AMBROSIA #12

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4

Contents ma ga z i n e

Contents > Editor’s Note

8-9

> Business Insider

10-11

> Attica: Region for all Seasons

12-21

> The Plant-Based Challenge

22-25

REGION OF ATTICA

> Feta Cheese: The Road to the Top

26-31

Heart of the country

> HELIOS Pasta Industry

32-33

> Special EVOOs of the Greek Land

34-39

> New Opportunities for Greek Honey

40-43

> FOOD EXPO 2022

44-45

> Market Report

46-47

> What’s New

feta cheese The cheese behind the famous name

48

12

26 special evoos Unique, delicious & full of nutrients

34 Μagazine

#12

Winter 2 0 2 1

Fi ne food and drinks of Greece

GREEK MVPS

Feta cheese Specialty olive oil Honey

greek honey

COVER AMBROSIA.indd 1

On the cover: Ιs it feta if it’s not greeK? Simply answer... NO

Top quality recognized 1 2 - 1 4 M A R C H 20 2 2

ambrosiamagazine.com

METROPOLITAN EXPO • ATHENS

15/09/2021 15:42

40



PUBLI

VASSILITSA - G. & A. NOUSIAS G.P.

The cheese

changemakers In a small village just outside Larissa, in the Greek region of Thessaly, lies a unit for the production of fine cheese, where a company run by a third-generation cheese-makers continues a legacy that started 40 years ago.

D

eep in the heart of the Greek land, in the region of Thessaly, where cheesemaking is an art, Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P. has been creating, for approximately 40 years now, dairy products using traditional methods and combining them with state-of-the-art quality controls and packaging. No wonder, the Vassilitsa brand was the first to export Feta cheese to West Germany in 1967, paving the way to international markets for other Greek companies. Currently, the factory in Nea Lefki, on the outskirts of the city of Larissa, is producing not only Feta PDO, but other delicious cheeses, such as PDO organic Feta, PDO Manouri and organic Manouri, goat cheese, organic goat cheese, Anthotyro, as well as yogurt. Feta and

Manouri, however, remain the core business with roughly 2,500 tons and 60 tons, respectively, of the famous cheeses produced every year in the company’s facilities.

Global seal of approval What makes Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P. cheeses and dairy products, in general, stand out from the competition is the fact they are produced from excellent quality local sheep and goats milk, using a combination of traditional recipes, millennia-old know-how and cutting-edge technology to ensure safety while conforming to the latest Greek and European legislation. Responding to modern consumer demands and following constant quality and quantity controls in all stages of production, Vassilit-

VASSILITSA PDO FETA FACTS & FIGURES

13,000,000 KG

2,500,000 KG

95%

OF SHEEP & GOAT MILK USED PER YEAR

OF FETA PRODUCTION A YEAR

OF PRODUCTION IS EXPORTED TO 16 COUNTRIES


sa - G. & A. Nousias G.P. has consolidated its leading place in the Greek market while guaranteeing products second to none. As a result, the products’ §superior flavor and exceptional quality have been instrumental in the subsequent international success of the company.

The main products • PDO Feta According to Mr Konstantinos Nousias, third generation cheesemaker, “only Greeks know the authentic recipe of real Feta cheese.” The milk used to make Feta is from sheep and goats (70%-80% sheep and 20%-30% goat milk) from mainland Greece –Thessaly in this particular case– in order to meet the PDO specifications. For the production of organic Feta, the company uses the same percentage of milk but with organic certification. • PDO Manouri Manouri is a cheese dating back to antiquity. It is a soft, white cheese, produced in Thessaly, Central and Western Macedonia –a basic precondition for its PDO designation– from sheep's milk or in combination with goat's milk. For its production, both cheese-milk and cream are necessary to create a curd cheese of pleasant, sweet taste and characteristic aroma.

New products and future endeavors Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P. has recently launched the Vassilitsa sheep yogurt, produced exclusively from fresh sheep’s milk, without the use of preservatives and by adding yogurt culture only in the traditional way, known to the Nousias family for generations. So far, Vassilitsa yogurt is exported to 3 countries. It is worth noting that 95 percent of the company’s production is exported but, there is considerable margin for further development. In fact, the brand’s plan for the future is to continue to adapt to the requirements of the everchanging marketplace, to implement the latest innovations in production, and to further develop its outward-looking orientation. n

VASSILITSA PDO MANOURI FACTS & FIGURES

37,000

60,000

KG

KG

95%

OF FRESH SHEEP & GOAT CREAM USED PER YEAR

OF MANOURI PRODUCTION A YEAR

OF PRODUCTION IS EXPORTED TO 13 COUNTRIES

Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P. in numbers

95 % of production exported

23 tons of sheep & goats milk used

40 years of experience

in cheesemaking


8

Editorial ma ga z i n e

Editor’s

id

NOTE

Founder / Honorary President Nikos Choudalakis nx@forumsa.gr CEO Thanassis Panagoulias tp@forumsa.gr

O

ne of the leading international food & beverage exhibitions that is also considered a barometer of the worldwide Fn’B industry status, Anuga returns with physical presence from 9 to 13 October in Cologne and essentially marks the long-awaited return to normalcy. It is, however, a slightly different regularity, since exhibitors and visitors will have to meet the requirements of the EU Digital Covid Certificate. With reference to the expected number of professionals from all over the world, as conditions are gradually improving worldwide, the time has come for 190 Greek companies out of a total of about 5,000 exhibitors to exhibit in Anuga, by declaring “physically” present in this new beginning. For Greek companies, Anuga is a first rate opportunity to showcase the quality and the variety of their products and to promote their comparative The global food market advantages to wholesalers, knows that greek products importers, and food traders from across the globe. are safe, high quality For a total of five days, Cologne, and extremely tasty! Germany will be the focus of all international food traders, who will finally meet live to discover the latest innovations in products and services, as well as to make important business deals. This fact, by and large, is very encouraging for the entrepreneurs of our country, as it gives them a note of optimism for the future and at the same time courage for the continuation of their important effort. The global Food and Beverage market knows that Greek products are safe, high quality and extremely tasty. It is worth mentioning that at the upcoming exhibition FOODEXPO 2022 (March 12-14, Metropolitan Expo, Athens) you will have the opportunity to meet with 1,200 (!) productive and commercial enterprises of Greek and Mediterranean food and beverages to obtain a more comprehensive view and to include them in the list of your suppliers. Please note that we will also be exhibiting in Anuga 2021 and will be more than happy to welcome you personally Hall 11.2 Stand F26 and of course to inform you about all the latest developments for FOODEXPO 2022. We are looking forward to meeting you there.

Thanassis Gialouris

Publication Director

ambrosiamagazine.com

FORUM SA: 328 Vouliagmenis Ave., 17342 Agios Dimitrios, Greece Tel.: +30 210 5242100 - Fax: +30 210 5246581

Publishing Director Thanassis Gialouris gialouris@forumsa.gr Sales Director Katia Molfeta sales@forumsa.gr Creative Art Director Niki Galanopoulou ng@forumsa.gr Editor-in-Chief Vana Antonopoulou va@forumsa.gr Contributing Editors Eleni Donou, Eva Touna Art Directors Nikos Kartalias Lenia Chalkea George Nikolaou Photo Retoucher Gogo Trikerioti Sales Department T. Belekoukias, A. Kaliantzi, I. Margelis D. Michalochristas, A. Mourati, G. Theodoropoulos M. Mellios Advertising Coordinators M. Spichopoulou, G. Patsari Int’l Relations F. Papanastasiou Digital Coordinator Katerina Kokkinou Printed by Baxas SA Published by FORUM SA

