Food Wine Travel Magazine—Our Favorite Places

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March 2022

our favorite places 1


2012 Join the International Food Wine Travel Writers Association (IFWTWA) and be a part of a worldwide group that provides networking opportunities, media trips, writing leads for paid assignments, placement for your articles, radio guest spots, and more! Join members from around the globe—Australia, Brazil, Canada, Greece, India, Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal, South Africa, Thailand, the United Kingdom, and across the United States of America.

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Get more information about the benefits, guidelines, and application process at ifwtwa.org.


letter from the editor

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admit it. I was more than a little down in the dumps during the pandemic. While I love being in my own house and having the conveniences that spoil us, I missed being in Europe, especially Italy. To be honest, I really missed all kinds of travel. I shouldn’t complain because we did hit the roads a few times in 2021, and I even traveled to Italy twice. Now that the world is opening up again (Save for that mess in Ukraine), I’m making a list of places we can go. Anyone who knows me knows that Italy (Yes, the whole country.) is my favorite place on earth. I do have towns scattered across the globe that are my other favorite places to visit. When the editorial board assigned this theme, I knew I would have a problem picking just one It follows, then, that this issue highlights our writers’ favorite places. Join us as we travel to Nevis and Berlin, to Istanbul and the waterways of France, and to Bali and Vancouver. You’ll nd much we love about the States, too, as our writers explore San Diego and Seattle, the Outer Banks and Coastal Mississippi, and Powder Mountain and the Florida Keys What are some of your favorite places to travel Be safe in your travels be they near or far

Chris

Christine Cutler Executive Editor

On the cover: Kauai Coastline Views © Noreen Kompanik

Christine Cutler | Executive Editor Amy Piper | Managing Editor Debbra Dunning Brouillette | AssociateEditor Noreen Kompanik | Associate Editor Irene Levine | Assistant Editor Jan Smith | Assistant Editor, Columns Robyn Nowell | Marketing Manager Paula Shuck | Marketing

Magazine Layout & Design Christine Cutler

Editorial Board

Debbra Dunning Brouillette David Drotar Mary Farah Jan Smith

Contributing Writers/Photographers Judi Cohen Christine Cutler Jeanine Consoli Diane Dobry Robin Dohrn-Simpson Lisa Evans Michelle Fedosoff Amanda Finn Joeanne Fossland Marie Haase Brigitte Hasbron Michael Hodgson Kim Jackson Scott Kendall Noreen Kompanik Sharon Kurtz Kathleen Messmer Linda Milks Robyn Nowell Robin O’Neal Smith Janie H. Pace Charlene Peters Heather Raulerson Elizabeth Smith Cori Solomon Julie Dee Suman Lori Sweet Stacey Wittig Bel Woodhouse All articles & photographs are copyright of writer unless otherwise noted. No part of this publication may be reproduced without express written permission.

Contact

Editor: chris@fwtmagazine.com IFWTWA: admin@ifwtwa.org

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David Nershi Robyn Nowell Amy Piper Irene Levine


6. . . . . Love Letter to Berlin 8. . . . .The Unforgettable Treasures of Kauai 12. . . .At Home in Beaune & Bourgogne 14. . . .San Diego—A Great Place to Visit 17. . . .Beyond the Outer Banks 20. . . .Powder Mountain—Eden, Utah

TABLE OF

CONTENTS

22. . . .Five Ways to Enjoy Laid-back Luxury in Ponte Vedra, Florida

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26. . . .Wine Not? Four Reasons to Try a Barge Cruise 28. . . .Following the UNESCO Culinary Trail in San Antonio, Texas 30. . . .Multi-generational Day Trip to Stanley Park in Vancouver, BC, Canada 33. . . .Finding Synchronicity in San Luis Obispo and Arroyo Grande 36. . . .Winter Park—The Best of Central Florida 38. . . .The Allure of Seattle’s Colorful Pike Place Market 42. . . . The Food Scene in St. Augustine—Where Food And Wine Are Naturally Part of the Culture


46. . . .Photo Essay: South African Adventure: Trip of a Lifetime 54. . . .Burnaby Fraser Foreshore Park 56. . . .Bali, Indonesia Land of the Gods 58. . . .Istanbul, Where East Meets West 62. . . .The Curative Appeal of Florida’s Key West 65. . . .Paris—The Culinary Arts Capital 68. . . .Exploring the Canadian Rockies with Rocky Mountaineer’s Luxury Rail 72. . . .Nevis—A Destination of Its Own Design 76. . . .Coastal Mississippi—A Treasure Trove of Natural Beauty, Culture, and Fun 78. . . .Flagsta Is So Easy to Love 81. . . .Los Poblanos Historic Inn, Organic Farm, & Hacienda Spa 84. . . .Garden of the Gods and Other Wonders in Colorado Springs 86. . . .Menehunes, Malasadas, and More on Hawaii’s Big Island 90. . . .Ta Prohm: Phantom Footsteps and Childhood Dreams.

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Love Le er to Berlin By Michael Hodgson

erlin, I can't get enough of you, even though I know you are not mine alone. Like most everyone who meets you, feels you, breathes in your scent–I have fallen in love. It is your way. On every street corner, in every café, you invite me to spend time thinking about your past, present and future. I love that you are political, democratic, and an activist. Protests for you are a way of expressing your love for all that is happening around you and caring enough to try to inspire change. And I love that you are not afraid to be loud about it.

Anything but Normal You are sophisticated, worldly, and yet distinctly bohemian in your ways. You encourage people from all walks of life and from all over the world to move here, live here, travel here, just to be close

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Soap bubbles and children in Potsdammerplatz during the Berlin Festival of Lights ©Michael Hodgson

to your heart. Beatniks, politicians, nomads, mis ts, free spirits, musicians, investors, artists, authors, entrepreneurs--all nd, as I have, that they become lost in your embrace, your charms. With you, following the norm--it's just not normal. You encourage all your lovers to express themselves, on the street, in exhibition spaces, in parks, in theaters, in clubs, and on the walls of new and abandoned buildings. You cultivate chaos and inspire universes to collide, harmoniously. Like in Mauer Park where somehow street artists, musicians, students, drug dealers, and parents playing with toddlers all manage to coexist.

Seasons of Love Yes, I know that to love you is to understand that sometimes you can be cold and distant. I've felt the chill from your icy moods more than once. And yet, just as


I’m wondering why I am still in love with you, the season changes and you reach out to caress my skin, as if saying you are sorry for the winter. The warmth of your touch in the spring and summer is intoxicating. Almost overnight, your streets ll with children devouring ice-cream, cafes spill onto sidewalks, parks ll with barbecue smoke, and I fall in love with you all over again. You never seem to sleep.

Photos, Clockwise from top left: Cafe am Englebecken ©Michael Hodgson; ooking out from inside the glass dome at sunset in the Reichstag. ©Michael Hodgson; Street art covers a building in Blozplatz ©Michael Hodgson; The Humboldt Forum ©Michael Hodgson; Dei Welt balloon over Berlin at sunset. Photo taken from the top of the Berliner Dom. ©Michael Hodgson; Musicians in Mauer Park ©Michael Hodgson; The TV Tower and Berlin lights. ©Michael Hodgso

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Night and day blend seamlessly as you tease your lovers to keep moving, breathing, feeling, tasting. The smells of food that permeate from the U-bahn, train stations, and open cafes are distinctly you. Music and warm breezes rustle the leaves of your green spaces as you dance from one night to the next. I've spent endless days laying in your embrace alongside the Spree River as music and your warm breath ow over my skin.

Berlin's Many Sides Not so long ago, I was sitting in a b e e r g a rd e n , n o t f a r f ro m

Treptower Park, enjoying a warm summer evening while wrapped in your arms. Sipping a beer, I found myself gazing out at former East German buildings that were built in a time you were very troubled. Sitting there, I pondered the many sides of you that are both mystifying and alluring. Yo u a re g r i t t y s t re e t s a n d abandoned spaces, Sunday ea markets, and street food adventures. You are illuminated beer gardens and cozy neighborhood cafes. You are a s y m b o l o f f re e d o m , a n d a reminder of what it is to be oppressed. You are a single street performer belting out a song that everyone passing by nd themselves stopping and listening to, and then suddenly singing along and smiling. Berlin, the more I am with you, the deeper I fall in love. Whenever I am away, the more my heart yearns for you.


The Unf gett le Tr s of Kauai By Noreen Kompanik

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8 Kauai Coastline Views © Noreen Kompanik


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agical, mystical, and magni cent. These are just some of the words to describe my husband’s and my favorite of the Hawaiian Islands—the “Garden Isle” of

Kauai Known for its unique geography and unparalleled natural beauty, Kauai is one of the most breathtaking isles in the world. Graced by innumerable awe-inspiring vistas, it touches our hearts in ways that few places in the world do. Kauai has all the elements: stunning rainforests, majestic cliffs, spectacular cascades, emerald valleys, and palm trees swaying on golden beaches. It’s impossible to merely “vacation” here as Kauai must be absorbed with all the senses. We love feeling the soft tropical air, listening to the birds singing at sunrise, the essences of ginger and plumeria wafting through the breeze, and enjoying dazzling sunsets and abundant waterfalls. The Hawaiian gods have certainly blessed this island in so many ways. Kauai is an outdoor lover’s nirvana and for those into nature, we have some favorite places we nd incredibly special.

Breathtaking Na Pali Coast There’s nothing like soaring over the Na Pali Coast. Taking a helicopter tour is the best way to experience its magni cent unparalleled beauty. These whirlybirds can get close to accordion-folded cliffs, countless waterfall plumes, and into the canyons and valleys that made this the perfect location for Jurassic Park lming Hiking the Na Pali coast is another unforgettable experience. Though the pathways can be slippery with uneven footing, the views are simply indescribable. If there’s a heaven on earth, this is it

Majesty of the Waimea Canyon Dubbed the “Grand Canyon of the Paci c” this impressive multi-hued gorge is one of Kauai’s most stunning surprises. At 10-miles long and almost 3,000-feet deep, Waimea Canyon is a geological wonder. It’s lush verdant cliffs and ruby soil stand

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Photos, from top: Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge & Lighthouse © Noreen Kompanik; Kauai Helicopter Trip Over Na Pali Coast © Noreen Kompanik; Waimea Canyon © Noreen Kompanik; Mooreton Figs at Allerton Garden © Noreen Kompanik; Kauai Sunset © Noreen Kompanik


Photos, from left: Exotic Allerton Garden Flowers © Noreen Kompanik; Wet Cave © Noreen Kompanik; Dry Cave © Noreen Kompanik

in striking contrast against its bluebird skies and glistening silver-ribboned waterfalls. No matter how many times we’ve seen this gorge, it’s a humbling experience. Mother Nature gave the world one of its most awe-inspiring gems with the Waimea Canyon.

Atherton Garden’s Botanical Paradise If any botanical garden could be considered the modern-day “Garden of Eden,” our vote goes to Allerton Garden on Kauai’s south shore This picturesque 186-acre botanical paradise extends along the banks of Lawa’i Stream emptying into the Paci c Ocean. Tropical fruits, spices, trees, rare exotic plants, and astonishingly captivating owers are located throughout this landscaped architectural masterpiece preserving the largest collection of native Hawaiian ora anywhere The actual Moreton Bay g trees prominently featured in Hollywood blockbusters like Jurassic Park and Pirates of the Caribbean reside here.

Fascinating Wet and Dry Caves So many visitors to Kauai so are anxious to get to the Na Pali Coast that they miss two genuine jewels along the way—the wet and dry caves Located along the main road in the Haena State Park, water lling the Waikapalae Wet Cave comes from an underground spring that feeds into the ocean. Water levels in the cave are affected by the tides.

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The Maniniholo Dry Cave is easily be explored through its massive entrance. Having a ashlight made the experience of walking through the

inviting cavern even better. Tropical vines climbing the rock walls and hanging above the caves’ entrances were reminiscent of an Indiana Jones movie, adding an aura of adventure to our amateur spelunking

Stunning Secret Waterfalls Kauai is known for its abundance of waterfalls due to the immense amount of rainfall the island receives. Some can be seen from roadway pulloffs, but the best require a bit of a journey Kauai boasts Hawaii’s only navigable rivers. Our kayaking trip on the scenic tranquil, nearly 20mile stretch of the Wailua River took us past lush jungle landscapes and green mountain ranges A moderate hike from our landing point led us through a tropical rainforest with mesmerizing views to the thunderous applause of a 100-foot bridal-veil cascade known as Uluwehi or Secret Falls

Kilauea Lighthouse and Refuge Ocean cliffs and tall grassy slopes of a dormant volcano provide a protective breeding ground and sanctuary for numerous species of Hawaiian seabirds at the Kilauea Wildlife Refuge Perched at the northernmost tip of Kauai, the 52foot Kilauea Point Lighthouse was built in 1913 as a navigational beacon. The drop-dead gorgeous vistas of the rugged coastline and deep-azure Paci c made this a perfect vantage point for unbelievably great photos Few places on Earth possess the sublime beauty of Hawaii's Kauai. It’s beauty and spirit of aloha beckons us back time and time again


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s a 21-year-old study abroad student, I experienced my rst wine moment during an overnight stay in Beaune, the heart of Bourgogne. In autumn 2021, Vins de Bourgogne (BIVB) hosted a writing colleague, Cindy Rynning, and me for their rst press trip since the pandemic began.

Day 1 Upon arrival, I felt at home. Our hotel, Cèdre Hostellerie & Spa, was both traditional and contemporary in design, with a lounge bar and replace, charming rooms, and complimentary breakfast. We enjoyed walking around historic Beaune at night and dining at Les Pôpettes.

Day 2 We began with an immersive tasting class at the BIVB’s school of wine, taught by our guide for the trip, wine ambassador, Steve Bobès, followed by lunch at Auprès du Clocher in Pommard. After photos in Volnay, we visited Domaine Michel Prunier et Fille in Auxey-Duresses. Fifth-generation winemaker Estelle Prunier gave us a cellar tour and guided us through an intimate tasting. She and her father, Michel, own a 30-acre estate spanning multiple appellations. We returned to Beaune for dinner at Le Cheval Noir.

Day 3 Our rst full day of Bourgogne winery visits awaited us with a start at Domaine Comte Liger-Belair in NuitsSaint-Georges. In 2001, Thibault Liger-Belair, the ninthgeneration of his family to work in the wine industry, assumed ownership of the 20-acre estate and became the family’s rst winegrower. He implemented organic and biodynamic farming, and makes 15 cuvées from the villages of Vosne-Romanée, FlageyEchezeaux, Nuits-Saint-Georges, and Vougeot. After lunch at Le Millésime in Chambolle-Musigny, we

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At Home in Beaune

Bourgogne By Elizabeth Smith

stopped at Domaine des Beaumont in Morey-SaintDenis for a tasting with seventh-generation wine producers Thierry and Vincent Beaumont, who make wines from their 15-acre estate. “Whether in the village, Premier Cru, or Grand Cru, ChambolleMusigny, Gevrey-Chambertin, or Morey-Saint-Denis, our wines will seduce you with expressive fruit, elegance, and ethereal harmonies,” they shared. After an unexpected side trip to the “the spiritual fountainhead” of Bourgogne wines, Château du Clos de Vougeot, we nished at Maison Dufouleur Frères in NuitsSaint-Georges with Jean Dufouleur. In 1848, Symphorien Dufouleur founded the family business, which continued for six generations. The château has been part of the family since 1912, and the company under its current name since 1932. T h re e c o u s i n s , J e a n , F r a n ç o i s - X a v i e r, a n d Mard, now manage the Maison, which offers a broad range of wines, including Nuit-SaintGeorges, Mercurey, and Clos Vougeot. We worked up an appetite for our dinner in Beaune at La Table du Square.

Day 4 We began with an early stop at Domaine Arnoux Père et Fils in Chorey-lès-


Beaune with our host, Audrey Arnoux. The family has been farming and making wine here for generations, and now owns 50 acres in the villages of Chorey-lèsBeaune, Savigny-lèsBeaune , Aloxe-Corton, Beaune, and Pernand Ve rg e l e s s e s . A f t e r a n comprehensive tasting, we made a quick detour to Fromagerie Gaugry to sample some of Bourgogne’s nest cheeses, then arrived for lunch at Bistrot Lucien in Gevrey-Chambertin. After lunch, we tasted with Romain Taupenot of Domaine Taupenot-Merme in Morey-Saint-Denis. He and his family are the ninth generation to farm the 32-acre estate, which spans 20 designations in the Côte de Nuits and Côte de Beaune. His Domaine Taupenot-Merme Clos des Lambrays Grand Cru is one of his most sought-after wines. After another surprise

Day 5 We enjoyed an exclusive tour and tasting at Maison Louis Latour. The Maison dates back to 1768 when Jean Latour moved to Aloxe-Corton and launched the business in 1797. Eleventh-generation LouisFabrice Latour manages the Maison’s 119 acres, including Bourgogne’s largest ownership of Grand Cru vineyards. The Maison makes diverse wines readily available in the United States at all price points. Our nal stop was Domaine Jean Chartron in the esteemed village of Puligny-Montrachet. Fifthgeneration viticulturist Anne-Laure Chartron hosted us for a tasting and tour of the family’s Clos de Chevaliers-Montrachet. Her brother, Jean-Michel, is the winemaker. Together they cultivate and craft some of the nest Chardonnays in Bourgogne. We toasted to a successful trip with lunch at Le Montrachet. During the trip, Cindy kept saying she had never seen me so happy. Of course, what she witnessed was me falling in love with Beaune and Bourgogne, my French home.

