Food Wine Travel Magazine

Page 1

December 2021

holiday traditions

1


2012

2


letter from the editor The holiday season is upon us, and at this time of year, we try to slow our busy lives long enough to share some time with our families and friends. We forget our yearly resolution to start eating more healthy foods and enjoy the fruits of the seasonal table. Of course, within a few weeks, we’ll be making another resolution to lose the 10 pounds we gained over the holidays. We at Food, Wine, Travel Magazine thought we’d add temptation by sharing some of our favorite holiday traditions and recipes with you. We’ve included family traditions as well as those of a variety of countries. You’ll nd recipes handed down from Czech, French, German, Swedish, and Italian ancestors. We’ll introduce you to Christmas in South Africa and Quebec as well as in the desert southwest and coastal southeast. Try your hand at making Italian pizzelles or Mexican tamales. Like sh? How about Bacalhau de consoada from Portugal or Italian Bacalá Salad. More adventurous? Try Norwegian Lute sk or Mexican Menudo (No thanks times two). No matter how, when, and where you celebrate, we all wish you a very happy and safe holiday season and a healthy and happy 2022!

Chris

Christine Cutler Executive Editor

Christine Cutler | Executive Editor Amy Piper | Managing Editor Debbra Dunning Brouillette | AssociateEditor Noreen Kompanik | Associate Editor Irene Levine | Assistant Editor Jan Smith | Assistant Editor, Columns Mary Farah | Marketing Manager Paula Shuck | Marketing

Magazine Layout & Design Christine Cutler

Editorial Board

Debbra Dunning Brouilette David Drotar MaryFarah Jan Smith Kathy Merchant

David Nershi Robyn Nowell Amy Piper Irene Levine

Contributing Writers/Photographers Jo Clark Christine Cutler Emily De Sousa Elsa Dixon Therese Iknoian Kathleen Messmer Susan Montgomery Barbara Redding Priscilla Willis

Jeanine Consoli Jim DeLillo Robin Dohrn-Simpson Maria Haase Noreen Kompanik Linda Milks Lisa Morales Elizabeth Smith

All articles & photographs are copyright of writer unless otherwise noted. No part of this publication may be reproduced without express written permission.

Contact

Editor: chris@fwtmagazine.com IFWTWA: admin@ifwtwa.org Marketing: marketing@fwtmagazine.com Visit our website: fwtmagazine.com

On the cover: Breitscheidplatz Market, Berlin © Therese Iknoian

fi

fi

fi

3


10. . . . Czechoslovakian Christmas Baking Memories

10

12. . . . Christmastime in Quebec City 14. . . . Feast of the 7 Fishes 16. . . . Santa Lucia Swedish Tea Ring 18. . . . Holiday Traditions Continue for Our Wild and Crazy Clan 22. . . . Mulled German-style Wine Awakens Memories

14

24. . . . Tamales, a Mexican Christmas Tradition 26. . . . Bourgogne Holiday Traditions, Memories, and Menus 28. . . . Mini Christmas Tree Lights a Holiday Tradition 30. . . . Southern Tradition Lights Up the Night

24

32. . . . Holiday Traditions Around the World: Christmas Markets in Germany 34. . . . Christmas Southwest Style 37. . . . Homemade Pasta On Boxing Day 40. . . . Distasteful Holiday Traditions: Scandinavian vs Mexican “Delights”

30

42. . . . Cod sh Christmas in Portugal 44. . . . Dolci Italiani (Italian Sweets) 46. . . . Meet Our Writers

42

4

44 fi

6. . . . . Geseënde Kersfees! Holiday traditions in South Africa


5


by Elsa Dixon

T

he Holiday Season in South Africa is a blend of South African, European, and even American traditions. But, instead of “Happy Holidays!” one hears “Merry Christmas!”, “Happy Christmas!” or blessings in any one of the eleven o cial languages such as Geseënde Kersfees! Krismesi emnandi! or Le be le keresemese e monate!

Since South Africa is in the Southern hemisphere, it is the height of summer with sunny skies, green grass, sandy beaches, and no snow at all. Still, South Africans decorate pine trees, send wintry Christmas cards, have traditional dinners with turkey, chicken, or roast lamb, wear Christmas hats, and pull Christmas crackers. Schools close during December and January for an annual, long holiday of ve to six weeks. Most businesses take a break during that time as well. South Africans love the outdoors, ock to the beaches, ll the camping places, and tour the national parks. Cities and shopping centers light up with Christmas embellishments, Christmas villages, and fake snow. There are indulgent treats to nibble on, cheerful jingles ll the air, and Father Christmas makes his appearance in an array of places. Families enjoy driving through the streets, admiring the decorative Christmas lights, such as dolphins pulling Santa’s sleigh.

fl

fi

fi

ffi

Photos, from left: Festive V & A Waterfront in Cape Town © Elsa Dixon; African-style Christmas ornaments © Elsa Dixon; Christmas Table with Christmas crackers © Leoni Schmidt; Opposite: Opening gifts under the Christmas tree © Elsa Dixon; South African braai of lamb chops and boerewors © Elsa Dixon

6

fi

Geseënde Kersfees! Holiday traditions in South Africa


South Africans love to decorate their homes, but one does not see the elaborate outdoor displays as in the USA. Instead, most homes display a r or imitation Christmas tree that the children help to decorate. During the last few years, a new range of African-style ornaments sprung up using materials such as beads, glass, and wire. As children, my mom encouraged us to make our own decorations. We took great delight in stringing Christmas cards above the chimney. Besides sending cards, writing an annual newsletter is a welcome tradition. It was customary in our home to produce a Christmas play and sing carols in the week leading up to Christmas. Friends of ours living in the country drove a big truck past farms and through town, picking up willing participants on the way, serenading as they went.

Father Christmas

Children put out pillowcases o r stockings for Father Christmas to ll. They believe that he will come in a s l e i g h pulled by reindeer and climb through the chimney. Family members and friends strew presents under the Christmas tree in readiness for

ff

fl

fi

ff

fi

7

fi

Celebrations in the home

Christmas morning. It was custom for one of the children to dress as Father Christmas and hand out the gifts in our home. Some families have the giftgiving late Christmas evening after caroling by candle-light or attending a c h u r c h service. Late Christmas morning, other families might drop in for a quick visit. It is not unheard of for adults to open a bottle of champagne in celebration, sharing a thimble-full of the good stu with their o spring. As one mom said:” After all, it is Christmas!” Come to think of it; my dad would pour my brothers and me a tot of wine on special occasions in any case.

Christmas Feast

The Christmas feast is a highlight. Some families opt to have a big meal on Christmas Eve and then enjoy the lovely summer weather on Christmas day. Pleasing aromas of roast lamb, beef, suckling pig, or turkey waft through the air while crispy, baked potatoes, yellow rice and raisins, vegetables, and salads ll the plates to over ow.

