Bucket took place and Ohana finished 2nd in the Grandes Dames des Mers (Class E) class.

NEW COLLEAGUES Fraser Yachts continues to grow with two new additions to its offices in Europe Joining the sales department in Monaco in 2016, Luca Lucheschi has many years of experience in the yachting industry. Born in Rome, Luca grew up in the Italian Alps, where he cultivated his passion for sports and the outdoors. Luca studied in both Rome and New York before graduating in communications and marketing in 2003. Soon thereafter, Luca joined the iconic Finnish sailing yacht builder Nautor’s Swan where he worked for over 12 years. During his time with Nautor’s, Luca held various key managerial positions in sales, marketing and technical support, ultimately serving as Nautor’s Commercial Director for the last five years. A passionate yachtsman, Luca has a global network of clients and industry professionals, as well as a clear vision of the marketplace.

Joining the Palma office in early 2016 as a charter broker, Fiona hails from Dublin, Ireland, and grew up sailing in Dublin Bay and the Northern Loughs. She began her career as an Oceanographer in Bermuda before her passion for yachting soon took her out to sea again, and she went to work on yachts (predominantly sailing yachts) for 15 years as Chef, Mate and Purser. Fiona has an extensive knowledge of yachts as well as many fantastic cruising areas including the Eastern and Western Mediterranean, the Caribbean, the Bahamas, East Coast USA and Pacific Mexico. Her sailing career has seen her race in various Superyacht regattas around the world. Her experience afloat gives her great insight into putting together the perfect holiday for clients.

Photograph: Stuart Pearce

There was no stopping 49m sailing yacht Ohana this year as she participated in a number of regattas in both the Mediterranean and the Caribbean. Starting with the Loro Piana Carribean Superyacht Regatta which took place in March in the stunning waters off the coast of Virgin Gorda, Ohana got off to a tricky start but excelled on the second and third day of racing, resulting in placing third overall in her class.

In June, she returned to the Mediterranean where she took part in the Loro Piana Superyacht Regatta held on the Costa Smeralda in Sardinia. On the second day of racing, stronger than expected winds made for a solid test but Ohana and her team, led by legendary Mauro Pelaschier, managed to secure the lead on this day winning by over four minutes. Overall an exciting regatta where Ohana collected the Loro Piana Trophy for third place in the Grande Superyacht Sub-Class C and came in sixth place in the Superyacht Class A.

FRASER YACHTS OPENS NEW YACHT MANAGEMENT DIVISION IN PALMA

In April, Fraser Yachts welcomed over 80 clients and Captains to a private event during the Palma Superyacht Show to celebrate the opening of a new yacht management division in the Palma office. The service is operated by long standing members of the Fraser Yachts Monaco yacht management department and offers the full range of administrative and technical support services. The new department works closely with the sales and charter divisions already wellestablished in the Palma office, focusing on clients throughout the Balearic Islands and Barcelona. Speaking about the decision to start offering the Yacht Management service directly from the Palma office Harald Van Exem, Yacht Management Services Director for Fraser Yachts commented “It was the next logical step for us, many of our yachts are based in Palma throughout the year and others have regular refit work done there or in Barcelona during the winter so we wanted to have people based locally to allow us to work with our clients more closely and efficiently.” The event was hosted at the Mar de Nudos restaurant, right in the heart of the Palma Superyacht Show. Guests enjoyed drinks and canapés with the back drop of over 60 superyachts on display.

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UNIQUE EXPERIENCES Throughout the year Fraser Yachts has offered a number of bespoke experiences to clients. Starting with a trip to St. Moritz Polo in January, guests were flown by private jet to watch the polo matches on ice before enjoying a day’s skiing around the beautiful Swiss alpine resort.

In June, a select group flew to Montenegro where they had dinner on board Deja Too (currently for sale with Fraser Yachts) before retiring to the stunning Regent Porto Montenegro. The next day guests cruised around the Montenegrin coast before embarking on a private jewellery shopping experience and a private dinner with Her Royal Highness Princess Altinaï of Montenegro. Many thanks to Bombardier and Luux Media for their assistance with these truly unique experiences. Over in the States, Fraser Yachts was delighted to sponsor the 2016 La Jolla Concours d’Elegance, an elite automotive event that raises funds for two local charities. Fraser Yachts California was proud to sponsor the ‘Aston Martin San Diego Midnight in the Garden of Good & Evil’ party, where guests spent an evening of adventure and had to choose whether to be good or evil, in line with the playful theme of the evening.

At the end of April a number of clients were flown for a truly special weekend in Geneva. Starting off with a private tour of the Roger Dubuis watch factory where they were gifted unique timepieces for the weekend, followed by a helicopter transfer to the Verbier Glacier for an alfresco lunch in the snow. After lunch, guests returned for tea with Mr Dubuis and a private viewing of The Discovery Collection. Guests were then transferred by Riva boats across the lake for a private dinner hosted by Fraser Yachts at Le Floris restaurant. The next day, guests enjoyed a range of beauty treatments with L.RAPHAEL before returning home.