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Photos, Opposite page: The Cellar at Maison Louis Latour ©Elizabeth Smith; Cellar Tasting at Domaine Liger-Belair ©Elizabeth Smith; La basilique coll giale Notre-Dame de Beaune at Night ©Elizabeth Smith; This page: Elizabeth Smith and Cindy Rynning at Clos des Lambrays in Morey-Saint-Denis ©Stevie Bob s; Anne-Laure Chartron of Domaine Jean Chartron and Elizabeth Smith at the family's vineyard plot at Cheveliers-Montrachet ©Steve Bob s; Lunch at Le Montrachet ©Elizabeth Smith; Lunch at Bistrot Lucien ©Elizabeth Smith; Cheese Tasting at Fromagerie Gaugry ©Elizabeth Smith é

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stop at Domaine de la Romanée-Conti, we concluded at Domaine Bonnardot in Villers-la-Faye, the center of the Hautes-Côtes de Nuits, with Danièle Bonnardot, proprietor and winemaker since 2009. She is the fourth generation to farm the Domaine’s 55 acres in the Hautes-Côtes de Nuits and NuitsSaint-George, which she has transitioned to organic and sustainable farming. “Our Estate is above all a family adventure,” she said. We returned to Beaune for dinner at La Maufoux.


o g e i D e n c a S Pla

t a e t i r s i G V A To By Maria Haase

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s I feel the warm sun on my skin and the fresh breeze from the ocean in my hair, I sometimes have to pinch myself. Do I really get to call America’s Finest City my home? San Diego has it all: The perfect spring-like weather year-round, the ocean, the desert, art, culture, and lots of things to do. So let me show you some of my favorite places in the city, from well-known sights to spots only the locals know.

Best Places to Visit in San Diego San Diego has a bucket list of “must-dos,” like the famous San Diego Zoo, the USS Midway, La Jolla, Little Italy, and Balboa Park. Any top 10 things to do in San Diego list features those. So let me introduce you to some lesser-known spots around the city. •Find the Hidden Swings in La Jolla: These swings are hidden in the coastal hills of La

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Jolla. Overlooking the Paci c, these swings make for a stunning photo op. On the way there, you can enjoy a beautiful coast hike. •Take the ferry to Coronado: You can board the ferry either behind the Convention Center or at Broadway Pier. Enjoy a mini harbor cruise with stunning views of downtown San Diego and the Coronado Bridge. Then go shopping at Coronado Ferry Landing, rent a beach cruiser, and bike to the famous Hotel Del Coronado. And nally, enjoy Happy Hour and a stunning sunset view of San Diego at Peohe’s. •Explore Barrio Logan: This neighborhood is famous for its stunning murals in Chicano Park and Hispanic in uence. Eat at great hole-in-the-wall tacos and tamales shops (Las Cuatro Milpas is an excellent choice)


Photos, from left: Coronado Beach; La Jolla; Hotel Del Coronado; Chicano Park Barrio Logan

and check out the low-rider club meetups showing off their vintage cars. •Explore the local art scene: San Diego has top-notch museums and a few artist hubs. You can meet local artists, watch them create their art, take classes and buy some fun souvenirs. My favorite two are the Spanish Village Art Center in Balboa Park and the Arts District at Liberty Station.

Where to Eat and Drink in San Diego San Diego recently transformed from a drab wall ower to a blossoming foodie town. Yes, we’ve always had tasty tacos, friendly neighborhood spots, and some of the best breweries in the country. Yet when it came to ne dining and innovative chefs, San Diego disappointed for a city of its size. Luckily, much has changed in the past 5-7 years. San Diego restaurants received an avalanche of

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recognition, including James Beard and Tre Gamberi awards, Bib Gourmand, and now even has 4 Michelin-starred restaurants. Addison leads the way with 2 Michelin Stars under Chef William Bradley, followed by the two Sushi restaurants Soichi and Tadokoro and French-inspired Bistro Jeune et Jolie. While I love to treat myself to a fancy dinner for a special occasion, I also love the more approachable neighborhood spots. Ciccia Osteria offers incredible Italian fare in Barrio Logan. Mitch’s Seafood has some of the freshest seafood in a rustic setting overlooking the Marina in Point Loma. Hodad’s has the most gigantic (and tastiest) burger in Ocean Beach and Downtown. Tacos El Gordo has authentic TJ-style tacos. I’d say some of the best outside of Mexico. And Morning Glory will give you by far the poshest brunch experience, including Mimosa ights and souf e pancakes.


Photos, clockwise from top: Seaport Village and Marina At Night; nish Village Art Center Balboa Park; Mission Beach San Diego; USS Midway San Diego Museum; California Tower Balboa Park at Dusk

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San Diego is also one of the biggest craft beer hubs on the West Coast. With over 120 local breweries, you will undoubtedly nd a brew you like. Try the famous Sculpin IPA at Ballast Point or the Arrogant Bastard at Stone Brewery for a traditional West Coast IPA. Do you like sours? Then check out Little Miss Brewing. If you prefer malty beers, try the Debutante by Societe Brewing Company. Don’t like beer? Head to one of the

fabulous San Diego wineries or check out the local distilleries like You & Yours or Old Harbor Distilling Co, both in the East Village in Downtown. As you can see, I wasn’t exaggerating when I said: “Sad Diego has it all!”. No matter what you choose to put on your itinerary, you are bound to have a fun time in San Diego.


Beyond the Outer Banks Beaches By Julie Dee Suma

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t the turn of the last c e n t u r y, the blustering winds and plentiful sand lured the Wright Brothers to the Outer Banks (OBX), North Carolina, to pursue their dreams of ight. The sand still calls visitors to this string of barrier islands, including me and my family. I have many fond teenage memories of family beach vacations in the charismatic towns of Kill Devil Hills, Manteo, and Buxton. However, my love for this natural paradise has grown beyond mere suntans and miniature golf; now, the OBX represents a world of discovery

First Flight

Bodie Island Lighthouse ©Julie Dee Suman

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No place captures this adventurous spirit better than the Wright Brothers National Memorial. Orville and Wilbur Wr i g h t s p e n t f o u r y e a r s


launching and perfecting their iers from a 90-foot tall dune in Kitty Hawk. My husband Mark and I learned about their perseverance during an hour-long tour led by Claire, a National Park Service Ranger. The Visitors Center houses historical artifacts and a replica of the First Flight airplane. We enjoyed touring the memorials marking the four ights own in December,1903. The ef ciency of the Wright Brothers' wing-warping and propeller designs has stood the test of time. Commercial aviation still uses their creative innovations

Graveyard of the Atlantic The ever-shifting sands coupled with strong ocean currents led to thousands of shipwrecks off the OBX coastline. In addition, both pirates and explorers plied these waters, and visitors can discover their stories in the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in the town of Hatteras. The treacherous Atlantic waters also called for lighthouses to guide passing ships. The OBX's f o u r l i g h t h o u s e s a re iconic landmarks that still f u n c t i o n t o d a y. M y favorite lighthouses are

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Photos: Sand dunes at Cape Hatteras National Seashore ©Julie Dee Suman; Cape Hatteras Lighthouse ©Julie Dee Suman; Sunset at Jockey’s Ridge State Park ©Julie Dee Suman; Wright Brothers National Memorial ©Outer Banks Tourism Bureau

the two iconic black and white striped beacons, Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and Bodie Island Lighthouse Cape Hatteras National Seashore Due south from Nags Head is Hatteras Island and the magni cent Cape Hatteras National Shore. Here, the OBX becomes an untamed wonderland. The dunes encroach upon the road creating a feeling as if you’re on the moon The 70-mile drive along the nation’s rst national seashore passes through small shing villages like Waves and Avon, reminding you of older coastal times. With views of the Atlantic Ocean on one side and the Pamlico Sound on the other, this scenic byway is my road tripper's dream

Year-Round Wildlife The OBX has something for every wildlife lover, from diving ducks to black bears. For example, my husband and I searched for bears at Alligator National Wildlife Refuge on our last trip. Due to the abundance of food sources, these bears never hibernate. So even though we were there in D e c e m b e r, w e s p o t t e d t w o chubby ones grazing in the refuge’s elds


Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge is a stellar location for year-round birding. Each season brings unique species such as Least Terns in the spring and migrating Tundra Swans and Snow Geese in the winter. In summer, Loggerhead Sea Turtles make their nests on the refuge's beaches, and you can spot over 40 different species of birds in any single day Besides the refuges, you can spot ducks and Great Blue Herons near the Duck Boardwalk. Brown Pelicans and cormorants hang out near the Bonner Bridge Pier. We also love Jennette’s Pier, the longest pier in the OBX for its ocean birding.

Food, Wine, and Beer Lovers No trip, in my opinion, would be complete without a fantastic meal. Fresh seafood, especially North Carolina shrimp, is a must at family-friendly Miller ’s Seafood and Steakhouse or the lively Blue Water Grill and Raw Bar. For a ne dining experience, head to an OBX favorite, the Colington C a f e . H o w e v e r, m y recommendation is the oneof-kind dishes served at the

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charming Salt Box Café We were pleased to sample the expansive wine menu at TRiO Restaurant and Market on our last trip. (And, yes, you can buy your favorite bottle here). Beer lovers have their choice of craft breweries. The newest kid on the block, Swells’a Brewing, invites guests to sit on their patio and kick back with a hazy IPA

Magni cent Sunsets Watching the sun dip below the horizon is a must in the OBX. One night, Mark and I climbed the tallest living dune at Jockey's Ridge State Park on the Atlantic Coast. No other place provides such panoramic views of the stunning landscape I have such warm memories of the Outer Banks. From its lighthouses and birdwatching to many memorable meals, the Outer Banks is a place you need to explore with all your senses. Every visit reminds me why I want to visit here again and again

Photos from top: Jennette’s Pier ©Julie Dee Suman; Snow Goose at Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge ©Julie Dee Suman; Pea Island sand dunes ©Julie Dee Suman; Fried green tomatoes and homemade strawberry jam at the Salt Box Café ©Julie Dee Suma


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’ve been a skier since I was eleven. The rst time I attempted skiing, my middle school friends took me up a chairlift on a tiny mountain in Pennsylvania and we all hit the trail. I wasn't afraid; I just did it, maybe because the slope wasn’t particularly steep or probably because I had a crush on a boy in my group and wanted to look cool. I’ve loved the feeling of gliding down runs ever since. I’ve skied mountains in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York State, Vermont, New Hampshire, California, and Park City, Utah. And even though every outing was thrilling, nothing tops skiing out West

A Family of Skiers On one family trip to Vermont, my husband and I enrolled our three-year-old twins in ski school instead of the babysitting room. We had similar stories about when we rst learned to ski, and neither of us ever took a lesson. We didn’t want our girls to inherit our lousy form. Since we both gured the sport out on our own, we wanted a safer experience for them. In their early twenties, they are better skiers and love skiing as much as we do. Thankfully, they also enjoy hitting the slopes with their parents, even if we don’t look as elegant when we carve our way down

A Mountain Like No Other When the opportunity to ski Powder Mountain in Eden, Utah, came up, I jumped at the chance to ski out West with my family again. I love my New York and Vermont haunts, but skiing in Utah is totally different. Each winter, the Wasatch Range receives a ton of snow– over 400 inches of “The Greatest Snow on Earth,” better known as pristine powder. And the mountain is high (8,900 feet), so

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Powder Mountain—

the runs are longer, allowing more time to enjoy the gorgeous alpine scenery as you swoosh down the slopes Powder Mountain Is a Sustainable Resort Powder Mountain is the largest resort in the United States, covering 8,464 acres (including u n g ro o m e d trails), and i t ' s sustainable. It's privately owned, with the intention to preserve the skier experience. Management established crowd controls to ensure that everyone gets the best skiing of their lives. Pow Mow limits daily lift tickets to 1,500 skiers with season tickets capped at 3,000 per year. They say it's roughly three acres of snow per skier with that much terrain. They also like to brag that Pow Mow skiers have been social distancing since the 1970s when the mountain rst opened


Eden, Utah Pow Mow never makes snow. That means the mountain opens when nature dumps enough akes to signal opening day. That timeline varies from year to year, but usually, the mountain is open for skiing from the end of December to the end of March. Other resorts “blow” snow, with a speci c opening day in mind. But once you pump frozen water out onto the runs, you aren’t skiing on powder. When the snow melts, it usually freezes in the late afternoon. I’ve skied on enough ice out East to know that means dangerous, conditions later in the day. At Pow Mow, the powder swirls, and oats. When I skied through it, it felt like I was in my own personal snow globe. I was giddy making tracks down the trail and had the biggest smile on my lips under my face covering; it was exhilarating There are no lift lines to speak of. We waited less than ten minutes for a signi cant chair lift and, at other times, hopped right on. I’ve experienced thirty or forty-minute lines for a chair back up to the top at different resorts. I was blown away by how Powder Mountain manages the crowds, lifts, and general operations. We spent more time skiing and less waiting, making for a fantastic day

The Ambiance Is Low Key The main lodge is rustic and simple. I’ve skied at luxury resorts and family mountains, and I prefer a chill vibe. We are there to ski. I like to enjoy my group and the friendly people I meet along the way. We could care less about anything else. I like their homey lodge and the affordable price of those delicious, Ramen bowls served in an unfussy atmosphere. I don't need more than that. I just want to ski. And, after we're tuckered out, après-ski at the Powder Keg bar, to enjoy live music and local beer.

My Family Skied To Their Hearts Content We loved discovering Pow Mow. We hopped on and off lifts, explored different runs, and cheered each other on when we learned how to ski powder properly. Afterward, we went to the Powder Keg to “re-live” our favorite trails and toasted a stellar ski day at this hidden gem. I feel grateful that I met such genuine people and had quality family time outdoors in this winter paradise.

Photos, clockwise from left: Snowboarder Enjoying the powder on Pow Mow; Aerial view of Powder Mountain; Uncrowded chair experience on Paradise Lift; Live music at the Powder Keg; A ramen bowl at The Timberline Lodge; Craft beer at the Powder Keg; Skiing through powder; My family hitting the slopes

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in Ponte Vedra, Florida By Robin O’Neal Smith

Ponte Vedra Sunset ©Robin O'Neal Smith

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A bad day in Florida is still better th a good day ywhere else.

re you looking for a luxurious, laid-back vacation destination? Look no further than Ponte Vedra, Florida.

I visited a few months ago while participating in a group press trip with six other food, wine, and travel writers. The trip was sponsored by IFWTWA and hosted by Florida's Historic Coast. We received the royal treatment in a very relaxed atmosphere. I fell in love with the luxurious amenities, and Ponte Vedra became my new favorite destination. This gorgeous seaside town offers beautiful beaches and world-class golf courses to fascinating history and delicious cuisine. There's de nitely something for everyone in Ponte Vedra. Here are offered.

ve ways we enjoyed the laid-back luxury that Ponte Vedra

Enjoy Decadent Food

~ W der Florida

I and my fellow writers savored fresh seafood and coastal cuisine at some of the best restaurants in Northeast Florida.

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5Ways to Enjoy Laid-back Luxury


Photos, from left: Nineteen Pork Belly Bao Buns ©Robin O'Neal Smith; Champagne ©Robin O'Neal Smith; Grilled Octopus White Bean Salad ©Robin O'Neal Smith; Charcuterie Board ©Robin O'Neal Smith

Our group enjoyed delectable meals at The Seahorse Grille, NINETEEN at TPC Sawgrass, and Palm Valley Fish Camp.

golf courses, a racquet club, spa, shopping, and ten restaurants, the Inn is one of Florida's few AAA Five Diamond Properties.

We tried new dishes at each restaurant and each of us typically ordered something different. It was my rst time tasting grilled octopus and fried alligator tail. And my favorite appetizer was the Pork Belly Bao Buns.

The rooms were gorgeous and overlooked the Atlantic Ocean. Shortly after check-in, a bottle of sparkling wine and charcuterie board arrived in each of our rooms as a welcome gift

The food at all three restaurants was delicious, and service was impeccable.

Stay at the Exquisite Ponte Vedra Inn & Club

Fluffy robes and slippers were waiting in the closet, and the in-suite powder room was spacious with both a tub and walk-in shower.