Outdoor Braai

It has become a popular tradition to substitute the hot meal for an outdoor braai (barbecue) or have cold leftovers on Christmas day. A South African braai features a variety of meats, such as lamb chops, steak, chicken, boerewors (farmers’ sausage,) and sides


including salads, braaibroodjies (sandwiches toasted on the grill), potatoes wrapped in tinfoil and baked in the coals.

Christmas Desserts

Most South Africans have a sweet tooth. A popular tradition is to serve a Christmas or fruit pudding. Initially, the Christmas pudding had 13 ingredients representing Jesus and the 12 disciples. Besides the raisins, currants, suet, brown sugar, citron, lemon peel, our, mixed spices, eggs, and milk, it contains a good quantity of brandy or a mix of brandy, rum, cognac, and sherry. The mixture also includes a ve-cent piece, signaling wealth and good luck for the lucky recipient. In our house, my mom would ensure that there were enough coins in the pudding for all the children to nd one! We were also in awe of my dad when he poured brandy over the pudding and set it alight for special e ect. Treats include mince pies lled with dried fruits and spices. Originally oval-shaped and lled with meat, a mince pie represented the manger with Jesus inside, and the pastry on top the swaddling clothes. Besides the fruit salad and ice cream, a more festive meal would include traditional desserts such as Malva Pudding, a sticky sweet dish served with hot custard, or melktert, a perennial favorite.

fi

fl

fi

fi

fi

n

ff

8

fi

Photos, this page: South African melktert for dessert at Christmas © Elsa Dixon; Two South African ladies wearing Christmas hats © Leoni Schmidt; Opposite: Minstrels playing banjo and guitar at Hout Bay © Elsa Dixon; South African families enjoying Bloubergstrand at Christmas © Elsa Dixo

Christmas Crackers and Paper Crown Hats South Africans retained the British tradition of wearing Christmas hats and pulling Christmas crackers. Each person, in turn, shows the trinket and reads the little message found inside. Depending on the price, some charms are little treasures. It is a lot of fun seeing the Christmas hat hidden inside the cracker and even more fun wearing the silly headgear. The paper crown tradition goes back to the Saturnalia festivals when the ancient Romans wore this paper coronet during the winter solstice. The candy maker, Tom Smith, developed the original Christmas cracker during the Victorian era in the 1840s when he lled it with colorful candies to spill out when it opened.


Day of Goodwill Since becoming a democracy in 1994, South Africa celebrates December 26th as the Day of Goodwill, previously Boxing Day. Traditionally, workers and servants received boxed gifts on this day and could enjoy a day of rest. South Africans make full use of the great weather and usually participate in outdoor activities, such as going to the beach. After the hustle and bustle of Christmas, it is usually a casual day, relaxing and eating leftovers.

Cape Town Minstrel Carnival

The Cape Town Minstrel Carnival, also known as ‘Tweede Nuwe Jaar’, is a riotous cultural festival dating back to the early days of colonization and slavery. During the rst and second days of January and even beyond, the Bo-Kaap bursts into song and dance. Up to 13,000 minstrels or Kaapse Klopse parade through the streets in tailored, colorful costumes and make-up, playing

ff

fi

9

musical instruments, dancing, and singing. Initially, only tambourines, banjos, and guitars accompanied the groups, but it also grew to include brass ensembles. There is no limit to who participates. Families carry on this tradition, with even little children in costume dancing alongside the adults. Over the years, di erent groups formed minstrel troupes and choirs, resulting in the annual, formal competitive event at the Green Point Stadium. I remember the sheer joy of seeing the parades and being part of the rowdy, appreciative onlookers shouting encouragement. South Africa looks forward to welcoming visitors to share in these joyful traditions during the Holidays and ring in the New Year with exuberant celebrations!


Photos, from top: Czechoslovakian Kolache © Helen Miklas; Pala inky © Noreen Kompanik; My Grandparent's Tinsel Christmas Tree circa 1960 © Noreen Kompanik

10


Czechoslovakian Christmas Baking Memories By Noreen Kompanik

M

y grandmother was amazing in the kitchen. Growing up in Ohio, I lived just a few blocks from her. That meant spending lots of time with my grandparents whom I adored, and learning the ethnic traditions passed on from their generation to mine. One of my favorites? Christmas baking. Two sweets I loved most were Kolache and Palačinky Kolache is a yeast- avored dough rolled and lled with a sweetened nut or poppy seed paste. Christmas smelled like kolache. My grandmother made enough for the family and as tasty gifts for others. Then there’s Palačinky, crepe-like pancakes made on a stovetop. At breakfast time, I’d beg for these delectable crepes. While often they’re lled with fresh berries and cream, my favorite was a butter, sugar, and cinnamon mixture. And I still have that simple Palačinky recipe in her own precious handwriting. I do make Palačinky and recently did so for my son and daughter-in-law who couldn’t get enough. I’ve never made my own kolache hoping my grandma would live forever. But this Christmas, I will honor her memory. I doubt it will ever be as good as hers as she had that secret ingredient–LOVE.

fi

.

fi

fl

11

Photos, from top: Christmas 1980 with my Grandmother and Daughter ©Noreen Kompanik; Four generations at Christmas—my Grandmother, me, Mother, and my daughter © Noreen Kompanik; Pala inky Recipe in my Grandmother's Handwriting


Christmastime in Québec City By Lisa Morales

E

ve n t h o s e wh o p re fe r w i n t e r i ng i n hibernation or sunning themselves in warm climates enjoy a holiday stop in Québec City. T h e o l d - w o rl d c h a r m a n d e l e g a n t decorations both indoors and out is a treat. From tiny tots wobbling on ice skates to older couples with piles of fur covers on their laps in sleighs, everyone can nd a way to enjoy the crisp air and inevitable snow.

My Québécois ancestors brought to New England the traditional French meat pie eaten on both Christmas and New Year’s Day in my family. Made by my grandmére with a combination of ground veal, pork and beef there are uncountable family recipes. The spice mixture contains mace, nutmeg, black pepper and cinnamon. It is a dish that exclaims abundance and wishes all good fortune in the coming year.

l ë o N x u e y o J e é n n A e n n o B

My very favorite things about the holiday season in Québec are the festive food and drink. Whether roasted chestnuts hot from rolled paper cones or hot mulled wine, vin chaud, the warmth is in your hand and in your heart.

Enjoy with a hearty red wine that stands up to the heady, aromatic spices. Joyeux Noël and Bonne Année!

