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The

S i x t h Fo r m AC A D E M I C Y E A R 201 9 - 2020


opportunity to complete the highly regarded Extended Project Qualification (EPQ).

THE SIXTH FORM

Extended Programme Extended Learning Learning Programme As part of the ELP Sixth Formers will study a bespoke wider curriculum that

As part of theexperience ELP Sixthand Formers will study bespoke for wider curriculum that enriches their develops the skillsanecessary independent learning, enriches their experience develops the skills necessary for independent whilst providingand opportunities for character development. learning, whilst providing opportunities for character development. The programme will consist of several complementary strands. •

The programme will consist of to several strands: Study Skills: Research skills including the ability searchcomplementary for and identify suitable sources of information within a subject area. Students will be encouraged to make links between their academic

• Study Skills: Research skills including the ability to search for and identify suitable sources of information within a subject area. Students will be encouraged to make links between their academic Employability Skills: Masterclasses related to employment, higher education, public speaking, subjects and compare the methods of research employed in those subjects. mindfulness andSkills: other life skills. • Employability Masterclasses related to employment, higher education, public speaking, Leadership Skills: There are many opportunities to develop leadership skills in the Sixth Form. The mindfulness and other life skills. leadership strand willThere develop leadership skills such as communication, motivating others and • Leadership Skills: areessential many opportunities to develop leadership skills in the Sixth Form. building teams. strand will develop essential leadership skills such as communication, motivating others The leadership and building teams Links: The ELP will introduce students to a wide range of areas of academic inquiry beyond their •chosen Links:courses. The ELP will introduce students to a wide range of areas ofwith academic inquiry their The existing lecture programme will be extended speakers frombeyond universities, chosen courses. The existing lecture programme will be extended with speakers from universities, commerce and industry. commerce and industry. subjects and compare the methods of research employed in those subjects,

• •

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is an exciting time for students; it is a period of transition discernible by subject specialism, increased responsibility and leadership opportunities, with a view to life beyond Framlingham College.

In order to fulfil their potential, Sixth Formers are expected to engage in independent learning during non-contact time. This strategy fosters self-improvement through planned independent study by students under the guidance of their class teachers. It can include wider reading, making notes, reviewing work, and assigned questions. It can also entail learning in partnership with another individual or as part of a small group. The Sixth Form Centre features a learning environment of the highest quality. Our students have a first class facility in which they can work and relax during the school day, evenings and weekends. To help them develop good study habits, all Year 12 students are expected to spend their study periods working in the Sixth Form Centre initially. This has different learning zones from the traditional to the less formal. There is even a seminar room in which students can work together on joint projects. They are also expected to make regular use of the Learning Resources Centre which is stocked with reading materials recommended by the examination boards. Through the Wi-Fi system, students are encouraged to use the Virtual Learning Environment for access to additional resources and support.

The College encourages and supports the effective use of ICT in academic study. Sixth Form students have laptops they are expected to bring to lessons for the purposes of research and extended project work. In light of this use of technology, we strongly advise all Sixth Form students to have a suitable device for the classroom. This emphasis on technology in no way replaces our focus on the need to develop handwriting skills, but complements it in today’s world. Further information is available within the joining section on the College website. In addition to formal teaching, a regular lecture programme involving outside speakers is provided. These are designed to raise awareness of opportunities and issues in the world today and so the content is wide-ranging. They often cover health education and citizenship topics which have been requested by the students themselves. There is an expectation that Sixth Formers will attend these events and some will form part of the Extended Learning Programme (Page 28). Sixth Formers are seen as role models for the younger years and as such are encouraged to take a lead in all aspects of College life. Every pupil is assigned a tutor who will maintain a holistic overview of their progress and, crucially, monitor their progress both academically and socially, encouraging involvement, commitment, and high standards of work and behaviour. They are easily contactable and are the first ‘port of call’ for most parents. By working together, we aim to ensure that every student flourishes in The Sixth Form.

Independent study will vary according to each subject, and much of the time will involve the completion of preps. It is important that students keep in mind that deadlines vary. Essay tasks may take a week whereas mathematical tasks may need to be completed for the next day and over the week an appropriate balance of time needs to be maintained. Many tasks will be selfdirected; for example, Business Studies and Economics students are expected to ‘read around’ the topics covered from their text books and read newspapers so they know what is going on in the ‘world of business’. Design students and those taking Art will (by mutual agreement) need to spend study periods and cocurricular time working on projects within the Design School. The College offers a ‘whole school’ approach to support for learning, creating an active partnership that includes the student and parents, with teachers and other professionals, working in concert to provide educational support for the individual at stages throughout their school career. There is a range of student support available to students. In the first instance, most students will talk to their class teacher to go over topics they are unsure about. In addition, many departments run drop in sessions and in the run up to examination periods revision sessions are offered. If they have a learning difficulty then the Head of Academic Support will determine appropriate support. In addition to the work of independent departments, gifted students will be fostered through the Scholars Programme. There is also the

M R D J B OAT M A N , B A ( H O N S ) P G C E D I R E C TO R O F S I X T H F O R M

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K E Y S I X T H F O R M S TA F F University Admissions at Framlingham College UK Universities Throughout Year 12, various events are arranged to help pupils discover the best course and university for them. All Year 12 students take the University Coursefinder Questionnaire Centigrade in the November of Year 12 and will be in possession of a personalised report which will be discussed and monitored by each student’s individual tutor. The report also has relevant information about university open days with dates and attendance information as well as specialised taster courses. In the Summer Term, a UCAS Day is held during which pupils register on the UCAS website and work on the first draft of the personal statement (UCAS is the centralised organisation responsible for all university applications in the UK). For those considering Oxbridge, preparation starts on entry to the College and those students will be invited to join the Scholars' Group. This is an informal gathering which helps those students with Oxbridge aspirations with guidance for the specialised applications that are required for success. In Year 13, there is a burst of activity during the Autumn Term as pupils finalise their UCAS forms. Where the course demands interviews, Framlingham provides practice interviews with specialist members of staff. In recent years, many of our applicants have won places at Russell Group universities and most are accepted at their first choice universities every year.

Overseas Some of our leavers will go on to a university in the US, Canada, mainland Europe or elsewhere outside the UK. Pupils who wish to apply to any other non-UK university benefit from advice offered by the school’s guidance team. There is an annual trip for Sixth Formers to the USA College Open Day in London.

Gap Years A good number of pupils take a gap year between school and university and the process of organising such programmes can be a little daunting for pupils. Specialist advice is available and information in the Sixth Form Centre can be accessed.

EPQ (Extended Project Qualification) The EPQ provides an opportunity for students to extend their abilities beyond the A Level syllabus, stand out and prepare for university or their future career. It can also be used to earn extra UCAS points. Working closely with a supervisor throughout the process, each student will produce either an extended formal report or artefact (video, artwork, production, model, audio recording) to satisfy the demands of the assessment criteria. Crucially, this entire course is based around individual curiosities, interests and passions which fall outside the formal programme of study. Anything from Architecture to Zoology (and everything in between!), including further research into academic or non-academic subjects, is suitable for an Extended Project. This is a course based around each individual; no two EPQs are ever the same. Running for approximately one year parallel to the A Level curriculum, the EPQ also empowers all candidates with a pre-university skills-set including independent research methodology, formal report writing and presentation skills; thereby helping each individual to stand out in the ever increasing competitive market for university places. Highly valued by universities all over the country including all Russell Group institutions - the University of Cambridge “would encourage you to undertake one” (aqa.org.uk) - it is the successful completion of the EPQ which could determine your place at your first choice university. M R S F R E N C H , B A ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ E P Q COO R D I N ATO R

Scholars’ Programme The Programme is both for those officially holding Academic Scholarships and those who have demonstrated a willingness to effectively engage with academic thinking above and beyond their lessons and continues through to the end of Year 13. For those invited therefore, the Scholars’ Programme meets weekly with Years 9 - 13 working together (and there are leadership opportunities for Sixth Formers) and the varied schedule of events includes diverse teacher-led sessions ranging from Classical Rhetoric and Logic to ‘How to play Bridge’. There are also occasional guest speakers, discussion forums, student-led presentations and trips out to leading universities and the Model United Nations. The Head of Scholars also provides support in the form of one-to-one meetings for Sixth Form Scholars and helping to run and co-ordinate mock Oxbridge interviews and guidance when it comes to applying to elite Universities around the world.

M R R W S K I TC H , B S C AC I B ACC E G P G C E ∙ H E A D O F H I G H E R E D U C AT I O N MR L GOLDSMITH, MA MBA PGCE ∙ HEAD OF SCHOLARS

Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Science and Professions Allied to Medicine (PAMS) It is well known that places to read any of these health-related degrees are very competitive and, therefore, in order to be successful in the quest for a place a candidate must show commitment, academic strength and determination. The process ought to be seen as a two or three year process and needs to start in earnest, ideally, in Year 11. Successful candidates are those that show commitment, get very good academic results and listen to advice provided. The key considerations for applying to medical school and veterinary college are available on the relevant websites but the situation changes quite markedly from year to year. Therefore, the responsibility for checking the situation with each university lies with the individual candidate so it is essential that this research is done in detail as early as possible; another a sign of commitment to this choice of career pathway. I qualified as a dental surgeon in 1984 from The Royal Dental Hospital and worked, as a dental surgeon, in the Army, general dental practice and in hospital, focussing on dental education latterly prior to coming into teaching. I continue to be a registered dentist and I am the member of staff responsible for guiding pupils who are interested in a career in health. My role in the College is to provide one-to-one support for any student interested in a health-related degree and we have a strong record of success in assisting pupils to obtain places on their chosen course.

Careers Advice In the Sixth Form, students are encouraged to continue their exploration of potential careers. As well as hearing about options at university, they are also given information about the wide range of excellent alternatives to university which many companies and industries offer through school leaver schemes and apprenticeships. Since the College is interested only in what is best for each individual student, we place no different value on those who go to university and those who choose an alternative route to begin their career. There is a great deal of help available. Tutors, since they know their tutees so well, are able to offer individual guidance, and the Head of Careers is always available for conversations about options. Help also comes in the form of developing skills. Sessions on writing CVs are offered, and all Year 12 students are given a practice interview at the end of the year. A crucial part of the Careers Programme is the involvement of parents, OFs and friends of the College who can speak about their own careers and offer valuable insights and advice. It is an inspiring and exciting experience. Talks at the College are regular, but we also recognise the need to get students out into the world to see work for themselves. To this end, there is a Year 12 Careers Experience Day in London. Students visit a careers show, attend workplaces in small groups for work-based experience, and meet up with Old Framlinghamians who can provide advice and practical help. The focus of the College’s careers advice is on giving each individual the confidence and knowledge to develop ideas about the future so that they can prepare themselves for their important first step after school.

DR R NOBLE, BDS PGCE PGCEDL MISS C CRANMER, BA (HONS) MA PGCE ∙ HEAD OF CAREERS

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LIFE IN THE SIXTH FORM

I have been at Fram since Year 9, but coming into the Sixth Form gave me great freedom; the freedom of suits, the freedom of study and the freedom of being able to choose the subjects I want to study. However, with that freedom I have felt great responsibility, not only the responsibility of being a Sixth Former, but the responsibility to myself. To do my work, do extra work when I can and to make sure I am always in control of what I am doing. Whether it’s sport, academics, drama, music or any other activity. I have had great fun so far in the Sixth Form, with theme nights and all the rest that comes with Year 12, but have found the need to be totally in control and responsible for what I do now, how I present myself and how I act around school.

The most rewarding part of being a Sixth Former at Fram is for me, the opportunity to succeed both academically and co-curricularly, in a way that differs to the necessary structure of the GCSE years. Sixth Form allows the opportunity to utilise your selfmotivation and ambition which inevitably matures as you make the step from Year 11 to 12, through the increased independence required for A Level learning. Where expectations are certainly raised academically, this does not detract from the extensive range of activities and social events which are a key part of life at Framlingham. For me, Sixth Form has provided the chance to channel my creative side whilst continuing my enjoyment of many different sports and academic interests. Every halfterm we come together as two year groups to enjoy Theme Nights, and weekly there are social evenings in the Sixth Form Centre to further the bond between Years 12 and 13 as leaders of the College. What I shall take from my time at Fram is invaluable; experiences such as DofE, the thirds team hockey, cabaret and drama performances, house dinner memories, and most importantly, lifelong friends. Sixth Form has provided me the opportunity to not only explore the subjects I love, but dip my toes into areas I am unfamiliar with, such as through the Scholars’ Programme. With a competitive but warm house spirit and core values such as respect and integrity shaping my school years, I am certain Framlingham has put me in excellent stead for university life and beyond.