Walk on Pristine Beaches

Ponte Vedra Inn is a luxurious place to stay in the area that provides over-the-top service. Entering through beautiful wooden doors, past well-manicured lawns and breathtaking views, you step into an enchanting world of luxury. Staying at this resort made me feel like a princess

The Beaches in Ponte Vedra are absolutely gorgeous. Whether you choose to swim, sunbathe, paddleboard, or take a stroll on the pristine sand beach, you’ll love it. At the time of my visit, it was too chilly to swim in the ocean, but I enjoyed several walks on the gorgeous halfmile of private beach.

With over 300 acres of lush landscaped gardens, a gorgeous private beach, three pools, two seaside

There are both public and private beaches along the coast to enjoy. One visit here, and you’ll

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Photos, from left: Room at Ponte Vedra Inn & Club ©Robin O'Neal Smith; Luxurious Tub ©Robin O'Neal Smith; View of the beach ©Robin O'Neal Smith


clearly understand why CNN included Ponte Vedra Beach in its list of "22 Can’t-Miss Beaches.” Mickler’s Beach in Ponte Vedra is an excellent place to hunt for unique shark teeth

town offers something for everyone. One visit, and I’ll bet it will be one of your favorite destinations ,too.

Visit TPC Sawgrass World-class golf courses designed by worldrenowned architects abound in the Ponte Vedra area. If you’re a golfer, you can tee off at one of the most challenging golf courses in the world! The Tournament Players Club at Sawgrass Stadium Course, home to PGA Tour headquarters and host for The Players Championship, is an experience like no other. Whether you're looking for a challenging course with world-class amenities or want to experience a course designed by world-renowned architects, TPC offers it all! Our group also toured the clubhouse and enjoyed a delicious lunch at Nineteen at TPC Sawgrass.

Experience History We learned about a fun piece of history they didn't teach us in history class. The rst European to set foot in Florida was a Spaniard named Ponce de Leon. He arrived at 30 degrees 8 minutes north of the equator on April 3, 1513, and claimed "La Florida" for Spain. We visited Ponce de Leon's bronze statue, marking the spot where he rst set foot on American soil. As one of Florida's most sought-after destinations, Ponte Vedra, Florida, is a beautiful, historic town and a fantastic place to visit. This beautiful beach

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Photos, from top, left: Lap Pool ©Robin O'Neal Smith; Spa ©Robin O'Neal Smith; TPC Sawgrass Hole 17 ©Floridashistoriccoast.com; Ponce de Leon Statue ©Robin O'Neal Smith; Ponte Vedra Beach ©Robin O'Neal Smith


WINE , GLASS, OUTDOORS & MORE! DOW N LOAD O U R A P P & P L A N YOU R T RI P TO DAY!

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Bottom photo courtesy of The Corning Museum of Glass


Wine Not?

4 Reasons to Try a Fren B ge Cruise By Judi Cohen

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o you love French Food and Wine?

Me too! While my past trips to France have been focused on Paris, my husband and I recently tried a 6-night luxury hotel barge cruise aboard the European Waterways Anjodi on the medieval Canal du Midi in the South of France. It was the perfect trifecta of food, wine, and the type of off-the-beaten-track travel that I have come to love. Check out these four reasons to see why a barge cruise in the South of France might

guests, and just watch the world go by very slowly. With just seven passengers aboard on our trip, we were provided personal service, with food, and even the itinerary, customized to our tastes. The crew responded to our every need, from our food preferences to speci c brands of whiskey. It felt like we were all family from the moment we embarked in Marseillan.

Fabulous Food and Fine Cheeses be for you.

Intimate and Personal Service The Anjodi is a cozy eight-person barge with a crew of four including a private chef, captain, housekeeper and guide. The barge, guests, and crew felt intimate, and ideal for slow travel away from the crowds along the tree-shaded Canal du Midi. Guests can even opt to walk along the towpaths or cycle along the canal and meet the slowmoving boat at its next stopping point. The cabins have multiple openable porthole windows and an ensuite toilet and shower. There are ample indoor and outdoor spaces to lounge, read, drink, share travel stories with the other

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Our resident chef, Mickail, used only the freshest local ingredients, and prepared outstanding four course lunches and dinners. You can expect Mediterranean and French specialities like duck breast, foie gras, beef bourguignon, ratatouille, and escargot paired with white, red and rose wines. Desserts included, poire belle Hélène, chocolate mousse, tarte Tatin, and crème brule. A cheese course was served with every meal that included a selection of regional varieties along with brie and Camembert Weather permitting, we ate our meals al fresco on the sun deck, otherwise we ate at a large, elegantly set dining table in the saloon


One morning we all joined our chef Mickail to go shopping at the local market in Narbonne to select fresh sh, seafood, vegetables and herbs for a seafood feast back onboard.

Regional French Wine and Private Winery Visits Wines were pre-selected, and paired expertly for each meal by the ship’s hostess, who presented background information on the type of grape and vintage before pouring. Our wine glasses were never empty as the barge meandered along the canal with views of autumncoloured vineyards. This is an excellent trip for wine lovers, and also included a

Languedoc winery tour and tasting at Chateau Pech-Celeyran, owned by the Saint-Exupery family for ve generations. Off the Beaten Track Villages and Towns Traveling by luxury barge is very different from a cruise, and is a slower and more picturesque way to experience the day-to-day life of the villages that line the Canal du Midi. Unlike on cruises, where you spent time in open waters, or a car trip, where the landscape whizzes past you, barge-travel is so slow that you feel part of the landscape. We had many opportunities to hop on and off the boat, and immerse ourselves into the local

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culture. Historic towns and villages were within a short walk or bike ride from the barge or a comfortable drive in our Mercedes Sprinter. The cruise offered a perfect way to experience the rich history of daily life of old, tiny villages like Carcassone, Minerve, Capestang, Salelle D’Aude and Narbonne. I recently wrote about these villages in a more detailed article for Quirky Cruise. Barging with a captain and guide who grew up on barges and have worked with European Waterways for many years, meant that we were presented with deep (and local) knowledge about the Languedoc Region.

Your Next Adventure?

So, if you love slow experiential travel, fresh food, and excellent wines, this may be just up your alley. In general, I believe that small-ship cruising on lakes, rivers, canals and oceans, may well be the future of upscale travel. I felt privileged and cared for personally during my time aboard Anjodi. These types of luxury barges are typically quite small with under 20 passengers, some with as few as four, making barge cruising suitable for families and group charters. I look forward to sharing my photos and stories as I continue to travel the globe in search of off-the-beaten-path cruise adventures on quirky vessels Photos, from left: Sun setting on Barge Anjodi © Judi Cohen; Judi and Lawrence enjoying sunset on Anjodi© Judi Cohen; Dining alfresco on Barge Anjodi © Judi Cohen; Barge Anjodi approaching Beziers © Judi Cohen; Judi enjoying the tree-lined canal © Judi Cohen; Shrimp at Seafood Lunch © Judi Cohen; Fresh Oysters from Marche in Narbonne © Judi Cohen; Pea Soup Served by Chef Mickail © Judi Cohen


by Kathleen Messmer

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magine streets lined with new, innovative restaurants, ingenious chefs, and steaming plates of goodness at the ready, and you will probably be in San Antonio, Texas, one of two cities in the United States that have been awarded the UNESCO Creative City of Gastronomy designation. This alone makes San Antonio one of the most exciting cities to dine in right now Instrumental in attaining that coveted title is Chef Elizabeth Johnson, owner of Pharm Table, an epic organic, plant-forward establishment where the word "Pharm" actually means culinary medicine. Not only was she a driving force behind the city's win, but she is a

wellspring of knowledge regarding San Antonio's culinary history, the very thing San Antonio hung its hat on to achieve the designation

goals. It uses its food and culture to drive sustainable economic development within the community, thereby creating a more robust food heritage

Culinary History

The "Food Medicine Guru”

Spaniards from the Canary Islands founded San Antonio. Then the Germans came in and developed powdered spices to take home the avors of San Antonio. Hence, the Tex-Mex avor palette was born, though the term is a reasonably recent restaurant-born creation. Either way, it was pure genius on the part of both cultures.

Sustainable development goals run parallel to what Johnson is trying to do with Pharm Table, whose mission is to heal the planet and people with food—

The convergence of these two cultures is unique to San Antonio and de nes south Texas cuisine as Spanish, German, and indigenous Indian. The UNESCO designation connects San Antonio to a global network of cities working towards sustainable development

Photos, from left: Israeli-style Hummus & Vegetables ©Kathleen Messmer; Ginger Meal Starter ©Kathleen Messmer; Herbal Tea ©Kathleen Messmer

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ollowing the UNESCO Culinary Trail in San Antonio, Texas


The spices at Pharm Table come from all over the world and are all medicinal as well as botanicals, which are the basis of so many of our pharmaceuticals. According to Johnson, "We consume so much sugar, meat, dairy, and processed foods, our bodies are in a state of chronic in ammation leading us to every known ailment—e.g.,

cancer, diabetes, arthritis, lupus, leaky gut, etc. So basically, you can heal yourself, or you can kill yourself with food." An eye-opening statement for sure

Pharm Table Johnson prefers to refer to Pharm Table as a "plantforward" establishment rather than vegan because you can add meat to anything on the menu. Everything is locally sourced but globally inspired Before perusing the menu at Pharm Table, I ordered an excellent cup of herbal tea that was at once sweet and lemony. It inspired a very homey feeling. The meal begins with a ginger starter containing all six avors in the ayurvedic avor wheel and is said to calm the vagus nerve, allowing us to digest our food correctly. The meal was Israeli-style Hummus and Vegetables with Grass-Fed Beef Kafka prepared with Persian spices. The hummus was perfectly spiced, and the vegetables were rm, fresh, and delicious. I've never

Photos, from left: Pharm Table Organic Tortilla ©Kathleen Messmer; Pharm Table Bar ©Kathleen Messmer; Pharm Table Spice Library ©Kathleen Messmer

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bringing increased awareness to the people of San Antonio means re-educating them to a new and better way of thinking about food and how it can help them. A return to homeopathic methods is also a part of that solution

had beef so tender and savory as the Beef Kefka For dessert, I had the Brazilian Spiced Pineapple. Pineapple is a bromeliad and eats twice its weight in protein, so it's the perfect dessert. It's cooked in a simple syrup of coconut sugar, star anise, cloves, allspice, and cinnamon. It was sweet and satisfying, and it's good for you and your body. I can honestly say when I left, I felt content and well on my way to a good, healthy day

Conclusion According to the NPD Group, a leading global information c o m p a n y, t h e r e a r e approximately 3403 independent restaurants in San Antonio, increasing 4% per year since 2011. So, even if you were to eat out every single day, it would take you nine years to eat your way through all of the fantastic restaurants in San Antonio. I can't even imagine, but it's never too late to start.


By Kim Jackson

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ancouver is one of the most beautiful cities to explore in Western Canada. It’s hard to imagine that Stanley Park is only a few steps away from Downtown Vancouver. This picturesque park includes scenic water views, mountains, majestic trees, and a seawall.

cold-water pool and play together. It was the highlight of my trip each time I visited. As the zoo expanded, there was so much more to explore. Mom always brought a picnic lunch, and my brother and I would run around and play. Luckily, Lisa and Rachel were able to enjoy the zoo before it closed in 1996

I have always loved visiting Stanley Park with my family as far back as I can remember. My furthest memory is mom pushing the stroller with my younger brother Tom and me walking alongside her. Dad must have been taking the photo

Stanley Park Train

When my daughters Rachel and Lisa were young, I regularly took them to Stanley Park. And when my rst grandchild Damian was born, Rachel and I took him to Stanley Park a lot. He loved the swings, the Stanley Park Train, and the sand where he could play

Stanley Park Zoo When I was a child, my favourite place was the zoo. I loved the polar bear exhibit and watching them jump into the

Photos, from left: Brockton Point Lighthouse ©Kim Jackson; Stanley Park benches ©Kim Jackson; Polar Bear Compound ©Kim Jackson

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Multi-generational Day Trip to Stanley Park in Vanc ver, BC, Canada

Our family had so much fun taking a ride on the miniature train. The anticipation was palpable as we’d walk towards the train station. It was a thrilling 15minute ride that featured trestles, tunnels, forests, and animals. After our miniature train ride, we would always visit the petting zoo just across from the train

Vancouver Aquarium The Vancouver Aquarium opened in 1956. After the zoo closed, the Aquarium used the land to expand its facility. As a child, I loved to watch the killer whales at mealtime. Spending time inside the Aquarium allowed us to observe sharks, freshwater sh, tropical sh, and other sea creatures. Of course, the best part for us kids was walking through the souvenir store

Walking along the Seawall My all-time favourite thing to do in Stanley Park is walking along the seawall. When I was younger, I always held onto my parent's hand so that I wouldn't fall into the ocean


This past summer, I spent a couple of days in downtown Vancouver and so enjoyed walking along the seawall and spending some quiet time in nature. My favourite places there were Coal Harbour, Totem Poles, Prospect Point Lighthouse, the Lion's Gate Bridge, and Siwash Rock. The anticipation of turning the corner and seeing Siwash Rock in the distance was still so exciting.

Last fall, Rachel and I took my granddaughter Madi to Stanley Park for the rst time. It was a beautiful day with the leaves changing colour, and I was surprised to see the cement polar bear zoo enclosures still there. As we continued walking towards Lumberman's Arch, Madi saw the ocean and immediately asked if we could play in the sand. Amazingly, we got to view quite a few star sh clinging to large rocks. One special moment was when Madi asked to hold my hand while she walked along the seawall. That brought back so many wonderful memories We c o n t i n u e d

along the seawall t o w a rd s o u r c a r, stopping for a quick

s n a c k along the way. Madi played with the fallen leaves while I took photos. Next time I’d love for my other daughter Lisa and her four children to join us.

Hollow Tree As we exited the park, I showed Madi the Hollow Tree. This 600–800-year-old Western Red Cedar is one of Vancouver's most well-known tourist attractions. Historic photos reveal people, cars, and even elephants inside the tree's large cavity. We all took our turn standing inside the tree An unknown author once said “The best things in life are the people you love, the places you’ve seen, and the memories you’ve made along the way.” That is what Va n c o u v e r ’ s Stanley Park means to me and my family

Photos, from left: Hollow Tree ©Kim Jackson; Stanley Park Group of Totem Poles ©Kim Jackson; Stanley Park Totem Pole ©Kim Jackson

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Photos, from left: Stanley Park Seawall ©Kim Jackson; View of Seawall towards Downtown Vancouver ©Kim Jackson; Siwash Rock walking west towards Third Beach ©Kim Jackson


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Finding Synchronicity in San Luis Obispo and Arroyo Grande By Cori Solomon

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laces I love usually involve all my senses; taste, touch, sight, smell, and hearing. Like wine and grape growing, it involves terroir and that sense of place. This connection is dear to me, especially visiting the destinations of San Luis Obispo and Arroyo Grande. My journey begins the minute I exit the tunnel on Highway 101 as it turns away from the ocean inland in Santa Barbara County. The view of the random oak tree standing apart from a

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tranquil pasture sets me in the mood for my special place

shows. It characterizes a time when I was close to my father

San Luis Obispo and Arroyo Grande represent a happy place. It gives me great pleasure to reminisce about visiting my father ’s ranch on Corbett Canyon Road in Arroyo Grande, walking around the pond, viewing the animals, including a llama named Michael, named after Michael Jackson because this llama came from Neverland. I remember potluck get-togethers with friends after the local dog

I remember the wineries I visited and the restaurants I frequented, including those still existing. In San Luis Obispo, walking along the creek, seeing bubble gum alley, or visiting the farmers market were some of our favorite pastimes. Our family often ventured to the Five Cities—Arroyo Grande, Pismo Beach, Shell Beach, Grover Beach, and Oceano


A recent trip brought back those memories because each location I visited had some connection with the past or an association with part of my life. Although the area has evolved since the 1990s, the charm and warmth still exist, attracting me to this region on the Central Coast

The Wineries Then and Now My visit started at Stephen Ross Wine Cellars. Located in an industrial area of San Luis Obispo, I did not expect a connection to my past, but as we sampled wine, I discovered that Stephen Ross grows grapes in partnership at Stone Corral Vineyard on Corbett Canyon Road with Talley and Kynsi. I wondered if the vineyard property was the back 75 acres my father sold to Talley. I gured I would learn more when I visited Talley. Often my father spoke of Talley, but I never had the privilege of