Photos, this page from left: Beautiful shop windows in the old city ©Lisa Morales; Magical experience all over centre ville downtown ©Lisa Morales; March de Noel in Old Qu bec ©Lisa Morales; Outdoor dining in all weather ©Lisa Morales; Opposite, top-to-bottom: The Mission church of the Sacred Heart ©Lisa Morales; The caleches take visitors around in style © Lisa Morales

fi

12


Tourtière: Canadian Meat Pie Serves six Heat oven to 400 F Flaky pastry for a double crust 9 inch pie Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 2 tablespoons neutral oil, like canola 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 medium-size yellow onions, peeled and diced ½ cup dry white wine or stock 1 pound ground pork 1 pound ground veal 1 pound ground beef ½ teaspoon ground white pepper ⅛ teaspoon ground cinnamon ⅛ teaspoon ground clove Pinch of freshly ground nutmeg ½ cup instant potato akes, more as needed to absorb liquid Sweat onions in butter and oil until soft but do not brown. Add broth, water, and/or wine. Add meats and spices and cook until meat is not pink, do not brown, about 7 minutes. Remove from heat and add potato akes. If mixture is too soupy, add one teaspoon at a time. Cool the mixture. Line pie pan with bottom crust, ll with meat mixture, place top crust and crimp. Cut a ½ inch round vent in the center of the top crust. Brush top crust with egg wash. Place pie in oven on hot baking sheet, and cook for 20 minutes, then reduce temperature to 350, and cook until the crust is golden brown and the lling is bubbling, about 30 to 40 minutes more. Let cool 20 minutes before serving.

fi

fl

fl

fi

13


The Vigil

O

ne of my favorite childhood memories is Christmas Eve dinner, or Vigilia—the vigil, as the Italians call it. We always went to my aunt’s home, and all our cousins were there. On this night, the dinner consists of The Feast of Seven Fishes.

The Fish The sh allows for a hearty meal in observance of the church’s abstinence rules. The actual number isn’t relevant, only that plenty of sh is laid on the table. Shrimp, clams, fried sole, smelts, lobster, cod, and calamari are a few of the varieties that may make up the meal.

Baccalà Salad My aunt followed the tradition with zeal. One of the most traditional dishes was her baccalà salad. Baccalà is salt cod; the preparation is notorious for the 3-day soaking with multiple changes of water. The sh, as you could imagine, gives o its natural odor as the salt leeches out. At the end of the three days, the sh is boiled and mixed ala salad with celery, onions, oil, vinegar, and the Italian spices of oregano and basil. The mixture is best refrigerated overnight for the avors to meld. I adapted the recipe for a mock baccalà.

All photos ©Jim DeLillo

fl

ff

fi

14 fi

fi

By Jim DeLillo

fi

7

The Feast of the Fishes


DeLillo’s Mock Baccala’ Salad INGREDIENTS 2 pounds fresh boneless cod (in lieu of baccalà) ½ cup celery, diced ½ cup onions, diced 1 tablespoon shallot 1/4 cup Italian, at-leaf parsley 1 tablespoon dried oregano 1 tablespoon dried basil 1 cup olive oil 4 tablespoons white vinegar Salt (a little extra) and pepper to taste Red chili akes to taste

DIRECTIONS Cut the cod into 1-inch pieces. Drop the cod into salted boiling water and cook until sh breaks o easily. Strain and cool. After it cools, remove skin and bones, if there are any. In a mixing bowl, combine the cod, celery, onions, shallots, parsley, oil, and vinegar. Toss gently. Season with salt and pepper and the Italian herbs. Cover and refrigerate overnight to meld the avors.

fl

ff

fl

fl

fi

15


Santa Lucia Swedish Tea Ring By Linda Milks

G

rowing up in a Swedish community taught me about St. Lucia and one of the most famous celebrations in Sweden. Our church had a Swedish tea where Spritz and Thumbprint cookies were served as well as the crowning jewel of the table, a Swedish Tea Ring.

On December 13, St. Lucia Day takes place. This day is a festival of light in the long, dark Scandinavian winter. Traditionally, the oldest daughter of a family dresses in a white robe with a red sash and a crown of greenery and candles. She goes from room to room in her home singing and bringing her family tea, pastry, and cookies. Today, schools, businesses, and towns hold their own St. Lucia procession on December 13 in Sweden and is broadcast each year with a concert by a di erent choir. Following in my mother’s tradition, I have prepared and frozen this pastry for Christmas morning to be served after we open gifts.

ff

16


Swedish Tea Ring

½ recipe of Traditional Sweet Roll Dough (or make two tea rings and double the ingredients) (recipe for dough follows) 2 Tbsp. butter ½ c. packed brown sugar 2 tsp. cinnamon ½ c. raisins

lling

Prepare the Traditional Sweet Roll Dough from recipe below or use your own recipe. After dough is punched down, roll dough into a rectangle, 15 X 9 inches. Spread with butter and sprinkle with sugar, cinnamon, and raisins. Roll up, beginning at the wide side. Pinch edge of dough into a roll to seal well. Stretch roll to make even. With sealed edge down, shape into ring on lightly greased baking sheet. Pinch ends together. With scissors, make cuts 2/3 of the way through ring at 1-inch intervals. Turn each section on its side to expose the circle of sugar mixture. Overlap as you turn the sections to make a complete circle. Let rise until double (about 30 min.) Bake 25-30 minutes. Frost with a Sweet Icing (1 c. confectioners’ sugar, 1 Tbsp milk, and ½ tsp. vanilla blended until smooth.) Decorate with nuts and maraschino cherries. Serve warm.

Traditional Sweet Roll Dough

2 packages active dry yeast ½ c. warm water ½ c. lukewarm milk (scalded then cooled) ½ sugar 1 tsp. salt 2 eggs ½ c. shortening or butter, softened 4 ½ to 5 cups white our Dissolve yeast in warm water. Stir in milk, sugar, salt, eggs, shortening, and 2 ½ cups of the our. Beat until smooth. Add enough our to make it easy to handle. Turn dough onto lightly oured board; knead until smooth and elastic (5 min.) Place in greased bowl and turned grease side up. Cover; let rise in warm place until double (about 1 ½ hours.) Dough is ready if impression remains when touched. Punch down dough.

fl

fi

fl

fl

fl

17


Our crazy family reunion

Holiday Traditions Continue for Our Wild and Crazy Clan By Susan Montgomery Photos by Todd Montgomery

Our four children and their spouses and four grandchildren (ranging in age from 4 years old to 22) arrived mostly via plane. It was wonderful they all made the e ort to go “over the rivers and through the woods” to their far- ung grandparents’ home.

fl

ff

ff

18

As family tradition dictates, we savored chili the night before Thanksgiving. Since our family’s taste buds range from “love that spice” to “keep it mild,” we had two pots with di erent levels of spiciness simmering on the stove. We all recall the year that one son made a chili so spicy that it was almost inedible. This year everyone was happy with the chili. (My secret tip for chili: Use both hamburger and Italian sausage.) Thanksgiving morning revived more traditions. We had our usual mildly contentious discussion about what we would watch on TV after the Macy’s

M

ost families have holiday traditions they carry on through the years. Our recent Thanksgiving reunion was no exception. After reunions over the last decade or so in Nashville, Memphis, Indianapolis, Connecticut, and South Carolina, this year we all gathered in Southern California where my husband and I live.