THE DJ DISPENSARY YACHT EDITION Earlier this year Fraser Yachts announced their partnership with The DJ Dispensary, offering a unique musical experience to clients. The DJ Dispensary is the world’s first company to create tailor-made luxury DJ Retreats worldwide. Always secretly dreamt of being a DJ? From the Caribbean to the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean, The DJ Dispensary Yacht Edition promises to meet you anywhere and take you

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on a ground-breaking luxury experience of both travel and music. A year round add-on package available exclusively to Fraser Yachts clients, the offer includes two private DJ Tutors and a personal Retreat Manager who will meet you on your yacht for two days of master classes where you’ll learn how to work the decks, mix music and wow the crowd. On the first evening the DJ Dispensary will provide the entertainment whilst the next night you will be able to show off your personal set to family and friends on board and even show off your skills to those overseas with a ‘live’ stream of your set. Lisa Peck, Global Marketing Manager at Fraser said “We are thrilled to be teaming up with The DJ Dispensary for this unique partnership. We’re always looking for new ways to improve our clients’ experience and we think they will love learning to be a DJ and impressing their friends and family whilst enjoying the experience of a luxury yacht.”


FRASER YACHTS NEWS

SPRING SHOW ROUND UP The spring show season is always a busy and exciting time of the annual calendar, and this year was no exception. In the US, first up was the Yacht & Brokerage Show in Miami Beach where Fraser Yachts exhibited three yachts: 43m Copasetic, 37.8m Sunshine and 23.77m Miss America. The month of March saw the return of the Palm Beach International Boat show, where Fraser Yachts had seven yachts attending including 47.85m Cocktails, 47.55m Seven J’s, 30.48m Keiki Kai, 26.39m Vivierae, 23.77m Miss America, and 21.34m Nimbus.

Palma Superyacht Show

Photograph: Stuart Pearce

place for the Chefs’ awards, in addition to tablescaping and service for yachts up to 39m. San Diego Boat Show

Over on the West Coast, the San Diego Boat Show was a highlight in May and Fraser Yachts displayed five yachts including 33.83m Seychelle, which then sold in July, 26.8m Altamar, 25.6m Islander, 19.8m Sam’s Place and 19.8m Mr. Chips. In June Fraser Yachts attended the Newport Charter Show, where the crew of Siete triumphed in the awards. Chef Craig scooped first prize for the Chef Competition and Chief Stewardess Mica first prize for tablescaping.

Finally Fraser Yachts was once again proud to attend the Singapore Yacht Show, which gets bigger and better every year. Three yachts of the Fraser Yachts sales fleet were attending, they were 49.54m Sensation, 43.4m Triple 8 and 34m Azul A.

Meanwhile in Europe the season began with the Palma Superyacht Show where there were six of the Fraser Yachts fleet on display: 46.2m Pink Gin, 43.44m Victoria, 34.34m Mystery, 28.75m Take 5, 25m Keanimai for sale and 37.3m Aurelia for charter. In addition, Fraser Yachts attended the MYBA Charter Show in Genoa and displayed four superyachts, 51.8m Victory, 43.6m Latiko, 42.6m Emotion and 33.5m Heliad II. Here too, the fleet excelled in the awards with Latiko receiving 1st place for tablescaping and service as well as the Clean Plate & Best Pasta award in the 40-49m category while Heliad II took 2nd

Singapore Yacht Show

Photograph: BlueiProd

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THE CAPTAINS' DINNER Held for the second year in a row at the new Yacht Club de Monaco, the 2015 Captain’s Dinner hosted well over 400 Captains and industry professionals celebrating the end of the long summer season. One of the most talked about events of the Monaco Yacht Show, the 15th edition of the Captains’ Dinner saw the Charter Captain of the Year Award go to Rob Shelnut of Lady Sara, the crew and Captain of Latitude won the award for Best Charter Crew (yacht over 50m) and the crew and Captain of Aurelia won the award for Best Charter Crew (yacht under 50m). The Awards were presented by Roberto Giorgi, Chairman of Fraser Yachts and guest of honour, Captain Nick Sloane, the salvage master who successfully raised the Costa Concordia in 2014. The 2015 edition also saw the introduction of a new award, the Roberto Migliaccio Award, in honour of the late Fraser Yachts Technical Superintendent Roberto Migliaccio which sees a Captain, employee or someone working closely with Fraser Yachts awarded for their outstanding level of service, loyalty and dedication. The winner of the inaugural Roberto Migliaccio Award for Service and Dedication was Ferdinando Tarquini, Captain of Force Blue, who has worked for the same yacht and Owner for over ten years. The award was presented by guest of honour Regina Catrambone, co-founder of MOAS – the Migrant Offshore Aid Station which operates a 40m expedition vessel equipped with life-saving equipment that saved over 3,000 lives in just 60 days last summer. Following the Awards the guests enjoyed a delicious feast and then the music was turned up and the dance floor was filled as guests partied the night away until it was time to go home with an overflowing goodie bag. The generous sponsors of the 2015 edition included Orbis Yacht, Ulysse Nardin, Port Adriano, Pride Mega Yachts, VSF Group, Agents by Catalano, Lusben, Peninsula Petroleum, Monaco Engineers, DIVA, Mercedes-Benz, Global Marine Travel, MHG Insurance, Boutsen Design, Davidoff Cigars, and Deco-Flamme.