If there is any advice that I could try and give you at this stage it’s this - firstly, good luck with the GCSEs from here on in it’s a lot of work and the only thing I can tell you, and it’s not very adventurous, is work hard and make sure you start revising as soon as possible even if it’s just 45 minutes on a Sunday, it all counts. Secondly, when you get into the Sixth Form, enjoy the freedom, but understand you face the step-up of work from GCSE and it’s real and not easy. It’s not the fact that the work is impossible to understand although it is harder, it is the amount of work you get set. However, now that has passed I have managed to get on top of the workload and started to enjoy the A Level subjects I do. Finally, work is very important in our everyday lives but don’t let your work get in the way of your education. The most successful people find time for the things they enjoy and fit it around the work that they have to do. Remember - no one can work all the time, it is all about the balance! J O E L I P M A N ∙ Y E A R 12

M I S S Y C R E W E ∙ Y E A R 13

I joined Framlingham for the Sixth Form from a small girls school where I went daily. I came to school here to experience full boarding and to procure a fresh perspective. What followed my first day has been honestly the best stage of my school life to date. I’d be lying if I said that there hasn’t been interesting moments, everyone has bad days, and Sixth Form is no exception. But overall, Sixth Form has definitely been my most enjoyable period of time at school. My Sixth Form experience has been very different to my previous school ventures, the new found freedom was exciting, combined with the new surroundings this led to an entirely captivating first year at Fram. In the Sixth Form, lessons are different; the group sizes are smaller and lessons are more frequent. Perhaps the most significant change, however, is the difference in teaching and learning style, this becomes a very ‘two-way street’ and is an enjoyable academic pathway. The social aspect of Sixth Form life is hugely good fun, we have soft drinks evenings twice a week in the Sixth Form Centre, a fun football league with matches once a week and theme nights every half-term. These are a few of the great ways to let your hair down and relax with your friends whilst at school. These all lead to an environment in which close friendships blossom, and bonds are formed that are second to none. Framlingham provides us with so many opportunities. In my first year here, I went to Geneva for the Model United Nations, speaking in front of a vast room of student delegates. I heard some of the most inspiring speakers I have ever had the privilege to listen to, and I met a plethora of useful contacts, including Old Framlinghamians, all of which may wee be of use to me in later life. These opportunities often lead to a very busy schedule; but I have found through my own experiences that the support network provided to us is unbelievable - there are so many people to turn to in times of need. Briefly; there is almost no barrier that cannot be surpassed with hard work and the support we receive. I couldn’t possibly go through all my personal ups and downs or hopes and fears, but trust me; I wouldn’t change any of them! What I can tell you, however, is that the combination of people and the variety of experiences I have undergone have genuinely broadened my perspective and hopefully enabled me to embrace whatever life has in store for me post-Fram. L E X I TAY L O R ∙ Y E A R 13

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THE SIXTH FORM CENTRE

SUBJECT CHOICES: OVERVIEW

The Sixth Form Centre was built to celebrate the College’s 150th anniversary and sits proudly right at the centre of the school. This splendid new facility, which was opened alongside the adjoining whole-school café in September 2014, really has transformed the heart of the College. Framlingham College has long been a very popular destination for those seeking to move to new pastures for the Sixth Form, regularly recruiting 30-40 new students each year to supplement those already coming through the College, and this new Sixth Form Centre provides them with unparalleled facilities and resources. The 16-year-old of today is a very different student from even ten years ago. They have a great sense of self and many feel ready for a more independent, ‘adult’ working environment. However, we believe firmly that they still require the pastoral and academic structures and support mechanisms that are offered by a school such as ours, and this building is about meeting them half way! The £2.7m project, which included the expansion of the College’s boarding facilities in the space freed up by the new building, occupies the first floor of the stunning two floor, glass-fronted extension to the main building, enjoying outstanding views of the surrounding school grounds and countryside. There are expansive and varied working areas and enhanced careers and Further Education resources. These include a Seminar Room that is fully equipped with state of the art conference facilities so that the College’s impressive Careers programme can access the national and global network of careers specialists that the school uses regularly to infuse our students with an awareness of the world they will enter beyond school. We were very keen that our Sixth Form remained in the heart of the school: we did not want a separate Sixth Form House or Centre that is at a tangent to the school; we want our Sixth Formers right in the middle as we want them to be the ones who are providing the leadership and inspiration for the younger members of the school. It is they who set the tone for what is – and what is not – acceptable behaviour, values and standards for the younger ones to follow. The new building is not just about the Sixth Form. There are four

Department if further details are required. We also offer BTEC (Level 3 Diploma) qualifications in Business, Computer Science, Music and Sport and they provide an alternative pathway involving continuous assessment and stronger vocational focus. BTEC Diploma is offered in Business, Computer Science and Sport which equates to two A Levels and should, therefore, be taken in conjunction with one or two A Level subjects. The Extended Certificate (equating to one A Level) is also offered in Computer Science. Extended Certificate courses are offered in Music and Music Technology with students able to choose one or both of these courses; taken together they will form a diverse BTEC Music programme. It is important to note that all modules must be passed if a BTEC qualification is to be gained. BTECs generally allow access to university study, although they may not be accepted for certain courses. Further details of course content and structure can be found within the subject entries within this booklet.

new classrooms, and the ground floor sees an impressive café that has become a social hub for the whole school and, increasingly, the wider Framlingham community. The new building sits as an extension to the original school, and while it is strikingly modern there is also much exposed original brickwork in the interior of the building. This blend of the old with the new represents so much of what this school is about: change and continuity. The glass fronted façade reflects that this school is a forwardthinking, outward-looking and dynamic environment; while the exposed brickwork of the original building inside reminds us of our heritage and of the traditional values that have underpinned the school since its foundation. Our anniversary year reminded us that it is important to remain true to our founding principles, but also that we must continue to reinterpret those principles and apply them to the students of today and the world into which they will be graduating. In many ways, therefore, it is a case of Back to the Future’. This Suffolk boarding and day school, which was founded in memory of Prince Albert, one of the most visionary and progressive educational thinkers of his time, is in robust good shape and is clearly confident in its future. Numbers are strong, the reputation is growing and there is a real sense of momentum about Framlingham College that will only be fuelled further by this latest addition to what is already an impressive site. All looks in good shape for the next 150 years! M R P B TAY L O R , B A ( H O N S ) ∙ H E A D M A S T E R

Choosing A Level subjects can be a complex process, especially if a student is not certain about the career that he or she would like to pursue. The best advice I can offer is for students to choose subjects that they enjoy and allow flexibility within possible further study and career paths. It is also worth remembering that the skills gained in one subject will often be valued in another subject or occupation, even if they at first seem unrelated. Thought should also be given to choosing ‘facilitating subjects’: according to the Russell Group of universities, most successful applications to their institutions contain two of these subjects and further information can be found at: www.russellgroup.ac.uk. Following on from recent reforms carried out by the government, all subjects will be offered in a linear format with examinations only taken at the end of Year 13. At this stage of the process, students should be seeking advice from people such as: Tutor, Housemaster/mistress, teachers, Head of Careers and Head of Higher Education. Most importantly, they should be speaking to current Sixth Form students as they can offer an important perspective on subjects and the approaches involved within them.

As part of their Sixth Form studies, students are invited to consider the possibility of undertaking an Extended Project Qualification (EPQ). This qualification is valued highly by universities because it shows that students have cultivated, and can demonstrate, many of the skills required at undergraduate study, including: the ability to work independently, to undertake research and to manage and complete a sustained piece of work. In addition to their A Level subjects, Sixth Form students at the College have timetabled lessons that form part of the Extended Learning Programme (ELP) and this will involve a range of guest speakers and workshops aimed at helping to prepare them for university studies, the workplace and extend their horizons. In short, the Sixth Form should represent an exciting opportunity for specialism whilst encouraging students to develop greater autonomy as they work towards the next stage of their journey. Please do contact me with any questions you may have. M R D G A S H TO N , B A ( H O N S ) D I P E D ∙ AC A D E M I C D E P U T Y

Students are encouraged to study a broad range of subjects in the Sixth Form; however, it is acceptable to commence Year 12 with only three subjects for those students who are set on their selection and want to throw all of their energies into them, although there will be the option of choosing four subjects for those students who would like true breadth of study or to experience a subject they are feeling uncertain about. Our experience shows us that students tend to cope best with the demands of A Level studies if they have completed a minimum of seven Grade 9 to 4 passes at GCSE and a Grade 6 or higher in those subjects to be continued at A Level is desirable. In fact, some subjects may deem that a Grade 7 at GCSE is needed for success in the A Level course. The following pages provide details about the content and structure of each subject, as well as specifying any entry requirements. Please do contact the relevant Head of

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ART & DESIGN

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U P DAT E D F O R 201 9 /20

You may choose to study Art and Design; the endorsed titles we offer are ‘Fine Art’, ‘Photography’ and ‘ Textiles’. These all combine areas of study which incorporate responses in a wide range of media. A Level Art offers you the opportunity to creatively develop skills in painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, ceramics, printmaking, textiles, fashion, design, film-making, animation or any media which can allow for an artistic response. Whether you choose ‘Fine Art’, ‘Photography’ or ‘Textiles’; all titles allow for freedom of expression and aim to help you creatively and imaginatively develop ideas and create original art work which is unique to you. W H O TAKE S A LE V EL A R T? You have probably studied GCSE Art, but this is not always essential. You should, however, have an interest in the basic elements of art: colour, tone, form and content. You should have an idea about the place of art in culture, both historically and in contemporary society. The course can be what you make of it but a passion for art is essential from the outset. No matter what your skills set; if you love art, if you want to learn more about art, if you want to learn new technical skills, if you want to use your imagination and creativity then A Level Art is for you.

Component 2 – Externally Set Assignment You will be given an examination paper which contains themes and suggested starting points. This component is worth 40% of your final grade and allows for opportunities to generate personal outcomes in response to the externally set themes. It incorporates two major elements: preparatory studies and the 15 hour examination. The preparatory studies will comprise a portfolio of practical and written development work. During the 15 hour examination you will produce final outcomes extending from the preparatory studies. The examination usually takes place directly after the Easter holidays in Year 13. This work is externally set, assessed by the teacher and externally moderated. To enable moderation an exhibition of all your work will be mounted, by you, immediately after your examination which will be open to your parents as well. DO WE GO AN Y WHERE? We will go on art study visits, usually to galleries, throughout the course. These visits are intended as inspiration for your art work.

W H AT CARE E RS ARE OPE N TO YOU AT T H E E N D O F T H E CO U R S E? With careers in the creative industries being responsible for an ever increasing amount of GDP, there are many careers for which Art is an invaluable subject. These might include: marketing, architecture, interiors, publishing, advertising, web design, furniture design, film and television, theatre, fashion design, art therapy, game design, illustration, graphic design, typography, packaging design, interaction design, photography or even teaching. Students wishing to take further courses in creative subjects will sometimes go on to study a foundation year before applying to degree courses in more specialist areas. W H AT IS TAUG HT O N T H E COUR SE? Component 1 – Personal Investigation This component enables you to generate and develop ideas, research primary and contextual sources, record practical and written observations, experiment with media and processes, and refine ideas towards producing personal outcome(s). From the beginning of Year 12 you are making work which counts; Component 1 is worth 60% of your final grade. In Year 12 you will start with an introductory course to help students develop technical skills appropriate to the level of the national standard. There will be a mock examination in the Summer Term which will bring together a major project. Component 1 incorporates three major elements: supporting studies, practical work and a personal study. Your supporting studies and practical work will comprise a portfolio of development work and outcomes based on themes and ideas developed from personal starting points. The personal study will be evidenced through critical written communication showing contextual research and understanding in a minimum of 1000 words of continuous prose, which may contain integrated images. The work is internally set, assessed by the teachers and externally moderated by the examination board. You will continue with your personal projects in Year 13.

