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Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


TABLE OF CONTENTS

FOOD&BEVERAGE

CITY SCENE

MAGAZINE

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A FLOCK of new restaurants, bars and cafes have just opened in one of the Top 10 “Foodie Cities” in the US, according to Wallethub.

on the cover organic valley

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MOVIES 4 FODDIES THE FOUNDER: Starring Michael Keaton.

10 DON’T GET CAUGHT IN THE COFFEE BUBBLE Why Does Nearly Every Industry Welcome Our Feedback...Except For Coffee Shops?

16 industry promotions

The Trends Of Chef Appointments And Promotions In The Industry Will Continue In 2017

28 syed “sy” ALI

Director of Food and Beverage at Fontainebleau Miami Beach, oversees all beverage operations

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32 STACKED HOSPITALITY LAUNCH 2017 Alizé at the Top of the Palms Casino Resort, Stacked Hospitality will kick off 2017 with a new dining concept

36 TRENDS IN TECHNOLOGY

Thermal Inkjet Coder Delivers Mobile Bottling Company with An Easy-to-Use, Reliable Coding Solution

42 WALK ON’S TO EXPAND IN 5 SOUTHERN STATES Development agreement to bring 8 restaurants to Ala., Fla., La., Miss. and Tenn. ;

58 INDUSTRY SUPPORTING THE COMMUNITY

Presqu’ile Winery is happy to announce that it has raised $10,670 for the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County

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BACK OF THE HOUSE

FOOD & BEVERAGE MAGAZINE was created by Publisher Michael Politz with the expert help of original advisory board members: Bobby Flay, Wolfgang Puck, Emeril Lagasse, Mario Batali, Kerry Simon and David Burke.

coming in February

“Candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker.”

Publisher - Micheal Politz • Food & Beverage Magazine® is owned and published electronically - Willy Wonka by Beautiful People LLC. Copyright 1995-2016 Beautiful People LLC. All rights reserved. Food & Beverage Magazine® and distinctive logo are trademarks owned by Beautiful People LLC. “fb101.com” is a trademark of Beautiful People LLC. No part of this electronic magazine may be reproduced without the written consent of MICHAEL Food & Beverage Magazine. Requests for permission should be-directed to:POLITZ editor@fb101.com. The information contained has been provided by such individual, event organizers or organizations. The opinion expressed in each article is the opinion of its author, organization or public relation firm. Nor are we afflicated with any other Food&Beverage or Hospitality publication. Articles and Comments are welcome, but they should be on-topic and well-expressed.

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To all of our Friends and Partners. Have a Great and Prosperous New Year! - Michael Politz, Publisher

DEDICATED TO THE ICY WINTERS OF SWEDEN WHERE VODKA IS KING. TO MEET THIS HIGH STANDARD, EACH BOTTLE OF XIII KINGS VODKA GOES THROUGH OUR PROPRIETARY 13-STEP REFINING PROCESS TO MAKE THE SMOOTHEST VODKA ON THE MARKET. SO LIFT YOUR SPIRITS AND RAISE YOUR GLASS TO THE NEW KING OF VODKA.

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TRENDS IN 2017

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


TRENDS IN 2017

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By Donshe Usher Editorial

the air we breathe.

The old saying, we are what we eat, is true. Every cell in our body was created from the food we eat, the water we drink and

This goes way beyond economic development that has driven the creation to consumption trend to move from basic staple to non-traditional staples – And towards more naturalbased, meat, fruit and vegetable items. More consumers are also prompted to dine away from home. This brings the restaurants and professional chefs efforts into play. With and increasing need for knowledge in order to grasp the changes in the creation to consumption theory. A trend with deliberation for turning relevant issues into opportunities, income, owner pricing, relative prices. Demographic factors, diets, and health concerns are now becoming the driving forces behind the changes in the food consumption trend. Of the widening role of healthy food demand which has shifted toward high quality-more natural organic characteristics – freshness, safety, texture, appearance and taste. Consumers are willing to pay for these quality characteristics. The essence of transforming these issues into opportunities is by responding to consumer expectations. An aligned market-led natural and organic supply chains are now proclaiming to offer differentiated and more natural complex food products, which express more health value creating activities via information sharing.