Captain Nick Sloane, Roberto Giorgi, Captain Rob Shelnut of Lady Sara, Susanne Hurni (Ulysse Nardin) and Lisa Peck

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Roberto Giorgi and staff from the YCM

The team from Diva

Captain Nick Sloane and guest

Regina Catrambone, Founder of MOAS

Guy Booth Captain of Aurelia and Olivia Pasquali

Roberto Giorgi and Domenica and Peter Redford

Entertainment from Port Adriano


FRASER YACHTS NEWS

Tim Davey and colleagues from ISS GMT

Gino Bonnici, Matthew Gusman, Gina Robertson, Regina Catrambone (MOAS) and guest

Captain Nick Sloane, Daniela de Marco, Roberto Giorgi and Lisa Peck

Captain Nick Sloane, Roberto Giorgi, Captain Ferdinando Tarquini of Force Blue and Regina Catrambone

Corinne Demougin and Patricia Codere

Natalia Langsdale and the team from Boutsen

Florence Xing and guests

All the winners and sponsors

The team from Pride

The Migliaccio family

Jessica and Mike Busacca, Lisa Peck and the owners of Lady Sara

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THE ANNUAL DOCKSIDE SOIRÉE The 2015 annual Dockside Soiree took place at the Fraser Yachts display at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show and played host to the inaugural Yacht Management Captain Awards, which recognised two Captains for their hard work and dedication. Captain Giles Smith of Helios 2 and Captain Luca Mosca of the exAnnaeva were the co-recipients of the award and both walked away with a Marine Diver Chronometre Ulysse Nardin Watch, a Weekend in a Bentley experience plus a Bentley Weekender Bag provided by Bentley Motors, and 10 days of free berthing courtesy of IGY Marinas, among other prizes. Over 200 VIP guests enjoyed delicious hors d’oeuvres and cocktails while attending the Soiree, set against the glamorous backdrop of superyachts at the Fraser Yachts display. The night could not have been possible without the generosity of all sponsors and partners, include Ulysse Nardin, Bentley Motors, IGY Marinas, Global Marine Travel, MHG Insurance Brokers, The Charter Store, ManageMyVessel.com, The Macallan, Snow Leopard Vodka and Robb Report.

Mike Busacca, Lisa Peck, Captain Luca Mosca, Giulio Chezzi (Ulysse Nardin) and Roberto Giorgi

The winning Captains and sponsors

Guests

Julia Fedorova, Michael Selter, Randi Myers and Josh Gulbranson

Mike Busacca and Roberto Giorgi

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FRASER YACHTS NEWS

Jessica and Mike Busacca

Guests

Guests

Guests

Winning Captains Giles Smith and Luca Mosca

Guests

Mike Busacca, Lisa Peck, Captain Giles Smith, Giulio Chezzi (Ulysse Nardin) and Roberto Giorgi

Patricia Codere, Clive McCartney and the team from IGY Marinas

Neal Esterly and guests

Vassilis Fotilas and Roberto Giorgi

The team from The Charter Store

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SUPERYACHT GALLERY A selection of the world’s finest yachts available for sale and charter.

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motor yachts for sale

107.4m

ULYSSES price usd 195,000,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

352’04”

30 15 42 15 knots

builder built beam draft

kleven verft 2016 18m / 59’01” 5.11m / 16’09”

“Built for expedition style cruising with 8,500nm range and amazing sea keeping capability.”

2


motor yachts for sale

41.9m

STAR price usd 13,500,000

137’06”

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

12 5 9 12 knots

builder built beam draft

kingship marine ltd 2012 / 2014 8.4m / 27’07 ” 2.64m / 8’08”

not for sale to us residents while in us waters.

AE CAP D’ANTIBES price eur 23,500,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

12 6 13 15 knots

builder built beam draft

56m

183´09” benetti 2007 10.4m / 34’01” 3.4m / 11’02”

3


motor yachts for sale

56m

ULYSSES price eur 29,800,000 also available for charter

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

183’09” 12 6 13 15 knots

builder built beam draft

benetti 2012 10.4m / 34’01” 3.6m / 11’10”

see details on inside front cover

not for sale or charter to us residents while in us waters.

52.3m

LADY NAG NAG price eur 25,950,000

4

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

12 6 13 13 knots

171’07”

builder built beam draft

amels 2008 9m / 29’06” 3.35m / 11’00”


motor yachts for sale

“The most exceptional and striking Lurssen available for sale on the market today.” Raphael Sauleau, CEO Fraser Yachts

65.99m

ESTER III price eur 79,500,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

216’06”

12 6 17 14 knots

builder built beam draft

lurssen 2014 11.6m / 38’01” 3.60m / 11’10” 5


motor yachts for sale

46.71m

MY SECRET price eur 22,500,000 vat paid

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

153’03”

12 5 9 14.5 knots

builder built beam draft

heesen 2012 8.83m / 29’00” 2.85m / 9’04”

see details on inside front cover

VICTORIA DEL MAR price usd 26,800,000

6

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

14 7 11 15 knots

builder built beam draft

49.91m

163’09”

delta marine 2006 10.08m / 33’01” 2.92m / 9’07 ”


motor yachts for sale

47.85m

COCKTAILS price usd 18,500,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

157’00”

12 5 9 14 knots

builder built beam draft

trinity 2004 / 2012 8.79m / 28’10” 2.36m / 7’09”

47.76m

HANSE EXPLORER price eur 13,500,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

12 7 18 11 knots

156’08”

builder built beam draft

fassmer 2006 10.4m / 34’01” 4.3m / 14’01” 7


motor yachts for sale

35.07m

KUIKILA price eur 8,900,000 vat paid

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

115’01”

10 4 5 42 kn / 52 kn

builder built beam draft

pershing 2011 / 2015 7.2m / 23’07 ” 1.6m / 5’03”

40.11m

DIVINE price eur 14,800,000

40.23m

ZAZOU I price eur 16,900,000 vat paid

8

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

132’00”