Please note: Charges are made for certain materials; they are an essential part of the course but each student uses different quantities. It is important to note that some specialist equipment will be necessary at some point during your course: camera, laptop and software for doing prep will be essential. Charges are also made for art study visits. M R S S TA N S L E Y , B A ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ H E A D O F A R T

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B I O L OG Y

W H AT DO I NE E D TO K N OW OR B E A B L E TO DO BE F O R E TA K IN G T H IS CO U R S E? The course builds on scientific knowledge and skills developed at GCSE. It integrates theory and practical work, and you will be required to communicate ideas effectively. The course has been written to follow on from GCSE Combined Science: Trilogy, GCSE Combined Science: Synergy, GCSE Biology or from IGCSE Biology; a Grade 7 or above at GCSE Biology or a Grade 7 - 7 combined Science is recommended. It is important that you are interested in Biology and that you are keen to explore this subject in greater detail, welcoming the challenge of practical investigative work. Within A Level Biology, 10% of the marks available within written examinations will be for assessment of Mathematics (in the context of Biology) at a Level 2 standard, or higher, so it would be helpful for students to have achieved at least Grade 5 in GCSE Mathematics. W H AT KIND O F STUD E N T I S T H I S COUR SE SUI TA BL E F O R? This course is suitable for students who: • Have an interest in and enthusiasm for Biology • Enjoy carrying out investigations in the laboratory or as fieldwork • Are interested in the developments of new Biology topics such as stem cells and advances in gene technology and the impact these topics have on society W H AT WILL I LE ARN ON T H I S COUR SE? • • • •

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TO B E U P DAT E D

Develop a greater knowledge and understanding of different areas of Biology and how they relate to each other Develop greater expertise in the area of practical work and the link between theory and experimental work Continue to enjoy and further develop a personal interest in the study of living organisms To appreciate how society makes decisions about scientific issues and how sciences contribute to the success of the economy and society.

W H AT COULD I G O ON TO DO AT T H E E N D OF MY CO U R S E? The A Level Biology course will prepare learners for progression to undergraduate study, enabling them to enter a range of academic and vocational careers in biological sciences, medicine and biomedical sciences, veterinary science, agriculture and related sectors. It is also a useful qualification when considering entry into non-science subjects at post-18 level. For learners wishing to follow an apprenticeship route or those seeking direct entry into biological science careers, this A Level provides a strong background and progression pathway.

Module 4 – Biodiversity, Evolution & Disease 4.1.1 ∙ Communicable diseases, disease prevention and the immune system 4.2.1 ∙ Biodiversity 4.2.2 ∙ Classification and evolution Module 5 – Communication, Homeostasis & Energy 5.1.1 ∙ Communication and homeostasis 5.1.2 ∙ Excretion as an example of homeostatic control 5.1.3 ∙ Neuronal communication 5.1.4 ∙ Hormonal communication 5.1.5 ∙ Plant and animal responses 5.2.1 ∙ Photosynthesis 5.2.2 ∙ Respiration Module 6 – Genetics, Evolution & Ecosystems 6.1.1 ∙ Cellular control 6.1.2 ∙ Patterns of inheritance 6.1.3 ∙ Manipulating genomes 6.2.1 ∙ Cloning and biotechnology 6.3.1 ∙ Ecosystems 6.3.2 ∙ Populations and sustainability CO URSE ASSESSMEN T The content of this course is assessed by three written papers: Paper 1 ‘Biological Processes’ ∙ 2h 15mins ∙ 37% Paper 2 ‘Biological Diversity’ ∙ 2h 15mins ∙ 37% Paper 3 ‘Unified Biology’ ∙ 1hr 30mins ∙ 26% The A Level practical skills are assessed throughout the two year course and lead to a separate pass/fail component of the A Level, unrelated to the grade achieved in the written exams.

COU RSE CO NTE NT M R S C CO L L I N S , B S c ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ H E A D O F B I O L OG Y

The course content is split into six teaching modules: Module 1 – Development of Practical Skills in Biology 1.1 ∙ Practical skills assessed in a written examination 1.2 ∙ Practical skills assessed in the practical endorsement Module 2 – Foundations in Biology 2.1.1 ∙ Cell structure 2.1.2 ∙ Biological molecules 2.1.3 ∙ Nucleotides and nucleic acids 2.1.4 ∙ Enzymes 2.1.5 ∙ Biological membranes 2.1.6 ∙ Cell division, cell diversity and cellular organisation Module 3 – Exchange & Transport 3.1.1 ∙ Exchange surfaces 3.1.2 ∙ Transport in animals 3.1.3 ∙ Transport in plants

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BUSINESS STUDIES

The

S i x t h Fo r m

U P DAT E D F O R 201 9 /20

P RE-R E QUISITE KNOW L E DGE A N D AT TA I N M E N T

CO URSE ASSESSMEN T - A LEV EL

We assume no prior knowledge and as such it is not necessary to have studied the subject at GCSE. However, we strongly advise all students to have achieved at least a Grade 5 in both English Language and Mathematics.

Paper 1: Business 1

Paper 2: Business 2

Paper 3: Business 3

W H O IS THE CO URSE SUI T E D TO?

All sections assessed

All sections assessed

All sections assessed

ASSESSMEN T: • written exam: 2 hours • 100 marks in total • 33.3% of A Level

ASSESSMEN T: • written exam: 2 hours • 100 marks in total • 33.3% of A Level

ASSESSMENT: • written exam: 2 hours • 100 marks in total • 33.3% of A Level

Q UESTIO N S Three compulsor y sections: • Section A has 15 multiple choice questions (MCQs) worth 15 marks.

Q UESTIO N S Three data response compulsory questions worth approximately 33 marks each and made up of three or four part questions.

Q UESTI ONS One compulsory case study followed by approximately six questions.

An understanding of Business Studies is becoming increasingly important in a rapidly changing world where advances in technology and communication have taken centre stage. Successful students of Business Studies will: • Be interested in the world of business and have an interest in current affairs, and actively read daily newspapers • Want to understand the choices that firms face • Enjoy taking on the role of consultant, analysing data and offering solutions W H AT WILL BE LE AR N T/W H I C H SK I L L S W I L L B E D E V E L O P E D? You will study business in a variety of contexts, from small, UK based firms to large multinationals. You will be encouraged to follow business developments and to think critically about contemporary business issues. The “right” answer will depend on the problem in front of you and you need to be able to think issues through logically, put together well-reasoned arguments and make recommendations. It involves analysing situations and making choices. W H AT DOE S T HE COUR SE I N VOL VE? You will study Sections 1 through to 6 in the first year and 7 through to 10 in the second year which leads to an A Level in Business Studies.

Section B has short answer questions worth 35 marks.

Sections C and D have two essay questions (you complete two from a choice of four) worth 25 marks each.

COU RSE CO NTE NT There are ten sections: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

What is business? Managers, leadership and decision making Decision making to improve marketing performance Decision making to improve operational performance Decision making to improve financial performance Decision making to improve human resource performance Analysing the strategic position of a business Choosing strategic direction Strategic methods: how to pursue strategies Managing strategic change

Please note that the A Level assesses quantitative skills, making up a minimum of 10% of the overall marks. The skills tested include ratios, averages, fractions, percentages and calculation of profit and loss. M R M M I L N E , B A ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ H E A D O F E CO N O M I C S A N D B U S I N E S S S T U D I E S

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BTEC BUSINESS

U P DAT E D F O R 201 9 /20

The

S i x t h Fo r m

The BTEC Diploma in Business is the equivalent of two A Levels. P RE-R E QUISITE KNOW L E DGE A N D AT TA I N M E N T Although there are no specific pre-requisite qualifications needed to study the subject, a good level of mathematical skills is an advantage. W H O IS THE CO URSE SUI T E D TO? BTEC Business can be studied alongside other A Levels subjects. It is designed for learners wishing to go on to further or higher-level study at university, or directly to employment. The Diploma carries twice the number of UCAS points as an A Level course and is widely recognised by universities and employers. W H AT WILL BE LE AR N T AN D W H AT SK I L L S W I L L BE D E V E L O P E D? BTEC Business offers work-related learning, giving learners an edge and opening the door to higher education or employment, the following areas will be studied throughout the duration of the course:

Exploring Business

Managing an event

Developing a Marketing Campaign

International Business

Personal Business Finance

Principles of Management

Optional Unit *

Optional Unit *

*Optional Units which are taken in Year 13 may include: • • • • •

Recruitment and Selection Process Investigating Customer Service Market Research The English Legal System Work Experience in Business

Transferable skills are developed throughout the course, such as: teamwork, creative problem solving and research. There is a clear focus on developing the following employability skills: • • •

cognitive and problem-solving skills: using critical thinking, approaching non-routine problems, applying expert and creative solutions, using systems and technology intrapersonal skills: communicating, working collaboratively, negotiating and influencing, self-presentation interpersonal skills: self-management, adaptability and resilience, self-monitoring and development.

“BTEC courses give you real, hands-on experience. It’s what I call ‘learning by doing’ and gives you the skills today’s employers are looking for.” — Peter Jones CBE, Entrepreneur, Dragons Den.

M R M M I L N E , B A ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ H E A D O F E CO N O M I C S A N D B U S I N E S S S T U D I E S

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CHEMISTRY

The

S i x t h Fo r m

TO B E U P DAT E D

W H AT DO I NE E D TO K N OW OR B E A B L E TO DO BE F O R E TA K IN G T H IS CO U R S E? The course builds on the ideas and skills developed at GCSE. It has been written to follow on from the Double Award Science GCSEs, so it is not essential to have studied Chemistry as a separate full GCSE. A Grade 7 or above at GCSE Chemistry or Double Award Science is recommended, as well as Grade 7 in GCSE Mathematics.

with a total duration of six hours. The A Level practical skills are assessed throughout the two year course and lead to a separate pass/ fail component of the A Level, unrelated to the grade achieved in the written exams. DR D R HIGGINS, MA PHD PGCE ∙ HEAD OF SCIENCE

W H AT WILL I LE ARN ON T H I S COUR SE? • • •

The course looks at what all matter is made of, the chemicals that make up living organisms and how different substances interact You will learn about how Chemistry relates to other sciences, as well as its social, environmental, economic and technological implications You will learn new practical skills and how to solve problems using these skills

W H AT KIND O F STUD E N T I S T H I S COUR SE SUI TA BL E F O R? This course is suitable for students who: • Have an interest in, and enjoyment of Chemistry • Want to use Chemistry to support other subjects, or to provide a stepping stone towards the career of their choice W H AT COULD I G O ON TO DO AT T H E E N D OF MY CO U R S E? •

A degree or other higher education course in chemistry, medicine, veterinary science, genetics, pharmacy or environmental science are just a few of the many options available. For medicine and veterinary medicine, most universities insist that students have studied A Level Chemistry Employment such as in the research departments of pharmaceutical or biotechnology industries, or laboratory work within a hospital

Chemistry is regarded as one of the most rigorous academic subjects, demanding that students have a broad range of skills and are prepared to work hard. Successful students will discover at the end of the course that people possessing such attributes are much in demand both from employers and universities. Consequently, people with chemistry-based qualifications have a very low rate of unemployment. Year 12 Module A: Foundations in Chemistry Elements, compounds and reactions, quantitative chemistry, acids and bases, bonding and structure Module B: Periodic Table and Energy Groups 2 and 7, qualitative analysis, enthalpy changes, reaction rates Module C: Core Organic Chemistry Hydrocarbons, alcohols, halgenoalkanes and analytical techniques Year 13 Module A: Physical Chemistry and Transition Elements Quantitative study of equilibrium and reaction rates, pH and buffer solutions, energy and entropy, electrode potentials and redox, transition metals Module B: Organic Chemistry and Analysis Aromatic, carbonyl, and nitrogen compounds, carboxylic acids and esters, polymers, organic synthesis, chromatography and nmr spectroscopy.

ASSESSME NT AND P R AC T I CAL SK I L L S There is no controlled assessment. The content of the course is assessed at the end of Year 13 by way of three separate written papers,

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

The

S i x t h Fo r m

TO B E U P DAT E D

W H AT DO I NE E D TO K N OW B E F OR E TAK I N G T H IS CO U R S E?

a highly motivated student who is intrinsically interested in the subject area of Computer Science.