Thanksgiving Day Parade. Would we watch football (the boys’ choice) or the National Dog Show (the girls’ choice)? Even though we have lots of boys in the family, the girls always win this argument. This year I o ered a prize for the person who chose the winning dog out of the nalists. Our 16-year-old grandson won with his choice of Claire the Scottish Deerhound. (Later I discovered that he had cleverly checked online about who the winner was three hours earlier in New York, but I still gave him the prize for ingenuity.) While watching the dog show and while our grill master son, David, got our freshly brined turkey from Trader Joes’ on the Weber, we sipped Bloody Marys and snacked on a plethora of appetizers. We always have deviled eggs (a specialty of our son, Tripp), and one year we even had a deviled egg contest. This year, in addition to a tempting charcuterie platter, we brought back fond memories by serving our grandchildren’s great grandmothers’ favorite and very easy appetizers. (I bet most of our readers here recall these simple, delicious appetizers too.)

My mother used to always make ham roll-ups, which I whipped together early Thanksgiving morning.

Ham Roll-ups Ingredients Softened cream cheese Thinly sliced deli ham Dill pickle spears

Directions Spread cream cheese on a slice of deli ham. Place a pickle at one end of the slice and roll it up into a loglike shape. Then slice the log into roll-ups that are about ½ inch thick. Place on a platter and chill for about an hour. These treats are always a hit.

Photos, from top: Son, David, slices the crispy, delicious turkey; Sue's sometimes spicy chili

ff

fi

19


20

Photos, from top: Grandma's ham roll-ups; Grandma's shrimp


My husband Todd’s mother used to make her yummy shrimp spread, which the kids always gobble down.

Shrimp Cocktail Sauce Spread Ingredients A block of cream cheese A can of tiny shrimp, well drained A bottle of cocktail sauce

Directions Unwrap the block of cream cheese and place on a platter. Dump the shrimp and cocktail sauce over the cream cheese. Serve with crackers. This couldn’t be easier and the kids devoured it. Not to be outdone by my wonderful mother and mother-in-law, I have created my own holiday memory recipe. This is an always-requested favorite for every holiday meal — my delectable Spinach Sou e. (Even kids who don’t like vegetables like this dish.)

Susan’s Famous Spinach Souffle Ingredients to serve about 8 About 16-20 ounces of chopped, frozen spinach 2 large cartons of small curd cottage cheese 8 ounces of cubed cheddar cheese ½ stick of butter, cut in small cubes 3 eggs, stirred together 2 tablespoons of our

Directions Drain spinach very well in a colander the night before making this dish. Squeeze water out in the morning. Mix all ingredients together very well. If you want a greener dish, you can add more spinach. Smooth mixture in a buttered 9 X 11-inch casserole dish. Bake for about an hour at 350 degrees or until it pu s up and starts to brown. This dish can be prepared a day ahead and then baked the day it is being served. Or it can be baked and frozen for a week or so and then thawed and warmed up the day it is being served. (This is what I did so I didn’t need to prepare it on Thanksgiving Day and it turned out perfectly.) I actually made about seven side dishes ahead and froze them so I didn’t have to spend all of Thanksgiving Day cooking. Most sides freeze just ne, although anything with eggs should be baked before freezing. And so another Thanksgiving has now created wonderful memories of enticing smells and tastes, peppered with lots of laughter. I wonder where we will be next year, but, wherever we are, I’m sure our traditions will continue — and perhaps we’ll create some new ones.

ff

ffl

fi

fl

21


Mulled German-style Wine Awakens Memories By Therese Iknoian

I

simply can’t smell hot mulled wine without harkening back to my student exchange year in Germany. Nothing says holidays to me more than a mug of Glühwein clutched in both hands with steam wafting into my face as I breathe in the sweet smell of spices and red wine.

Recipe Mulled wine German-style isn’t hard to make. In short, you use a decent quality fruity red wine and mix in a little port wine. Slice up a medium orange, add fresh lemon peel, some lemon juice, a few dashes of vanilla, and a dollop of sugar to taste. Float in some cinnamon sticks (I like to put one stick in each mug). Put some whole cloves and allspice in a tea ball and hang it in the liquid. Let that spiced, fruity mix simmer slowly. Serve in mugs and take a deep breath of the sweet steam. Get a detailed recipe with photos of each step at HITravelTales.com. Planning a winter trip to Germany? These days, the Christmas markets o er a wide array of drinks. To understand what they all are and how to order, our guide to Christmas market drinks will help you out.

Photo above: Mulled wine at Christmas Market ©Therese Iknoian; Frankfurt Oder Church Market ©Therese Iknoian

ff

22


Photos, clockwise from top: Ferris Wheel ice rink re ections ©Therese Iknoian; Recipe putting peels into wine ©HITravelTales; Pouring Wine Spandau ©Therese Iknoian; Omas Gluehwein ©Michael Hodgson; Gluehwein booth ©Therese Iknoian; Lebkuchen Cookie Hearts ©Therese Iknoia

n

fl

23


By Priscilla Willis

T

amales are a Mexican Christmas tradition that is beloved by many nonHispanics as well. Families, including my own, order tamales from their favorite Mexican restaurant or through an inside connection who knows someone who makes tamales to sell during the holidays.

Aracely added that, besides making tamales, the other tradition is a tired and cranky mother on Christmas Day (wink). Nonetheless, she is learning to make tamales and other Latin dishes so her family can appreciate the foods of their heritage. Using fresh unprepared masa and corn husks purchased at Latin markets makes the best tamales. Traditionally masa is mixed with lard, but Jose na uses soybean oil and olive oil rather than animal fat because she has diabetes, and it's a healthier alternative. The substitution can result in the masa being a little drier and less u y. In addition, garlic, onion, and water from the cooked meat add avor to the masa. Jose na doesn't have a recipe, but if you want to make tamales, this recipe from All Recipes is similar. Perfecting a dough (masa) that will be u y, not heavy, when steamed is the trickiest part of tamale making and, just like anything else, takes practice.

How Did Tamales Become a Christmas Tradition? The tradition of tamales dates back to MesoAmerican times when long before the Spaniards arrived, Mesoamericans believed that God crafted humans from corn. "Quite literally, corn was their substance of life. Because corn was so important, preciously wrapped tamales became a part of ritual o erings, a human stand-in, of sorts. "When the conquistadors came, and human sacri ce was no longer acceptable, they used tamales as a substitute, placing l little bundles of corn as o erings," says Alarcón.

Tamale llings vary by region (as do the wrappers and masa); savory llings from shrimp to a rich, dark mole to sweet fruit llings such as pineapple and raisins. Jose na is from Sinaloa in northern Mexico, where they use more vegetables such as carrots and potatoes. Probably the most common lling is pork with Pasilla chiles.

To this day, the most sacred occasions in Mexico—baptisms, rst communions, and special wedding anniversaries—are still marked with the ritual of tamale making”. ~ Seattle PI

Organization is the other key to tamale success. Before starting the actual assembly, have your steamer prepared, the llings ready to go, and leaf wrappers and ties (if you use them) soaked and cleaned. Then, steam the tamales for 30 - 45 minutes, depending on size and thickness.