11 5 7 14 knots

builder built beam draft

benetti 2014 8.18m / 26’10” 2.24m / 7’04”

131’07”

11 5 7 15 knots

builder built beam draft

palumbo 2016 8.2m / 26’11” 1.93m / 6’04”


yachts for sale

46.22m

PINK GIN price eur 12,900,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

151’08”

10 5 6 10 knots

builder built beam draft

baltic yachts 2006 / 2011 8.45m / 27’09” 3.75m / 12’04”

48.01m

NATIVA price eur 14,900,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

10 5 8 10 knots

builder built beam draft

arzana navi 2013 9.8m / 32’02” 5m / 16’05 ”

36.88m

+LEJOS price eur 8,400,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

157’06”

121´00”

12 5 7 12 knots

builder built beam draft

benetti 2010 8.13m / 26’08” 1.96m / 6’05 ”

not for sale to us residents while in us waters. 9


motor yachts for sale

52m

DEJA TOO price eur 23,900,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

170’07” 12 6 13 12 knots

builder built beam draft

amels 2003 9.00m / 29’06” 3.2m / 10’06”

“Timeless AMELS, quality maintained and upgraded to perfection.”

10


motor yachts for sale

44.7m

BELUGA price eur 12,900,000 also available for charter

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

146’08”

10 5 9 11 knots

builder built beam draft

timmerman yachts 2014 9.19m / 30’02” 2.8m / 9’02”

43m

ECLIPSE price usd 10,950,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

141’01” 12 6 10 12 knots

builder built beam draft

feadship 1993 / 2008 8.41m / 27’07 ” 3m / 9’10”

see details on inside front cover

37.19m

SOL price usd 9,950,000

122’00”

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

6 3 5 26 knots

builder built beam draft

riva 2014 7.59m / 24’11” 2.13m / 7 ’00”

not for sale to us residents while in us waters. 11


motor yachts for sale

MISUNDERSTOOD price usd 19,750,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

9 4 9 35 knots

builder built beam draft

49.9m 163’09”

overmarine 2012 9.2m / 30’02” 1.98m / 6’06”

30.76m

MRS D price eur 8,900,000

51.13m

HELIOS 2 price usd 14,500,000

12

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

167’09”

14 5 12 13 knots

builder built beam draft

palmer johnson 2002 / 2015 8.64m / 28’04” 2.59m / 8’06 ”

100’11”

7 3 4 12 knots

builder built beam draft

moonen 2013 / 2016 7.5m / 24’07 ” 2.4m / 7’10”


motor yachts for sale

25.91m

MISS MOLLY price usd 1,500,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

8 4 0 10 knots

85’00”

builder built beam draft

steel kraft 2001 / 2007 6.17m / 20’03” 21.65m / 5’05”

ALASKA OF GEORGE TOWN price eur 9,900,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

10 5 8 13 knots

builder built beam draft

144’00”

shipworks brisbane 2004 / 2015 8.26m / 27’01” 2.05m / 6’09”

21.44m

YXT 20 price eur 1,950,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

43.89m

70’04”

4 2 4 14 knots

builder built beam draft

lynx 2016 5.51m / 18’01” 1.3m / 4’03”

13


yachts for charter

all prices listed are low rates for that season

51.9m

VICTORY price per week summer mediterranean eur 200,000 winter west med eur 200,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

170’03”

12 7 12 14 knots

builder built beam draft

see details on inside front cover

golden yachts 2007 / 2010 9.2m / 30’02” 2.8m / 9’02”

see details on inside front cover

51.7m

PRANA price per week summer mediterranean eur 175,000 winter caribbean eur 175,000 14

169’07”

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

10 5 9 12 knots

builder built beam draft

alloy yachts 2006 / 2016 10.2m / 33’06” 4.9m / 16’01”


motor yachts for charter

all prices listed are low rates for that season

“Offers endless possibilites for entertaining and gracious living.”

not for charter to us residents while in us waters.

57m

LADY SARA price per week summer west med eur 322,000 winter bahamas usd 250,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

187’00” 12 6 13 16 knots

builder built beam draft

trinity 2012 10.21m / 33’06” 2.44m / 8’00” 15


motor yachts for charter

all prices listed are low rates for that season

67.05m

GLOBAL price per week summer bahamas please enquire winter bahamas please enquire

220’00”

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

12 6 13 10 knots

builder built beam draft

shadow marine 1982 / 2008 12.19m / 40’00” 3.66m / 12’00”

not for charter to us residents while in us waters.

37.8m

LADY DIA specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

price per week summer west med eur 110,000 winter west med eur 110,000

30.2m

QUID PRO QUO price per week summer west med eur 55,000 winter west med eur 55,000

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specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

10 5 6 11.5 knots

99’01”

builder built beam draft

benetti 2007 7.15m / 23’05 ” 1.79m / 5’10”

124’00”

12 5 7 15 knots

builder built beam draft

ferretti 2011 / 2016 7.4m / 24’03” 2.4m / 7’10”


motor yachts for charter

all prices listed are low rates for that season

30.53m

WHERE’S WALDO price per week summer new england usd 55,000 winter caribbean usd 55,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

8 4 4 15 knots

100’02”

builder built / refit beam draft

ocean alexander 2015 7.01m / 23’00” 1.96m / 6’05”

36.58m

FINISH LINE price per week summer florida / bahamas usd 85,000 winter florida / bahamas usd 85,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

12 6 10 12 knots

8 4 6 18 knots

builder built / refit beam draft

trinity 2013 7.92m / 26’00” 1.68m / 5’06”

54.56m

CHANTAL MA VIE price per week summer new england usd 230,000 winter caribbean usd 230,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

120’00”

179´00”

builder built beam draft

feadship 1993 / 2011 8.84m / 29’00” 2.97m / 9’09”

17


motor yachts for charter

all prices listed are low rates for that season

42.6m

EMOTION price per week summer west med eur 132,000 winter caribbean eur 132,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

139’09”

11 5 9 12 knots

builder built beam draft

“Graced with a private balcony in the master stateroom, she combines a spacious sundeck, gym facilities and a fantastic array of water toys.”