The traditional supply chain players must also adopt value creation and delivery approach to produce food products that have sufficient health value to consumers even it it means paying more. Changes in food consumption trend in tandem with economic development are a national pandemic. Economists generally describe that there is an initial increase in organic or natural food staples when it becomes even more obvious that there is diversity in food intake. This is the narrative that drives food professional to adapt to - hence the trend towards “Direct from the farm.” As it turned out, that organic food demand has empirically crossed another threshold that is just as crucial. Consumers desire and are willing to pay for safety and taste of these organic foods. Freshness and safety are ranked high above other quality attributes in desire and a willingness to pay for vegetables and fruits. texture, freshness, and packaging in red meat whereas safety, packaging and texture in white meat are attributes which are also a desired sequence by consumers. Despite the undisputed importance of information of future food consumption trends, the agricultural-food system still evolves around the input, production, post-harvest, processing markets. The future food consumption trend is going to favor natural and organic-based, meat, vegetable, and fruit items so much so that consumers are will pay for these higher quality-based attributes on restaurant menus. Putting more emphasis on the term from creation to consumption. w w w. f o o d b e v m a g . c o m | J a n u a r y 2 0 1 7


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TRENDS IN BEVERAGES

CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST

A Coffee Analyst predicts the future of the specialty coffee industry.

DON’T GET CAUGHT IN THE COFFEE BUBBLE                                     WHY DOES NEARLY EVERY INDUSTRY WELCOME OUR FEEDBACK... EXCEPT FOR COFFEE SHOPS?

BY JASON NASH Lattes with whip, the smell of coffee and freshly baking scones, friendly baristas, free WIFI...what a great way to start the day! Coffee shops have become so much a part of our daily routine that baristas often become great friends. They know us like family...or do they? When is the last time they offered you a customer satisfaction survey? It’s called Market Research and coffee shops need to get onboard before it’s too late. Disruptive technologies are getting ready to open a can of whoop-ass on the specialty coffee industry. Specialty coffee shops are becoming a little less specialty and a lot more unnecessary as each innovation hits the market. Single serve coffee makers, at-home espresso machines,

and at-home coffee bars make it easier than ever to craft your own beverage. Coffee consumers are way too intelligent to tolerate a 300% markup, mediocre customer service, and improperly made lattes. There’s a storm brewing and you heard it here first. The coffee industry is bloated and the numbers back me up. So, the housing bubble in the United States was formed between 1997 and 2006. During that same time period, Starbucks was popping up stores left and right. I discovered a 99.62% correlation between the growth of housing prices (Standard & Poor’s Case–Shiller Real Home Price Index) and growth in number of Starbucks stores worldwide. While economists struggle to define a market bubble, I would dare say that a nearly 100% correlation of a bubble...equals another bubble! If strong correlations to two recent bubbles isn’t enough evidence for you, there’s more. The number of transactions at Starbucks (same store sales) has dwindled to a mere 1% growth in 2016.

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017

This is what happens when you try to please your shareholders and forget about your customers. The specialty coffee industry must make some changes before this coffee bubble bursts. And if Americans want change, then that is what they will get...just ask Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton! The specialty coffee industry has been evolving ever since 1900. Think about it, there has been a lot of advancement since Maxwell House was “Good to the last drop” and TV commercials were singing “The best part of waking up is Folgers in your cup!” These brands embody what is now called the First Wave of coffee. Our grandparents were drinking instant coffee and the Mr. Coffee brand coffeemaker was invented. Then, the first Starbucks opened in Seattle in 1971 and the Second Wave of coffee began. The latte became popular and coffeehouses began to pop up on almost every corner. Finally, around 2002, experts began defining the Third Wave of coffee.