ISSN

2623-4661



10

Business Insider ma ga z i n e

Greek Food Industry Tackling Covid crisis & green transition

I

t has been more than a year now that the world is experiencing the coronavirus pandemic, with multiple effects on almost every aspect of our socio-economic lives. In this uncertain environment, the Greek Food & Drink Industry remains a fundamental pillar of the Greek economy and the leading manufacturing sector in the country in terms of turnover, employment and value added. It is a dynamic, competitive player and a major exporter worldwide. As all over Europe, our Industry had to face important challenges. Availability and transport of raw materials –ingredients, packaging and packaging materials, necessary for the production process– were affected. Uncertainty, transportation obstacles and border-crossing complications negatively impacted our exports. Obviously, the closure of large segments of the food service sector (restaurants, hotels, bars, cafeterias, etc.) resulted to a drastic reduction of the turnover of certain food and drink manufacturers. Despite the difficulties, the companies of our sector managed to respond effectively to this unprecedented situation, in close collaboration with all stakeholders in the food value chain and the authorities. Now, with the COVID-19 crisis, but even more so with the emerging sustainability concerns, we are at a turning point. Climate neutrality, food suffiThe greek Food Industry ciency, food waste reduction is a growth generator and prevention, food quality and safety, product reformulathat can play a major tion, healthy diets, are always issues that require our utmost post-pandemic role attention and actions. The recent crisis could lead to a potential acceleration of the EU “circular economy” related challenges (European Green Deal, Farm to Fork strategy). The pandemic acted as an accelerator of digitalisation and changes were monitored in consumer preferences and behaviours. In this context, the commitment to growth of our Industry is indisputable and the priority put on our consumers, our products and the sustainability of the food sector is non-negotiable. The national recovery and resilience plans should go beyond recovery to pre-crisis levels and should aim to boost the competitiveness of the Greek industry through investments in Research & Innovation and digital transformation. This would help all companies, no matter their size, that are struggling in times of economic hardship, to make a strong comeback and tackle the challenges.

360,000 EMPLOYEES IN THE GREEK F&B SECTOR

€5 bn

EXPORTS IN FOOD & BEVERAGES

Evangelos Kaloussis

Chairman of the Federation of Hellenic Food Industries (SEVT)

SEVT - ID The TheFederation FederationofofHellenic Hellenic Food FoodIndustries Industries(SEVT) (SEVT)

The Federation of Hellenic Food Industries (SEVT), is the official body representing the interests of the Food and Drink Industries at national and European level. SEVT has as members not only food and drink companies but also branch associations.



12

Region of Attica ma ga z i n e

ATTICA

REGION FOR ALL SEASONS The political and economic center of Greece; The place where everything converges; The de facto heart of the country. Still, Attica is much more than just one thing. With a booming cultural and gastronomic scene and dynamic primary and secondary sectors, it no wonder holds the largest share in Greek exports.


Attica


14

Region of Attica ma ga z i n e

EXPORTS AND A DYNAMIC PRIMARY SECTOR The Region’s exports continue to surpass expectations with a 5.9 percent rise compared to the previous year.

1 Although food is not the Region's top export, its numbers are growing.

*Source: Greek Exporters' Association (SEVE)

H

aving recorded a total of €17,825 million in exports for the year 2019, according to the latest data provided by the Institute of Export Research and Studies (ΙΕRS) established by the Greek Exporters Association (SEVE), the Region of Attica is leading Greek export activity with 53.9 percent (excluding mineral oils) and a 16.3 percent share in the country’s GDP. The Region’s exports break down to 31.3 percent in mineral oils, 18.7 percent in chemicals and plastics, 12.9 percent in machinery and appliances, 12.7 percent in metals, and 5.9 percent in foodstuff. It is also worth noting that the top 5 countries where the Region’s products are exported are Italy with a 15 percent share, Cyprus (8.6% share), Lebanon with 5.7 percent, Germany (5.6%), and France with a 5 percent share.

TOP 5 EXPORTS (2019 SHARE)

31.3%

MINERAL OILS CHEMICALS & PLASTICS MACHINERY & APPLIENACES

12.9% 12.7%

METALS FOODSTUFF

18.7%

5.9%

OTHER

18.5%

AN ACTIVE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR

16.3% OF GREECE’S GDP IS STEMMED FROM THE EXPORT ACTIVITY OF ATTICA

Attica’s primary sector shows significant activity, which is due, among other things, to the increased labour productivity (twice as high as in other Regions), the proximity to the strong consumer centre of country (Athens), the type of products produced, the relatively large agricultural land, and the use of modern methods of mechanisation of production. The place of the agricultural sector in the economy of Attica is significant, both in terms of the sector’s contribution to the regional GDP and in terms of employment rate of the economically active population of the region. Despite the economic crisis that led to a decline

in employment in most productive sectors, the agricultural sector has recorded a relative increase in the number of employees since the end of 2008, due to the significant number of newcomers in the sector, but also due to the movement of workers from other sectors of the regional economy. In fact, the recorded increase in Attica amounts to 14.2%, more than double the national average, with a significant participation of young people and productive age groups up to 40 years old. Significant employment in the agricultural sector is found in Western and Eastern Attica, as well as in the islands of the Region and in Troizina.



16

Region of Attica ma ga z i n e

TOP TIER AGRI-FOOD PRODUCTS 1

Agriculture; A resilient sector of the Region’s economy, with unique, high quality products. THE REGION OF ATTICA –

EXPORT ACTIVITY *

€17,825

MILLION IN EXPORTS IN THE YEAR 2019

53.4%

SHARE IN TOTAL GREEK EXPORTS

7,1%

RISE BETWEEN 2015-2019 *Source: Greek Exporters' Association

T

he mainland and the islands of Attica stand out not only for their unique historical and cultural wealth. Attica in its entirety has to offer an invaluable primary production and a wealth of nutritional goods. As a result, one can find excellent products such as wine, pistachios, figs, olive oil, citrus fruit, vegetables, aromatic-medicinal herbs, animal products such as dairy, meat (sheep and goat, poultry, etc.), eggs, honey, as well as fishery and fish farming products. Agricultural activities in the Region of Attica are mainly located in the areas of Marathon, Avlona, Mesogeia, Megara, Erythres, the islands

and the municipality of Troizinia, while floriculture, vegetable farming, viticulture, fishing and aquaculture are recorded as dynamic sectors. Namely, in West Attica, many capital-intensive glasshouse units are located while an important part of the primary production is reserved for viticulture, olive and pistachio cultivation, and cabbage growing. In East Attica, an important part of the primary sector comprises also viticulture, olive growing, greenhouse, horticultural and tree crops, as well as arable crops. Finally, the islands produce olive oil, grapes and wine, pistachios, rusks from Kythira, vegetables, flowers, and aromatic plants.

GEORGE PATOULIS, REGIONAL GOVERNOR OF ATTICA Apart from its significant historical and cultural wealth, the Region of Attica, the largest region of Greece, also offers excellent products, held in high regard and worth trying. The fertile land of Attica and the sea breeze of its islands gave birth to a variety of exquisite local products, such as wine, honey, fruits, vegetables and olive oil of unique taste and texture. The Region of Attica supports producers and those involved in the standardisation of products of high nutritional value, namely, basic raw materials of our unique Mediterranean Diet. We are confident that those interested in the market of food, wine, beverages, organic products, dairy and confectionery products will discover the excellent quality of the treasures of Attica and will contribute to their placing on the market. We, therefore, remain strongly committed to actively supporting our businesses as well as promoting and highlighting the agri-food sector of Attica.



18

Region of Attica ma ga z i n e

THE MILLENNIA OLD VINEYARD OF ATTICA The total area of the vineyard of Attica amounts to approx. 65,000 decares and is home to some exceptional wines from both local and international varieties.