If you have studied Computing before we require at least a Grade 5 at GCSE and as the course requires the ability to think logically, a minimum of a Grade 5 in Mathematics at GCSE is required. If you have not studied Computing before but have worked independently on your skills, you will meet with the Computing Department to assess your suitability for the course. The key desirable qualities are a genuine interest in the subject area.

WHAT CO ULD I GO O N TO DO AT THE EN D O F THE CO URSE?

W H AT WILL I LE ARN ON T H I S COUR SE? Candidates develop their knowledge and understanding of computer systems, the principles of computing (including programming) and how these are applied to the solution of problems. Candidates gain an understanding of systematic methods – such as the use of algorithms and test strategies, the maintenance of computer systems, and the skills associated with documenting solutions – and further develop skills associated with applying this knowledge and understanding to producing computer-based solutions to real problems.

In today’s workplace, those with knowledge and skills in Computer Science have the opportunity to pursue new and exciting careers and to be instrumental in the conception of computer systems that increasingly shape work and leisure activities. These include careers such as 3D animator, games developer, graphic designer, network administrator, programmer, software developer, system analyst and web designer. The course strongly prepares you for a degree or higher education course in a relevant discipline or to immediately acquire an industry entry level job. THE CO URSE The course consists of three components, two external exams taken at the end of Year 13 and a programming project that is completed over the duration of the course.

External Exam: Computer Systems

• • •

The characteristics of contemporary processors Software and software development Exchanging Data

2.5 hours written paper

• •

Data types, data structures and algorithms Legal, moral, cultural and ethical issues.

External Exam: Algorithms and Programming

• • •

Elements of Computational Thinking Problem Solving and Programming Algorithms to solve problems and standard algorithms

40% of the total A Level

• • • •

Analysis of the problem Design of the solution Developing the solution Evaluation

20% of the total A Level

2.5 hours written paper

Internal Coursework: Programming Project

40% of the total A Level

THE P ROGRAMMIN G P ROJECT Ever wanted to code your own game, app, computer simulation or website completely from scratch? The programming project component of the course allows you to create a piece of software of your own choosing, you then follow this project right from the initial analysis and research of it through to the development and evaluation phase. M R J B H A R R O D , B A ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ D I R E C TO R O F CO M P U T E R S C I E N C E

The aim of Computer Science is to encourage candidates to develop: • • • • • • •

The capacity to think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically An understanding of the organisation of computer systems, including software, hardware, data, communications and people The ability to apply skills, knowledge and understanding of computing (including programming), in a range of contexts to solve problems Skills in project and time management The capacity to see relationships between different aspects of the subject, and perceive their field of study in a broader perspective An understanding of the consequences of using computers, including social, legal, ethical and other issues An awareness of emerging technologies and an appreciation of their potential impact on society

W H O IS SUIT E D FOR T H I S COUR SE? The OCR Computer Science A Level contains less ICT but more programming, algorithms, problem-solving, thinking skills and mathematics. There is also a heavy focus on the theory of how computers work. The level of detail required for the course lends itself to

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D E S I G N A N D T E C H N O L OG Y

U P DAT E D F O R 201 9 /20

The

S i x t h Fo r m

DES I GN AND TE CHN OL OGY PreU A R T A N D D E SI G N Design and Technology encompasses a wide range of design disciplines but is firmly rooted in the skills required to design and make high quality products that are fit for purpose, satisfy wants and needs, enhance our daily lives and demonstrate knowledge and understanding. PreU Art and Design offers learners opportunities for creative exploration, development and innovation in one or more of a wide range of materials and processes. PreU Art and Design is assessed at the end of Year 13. None of the components are time limited; work is assessed without time constraint. H OW WILL THE CO UR SE H E L P M E I N T H E F UT UR E? The PreU Art and Design qualification can lead to further study in a range of areas. It is useful as a qualification for design based courses and some engineering courses; these include Architecture, Art and Design, Product Design, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Material Science, General and Mechanical Engineering and teacher training. W H AT WILL I LE ARN? The course is split into three components with the following weightings: 1. 2. 3.

Portfolio 30% Critical and contextual study 30% Project 40%

P ORTFO LIO The portfolio is an exploratory investigation, typically during the first year of the course. The focus of the assessment is the journey that students have made, and not resolved outcomes. Students work in sketchbooks and are expected to build a range of annotated evidence of work completed over the year. Students will use a wide range of materials and processes. C RI TI CAL AND CONT E X T UAL ST UDY The critical and contextual study is a written essay of 3,000 - 5,000 words with relevant illustrations. The focus of the study is an aspect of design of interest to the student, the focus of the critical and contextual study is expected to evolve through ideas generated by candidates during the first year of the course. P ROJE CT The project involves development of a sustained piece of workshop practice culminating in a fully functioning piece of work. The examination board gives a starting area for students to explore but then it is up to them to develop their work. Students will produce a series of sketchbooks, models and a working outcome. The PreU course is seen as a direct equivalent to an A Level qualification and recognised as such by universities. Please note: Charges will be made for the cost of materials. M R J B U X TO N , B A ( H O N S ) M E d P G C E ∙ H E A D O F D E S I G N A N D T E C H N O L OG Y

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D R A M A A N D T H E AT R E

The

S i x t h Fo r m

U P DAT E D F O R 201 9 /20

This is a really exciting opportunity to extend your knowledge and practice of Drama and Theatre. Alongside the study there are opportunities to produce, direct and perform your own devised work as well as take part in scripted performances from a variety of challenging and diverse performance texts.

CO MP O N EN T 2: TEXT IN P ERFO RMAN CE 20% of the qualification

We will also be visiting the theatre giving you experience of exciting and varied professional theatre in London as well as more locally. Previous theatre trips have been to see thrilling ground-breaking immersive theatre performances from Punchdrunk; new theatre at the Young Vic and the Royal Court as well as trips to see Shakespeare greats at the RSC in Stratford alongside performances at The Globe. We regularly visit the National Theatre.

This component has two externally assessed elements:

Theatre practitioners visit the school to provide stimulating workshops and there are opportunities throughout the year to hone your skills in extra-curricular productions, possibly direct student productions and take part in the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. The school also offers the opportunity of developing skills with LAMDA examinations as an optional extra and students are encouraged to enter for the National Youth Theatre auditions in February.

CO MP O N EN T 3: THEATRE MAK ERS IN P RACTICE

• •

A group performance/design realisation of one key extract from a performance text. A monologue or duologue performance/design realisation from one key extract from a different performance text.

Task: 2 hours and 30 minutes written examination This component has three aspects:

It should be noted that there is a cost attached to theatre trips to a maximum of £80 per term but the charge is often less than this depending on the production.

THE QUALIFICATION IN GREATER DEPTH:

The qualification has three components, one that focuses on devising, one that focuses on performing or designing skills and one that focuses on practical exploration of texts to interpret them for performance.

Live Theatre Evaluation – you will have a choice of two questions requiring you to analyse and evaluate the performance you have seen. We will give you a choice of at least two productions over the length of the course. Page to Stage – Realising a Performance Text – you will answer two extended response questions on an unseen extract from a performance text you have studied. You answer these questions from the perspective of a performer and a designer. Interpreting a Performance Text – you will have a choice of two questions for an extended response on a chosen text. You have to prepare for this section by creating a re-imagined production concept for the play to communicate your ideas to a contemporary audience.

COM P ONE NT 1 DE V I SI N G M S D L E N G L E R T , B A ( H O N S ) D I P P G C E ∙ H E A D O F D R A M A A N D T H E AT R E

40% of the qualification Task: Using one key extract from a performance text and a theatre practitioner as stimuli you will create a devised performance. Your work in this component will be internally assessed and externally moderated. This component is assessed in two ways: • •

The performance: You can choose a performer or a designer route here. This performance will take place in front of an audience. (20 marks) A portfolio: You will put together a portfolio to support this performance which can be hand-written or typed between 2500 words or recorded/verbal evidence lasting between 12 – 14 minutes. It is also possible to present this portfolio in a combination of handwritten/typed evidence (1250 – 1500 words) and recorded/verbal evidence lasting between 6 – 7 minutes. (40 marks)

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ECONOMICS

The

S i x t h Fo r m

U P DAT E D F O R 201 9 /20

P RE-R E QUISITE KNOW L E DGE A N D AT TA I N M E N T We assume no prior knowledge and as such it is not necessary to have studied the subject at GCSE. However, we strongly advise all students to have achieved at least a Grade 7 in both English Language and Mathematics. W H O IS THE CO URSE SUI T E D TO? Economics is an academic subject highly valued by both universities and employers. Successful students will have a genuine interest in current affairs; it relates to every aspect of our lives: from the decisions we make as individuals or families to the structures created by governments and firms. Economics can be observed every day in the newspapers and on TV programmes.

Paper 1: Markets & Market Failure

Paper 2: The National and International Economy

Paper 3: Economic Principles and Issues

Sections 1 - 5 and 10 - 13 assessed

Sections 6 - 9 and 14 - 16 assessed

All sections assessed

ASSESSMEN T: • written exam: 2 hours • 80 marks • 33.3% of A Level

ASSESSMEN T: • written exam: 2 hours • 80 marks • 33.3% of A Level

ASSESSMENT: • written exam: 2 hours • 80 marks • 33.3% of A Level

Q UESTIO N S • Section A: data response questions requiring written answers, choice of one from two contexts worth 40 marks

Q UESTIO N S • Section A: data response questions requiring written answers, choice of one from two contexts worth 40 marks

Q UESTI ONS • Section A: multiple choice questions worth 30 marks

W H AT WILL BE LE AR N T? W H I C H SK I L L S W I L L B E D E V E L O P E D? You will learn to apply economic theory to support analysis of current economic problems and issues. You will develop the knowledge and skills needed to understand and analyse data, think critically about issues and make informed decisions. You will also build upon your quantitative skills and appreciate that, when evaluating arguments, both qualitative and quantitative evidence are important. W H AT DOE S T HE COUR SE I N VOL VE? You will study Sections 1 through to 9 in the first year and 10 through to 16 in the second year which leads to an A Level in Economics. COU RSE CO NTE NT The Operation of Markets and Market Failure: 1. Economic methodology and the economic problem 2. Price determination in a competitive market 3. Production, costs and revenue 4. Competitive and concentrated markets 5. The market mechanism, market failure and government intervention in markets

Section B: essay questions requiring written answers, choice of one from three worth 40 marks

Section B: essay questions

Section B: case study questions requiring written answers, worth 50 marks

requiring written answers, choice of one from three worth 40 marks

M R M M I L N E , B A ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ H E A D O F E CO N O M I C S A N D B U S I N E S S S T U D I E S

The National Economy: 6. The measurement of macroeconomic performance 7. How the macro economy works 8. Economic performance 9. Macroeconomic policy Individuals, Firms, Markets and Market Failure: 10. Individual economic decision making 11. Perfect competition, imperfectly competitive markets and monopoly 12. The labour market 13. The distribution of income and wealth: poverty and inequality The National and International Economy: 14. Financial markets and monetary policy 15. Fiscal policy and supply-side policies 16. The international economy

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E N G L I S H L I T E R AT U R E

The

S i x t h Fo r m

TO B E U P DAT E D

W H AT DO I NE E D TO K N OW OR B E A B L E TO DO BE F O R E TA K IN G T H IS CO U R S E?

PAP ER 2: TEXTS IN SHARED CO N TEXTS

A Level English at Framlingham College is very much a Literature, rather than a Language, course. If you have enjoyed and been successful at GCSE or IGCSE English Literature, then there’s a good chance the same will be true of A Level.

Modern times: literature from 1945 to the present day. Study of three texts: one prose, one poetry, and one drama, of which one must be written post-2000. Examination will include an unseen extract. Open Book.

W H AT WILL I LE ARN ON T H I S COUR SE?