TRENDS IN BEVERAGES

This is what happens when you try to please your shareholders and forget about your customers. The specialty coffee industry must make some changes before this coffee bubble bursts. And if Americans want change, then that is what they will get...just ask Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton! The specialty coffee industry has been evolving ever since 1900. Think about it, there has been a lot of advancement since Maxwell House was “Good to the last drop” and TV commercials were singing “The best part of waking up is Folgers in your cup!” These brands embody what is now called the First Wave of coffee. Our grandparents were drinking instant coffee and the Mr. Coffee brand coffeemaker was invented. Then, the first Starbucks opened in Seattle in 1971 and the Second Wave of coffee began. The latte became popular and coffeehouses began to pop up on almost every corner. Finally, around 2002, experts began defining the Third Wave of coffee. This is where the specialty coffee industry currently resides. Third Wave references the current movement that appreciates coffee as an artisanal or craft beverage, like wine and craft beer. I’ve been in the coffee business for 10 years, and, for the decade before that, I worked in the family business becoming a master at customer service. Following in the footsteps of my father, I had a huge desire to be an entrepreneur. I wanted to get involved in a rising industry without having to reinvent the wheel. So, I opened a coffee shop in Grand Rapids, MI on October 1, 2007. Without any prior marketing experience, I coordinated the largest one-week grand opening in franchise history. I’ll never forget that date because I had open-heart surgery the exact same day (mitral valve repair). Year one, our P&L showed a huge loss because customer service was my only focus.

By year four, I was able to find a balance between outstanding customer service and making a profit. Alas, this was no small feat and it took a huge toll on my mental well-being. After fighting with the corporate office for five long years, I simply got burned out. So, I handed the coffee shop off to my parents in order to pursue a marketing degree at Oakland University, north of Detroit. This is where all the pieces of the puzzle finally began to come together for me. My love for the coffee industry, mastery in customer service, natural marketing skills, and love for analytics has led to my job as a Coffee Analyst. My research has uncovered valuable information that cannot be ignored.

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It’s the arrogance and lack of interest in what customers prefer is what pisses me off. For once, I’d love to see coffee shops make a change because it’s what the customer desires. Instead, they make changes based on profitability, convenience, and wild guesses. PIZZA chains, burger joints, supermarkets, car dealerships, office supply stores, and even recipe websites... they all gather feedback from their customers. Sometimes, they even offer sizable coupons as an incentive to complete a customer satisfaction survey. It’s called market research and it’s a very simple concept...just ask Porsche, Coke, or Pepsi.

These three companies have perfected the art of ongoing market research. It takes on many forms, but the most common are surveys and focus groups. It’s one of the key factors used in maintaining a competitive advantage. They gather information about the needs and preferences of their consumers, analyze the data, and discuss making changes based on what the customers have told them. It’s been extremely effective for Porsche. According to Newsroom.Porsche. com, their “Customer Insights” department carries out more than 150,000 surveys each year. So, it was no surLet me give you a great example. A prise when they were ranked highest in huge aspect of the Third Wave move- Automotive Performance, Execution ment is lighter roasts of coffee. So, if and Layout for 12th consecutive year the “Third Wave” term was coined by J.D. Power in 2016. The tools are in 2002, why did it take until 2012 there...what the hell are these coffee before Starbucks finally launched shops waiting for? their blonde roast? For 40 years, they tried to convince us that darker As the housing market learned quickly, roasts were better. Not only that, but purchasing behavior has the power to it took them until July 2010 to offer destroy an industry with ease. If you free WIFI. I’m not a Starbucks hater, don’t believe me, just ask the ghosts I’ve just never seen a company give of failed businesses like Blockbuster the middle finger to their customers Video, Kodak, Borders Books, so many times and get away with it. Blackberry, or Hummer. All of these In reality, I think most coffee shops consumer markets shifted with blazing have failed to perform any legiti- speeds. While this paints a rather glum mate market research. Amidst an picture, purchasing habits can actually Information Age where data is overly have very positive effects. abundant, you think they’d exploit the opportunity to gather data and make Continued On Next Page sense of it. For years, coffee consumers have been guinea pigs without even realizing it. Coffee shops have almost no idea what customers want. They basically put new items up on the menu and wait to see if they will sell...the equivalent of throwing crap on a wall to see if it will stick. Dark roast coffee, high-calorie blended drinks, loyalty programs (or lack thereof), styrofoam cups, charging for WIFI, upcharges for certain milk, frozen baked goods... do they have any idea what consumers want?

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TRENDS IN BEVERAGES

Pumpkin spice lattes, cage-free eggs, organic produce, and electric vehicles are all great examples of markets that have been created through purchasing behavior. In the same way, consumers can reshape the specialty coffee industry. Next time you get bad service, let your almighty dollar do the talking. I mean, coffee shops gladly accept our money, but seemingly have no interest in our thoughts or ideas. Maybe they think our $1.00 tip is confirmation they’re doing something right. They couldn’t be more wrong!