T

he vineyard of Attica is considered the oldest and most historic vineyard in Greece, and wine is the pre-eminent traditional product of the land of the Region. Many vineyards are family-owned and their winemaking businesses, although small, are driven by passion, know-how and dedication. Furthermore, the largest wineries work with independent growers who can produce highquality grapes. Combining high level knowhow, low acreage yield together with the local viticultural/winemaking tradition, winemakers create exceptional wines, while highlighting the quality characteristics of the wines of Attica. The total area of the vineyard of Attica reaches 61,320 decares and is essentially divided into three viticultural zones: the zone of Mesogaia and Lavreotiki, which includes the vineyard that is literally embraced by the sea, occupies almost 80 percent of the total Attica vineyard; the zone of Western Attica includes the viticultural zone of Erythra, Megara, Geraneia

THE MOST IMPORTANT GRAPE VARIETIES CULTIVATED IN THE REGION OF ATTICA (DECARES) WHOLE OF ATTICA REGION

COUNTRY TOTAL

decares

decares

61,320

627,734

Mountains, and Oinoi and reaches as far as the slopes of mount Kithairon; and the zone of North Attica, which includes the vineyards at the northern slopes of mount Pentelikon, Dionyssos, Parnitha, and Kapandriti. Today, the vineyard of Attica produces twenty wines with Protected Geographical Indication, of which, nine are Retsina wines with Traditional Designation.

The local varieties It is worth noting that in the vineyard of Attica both indigenous and selected international grape varieties coexist in harmony, while white wine varieties are clearly predominant. The preference of the vine growers for the Greek varieties Savvatiano and Roditis, which thrive in the climate of Attica and are cultivated in almost 90 percent of the vineyard, had a lot to do with this. However, red varieties are also cultivated with great success, producing some of the best red wines in the country.

SAVVATIANO WHITE RODITIS REDDISH ASSYRTIKO RED

54,988 1,367 812

CABERNET SAUVIGNON RED

603

MALAGOUZIA WHITE

586

FOKIANO RED

469

SYRAH RED

463

MERLOT RED

447

AGIORGITIKO RED

392

OTHER VARIETIES

1,193


THE FAMOUS RETSINA Tradition makes Attica a famous place for the production of Retsina wine.

R

etsina is resinated wine, which means it is produced with the addition of the natural resin extracted from pinus halepensis (commonly known as Aleppo Pine), which is mainly found in Attica, during fermentation of white and, in rare cases, of rosé wines. Intensely aromatic, balanced and refreshing, Retsina is a wine that embodies the taste of Greek summer. It goes very well with fish, seafood, cheese and appetizers.

Did you know? • Retsina produced in Greece carries the indication “Traditional Designation”, while the vineyards of Attica area are famous for their PGI Retsina of Attica, Mesogaia, Spata, Pallini, Koropi, Markopoulou, Paiania, Pikermi, and Megara.

• Retsina can be produced using several of Greece’s white grapes. The most popular variety for its production is Savvatiano, while some of the best examples are mostly made with Roditis grapes as their base. • Contrary to popular belief, Retsina is not only white. According to legislation, in addition to white wine, Retsina can also be rosé, usually from Xinomavro or Roditis varieties (Retsina produced from Roditis is called “kokkineli” aka “red wine” in Greek vernacular). However, there are many Retsinas out there that are made from Roditis and are white wines. • According to archaeological finds and countless written accounts regarding its production and consumption, Retsina, or “retinitis oenos” as it was called in antiquity, has been steadily produced for thousands of years in Greece. • Retsina emerged from an ancient winemaking tradition that can be traced back as far back as many centuries BC. In antiquity, they used resin as preservative that extended a wine’s drinkability. Resin was also used to seal the mouth of amphorae (ancient ceramic vessels used for storage and transportation of wine) and coat their interior for insulation and to prevent the wine from coming into contact with the air.

THE VINEYARD OF ATTICA IN NUMBERS*

61,320

DECARES IS THE TOTAL AREA OF THE VINEYARD

54,988

90%

OF THE VINEYARD IS CULTIVATED WITH SAVVATIANO & RODITIS VARIETIES *Source: The Region of Attica

DECARES ARE CULTIVATED WITH THE SAVVATIANO VARIETY


20

Region of Attica ma ga z i n e

HONEY, OLIVE OIL AND OTHER SUPERIOR PRODUCTS Attica produces many emblematic products that find their way to c-stores and discerning customers across the world. 1 Apiculture has been practiced in Attica for millennia. The region produces top tier honey.

A

ttica has to offer an invaluable primary production and a wealth of goods, such as wine, pistachios, figs, olive oil, citrus fruit, vegetables, aromatic-medicinal herbs, dairy products, sheep, goat and poultry meat, eggs, honey, etc. Feta PDO from small producers, honey from the island of Kythira, lemonomyzithra cheese from Poros, and fruit and vegetables from Marathonas, are some other famous products of the Region. Apart from vineyards, very important crops in Mesogaia are also olives and pistachios. The area of Trizinia-Methana is famous for its citrus fruit, nuts and olive oil, olives, honey, dried figs, almonds, traditional cheeses, and yoghurt.

1

Methana is also known for its delicious pears, wild asparagus and oregano, which grows in the volcanic soil of the peninsula and is considered among the best not only in Greece but also in the world. The blessed land of Kythira gives products of excellent quality, known for their flavor and nutritious properties, such as thyme honey, which is produced on the island and is considered one of the best in the world, olive oil and wine, oil rusks, a wide variety of cheeses such as anthotyro, ladotyri, myzithra, graviera, mytato, fratsia, and the traditional butter of Kythira –an excellent meze collected during the production of cream from sheep’s milk.

AN ACTIVE PRIMARY SECTOR

Honey

The “art” of beekeeping is widely practiced in the Region of Attica, with an annual honey production of at least 500 tons of honey with exceptional organoleptic characteristics. Among the most famous and best Greek honeys, stands out the thyme honey from the island of Kythera with its intense aroma and flavor, as well as the thyme honey produced on Mount Hymettus in Athens, Anavyssos, Gammatiko and Kapandriti, in East Attica.

Olive oil & olives

Olive cultivation for the production of both olive oil and table olives, is widespread in Attica. Special mention should be given to the olive groves in Trizinia, mainly from the “Manaki” (Kothreiki) variety. “Manaki” is the traditional variety cultivated thousands of years in the region, which produces high quality EVOO. “Troizinias” EVOO is a PDO product since 2006, mainly from Manaki and sometimes with the addition of Koroneiki variety (up to 50%).


THE FRUIT OF KINGS Delicious and one of the world’s healthiest fruit, figs have a long and illustrious history in the Region of Attica.

G Did you know? Nowadays, the rumored Asian origin of the fig tree is disputed. Ancient historian Herodotus states that it was not cultivated neither in Lydia nor in Persia. Herodotus says that king Xerxes started his campaign against Attica to conquer its precious figs.

reek figs are deliciously decadent and probably the best in the world. Figs, along with olive oil, olives, and raisins were considered the top Greek export products during the ‘60s. Gradually, the potential of figs declined because of altered production models and the urbanization choices made by Greek society. Nowadays, fresh figs are mostly produced in Marcopoulo, an area close to Athens, in the Region of Attica. Dried figs (often filled with nuts) are of course very popular all around the world, but so are jams, pastes from figs, energy bars, fig chocolates, as well as fig molasses, making Greek companies invest in innovation in order to create exciting new flavors that will delight the palate of even the most discerning customer. Since 2010, when Italy was the number one export destination for dried figs, things have

changed. Exports have increased by 12 percent, and Austria was propelled into the lead. The US and Canada remain among the top destinations for Greek figs, while Poland, Australia and the Czech Republic duke it out for a place among the top 6 countries importing large quantities of the fruit. Excellent local fig varieties are “Vassilika” (“royal” in Greek) and “Mavra Markopoulou” (black figs from Markopoulo), which are consumed either dried or fresh, from the end of July to the beginning of November –it is worth noting that, in antiquity, the “Vassilika” variety, was widely known and renowned for its exceptional quality. These varieties, which are cultivated within the area of the municipality of Markopoulo in Mesogaia, produce the excellent figs Syka Vravronas Markopoulou Messongion PGI.

THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF FIGS Figs are rich in vitamins A, B (especially B6), C, and minerals like calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and iron. They are also an alkaline food, making them rich in antioxidants –flavonoids and polyphenols, which help protect cells against free radical damage. In addition, figs contain a large percentage of fibers that can help lower cholesterol and triglycerides levels, since they cleanse and detoxify the body. It has also been suggested that due to their high fibre content, they can help prevent colon cancer and may provide protection against breast cancer. Furthermore, the high content of figs in calcium, which reaches that of milk whose 100 grams can cover 17 percent of the recommended daily requirements. Due to their high laxative value figs are also used in pharmacology as a natural laxative.


22

Greek Cuisine Alter Meat ma ga z i n e

THE

PLANT BASE CHALLENGE

Will a meatless food industry featuring plant-based meat or seafood substitutes be the next step for food? Greek meat production businesses are tapping into a future where protein isn’t dominated by conventional meat sources.


W

hat do Richard Branson, Bill Gates, and Google founder Sergey Brin have in common? They have all invested heavily in plant-based and “clean meat” startups. And no wonder. With population numbers on the rise and natural resources in decline, the F&B industry is tasked with the challenge of boosting food production on less land and with fewer greenhouse emissions. At the same time, consumers around the world are clamouring for meatless products and for good reason – they have the potential to be sustainable, ethical, and healthy. As a result, plant-based categories are growing at an incredibly fast pace. Millennials are the main drivers for the global shift away from the consumption of animalbased products, whereas countries such as China are also supporting the vegan movement. For sure, plant proteins are here to stay. However, expectations are high and consumers are looking for more diversified and indulgent options, while taste remains a major key driver in the purchase decision. According to Arizton Advisory and Intelligence, which offers cutting-edge research solutions, rise in the flexitarians coupled with healthconsciousness have led to shift from animalbased diet to plant-based diets. As a result, the huge demand from plant-based protein from vegans, fitness enthusiasts, flexitarians

1

and the lactose intolerant population, will help the plant-based protein market grow at CAGR of more than 8% between 2020 and 2025. In addition, Europe will account for approximately 22% to 25% of the market in 2019 and 2020. In terms of protein source, soy will be the leading raw material used, accounting for 66% to 68% of the market.

PLANT-BASED MEAT PROVES DRIVER FOR INVESTMENT 2

1 According to data, 15% of global meat turnover will be replaced by plantbased protein by the year 2025.

A staggering $741 million has been invested in alternative protein already in 2020, according to a new report released by nonprofit The Good Food Institute (GFI). Namely, the growth of the plant-based food market fuels investment, resulting in more R&D spending and better products, which further increases consumer demand. This virtuous cycle of plant-based food innovation will be reinforced as plant-based products move even closer to cost parity with conventional animal products due to increasing returns to scale and technological improvements. Corporate, government, and entrepreneurial prioritization of plant-based meat to address environmental goals, will further fuel improvements in production efficiency and product quality. Governments and industry increasingly recognize the importance of achieving these goals through public-private partnerships, such as the European Union’s EIT Food initiative and Israel’s The Kitchen FoodTech Hub.


24

Alter Meat ma ga z i n e

PLANT-BASED PROTEIN FEVER GRIPS THE GREEK F&B MARKET

A

ccording to Greek industry insiders, by 2025 10% of food consumption is expected to be plant based. In fact, in Greece, the market is steadily growing with an expected 20 percent monthly average, which appears not to have been deterred by the Covid-19 crisis – by contrast, people express the belief that the pandemic has increased demand, at least in the super market and c-store front. At the same time, there is an intense activity around the launch of plantbased meat alternatives, catering to both vegan as well as flexitarian –persons whose diet is mostly vegetarian but sometimes includes meat, fish, or poultry– consumers. As a result, burgers, sau-

sages, meat balls, even gyros, souvlaki, and frozen traditional Greek dishes, such as moussaka, are introduced in plant-based alternatives from a plethora of businesses operating in the meat production industry. And of course, international competition has boosted the efforts of the Greek companies in the R&D department. Extra emphasis is being placed not only on texture and structure but on flavor, as well. For businesses introducing plant-based meat alternatives to the market, taste is of paramount importance. Their products should be able to pass blind taste tests with flying colors, not to mention satisfy all organoleptic and quality criteria.

GREEK F&B PLAYERS ARE EXPECTING A meteoric RISE IN PLANT-BASED FOOD WITHIN THE NEXT 5 YEARS

PLANT-BASED AT A GLANCE

$7

BILLION REVENUE FOR GLOBAL PLANT-BASED PROTEIN MARKET BY 2025

+12%

VOLUME GROWTH FOR GLOBAL MEAT SUBSTITUTE RETAIL IN 2020

$741

MILLION INVESTED IN PLANT-BASED PROTEIN IN THE YEAR 2020 ALONE

25%

MONTHLY GROWTH OF THE GREEK PLANTBASED MEAT MARKET

Special thanks to Euromonitor International, Arizton Advisory and Intelligence, and The Food Institute.



26

Greek Cuisine Feta ma ga z i n e

FETA CHEESE

The road to the top


Pandemic be damned; With a 9.1 percent increase in exports, amounting to €398,061 within the year 2020, Feta has confirmed its reputation as a premier cheese choice.

F

eta has always been the signature Greek cheese, a unique dairy delicacy intertwined with the country’s past, present and future. A cheese that has captured the imagination of chefs –professional as well as amateur– across the globe. One reason for its reputation and growing following may be its versatility, whereas its flavor –authentic Feta is slightly salty and tangy– perfectly complements other foods. In Greece, Feta accounts for more than 40 percent of cheese sales. But consumers all around the globe love it too, whereas production in 2019 was approximately 119,000 tons according to official data.

Exports in the time of COVID-19 Despite the economic crisis sparked by the COVID-19 pandemic and the uncertainties related

GLOBAL FETA CHEESE EXPORTS (2020)*

*Source: The Greek Exporters Association

Germany United Kingdom Italy France Sweden USA Austria The Netherlands Australia Belgium Denmark Cyprus Poland Canada Switzerland Finland Rest of the world

34.2% 12.9% 10.9% 6.4% 5.5% 5.3% 5.1% 2.9% 2.5% 2.4% 1.7% 1.4% 1.2% 1.1% 1% 1% 4.5%

to Brexit, the course of Greek exports for 2020 has grown, especially in the Food & Beverage sector, proving once again that extroversion is the way to go regarding the country’s economy. According to provisional data recently announced by the Hellenic Statistical Authority and processed by the Institute of Export Research and Studies (ΙΕRS) established by the Greek Exporters Association (SEVE), Greek exports were up by 3.2 percent in 2020 compared to 2019. The food sector had a decisive role to play in the development of Greek exports. Food exports increased by 10.3 percent, ie €496.2 million, while it is worth noting that this change is mainly due to the increase in food exports to Third Countries. As far as Greek cheese exports are concerned, they were up approximately 13.2 percent in 2020, while Feta exports amounted to €398,061,040 compared to €365,025,010 in 2019 (for the period January-November 2020 and 2019, respectively), thus displaying a 9.1 percent increase. And while certain classic Feta cheese destinations were low on imports (the UK was -0.1%, Italy -4.4% and Sweden -4.5%) compared to the previous year, others such as France (+34.1%) or the USA (+16.4%) showed strong growth. It should also be pointed out that 69.9 percent of total Feta export share went to just 5 countries: 34.2 percent went to Germany, 12.9 percent to the United Kingdom (despite the small drop mentioned above), 10.9 percent to Italy, and 6.4 percent and 5.5 percent to France and Sweden, respectively.


28

Feta ma ga z i n e

FETA, THE GLOBAL CHEESE Market insiders predict that global Feta demand will soar.