How to Make Tamales I witnessed the art of tamale making from my friend Aracely's mom, Jose na Vega, who makes 200-300 tamales every Christmas. She carries on the tradition of beginning at midnight on Christmas eve and working until 4 or 5 a.m. making the masa, slow-cooking the meat, soaking the corn husks, and assembling the tamales.

fi

ff

fl

ff

fi

fi

fi

fi

fl

fi

fi

ff

fi

fi

fi

24 ff

fl

fi

Tamales—A Mexican Christmas Tradition


Photos, from top: Cornhusks for tamales ©Priscilla Willis; Ingredients for making tamales ©Priscilla Willis; Jose na’s homemade tamales ©Priscilla Willis; A plateful of Christmas tamales ©Priscilla Willis; Jose na Vega and her homemade tamales ©Priscilla Willis

fi

fi

25


by Elizabeth Smith

D

uring my 2021 trip to Bourgogne, I met two inspirational women in wine, Anne-Laure Chartron of Domaine Jean Chartron and Estelle Prunier of Domaine Michel Prunier and Fille. In an interview, they shared their family holiday traditions, memories, and menus.

Anne-Laure Chartron “Before Le Père Noël (who arrived in the 1960s), we had Père Janvier in Bourgogne. He would bring presents New Year’s Eve instead of Christmas Eve. This was tradition when I was a child,” recalled Chartron. When the celebration moved to Christmas Eve, Chartron’s mother served homemade escargots in parsley and garlic butter, wild goose and duck fois gras, boudin blanc, Bourgogne cheeses, and Bûche de Noël. On Christmas Day, her family enjoyed fois gras and turkey with chestnuts, the latter which they paired with their own PulignyMontrachet Premier Cru, Clos du Cailleret, Rouge (Pinot Noir), and concluded with Bûche glacée or vacherin meringué.

26

Estelle Prunier The Pruniers celebrate Christmas Day with a blind wine tasting lunch. “We often include a wine to trick the guests like a New World one,” shared Prunier. They serve their holiday meal with their own wines (except dessert): an apéritif of Crémant de Bourgogne, oysters with Aligoté Bourgogne, smoked salmon with Chorey-lesBeaune blanc, foie gras with an older vintage Meursault, chapon (capon) with an older Volnay Premier Cru les Caillerets, cheeses with an older Auxey-Duresses Premier Cru, Clos du Val, and Bûche de Noël with a vin doux naturel like Banyuls.

Bûche de Noël Chartron reminded me that Bûche de Noël originated in Bourgogne. “During the Middle Ages, the people of Bourgogne used real logs decorated with sweets (dried grapes or blackcurrants). It was a real treat for the children!”

Photos, from left: Visiting Estelle Prunier © Stevie Bobès; Anne-Laure Chartron and Elizabeth Smith © Stevie Bobès; Estelle Prunier © Elizabeth Smith

Bourgogne Holiday Traditions, Memories, and Menus


Total prep time: 90 minutes Serves: 12 2 cups heavy cream ½ cup confectioners' sugar ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 6 egg yolks ½ cup white sugar ⅓ cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1½ teaspoons vanilla extract ⅛ teaspoon salt 6 egg whites ¼ cup white sugar Confectioners' sugar for dusting

Bûche de Noël ~ Creative Commons

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). Line a 10x15 inch jelly roll pan with parchment paper. In a large bowl, whip cream, 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar, 1/2 cup cocoa, and 1 teaspoon vanilla until thick and sti . Refrigerate. In a large bowl, use an electric mixer to beat egg yolks with 1/2 cup sugar until thick and pale. Blend in 1/3 cup cocoa, 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla, and salt. In large glass bowl, using clean beaters, whip egg whites to soft peaks. Gradually add 1/4 cup sugar and beat until whites form sti peaks. Immediately fold the yolk mixture into the whites. Spread the batter evenly into the prepared pan. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes in the preheated oven, or until the cake springs back when lightly touched. Dust a clean dish towel with confectioners' sugar. Run a knife around the edge of the pan and turn the warm cake out onto the towel. Remove and discard parchment paper. Starting at the short edge of the cake, roll the cake up with the towel. Cool for 30 minutes. Unroll the cake and spread the lling to within 1 inch of the edge. Roll the cake up with the lling inside. Place seam side down onto a serving plate and refrigerate until serving. Dust with confectioners' sugar before serving.

fi

ff

fi

Photos, from left: Escargots and Wine © Elizabeth Smith; Domaine Michel Prunier and Fille Auxey-Duresses Premier Cru, Clos du Val © Elizabeth Smith; Bourgogne Cheeses © Elizabeth Smith; Holiday Table © Elizabeth Smith

27 ff

Flourless Chocolate Bûche de Noël by Tyra Rachelle Courtesy of AllRecipes.com


Mini Christmas Tree Lights a Holiday Tradition By Barbara Redding

W

hen Jaris, my daughter-in-law, asked my youngest son if there were any family traditions, he would like to share with their 17-month-old son, the answer brought back a ood of holiday memories. Evan said he wanted son Barrett (we call him “Bear”) to have a small lighted Christmas tree in his bedroom in Dallas—just like the one he had growing up.

Like most youngsters who still believed in Santa Claus, Evan and older brother Jason loved the twinkling lights and colorful ornaments on the Christmas tree in our new home in Austin, Texas. But that tree was downstairs, awaiting Santa. They wanted trees in their bedrooms upstairs.

Tiny Lights and Ornaments And why not? I bought two inexpensive miniature trees, white lights, and tiny ornaments. After I kissed them good night, I turned on the lights and their rooms glowed warmly. Unlike many of our friends and neighbors, we had no close relatives in Austin with whom to spend the holidays. Yes, we baked Christmas cookies, roasted a plump turkey, and rarely missed Christmas Eve church services. Sometimes we drove to Houston to open presents with their closest cousins. But those little Christmas trees lit up their bedrooms well into the temperamental teenage years. This new grandmother was overjoyed to learn that our special holiday tradition will be passed along to the next generation in 2021.

y

fl

28

Photos, from top: 3. Tree lights up bedroom. @EvanLowery; Barrett and his mini-Christmas tree in Dallas. @JarisLower


Holiday Cornbread Recipe Cornbread can also be added to your favorite cornbread stu ng recipe. This recipe makes one ten-by-seveninch loaf. Adapted from recipe by Ina Garten.

Ingredients ½ cup (one stick) unsalted butter ½ cup buttermilk 1 large egg 1 ½ cups sifted all-purpose our ½ cup granulated sugar ½ cup yellow cornmeal 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt

Preparation 1.Heat oven to 325 degrees. 2.Melt butter. Combine with buttermilk, milk, and egg. 3.Mix dry ingredients and add to buttermilk mixture. Stir until just blended. 4.Pour into buttered dish. 5.Bake for 35-45 minutes, until golden and rm.

fi

fl

ffi

29

Photos, from top left: Tree is in sight but out of reach in Barrett's bedroom @EvanLowery; Colorful ornaments on a traditional Christmas tree @CaroleMick; Author and grandson Barrett in Austin @JarisLowery; Ready for a holiday party @CaroleMick; Decked out for holidays @CaroleMick


30

The arched bridge entices visitors to cross © Jo Clark


A Southern Tradition Lights Up the Night By Jo Clark

I

n the south, we rarely have a white Christmas. But we have water—and lights—lots of lights! Water plus lights equal magic!