Assessed • Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes • 75 marks • 40% of A Level

As an A Level English Literature student, you will learn to evaluate literary texts from a range of genres and time periods. You will also learn to assess these texts in terms of their literary, historical and cultural contexts as well as to compare them with one another. You will hone your abilities to express your ideas in discussion and to communicate them on paper. W H AT KIND O F STUD E N T I S T H I S COUR SE SUI TA BL E F O R? The ideal A Level English Literature student is a passionate and engaged reader and expects to spend time reading and re-reading their various set texts as well as other relevant works. Happy to contribute to class discussion, she/he is also a good listener and enjoys responding to others’ opinions, but performs equally impressively when called upon to write. To be successful, any A Level English Literature candidate must accept that the most interesting questions are the ones to which there is no easy or final answer. W H AT COULD I G O ON TO DO AT T H E E N D OF MY CO U R S E? If you want to study English in Higher Education, then an A Level in the subject is a must. English Literature fits well in any combination of A Level subjects, and in recent years we have shared successful candidates with almost every other department in the College. The intellectual and practical skills learned and developed during an A Level Literature course are valued highly by universities and employers, and a good English Literature A Level provides evidence of intelligence and communicative ability. Careers open to students with an A Level in English Literature are many and varied, including journalism, education, business, the media and law. In fact, former English students turn up in all walks of life, and choosing this facilitating subject at A Level is unlikely to close any doors for you.

Questions • Section A: Set texts. One essay question on set text. Open book (25 marks) • Section B: Contextual linking: One compulsory question on an unseen extract (25 marks) One essay question linking two texts. Open book (25 marks) Non-exam assessment: Independent critical study: Texts across time: • Comparative critical study of two texts (One of which must be written pre-1900) • One extended essay (2500 words) and a bibliography • 50 marks • 20% of A Level • Assessed by teachers and moderated by examination board

MR L GOLDSMITH, MA MBA PGCE ∙ HEAD OF ENGLISH

P OS S IBLE SUBJ E CT CON T E N T A N D ASSE SSM E N T: • • • • • • • • •

Shakespeare: Othello, Hamlet, Antony and Cleopatra Unseen poetry: Preparation will include study of poets such as: Marvell, Dryden, Rossetti, Browning, Yeats, Cope, Larkin Prose and prose comparison through the lens of a theme (“Love Through the Ages”): Canterbury Tales, Persuasion, Wuthering Heights, The Great Gatsby, Atonement, The Go-Between Text and context study (Literature from 1945 to the present day): Prose: The Handmaid’s Tale, Waterland, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, The God of Small Things, The Help, Revolutionary Road Poetry: Skirrid Hill, Feminine Gospels, Ted Hughes selection, Sylvia Plath selection Drama: Top Girls, A Streetcar Named Desire, Translations, All My Sons, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof Texts across time: Themes may include: Crime and Punishment, Minds Under Stress, The Gothic, Satire and Dystopia

PAPER 1: LOV E THROUGH T H E AGE S - SH A K E SP E A R E A N D P O E T RY Study of three texts: one poetry and one prose text, of which one must be written pre-1900, and one Shakespeare play. Examination will include two unseen poems. Assessed • Written exam: 3 hours • 75 marks • 40% of A-level Questions Section A: Shakespeare: one passage-based question with linked essay. Closed book. (25 marks) Section B: Unseen poetry: compulsory essay question on two unseen poems (25 marks) Section C: Comparing texts: one essay question linking two texts. Open Book (25 marks)

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ELP

(Extended Learning Programme)

The

S i x t h Fo r m

The Sixth Form is an exciting time for students. It is a period of transition discernible by a focus on subject specialism and increasing opportunities to take responsibility through leadership, all with a view to preparing for life beyond Framlingham College. The Extended Learning Programme is designed to enrich students' experiences and allow them to develop the skills necessary for independent learning as well as providing opportunities fort character development. The Programme starts with a focus on study, reflecting the need for students to adapt quickly to A Level work. Note-taking, referencing, research methods and avoidance of plagiarism are taught to complement and enhance students' experience of their subjects. All Sixth Form students are role models and potential leaders, and the development of leadership skills is a real strength of our Sixth Form, whether they do so through Peer Mentoring or a position in the House. In addition, we take all Year 12 students through a course certified by the Institute of Leadership and Management, allowing the students to earn a Level 2 City and Guilds Award in Leadership. This is taught through the example of established leaders, and a variety of inspiring speakers therefore address the students regularly. M I S S C C R A N M E R , B A ( H O N S ) M A P G C E ∙ E L P COO R D I N ATO R

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EPQ

The

S i x t h Fo r m

(Extended Project Qualification)

W H AT IS IT?

The taught element will be directed through a number of co-ordinated in-class sessions, online courses and local university visits.

Can I make recognisable musical instruments out of household items? What factors caused the closure of the Millennium Bridge? Makeup Analysis of Beauty Icons. The Value and Uses of 3D Printing in Medicine. Is solely beef farming profitable? Could the encouragement of free markets lead to an increase in personal liberty? How can we encourage a greater female demographic in the air cadets? How has folklore influenced Gothic Literature? Organic Food – is it worth it?

M R S F R E N C H , B A ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ E P Q COO R D I N ATO R

These are just some of the areas of personal curiosity upon which Extended Projects have been based. Are you into motor sport? Do you have a passion for archaeology? Perhaps you’re captivated by the films of Sergei Eisenstein. You may have a desire to quench your curiosity about feudal Japan or maybe you have always been interested in the real world application and value of prime numbers. You might even want to put on your very own rock show. On paper, here in this guide, it’s just speculation; a dream. But you can make it a reality; whatever excites you or sparks your interest could be a viable project for a study and it could help you to get into your first choice university. The Extended Project Qualification is your chance to apply your analytical and evaluative skills to your own area of interest – in your own way. Designed to enhance and develop the essential skills sought by institutions of higher education and valued by universities all over the world, the EPQ works in harmony with your existing A Level choices to develop your holistic learning skills; everything from conceptualisation and planning, through critical research proficiency to development and realisation of ideas and presentation skills. The “university-friendly” methodology of the EPQ is such that it is intended to engage learners of all abilities and provide an opportunity to extend their expertise beyond their current programmes of study. At the equivalent of half an A Level, it is also becoming increasingly more commonplace on university offers to students. W H AT IS THE PROCE SS? You will be assigned a supervisor – a specially trained member of the teaching staff who will guide you through the process, challenging you at every step. You will select, interpret, review, evaluate, analyse, develop, explore…the list is endless! Remember, you are responsible for everything in this learning journey, integrating your own areas of interest with the feedback from your supervisor. So, whilst a very robust structure exists within the College to support you with the process, ultimately the accountability rests with you. You must be highly motivated, organised, willing to learn new skills and attend sessions outside your current timetable, consistently demonstrate the qualities of an independent learner, be able to respond to and engage with formative feedback and, above all, have a passion for your project. W H AT WILL I DO (AN D H OW I T I S ASSE SSE D)? Complete a Production Log: an official AQA 15 page document designed to help you quantify and explain your learning journey. Every decision, every obstacle, every success will need to be chronicled and organised in this important document which is assessed – with almost equal weighting – alongside your project. Produce a written report or artefact based on your chosen area of interest. Written reports must be 5000 words, artefacts must be accompanied by a 1500 word report detailing the process or creation. Artefacts include anything not produced in standard “essay format” including, but not limited to: models, artwork, collage, games, exhibitions, shows/performances, audio recordings and original videos/movies. Presentation to a non-specialist public audience: you will be required to host an evaluative and reflective oral presentation (including Q&A session) chronicling the development and progression of your entire EPQ journey. This will take place in a public venue and is another opportunity to gain valuable marks through assessment. THE TAUG HT E LE ME N T Running concurrently throughout the process, a series of structured sessions will be held which are designed to enable candidates to develop understanding of the formal requirements of the EPQ including: • • • • • •

Formal extended writing style/structure Time management Plagiarism Research Methodology/Skills Referencing (citations/footnotes/bibliographies/appendices etc.) Presentation skills

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G E OG R A P H Y

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W H AT DO I NE E D TO K N OW B E F OR E TAK I N G T H IS CO U R S E? It is usual for candidates to have successfully completed a GCSE Geography course, but it is not essential. If you have any questions, please talk to the Geography staff. W H AT WILL I LE ARN ON T H I S COUR SE? • • • • • • • • •

Understand how to look at the world through a geographical lens Understand the concepts of space and place Understand the processes which form unique physical features Understand the interdependence of societies, economies and environments at various scales Investigate and evaluate sustainable development strategies in a range of contexts Investigate Geographical issues and formulate sustainable solutions Understand how to plan and undertake rigorous investigations Acquire experience of a variety of fieldwork techniques Develop a range of transferable skills from communication and teamwork to literacy and problem solving

W H O IS SUIT E D TO TH I S COUR SE? Anyone who is interested in acquiring and developing a geographical perspective: Students who are willing to be challenged to view the world in a different way.

Changing Landscapes and Changing Places

Data response and extended response questions on Coastal Landscapes and Changing Places

Global Systems and Global Governance

Data response nd extended response questions on Water and Carbon Cycles, Migration and Oceans and 21st Century Challenges

Contemporary Themes in Geography

Extended response questions on Tectonics, Ecosystems and Economic Growth and Challenge

Independent Investigation

One written investigation (3,000 - 4,000 words) on a topic of the candidate's choosing

Collecting, analysing and evaluating data are significant for understanding in all units. Fieldwork will be undertaken using the Norfolk and Suffolk coastlines, urban areas such as Ipswich and the London Docklands. This will be supported by local fieldwork in the Framlingham area. Students will undertake their own data collection (on a topic of their choosing) for the Independent Investigation and they will have the opportunity to visit Iceland which offers a unique and unforgettable experience. Year 12 Geographers will take part in a residential fieldtrip at an additional cost of approximately £250. M R E N E W M A N , B S c ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ H E A D O F G E OG R A P H Y

W H AT COULD I G O ON TO DO AT T H E E N D OF T HE CO U R S E? Geography is at the interface between the sciences and the arts and therefore complements a range of subjects. Employers are on the look-out for young people with geographical skills and a geographical perspective. There are over 80 universities which offer geography courses including 20 Russell Group Universities.

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H I S TO R Y

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P RE-R E QUISITE KNOW L E DGE A N D AT TA I N M E N T? CO URSE ASSESSMEN TS While History GCSE prepares a student in some ways for A Level, it is certainly not essential. The key desirable qualities are a genuine interest in the subject, combined with an ability to analyse and argue a case, both orally and in writing.

Component 1: ‘Breadth Study’

W H O IS THE CO URSE SUI T E D TO?

Written exam of 2 hours 30 minutes; three questions (one compulsory source question, plus two essays); 80 marks; 40% of A Level.

The A Level course will appeal to students who:

Component 2: ‘Depth Study’

• • • • •

Written exam of 2 hours 30 minutes; three questions (one compulsory source question, plus two essays); 80 marks; 40% of A Level.

Have an interest in the way that the world has developed Enjoy investigation, debate and framing a well-argued case Want to combine History with subjects such as English and a Modern Foreign Language Want to broaden their Science A Levels to include an Arts subject Want to keep their options open for a wide range of higher education or career choices

W H I C H SKILLS WILL B E D E VE L OPE D?

Component 3: Historical Investigation 3000-3500 words; 40 marks; 20% of A Level; marked by College teachers and moderated by AQA. M R J M OO R E , B A ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ H E A D O F H I S TO R Y

By the end of your course you will have learned how to evaluate and analyse information, how to weigh up evidence and how to communicate complex ideas effectively. These skills are recognised and valued by employers, universities and colleges. W H AT DOE S T HE COUR SE L E A D TO? History provides an excellent foundation for a number of popular careers including journalism, politics, law and business. The quality of the A Level History experience at the College is well illustrated by the significant number of students choosing to read the subject at top universities in recent years, including Oxbridge. COU RSE CO NTE NT The A Level course is made up of three components: 1.

The Quest for Political Stability: Germany, 1871–1991 (‘Breadth Study’)

This option allows students to study in breadth issues of change, continuity, cause and consequence relating to the following key topics: • • • •

The Kaiserreich, 1871–1914 Empire to Democracy, 1914–1929 The Nazi Experiment, 1929–1949 Division to Unity: the Federal Republic of Germany, 1949–1991

2.

Religious Conflict and the Church in England, c1529–c1570 (‘Depth Study’)

This option provides for the study in depth of a period of major change in the English Church and government, focusing on issues which led to the ‘Break with Rome’ and the problems surrounding the emergence of the Church of England. • • • • • •

The Church in c1529 The Break from Rome, c1529–1536 Change and Reaction, 1536–1547 A more Protestant Nation, 1547–1553 The restoration of Papal Authority, 1553–1558 The establishment of the Church of England, 1558–c1570

3.