T

he main Feta destinations for 2020 were Germany with €136,077,676 (+13.3% from 2019) worth of cheese, the UK with €51,256,501, Italy with €43,405,938, France with €25,465,613, Sweden with €21,713,026, the US with €20,899,663, Austria with €20,166,246 (+19.6% from the previous year), and the Netherlands with €11,464,092 (+19.6%, as well). In addition, more positive trading developments regarding Feta were recorded in countries such as the Ukraine, Qatar and Luxembourg with 170.5 percent, 304.7 percent and 278.4 percent increase, respectively, provin the global allure of the famous cheese. Mr Ioannis Hotos of Hotos SA (www.hotos. gr), a Greek company exclusively engaged in cheese-making, explains that although in the beginning of the pandemic things were rather challenging, “shortly after, the markets reacted calmly and managed to return to a steady pace, creating the right conditions for the increase in exports.” “International consumers are finally recognizing its superiority”, states Mr Kostas Stamatelos, Commercial Director at Eurofood Quality SA (www.eurofoodquality.gr) a business involved in the production of cheese products since 1981 and possessing two cheese plants in Kastoria and Crete. “In fact, in 2020 our company has experienced an increase in exports, especially in new markets”.

1 Feta production adheres to strict quality and safety controls determined by the EU.

The thing with Brexit As of 1st January 2021, both the UK and the EU are faced with the reality of Brexit and must adhere to new trade deals and regulations. For businesses, the challenges of adapting to Brexit remain profound. This is likely to be the

case for coming years, too, as additional new legislation and cooperative mechanisms are introduced by the two parties. As stated previously, the United Kingdom was one of the countries that registered a decrease in Feta trade. Specifically, in 2019 Greek Feta exports to Great Britain amounted to €51,323,934, while in 2020 exports were down €67,433 aka 0.1 percent. Although the number is negligible, things have been getting worse since the implementation of Brexit. In fact, in January 2021 cheese exports from the EU to the UK have been down 30.5% (£86.7 million compared to £124.8 million in January 2020). However, as the Food & Drink Federation (FDF) has indicated, not all damage should be attributed to Brexit; The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic could also be a major issue, since the continued closure of the UK’s hospitality sector may have taken a toll on food imports from the EU.


DID YOU KNOW? Lesser known yet interesting facts about Feta cheese. Its PDO status ensures that Greek Feta is produced and matured in particular areas in Greece; its ingredients are also produced within these areas; it is produced following specific traditional methods, while no chemical additives are used.

Contrary to popular belief, Feta in wooden barrels does not need to be stored in brine, whereas Feta maturing in tins is necessary to be kept in brine.

Feta has been listed in the geographical indications register of the European Union as a unique Greek PDO product since 2002.

Feta is lower in fat and calories than aged cheeses such as cheddar or parmesan and has more calcium and B vitamins than soft cheeses like ricotta or cottage. It is also less allergenic and anti-inflammatory, hence good for people slightly allergic to dairy.


30

Feta ma ga z i n e

IS IT FETA IF IT'S NOT GREEK? Part of the Mediterranean Diet, Feta is a cheese firmly linked with Greece, its history and tradition.

Special thanks to the Greek Exporters Association and ELGO-Dimitra.

“Consumers have eventually linked authentic Feta with Greece and have realized its difference compared to other white cheeses”, specifies Mr Stamatelos. “And although each producer has different quality criteria, everyone acknowledges the fact that making a pure product is a one-way street”, he insists. Not many things have changed in the process of making Feta cheese since antiquity—Greek producers still use the traditional methods that give Feta its distinctive flavor. Feta is produced from unpasteurized sheep’s milk or a mixture of sheep and goat’s milk—mostly sheep’s and up to 30 per cent of goat’s milk (the percentage of goat’s milk used has an impact on flavor and fat levels)— and is left to mature for no less than 60 days. Greek flora as well as the country’s indigenous goat

and sheep breeds makes Feta unique and nutritionally different from the other so-called “white” cheeses produced anywhere else in the world. And yes, according to the European Union, authentic Feta is only produced in Greece and any white cheese of different origin cannot and should not claim the Feta name. “Feta is Greek and has been recognized as a PDO product by the EU. Even so, there are many white cheeses produced in other countries that are appropriating its name and this has definitely hurt exports, since not everyone knows that the authentic Feta is in fact Greek. The biggest problem lies in countries where the EU quality protection schemes do not apply, such as the US and Canada”, states Mr Hotos.

FETA PRODUCTION IN GREECE (2019)*

45.9% 14.4% 10.2%

EASTERN MACEDONIA & THRACE

THESSALY

NORTH AEGEAN

EPIRUS

CENTRAL MACEDONIA

WESTERN GREECE

4.9% 2%

1.3%

PELOPONNESE

WESTERN MACEDONIA

CENTRAL GREECE

ATTICA *Source: ELGO-Dimitra

4.3% 15.2% 1.1%

0.5%



32

Special Feature ma ga z i n e

90

HELIOS PASTA INDUSTRY

years

OF EXCELLENCE AND INNOVATION

Founded in 1932, with 100% vertical production, the company is systematically investing in the equipment of its production unit, the development of new and innovative products, as well as in human resources and technical know-how. Thus, HELIOS Pasta Industry is among the most contemporary pasta industries in Europe. “Our mission at HELIOS is to exceed the expectations of our customers by creating high quality pasta and innovative products.” “Our belief in the creation of quality and longlasting relationships is a commitment to each of our customers that are confident that they buy and trade high quality and delicious pasta from Greece. Our goal is to follow and promote good sustainability practices to reduce our environmental impact in all our activities and to help our customers and partners do the same”, states Ms Athanasia Dakou, Commercial Director and Member of the Board. HELIOS Pasta Industry has innovation in its DNA, counting 6+ innovations in its product-portfolio. Since the very beginning with wholewheat, or-

ganic and Emmer-Farro dicocco wheat pasta being presented to the Greek market long before competition. It recently presented unique pasta from legumes and vegetables, the first wholewheat pasta for children, traditional wholegrain “trahanas”, thematic pasta for kids, an authentic Mediterranean CousCous, as well as a range of organic gluten-free CousCous and it now presents the new, cheerful and modern packages of HELIOS quick-cooking espressi, a pasta range which is also an ecological proposal since the energy saving from their short-cooking-time is important. Innovation and quality HELIOS Pasta Industry also creates new product categories, such as the biodegradable artesian


pasta straws, suitable for cold beverages and juices and more recently the new lines organic kiddo pasta by HELIOS and HELIOS Greek pasta specially designed for the USA, LOI approved. HELIOS pasta is FDA compliant and certified by IFS v6.1, ISO 22000:2018, ISO 9001:2015 and have KOSHER and HALAL certification. Organic pasta HELIOS is certified by DIO (European Directive 834/2007 & USDA equivalence). The Wholewheat and Organic Pasta Wholewheat ranges are licensed to use of the U.S. Whole Grains Council brand. HELIOS gluten-free pasta is notified to the Hellenic National Medicines Organization and licensed to use the Crossed Grain trade mark of Coeliac UK in the United Kingdom. HELIOS Pasta raw materials are non-GMO and selected products are non-GMO project verified. Essentially Greek certified – Company member of ELLA DIKA MAS initiative. Pure Greek products, a worthy ambassador of the country Greek pasta products hold an important position in the world map as they excel in taste thanks to the temperate climate of the country, the rich soil, but also the strong sun that bathes most of the year the wheat fields. With an emphasis on excellent quality and fine raw materials, HELIOS

stands out steadily in a highly competitive sector by expanding its presence with high quality, award winning propositions within and outside the Greek borders. In just 10 years, 50+ awards have been received from organizations specialized on evaluation of taste, packaging/design, free from ingredients taste, healthy-diet. HELIOS Pasta Industry, is the first pasta industry internationally and the first Greek brand, whose selected products qualified for the Clean Label Project™ Purity Award for their purity from chemicals including heavy metals, pesticide residues and chemical plasticizers by the Clean Label Project™ organization. HELIOS Pasta Industry has extroversion as a top priority and invests in new partnerships opening new markets and distribution either with its branded products, or with the creation of new private label ranges. In 2020 exports increased by 48% and accounted for 15% of HELIOS Pasta Industry annual turnover. Today, HELIOS Pasta Industry exports to 30 countries in all 5 continents and is constantly expanding its presence in other markets producing innovative-unique-products in 20-different-pasta-categories more than 80 pasta-shapes.