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Photos, this page: Talley Vineyards, The Ranch House on Corbett Canyon Road; View From the Arroyo Grande Ranch in 1998; San Luis Obispo Creek behind Higuera Street

visiting. On this trip, after m e e t i n g B r i a n Ta l l e y, I understood the importance this family had on grape growing and general agriculture in the Edna Valley. Growing Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, along with other varieties, I learned part of the answer to my mystery. The Stone Corral Vi n e y a r d f r o n t s C o r b e t t Canyon, so it was not the property Talley purchased from my father. Talley cultivates many white grapes at Oliver’s Vineyard, which lies behind and adjacent to Stone Corral Vineyard, and that too is not the property from my memories. The mystery is still unsolved, but if I w e r e t o g u e s s , Ta l l e y purchased the property to farm vegetables. Hopefully, Brian will help me discover how they utilized the back acreage in the future In the past, my husband and I ventured across the street to Corbett Canyon Winery from

the ranch. Today that winery is Center of Effort, known for its Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. Its name describes a point on a sailboat when everything is in perfect balance. For me, it signi es the balance between past and present and the alignment of today’s sustainability in farming re e c t e d a t m a n y o f t h e vineyards in the Edna Valley. Several years ago, I discovered Chêne Vineyards, a property located next door to the ranch entrance. The property has since sold, and while I visited Center of Effort, Nathan, the w i n e m a k e r, s u g g e s t e d introducing me to the woman that farms Chêne Vineyards. I met Gina Guigni, Lady of Sunshine Wines, who farms biodynamically. As Gina and I walked the vineyards, Gina mentioned she acquired her passion for biodynamics from her parents, who grow grapes in El Dorado County. Knowing one biodynamic winery in El


Photos, this page: Family Photo at the Ranch; View of the Ranch from Corbett Canyon Road in 2022; Arroyo Grande Rooster; View of the Ranch from Center of Effort in 2022

Dorado, I said, do you know Narrow Gate. She responded, “That is my parent’s winery,” so again, the ranch brought back more connections 30 years later

Restaurants Then and Now Back in the 90s, we frequented Big Sky Café, Linn’s, Apple Farm Inn in San Luis Obispo. In Pismo, it was McClintock’s and Giuseppe’s. Big Sky is still there after 30 years and an excellent place to have lunch. Linn’s, known for their baked goods, pies, olallieberry preserves, and country fare, closed their San Luis Obispo location but kept their Cambria location. Originally called the Franciscan Motel, the Apple Farm Inn dates to 1957. The restaurant opened in 1977. The Davis’ purchased the property in 1988, adding buildings, planting apple trees, and renaming it, Apple Farm Inn. During their

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ownership, I often visited the restaurant for breakfast and lunch. On my recent visit to San Luis Obispo, I stayed at the Apple Farm Inn. Country charm abounds under the new ownership. The hotel will embark on a remodel, maintaining the quaint ambiance but bringing the décor and amenities to today’s standards. The restaurant still offers the wonderful bakery goods that the restaurant was always known for, including apple dumplings Giuseppe’s in Pismo is still there even after burning down but has now opened a second location in San Luis Obispo in the original Sinsheimer Bros. Building, which served as the general mercantile Today restaurants with an ethnic cuisine are springing up in San Luis Obispo, including Mistura, a must-try Peruvian restaurant

San Luis Obispo and Arroyo Grande Downtown San Luis Obispo still has its old-world charm, but the restaurants and shops have changed to meet the demands of today's population. With city murals and growing patronage at the art museum, the city embraces the arts and integrates these works into the local scenery The Village of Arroyo Grande was a quaint small town in the 1990s, whose agrarian roots come forth hearing the roosters, who reside along the creek behind the stores on Branch Street. Today this lively town boasts wineries, cafes, and curio shops. A s t h e p a s t a n d p re s e n t converge, I am drawn to San L u i s O b i s p o a n d A r ro y o Grande. Each time I visit, that connection increases as I discover more family ties to the region


PARK—The

of C t l Fl i

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By Diane Dobry

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inter Park, Florida, draws me in like a magnet. When telling friends from out of state about this beautiful city, I describe it as the Hamptons of Central Florida.

It is my favorite town to hang out in, eat in, walk through, and explore. The streets are paved with classy, mottled bricks and the buildings are trimmed with attractive awnings and cheerful hanging ower baskets. Park Avenue, the main throughfare, is bordered by Central Park on one side and irresistible shops and restaurants on the other. It’s the part of town that also hosts the Christmas Parade, open-air concerts, and outdoor lms I attend annually. Who wouldn’t love a place that exudes the best of American hometown charm and culinary enticement on every corner?

Give Me Park Avenue You just know Park Avenue is over owing with artsy boutiques, gourmet markets, sweet shops, and trendy eateries. Peterbrooke Chocolatier, is a go-to stop at the top of my list. Once I get past tempting displays of hand-dipped and molded

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chocolates, gift baskets and boxes lled with various sweets, I pick out four or ve handmade cream- lled candies from the display case. Peeking at the dozen or so avors of creamy Italian gelato, I hope they have their Lavender Honey blend. Otherwise, I order a vanilla ice cream soda and sit outside on a bench, savoring it while proudly displaying their elegant cobalt blue signature bag holding my candy stash Another target destination with stimulating tastes and scents is Spice & Tea Exchange, where I always grab a tea to go—hot or cold, depending on what their special iced tea of the day is. After searching walls covered with packets of sugar, spice and everything nice, I pick up gifts for friends and tea leaves for myself. Then I’m ready to wander around town. My favorite day to visit Winter Park is Saturday for the weekly Farmer’s Market offering artisanal honey or vanilla, fruits, veggies and more

A Few of My Favorite Things High-end shops draw in the most discerning of


buyers, even if we are just window shopping. Williams-Sonoma, and Chico’s t the bill for me, though my budget allows me to buy just a small bauble as a treat. One small boutique where I do drop some cash is Through the Looking Glass, which has lots of cute accessories—purses, scarves, hats and jewelry. Pottery Barn at the southern end of the street is where I look for more homey, decorative items that give my apartment just the right look. When seeking out a cultural learning experience there is the Writer’s Block book store and the Morse Museum on Park Avenue. I’ve learned a lot about the town, itself, at the local history museum near the train tracks. (Yes, train tracks—a Craftsman-style train station in the park serves both Amtrak and Sun Rail commuter trains).

Eat, Drink, and Be Merry Lots of tempting restaurants. wine bars, and coffee shops line Park Avenue across from the wide green span of Central Park. People dining al fresco at sidewalk tables allows me an enticing look at (and aroma from) what’s on the menu. I explore side streets that reveal options including Turkish, Indian, Mexican and Italian cuisine, pub fare, croissants, seafood, sushi, and barbecue, to name a few

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More Places to Love Once I’ve lled my bags with goodies from the farmer’s market, stopped for some sweet treats from Peterbrooke, sampled a quesadilla from Cocina 214, and peeked inside the shops, I hop in my car wherever I was lucky enough to nd space on the street. There are some larger free parking lots and garages in town, too. Heading down Morse Avenue, I nd more temptation. Bulla Gastrobar, on Morse and Orlando Avenues, is my favorite for tapas. I drool over the treats at the popular nearby cakery, The Glass Knife, offering not only desserts and pastries, but also breakfast, lunch, weekend brunch, coffee, tea, wine and beer. I may cross Orlando Avenue to visit Trader Joe’s or Shake Shack, sitting outdoors appreciating the view of Lake Killarney, or I’ll head farther north to grab a bite at The Hangry Bison With so much to see and do in Winter Park—boat tours, movie theaters, festivals, concerts, museums, and more—one Saturday is not enough time to see and experience it all. So, I always have something new to look forward to when I return.


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By Linda Milks

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old prospectors, prostitutes, immigrant farmers, shermen, politicians, and horses with wagons. That was the beginning of the city of Seattle and also the beginning of Pike Place Market.

The Market’s Beginning On August 17, 1907, a summer downpour, mud, a wood planked roadway, live chickens, and eight wagons full of produce drawn by horses awaited a group of thousands of female shoppers eager to nd fresh produce direct from the farmers of the local valleys. Produce was sold out by noon. Within three months, 120 farmers in the area who contributed were recent immigrants from Germany, Italy, China, Japan, and the Philippines. They were tired of selling to middlemen and making little pro t. Soon a long narrow shed was built with 76 stalls to protect the farmers from the rain. A permanent arcade opened in November, 1907. In the early 1900s, more than 3,000 farmers supplied the city with fresh fruits and vegetables From these beginnings, the market grew to more areas known as the Economy Market, the Corner Market, the Sanitary Market (named that because

horses weren’t allowed in that section,) and the lower levels of the Main Market. Then came the Outlook Hotel and the Triangle Market. The market is still considered a place to meet growers with roots from all over the world. Pike Place Market is the oldest continually operated and historically authentic public market in the country and is considered the “soul of the city.

Rough Times at the Market And yes, during WWII, there was even a brothel at the foot of Pike Street at a hotel named the Outlook and then renamed the LaSalle, possibly getting the new name from the luxury car and known for a place where soldiers stood in line to get “a ride.” WWII also brought about the disgrace of the internment of Japanese, causing many stalls at the market to be shut down. During the following years the market fell into disrepair. Luckily, with help from community leader Victor Steinbrueck, the Friends of the Market was formed. This group put preserving the market on the ballot in 1971. The measure passed

Photos, from opposite page: Dahlias; 50 Years of Saving the Market; Fruits; Pike Place Fish Co tt

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The Allure of Sea le’s Colorful Pike Place Market


Fifty years later during the celebration of the preservation of the market, I visited Pike Place Market with fellow writer Debbra Dunning Brouillette. The activity and charm of this market never ceases to enthrall me. One section, known as the Pike Place Fish Market, has been at the market since 1930. Not only can you nd a huge selection of the freshest sh imaginable, but you can also be entertained. These shmongers put on a show throughout the day where one shmonger throws a large sh across the space to another behind the counter and then the sh is thrown back while a crowd of onlookers applauds. Supposedly, this came about because one shmonger was upset with another and tossed a sh at him, and the crowd cheered. If you love owers like I do, nd yourself delighted with large and reasonably priced

bouquets of giant dahlias (one of my favorites), asters, and ornamental cabbages grown in the nearby valleys. Fruits and vegetables as brilliantly colorful as a Van Gogh painting ll stalls. Merchants offer samples of some of the more unique fruits.

A Private Tour I highly recommend the chef-guided food tour we took with Eat Seattle Tours. Not only did we get top notch service from some of Chef Sean’s nine favorite stalls with delicious samples, but he also shared some interesting insights and stories about the market. On this tour we experienced everything from Beechers Handmade Cheese where we sampled Mac’ N Cheese to Pike Place Chowder, where tourists wait in long lines (but not us) to sample the only West Coast chowder inducted into the Chowdafest Hall of Fame. We also visited the mother/daughter team owners of the Truf e Queen where we sampled their mushroom, olive, and black truf e sauce on a crostini. One of my favorites was Ellenos Yogurt, the yogurt said to make ice cream jealous (and I agree. When you visit, don’t miss the Secret Garden, a rooftop patio, garden, and seating area where gardening activities take place and produce is grown and donated to the Pike Market Senior Center and Food Bank. Before you leave, say “hi” to Rachel the Pig, an outdoor bronze sculpture piggy bank, and tell her I sent you

Photos, from top left:Fishmonger Throwing Fish; Fish and Octopus at Market; Pike Place Chowder Kitchen ; Debbra and Me in Front of the Pike Place Market Sign; Rachel the Pig with Debbra

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What to See at the Market


No matter how many times you set foot in Albuquerque, you’ll always see it for the first time. With history that spans millennia and so many unique faces, flavors and fascinating cultures, each trip is a new adventure. From galleries celebrating both traditional artisans and artists up-and-coming, to rooftop brunches overlooking spectacular sunsets, to discovering treasures in one-of-a-kind shops, there’s no way to take it in all at once. And as soon as you’re introduced to one facet, you’ll want to uncover them all. #TrueABQ

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The Food Scene in St. Augustine— Where Food And Wine Are Naturally Part of the Culture By Stacey Wittig

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rom the datil pepper, which ancestors of indentured servants have grown in backyard gardens for centuries, to seafood plucked from the ocean in its front yard, the food scene in St. Augustine, Florida, bene ts from its history and long tradition of tourism Exploring the cultures of a place, primarily through the lens of food and wine, gets my juices owing. Tasting, sipping and strolling along Florida’s Historic Coast, which includes St. Augustine and Ponte Vedra Beach, satiated that craving in more ways than I expected St. Augustine is located about halfway between Jacksonville and Daytona Beach on the state’s east coast. An extensive system of public lands, including wildlife preserves, state parks, and national recreation areas, keeps beaches and wooded wetlands oh, so natural. Further inland, the mild climate and rich soils produce intensely- avored fruits and vegetables that we found highlighted by local chefs and winemakers. .

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Spanish conquistadors rst set foot on the continent here in 1513, bringing with them appetites for European foodstuffs: the Iberian trinity of wheat bread, wine, and olive oil often eaten with meats like beef, lamb, and pork. On the other hand, the indigenous people living here when the Spanish landed thrived on wholesome diets of fresh seafood and veggies, including maize and squash. The balanced diet enhanced life span and adult height—the Timucua stood much taller than the average Spaniard at the time. Indeed once the Spanish saw the Timucua people’s stature and longevity, the quest for the fabled Fountain of Youth was on Fifty years later, the French encroaching on Spanish territory from the north struggled to make wine from wild grapes they found in northeastern Florida. So today, you can sample the same Scuppernong grapes at local markets or sip wines made from muscadine grapes, of which Scuppernong is a variety, at Florida wineries. “The rst wines in North America were made by French Huguenots in the area that is now

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Jacksonville, Florida,” explains Matheson Cory, Certi ed Sommelier, CHS, at a ve-course dinner at Ponte Vedra Inn & Club. “By 1565, they were massacred by the Spanish or had ed back to France. The wine was not very good, so their plan was to start importing French wines—but history got in the way. “We do not have any Florida wines at Ponte Vedra Inn & Club,” discloses the Resort Sommelier. “As in the 1560s, Florida is not the best place to grow wine grapes.” Matheson performed a ceremonial sabrage for our cocktail welcome on outdoor space overlooking the white, sugary sand beach, the same mesmerizing view that I enjoyed from my elegant guestroom. French sabrage entails opening bottles of bubbly with sabers by slicing bottlenecks below the cork

Evolution of the Food Scene in St Augustine As the years unfolded, the settlement established by the Spanish as a forti cation against the French and English became St. Augustine, now North America’s oldest European city. Since then, the


The Minorcan in uence of the St. Augustine food scene stems from a tiny Mediterranean isle off the east coast of Spain. Poor families from Minorca packed their belongings and foodstuffs for the promise of land and the good life in the New World. It was 1768, and by now, the British were solidly in control of Florida. Locals debate whether the indentured servants brought datil peppers from their homeland or whether they adapted the pepper to their cuisine once here. Enslaved Africans or Havana traders who encountered datil peppers in Cuba could have introduced the bond slaves to the hot chiles in Florida In either case, Minorcans, whose descendants now number over 10,000 in St. Johns County on Florida’s Historic Coast, are the keepers of secreted datil recipes passed down through the generations. Besides datil pepper sauce, watch for Minorcan clam chowder made with clams, lobster or squid; Minorcan pilau (pronounced per-low, but think ‘pilaf’ or ‘paella,’ similar one-pot rice dishes) with chicken, sausage and/or shrimp; and smoked striped mullet, a sh traditionally caught in handcast nets.

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indigenous seafood diet has mingled with Old World fare to produce a local cuisine that includes St. Augustine shrimp, Datil pepper sauces and Minorcan clam chowder.

You’ll nd a variety of shrimp dishes along Florida’s Historic Coast. In fact, wild-caught shrimp is St. Augustine’s of cial seafood. The US shrimp industry was born when WWII military cooks fed fried shrimp to the troops stationed in the area. After the war, the soldiers brought recipes for their new favorite dish back home. Soon, fried shrimp was an American classic.