A century-old quarry turned botanical garden lights up the night for the holidays. Cedar Lakes Woods and Gardens, and its annual Christmas extravaganza, are the vision of one man. Dr. Raymond Webber! In the four years since the lights took over, it has grown to a display that can easily guide Santa straight to Williston, Florida! The extension cords alone have topped $10,000! Come early and enjoy the gardens and stay for the lights. I know you’re thinking lots of gardens have lighted paths and displays. Trust me, they’re nothing like this! The lakes re ect every twinkling light, multiplying their magic. And as Dr. Webber says, “You can never have too many lights!” If you aren’t in the Christmas Spirit, you can nd it at Cedar Lakes! Have a cup of hot cocoa while you walk the garden paths. And if you discover an elf strolling through the gardens, you just may have spotted Dr. Webber! Put Cedar Lakes on your to-do list, and tell Lori, Teresa, and Ray that I sent you.

fl

fi

31

Photos, from top: Jo Enjoying the Gardens © Jo Clark; Weeping Willow beside a small pond © Jo Clark; Pavillion under the 500 year old Live Oaks © Jo Clark; Pavillion lights, complete with an alligator © Jo Clark; A Flamingo—it is Florida after all © Jo Clark


Ice Rink at Christmas Market in F rth © Maria Haase

Holiday Traditions Around the World: Christmas Markets in Germany By Maria Haase

G

rowing up in Germany, one of my most treasured childhood memories is going to the Christmas market with my sister each year and it has become a “MUST” during the holiday season each year. Nothing quite sparks the holiday spirit as much as when I walk through the little shops selling gifts, trinkets, home goods, and holiday decoration, when the the wavering smells of candied nuts and roasting chestnuts hit my nose and feeling the warmth of a hot cup of Glühwein in my hands.

Over the years, I visited many Christmas markets in Germany and beyond. The most famous one is by far the Nuremberg Christmas market. But I also love the smaller ones, which have a cozy atmosphere and lighter crowds. If you like the holiday season, add a trip to Germany in December to see the Christmas markets to your bucket list.

32


Glühwein Recipe Ingredients 1 bottle of dry red wine, such as Merlot, Pinot Noir, or Chianti 6 green cardamom pods 8 cloves 3 allspice 3 star anise 1 tsp fennel seeds 1 tsp coriander seeds 1 cinnamon stick 1 organic orange Sugar to taste Optional: add a shot of rum to the cup before serving Instructions Slice orange in 1/2 inch slices and add together with all other ingredients to a sauce pan. Heat up slowly over low to medium heat, but do not bring to a boil.

33

Photos, from top: Christmas Pyramid © Maria Haase; Handwerker Markt at Nuremberg Christmas Market © Maria Haase; Christmas Market in W rzburg, Germany © Maria Haase; W rzburg Christmas Market © Maria Haase


34

Enter the River of Lights © Kathleen Messmer


Christmas Southwest Style

By Kathleen Messmer

35


M

oving to the southwest, New Mexico speci cally, from California, was a life-changer for me. The way of life here is very di erent than anywhere else in the country. Hailed as being the Chile Capital of the World, New Mexico is also called the Land of Enchantment. It lives up to both of those monikers. The holidays here are festive, family-oriented, and like nothing you’re likely to experience anywhere else. There’s the traditional tree lighting in Old Town, Luminarias, and the Christmas Stroll in Nob Hill, but the biggest and best holiday celebration is the River of Lights. Set up in the world-renowned BioPark, the River of Lights is one of the most beautiful displays of holiday lights ever to be witnessed. Complete with scorpions, cowboys, snakes, dinosaurs, cranes, and tarantulas, the one-way walk around the BioPark is one you won’t soon forget. Everyone, adults and children alike, are oooing and ahhhing their way through the displays and loving every minute of it. Afterward, you can enjoy a biscochito or two, the only cookie ever to be given the title of “O cial State Cookie.” Add some hot chocolate to that, and you’ve got the best holiday combo around.

Photos, clockwise from top: Cowboy Christmas © Kathleen Messmer; Luminarias © Kathleen Messmer; Christmas in the Desert © Kathleen Messmer; Hot Air Balloon © Kathleen Messmer; Desert Longhorn © Kathleen Messmer; River of Lights 2 © Kathleen Messmer

ff

ffi

fi

36


By Jeanine Consoli

M

any Italian American families make traditional menus for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Since Christmas Eve is a holy day, most Italian Catholics don't eat meat. My mother always served several sh dishes, including pasta, on Christmas Eve. At my house, the sh dishes would change depending on what my mother wanted to make, but we didn’t eat meat until Christmas Day. On Christmas Day, we would have so much food, you'd think we were feeding the whole neighborhood. We would start with "antipasti" or a charcuterie platter. The next course was lasagna with meat sauce. After the pasta course, a roast would appear complete with all the sides. After a break to clear the dishes and open gifts, the co ee pot went on the stove. The traditional pastries, cookies, fruit, and nuts were laid on the table for dessert when the co ee was ready. It was an event that lasted all day.

Merging Families When I met (and later married) my husband, one of the things that connected us was our shared heritage. We were both Italian and grew up in immigrant households. Both of our dads were rst-generation Americans from Southern Italian families. But my father-in-law's traditional side was set in stone. The meal on Christmas Eve never changed. The sh dishes were always the same ones, prepared the same way. Even the vegetables were fried. The starter was a fried dough ball (think zeppole but not sweet) and a pickled vegetable salad called giardiniera. After the salad, a pasta dish with a sweet lobster sauce came out. And then fried sh and fried vegetables such as cauli ower and asparagus were the sides. After my twins were born, the meal transitioned to our house so that our daughters could wake up

Photos: Merging Families Jeanine and Tony Consoli© Andy Chen.JPG; Christmas Eve with the Consoli family ©Tony Consoli.jpg

ff

fi

fi

fi

fl

37 ff

fi

fi

Homemade Pasta On Boxing Day


at home on Christmas morning. My husband and I realized that too many fried foods were on the menu, and we went in a healthier direction. The menu got pared down to salad, lobster sauce, sauteed vegetables, and desserts. We had a lot of leftovers; it was way too much food. Every Christmas Day, we spent with my side of the family at my brother’s house for the “roast beast" feast.

A Boxing Day Tradition Is Born After two days of eating, you'd think we would take a break and fast, but no. We created a new tradition, a nuclear family tradition, just for the four of us. We make fresh pasta on Boxing Day because we don't feel like going out, and there

The following year we used the tagliatelle cutter. We threw together a meat sauce with the ingredients from the pantry and the freezer. The object of “Boxing Day Pasta” is to use what’s on hand.