For more information on HELIOS Pasta Industry and its products, go to: www.heliospasta.gr

HELIOS PASTA IN NUMBERS

20

PASTA CATEGORIES

80+

PASTA SHAPES

29,000

TONS ANNUAL PRODUCTIVITY

100%

VERTICAL PRODUCTION

30+

COUNTRIES OF EXPORT


34

Greek Olive Oil ma ga z i n e

OF THE GREEK LAND Sweet and smooth or bold, fragrant, fresh and peppery, olive oil and especially extra virgin olive oil is the cornerstone of the Mediterranean diet. Greek producers use traditional olive varieties to make unique, delicious and gourmet oils that can be used liberally, creatively and with relish. What’s not to love?


W

ith an estimated production of approximately 265,000 tons for the year 2020-2021, Greek olive oil is a hot commodity that travels to the four corners of the globe to find its way into the most delectable dishes. And no wonder; the country produces the largest percentage of extra virgin olive oil in the world, while Greek olive oil companies are offering the most discerning palates a plethora of specialty oils, from early harvest to aromatic to rare single varietals and more. In fact, according to Ms Evi Psounou - Prodromou of Yanni’s Olive Grove (www.yannisolivegrove.gr), a family-owned company with 6,000 olive trees located in Nea Potidaia in the Halkidiki peninsula in northern Greece, “Specialty olive oils are definitely a new, dynamic and constantly growing trend in the global market” which she attributes to an international pressure for specialization and differentiation. “Gastronomy at a global level is evolving and demands different flavors and high quality olive oil with PDO certifications, awards, mainly from single varietals due to the pure and authentic character of the small groves in each area”, adds Mr Constantin Potou, Chemical Eng. and CEO at Constantin Potou Group of Companies (www.c-potou.com), a third generation of olive oil producers with extensive olive groves near Kalamata in the Peloponnese. “Experience tells us that this is a great op-

portunity for quality Greek olive oil to stand out thanks to its special advantages, such as the many different flavors owing to the pluralism of Greek varieties”, he states. And while flavored olive oils have grown very popular, the use of flavored olive oil is hardly a new trend. Actually, olive oil infused with a variety of herbs, even flowers and spices was used by ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians as medicine and in cosmetics. Greece is true that can produce significant quantities of specialty olive oils, provided best practices are followed throughout the entire process, from the growing and gathering of the fruit to the pressing and storing

specialty olive oils are a dynamic and constantly growing global trend of the oil. And because the country, although in third place in global olive oil production, cannot compete with the “conventional” oils of countries such as Tunisia or Italy and Spain (the No1 producer of olive oil), the high-end specialty market is a one way street. “We must produce high quality olive oils instead of focusing on quantity”, says Mr Potou. “We have to move away from the ‘very and cheap’ oils and invest in ‘less, more expensive but special and of much better quality’ oils”.

GREEK OLIVE OIL IN NUMBERS

3rd

80%

LARGEST PRODUCER OF OLIVE OIL IN THE WORLD

OF GREEK OLIVE OIL PRODUCTION IS EVOO

124

MILLION OLIVE TREES ARE GROWN IN GREECE

9

MILLION ACRES OF OLIVE GROVES DEDICATED TO OLIVE OIL PRODUCTION


36

Greek Olive Oil ma ga z i n e

1

A fine selection Gourmet Greek olive oils are second to none mostly because Greece is the number one country in the production of extra virgin olive oil, and especially early harvest olive oil, which offers a unique selling point, appreciated in international markets. In addition, Greek specialty olive oils have unique organoleptic characteristics (aroma and flavor) due to the country’s microclimate, while their flavor varies depending on the olive variety and the region they come from. As a result, the country features a fine selection of gourmet EVOOs without sacrificing quality or nutritional value: from aromatic oils to original mixes (some infused with Kozani red saffron, Greek mountain truffle, walnuts, sage, etc.) to monovarietal and early harvest olive oils, there is something for every palate and every market need. “Greek soil is much purer than the highly loaded with chemicals soils of other, competitor

countries”, Mr Potou lays down the list of reasons to pick Greek specialty EVOOs. “It is worth noting that a large number of Greek specialty olive oils have a health claim due to the high percentage of polyphenols in them, something that our competition does not have. Furthermore, in Greece we do not blend olive oil with cheap olive oils of unknown origin and dubious quality, mainly from North African countries”. Ms Psounou concurs that “olive oil producers in Greece should invest in this global trend for specialty, gourmet EVOOs by initially isolating the particular characteristics of their oils and then by highlighting them appropriately in order to differentiate”.

Greece is an olive oil superpower: There are 1,500 olive oil mills active in the country.

Greece features a fine selection of gourmet evoos without sacrificing quality



38

Greek Olive Oil ma ga z i n e

GREEK OLIVE OIL PRODUCTION IN A NUTSHELL*

60%

OF GREEK OLIVE OIL PRODUCTION COMES FROM THE KORONEIKI VARIETY

90%

THE NEW EXPORT LANDSCAPE The global impact of the pandemic, combined with uncertainty surrounding Brexit, have affected the olive oil market.

T

Special thanks to the Association of Hellenic Industries for the Standardization of Olive Oil (SEVITEL), and the International Olive Council

he impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the world market has been indisputable and incredibly harsh. And has affected everyone and everything, including the olive oil sector. At the same time, this global health crisis has created the need for a more nutritious diet and has subsequently upped demand for healthy food offerings, such as extra virgin olive oil. Staying at home provided an opportunity for culinary experimentation, so the use of olive oil in small retail packages increased dramatically. On the other hand, larger packages, destined for the wholesale or the hospitality industry, remained practically unsold due to the consecutive lockdowns thus affecting trade and exports in a major way. “Specialty olive oils are mostly designed for retail”, points out Ms Psounou. “Due to their increased price or to their small production volume, it is impossible to cater to the foodservice sector. As far as our exports are concerned, 2020 has been a good year with an increased export activity, especially in small, 500ml packages, that with our entry into super market chains in Europe, the US and

the United Kingdom. The main reason was the publication of the first global study in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment, which proved the positive effect of our early harvest olive oil against Alzheimer’s disease.” However, the pandemic has not been the only factor upending trade relations and, subsequently, exports. Brexit has also been a source of concern for future trade developments with the United Kingdom, even if, according to market insiders, Greek specialty olive oil exports will not be dramatically affected —Italian olive oil will have a much bigger problem, on the other hand. As Ms Psounou explains “Brexit will mainly affect small olive oil producers, due to the difficulty adapting to exports to a third country. Large olive oil companies have already adapted accordingly (since December 2020) by issuing all the necessary documents and certifications”. “In Great Britain, the combination of the Covid-19 pandemic and Brexit has dealt a strong blow to specialty olive oil exports. It may take years for the British consumer to recover,” adds Mr Potou.

OF GREEK OLIVE OIL EXPORTS GOES TO THE EU

275,000

TONS PRODUCTION FOR THE YEAR 2019-20

265,000

TONS ESTIMATED PRODUCTION FOR THE YEAR 2020-21

* Source: The Association of Hellenic Industries for the Standardization of Olive Oil (SEVITEL) and the International Olive Council


12 -14 MARCH

2022 ATHENS • GREECE

The leading Food & Beverages Trade Show in S.E. Europe!