Gilded Age Resorts Focus on Food The ambiance of the old Spanish colony and subtropical climate with its abundant agriculture caught the attention of Standard Oil co-founder Henry Morrison Flagler when he visited with John D. Rockefeller during the Industrial Revolution. So in 1885, the American tycoon began building Hotel Ponce de Leon in St. Augustine, tted for electric lighting by Thomas Edison just 372 years after Ponce set the rst European foot on mainland North America. The opulent hotel would be the rst of many Gilded Age resorts created by Flagler, who also developed railroad systems to connect Florida’s entire east coast and transport citrus and other local foods. Dining room menus that featured Florida shrimp, clams, and citrus exemplify the haute cuisine of the day. Guests stayed two to three months, not just for the night, so the food focus was part of the total resort experience


Visit “The Ponce,” as the Hotel Ponce de Leon is known to locals, to behold one of the world’s largest collections of Tiffany windows in their original location. If you go, you’ll join the ranks of Andrew Carnegie, John F. Kennedy, Sinclair Lewis, J.P. Morgan, Joseph Pulitzer, Teddy Roosevelt, and Mark Twain, who also spent time at the hotel, now part of Flagler College

Experience the Legacy Today If you’d like to stay in one of Flagler’s luxury hotels, Casa Monica Resort & Spa, Autograph Collection, right across the street from Flagler College, is the place for you. The Morrocanthemed hotel mixes a Gilded Age setting and modern amenities within walking distance of Lightner Museum, Castillo de San Marcos National Monument, and St. George Street, the historic quarter The newest hotel in St. Augustine, Renaissance St. Augustine Historic Downtown Hotel, was my home for two nights. Its exterior re ects the mood of the historic city, but upon entry, the interior swept me into an Alice in Wonderland-like sensory experience. A long, golden staircase leads upward, framed by giant bulbous columns reminiscent of white chess pieces. The ultracontemporary interior design reminded me of chic Bangkok hotels’ art-focused themes. The culinary team at the hotel’s Castillo Craft Bar + Kitchen partners with sustainable local farmers for its farm-to-fork focus. Before dinner, I was enamored while watching the bartender create craft cocktails,

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Photos, from opposite page, left: Fresh sh PalmValley Fish Camp; Datil Pepper, St.Augustine FHC; Palm Valley Fish Camp octopus; Ancient City; Hotel interior; Aunt Kate’s shrimp

including Strawdogg Spritz with Elder ower liqueur and House Smoked Old Fashioned Of course, that did not top the sabrage executed by Matheson Cory at Ponte Vedra Inn & Club, where I luxuriated for two incredible nights. Visit my website to read my full review of that property at Ponte Vedra Beach. In that community, THE PLAYERS Championship is held annually at Sawgrass. The top golf event is another reason for the area’s elevated cuisine. Chefs worldwide come for the festivities, and some have stayed to call Florida’s Historic Coast their home The high level of service, top-rated attractions and well-developed food scene in St. Augustine that I experienced along Florida’s Historic Coast is due to its deep history, and long tradition of tourism begun by Henry Flagler

When You Go Ponte Vedra Inn & Club www.pontevedra.com Ponce de Leon’s Fountain of Youth Archaeological Park www.fountainofyouth orida.com St. Augustine Experiences staugustineexperiences.com


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South African Adventure: Trip of a Lifetime Photo Essa By Lori Sweet & Sylvio Roy

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hen you hear South Africa, what is the rst thing that comes to mind? For us, it was what it would be like to experience a safari. We also pictured shanty towns and a somewhat barren landscape; likely because of what we see in print and on screen

South Africa is so much more than that. Our photo essay is a glimpse into the beautiful landscape, majestic animals, delicious food, vibrant people, and deep history of this colorful and diverse country. .

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Photos, Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Mom & baby zebra; Hippo; Resting lions; South African penguins resting; Waterbuck in the morning fog; Colony spider web in the fog; Village Weaver; A dazzle of zebras; This page, clockwise from top right: Whitey the giraffe with a bird friend; Blue Waxbill; Elephant eye; Vervet monkey; Impala; Blesbok; Wildebeest 49


Africa has her mysteries, and understand them…

Photos, from top: Bridge over the river; South African boma ( gathering place); Safari Jeep tracks; View of Camps Bay Beach and Table Mountain; Opposite page from top right: View of the coast from Cape Point; Day time view of Table Mountain from Bloubergstrand; Cape Point LIghthouse; Sunset storm rolling in; False Bay Seal Island Reserve and seagulls; Table Mountain's tablecloth of clouds; Humala River Lodge coordinates

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Even a wise man cannot But a wise man respects them.

~Miriam Makeba

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Photos, from top, left: Millipede; The sign says it all; Baskets made from phone wire; Green Stone Mountains; Jeep heading down the road; Giraffe 52


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never knew of a morning in Africa when I woke up that I was not happy.

~Ernest Hemingway

Photos, from top, right: Sprinkling magic dust; Entertainment with marimba percussion & djembe drums; Drums; Enjoying the view at Humala River Lodge; Malva pudding; Food from Malawi, Kenya, Ethiopia & Cape Malay; Foods from Cameroon, Nigeria & Egypt

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By MIchelle Fedosof

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ocated in South Burnaby, British Columbia, along the shores of the Fraser River, the Burnaby Fraser Foreshore Park is one of my favorite places to spend time. The park is a mix of grassy areas and forest. Having several areas with picnic tables, a well-maintained washroom, and a playground, this park is the perfect location for picnics or birthday parties with family and friends. The ninemile trail combines p a v e d sections a n d woodland trails that are at and easy to access, although the forest trails can become ooded during high tide.

low, the muddy shores reveal tracks of beavers, muskrats, and geese. When I want to have a laugh, I visit the off-leash dog area to watch the many dog visitors chase balls, roll in the sand, and just be goofy. Over the years I have made many dog friends that love to say hello when they see me

The Seasons It’s hard to say what my favorite time of year is in the park.

Because the Fraser River is a working river as well as tidal, every day brings a new view. Some days the river is a fast-moving body of water, while other days the log booms seem to reach across the width of the river. Tugboats pull the log booms up and down the river, and loggers work the logs to help release them to the currents. When the tide is

Spring is w h e n b a b y wildlife can be spotted, t h e skunk cabbage blooms in the marshy areas bringing its musky smell to the forest, and forest trails become ooded, then dry, based on the tides. Summer is a great time for wildlife viewing, bike riding, BBQ’s, playing frisbee, and picking the wild blackberries that are everywhere.

Photos, clockwise from top left: Summer trees in the park ©Michelle Fedosoff; Winter re ections on the Fraser River ©Michelle Fedosoff; The trail at high tide ©Michelle Fedosof ; Spring brings the baby geese ©Michelle Fedosoff .

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Burnaby Fraser Foreshore Park


Fall provides changing color of the deciduous trees and bushes and a lot of bird activity. Winter brings back the high tides, wind storms that whoosh through the evergreen trees, and Christmas decorations on the trees. No matter what the season or the weather, my favorite thing to do here is walk. Usually sticking to the forested section, walking here gives me calmness. Sometimes during my walk there are a lot of other people, with or without dogs, who always say hello. But those times when this busy park is quiet and I walk for an hour without meeting a soul, that’s magical. The wildlife viewing is part of what makes this location special. Dawn and dusk are when the

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beavers are most active and will swim close before slapping their tail and diving under the water. Raccoons and squirrels are everywhere and if you are lucky, a coyote will step out from the forest and onto the trail in front of you before ducking back into the trees. And watching the pair of bald eagles return year after year to build their nest is something special to see. The Burnaby Fraser Foreshore Park brings a sense of peace and quiet to the chaos of city life and I cannot imagine a day when I don’t return. Photos, clockwise from top left: A paved portion of the trail system ©Michelle Fedosoff; Brightly colored fungus found in the park ©Michelle Fedosoff; One of the many bridges in the park ©Michelle Fedosoff; Log booms on the Fraser River ©Michelle Fedosoff; A couple taking in the view ©Michelle Fedosoff; Bottom from left: Father and daughter walking the trail ©Michelle Fedosoff; Raccoons are plentiful ©Michelle Fedosoff; Animal tracks ©Michelle Fedosoff; Autumn colors in the park ©Michelle Fedosoff


By Robin Dohrn-Simpso

We shall not cease from exploration and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know it for the first time.

~ T.S. Elliot

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ravel is much more than a physical act. It is spiritual. It is cultural. It offers a metamorphosis to those with open eyes and open minds. That is what Bali was for my husband and me on our rst trip there in the early 80s Bali changed my life. Bali, the Land of the Gods, is a spiritual island and you cannot help but absorb the energy of peace here. I have never seen such beautiful people living a beautiful and truthful existence. Happy and content with what they have. Joyful every day

Spiritual It becomes quickly apparent to visitors that a deep and ubiquitous vein of spirituality runs through the island. The Balinese people practice a distinct form of Hinduism. It incorporates animism and ancestor worship. Parades through neighborhoods that end at an ancient temple occur practically on a daily basis. Some small, some large. There are over 20,000 temples on the island. Beautiful Balinese women in the parades balance large platters of food and owers on their heads as they sway down a street en route to a temple. Cement statues of gods are dressed in black and white checkered cloth to symbolize the philosophy of the balance of harmony found throughout Bali Worshippers honor the gods on a daily basis. One custom is to make regular offerings to the gods. A typical offering might be a small banana leaf with a dollop of rice, pretty ower petals, and a stick of incense burning. The host at our losmen, a Balinese guesthouse, left an offering every night at our doorstep entreating the gods to protect us. Every car dashboard has an offering, as does every storefront and home. Our host had a motorcycle accident and later

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Bali, Ind ia L d of the Go


Art is Life Bali is culturally rich in art. It is omnipresent in every aspect of Balinese life. Artists are skilled woodcarvings, painters, musicians, ower arrangers, dancers, and weavers. Every home has an ornate entrance most carved from wood or stone. Every temple is a work of art.

Landscape Even the landscape is art. Vivid green terraced rice

elds sparkle like diamonds in the sunlight. Distant vistas capture your eyes and beckon you to where sarong-clad women bent over weeding their rice paddies. Men work the elds with their water buffaloes. Three volcanoes dot the island

Monkeys The Ubud Monkey Forest is a sanctuary for the long-tailed macaque. These monkeys are very clever and know that you will have peanuts with you when you come to visit them. Don’t make the mistake I made and arrive without nuts. They a very serious about receiving their snacks and will

not take no for an answer. I learned that the hard way when one jumped on my back looking for what he thought was my secret stash of nuts

Surf As a native-California surfer, my husband knows all the best surf spots in the world. One of them is Uluwatu with its cliff face dropping into the ocean. To get to the water surfers must climb down the cliff and be very cautious of the tides. This worldfamous surf spot offers ve different breaks for a variety of sur ng levels. For those watching from the top, there is a viewing platform bustling with

activity. Would you like a massage? A soda? How about a trinket? Lunch? Bali is my favorite place because, to me, it is magical. The beauty of the people, the purity of their spiritual beliefs, the immense greenery of the perfectly terraced hillsides dotted with banana trees, and the pure joy of the Balinese people drew me in and showed me how I could live my life. I have not been the same since that rst trip to Bali. Oh, yes, I have returned a few times, and it just keeps getting better. Photos of Bali courtesy of unsplash.com and pexels.com

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realized he had not invoked the god of protection while motorcycling


Istanbul, Where East meets West By Sharon Kurtz

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here are many reasons why I fell in love with Istanbul. It’s the only city on the globe to straddle both Europe and Asia, a true melting pot of cultures.

History comes alive in Istanbul You’ll nd over a dozen UNESCO-recognized sites throughout the city. Here are some of my favorites. The Hagia Sophia is a Byzantine marvel, anchoring the Old City of Istanbul and serving for centuries as a landmark for Orthodox Christians and Muslims. Built as a Christian Basilica nearly 1,500 years ago, it was converted into a mosque after the Ottoman conquest in 1453. When Turkey became a secular Republic in 1934, Hagia Sophia became a museum and UNESCO World Heritage site. In 2020 the court annulled its museum status, and it has once again become an active Mosque. The Blue Mosque is one of the Istanbul skyline’s most iconic features. Its cascading domes and six

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minarets top one of the most impressive monuments in the world. The interior is decorated with 20,000 hand-painted Iznik-style tiles in more than 50 tulip patterns. The Ottoman Empire ruled from the Topkapi Palace for over 600 years. It served as the principal residence of the Ottoman Sultans and the administrative headquarters, with over 4,000 people living on the grounds. Transformed into a museum in 1924, it displays some magni cent Islamic works. Don't miss the Harem, where the wives, children, and concubines lived. Other choices include the Great Palace Mosaics Museum depicting daily life, nature, and mythology from a Palace thought to have been built by Emperor Justinian I over 1,500 years ago. The lavish Dolmabahçe Palace interiors are covered in gold and opulent crystal chandeliers. Completed in the mid-1800s, the last of the Sultans resided here in the waning years of the Ottoman Empire. The iconic 196-foot Galatea Tower from the 6th century has panoramic views of Istanbul and the Bosporus Strait.


Shopping At the Grand Bazaar Located inside the Walled City, the Grand Bazaar is one of the world’s largest and oldest covered markets. Construction began in the 15th century, shortly after the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople. The labyrinth of vaulted roofed winding streets and domed buildings are lined with over 4,000 enticing shops, whose wares spill out to tempt customers—shopkeepers are relentless in their quest for a sale. I captured these good-natured vendors sharing their morning tea in one of the many small, sweet shops in the bazaar.

History and Rituals of Turkish Hammam You can't visit Istanbul and not enjoy a Turkish bath. I chose the histori Ayasofya Hurrem Sultan Hamami for a traditional bathhouse experience. Built in the 16th century—it was the rst hammam built with a women's section mirroring the men’s The structure is classical Ottoman bathhouse style —with marble interior and 24-carat gold taps and

bath bowls. I was scrubbed, bubbled, exfoliated, then oiled and massaged until my skin was pink and smooth as a newborn baby. I oated rather than walked back to my hotel.

Food! Food! Food! Food lovers will revel in Istanbul's mouthwatering cuisine. Primarily the heritage of Ottoman culture, it can be described as a fusion of the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern. It may be famous for its kebabs, but that's just the start. Few cuisines in the world can rival Turkish cuisine for Meze, a spread of small dishes akin to appetizers, paired with Turkey's famous puff atbread, called 'lavas". Neighborhood pushcarts with warm simit (sesame bread rings) are cherished street food.

Istanbul’s vibrant neighborhoods Istanbul is uniquely divided into districts, each distinctly different from one another. Getting out and exploring the neighborhoods is the best way to discover the city. Ortakoy is located just north of Besiktas, right under the rst Bosphorus Bridge, famous for its open-air

Photos, opposite page, left: Turkish Coffee; Dolmabahce Palace; Istanbul Skyline from the Bosphorus Strait; Blue Mosque; Galatea Tower; Simit Pushcart Vendor; Historic Red Tram in Taksim Square; Meze Platter; Dolma stuffed squash blossoms; Baklava with Turkish Coffee

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sh market. Pop into a charming cafe for a traditional Turkish coffee and baklava as fuel for your journey Beyoglu is marked by the iconic Galata Tower and Istanbul’s most famous pedestrian avenue, Istiklal Caddesi, perfect for strolling and shopping. A historic red tram runs down the middle of the bustling street and ends in Taksim Square, the very heart of the city.

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Hagia Sophia Refection

Hop on a ferry from Karakoy port to Kadikoy; if you're lucky, you might even spot some dolphins swimming in the Bosphorus. Cross the Galata Bridge, watching the shermen sort their daily catch. With its kaleidoscope mix of East and West, ancient and modern, traditional and trendy, it's not hard to see why I fell in love with Istanbul


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The Cu tive Appeal of Florida’s Key West By Charlene Peter

Sunset at Parrot Key Resort © Charlene Peters

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s a native Bostonian, I’ve come to realize few things in life are more restorative than a mid-winter trip to the Florida Keys.

Adventure is everywhere within this ribbon-like archipelago of about 1,700 islands, islets, and keys. The weather is the main draw, however, and this climate boasts an average of 330 days of sunshine per year. With my bestie Kathy and my fur baby Freddie in tow, I packed my car and drove us to the subtropical climate of Key West, the southernmost city in the continental United States (and its warmest).

Highway/Route 1. This highway wends its way for 100 miles and over 42 connecting bridges in the turquoise waters of the Straits of Florida that function as a buffer between the Gulf of Mexico to the west and the Atlantic Ocean to the east. What makes that water turquoise? Limestone, which is a rock made of calcite, whose bright whiteness illuminates the ocean water above. Interesting to note is that it took more than 200 million years for Mother Nature to create The Keys, when coral reefs began to form on top of the limestone

Arrival at Parrot Key

This stretch of Florida is better known for stellar snorkeling and scuba diving among its coral reefs, and for its catch of local saltwater sh. Key West, in particular (often referred to as Cayo Hueso by its longtime residents), is notorious for its tropical vibe, nightlife, and history. And, since Cuba lies just 90 miles away, Key West’s culture and its food have a notably Cuban accent

We arrived at Key West, a destination known for its well-documented sunsets that are best viewed at one of numerous hidden seaside pockets that rim the downtown area ( nd famed Mallory Square out at the Naval Air Station). We took a spot on the end of a dock built for sunset watching at The Parrot Key Hotel & Villas, located on its own islet in the Gulf of Mexico.