Historical Investigation (non-exam assessment)

Students will be required to submit a Historical Investigation (3,000 - 3,500 words) based on a development or issue which has been subject to different historical interpretations. This topic will be chosen by the student, subject to teacher guidance. It must be independently researched and draw upon the student’s investigation of primary and secondary sources; the topic must cover a period of approximately 100 years and must not duplicate the content of Components 1 and 2. Students will complete this by March of their Year 13, to leave the summer clear for revision of the two examined components. PAGE 36 ∙ THE SIXTH FORM

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H I S TO R Y O F A R T

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W H AT DO I NE E D TO K N OW B E F OR E TAK I N G T H IS CO U R S E? You need to be interested in Art; although you may not have had any prior experience of the subject. It is not necessary to have studied Art and Design at GCSE but you should have an interest in the history of western culture, incorporating inevitably art and architecture. You should have an enthusiasm for reading and researching ideas around this subject area and therefore you need to be able to write essays effectively. The course will involve visits to galleries and architectural landmarks. W H AT WILL I LE ARN ON T H I S COUR SE? The course will enable you to learn about the significance of artworks from specific periods of history; from Ancient Greece to the present day. You will develop your ideas and opinions about historical issues and learn to use specialist vocabulary to communicate your knowledge and understanding about architecture, sculpture, painting, photography and design. You will gain an understanding of the principal methods of research and you will learn how artworks have been interpreted in the past and how this has often been affected by the context in which the work was made. F OR WHAT KIND O F ST UD E N T I S T H I S COUR SE S U ITA BL E? Students who think they will enjoy discovering and investigating their cultural history. It will appeal to students who are looking for an academic essay style subject that is approved by Oxbridge and Russell Group universities. It should also appeal to those who want to learn more about contemporary art, architecture and design. It is a subject that often uses ideas from literature, history and philosophy, combining these ideas in an exciting discipline that makes you think. As a well-respected academic subject it can lead on to a wide range of courses and careers. W H AT COULD I G O ON TO DO AT T H E E N D OF MY CO U R S E? There are specific History of Art degree courses at many top universities and in addition History of Art is often combined with Languages, History, English Literature and Music, though it can also be combined with Psychology and other Sciences. History of Art is useful if considering studying Archaeology and/or Anthropology. It will also inform any aspiring architectural student with the knowledge they need to understand the history and current trends in this specialism. However, as an academic essay based subject, like many humanities, it is also an excellent subject to lead on to a variety of different degrees that involve the ability to research and express ideas through written prose. It is, of course, a very good subject to take with Art and Design courses, providing a good basis from which to develop ideas. The analytical skills that you develop and the ability you will gain in researching ideas and how to reach independent judgements are very useful in a variety of careers. History of Art is also useful for working in specific areas such as restoration, conservation and curatorial work as well as opportunities to work with antiques, auction houses, museums and galleries, or in sectors that require visual literary and analytical skills such as advertising, marketing and communications.

CO URSE STRUCTURE The areas of study are: Visual analysis, Themes and Periods in Art History Paper One 1.

Visual Analysis and Theme: 3 Hours = 50% Students will be given examples of painting, sculpture and architecture from Art History. They will need to be able to discuss and analyse this work, which they may not have seen before.

2.

From the two themes below, students will answer a simple compulsory question in two parts: • B1 Nature in Art and Architecture • B2 Identities in Art and Architecture

Paper Two 1.

Two periods of Art History: 3 Hours = 50% • C1 Invention and Illusion: The Renaissance in Italy 1420 - 1520 • C4 Brave New World: Modernism in Europe 1900 - 39 For each period, students answer a single compulsory question in four parts. CRITICAL TEXTS Students must explore critical texts: essays/critiques with books/articles to evidence and support their arguments. A different critical text must be used for each theme, and these must be different for each of the different papers. M R S S TA N S L E Y , B A ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ H E A D O F A R T

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L AT I N

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Latin is a subject that is very much back on the curriculum. If a generation back there was some speculation that it might disappear amongst a plethora of trendier options, it is now re-establishing itself in a variety of forms in a variety of schools, and Framlingham is keen to ensure that students with the right aptitude have the opportunity to make the most of their ability in this field. A knowledge of our classical heritage is vital for understanding the nature of modern Europe, many of the languages of modern Europe largely derive from Latin, and so for scientists, linguists and those following courses in any of the humanities, some Latin is a useful tool, an adornment to their studies, and an indication to good universities that here is a student with something extra. Latin A Level has evolved as have other exam courses, but mutatis mutandis, the basic elements remain much the same. The course content as set out in the syllabus is divided into Language and Literature, each carrying 50% of the total final marks. The Language element builds on the basic work done for GCSE and involves a high level of competence with a range of vocabulary and linguistic structures developed through reading and studying prose and verse extracts. Students will therefore encounter a range of authors from the Classical period so as to be prepared for an Unseen Translation paper (33%) and a Comprehension or Prose Composition paper (17%). In the process they will pick up an outline of Roman history and civilisation.

For the Literature element, study of specific texts in prose (25%) and Verse (25%) is undertaken. Currently the prose text is Cicero’s pro Milone, most of which is studied in Latin, though parts are just to be read in English. This shows the leading orator of his day mounting a powerful defence of his client in difficult circumstances, but with all the style and panache that Cicero could bring to a polished legal speech. Quite apart from the language, anyone interested in the Law or politics or the art of persuasion can find much to chew over here. The Verse works are a complete contrast, centred round romantic, and sometimes less romantic, love: selections from Ovid’s Amores are linked with selected poems from Propertius and Tibullus, verses with which any teenager should be able to identify, all done with a craftsmanship that puts the moderns to shame. Ovid in particular speaks to us directly, in a manner comparable to that of Philip Larkin in the twentieth century. The Sixth Form groups for Latin are usually small, and the lessons are fitted in the time-table around the blocks for other subjects chosen by students in a particular year. Latin students have fewer lessons, but the small groups mean that tuition is almost individual. The right motivation is necessary for students to be able to work on their own, but those who work hard can get their full reward. me miserum! certas habuit puer ille sagittas: uror, et in vacuo pectore regnat Amor. Alas! that boy had unerring arrows: I am on fire, and Love reigns in my once empty heart. Perhaps Cupid can tempt you too into this ancient and modern subject? M R M J COO K E , M A ∙ H E A D O F L AT I N

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M AT H E M AT I C S

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The A Level Mathematics course enhances and develops your existing Mathematical skills, and delves deeper into the world of Pure Mathematics, Statistics, and Mechanics. W H AT E NTRY QUALI F I CAT I ON S DO I R E QUI R E FO R T H IS CO U R S E? A solid foundation in the more challenging aspects of iGCSE Mathematics is necessary, as the course builds on this understanding. Strong knowledge of number and algebra is essential and, based on past experience, Grade 7 at GCSE is the desirable minimum requirement for starting the A Level course. Aspiring candidates should seek advice from their present Mathematics teacher as to their suitability for this next, more demanding level.

HOW MAN Y PAP ERS WILL I HAV E TO TAK E? 1. 2. 3.

Pure Pure 2 Statistics and Mechanics

2 hours 2 hours 2 hours

∙ ∙ ∙

Calculators are allowed Calculators are allowed Calculators are allowed

Further Mathematics A Level A Level Further Mathematics is fun and rewarding, broadening your mathematical skills and promoting deeper mathematical thinking. At Framlingham College, we teach the entirety of A Level Mathematics in an accelerated program, before embarking on the second qualification.

W H AT WILL I LE ARN ON T H I S COUR SE? Mathematics at A Level is a challenging and interesting course which provides a richer and more in depth understanding of what you have studied previously. It utilises skills of logical and rational thought processes when building on work you will have met before, and when exploring new ideas and concepts. Whilst it is worth studying in its own right, Mathematics is widely appreciated as a versatile qualification that is well-respected by employers, facilitating entry into many Higher Education courses. Mathematics at A Level is divided into three branches: Pure Mathematics Pure Mathematics extends your knowledge of topics such as algebra, geometry and trigonometry, as well as starting to explore new concepts such as calculus. Pure Mathematics is the main section of the course, which describes the fundamental building blocks of the subject. Statistics In Statistics you will learn how to collect, analyse, and summarise numerical data to make conclusions or predictions about future events. You will test the validity of statements by using hypothesis testing, investigate probability and risk, and tackle real-life problems with statistical models. Many subjects make use of statistical information and techniques, and is important for careers like insurance, medicine, engineering, and science. Mechanics Mechanics involves modelling and analysing the physical world around us. You will explore the effect of forces and motion, learning how to describe and interpret these situations mathematically. Mechanics is particularly useful to make mathematical sense of the real world and is great for students studying Physics and Engineering.

This course is suited only to the very best Mathematicians, opting for Further Mathematics in addition to their A Level Mathematics course (resulting in two A Level qualifications overall). Further Mathematics is divided into four parts, consisting of two compulsory Pure Mathematics units, and two optional units. The optional units may be chosen from extra Pure Mathematics, Mechanics, Statistics or Decision Mathematics options. Pure Mathematics (compulsory) Here you extend your knowledge of the A Level course, whilst also exploring other topics such as complex numbers, matrices and vectors. Statistics (Option) In Statistics, the work covered on the A Level course is extended to introduce further probability models, and also to testing whether a particular model may be used to represent a real-life situation (Chi squared testing). Mechanics (Option) The A Level Mechanics unit is extended to introduce more complicated work-energy problems and collisions. You will also look at circular motion, finding centres of mass, and look at elastic strings and springs. Decision Mathematics (Option) If you study Decision Mathematics, you will learn how to solve problems involving networks. You will study a range of methods, or algorithms, which enable such problems to be tackled. This branch of mathematics is of recent origin and does not require pure mathematical skills. HOW MAN Y PAP ERS WILL I HAV E TO TAK E?

While studying Mathematics you will be expected to: • • • • •

Use mathematical skills and knowledge to solve problems of varying complexity; Simplify real life situations so that you can use mathematics to show what is happening and what might happen in different circumstances; Use mathematics to solve problems that are given to you in a real-life context; Develop and extend your ability to structure mathematical arguments logically, including formal proofs; Use calculator software and other resources effectively and fluently, where appropriate.

1. 2. 3. 4.

Further Pure 1 Further Pure 2 Option 1 Option 2

90 minutes 90 minutes 90 minutes 90 minutes

∙ ∙ ∙ ∙

Calculators are allowed Calculators are allowed Calculators are allowed Calculators are allowed

M I S S H M cC A R T N E Y , B A ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ H E A D O F M AT H E M AT I C S

It is essential the students purchase an appropriate calculator that has the capabilities required to access the course. It would be advantageous, but not essential, for students to own a calculator that has graph drawing capabilities. Framlingham College students and staff use the Casio range: the FX-991 EX CLASSWIZ that has been specially designed for the course, and the FX-CG50 graphical version. W H AT COULD I G O ON TO DO AT T H E E N D OF MY CO U R S E? A Level Mathematics is very valuable in supporting many courses at A Level and degree level, especially in the Sciences, Geography, Psychology, Sociology, and Medical courses. It is a much sought-after qualification for entry to a wide variety of full-time courses in Higher Education. A Level Mathematics is essential for studying Mathematics, Engineering or Physics at University. A Level Further Mathematics may also be advisable for entry to these courses at some universities.

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M O D E R N L A N G UA G E S

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French and Spanish

L ANGUAG E S TODAY The globalised nature of today’s employment market means that almost all businesses and careers need some level of linguistic competence in languages other than English. With a Modern Languages degree, or a combination of languages and other subjects, you could have a career in a wide range of industries. Companies are keen to employ British graduates who speak another language and those who do are at a distinct advantage over those who speak only English.