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crn ancona 2007 / 2012 8.7m / 28’07” 2.4m / 7’10”


motor yachts for charter

all prices listed are low rates for that season

30.48m

KEIKI KAI price per week summer bahamas usd 60,000 winter caribbean usd 60,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

100’00”

8 4 5 10 knots

builder built beam draft

benetti 2005 / 2013 7.15 / 23’05” 1.85m / 6’01”

not for charter to us residents while in us waters.

see details on inside front cover

39.62m

FAR NIENTE price per week summer ne w england usd 130,000 winter caribbean usd 140,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

130’00”

1o 5 7 12 knots

builder built beam draft

westport 2014 7.98m / 26’02” 1.96m / 6’05” 19


motor yachts for charter

all prices listed are low rates for that season

49.99m

WHEELS price per week summer florida / bahamas usd 200,000 winter florida / bahamas usd 200,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

164’00”

12 6 8 16 knots

builder built / refit beam draft

trinity 2009 / 2015 8.53m / 28’00” 2.44m / 8’00”

43.6m

LATIKO price per week summer mediterranean eur 165,000 winter west med eur 165,000

143’01”

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

11 5 9 13.5 knots

see details on inside front cover

49.9m

EXUMA price per week summer tbc eur 189,000 winter tbc eur 189,000

163’09”

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

9 5 9 14 knots

builder built beam draft

picchiotti 2010 9.5m / 31’02” 2.3m / 7’07 ”

not for charter to us residents while in us waters. 20

builder built beam draft

benetti 2014 9.2m / 30’02” 2.60m / 8’06”


sailing yachts for charter

all prices listed are low rates for that season

35.2m

SOLLEONE price per week summer west med eur 80,000 winter west med eur 80,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

115’06”

9 4 5 1o knots

builder built beam draft

nautor’s swan 2015 8.12m / 26’08” 3.35m / 11’00”

49.7m

OHANA price per week summer mediterranean eur 150,000 winter caribbean eur 150,000

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

specifications guests cabins crew cruising speed

1o 5 8 12 knots

builder built beam draft

fitzroy yachts 2012 9.95m / 32’08” 5.6m / 18’04”

46m

ANTARA price per week summer mediterranean eur 125,000 winter caribbean usd 125,000

163´01”

150’11” 10 4 8 10 knots

builder built beam draft

perini navi 1991 / 2016 9.2m / 30’02” 3.35m / 11’00”

21


THE

DIARY NOVEMBER 2016 TO SEPTEMBER 2017

NOVEMBER 2016

FORT LAUDERDALE INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW What: Fort Lauderdale, the ‘Yachting Capital of the World’ will host the 57th annual event, which will exhibit a range from yacht builders and designers to exotic cars and superyachts. When: November 3-7 Where: Fort Lauderdale, USA www.flibs.com

29TH ANNUAL SHOWBOATS INTERNATIONAL BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS RENDEZVOUS What: Join the biggest annual yachting event for charity. Three days of festivities including a yacht hop, cocktail parties and fun-filled activities. Saturday’s formal gala features live and silent auctions and entertainment by Huey Lewis and the News. When: November 10-12 Where: Fisher Island, Florida, USA

FEBRUARY 2017

74TH GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS

NEW YORK FASHION WEEK

What: Jimmy Fallon will be the host of the 74th Golden Globe Awards. Produced by Dick Clark Productions in association with the HFPA, the Golden Globes is viewed in more than 160 countries worldwide and is one of the few awards ceremonies to include both motion picture and television achievements. When: January 8 Where: The Beverly Hilton Hotel, Los Angeles, CA www.goldenglobes.com

What: A whirlwind of style and glamour over eight champagne-fuelled days. Expect to see autumn/winter collections from the renowned and emerging designers. As you would expect from a 24-hour city like New York, the parties are extravagant and endless. When: February 9-17 www.nyfw.com

SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL FORMULA 1 ETIHAD AIRWAYS ABU DHABI GRAND PRIX What: The Yas Marina Circuit hosts a twilight event, where lighting systems smooth the transition from day to night. Wrapped around the yacht-filled marina and with all grandstands covered, Abu Dhabi rivals Monaco in terms of glamour. Running anti-clockwise, the track features nine right and eleven left turns, with top speeds of 320km/h. Practice and qualifying sessions take place on Friday and Saturday; the main race is on Sunday. When: November 25-27 Where: Yas Marina, Abu Dhabi www.formula1.com

www.bgcbc.org

DECEMBER 2016

GLOBAL SUPERYACHT FORUM

ART BASEL

What: The industry’s longest-serving and most professional conference for the world of large yachts. With the tried-andtested formula of breakout sessions, the Superyacht Events team organises smaller group discussions, introducing superyacht owners and knowledgeable personalities in the industry to bring to light those niggling ownership and industry issues that need to be confronted. When: November 16-18 Where: Amsterdam RAI Convention Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands www.superyachtevents.com