Our automobile odyssey began in Fort Myers, with a short stop for al fresco brunch at LT Steak & Seafood at The Betsy before we headed toward the Overseas

With its appealing façade, gardens, spa, and pool, this resort is best appreciated in its oceanfront backyard: a white picket fence divides the property’s

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We spent a portion of our few days here swaying on a hammock under a palm tree before sipping rum drinks on our villa’s back porch, which overlooked the sea. For dinner, we strolled onresort to the tropical Grove Kitchen and Bar for dinner of local Grouper and Gulf shrimp As content as we were on Parrot Key, we took an afternoon to explore the downtown of Key West. We opted to drive there, but the resort did offer a complimentary shuttle bus to visit some of these recommended sites •Ernest Hemingway Home & Museum on Whitehead Street, where he lived with his second wife, Pauline Pfeiffer, from 1931-1939, and he penned To Have and Have Not and The Snows of Kilimanjaro. Today, it’s a museum worth touring and to marvel at its dozens of resident feral cats •The Key West Lighthouse is just across the street. Climbing its 88 steps is recommended, particularly at sunset. Built by the U.S. Navy in 1823, it was

staffed by the country’s keeper in 1848

rst female lighthouse

•Mile Marker Zero is a half mile from the lighthouse. It’s a roadside signpost that proclaims this spot as the of cial end of Route 1, having spanned the width of the east coast from Fort Kent, Maine, more than 2,300 miles away on the border with Canada. Sel e alert •Over on South Street is the southernmost point in the continental United States, marked by a large tri-colored buoy -- another critical sel e spot •The Home of Pres. Harry S. Truman, the postWWII president who called this modest spread the Little White House, having stayed here at least a dozen times during his 1945-1949 term in of ce •Duval Street, the beating heart of the town of Key West, with its six-block span of unique, independent clothing and jewelry shops, restaurants that range from casual to elegant, its art galleries, and bars •Rum. There are ve distilleries in Key West who continue the long tradition of rum production in this area. Two offer free daily tours and tastings: Papa’s Pilar and Key West First Rum Photos, top from left: The view from the back porch at Parrot Key ©Charlene Peters; LT Steak & Seafood at The Betsy, Miami ©Charlene Peters; Nao Santa Maria in Key West ©Charlene Peters; The Little White House in Key West ©Charlene Peters; Pres. Harry Truman’s car at The Little White House ©Charlene Peters; On the back porch at The Little White House is a Ballot Box dated1968 ©Charlene Peter

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bungalow-style villas and manicured shrubbery from a barrier of seagrass and an expanse of sugarne white sand


Patisserie © Farhad Ibrahimzade for unsplash.com

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aris is the city of lights. I get goosebumps just thinking about all Paris has to offer—history, food, retail therapy, food. Did I mention the food? It is a relatively simple city to navigate, and even if you do get lost, you are surrounded by beautiful buildings, bridges, alleys, and you are never too far from the deliciousness that is Paris Everywhere you turn, you nd food in one form or another, and you’ll nd it at the fresh food markets, the charcuterie, fromagerie or boulangerie. Every neighbourhood has its own. And you cannot miss the restaurants, bistros, and cafes. Why is Paris recognised as the Culinary Arts Capital of the world? With an uncountable number of offerings, Paris can teach you the art of food. Whether your delight is a two-hour, basics of macarons or classes of up to 18 months to be fully quali ed as a Cuisinière or Pâtissier, many options are on offer in Paris Since the Revolution of 1798, which was a crucial step in the evolution of French Cuisine when many private chefs to the nobility found themselves without a post, restaurants began to appear across France and England. France found itself as the ‘home of cuisine and cooking.’ Such

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foundations as the Kitchen Brigade, formulated by Georges Auguste Escof er, ensured every person in the kitchen had a clear purpose and the kitchen worked to maximum ef ciency. In fact, UNESCO has declared ‘gastronomic meal of the French’ is in its list of intangible human culture. French nourishment culture, according to UNESCO is signi cant for uniting individuals to appreciate the ‘craft of good eating and drinking.’ It is not just what the French eat but how they eat that makes food and nourishment a culture not just an activity

Where to Start Your Culinary Adventures At home with Patricia Wells, Patricia is a highly regarded American journalist, author, and cooking instructor who has called France home since 1980. She established her cooking school in 1996. Patricia’s specialty is her one-week, immersion program where you will visit the local markets, kitchenware stores, and of course, hands on classes Galeries Lafayette, the famous department store, opened in 1893. Haussmann Galeries Lafayette holds a variety of classes, but you won’t want to


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Eiffel Tower & cafes © Edouard Grillot unsplash.com

The Culinary Arts Capital

Paris

By Robin Nowell


miss their macaron class. Learning to bake macarons in one of the best retail locations of Paris is heaven Le Cuisine Paris has a large offering from pastry and baking classes to sauces and essential French cuisine. Of course, they also have market tours. Le Cordon Bleu Paris, considered by many as the best culinary arts institute in the world, is certainly the oldest. Marthe Distel, a French journalist who published a culinary magazine, Le Cuisinière Cordon Bleu, offered her subscribers the rst Le Cordon Bleu cooking class in 1895. Whilst often considered for the longer more formal quali cation, Le Cordon Bleu Paris also offers small one-to-four-day courses in pastry, bread, sauces, and fundamentals.

Buying Your Kitchen Equipment If a formal cooking class or tour is not for you, Paris offers some of the oldest kitchenware stores, just a few include

E. Dehillerin, Eugene Dehillerin opened this store in 1820 in the heart of Le Halles. Not for the fainthearted, it is an experience any kitchenware lover must complete at least once. Many a trip to Paris for me is not complete without a visit and, indeed, a purchase from this iconic store. Incidentally Le Halles was once the site of the famous food market until 1971. The location has been a fresh food market since the 1100s TOC La Bovida, and Du Bruit dans la Cuisine are located nearby in the Les Halles district also. There are so many intriguing food-related stores that you should plan at least a day to wander the Le Halles area. You will not be disappointed With such a rich history, a culture of good eating, and drinking recognised by UNESCO, Paris will not disappoint you if food is your thing

Photos, clockwise from top left: Patisserie ©Maria Orlova for pexels.com; Cafe ©Marloes Hilckmann for unsplash.com; Cafe ©Bram Naus for unsplash.com; Macarons ©Diana Akhmetianova for pixels.com; Parisian market ©GG Lemere for unsplash.com; Making macarons ©Holly Stratton for unsplash.com; Fromage (cheese) ©Alana Harris

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Explo ng the Canadian Rocky Mountain r's

Photos, counterclockwise from top right: Jasper National Park @Brigitte Hasbron; Lake Louise @Brigitte Hasbron; Jasper National Park @Brigitte Hasbron; Mount Robson @Rocky Mountaineer; Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge @Brigitte Hasbron; Moraine Lake @Rocky Mountaineer; Maligne Lake @Rocky Mountaineer; Moraine Lake @Brigitte Hasbron; Ice elds Parkway @Rocky Mountaineer ee

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J

Rocki with Luxury Rail By Brigitte Hasbro

ourney Through the Clouds is a very apropos route description from one of the world’s leading luxury rail experience, The Rocky Mountaineer. As I embarked on this incredible voyage through the Canadian Rockies in Western Canada, I realized just how fortunate we were as Canadians to be blessed with picture-perfect landscapes of stunning peaks and remote vistas. The scenes were mesmerizing to say the least.

Gold Leaf Service Rocky Mountaineer has left no detail to chance where luxury is concerned. The Gold Leaf Service is synonymous with indulgence upon indulgence. From the most incredible panoramic views on the upper-level to the exquisite culinary offerings in the lower-level dining room, the bi-level glass-domed carriage is, without a doubt, a treat for your senses. Settled comfortably in my spacious plush heated reclining seat, I sat back and soaked in the natural beauty of the Canadian Rockies. For the social butter ies, each seat also rotates 180 degrees so you can easily interact with those around you. And, if that wasn't enough, as a Gold Leaf member, I also had access to the exclusive outdoor viewing platform—an ideal vantage point for any photographer or nature enthusiast. The fact that you can step outside, breath in the crisp clean air and get a little closer to the awe-inspiring wilderness is something only the Rocky Mountaineer can provide! Walking down the spiral staircase to the dining room below just added to the excitement of what was to come next on this memorable journey. The elegant linen, the warm hospitality, and most importantly, the delicious gourmet meals prepared by the executive chef made me feel as though I was in a posh restaurant! Actually, the

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The Journey My journey had me traveling through scenic valleys, leaving the rainforest-like conditions of Vancouver to the desert-like environment of Kamloops, to being surrounded by majestic mountains, as we made our way to Jasper.

moment you step onto this luxury train, you are served with pre-breakfast treats which is a foreshadowing of the delectable dishes you will be savoring onboard. From someone who loves her ne dining moments, the Gold Leaf Service delivered on all fronts. Enjoying cuisines of all varieties, I was very impressed in knowing that the chef prepared regionally-based dishes using locally sourced ingredients. This means that during my threecourse lunches, I was very privileged to devour copious amounts of salmon (prepared in every

Photos from top left: Gold Leaf service @Brigitte Hasbron; Gold Leaf 3 course lunch @Brigitte Hasbron; Onboard Gold Leaf Service @Rocky Mountaineer; Upper level - Gold Leaf Service @Rocky Mountaineer 70 fi

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possible way) and prized AAA-grade beef. Now, no dining experience would be complete without some libations or two, and believe me when I say, there was no shortage of local wines and beers, as well as high-end spirits to enjoy. And if that wasn't enough, afternoon snacks, including right-fromthe-oven cookies, were always welcomed by yours truly!

Seeing renowned and very much sought-after sights, we traveled along the impressive Fraser River, through Hell’s Gate (a 100 foot wide narrow rock canyon), and past the magni cent Pyramid Creek Falls. With a vantage point only accessible by rail, I had the pleasure of viewing the falls’ cascading 300 feet next to the train tracks.


De nitely a highlight of the trip! Yet, that wasn't the piece de resistance that was in store for me. As the train slowed down (for optimal viewing of wildlife sightings and other scenic attractions, the train will slow down), I quickly went to the outdoor viewing area to capture the beauty of Mount Robson, the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies. Not being completely versed with all the landmarks that I saw, it was an added bonus to have the train hosts, the exceptional staff members on the train who are there with you from the start of your trip, provide interesting and humorous historical facts. With their practiced touch, the hosts make their guests feel like a VIP by enhancing their experience with subtle preferential details and services. In order to maximize the overall experience, guests can also curate their vacation package to add bucket-list adventures, such as discovering Jasper National Park, visiting the Columbia Ice eld, seeing rsthand the incredible views from Lake Louise and Lake Moraine. Sights and memories that will stay with me always! Having partnered with premium hotels at each destination, The Rocky Mountaineer provided me with the pleasure of staying at some incredible high-end properties. All part of my unforgettable Gold Leaf Service package! And, the rail service stays true to their slogan, "With Rocky Mountaineer, you get the best of both worlds: maximum views, and maximum comfort". Providing its guests with unforgettable memories, one can easily see why The Rocky Mountaineer, with its breathtaking views and exemplary culinary offerings, is deemed one of the most iconic travel experiences on the planet. Unforgettable memories that have left me yearning to experience the different routes that this luxury service has to offer...one track at a time Please note: The Rocky Mountaineer hosted the author on this trip. All opinions are her own.

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Photos from top: Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge @Brigitte Hasbron; Gold Leaf 3 course lunch @Brigitte Hasbron; Ice eldsParkway @ Rocky Mountaineer; Lake Louise @Rocky Mountainee


Nevis——

A Destination of its Own Design

By Amanda Finn

If you have manners, they can take you around the world without a penny.

‘’

-Mac Kee France,* quoting his grandmother

Photos, from top: A glimpse of Nevis Peak © Haggerty Photography; The main pool deck from the steps of the main building at the Four Seasons Resort Nevis © Haggerty Photography; Nevis Peak from the Four Seasons Resort Nevis © Haggerty Photography; Opposite page: The dock leading to the Four Seasons Resort Nevis © Haggerty Photography; The main building of the Four Seasons Resort Nevis from the pool deck © Haggerty Photography;

* Mac Kee France is director of guest experiences at Four Seasons Resort Nevis 72


rm in protecting itself and its people from overtourism only solidi es how special the island is. After all, over-tourism wouldn’t just harm the Nevisian people; it would be devastating to Nevis’ main population—the green vervet monkey. These

Even so, maybe Nevis shouldn’t be a true lyric in the hit musical because what makes this 36-square-mile spot a true gem is that tourism hasn’t dominated it. And it is the hope of former Nevis Tourism Authority CEO turned Sun Tours owner Greg Phillip that the island maintains its spirit by keeping its tourism manageable.

A Tiny Island That Protects its Heart Mega cruise ships can’t dock on Nevis, the island’s beaches aren’t crowded with allinclusive resorts, and you won’t get your fast food x on Nevis either. Why? Because some cruise ships carry thousands of passengers while the island only has about 11,000 residents. Nevis wants to protect its resources and not become overrun by hotels. And as for the fast food places? They don’t make enough money to warrant a franchise on the island. So if you want KFC, you’ll have to hop over to Nevis’ sister island St. Kitts, convince a friend to hop a ferry and fetch it for you or devise a new plan. But chances are you won’t want to because the cuisine you can nd on Nevis is worlds above any franchise. While those points may not impress other American tourists, knowing that Nevis stands

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lexander Hamilton was born or rather “dropped in the middle of a forgotten spot in the Caribbean” in the 1750s (whether it was 1755 or 1757, we may never know). Still, that line is the only one that almost mentions a genuinely unforgettable place in Lin-Manuel Miranda’s recordsmashing Hamilton. While several of the Nevisians I spoke to would have preferred for Miranda to namedrop Nevis, it would admittedly be a more dif cult rhyme.

non-native critters outnumber their human neighbors six to one. If brands or bigwigs were allowed to run rampant over Nevis, there would be no room for the glistening beaches, the island’s myriad of orchids, or the hummingbirds that adore them.


A Resort for All Seasons Although you won’t nd resort clusters on Nevis, one stands out both because of its size and its service. The Four Seasons Resort Nevis sits along the famed Pinney’s Beach. It’s home to its own troop of vervet monkeys and employs some of the very best people. You can take a rum tasting class with their brilliant, award-winning mixologist Kendie Williams, learn about the island fauna from guest experiences director Mac Kee France (and by default his grandmother, who instilled so much wisdom in him). You’ll even become friends with the bartenders like Kurvron, who owns a bar in Charlestown called 5Trees. Besides the government, the Four Seasons is the biggest employer on Nevis. Vacationers can even purchase timeshares on the property to have even more breathtaking views from the privacy of one of the dozens of villas. The aptly named Monkey Villa even has hand-painted murals. One bedroom transports you to a nature-reclaimed temple with animals, plant life, or temple ruins painted on every wall and even the ceiling. What is particularly special for someone like me, who loves all things travel and theater, is that the Four Seasons embraces the island’s connection to Alexander Hamilton. They’re “not throwing away [their] shot.” Their Alexander Hamilton package includes a historically styled portrait session with a local artist, a Hamilton-focused tour of the island as well as a history lesson for the Hamilfans with kids in tow.

Photos, from top: A bird (perhaps a stork) eating a lizard on Nevis © Haggerty Photography; A green vervet monkey with her baby near the tennis courts at the Four Seasons Resort Nevis © Haggerty Photography; A royal tern taking off from the ocean © Haggerty Photography; An anole on a tree on Nevis © Haggerty Photography

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Musical references aside, Nevis is the kind of paradise I had only ever dreamed of. As our boat shuttle jetted us from St. Kitts to the island, Nevis Peak looming large, my heart soared faster than the boat slapping through the water. Who could have ever guessed an island nearly one-seventh the size of my home city of Chicago could leave such an imprint in my heart?


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Coastal Mississippi— A Treasure Trove of Natural Beauty, Culture, and Fun Written by Lisa Evans

C

oastal Mississippi sometimes lives in the shadow of her neighboring larger cities of New Orleans and Mobile. We are lovingly known as The Secret Coast. More and more people are discovering our mystique, and I'd like to give you a few reasons why. Understand there are multitudes of other places here to enjoy. We have something for everyone! But here is a brief list of why Coastal Mississippi is a place that I love.

Ship Island and Fort Massachusetts Ship Island is one of the six barrier islands found off the coast of Mississippi. It is part of the Gulf Islands National Seashore and is home to the historic Fort Massachusetts. You can reach the island by boat, either the ferry service from the coast or private boat. Fort Massachusetts was built after the War of 1812 and had a prominent role in the Civil War,

surprisingly for both sides. The granite spiral staircases are hauntingly beautiful and take you up to the top of the fort. Here, you can see a vast, intact canon from the bygone era. As for Ship Island itself, it is simply stunning. Visitors swim in the crystal blue warm water of the Gulf of Mexico and sun themselves on a white sand beach. The marine and wildlife you see are delightful, from many water and shorebirds to swimming with the rays, blue crabs, minnows, and perhaps even a small shark. Here is nature's beauty at its nest.

Mississippi Blues Trail—100 Men Hall Mississippi and blues music are intertwined. Coastal Mississippi has several markers along the Mississippi Blues Trail, one of which is 100 Men Hall. It is one of my favorites. History vibrates from the walls of this small, unassuming building— African American history as well as iconic music history. During a bleak time in our history, African Americans were not allowed to congregate with others. 100 Men Hall was their gathering place for meetings, social events, and other signi cant life events. Sadly, black musicians kept to a narrow window of performance opportunities known as 'The Chitlin Circuit,’ and 100 Men Hall became a stop along the way.