Photos, Above: Tagliatelle; Below: Fresh vegetables

38

aren't leftovers at our house. It's an activity the four of us can do together and it provides dinner for us afterward, so it's a win-win. We know it's another day of decadent eating, but we agree to be healthier after this meal. It started three years ago when I received Kitchen Aid pasta attachments under the tree. We were bored watching movies and lazing around all day when one of my daughters asked if we could make fresh pasta and use the new attachments. We peeked in the refrigerator and decided to see what we could scrounge for the dish. I said, “Let’s use up the ricotta from the cannoli." My other daughter lit up and squealed, "Let's make homemade ravioli!” I had a metal mold for ravioli, so we prepared a pasta dough and used the Kitchen Aid mixer roller attachment to make sheets, and we went with it.


Last year was the best yet. My niece grew sugar pumpkins and gave me two to make pies for Thanksgiving. I roasted them, pureed them, and froze the extra puree. When we needed an idea last year, we came up with pumpkin gnocchi. We used leftover ricotta, pumpkin puree, butter, and fresh sage (I brought a side dish to Christmas Day dinner that needed fresh sage). Voilà we had the makings of pumpkin gnocchi in a sage butter sauce. I mixed the puree, our, parmesan, ricotta, and eggs in a bowl with a wooden spoon. Then turned the mix out onto the counter sprinkled with our. One of my daughters shaped it to look like a loaf and cut it into strips. We each took a ribbon and rolled it into ropes. We were careful

not to touch it too much. Then we cut our ropes into cubes and took a fork to make dents in the top. After that, we boiled the gnocchi. Then my husband sauteed the pillowy dough in batches in a pan with lots of butter and sage. Everyone added more grated cheese to top their portions and were giddy with excitement. As we hoped, they were terri c. We never tasted better. I can't wait to see what we come up with this year. What's impressive is there are no hard and fast rules to our tradition, just that we have fun together. We wing it and enjoy the experience.

Photos from top left: The sugar pumpkin before it became pumpkin gnocchi ©Jeanine Consoli; Turning out the gnocchi dough on a oured surface ©Jeanine Consoli; Dad making pumpkin gnocchi ©Jeanine Consoli; Gnocchi about to go in the boiling water ©Jeanine Consoli; Pumpkin gnocchi with fresh Parmigiano Reggiano cheese ©Jeanine Consoli

fi

fl

39 fl

fl

Last Year's Pumpkin Gnocchi


Distasteful Holiday Traditions Scandinavian vs Mexican “Delights” By Robin Dohrn-Simpson

Y

ou take a perfectly good piece of sh, soak it in lye and then bake it until it’s gelatinous like mackerel- avored Jell-O, only worse.” That’s what my husband says when recounting his rst Christmas being a part of my family.

Norway’s famous—or infamous—food, Lute sk, is a Midwestern Christmas feast tradition that dates to the Viking days. Goofy tales are recounted about how it came about. Perhaps somebody accidentally dropped the cod in an ash pile (Lye is made from ash). They were too poor to throw it out, so they soaked it in water and ate it anyway. Another story is that the Irish put lye in the Viking’s sh barrels to poison them and the Vikings liked the lye-poisoned sh. Lute sk is usually Cod, dried, and salted (a great way to preserve your sh for years) and then soaked in a lye solution of wood ashes soaked in water, to rehydrate it. It is then baked until it’s delicious (according to a few deeply disturbed Scandinavians) or outright nasty (according to any well-adjusted humans who walk upright).

fi

fi

fi

fi

fi

fi

fl

fi

40


I married into a Mexican family and was optimistic to have a new holiday tradition. Surely the holiday tables in Mexico could never feature anything so slimy, so pungent, so diabolically calculated to make one’s nether regions do a double reverse with a one-and-a-half twist. My new family would never do that to me, right? Wrong! Their Christmas feast is menudo, a traditional soup, made with cow’s stomach in a broth with red chili pepper, hominy, lime, onions, and oregano. Recently, thanks to “23 and Me”, we discovered that my husband is more Scottish than Mexican. Hopefully there’s no haggis in my future!

Photos, Opposite: Lute sk; This page: Menudo; Menudo; Lute sk for sale

fi

fi

41


Cod sh Christmas in Portugal By Emily De Sousa

L

ike any kid, I was always anxious for Christmas Eve to arrive. But my eagerness wasn’t about Santa and presents, rather it was about the food. On December 24, Portuguese households all around the world sit down to enjoy Christmas dinner, or “Ceia de Natal,” after attending Midnight Mass (Missa do Galo). Even as kids, we were allowed to stay up past our bed times to enjoy bacalhau (cod sh). Cod sh is a staple in Portuguese households dating back to the 14th century. Tradition says there are over 365 ways to make bacalhau—one for each day of the year. But on Christmas Eve, we eat bacalhau de consoada, or cod sh served with eggs, potatoes, and cabbage. After licking our plates clean, Avo (grandma) cut us all a piece of dessert. Bolo Rei, is a traditional Portuguese fruitcake. Of course, it was never popular among the kids. Not for its taste, anyway. The Bolo Rei game is what got us excited. Bolo Rei contains small toy, like surprises inside. One of the surprises decides who’s responsible for purchasing next year’s fruitcake, so it’s always a game of roulette to make sure the surprise doesn’t end up on your plate!

fi

fi

fi

fi

42


• 2 pounds of cod sh lets • 1.5 pounds of potatoes, boiled in their skins and peeled while hot • 2 bunches of collard greens • 12 hard-boiled eggs, sliced in half • 4 tablespoons of olive oil • 4 cloves of garlic, minced • 4 tablespoons of wine vinegar (or less, to taste)

Directions 1)

Rinse the cod under cold running water. Place the sh pieces in a large pot, cover with water and soak for 24 hours, changing the water regularly.

2)

Once done, pour out the water, and re ll with enough boiling water to cover the sh by several inches.

3)

Add the collard greens and potatoes to this pot as well. Cook on medium to high heat until the sh is well cooked and the potatoes are done.

4)

Once done, drain the liquid, and remove any bits of skin or bone from the cod.

5)

For making the sauce, saute the olive oil and garlic in a saucepan on medium heat. Once the garlic has slightly browned, remove from the heat, add the vinegar, mix well and serve in a small bowl.

6) Place the sliced eggs alongside the bacalhau, collard greens, and potatoes on a platter alongside the sauce and serve.

fi

fi

fi

fi

fi

fi

43

Bacalhau de consoada


By Chris Cutler

I

f I’m to be honest, and heaven knows I don’t want Santa to think I am naughty, I was not wild about Christmas traditions we celebrated when I was a child. Christmas Eve at my paternal grandparents’ house was a dinner of dishes I didn’t like: sauerkraut soup, buckwheat pierogis, and some other things I have thankfully forgotten.