But, when they readopted a policy of baking fresh bread every four hours, bakery sales jumped 35 percent. Feargal Quinn, founder of Superquinn, said “I listened, I learned, I discovered.” It’s time these coffee shops start listening. If I want a semi-stale muffin, I’ll just purchase it at the supermarket and sit it next to my Keurig machine at home. One great example of recent data falling upon deaf ears has to do with Millennials (born between 1981 and 1997) and alternative brewing methods.

Even though data from the National Coffee Association shows that daily consumption of espresso-based beverages among Millennials has nearly tripled since 2008, the specialty coffee industry insists on focusing on brewed coffee. Because of this, a handful of alternative brewing methods have recently surfaced. Some of the more popular ones are the cold drip, cold brew, and pour-over. Sure they’re new and unique, but I’m definitely not crazy about the extra cost...and Freshly baked scones and cinna- waiting three minutes for a pour-over mon rolls are a thing of the past, an doesn’t even seem worth my time. upcharge for breve lattes, only one or two brewed coffee varietals, and This is just one more way the coffee some even use non-homogenized milk industry is trying to convince the for lattes. They may know our name, public that something is great when but they have truly lost touch with it really isn’t. They stumble upon an what we want. As I mentioned, many innovation, call it “cool”, and use it coffee shops have stopped preparing as an excuse to place an upcharge on freshly baked goods in the store each our coffee. morning. No longer are we delighted with a deliciously scented cloud of lemon scones and cinnamon rolls. Instead, we get to choose from baked goods that have been thawed out overnight and all look exactly the same. The results of this change begs to be measured. According to a book by Fred Reichheld, when Superquinn (grocery chain in Ireland recognized for their amazing customer service) stopped baking fresh bread each morning, their bakery sales plummeted

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017

Coffee shops and politics have always gone hand in hand. Recently, market research has uncovered something else that goes hand in hand: Cooler Weather + Colorful Foliage + Pumpkin Spice Latte = Huge Sales. When the fall season arrived and the pumpkin spice latte went up on the menu, sales at my coffee shop would jump 25 percent. This is what happens when you give customers what they want. It’s all about exploiting opportunities whenever possible. Think about this... do you know when electric cars finally become a viable option for many consumers? According to GasBuddy. com, fuel prices jumped from $2.79 to $3.99 per gallon during the period of October 2010 through May 2011. At that exact moment (end of 2011), sales of plug-in electric vehicles took off at a nearly perfect 45-degree angle and have never looked back. Consumers needed a cheaper way to get around and electric cars provided exactly that. This is a perfect example of the power of market research. The electric vehicle simply needed to find an opportunity to present itself so they could exploit the hell out of it. Fortunately for the coffee industry, multiple opportunities are ripe and ready to be capitalized upon. Many of them tend to favor the independent coffee shops because they’re small enough to be flexible in this ever-changing environment.


TRENDS IN BEVERAGES

This allows them to respond much quicker than franchises and large chains. Not only that, but single store owners tend to focus on customers out of necessity. They don’t have other stores to offset losses so they must capitalize on every available opportunity. The first opportunity actually presented itself last year when Millennia’s became the largest generation in terms of population. The statistics are actually quite staggering. According to Oracle, they’re the largest generation in world history, 77% visit a restaurant at least once a week, and their direct annual spending is $1.3 trillion in the U.S. alone. Their unique buying habits are driving some markets and destroying others. Craft brewers and wineries are currently capitalizing on their desire for individuality and it’s time coffee shops do the same. This generation has huge buying power that is growing each and every year. They have rather unique expectations so it’s extremely important to find out what they want from their local coffee shop. Think about this… the Baby Boomer population (born between 1946 and 1964) peaked at 78.8 million and is currently at 74.9 million, but will dwindle to only 16.6 million by the year 2050. In a relatively short amount of time, coffee shops will need to focus their marketing efforts on the future buying power of Millennialism. The second opportunity is a gift from the world of franchising. I can tell you from firsthand experience that franchising is a broken model. The misalignment of goals within the organization is the main reason. Let me explain. Corporate gets paid on the top line (total sales) while the franchisee gets paid on the bottom line (net profit). Corporate gets paid no matter what...they collect their $30,000 franchise fee and ongoing royalties, while the franchisee gets stuck with all the risk. Corporate has one agenda and the franchisee has a second agenda.