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Musical greats such as BB King, Etta James, Sam Cooke, Chuck Berry, and James Booker—to name a few—played on the stage that remains in the house today. A visit here is a step back in time and is truly fascinating.

Ohr O’Keefe Museum Art & Walter Anderson Museum of Art Have you ever heard of the ‘Mad Potter of Biloxi’? Or perhaps the incomparable genius of Walter Anderson? As natives of Coastal Mississippi, you will nd museums dedicated to and highlighting the works of both compelling artists. Ohr O’Keefe Museum is dedicated to the beautiful ceramic art of George Ohr and showcases much of his work. In addition, there are exhibitions of kindred artists from all over the world. The museum buildings, designed by renowned artist and architect Frank Gehry, are set among majestic live oaks with the backdrop of the Mississippi Sound. A ceramic studio also makes its home here, offering studio space to artists and classes on the craft. W h i l e a l i v e , Wa l t e r Anderson dodged the spotlight. He did not paint for fame but rather for himself. The story of his life and work is riveting, and visitors can experience this during a visit to the Walter Anderson Museum of Art. His genius is evident in the exquisite paintings, murals, drawings, sculptures, and other works of art housed within. The intensity of Mr.

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Anderson’s focus on coastal plants, animals, landscapes, and people makes his art much sought after.

Mississippi Aquarium As one of the newest attractions on the coast, the Mississippi Aquarium brings to life many local marine creatures while still focusing on the importance of education and conservation. You have the thrill of starting on the top oor with an open display where you can touch crabs, stingrays, and an albino shark. From there, walk down a spiral walkway encircling the spectacular aquarium holding tank containing over one million gallons of water and countless varieties of sea c r e a t u r e s . Yo u w i l l experience dolphins, alligators, otters, and even an outdoor aviary. You will learn about conservation. You will discover the bounty of the water and the area's ecosystem. Coastal Mississippi has remarkable experiences throughout the area; noted here are only a handful. Visit this place that I love and make some memories.

Photos, opposite page: Biloxi Lighthouse + Beach Blvd, Credit Coastal Mississippi; Fort Massachusetts on Ship Island, Credit danstefoutdoors.com; This page: Mural,100MenHall, Credit Coastal Mississippi; Ohr-O_Keefe Steve Shepard Exhibit, Credit Coastal Mississippi; Ohr-Okeefe Museum pottery, Credit Coastal Mississippi; Mississippi Aquarium, Credit Mississippi Aquarium


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iking through the evergreen and pine trees with the mist rising and morning dew on the plants reminds me of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. It’s my rst time visiting Flagstaff, and I fell in love in less than a week. So much so that I would consider moving here. The dichotomy of a bustling college town surrounded by no less than seven natural wonders makes this an unbelievable town to explore and one of my new favorite places in the U.S.

Flagstaff Is So Easy to Love

Visit National Monuments Being only an hour and a half away from the Grand Canyon, Flagstaff makes the ideal jumping-off point to travel to the majestic National Park. However, there are several other natural wonders less than 80 miles from Flagstaff that you can’t miss. Check out the diverse landscape of Arizona by visiting three National Monuments in one day. First up is Walnut Creek National Monument, where you can meander down 240 steps to see how the Native Americans lived in cliff dwellings next to stunning canyons. The staircases are steep, but the views are impressively worth the shortness of breath to get to the dwellings. Next, head over to Sunset Crater National Monument to experience what it is like to walk on the moon and among lava rocks like the Apollo Mission astronauts did when they trained here. I couldn’t stop the smile and my giddiness pretending I was an astronaut while pretending to make one giant leap for mankind. The last National Monument to visit this day is practically right next door, and the landscape changes almost immediately from volcano to desert. The Wupatki National Monument houses what remains of the dwellings of families that farmed here in the hot, dry, windy climate. But that isn’t all. Make sure to take a Gondola ride up the Arizona Snowbowl for

By Heather Raulerso

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spectacular views of Arizona high above the golden Aspens and wildlife living on the mountain. Flagstaff is a spectacular city to see at every height!

View the Dark Sky In 1958, Flagstaff enacted a light pollution control ordinance that allows you pristine views of the stars overhead, helping Flagstaff become the rst of cial dark sky city in the world. If you love star gazing as much as I do, you will love this town at night. And if you decide you want a closer look at the stars, head up to the Lowell Observatory and see the telescope that discovered Pluto. Is it a Planet or not? That is still a topic of debate, but I’ll always believe it to be one.

Enjoy Tastes Around the World Flagstaff is becoming a travel destination for food alone. There are over 200 superb eateries for you to choose the culinary journey that will take you around the world. With local ingredients and international avors, you will never go hungry while visiting any ne establishments around town. My favorites are Tinderbox Kitchen, Josephine’s, Pato Thai Cuisine, and Pizzicletta. However, you can’t go wrong eating anywhere in Flagstaff.

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And don’t forget the drinks. Flagstaff is Arizona’s leading craft beer city, with eight local craft breweries and more to come in the next year.

Explore Downtown Flagstaff There are so many things to do in Flagstaff that you can easily spend a week in this fabulous town and still not see everything! There are exhilarating Segway tours where you can ride through downtown and the Northern Arizona University campus, go on a self-guided history tour, hunt for street murals, or just walk around the town browsing through the unique boutiques and art galleries. I even spent a little time having my Tarot cards read. Very enlightening! And while you are exploring, don’t forget to keep your ears open to hear about the multiple ghost encounters in several downtown historical buildings. With all of these activities, it is no wonder that Flagstaff is so easy to fall in love with! Photos: Opposite page: Morning Hike through Forest ©Heather Raulerson; This page, clockwise from top left: The Gondola at the Arizona Snowbowl ©Heather Raulerson; Wupatki National Monument ©Heather Raulerson; Hotel Monte Vista ©Heather Raulerson; Lowell Observatory ©Heather Raulerson; Walnut Creek National Monument ©Heather Raulerson; Piano Room Mural ©Heather Raulerson


Come Hungry PIZZA BYRONZ

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By Janie Pace

Blissful Accommodations Whether the Meem Room in the historical hacienda surrounded by original artwork is your destination, a Farm Room with details inspired by the 1930s dairy barn, or a Field Room overlooking the farm and lavender elds, you will nd a serene and relaxing atmosphere. We settled into our quiet farm guest room with luxurious organic bedding, sitting area, adobe replace, mini-kitchen with frig and coffee maker, and accessorized with lavender amenities.

Tour the Farm at Your Leisure See the Canadian geese that made the farm their winter home as you explore the grounds. Visit the organic kitchen gardens bursting with new vegetables and herbs, and learn about sustainable bee-keeping practices. Near the lotus pond, pay homage to San Ysidro, the giant wooden statue of the patron saint of farming, appearing in many instances across

Photos from top: Los Poblanos at Night ©Los Poblanos; Los Poblanos ©Janie Pace; Turn Down The Lane ©Los Poblanos (Alexander Vertiko); Spa Patio with Star Shaped Moorish Fountain ©Janie Pace

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Los Poblanos Historic Inn, Organic Farm, & Hacienda Spa

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s we turned onto the lane lined with gigantic cottonwood trees, we took a deep breath and relaxed; we were there. Settle in for a luxurious farmstay set on 25 acres of lavender elds, lush formal gardens, and glimpses of farm alpacas, peacocks, and guinea hens. Just off the Rio Grande and with the Sandia Mountains in the distance, relax with a glass of wine at Los Poblanos Historic Inn, Organic Farm & Hacienda Spa.


the property, including the Los Poblanos logo.

Visit The Farm Shop Shop the artisan lavender products at The Farm Shop like bath gel, salves, lotions, and lavenderscented hand sanitizer. The handmade jewelry, kitchen products, cookbooks, and adorable children's gifts make a one-stop-shop for thoughtful gifts for your loved ones. Add artisan bread, seasonal baked goods, lavender jelly, and green chili jam from the Farm Foods Market. Don't forget to order extra lavender products from the Farm Shop when you return home.

Have a Cocktail on the Campo Patio Relax and sip a specialty crafted cocktail like Campo's Lavender '99 cocktail, gin mixed with lavender, lemon, sparkling wine, sweetened with house-made lavender syrup that pays tribute to 1999, the year owner Armin Rembe planted the rst farm lavender crop. Enjoy Campo's version of the lavender margarita and a small plate, perfect as you take in the sweeping views of the farm and watch

the sunset re ect on the Sandia Mountains from the patio.

Supper at Campo You'll enjoy ne casual dining with the Southwest's most highly crafted eld-to-fork menu created by Chef Jonathan Perno. Campo means eld in Spanish and re ects the dedication to organic farming in farm elds and the local valley food farms, a list featured on the menu. Los Poblanos is ranked as a "Top 10 Hotel for Food Lovers of America" by Bon Appetit. Savor a native beef ribeye with roasted potatoes, mushrooms, and a brandy mustard sauce paired with a Chateau Larose-Trintaudon. The tender braised New Mexico lamb comes with roasted seasonal vegetables, blue corn hominy, and housemade our tortilla paired with a glass of R. Lopez de Heredia "Vina Cubillo" Crianza. Unforgettable!

Enjoy An Organic Brunch Begin the new morning with a leisurely, organic, seasonal brunch as you enjoy views of the farm and watch the peacocks. I love the Seasonal Omelette

Photos from top: Peacock while we were at breakfast ©Janie Pace; Spa Dressing Room ©Janie Pace; San Ysidro, Patron Saint of Farming ©Janie Pace; Spanish Madonna with Punched Tin Frame ©Janie Pace

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designed by Meem. The artwork also appears on spa products. I recommend the Himalayan salt stone massage, an 80-minute deep massage combined with the warm salt stones' balancing properties that release tension and provide complete relaxation. You'll sleep like a baby.

with herbed goat cheese, sauteed greens, smoked Rojo, local mushrooms, root vegetables, a side of toast with a cup of Cutbow coffee. Food & Wine Magazine voted Campo best breakfast in New Mexico. Pro Tip: Make your reservations for brunch, dinner, tea, wine tasting, and the spa before your arrival.

The Historic Hacienda Spa The original ancestral home designed by John Gaw Meem, the father of Santa Fe style, houses the luxurious Hacienda Spa with elegant lounges, a stunning courtyard with a cozy replace, starshaped Morrish fountain, and oral landscape. Lining the women's changing room walls are antique bathing scenes on panels, initially serving as doors in the changing room at La Quinta,

The seasonal facial involves a formulated, customized treatment with cleanses, exfoliation, a face and scalp massage, custom masks, serums, nourishing moisturizers, and sun protection. You'll love the facial clarity and new skin radiance. In the Sala Grande Lounge, I spent time perusing the carved wooden chests, Spanish Madonnas in punched tin frames, woven blankets, Native American pottery, and original art books.

The comfort, privacy, and scenic beauty of Los Poblanos make it the perfect place to retreat, relax, and restore your spirits.

Photos from top: Tractor at Los Poblanos with Janie & Ronnie Pace ©Janie Pace; Hacienda Spa at Los Poblanos ©Janie Pace; Chef Jonathan Perno ©Los Ploblanos

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arden of the Gods and Other Wonders in Colorado Springs By Scott Kendall

When my son received orders to Colorado Springs a few years ago, he was excited about his new duty station. The Space Force had moved him to Peterson Air Force Base, and he was pretty excited about his new job as well as his new digs.6 in My wife and I have been lucky to visit him several times over the past few years. As someone who always likes to explore new environs, our extended time in Colorado Springs gave me ample opportunity to explore to my heart’s content. In this article, I am highlighting the fabulous Garden of the Gods National Park as well as several other top level attractions in Colorado Springs.

Garden of the Gods Noted by many tourists and travel experts as one of the most beautiful parks in the nation, Garden of the Gods is aptly named. When Colonel James Palmer ’s descendants donated this magical piece of God’s handiwork to the city, it proved to be a priceless gesture. Visitors can drive, hike, and bike through this treasure trove

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of natural wonders – all for free Unique rock formations include Kissing Camels, Balanced Rock, Siamese Twins, and other oneof-a-kind natural rock structures. On several occasions, I have been lucky to be in the park at sunrise or sunset, when the sun glistens off the red rock surfaces, radiating a brilliance that has to be seen in person to truly see and feel this magical sight

Pikes Peak, America’s Mountain After searching high and low in a tough housing market, my son was able to buy a house near base that had an awesome view of Pikes Peak from his living room and back porch. Each morning I was in town, I enjoyed my morning coffee looking out at the purple majesty of the Rocky Mountains. The new cog railway in nearby Manitou Springs whisks guests up to the 14,000 plus summit of America’s Mountain in about an hour. This modern cog railway, the highest in the world, makes the summit more

accessible to the many tourists, as well as locals, who take in this natural attraction.

The Manitou Incline One of the most unique and challenging trails in the US, the Manitou Incline is a hugely popular attraction in nearby M a n i t o u S p r i n g s . Wi t h a gradient up to 68 percent, and an average rise of 45 percent, this hiking trail attracts Olympic athletes, outdoor enthusiasts, and everyday people from around the world. With the high elevation and steep climb, this trail can challenge even the most t athlete Red Rock Canyon Open Space Just a few miles south of Garden of the Gods is picturesque Red Rock Canyon Open Space. This 1,474 acre outdoor playground is very popular with hikers and rock climbers (with permit) who want to get their exercise while viewing the beautiful landscapes of Colorado Springs. You can even bring your dog. With 11 marked trails ranging from 1.7 miles to 5.4


Some of my favorite views of Pikes Peak and Garden of the Gods are from spots in Red Rock Canyon Open Space

The Broadmoor Since being built by legendary businessman Spencer Penrose in 1891, T h e B ro a d m o o r i s t h e ultimate resort destination. This Forbes Five-Star resort, nestled at the foot of Cheyenne Mountain in southwest Colorado Springs, offers scenic natural wonders, unparalleled service and amenities, and the timeless elegance of European luxury

Glen Eyrie Castle

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Glen Eyrie Castle is a fascinating English Tudor style castle just north of Garden of the Gods. The castle was built by the founder of Colorado Springs, General William Jackson Palmer, in 1871. The beautiful grounds are a

gorgeous setting for the 17 guest rooms, library, dining rooms, and the Castle Great Hall.

Other Attractions Don’t think Colorado Springs is just a bunch of really pretty big red rocks. There are lots of other fantastic attractions in Colorado’s second largest c i t y. F o r m a n y y e a r s , Colorado Springs has been known as Olympic City. Thousands of world class athletes have lived and trained in this mile high city, and several museums, training, and event sites are located in Colorado Springs. Don’t take my word for it. Go see for yourself. I think you will agree that Colorado Springs has an overabundance of awesome things to see and do

More to Do in Colorado Springs Olympic and Paralympic Museum Olympic Training Center Peterson Air Force Base Air Force Academy Carson Army Base Cheyenne Mountain Zoo Helen Hunt Falls

Photos from opposite page: Window to Pikes Peak in Garden of the Gods ©Scott Kendall; Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs ©Scott Kendall; Balanced Rock in Garden of the Gods ©Scott Kendall ; Window to Pikes Peak at the Siamese Twins in Garden of the Gods ©Scott Kendall; Pikes Peak America's Mountain © Scott Kendall; The Broadmoor ©Scott Kendall; Glen Eyrie Castle ©Scott Kendall

miles, there is plenty to take in.


enehunes, alasadas, and ore on Hawaii’s Big Island

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By Joeann Fossland

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s I stepped off the plane at the Kona Airport, the humid, owerscented air enveloped me and melted all my tension. Every year since 1993, my husband Bub and I have visited the Island of Hawaii, often called The Big Island Volcanos created this island. The 14,000-foot tall Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea volcanos spewed lava that is deposited from the heights down to the sea. Visitors are often shocked to see black lava instead of white sand beaches and palm trees. One year, my young granddaughter traveled with us. As we headed through the lava elds to our resort, in her tiny voice she asked, ”When are we getting to Hawaii, Grandma?”