JANUARY 2017

What: The favourite winter meeting place for the international art world, the show presents premier artwork from across the globe. With miles of sandy beaches dotted with classic Art Deco architecture, worldclass art museums and a glittering nightlife, Miami Beach ranks among America’s most iconic cities. During Art Basel, over 250 of the world’s leading galleries participate, drawing over 73,000 visitors to the dynamic, cultural city. When: December 1-4 Where: Miami Beach, Florida, US www.artbasel.com/miami-beach

What: Presenting dramatic and documentary feature-length films from emerging and established artists, innovative short films, film-maker forums and panels, live music performances ranging from solo acts to film composer events, cutting-edge media installations and engaging community and student programmes, the Sundance Film Festival brings together the most original storytellers of our time. When: January 19-29 Where: Park City, Utah, USA www.sundance.org

ST MORITZ POLO WORLD CUP What: The world’s most prestigious winter polo tournament. Four high-goal teams with handicaps between 15 and 18 goals battle for the coveted trophy on the frozen surface of Lake St. Moritz; a combination of strength, elegance, speed, pride and the traditional British love of fair play. Where: St Moritz, CH When: January 27-29 www.snowpolo-stmoritz.com

CARNIVAL OF VENICE What: There is no better time for lovers of romance to discover this enchanting, watery city than during this world-famous carnival. Just as they have for hundreds of years, Venetians throw a 10-day party celebrating the end of winter and the onset of spring. Italian aristocrats and international jet-setters throw modesty aside and get dressed up in the full regalia. When: February 11-28 February www.carnevale.venezia.it

VIENNA OPERA BALL What: The Vienna Opera Ball combines the Viennese lifestyle with global allure and the modern stage management of a traditional event. It opens with a dazzling festival with artists from all over the world taking part, and goes on to include the legendary entrance of the young ladies‘ and gentlemen’s committee, the elegantly appointed ballroom, the exquisitely decorated House on the Ring, and international guests from the world of culture, business, politics, sports and science. When: February 23 Where: Vienna www.wiener-staatsoper.at

THE 89TH ACADEMY AWARDS What: The Kodak Theatre in Hollywood will once again be the place where the prestigious Oscar trophies will be handed out. To be broadcast live in the US on ‘Oscar Sunday’ on the ABC network. When: February 26 Where: Kodak Theatre, Hollywood www.oscars.org


MARCH 2017 LORO PIANA CARIBBEAN SUPERYACHT REGATTA & RENDEZVOUS What: Bringing together sail and motor yachts during a four-day event for owners, their families and friends. Organised by Yacht Club Costa Smeralda and Boat International Media. When: March 10-13 Where: Yacht Club Costa Smeralda www.boatinternational.com

THE CHELTENHAM FESTIVAL What: Four days of magic, magnificence and madness, played out by the best horses, jockeys and trainers, on a stage framed by the Cotswold Hills, to a crowd of 230,000 people having the time of their lives. Gold Cup Day is the climax of the festival. Some 20,000 bottles of champagne are served during the festival. Around 20,000 people will sit down each day to a four-course lunch, while the rest tuck into burgers and hot dogs. When: March 14-17 Where: Cheltenham Racecourse, UK www.thefestival.co.uk

DUBAI WORLD CUP

TOP MARQUES MONACO

What: The Dubai International Racing Carnival consists of nine race nights and attracts more than 450 of the finest thoroughbred horses from more than 20 countries. The pinnacle of Dubai’s racing calendar is the Dubai World Cup. Join the best of the international racing fraternity and enjoy the electrifying atmosphere of the world’s richest horse race. When: March 25 Where: Meydan Racecourse and Grandstand, Dubai www.dubairacingclub.com

What: The most exclusive car show in the world, where you’ll also find private jets, private yachts, luxury real estate, private banking, watches, rare wines and unique products of excellence from luxury brands. When: April 20-23 Where: Grimaldi Forum, 10 Avenue Princesse Grace, Monaco www.topmarquesmonaco.com

APRIL 2017

THE 22ND CHINA (SHANGHAI) INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW What: The 22nd China (Shanghai) International Boat Show is the most comprehensive and longest established boat and yacht exhibition in China. CIBS provides a platform for all the boating industry's products, but also continues to further explore opportunities to popularise a maritime lifestyle and yachting culture. When: April 26-29 Where: Shanghai, China www.boatshowchina.com

ST BARTHS BUCKET REGATTA What: The St Barths Bucket Regatta is a congenial, invitational regatta set in the Corinthian spirit. The regatta is open to yachts over 31 metres LOA, unless invited under the ‘Grandfather Clause’, and spans an exhilarating three days of competitive racing with a disparate fleet featuring sloops, schooners and ketches. When: March 16-19 Where: St Barths www.bucketregattas.com

MONTE-CARLO ROLEX MASTERS What: The Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters is the first of three ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tournaments played on clay. The tournament is a player and fan favourite due to its magnificent location and long tradition of champions. When: April 15-23 Where: Monte-Carlo, Monaco www.montecarlotennismasters.com