As Italian as I am, I wasn’t wild about a lot of the Christmas Eve foods on my mother’s side, either. I lled my plate with the pasta of the year and let the others enjoy the eel, anchovies, squid, and whatever other slimy sh happened to grace the table. Desserts were another thing. My paternal grandmother o ered kolache, which was okay unless she made it with lekvar. The goodies my Italian mother and aunts made, though, made the table groan under their weight. We never had panettone because that particular sweet bread/cake originated in Lombardia, and we were Abruzzese. We had snowballs, cream wafers, amaretti, biscotti, and more. My mother also made scrucchiata, a rolled and lled cookie she called “little kolache” to appeal to my father’s roots. Instead of ground nuts and lekvar, though, she used apricot, cherry, and strawberry jams to ll them. Of course, we always had pizzelles. My grandmother, mother, and aunts (I had seven!) had their own recipes. From the plain to orange, lemon, cocoa, and anise, we had every kind of pizzelle you could imagine. I think I’ll take out the ol’ pizzelle iron and make a few dozen before Christmas.

Cookies, Photos courtesy unsplash.com

ff

fi

fi

44 fi

fi

Dolci Italiani (Italian Sweets)


Pizzelle comes from the Italian word, pizze, which means round and at. The “elle” is a diminutive, meaning the cookie is small, round, and at.

Aunt Vera’s Pizzelle 6 Egg 1 c oleo, melte 1.5-1.75 c suga 1-2 tablespoons grated orange rin 2 tablespoons anise seed, crushe 3.5 c ou 1-2 teaspoons baking powde Preheat pizzelle iron Melt oleo and cool. Beat eggs. Add sugar gradually and beat. Add oleo, orange, and anise seed and mix together. Gradually add our Coat pizzette iron with nonstick cooking spray. Drop rounded tablespoon of dough on iron and close. Do not press down Cook 30 seconds-to-one minute or until golden brown. Remove to cooling rack. Sprinkle with powdered sugar before serving.

.

fl

.

d

d

r

.

s

r

d

r

s

fl

45 fl

fl

Did You Know….


M t Our Writers Jo Clark is a southern travel writer and photographer. She is spending the months of November and December crisscrossing North Florida, searching for Santa Stops! She is in full agreement with Dr. Webber—you can never have enough Christmas lights! Jeanine Consoli is a freelance travel writer, photographer, and foodie based in Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania. Jeanine loves uncovering the history, the culture, and the local avors of each unique place she explores. Her hidden talent is nding dining gems that are o the beaten path both at home and abroad. www.jconstravels.com Christine Cutler is a writer, photographer, and editor living in Palm Harbor, FL. She is president of International Food Wine Travel Writers Association, executive editor of its publications and her own website (christinecutler.com and coldpastaandredwine.com), travel editor of Live in Italy Magazine, and contributing writer to other publications and websites. A dual Italian-American citizen, she writes about all things Italy and travels there whenever she can. Jim DeLillo has been an internationally published photographer since 1972. He writes about tech, science, and travel. He is also an adventure photographer specializing in transporting imagery and descriptive narrative. His portfolio may be seen at https://www.alamy.com/portfolio/ jim_delillo_at_alamy. He lives in Cedarburg, WI with his wife, Judy. He writes regularly for FWT, Allways Traveller, MetaStellar, and TelescopeLive.

fl

ff

fi

fi

ee

fi

46

Emily De Sousa is a Portuguese-Canadian travel and food writer; sheries scientist; and research consultant based in Niagara, ON. Learn more about her work www.seasidewithemily.com Elsa Dixon is a travel writer, author of two books under the name Elsa van der Byl, and a piano teacher. A dual South African-American citizen, she loves taking small groups on tour to her motherland and other places. Follow her adventures and latest publications on https:// t r a v e l s w i t h e l s a . c o m / a n d h tt p s : // travelswithelsa.com/elsa-the-author/. Robin Dohrn-Simpson has been traveling for as long as she can remember. With over 25 years in the travel industry, she’s traveled to over 70 countries and 50 states. You can generally nd her exploring somewhere. She’s tried to cure my wanderlust, but it is not possible! Maria Haase is editor-in-chief of several online publications. She grew up in Germany and now splits her time between the San Diego and Europe. Europe holds a special place in Maria’s heart, and she chronicles her insider experiences at Europe Up Close. She also runs San Diego Explorer, a site that shares some of her favorite local places. A lifetime love of travel, languages, exploration, and cultures led Therese Iknoian into writing and photography. She started with daily newspaper (and part of a Pulitzer Prize-winning news team), then freelancing and books, and now HITravelTales.com, dedicated to meaningful travel adventures emphasizing immersive travel and award-winning storytelling in words and photos.


Noreen Kompanik is a San Diego-based travel journalist with over 650 published articles; an assistant editor of Food, Wine, Travel Magazine and editor of Travel By Vacation Rental Magazine. She’s a regular contributor to Travel Pulse, San Diego Explorer, and GoNOMAD. And Christmas is her favorite holiday! Linda Milks is a member of the board and treasurer of IFWTWA. She lives in Southern California, but she loves to travel. You can c a t c h u p w i t h h e r a t h tt p : // toastingfoodwinetravel.com/

Elizabeth Smith is a contributing wine, food, and travel journalist to Napa Valley Life Magazine and the Napa Valley Register, communications and media specialist, and a member of Les Dames d’Esco er International Sacramento. She enjoys tasting her way through Napa Valley, tness, and pet sitting. Connect with her at easmith.net.

Sue Montgomery is rst vice president of International Food Wine Travel Writers Association and chairman of the Media Trips Committee. She holds an MA in journalism from Marquette University and taught there for several years. You can nd her at http:// life-uncorked.com

Priscilla Willis is a freelance food and travel writer turned Realtor®. Three years ago, she traded her life at the beach in SoCal to return to her roots in Northwest Arkansas and build her dream home. Putting her wanderlust on hold, she’s busy selling the virtues of living in the Ozarks.

Barbara Redding is a freelance travel writer in Austin, Texas, who has written about a Hindu wedding in Kolkata and snorkeling in

ffi

fi

fi

fi

47

Cuba’s Bay of Pigs. Always in pursuit of adventure, she’s also a new grandma who can’t wait until her grandson has his own passport. Find her stories on barbaraeredding.com.


Stay where lodging meets local at the Hyatt Place St. Petersburg Downtown. We combine style, innovation and warmth to create a unique and timeless experience for each visit. Whether visiting The Salvador Dali Museum, watching a game at Tropicana Field or attending a function in one of our seven event spaces, our hotel is the most convenient for both leisure and business guests.

HYATT PLACE ST. PETERSBURG DOWNTOWN 25 2ND St N | St. Petersburg | FL 33701 Tel: + 727.220.0964 www.hyattplacestpetersburgdowntown.com For details and full terms and conditions, visit hyatt.com/meethphh. Hyatt may alter or withdraw this offer at any time without notice. Offer, inclusions and hotel benefits are based on availability. Hyatt PlaceTM, HyattTM, World of HyattTM and related marks are trademarks of Hyatt Corporation or its affiliates. © 2020 Hyatt Corporation.

48