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Not only that, but many times the regional advertising co-ops have a third agenda. Amidst all this internal conflict, franchises are losing focus on what their customers expect. Not

Not only that, but it allows for ongoing market research so coffee shops can track the results of any changes they decide to make. This will allow them to make decisions based on reliable data about what their customers truly only that, but because of all the red desire. tape, they’re evolving way too slowly. Many of them have failed to respond I always have been and always will be to any of the recent new trends in intolerable of bad customer service. I coffee as defined by the current Third fell in love with coffee shops because Wave movement. It started as a ripple I found them to be a “happy place”... in 2002 and has been growing ever an oasis of peace in this crazy world. since. The more research I do, the more I realize how out of tune coffee shops The third opportunity is...you guessed have become with their customers. it: Third Wave coffee shops are Soon, this coffee bubble will burst. booming. Coffee drinkers are now Independent coffee shop owners, becoming interested in all of its dif- shareholders, and franchises will be ferent processes; from the origin of stuck scratching their heads. Then, the harvested bean to the roasting and as they always do, market research brewing processes. Beans are sourced companies will pick up the pieces and from farms instead of countries and explain how this bubble could have lighter roasts are preferred so the been prevented. Finally, once the dust unique characteristics of each bean settles, the specialty coffee industry aren’t burned away. One added bonus will take an appropriate turn. is that light roast coffee has more caffeine than dark roast coffee (if you Five years from today, specialty coffee measure your coffee using a scoop). shops will be vastly different. No This movement also includes revivals longer will the coffee industry tell us of alternative brewing methods such what we’re going to drink based on as cold drip, cold brew, AeroPress, their convenience, profitability, and pour-over, and many more. Keeping stumbled-upon inventions. up with trends by listening to customers through market research is crucial. As coffee consumers, we must demand Right now, independent coffee shops that we are heard. Start by asking have an opportunity to grab massive your barista for a customer satisfacmarket share because franchises will tion survey. And when they refuse, let be too slow to respond. Today, cus- your dollars do the talking by spendtomers prefer the uniqueness of craft ing them at a coffee shop who listens beverages…craft beer, wine, and now to their customers. As coffee lovers, hand-crafted coffee! we will begin shaping the coffee shop of the future one purchase at a time. The final opportunity lies in the recent trend of subscription business models. As consumers, we subscribe to magazines, Netflix, software (like Microsoft Office 365), and even clothing through places like Rent the Runway. Market research companies will be next to jump onboard. Instead of charging $3,500 for a one-time study, market research companies will be offering their services via subscription. This brings the price low enough to make it cost-effective for coffee shops. w w w. f o o d b e v m a g . c o m | J a n u a r y 2 0 1 7


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DOWNLOAD THE RECIPE Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


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CAMEO

®

Tomato Butter Lettuce Salad Simple, fresh and perfect for any time of year, our CAMEO® ELITE tomato DELICATO® living fresh butter lettuce salad.

SALAD • •

1 cup Cameo® Elite tomatoes, halved 1 Delicato® Living Fresh Butter Lettuce

DRESSING • • • • • • •

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 Tbsp sherry vinegar 1 tsp finely grated lemon zest (from one large lemon) ¼ tsp sugar 1 clove garlic, minced ½ tsp Dijon mustard ¼ tsp Worcestershire sauce

INSTRUCTIONS Combine all ingredients in a glass measuring cup or jar with a tight-fitting lid and whisk or vigorously shake to combine. Season to taste with salt and pepper. The dressing may be made ahead and kept refrigerated. Place the lettuce on a plate and drizzle the vinaigrette dressing over the Cameo® Elite tomatoes and Delicato® living fresh butter lettuce leaves and serve.