MIAMI OPEN

THE 10TH ANNUAL PEBBLE BEACH FOOD & WINE

What: A two-week annual event showcasing one of the deepest fields of the year, the Miami Open has reached the next echelon in presenting an international sports extravaganza. With over $6 million in prize money, equally distributed to the men and women, and all the top players and media from all corners of the world covering the action every day, the event has earned its place in the world as the fifth largest tennis tournament. When: March 20-2 April Where: Miami Beach, Florida, USA www.miamiopen.com

What: The premier epicurean lifestyle event on the West Coast featuring world-renowned celebrity chefs creating decadent culinary delights paired with exceptional wines. In addition to cooking demonstrations led by the most talented chefs and vertical tastings from the world’s top wine producers, unique experiences are added each year making this a must-see annual event for culinary enthusiasts and wine aficionados the world over. When: April 20-23 Where: Pebble Beach, California, US www.pbfw.com

What: In 2017, Cannes Film Fesitval will celebrate its 70th anniversary edition. Movie fans might think the Cannes Film Festival is all about cinema, but most would agree it is the parties that steal the show. For 12 days, the seaside town of Cannes on the south coast of France will transform into a razzle-dazzle party town. When: May 17-28 Where: Cannes, France www.festival-cannes.fr

INTERNATIONAL CONTEMPORARY FURNITURE FAIR

SINGAPORE YACHT SHOW What: The Singapore Yacht Show is your opportunity to discover some of the world’s finest superyacht and international yacht brands in an elite and highly social setting, giving you a chance to enjoy luxury yachting at its finest. When: April 6-9 Where: Sentosa Cove, Singapore www.singaporeyachtshow.com

CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

ANTIGUA SAILING WEEK What: 2017 marks the 50th birthday of Antigua Sailing Week. It's a chance to see yachts racing in some of the best sailing conditions in the world, while soaking up the party atmosphere in the historic English Harbour. When: April 29-May 5 Where: Antigua www.sailingweek.com

What: The 29th annual fair is set to turn New York City’s Jacob K. Javits Convention Centre into a global summit for what is best and what is next in design. The event will host more than 500 exhibitors from more than 30 countries in categories from accessories to wall coverings. When: May 21-24 Where: Nework, US www.icff.com

MAY 2017 AMERICAN EXPRESS WORLD LUXURY EXPO What: Hosted for the fifth year in the spectacular Ritz-Carlton, the American Express World Luxury Expo, Riyadh will showcase the world’s leading luxury brands including fine dining, furniture, travel, art, gems, automobiles and entertainment to an ultra-affluent and highly discerning target audience. When: May 3-5 Where: The Ritz-Carlton Hotel, Riyadh www.world-luxury-expo.com

21ST ANNUAL NANTUCKET WINE FESTIVAL What: The festival has become one of the best wine events in the US, with some of the finest global wine talent on hand every year. When: May 17-21 Where: Massachusetts, US www.nantucketwinefestival.com

FORMULA 1 MONACO GRAND PRIX What: The F1 Monaco Grand Prix is widely considered to be one of the most significant and famous automobile races in the world. From Casino Square to the world’s most famous hairpin, through the tunnel and past the luxurious yachts, Monte-Carlo is a circuit of legendary corners seeped in history. When: May 25-28 Where: Monte Carlo, Monaco www.formula1.com


JUNE 2017

ASPEN FOOD AND WINE CLASSIC

THE AUDI INTERNATIONAL POLO

What: Experience a pleasure-packed weekend of cooking demonstrations, food samplings and wine tasting. When: June 16-18 Where: Aspen, Colorado, US www.foodandwine.com

What: Known in polo circles as the ‘world’s greatest spectator polo day’, the highlight is definitely the afternoon Coronation Cup match featuring the best English players. When: July Where: Guards Polo Club, Windsor, UK www.guardspoloclub.com

ROYAL ASCOT

THE CARTIER QUEEN’S CUP What: Cartier will once again bring their unique blend of glamour, style and elegance to this world-famous, high-goal polo competition. Attracting the sport’s leading players from across the globe, the team sheet reads like a who’s who of polo and each game is so important that if the players are not in action on the field, they can be found watching the games intensely, keeping a close eye on their rivals’ tactics. When: June Where: London, UK www.guardspoloclub.com

THE 2017 BRITISH & IRISH LIONS TOUR What: The 2017 British & Irish Lions will play 10 matches on their first tour to New Zealand since 2005. The Lions, who were coached by Warren Gatland to a 2-1 series win over Australia in 2013, will have six games before the first Test against the All Blacks at Eden Park, Auckland on Saturday 24 June. They will then face the Hurricanes before the final two Test matches on Saturday 1 July at the Westpac Stadium, Wellington before a potential series decider back in Auckland on Saturday 8 July. When: June 3-July 8 Where: New Zealand www.lionsrugby.com

What: With a rich heritage of more than 300 years, Royal Ascot has established itself as a national institution and the centrepiece of the British social calendar, as well as being the ultimate stage for the best racehorses in the world. When: June 20-24 Where: Ascot, UK www.ascot.co.uk

MASTERPIECE LONDON

www.prestigelondon.org

ART BASEL What: The world’s premier international art show for modern and contemporary works, Art Basel features nearly 300 leading galleries from North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia and Africa showcasing the highest-quality paintings, sculptures, drawings, installations, photographs, video and editioned works. When: June 15-18 Where: Basel, Switzerland www.artbasel.com

What: Formerly the Newport Bucket, the Candy Store Cup Superyacht Regatta is hosted and organised by Newport Shipyard and Bannister’s Wharf. When: July 27-29 Where: Newport, Rhode Island, US www.candystorecup.com