HOW WILL I STUDY? • • • •

You will study in small classes using authentic materials, text books, internet-based resources, literature and films You will have a weekly speaking tutorial with a native speaker assistant teacher either on a one-to-one basis or in a pair You will have the opportunity to participate in an exchange to France and Spain By the end of two years of A Level study, you can expect to be confident speaking on a wide range of topics and be able to understand written and spoken language as it is used on a day-to-day basis in the country

WHAT DO ES THE A LEV EL EXAM IN VO LV E? I S TH I S CO URSE SUITA B L E F OR M E? If you are interested in people, travel, learning about other countries and ways of life, then the Modern Languages A Level could be suitable for you. You will need patience and persistence to learn vocabulary and grammar. You will have to devote time to reading, researching and listening independently. You need a genuine curiosity about your language and real desire to be able to speak and understand it. W H AT DOE S T HE A LE VE L COUR SE I N VOL VE? An A Level in Modern Languages will build on the knowledge, skills and understanding acquired at GCSE. It will significantly enhance your practical linguistic skills, develop a capacity for critical and analytical thinking and a broad knowledge and understanding of language, culture and society. You will acquire skills which will enable you to learn other languages in the future. It will give you a deeper understanding of other countries and the confidence to interact with people from backgrounds other than your own. You will develop independence, resourcefulness, creativity and critical thinking.

• • •

Paper 1 ∙ Listening and reading comprehension. Translation into English Paper 2 ∙ Written response on two literary texts or one literary text and a film. Translation into French, Spanish. Paper 3 ∙ Speaking: • Task 1 - discussion of an A level theme, • Task 2 - presentation and discussion of independent research on a topic of your choice.

WHAT CO ULD I STUDY AFTER A LEV EL MO DERN L AN GUAGES? There are many options for the study of languages at university. You could take a Modern Languages degree, either continuing with your A Level language(s) or taking others that you have not studied before “ab initio”. Languages combine with almost any other subject at degree level. To list just a few examples: Law, English, Business Studies, Politics, International Relations, Engineering, History, Journalism. Most universities offer a year in the country of your language either working or studying. You would have a unique opportunity to gain experience and broaden your horizons before beginning a career. MR B DYER ∙ HEAD OF FRENCH

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MUSIC & BTEC MUSIC

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Music in the Sixth Form is varied and enriching. Music students are the backbone of the department, and have the opportunity to demonstrate both leadership and excellence in whichever areas of music they are interested in. All Music students are heavily involved in co-curricular Music, and as such are outstanding role models for their peers.

2.

We offer two pathways:

The new BTEC Level 3 Extended Certificate offers students a modern, work-related qualification, the purpose of which is to support defined progression routes into higher education or employment. BTEC Extended Certificate also aims to develop independent research and study skills essential for success at university. This is a vocational course that offers students the opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge in a wide range of musical scenarios, in order to meet industry standards.

1.

A LE V E L MUSIC

This two year course enables students to develop the skills and knowledge both academically and practically. The course is split into three different sections: 1.

Performing: Students must submit a recording of a recital of at least 8 minutes of performing time in total. The expected standard of performance is Grade 7 or its equivalent.

2.

Composing: Students compose at least two pieces lasting no less than 6 minutes in total. One is to be a free-choice (brief based) or free composition. The other must be in response to one of four briefs assessing technique.

3.

Appraising: Through the study of set works, students develop their analysis skills, and are encouraged to make connections between different styles, genres and periods of music. Students will sit a two-hour examination based on their study of set works. Aural skills are also assessed through the listening section of this examination.

Students are required to study a minimum of three areas of study at A level: • •

At least one area of study must be drawn from music composed in the Western Classical Tradition with all or the majority being composed between 1650 and 1910. At least one other area of study must not be drawn from the Western Classical Tradition.

The Areas of Study are: • Area of study 1: Vocal Music • Area of study 2: Instrumental Music • Area of study 3: Music for Film • Area of study 4: Popular Music and Jazz • Area of study 5: Fusions • Area of study 6: New Directions This course suits students who have achieved Grade 5 Theory, and are at least Grade 6 in one instrument. It is an ideal course for those who relish academic challenge, and are interested in a formal teaching and learning style.

BTEC MUSIC

We will be following the Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate, which is the equivalent of one A-Level qualification.

The course consists of five units, of which three are mandatory and one is optional. Students will apply their learning through practical assessments, in the form of internally assessed assignments and externally assessed tasks. The course outline is as follows: Mandator y Units: 1. 2. 3.

Practical Music and Harmony Professional Practice in the Music Industry Ensemble Music Performance

Optional Units: 4. Composing Music 5. Music Performance Session Styles 6. Solo Performance 7. Improvising Music

The course suits students with a passion for all styles of music, who want to learn through practical application. It is also relevant to those who wish to work in the music or entertainment industry, whether as a performer, technician or in a more administrative role. 3.

BTEC MUSIC TECHN O LOGY

We will be following the Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate, which is the equivalent of one A-Level qualification. The new BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate offers students a modern, work-related qualification, the purpose of which is to support defined progression routes into higher education or employment. BTEC Extended Certificate also aims to develop independent research and study skills essential for success at university. This is a vocational course that offers students the opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge in a wide range of musical scenarios, in order to meet industry standards. The course consists of five units, of which two are mandatory and three are optional. Students will apply their learning through practical assessments, in the form of internally assessed assignments and externally assessed tasks. The course outline is as follows: Mandator y Units: • •

Studio Recording Techniques DAW Production

Optional Units: • Live Sound • Mixing and Mastering Techniques • Studio Design and Acoustics • Working and Developing as a Production Team

The course suits students with a passion for all styles of music, who want to learn through practical application. It is also relevant to those who wish to work in the music or entertainment industry, whether as a performer, technician or in a more administrative role. M R S L B L OO R E , D I P TC L L TC L P G C E ∙ D I R E C TO R O F M U S I C

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PHILOSOPHY

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Incorporating Religious Studies

This accessible but challenging course combines four respected and related philosophical disciplines: Epistemology, Moral Philosophy, The Metaphysics of God (Philosophy of Religion) and The Metaphysics of Mind. Building on the critical ethical study undertaken in GCSE RS, and covering much of the previously familiar A Level course known as ‘Religious Studies’, this course investigates our capacity to know the world, to make consistent moral decisions, to argue for belief in God and to understand human consciousness. Students will study all four areas: epistemology, moral philosophy, metaphysics of God and metaphysics of mind. The qualification is linear which means that all students will sit two exams at the end of the course. YEAR 12

Why should you study Philosophy? One direct benefit is greater comprehension. Firstly, comprehension of the profound questions that have propelled human development forward in search of understanding. Secondly, comprehension of the key thinkers and experimenters who have extended our grasp of human perception, human belief, human morals and human ontology. A more indirect benefit of studying this subject, which incorporates the knotty question of whether we have any relationship with a divine power, is the acquisition of the following transferable skills: the development of competent research strategies; the ability to construct reasoned arguments; the confidence to articulate one’s arguments forcibly and engage others in debate; the capacity to analyse received wisdom and to pare down cluttered and distracting claims to their essentials.

50% of A Level How can you apply philosophical aptitude in the real world? Section A: Epistemology Section B: Moral philosophy

Not only does this course introduce you to four central philosophical specialisms, informing you about how you might pursue philosophy at university, it opens up other key careers too.

Epistemology – What can we know? Here are some of the questions this aspect of the course addresses. • • • •

What are the immediate objects of perception? What is the difference between knowing ‘of’, knowing ‘how’ and knowing ‘that’? Where do ideas/concepts and knowledge come from? Can we know things outside of experience? Can we… should we… trust our senses?

Philosophy in its various forms is seen as an academic grounding useful for Law, Local Government and policy making, Politics, Medical Ethics, Journalism, Teaching, Corporate Leadership and Creative Writing. A thorough grounding in this course and its analytical problem solving furthermore, is likely to equip you to identify other career paths philosophy ably illuminates. DR P R GILES, BD MED PHD PHIL HND ART DIP ART PGCE ∙ HEAD OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Moral Philosophy – How do we decide morally? Here are some of the questions this aspect of the course addresses. • • •

How do we decide consistently what it is morally right to do? Is morality determined by pleasing the greatest number of people? Are actions and intentions morally right or wrong in principle regardless of outcomes?

YEAR 13 50% of A Level Section C: Metaphysics of God Section D: Metaphysics of Mind Metaphysics of God – Is God’s existence provable? Here are some of the questions this aspect of the course addresses. • • • •

How is the nature of God to be understood? Are any philosophical arguments for God’s existence effective? Isn’t God disproved by a world of suffering? Can one really speak meaningfully anyway about an intangible God?

Metaphysics of Mind – Are mind and body separate? Here are some of the questions this aspect of the course addresses. • • • •

What is the relationship between the mental and the physical? Could a person exist without a body? Is there a ‘what it is like’ to be human that goes beyond mere information? Are humans just a collection of physical behaviours and the mind is an illusion?

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By three methods we may learn wisdom: First by reflection, which to noblest; Second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third by experience, which is the bitterest. - CON F UC IUS

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P H Y S I C A L E D U C AT I O N a n d BTEC SPORTS SCIENCE

A LEVEL PHYSICAL EDUCATION P RE-R E QUISITE KNOW L E DGE AN D AT TA I N M E NT

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U P DAT E D F O R 201 9 /20

3. Socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport (20% weighting – 1 hour examination) This component focuses on the sociological and contemporary issues that influence and affect physical activity and sport for both the audience and the performer and how sport affects society. It is divided into:

GCSE Physical Education is not a pre-requisite for following this subject at A Level, although it does provide useful background information. Generally candidates should be interested in sport and keen to understand how the human body is able to respond to the demands of the sports environment and the role that sport plays in society. You do not need to be a top class performer, but you must be prepared to take advantage of all the opportunities for improving personal skills that exist outside the curriculum.

a.

W H AT WILL I LE ARN ON T H I S COUR SE?

4. Performance in Physical Education (30% weighting – non-examination element) This component contains the practical element of the A Level Physical Education course, divided into two sections:

Studying A Level Physical Education will give you a fantastic insight into the amazing world of sport performance. Not only will you have the chance to perform or coach a sport through to the non-exam assessment component, you will also develop a wide ranging knowledge into the 'how and why' of physical activity and sport. The combination of physical performance and academic challenge provides an exciting opportunity for students. Your can perform, and then through the academic study improve your performance or coaching through application of theory. Physical Education is studied through a range of different contexts and the impact it has on both ours and others' everyday lives. You will learn the reasons why we do things, why some people outperform others, mentally and physically. You will also delve into the ethical considerations behind the use of drugs and also the influence that modern technology is having in and on physical activity and sport. W H AT KIND O F STU D E N T I S T H I S COUR SE SUI TA BL E F O R? You must understand that it is an academic subject which covers a range of topics. The focus isn't just practical PE! This is a fantastic course that goes into great detail about a wide range of concepts. Are you thinking of becoming a physiotherapist; managing a leisure centre or gym; wanting to become a personal trainer or influence the diet and exercise habits of the nation as a nutritionist or adviser; fascinated by the human body or studying other sciences; or do you just want to understand the why behind sports performance? If so, then A Level PE is for you.

b.

a. b.

Sport and society – in the section we look at the role played by sport in society and factors that have influenced the development of sport. This will include topics such as the impact of hosting the Olympics and also the role of technology. Contemporary issues in physical activity and sport – here pupils will consider the ethics involved in sporting behaviour and topics will include commercialisation, the media and the use of illegal drugs.

Practical Performance – pupils are assessed as either a performer or a coach in one sport from the list below. The Evaluation and Analysis of Performance for Improvement – pupils are required to observe and analyse a performance in their chosen sport and apply aspects of their theory courses to the performance in an oral response.

This component is assessed internally and then verified through a moderation process.

Association football Athletics Badminton Basketball Blind Cricket Boccia Boxing Camogie Canoeing

Cricket Track or road cycling Dance Platform diving Equestrian Gaelic football Goal Ball Golf Gymnastics

Handball Field Hockey Hurling Kayaking Lacrosse Netball Polybat Powerchair football Rock Climbing

Rowing Rugby League Rugby Union Sculling Skiing Snowboarding Squash Table Swimming Table Cricket

Table Tennis Tennis Trampolining Volleyball Wheelchair basketball Wheelchair rugby

W H AT COULD I G O ON TO DO AT T H E E N D OF MY CO U R S E? A Level Physical Education is an excellent base for a university degree in sports science, sports management, sports psychology, healthcare, or exercise and health. It can also complement further study in biology, human biology, physics, psychology, nutrition, sociology and more. A Level Physical Education can open up a range of career opportunities including: sports development, sports development in the leisure industry, sports coaching, physiotherapy, personal training or becoming one of the next generation of PE teachers. The transferable skills you learn through your study of Physical Education, such as decision making and independent thinking are also useful in any career path you choose to take. The A Level Physical Education course The OCR A Level Physical Education course that we follow comprises the following four components: 1. Physiological factors affecting performance (30% weighting – 2 hour examination) This component focuses on developing the learner’s knowledge of the science behind physical activity. It is made up of: a. b. c.