328 Vouliagmenis Ave. • 173 42 Athens, Greece • Τ: +30 210 5242100 • W: www.foοdexpo.gr • E: sales@forumsa.gr Member of NürnbergMesse Group


40

Ηoney ma ga z i n e

With European honey harvest down 40% in 2020, Copa-Cogeca warns that the survival of professional beekeepers is really threatened. Greek companies, however, are ready to undertake the mission to provide international markets with top-tier, delicious and highly nutritious honey.


T

he year 2020 marked a new negative record for the beekeeping sector with a drop of 40% in honey harvests. The EU, that is not selfsufficient, will only provide 64% of the honey placed within the EU market. Tense climate conditions have affected honey producers in most EU countries with the reduction of flowering periods, delivering a new blow to a sector that suffers from deep and structural market distortions as evidenced by the volatility of the markets despite the low volumes produced.

Apiculture: The Greek reality Although Greece ranks only 5th in terms of honey production in the EU (the countries with the highest volumes of honey production in 2019 within the EU were Spain (37K tons), Romania (31K tons) and Hungary (29K tons), with a combined 38% share of total production, followed by Poland, Greece, Germany, France, Bulgaria, Portugal, Croatia, Italy, and the Czech Republic, which together accounted for a further 52%), it nevertheless ranks 4th in the world in terms of consumption with 4.24 grams per capita. Not to mention that in 2020, the country registered a 12.2% increase in the number of hives (1,584,000 in 2019 and 1,631,000 in 2020), while it leads the EU in average number of hives per beekeeper with 147 hives, when the average number in the European Union stands at a mere 21 hives/beekeeper. It is also worth mentioning that in terms of value, Greece ranks third among the countries with the highest level of market value in 2019. That is to say that Greece is in fact a honey powerhouse with €13,288,233 in value (+37.9% increase from 2019) and 3,457.2 tons in volume (a +50.1% rise from 2019) of honey exports

in 2020, but –mostly– because of its top-tier honey that is GMO-free (Greece has opted out from growing GM crops, whereas about 90% of Greek honey comes from natural ecosystems in non-cultivated land and from beekeepers who move their bees from place to place) and full of nutrients. Indeed, research conducted by the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, indicated that, after analyzing 48 varieties of honey from different areas of Greece and the world, Greek honey had significantly more superior properties than the rest, even the world-famous Manuka honey! Compared to Manuka honey, Greek honey was found to contain far more antioxidant properties. In particular, the varieties of honey found to surpass Manuka honey in quality were those made by bees feeding on oak tree, fir tree, heath, chestnut tree, pine tree, thyme, and orange blossom. The antioxidant properties of the aforementioned honey varieties can be useful in eradicating the free radicals responsible for cell damage leading to illnesses like cancer. This means that the quality of Greek honey is exceptional even if its price is rather high compared to honey from other countries.

1 Greek beekeepers usually move their bees from place to place, thus producing exceptional honey.

APICULTURE IN GREECE*

1,631,000 HIVES in 2020

€13,288,233 OF HONEY EXPORTS in 2020

+37.9%

INCREASE IN HONEY EXPORTS within 2020

55-60%

OF PRODUCTION IS PINE HONEY

*Source: FAO, IndexBox, the Greek Exporters’ Association, the European Commission, the Union of Honey Processors of Greece (Greek Honey Producers Association)


42

Ηoney ma ga z i n e

THE WORLD NEEDS GREEK HONEY Greek honey is natural, free of genetic modification, and collected from uncultivated lands. The result, a delicious, top-tier product favored by global consumers.

G

reece produces some of the best and most popular honeys in the world, with 65 percent of production taking place in the regions of Chalkidiki, Thassos, and Evia. Its superior quality compared to other honeys, together with the fresh, innovative ideas implemented in apiculture as well as the final product by producers, have managed to create honeys of excellent reputation that have crossed the borders of the Greek market and are currently pushing exports. Germany, Italy, the US, France, and the UK are the main export destinations. These five countries absorb 69 percent of total honey exports, while other markets, such as Canada, Cyprus, Austria, Slovenia, Poland, and even South Korea are also enjoying the benefits of Greek honey. Namely, in 2020, Germany accounted for 23.6 percent (registering a +37.9% annual export trend between 2019-2020) of exports in terms of volume,

Italy came second with 15.5 percent (recording an annual trend of +2,924.9%), USA, with 15.1 percent (+63.5% increase in 20192020), followed by France and the UK with 8.6 percent (and an annual trend of +18.6%) and 6.2 percent (with a +8.9% of growth), respectively. Regarding the value of honey exports, Germany is in first place with €2,636,847 between January-September 2020 and a 19.8 percent market share, followed by the US with €2,232,074 and a 16.8 percent share. In third place, Italy accounts for €1,471,796 and 11.1 percent market share, while the UK and France come fourth and fifth with €1,274,086 and €1,215,729, respectively. Canada (€811,870), Cyprus (€658,043), Slovenia (€405,232), Austria (€246,261), and South Korea (€241,256) round up the top 10 of Greek honey importers in terms of value and a total of 84.2 percent of market share.

ABOUT BEEKEEPING IN THE EU*

Special thanks to the Greek Exporters’ Association, the Union of Honey Processors of Greece (Greek Honey Producers Association), Copa-Cogeca, and IndexBox

• The European Union is the second largest producer of honey worldwide. Beekeeping is practised in every country within the EU. • The main honey producing countries are Romania, Spain, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, France, and Greece. Beekeeping is deeply rooted within the rural areas and contributes to their development. It is also starting to have an impact in more urban areas. • In the EU, there are 615,058 beekeepers managing some 18.9 million beehives (+3.9% since 2019). From an economic, environmental and cultural perspective, all of these colonies are of vital importance for the social fabric of the regions concerned. • EU is only 60% self-sufficient in honey. *Source: FAO, IndexBox, the Greek Exporters’ Association, the European Commission


BEE & HONEY FACTS* A HONEY BEE VISITS

50 TO 100 FLOWERS DURING A COLLECTION TRIP AND CAN FLY UP TO

24km PER HOUR

1,000,000

Honey bees, scientifically also known as Apis Mellifera, are environmentally friendly and are vital as pollinators

FLOWERS

50,000

EACH BEEHIVE CAN PRODUCE ABOUT

BEE FLIGHTS

20

KGS OF HONEY PER YEAR

ARE NEEDED TO PRODUCE

1kg HONEY

38% FRUCTOSE HONEY

CONTAINS

*Source: FAO, The American Bee Journal, WWF

31% GLUCOSE 17% WATER


44

Business ma ga z i n e

1 2 - 1 4 M A R C H 20 2 2 METROPOLITAN EXPO • ATHENS

A STRONG COMEBACK FOR THE PHYSICAL TRADE SHOW FOOD EXPO, the largest Food & Beverage trade show in S.E. Europe and one of the most significant of its kind internationally, is staging a strong comeback between 12-14 March 2022.

R

ecent events confirm that the market still needs bricks and mortar exhibitions since they are the most important forums for the development of trade contacts and cannot be substituted by any other form of actions or activities. FOOD EXPO, the largest Food & Beverage trade show in Southeast Europe and one of the most significant of its kind internationally, is

staging a strong comeback between 12-14 March 2022, in a Covid-free environment at the Metropolitan Expo exhibition center, in Athens, Greece. Featuring 1,350 exhibitors from across the world and 3,500 key food traders, FOOD EXPO 2022 will once again consolidate its leading position in the wider region of Southeast Europe, while further strengthening its international reach.