FOR MORE GREAT RECIPES VISIT WINDSETFARMS.COM w w w. f o o d b e v m a g . c o m | J a n u a r y 2 0 1 7


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INDUSTRY PROMOTIONS

CAMERATA AT PA ULIE’S APPO INTS NEW A S S I S TA NT

F OOD A ND BEVE R AGE D I R E CT OR BOSTON-NATIVE JOINS STAFF OF INDUSTRY EXPERTS AT HOUSTON’S TOP WINE BAR

“Chris’s vast understanding of the hospitality industry in addition to his experience makes him a welcome asset to the Camerata team.” Camerata at Paulie’s, Houston’s leading wine bar, is pleased to welcome General Manager Chris Poldoian to its roster of knowledgeable sommeliers. Since opening in 2013 in the Montrose neighborhood, Camerata has served as a meeting place for wine novices and experts alike to enjoy, discover and learn. “I am proud of the growing team and ever-evolving wine list at Camerata,” owner Paul Petronella said. “Chris’s vast understanding of the hospitality industry in addition to his experience makes him a welcome asset to the Camerata team.” Poldoian is a certified sommelier and a member of the Houston Sommelier Association.

In his position at Camerata, he brings experience in the Houston market and a vast understanding for the hospitality industry. After spending a harvest in Spain, wine experts and novices can expect small producers in Spain from Jerez and Rioja to grace the menu from the proudly traditional to the avant-garde. Poldoian joins Camerata’s knowledgeable staff that collectively shares over 30 years of experience in the wine and hospitality industry.

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Bringing together professionals from all over the country and supporting sustainable, family-run wineries, Camerata’s extensive wine list and quality service standards make it one of the top wine bars in the country. A native of Boston, Poldoian’s resume includes all facets of the industry from back of the house experience at Lambert’s Cove Inn and Cakes by Liz kitchens, both in Martha’s Vineyard, and various positions with the Hillstone Restaurant Group in both California and Texas. From manager-in-training to his rise to beverage manager, he was responsible for budgeting and inventory, reconstructing bar programs to increase profitability, educating staff and much more.    Camerata is open daily from 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. serving delicious beverages complemented by a thoughtful food menu curated by seasoned chef Erin Smith with favorites remaining from former employee, Felipe Riccio.         ABOUT CAMERATA AT PAULIE’S

The name Camerata was taken from Florentine Camerata, a group of artists, musicians, intellectuals in Renaissance Florence, Italy. The term, “camerata”, means room or chamber where gatherings are held. Owner Paul Petronella was inspired by this term because of its Italian heritage; he created an unpretentious meeting place where guests can enjoy delicious beverages, complemented by a thoughtful food menu curated by seasoned chef Erin Smith with favorites remaining from former employee, Felipe Riccio. Camerata also strives to be a place of learning, whether it is about wine, literature or history. Camerata is open daily from 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. and sells bottles of wine at retail.

RESTAURANT R’EVOLUTION

NAMES NICOLAS ROUET WINE DIRECTORE D I R E CT OR Restaurant R’evolution, the renowned fine-dining establishment located at 777 Bienville St. inside the newly renovated Royal Sonesta New Orleans hotel, has named Nicolas Rouet as wine director. “Nicolas brings more than a decade of diverse wine program and sommelier experience to R’evolution,” said Chef John Folse, managing partner and executive chef. “We are excited to introduce his fresh ideas and exceptional pairings to our guests.” 

Rouet studied at the famed Lycée Hôtelier François Rabelais in France, furthering his education through notable work at the Michelin three star-rated Paul Bocuse Restaurant in Lyon and Chef Bernard Loiseau’s restaurant in Burgundy. To learn more about Rouet or the wine program at Restaurant R’evolution, including its expansive list of selections and renowned wine cellar space, visit www.revolutionnola.com/.  

Rouet’s professional background and expertise in the restaurant and hospitality industries includes work in premier venues across the globe. Throughout his career, Rouet has successfully led front of house operations, while overseeing teams of more than 25 employees at top-brand hotels and among high-end restaurants and bars. Most recently, Rouet served as head sommelier for L’Atelier de Joel Robuchon at the Four Seasons New York and Picholine Restaurant, rated one and two Michelin stars respectively. Familiar with all aspects of the industry, Rouet helped open Restaurant Le Paradou in Washington, D.C., which earned Esquire Magazine’s Best New Restaurant title in 2006. He then went on to manage Restaurant Ortolan in Los Angeles.