Anatomy and Physiology – here you will learn how various systems of the body, such as muscular, skeletal and circulatory,combine in order to produce human movement in a sporting context. Exercise Physiology - students examine the scientific principles behind how performance can be enhanced by training. As part of this course it is usual for students to attend a workshop at Essex University Human Performance laboratory or similar facility. Biomechanics – this involves applying mathematical concepts, such as the effect of forces, to the sporting context in order to help explain why things happen as they do.

2. Psychological factors affecting performance (20% weighting – 1 hour examination) Through the study of this component, pupils will gain a deeper understanding of the underlying psychological factors that influence our performance in physical activity and sport. It is divided into: a. b.

Skill Acquisition - we consider how performers learn skills and we apply this knowledge to discovering the best ways in which coaches and teachers can work with their students. Sports Psychology - students learn how the power of the mind can provide the winning edge in competitive situations. This includes topics such as stress management, controlling aggression, mental preparation and self-confidence.

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P H Y S I C A L E D U C AT I O N a n d BTEC SPORTS SCIENCE Continued

U P DAT E D F O R 201 9 /20

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BTEC - SPORTS SCIENCE The BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Sport is a qualification that is designed to provide pupils with the specialist sports science related knowledge, understanding and skills that are required for career or higher education advancement. The qualification offers an exciting and engaging academic programme for those who are keen to advance their sports science and management expertise. This course offers an excellent insight into the theoretical and biological aspects of sporting performance and coaching as well as sports and leisure management. Whether you are looking to enhance your understanding of exercise physiology and anatomy, understand how nutrition maximises athlete performance, develop your understanding of how to manage sport in the industry or develop your leadership skills through sports coaching, this course is for you. Assessment will mainly be through assessed assignments. Three of the units over the two years will be assessed via externally marked examinations. Within the coursework units, assessment will be generated through a range of activities, including written reports, practical work, poster presentations, leaflet design, observations and oral assessment. This BTEC qualification includes many transferable skills, which play an essential role in developing personal effectiveness for further study and working life. COU R SE OUTLINE The BTEC Diploma in Sport is a two year course and is equivalent to two A-levels. The course consists of nine core units covering diverse sports science-related areas such as:

There are 6 mandatory (M) units (including 3 externally assessed units) and 3 optional units (O) (internally assessed). In Year 12 the following 4 units are delivered: • • • • • • • •

Anatomy and Physiology (M) (externally assessed through an exam) Fitness Training and Programming for Health, Sport and Wellbeing (M) (externally assessed through coursework) Investigating Business in Sport and the Active Leisure Industry (M) (externally assessed through coursework) Skill Acquisition in Sport (M) (internally assessed through coursework) Professional Development in the Sports Industry (M) (internally assessed through coursework) Sports Leadership (M) (internally assessed through coursework) Sports Psychology (O) Practical Sports Performance (O)

In Year 13 the remaining 5 units are delivered: • • • • •

Skill Acquisition in Sport (M) (internally assessed through coursework) Professional Development in the Sports Industry (M) (internally assessed through coursework) Sports Leadership (M) (internally assessed through coursework) Sports Psychology (O) Sports Injury Management (O)

The course has been developed in order to give you a solid foundation within sports science, enabling you to develop essential study and work skills. The development of such skills will prove invaluable in assisting progress to higher education, further qualifications and/ or the enhancement of employment opportunities. You will find the course an excellent platform from which to launch a career into diverse pathways such as: Sports Science Nutritionist Health/Lifestyle Management Sports Therapy Health and Fitness Industry/Management Recreation and Leisure Management Sports Coaching Performance Analysis Sports Development

M R C D G A N G E , B S c ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ H E A D O F P H Y S I C A L E D U C AT I O N

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PHYSICS

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P RE-R E QUISITE KNOW L E DGE A N D AT TA I N M E N T.

Y EAR 13

‘Physics is everything’. So what do you need to know to be able to find out about everything? A background in GCSE/ IGCSE Science is crucial. A Grade 7 or above at GCSE Physics or Double Award Science is highly recommended, as well as a Grade 7 in GCSE Mathematics. The course requires a background in the ability to use algebra and trigonometric techniques in problem solving and the analysis of experimental results. It is highly preferable for a candidate to be studying Mathematics at A Level, too, but although not a necessity, it would be more of a challenge to succeed at Physics.

Module 5 – Newtonian World and Astrophysics 5.1 Thermal physics 5.2 Circular motion 5.3 Oscillations 5.4 Gravitational fields 5.5 Astrophysics and cosmology

W H O IS THE CO URSE SUI T E D TO?

CO URSE ASSESSMEN T

Paper 1 “Modelling Physics”, 2 hours 15 minutes, 37%.

Physics suits someone who is fascinated by how things work, by fundamental questions about the way the world is and by the exactness of science which alone can try to uncover truths about the world. Studying the subject you will feel that what you learn builds upon what you did at GCSE but in a more mathematical way. You must practise the use of mathematics in the subject so that it becomes natural to you so you can begin to concentrate on the ideas themselves as they become more complex. Physics is the science that attempts to describe how nature works with the help of the language of mathematics. It is often considered the most fundamental of all the natural sciences and its theories attempt to describe the behaviour of the smallest building blocks of matter, light, the Universe and everything in between! Physics is often studied alongside Mathematics, Biology and Chemistry, but it can give an analytical edge to any portfolio of subjects. It suits someone who enjoys problem-solving, is interested in explaining how the material world works and would like a practical subject. If you pursue the subject at university you will find that Physics graduates are in great demand in the widest range of careers: pilots, engineers, accountants, management/computer analysts, in the City – anywhere that profound analytical skills are required.

Module 6 – Particles and Medical Physics 6.1 Capacitors 6.2 Electric fields 6.3 Electromagnetism 6.4 Nuclear and particle physics 6.5 Medical imaging

• • •

15 multiple choice questions 85 marks of structured questions Covers modules 1, 2, 3, and 5, and practical skills

Paper 2 “Exploring Physics”, 2 hours 15 minutes, 37%. • • •

15 multiple choice questions 85 marks of structured questions Covers modules 1, 2, 4, and 6, and practical skills

W H AT WILL BE LE AR N T AN D W H I C H SK I L L S W I LL BE D E V E L O P E D? •

• •

From the birth and death of stars to the fleeting interactions of tiny particles, Physics studies how our world works. To do this it uses ideas ranging from Force and Energy, easily understood and ‘everyday’, to Strangeness and Charm, rather more abstract and fanciful concepts! It is a fascinating subject, driven by the desire to find out how and why matter behaves the way it does. Physics is not only interesting, it is also highly marketable. With an A Level in Physics you have proved that you possess a wide range of key skills, exactly what employers and universities are looking for today. Indeed there can be few subjects at A Level that cover such a wide range of transferable skills – from the use of IT in data-logging experiments to the numerical skills that are the bedrock of the subject (essential in problem-solving and in practical work) to skill in written expression needed to produce clear, concise explanations. A Physics student usually possesses excellent analytical, quantitative and problem solving skills. They have the ability to synthesize and analyse large quantities of data and present their analysis in an easily understandable form. When faced with a particular problem they are taught to systematically identify all factors contributing to the problem and work out how those factors interact in order to solve the problem. These are valuable skills that can be applied in a range of careers. More importantly, an increasing number of employers are starting to realize this fact and are looking to hire Physics graduates. Throughout the course, students are invited along to lectures at Cambridge University on a diverse range of topics: we have heard about the ‘Physics of Juggling’, ‘Relativity: The Physics of Space-Time’ and ‘Can Science Make a Cyclist Faster?’ In Year 13, Students have visited the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva as part of the Particle Physics topic.

Paper 3 “Unified Physics”, 1 hour 30 minutes, 26%. •

70 marks of structured questions and extended response

Practical endorsement: Pass/fail, awarded separately to the A Level grade: Over the two year course students will complete a minimum of 12 assessed practicals to develop their skills and contribute to their understanding of core concepts.

M R C M CO N S TA N T I , B S c ∙ H E A D O F P H Y S I C S

YEAR 12 Module 1 – Development of Practical Skills in Physics 1.1 Practical skills assessed in a written examination 1.2 Practical skills assessed in the practical endorsement Module 2 – Foundations of Physics 2.1 Physical quantities and units 2.2 Making measurements and analysing data 2.3 Nature of quantities Module 3 – Forces and Motion 3.1 Motion 3.2 Forces in action 3.3 Work, energy and power 3.4 Materials 3.5 Newton’s laws of motion and momentum Module 4 – Electrons, Waves and Photons 4.1 Charge and current 4.2 Energy, power and resistance 4.3 Electrical circuits 4.4 Waves 4.5 Quantum physics

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P S YC H O L OG Y

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W H AT DO I NE E D TO K N OW OR B E A B L E TO DO BE F O R E TA K IN G T H IS CO U R S E?

CO URSE ASSESSMEN T

The course demands good communication and analytical skills. You will need to be able to read around the subject, analyse and summarise it orally and on paper. Most students have had no previous study of Psychology but come with a keen interest in why people behave as they do.

Paper 1: Introductor y Topics in Psychology

W H O IS THE CO URSE SUI T E D TO?

Compulsory content 1 – 4 Written exam: 2 hours / 33.3% of A Level Mixture of multiple choice, short answer and extended writing

Psychology is the scientific study of the mind and behaviour so you will need to have a keen interest in people's behaviour, be able and prepared to read about different approaches and theories and to present them in logical, analytical essays, using precise terminology. The course requirements now have a clear emphasis on scientific methods including knowledge of statistics, and it should be noted that most universities regard Psychology as a Science for entry requirements onto courses to reflect this. Therefore, as a result of this scientific emphasis, we recommend that students have achieved at least a Grade 7 in English, a Science and Maths at GCSE level, but more importantly, that they approach the course with a mature attitude to learning, as the department uses a flipped teaching approach.

Paper 2: Psychology in Context

W H AT WILL BE LE AR N T? W H I C H SK I L L S W I L L B E D E V E L O P E D?

Compulsory content 8 Optional content: one from option 1, one from option 2, one from option 3 Written exam: 2 hours / 33.3% of A Level Mixture of multiple choice, short answer and extended writing

Transferable skills such as the ability to analyse, evaluate and apply knowledge to everyday situations. Knowledge of Research Methods, their strengths and weaknesses and basic statistical knowledge and application will also be learnt as well as some fundamental concepts that help to explain human behaviour.

Compulsory content 5 – 7 Written exam: 2 hours / 33.3% of A Level Mixture of multiple choice, short answer and extended writing Paper 3: Issues and Options in Psychology

M R S S H O B S O N , B A ( H O N S ) P G C E ∙ H E A D O F P S YC H O L OG Y

W H AT COULD I DO AT T H E E N D OF M Y COUR SE? How the mind works and how people behave in certain situations affects us all and all aspects of work. It can be of use in any career. Recently students have gone on to study a huge variety of courses at University ranging from; Forensic Psychology, Music Therapy, Law, Personnel, Physiotherapy, Teaching, Clinical Psychology, Management, Behavioural Economics, and even Dentistry! COU RSE CO NTE NT The Department follows the AQA specification. Compulsor y Content 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Social influence Memory Attachment Psychopathology Approaches in Psychology Biopsychology Research methods Issues and debates in Psychology

Options

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

9. Relationships 10. Gender 11. Cognition and Development

12. Schizophrenia 13. Eating behaviour 14. Stress

15. Aggression 16. Forensic Psychology 17. Addiction

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Framlingham College - The Sixth Form  

Framlingham College A Level Booklet for academic year 2019-20.

Framlingham College - The Sixth Form  

Framlingham College A Level Booklet for academic year 2019-20.

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