An Ethnic Mosaic Hawaii is one of the most culturally diverse destinations in the world. Over three hundred years ago, Asians, Europeans, and Polynesians began moving to Hawaii, joining the natives and Menehune who were already here I’ve never seen a Menehune, but legend describes them as little people (six inches to two feet) that are superb craftspeople who live in the forests and labor at night. On my Hawaii visits, I feel as if I’ve slipped down a rabbit hole into a magical, mystical existence steeped in the mythology of gods, goddesses, and legends

Big Island Fun

Blood Red Hawaiian Sunset ©Joeann Fossland

The stunning lava ow scenery in the west contrasts with the green rainforests in the

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east. In the same day, I’ve swum in the ocean at a black-sand beach, thrown snowballs at the top of the Mauna Kea Volcano, and sipped a Mai Tai watching hula dancers Beyond beach and sea activities, like sur ng, swimming, and snorkeling, I have hiked, ridden horseback, and considered zip-lining. Helicopter rides to see the erupting volcano, sunset cruises to see whales, and snorkeling with the manta rays are tempting splurges. Thankfully, budgetminded options are plentiful as well

Gorgeous Flowers, Huge Turtles and Humpback Whales One of my favorite places to visit is the Hawaii Tropical Bioreserve and Garden on 40 acres just north of Hilo. I’ve spent hours hiking the trails while reading the little signs that identify the 2000 species of ora and fauna On many beaches, there are an abundance of Hawaii’s protected sea turtles called Honu. I’ve learned to look but not touch From November until April, humpback whales enjoy these warm waters. We always look for the blows and breeches just offshore as we drive up the northwest side of the island towards Hawi

Volcanoes National Park The Volcanoes National Park is home of the active Kīlauea Volcano as well as the legendary home of Pele, the Hawaiian re goddess. After the 2018 eruption, many areas of the park, including the Jagger Museum, closed We’ve enjoyed driving the Crater Rim Road and Chain of Craters Road through the park down towards the sea. Scenic overlooks and trailheads populate this route. Trails lead to crater rims, calderas, devastation areas, and sulphur banks. The Thurston Lava Tube Trail is a mile and a half round trip passing through an area of lush rainforest before entering the 500-year-old lava tube

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Photos from top: Lava ow ©Cedic Letsch; Honu ©Alexandra Tran; Hula dancers ©Anvesh; Rainforest waterfall on the Big Island ©Martin Zangeri


At the Ranger Station, the detailed map provided shows the open roads. Before going, check here for current volcanic activity.

outside, light and uffy on the inside, and lled with chocolate or mango or some other luscious lling. Eat while warm!

The Volcano House Restaurant

The variety of foods in Hawaii offers something for every taste. The Seafood Bar and Grill in Kawaihae is a favorite with locals. We went on a Tuesday night for Prime Rib and found their Happy Hour Mai Tai to be the tastiest and cheapest on the island

The Volcano House Restaurant overlooks the Kīlauea caldera and the billowing Halema’uma’u Crater. The length of the dining room features tall windows offering a front-row view of the volcano’s steam or spewing lava. Seated in safely inside, you’ll feast on exquisitely prepared meals of freshly caught sh or grass-fed organic beef

Speaking of food Malasadas are Hawaii’s yummy version of a doughnut. We always stop at Tex Drive In for balls of fried dough that are golden brown on the

Enjoy the Aloha Vibes It is easy to rush from place to place to try to see everything. Don’t do that! Set aside a few days to just soak in the beauty, listen to the birds, watch the waves, and enjoy the sunshine.

SAVE THE DATE

IFWTWA 2022 CONFERENCE REGISTRATION INFORMATION COMING SOON!

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18-21 SEPTEMBER 2022 • HYATT PLACE DOWNTOWN ST PETERSBURG, FL fi

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Photos from left: Ribs, MaiTai, Seafood ©Joeann Fossland


Taste something completely new.

Hear the gentle lapping of the Gulf waves nearby as you dine al fresco. Taste a local favorite as you bite into fresh-caught grouper. Raise a toast with a glass of wine as the sun warms your shoulders. Discover the unbeatable open-air dining scene in St. Pete/Clearwater. VisitStPeteClearwater.com

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Phantom Footsteps & Childhood Dreams By Bel Woodhouse

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S

taring up at the giant lichen-covered face of a smiling Buddha carved in centuries-old stone I thought “love at rst sight isn’t just in the movies.”

Warm reddish sand nestled over my sandals as the Cambodian heat sent a trickle of sweat down my spine. I didn’t care. I was here. Finally standing before Ta Prohm Temple in Siem Reap smiling right back at Buddha.

Childhood Dreams Do Come True I had dreamed of Siem Reap’s jungle ruins ever since my eight-year old self fell in love with it on the cover of National Geographic. That one image opened my heart and unleashed a world of childhood wonder. Being an Indiana Jones movie lover and adventurer at heart had skyrocketed the dream of exploring Ta Prohm to the top of my ‘things to do when I grow up’ list. It took me nearly 40 years, but I nally arrived. And the feeling was phenomenal. The massive banyan trees’ thick ropes of roots wove themselves into living webs creeping over the temple walls. The only way to describe it is to say that my heart smiled. Standing there with the warm sand invading my sandals it was a dream come true.

Tomb Raiding in Ta Prohm Ta Prohm—made famous by the 2001 action adventure movie Tomb Raider—is now affectionately called the Tomb Raider Temple. Reawakening my childhood wonder and nature lover’s heart, I wanted to explore it quietly away from people so I could feel the real Ta Prohm. Wandering off to the lesser visited areas, I felt a deep peace surround me. I saw ancient carved pillars and perfectly symmetrical architecture still standing centuries after they were built. It is easy to see how magic could happen here. There is a timelessness to Ta Prohm. Craning my head back to gaze upon the canopy of gigantic banyan trees, I understood why Cambodians consider them sacred. These trees are hundreds of years old. They have their own spirit. Starting from

a tiny seed dropped on the temple walls by birds they take hold to create a magical landscape. The very air seemed to vibrate with an aweinspiring sense of timeless peace. Standing quietly thinking of this was when it happened. The most surreal experience of my life.

Phantoms and Footsteps Like a phantom materializing from thin air, a small Cambodian boy appeared. Smiling and waving to me all he said was, “Come, I show you beauty.” I followed. It felt safe. And like the right thing to do. I could feel it in the calm of my heart. His little bare feet expertly navigated dark tunnels, narrow walkways, and hairpin turns over fallen ruins. Following the soft patter of those little feet on the earth changed my life. As if he had been walking those ruins for centuries, true to his word, he showed me beauty—hidden treasures like secrets shared with an honored few. My favorite was a tiny buddha face peeking through thick ancient roots as if mother nature respected the peaceful serenity of Buddha and refused to hide his face. We never spoke. We didn’t need to. He only smiled and waved for me to catch up as he hurried around one corner and the next weaving our way through Ta Prohm’s heart. Then he stopped. Pointing through a small doorway sunken halfway into the ground, he just smiled and gestured I go. It was goodbye. As I passed through the doorway into the light, suddenly the world crashed down around me. Noise, people, hands on my arms, and sighs of relief fell down on me. You see, I had arrived at Ta Prohm with a group. They were worried because they could not nd me. What seemed like 10 minutes to me had been over an hour. My beautiful guide had taken me to see the real Ta Prohm. The Ta Prohm I had always dreamed of and, to this day, am still not sure if he was real or a spirit sent to ful ll my childhood dreams.

All photos of Ta Prohm ©Bel Woodhouse fi

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m t our writers…

Judi Cohen, a full-time traveler and travel writer from Toronto, Canada, has a passion for luxury, off-the-beaten-path destinations, and small ship cruises around the world. She shares her photography and stories from over 90 countries on Instagram (@TravelingJudi) and is a contributing writer for various publications. A health coach, Judi enjoys wellness experiences and sampling local food and wine while traveling. Judi serves as a National Board Member for Travelmedia. Christine Cutler is a writer, photographer, guide, editor, and teacher whose work has appeared in numerous publications. A dual Italian-American citizen, Chris lives with her feet in Palm Harbor, Florida and her heart in I t a l y. C o n n e c t w i t h h e r o n coldpastaandredwine.com and christinecutler.com J e a n i n e C o n s o l i i s a t r a v e l w r i t e r, photographer, and foodie from Sarasota, Florida. A retired teacher, she used summers to explore destinations and journal about it all. She loves uncovering the history, culture, and avor of each place, nding special places off the beaten path at home and abroad Diane Dobry, an online educator and freelance writer /blogger writes mostly about Hungary, Florida and New York, and brie y imported Hungarian wines to the US. Online and on social media she’s at GettingHungary.com, DiscoveryDaze.com, and HungarianAquarian.com. She’s also writing several non- ction books and hosting podcasts on travel and wine Robin Dohrn-Simpson has been traveling for as long as she can remember. With over 25 years in the travel industry, she has traveled to over 70 countries and 50 states. You can generally nd her exploring somewhere. She’s tried to cure her wanderlust, but it is not possible!

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Lisa Evans is a freelance travel writer and photographer who enjoys all things in nature and outdoors. History is another passion. Every place has a story to tell if only you nd it. You can nd her at writerlisa.com or on Instagram and Twitter @mygypsytravel Michelle Fedosoff is a photographer and writer whose work has appeared in various publications. She has visited thirteen countries and is always on the lookout for unique and interesting things. She is a member of IFWTWA, CAPA, and IAPP. www.sitesandbites.org Amanda Finn is a queer award-winning theater, travel, and lifestyle writer. Her work has been featured on Huf ngton Post, Ms. Magazine, Yahoo, and more. In late 2021, she launched Dreamsuitcase.com , a website that caters to building con dence in travelers Joeann Fossland was bitten by the travel bug decades ago and has never recovered. A baby-boomer, free-spirit, she has visited 30 countries and four continents. Road trips, historic hotels, hot springs, tennis courts, and roads less traveled are her favorite writing topics. Her blog is www.JoeannsView.com Maria Haase is editor-in-chief of several online publications. A self-proclaimed serial expat, blogger-turned-publisher, and spicy food a cionado, Maria grew up in Germany and now splits her time between the United States and Europe. She chronicles her insider experiences from a local’s perspective at EuropeUpClose.com and runs SanDiegoExplorer.com with her husband Greg Brigitte Hasbron is the owner of The Food Tease, the Canadian Capital’s only combined culinary and travel blog. Her column, The Bon Vivant of Luxe Ottawa Magazine depicts her culinary and travel adventures. She has also been published in other platforms i n c l u d i n g Ta s t e & Tr a v e l , M o d e r n Mississauga and Natalie Maclean's website


Kim Jackson is a freelance travel writer and photographer based in Agassiz, BC, Canada. She focuses on travel, exploring nature, wine, and hikes. Kim's journeys have taken her to many places within North America and, most recently, to Uganda. She enjoys exploring her province of British Columbia and nds joy in researching new places to visit and incorporates her interests into her travels A member of IFWTWA and SATW, Scott Kendall is editor of PlayStayEat.com as well as a freelance travel writer, photographer, and videographer based in The Woodlands, Texas. He has traveled extensively throughout the US and Europe. In addition to writing for PlayStayEat, Scott has written for several publications. Catch up with him at PlayStayEat.com,ScottKendallTravels.com and scottkendalltravels@gmail.com Noreen Kompanik is a San Diego-based travel journalist with 700 published articles; assistant editor of Food, Wine, Travel Magazine and editor of Travel By Vacation Rental Magazine. She’s a regular contributor to Travel Pulse, San Diego Explorer, and GoNOMAD. Noreen and her partner also created the Travel Writer’s Café and travel writing retreats under their business model Travel Writer’s University. Sharon Kurtz is a freelance writer and photographer. Her passion is travel, and she welcomes opportunities to share stories of people, places, food, and avors around the corner or around the world. Dallas, Texas, is home with her husband and three spoiled dogs,

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Michael Hodgson is a winner of a Silver Medal from the North American Travel Journalists Association for travel writing excellence in both 2019 and 2020, and a gold medal for photography excellence from the International Food Wine and Travel Writers Association in 2021. More of Michael's writing and photography can be found at HITravelTales.com. His travels have taken him to all seven continents

but her carry-on is always packed, ready for the next adventure. http://sharonkkurtz.com Kathleen Messmer is a photographer, lmmaker, journalist, and wildlife advocate. She believes the world is an amazing place and presents her experiences with humor and appreciation for other world cultures. Her adventures are presented in a number of publications including her own travel journal at indiespirit.live and kathleenmessmer.com Linda Milks specializes in exploring all that is food, wine, and travel by connecting with people to learn about their activities, culture, food and wine. Linda serves on the board of the International Food Wine and Travel Writers Association (IFWTWA) and is Treasurer. Find Linda’s website at:https:// toastingfoodwinetravel.com/ Robyn Nowell is a freelance writer and photographer based in Melbourne, Australia. She has been a proli c traveler since a young age and has no plans to stop. Her interest in food knows no bounds. Robyn holds Diplôme Universitaire Hautes Études de la Gastronomie HEG and a Masters of Gastronomic Tourism Robin O’Neal Smith is a freelance travel writer based in Pennsylvania. Robin is an expert contributor for Travel Awaits and Extended Weekend Getaways. She loves inspiring others to live their dreams of travel. Follow her travels on https://instagram.com/ atoucho uxurytravel Janie H. Pace is a travel writer and photographer based in Fort Worth, Texas. Traveling locally and internationally, she works closely with editors to provide the best writing and photography possible. After a career in advertising and sales, Janie knows what makes compelling, substantial content. See her adventures at www.journeymapped.com


Charlene Peters is a long-time travel journalist who shares her picturesque and palatable journeys and wellness experiences around the globe. She has published thousands of featured lifestyle stories and is author of “Travel Makes Me Hungry,” a book that connects the world through food. www.Spavalous.com Heather Raulerson is a freelance writer and photographer from Detroit. She is the owner of Raulersongirlstravel, a travel website sharing her adventures and photographs from around the world. She loves slow travel, getting to know the local culture, and always exploring with her camera. She has been published in several publications Elizabeth Smith is a former French and Spanish professor turned award-winning writer, copywriter, and editor by way of a detour through the Napa Valley and Sonoma County wine industry as a wine club manager. She is a member of Les Dames d’Escof er International Sacramento Chapter. Connect with Elizabeth at info@easmith.net Cori Solomon, an award-winning writer/ photographer in Los Angeles, can often be found traveling with her dogs in tow. Her blog, The Written Palette, focuses on travel, art, food, wine, and pets. Cori's background is real estate. Also, being an animal artist, her articles utilize the art palette both visually and verbally.

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Julie Dee Suman is a Maryland-based freelance travel writer and photographer. She has traveled to over 43 countries across ve continents. In addition to featuring the MidAtlantic Region, Julie enjoys destination travel focusing on nature and wildlife excursions. She is a member of the Travel Writers Café, International Food Wine & Travel Writers Association (IFWTWA), and TravMedia. Lori Sweet is based in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. A retired teacher, Lori, and her writer/ pilot husband Sylvio, are a boomer couple travelling the world. They share what they learn about wine, food, and other cultures to help others make the most of their travels at VoyageWriters.com Unstoppable Stacey Wittig is a travel writer based in Flagstaff, Arizona. She does not let age, gender, or family stop her from traveling. Hery hubby prefers not to travel, so she typically goes solo. Catch up with her at https://unstoppablestaceytravel.com/ Bel Woodhouse is author of “21 Reasons to Visit …” travel guides and a full-time writer, photographer, and videographer passionate about traveling. A fun-loving Aussie living in the Mexican Caribbean she’s always frolicking in the ocean, trekking through jungle, or crawling over something. Follow her on Instagram @thetravelbag.guru,Travel Writer Bel or web at thetravelbag.gur


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Articles inside

Ta Prohm: Phantom Footsteps and Childhood Dreams

11min
pages 90-97

Menehunes, Malasadas, and More on Hawaii’s Big Island

4min
pages 86-89

Los Poblanos Historic Inn, Organic Farm, & Hacienda Spa

4min
pages 81-83

Garden of the Gods and Other Wonders in Colorado Springs

4min
pages 84-85

Flagstaf Is So Easy to Love

4min
pages 78-80

Coastal Mississippi—A Treasure Trove of Natural Beauty Culture, and Fun

4min
pages 76-77

Nevis—A Destination of Its Own Design

4min
pages 72-75

Paris—The Culinary Arts Capital

2min
pages 65-67

Exploring the Canadian Rockies with Rocky Mountaineer’s Luxury Rail

5min
pages 68-71

The Curative Appeal of Florida’s Key West

6min
pages 62-64

Istanbul, Where East Meets West

4min
pages 58-61

Bali, Indonesia Land of the Gods

3min
pages 56-57

Burnaby Fraser Foreshore Park

3min
pages 54-55

Winter Park—The Best of Central Florida

4min
pages 36-37

Photo Essay: South African Adventure: Trip of a Lifetime

4min
pages 46-53

Finding Synchronicity in San Luis Obispo and Arroyo Grande

5min
pages 33-35

The Allure of Seattle’s Colorful Pike Place Market

4min
pages 38-41

The Food Scene in St. Augustine—Where Food And Wine Are Naturally Part of the Culture

7min
pages 42-45

Multi-generational Day Trip to Stanley Park in Vancouver BC, Canada

4min
pages 30-32

Following the UNESCO Culinary Trail in San Antonio, Texas

3min
pages 28-29

San Diego—A Great Place to Visit

4min
pages 14-16

Wine Not? Four Reasons to Try a Barge Cruise

4min
pages 26-27

Love Letter to Berlin

3min
pages 6-7

At Home in Beaune & Bourgogne

4min
pages 12-13

The Unforgettable Treasures of Kauai

4min
pages 8-11

Beyond the Outer Banks

5min
pages 17-19

Five Ways to Enjoy Laid-back Luxury in Ponte Vedra Florida

4min
pages 22-25

Powder Mountain—Eden, Utah

4min
pages 20-21
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