A COMPREHENSIVE HOSTED BUYER PROGRAM

FOOD EXPO 2022

IN A NUTSHELL

1,350 EXHIBITORS FROM 26 COUNTRIES

50,000 m2 EXHIBITION AREA

50,000 EXPECTED VISITORS

900

HOSTED BUYERS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD

NEW

The Hosted Buyer program that has contributed to the success of the trade show all these years, will continue for FOOD EXPO 2022. The 900 hosted buyers that will participate in it will be selected using strict criteria among owners and major executives of large supermarket chains, traditional grocery stores and delicatessens, catering venues, hotels, and restaurants. These international visitors will come from 83 target markets for Greek & Mediterranean food and beverages.

“Fruit & Vegetables” & “Bio/Natural” sections The organic products sector is one of the world’s fastest growing. FOOD EXPO 2022, responding to this new market need, is introducing a distinct section with organic products. Exhibitors in this section will have the opportunity to present their products and make contacts with Greek and foreign visitors who are interested in including organic and natural food & beverages in their businesses.

FOOD

Guided by the increased demand for fresh produce, FOOD EXPO 2022 will inaugurate a new sector with fruit and vegetables, aiming to promote the high quality of Greek production. And since extroversion is the key accelerator for business growth, the trade show has already been in contact with 70 potential fruit & vegetable buyers from the Czech Republic, France, Canada, Romania, Poland, the Netherlands, Belgium, Italy, Denmark, Austria, Sweden, the UAE, and Russia to visit FOOD EXPO 2022 as hosted buyers.

&

FOOD EXPO DIGITAL: A SUCCESSFUL INITIATIVE Thousands of business deals between exhibitors and visitors sealed the success of FOOD EXPO Digital 2021, the largest digital Food & Beverage trade show to ever happen in Greece. The fair was attended by 3,250 trade visitors, while 5,065 B2B meetings took place and 5,650 digital business cards were exchanged. These numbers only confirm the success of the digital trade show and highlight FOOD EXPO’s leading role for the F&B industry in Greece and abroad.


46

Market News ma ga z i n e

news

MORE

Kashkaval Pindou cheese on road to become a PGI product

DODONI Group reporting 28% increase in sales in 2020 According to the latest data, in 2020, DODONI achieved a group turnover of €138 million, an increase of 28% compared to 2019. Yet, the group’s gross margin was slightly lower at 19.4% because of higher raw material (milk) procurement costs.

The recorded increase in sales is a direct result of the 100% consolidation of the operations of DODONI Cyprus, which now contributes more than 20% of the group’s total sales. The total net profit for the DODONI Group amounted to €5

million. As a result of the company’s focus on enhancing its sustainability results, DODONI managed to increase its rating by the independent rating authority Ecovadis and was included in the top 10% of dairy companies globally.

An application for the registration of the name “Kashkavali Pindou / Kashkaval Pindou” as a Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) in the EU register has been submitted by the Organization of Producers of Kaskaval of Pindos. Kaskaval Pindou is a semi-hard cheese, whitish to pale yellow in color, cylindrical or rectangular in shape. It is produced from sheep’s milk or a mixture of sheep’s milk and goat’s milk, using a special technique developed and disseminated by the Aromanian-speaking nomadic farmers of the Balkans, who came from the central northern end of the Pindus mountain range.

77% Greek olive oil exports up 225% in 2002-2020 Standardized Greek olive oil exports increased by 225%, both towards the EU markets, as well as towards third countries, during the period 2002-2020, according to a report based on data published by the Association of Hellenic Industries for the Standardization of Olive Oil (SEVITEL). The report showed that exports of branded Greek olive oil to EU countries totaled 31,655 tons in 2020 from 7,561 tons in 2002, i.e. up 319%, while exports to third countries rose a whooping 189% –from 7,290 tons in 2002, exports reached 21,080 tons in 2020.

OF THE PRODUCTION OF THE GREEK AQUACULTURE INDUSTRY IN 2019 WAS EXPORTED. 72% OF SALES WENT TO EU MARKETS, WHILE ALMOST 5% TO THIRD COUNTRIES.


BACCHUS project Harvesting robot launched in Greek vineyard

greek wines the winners of Decanter World Wine Awards 2021

Just imagine: A mobile dual arm robot with advanced cognitive capabilities for selective harvesting of high value crops, such as grapes of different varieties, in a human-like manner, moving autonomously in the vineyard and harvesting

290.5

only the highest quality grapes. This is no fiction, but the tangible results of the European research project BACCHUS, coordinated by the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, which aims to develop an innovative robotic system, equipped with the

appropriate sensors and with new methods of intelligent control, and machine vision and learning. In fact, in July, a prototype of the BACCHUS mobile dual arm started “working” in a vineyard on the outskirts of Thessaloniki, in northern Greece.

THOUSAND TONS OF OLIVE OIL WERE PRODUCED IN GREECE IN 2019, ACCORDING TO THE ANNUAL AGRICULTURAL STATISTICAL SURVEY OF THE HELLENIC STATISTICAL AUTHORITY.

Now in its 18th year, Decanter World Wine Awards is the world’s largest and most influential wine competition, with unsurpassed global reach. This year, 328 Greek wines in total were among the prestigious winners of the 2021 Decanter World Wine Awards. Namely, apart from the Best in Show, 6 wines received a Platinum award, 16 a Gold award, 138 were given a Silver prize, while 167 a Bronze. Of these awarded wines, 71 came from Macedonia, 63 from Crete, 62 from the Peloponnese (mostly from the vineyard of Nemea), 55 from the Aegean islands (mainly from Santorini and Samos, which is famous for its sweet varieties), 12 from Central Greece (Attiki and Evia), 9 from Epirus and the Ionian islands, and 6 from the northernmost part of Greece, Thrace. Among the Best in Show, a Greek wine from the volcanic vineyard of Santorini the much sought-after nod from the judges: Canava Chrissou, Laoudia, Single Vineyard, 2018 from Tselepos Winery.

Hellenic Aquaculture Two research projects in cooperation with the University of Patras The Hellenic Aquaculture Producers Organization (HAPO) has announced the implementation of two new research projects in collaboration with the University of Patras. The first project regards the assessment of the environmental footprint in terms of greenhouse gas emissions for the whole production process and handling of farmed fish. The second includes the development of guidelines and protocols for the environmental monitoring of the impact of aquaculture units on the marine environment.


New Products ma ga z i n e

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A UNIQUE ORGANIC EVOO FROM LESVOS

HELIOS ESPRESSI PASTA WITH MODERN PACKAGING

Extra-virgin, organic, gold-colored, smooth-tasting olive oil, with an intense fruity aroma and an intriguing aftertaste. Comprised of a mix between the Adramitiani and Kolovi varieties, both unique to the island of Lesvos, Greece, EVOO Mitira is a highly nutritional, yet sophisticated and complex complement to fish, tarts, cold cuts and salads of all sorts. www.mitiralesvos.com

Helios quick cooking espressi pasta has a new, light and cool package design. And it really takes no time to be cooked; just 1.5 mins for the spaghetti and 4 mins for the penne rigate. Thanks to their delicate dimension, thickness and shape, the quick cooking pasta Helios espressi absorbs water faster, resulting in a much faster cooking time. Helios espressi pasta is also the ideal choice for HO.RE.CA professionals, as they can offer their customers delicious pasta freshly cooked a la minute. www.heliospasta.gr

IONIAN: NEW LINE OF BOXES BY FOKAS PACKAGING

AEGEAN SEA SALTED FISH

Inspired by the Greek nature and the nostalgia of travelling to the Greek islands with their laid-back atmosphere, the new line of folding cartons by Fokas Packaging brings on the colors to boost your sales. Luxury and an exceptional design that will set you apart. www.fokaspackaging.gr

With over 70 years of family heritage regarding Greek traditional flavors, “HELLAS MEZE” offers excellent quality salted and smoked fish meze, following the authentic recipes of their Greek ancestors. The traditional flavor of the Aegean sea now comes, for the first time, in retail packages for the global market. info@karagounisbros.gr