ABOUT RESTAURANT R’EVOLUTION

Restaurant R’evolution is the first joint venture of award winning chefs John Folse and Rick Tramonto, offering modern, imaginative reinterpretations of classic Cajun and Creole cuisine. Located inside the iconic Royal Sonesta New Orleans hotel in the heart of the French Quarter, Restaurant R’evolution’s menu reflects a melding of the chefs’ distinct culinary styles.

“I’m thrilled to join the Restaurant R’evolution team,” said Rouet.

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INDUSTRY PROMOTIONS

GRAND HYATT NEW YORK APPO INTS NEW A S S I S TA NT

F OOD A ND BEVE R AGE D I R E CT OR It is exciting having a Hyatt family member join the team and play an integral role in the hotel’s food and beverage initiatives. Renowned Manhattan property Grand Hyatt New York is pleased to announce the appointment of Lindsay Maddock as the Assistant Food and Beverage Director. Maddock makes this move from within the Hyatt family, where she has worked for the past six years. In her new role, Maddock will work alongside Food and Beverage Director Jim Dale in overseeing all food and beverage operations for the hotel’s 1,306 rooms and suites, seasonally-inspired restaurant New York Central, grab-and-go Market, as well as banquets in the hotel’s extensive meeting and event spaces. “It is exciting having a Hyatt family member join the team and play an integral role in the hotel’s food and beverage initiatives,” said Dale.

“Lindsay has an impeccable record of management and her dedication to Hyatt and passion for hospitality makes her a true asset. We know she will expend her passion and experience to help elevate our food and beverage operations.” Growing up in Massachusetts, Lindsay Maddock began her career in the hospitality industry at the age of 16, working at a banquet facility as a coat check girl before going on to major in hospitality management at Syracuse University.

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Since graduating in 2009, she has climbed the Hyatt ladder with enthusiasm and determination, beginning with her role as Assistant Banquet/ Convention Services Manager at the Hyatt Regency Boston, where she earned Manager of the Year award in 2010. Maddock spent the next two years at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill, before moving to the Grand Hyatt brand in 2014 as Director of Outlets at the Grand Hyatt Washington. In this position, she worked on several prominent projects including the opening of two new restaurants. Most recently, Maddock took on the role of Event Services Manager where she collaborated with a multi-faceted team to service over 100 events in 2015, producing $20 million in revenue. During her time in this role, Maddock earned the Manager of the Year Award in 2015.

Grand Hyatt New York lies in the heart of midtown Manhattan. Attached to the legendary Grand Central Terminal, Grand Hyatt New York is just steps away from the city’s best culture and attractions, including Times Square, Broadway, art, culinary experiences and world-class shopping. The hotel has 1,306 guest rooms, including 43 suites. The suites range in size from 600 to more than 3,500 square feet. The guest rooms feature the Hyatt “Grand Bed” and have large workspaces. Grand Club provides added luxury offering elevator key access, complimentary breakfast, afternoon snacks and evening hors d’oeuvres. Grand Hyatt New York is perfect for groups of any size. Boasting over 50 meeting rooms and 60,000 square feet of meeting space, the hotel can accommodate groups from 10 to 1,500 people.

blended bourbon whiskey

In her spare time, Maddock enjoys trying new restaurants, attending sporting events, hiking and being outdoors. “I am excited to grow with my Hyatt family and take on this new position with the Food and Beverage team at Grand Hyatt New York,” said Lindsay Maddock. “My passion for hospitality has always kept me engaged and inspired in all my positions, and working alongside James Dale and the rest of the team will be an honor. I am looking forward to bringing my expertise to the food and beverage program of this iconic hotel and contribute to its growing success.”   For more information on Lindsay Maddock, New York Central or Grand Hyatt New York please visit: http:// newyork.grand.hyatt.com.

ABOUT GRAND HYATT Around the world, Grand Hyatt hotels unlock the extraordinary in every moment by creating experiences beyond expectation. Located at the crossroads of local culture and global business within major gateway cities and resort destinations, each Grand Hyatt hotel is uniquely designed to reflect its own distinct environment and provides a hub for travelers and locals alike. Grand Hyatt hotels exemplify the pursuit of life lived grandly offering guests superior service, first-class accommodations and an abundance of options within a multicultural backdrop of dramatic architecture and innovative design. Grand Hyatt properties boast inventive restaurants, luxury spas, fitness centers, and business and meeting facilities. Grand Hyatt hotels stand to make every moment memorable through their commitment to #LivingGrand every day. For additional information or to make a reservation, please visit www.grandhyABOUT GRAND HYATT NEW YORK att.com. 