COWES WEEK

What: Perfectly situated at the peak of the capital’s summer season, Masterpiece London brings together exhibitors from across the world renowned for specialising in art, antiques, and design of the highest calibre. When: June 29-5 July Where: Royal Hospital Chelsea, London www.masterpiecefair.com

What: A fusion of exciting competitive sailing and social events, Cowes Week now stages up to 40 daily races for more than 1,000 boats and is the largest sailing regatta of its kind in the world. The 8,500 competitors range from Olympic and world-class professionals to weekend sailors. When: July 29-August 5 Where: Cowes, Isle of Wight www.aamcowesweek.co.uk

JULY 2017

MONACO RED CROSS BALL

ROUND THE ISLAND RACE What: The annual one-day yacht race, a 50nm course around the Isle of Wight, an island situated off the south coast of England, attracts more than 1,700 boats and around 16,000 sailors, making it one of the largest yacht races in the world. When: July Where: Isle of Wight, UK www.roundtheisland.org.uk

SALON PRIVÉ CONCOURS D’ELÉGANCE What: A celebration of some of the world’s most exclusive brands for a grand three-day event in celebration of everything that epitomises luxury. Browse the finest brands from designer clothing to exclusive properties, jewellery, yachts and aviation, as well as vintage, classic and super cars. When: September Where: London, UK www.salonprivelondon.com

GOODWOOD REVIVAL What: For those who love the romance of the fifties and sixties, this event is a must. The Goodwood Revival is the world’s most popular historic car race meeting, recreating the golden era of motor sport, in the heart of the English countryside When: September 4-11 Where: West Sussex, UK www.goodwood.co.uk

What: The Sporting d’Eté Club is the prestigious venue for this important fundraiser, which attracts ball gown-clad celebrities in their droves. When: July 22 Where: Monte-Carlo, Monaco www.croix-rouge.mc

AUGUST 2017 POLO MASTERS ST TROPEZ What: The tournaments of the Saint-Tropez Polo Club, sponsored by the two Gracida brothers, have attracted the world’s best players since 1998. Among the crowds cheering you may be lucky enough to spot The Queen of Sweden, Princess Anni-Frid Reuss, or Prince Talal of Jordan. Where: St Tropez, France www.polo-master.com

PRESTIGE LONDON What: Moving to a new venue for 2017, Prestige London (formerly the London Yacht, Jet & Prestige Car Show) will present the finest things in life, all at a single, fabulous Thames-side location. Visitors will be treated to displays from the world’s leading luxury yacht builders and brokers, yacht and interior designers, private jet manufacturers, charter agents, luxury car manufacturers and a whole host of luxury goods and service companies. When: June 8-10 Where: Battersea Evolution, London

CANDY STORE CUP

SEPTEMBER 2017

WIMBLEDON CHAMPIONSHIPS

PEBBLE BEACH CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE

What: Dating back to 1880 Wimbledon is the most prestigious tennis event on the UK calendar where the sporting elite come to battle it out for first place under the canopy of British weather, on the tricky grass courts. When: July 3-16 July Where: All England Club, London www.wimbledon.com

What: Tyre meets turf and transformation each year as 200 of the most prized collector cars and motorcycles in the world roll on to what is often called the best finishing hole in golf – the 18th Fairway at Pebble Beach. When: August 20 Where: Pebble Beach, US www.pebblebeachconcours.net

109TH RACE TO MACKINAC What: Since 1921, the Chicago Yacht Club Race to Mackinac has run every year, remaining the longest annual freshwater distance race and recognised as one of the most prestigious sailing races in the world. When: July 15 Where: Chicago, US www.cycracetomackinac.com

74TH VENICE FILM FESTIVAL What: An event that raises the awareness and promotes international cinema in all its forms: as art, entertainment and as an industry, in a spirit of freedom and tolerance. Where: Venice, Italy www.labiennale.org

CANNES YACHTING FESTIVAL What: The first gathering of the autumn season, the show brings together the key players in pleasure boating and international luxury yachting between two ports – Vieux Port and Port Pierre Canto in Cannes in the heart of the French Riviera. The show promises more than 500 boats and over 450 exhibitors. When: September 8-13 Where: Cannes, France www.cannesyachtingfestival.com

MONACO YACHT SHOW What: With over 30,000 professional and private visitors expected over four days, the event is considered the most prestigious pleasure boat show in the world with the exhibition of 500 major companies from the luxury yachting industry and over 100 superyachts afloat. Where: Port Hercules, Monaco www.monacoyachtshow.com


ROYAL COLLECTION

NEBULA Hand-crafted in Switzerland Calibre A&S5101: manufacture movement / skeletonised and symmetrical architecture / hand-wound / power reserve over 90 h / historical English movement design with 10 bridges and solid gold chatons / all technical elements visible dial side / Haute Horlogerie finishing: chamfered bridges with polished edges, sunburst barrels, satin-finished wheels and ratchets with chamfered and polished edges, screws with bevelled and mirrorpolished heads. Functions: hours, minutes and small seconds. Case: very elaborated and tapering from top to bottom to perfectly fit on the wrist / stainless steel / diameter 41.50 mm. www.arnoldandson.com


FRASER XII  

FRASER magazine issue XII. The intelligent magazine for living, loving and luxury yachts.

FRASER XII  

FRASER magazine issue XII. The intelligent magazine for living, loving and luxury yachts.