With a premier location on 42nd Street between Park and Lexington Avenues,

& Stir

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CREATION TO CONSUMPTION

Organic Valley Organic Valley has been the leader in emphasizing pasture for cattle for decades. The very best animal care includes making sure they eat right, which means eating what nature intended them to eat. For cattle (which are herbivores), that means eating plants like grasses and legumes, not so much grains. In return they give us the healthiest ingredients. Organic Valley farmers are so dedicated to organic, pasture-based farming, they developed a line of 100% grass-fed dairy products. Grassmilk® milk, Grassmilk Yogurt™ and Grassmilk Cheese™ all come from milk provided by 100% grass-fed cows. The balance of omega-3 to omega-6 in Grassmilk products is near the ideal ratio nature intended: 1 to 1. This is amazing when you consider the national average ratio is heavily skewed to omega-6 (too many grain-based foods), which research has shown to be associated with inflammatory disease. When it comes to Grassmilk, you’re reminded of that classic old line: It’s good and good for you. So not only do you get high-quality nutrition from Grassmilk products, you get superior, delicate, authentic dairy taste. Silky, cream-on-top, whole milk Grassmilk Yogurts are small-batch-crafted from Grassmilk.

You can practically smell the clover flowers. Since it was founded in 1988 by seven farmers, the farmer-owned cooperative behind Organic Valley has never been inspired by fads. Business decisions are based on what’s right for people and planet. For nearly 30 years the co-op has remained steady and faithful to the mission. On-farm practices and business practices are geared to sustainability, emphasizing fair pay prices for family farmers to create the healthiest products for all families. Organic Valley products are always organic—which means no toxic pesticides/herbicides, GMOs, or antibiotics are added to the environment, our animals or our bodies. The business is committed to renewable energy in its business facilities and the supply chain, not to mention comprehensive wellness, education and training initiatives for employees. In fact, in 2015 Outside magazine voted the co-op one of the 100 best places to work in the U.S. Besides Grassmilk, Organic Valley farmers provide plenty of award-winning products, like Pasture-Raised Milk, cream, butter, cheese, yogurt, eggs, protein shakes, Good to Go 6.75 oz aseptic milk, and produce.

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


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INDUSTRY PROMOTIONS

CAMERATA AT PA ULIE’S WELCOME S G E NE R A L M A NAGE R CHR IS POLD OIA N

BOSTON-NATIVE JOINS STAFF OF INDUSTRY EXPERTS AT HOUSTON’S TOP WINE BAR

I

I am proud of the growing team and ever-evolving wine list at Camerata,” owner Paul Petronella said. Camerata at Paulie’s, Houston’s leading wine bar, is pleased to welcome General Manager Chris Poldoian to its roster of knowledgeable sommeliers. Since opening in 2013 in the Montrose neighborhood, Camerata has served as a meeting place for wine novices and experts alike to enjoy, discover and learn. Poldoian is a certified sommelier and a member of the Houston Sommelier Association. In his position at Camerata, he brings experience in the Houston market and a vast understanding for the hospitality industry. After spending a harvest in Spain, wine experts and novices can expect small producers in Spain from Jerez and Rioja to grace the menu from the proudly traditional to the avant-garde.

Poldoian joins Camerata’s knowledgeable staff that collectively shares over 30 years of experience in the wine and hospitality industry. Bringing together professionals from all over the country and supporting sustainable, family-run wineries, Camerata’s extensive wine list and quality service standards make it one of the top wine bars in the country. A native of Boston, Poldoian’s resume includes all facets of the industry from back of the house experience at Lambert’s Cove Inn and Cakes by Liz kitchens, both in Martha’s Vineyard, and various positions with the Hillstone Restaurant Group in both California and Texas. From manager-in-training to his rise to beverage manager, he was responsible for budgeting and inventory, reconstructing bar programs to increase profitability, educating staff and much more.

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


TRENDS IN BEVERAGES

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WINE TRENDS 2017

ENGLISH SPARKLING WINE: While Brexit may have been the most controversial upheaval in the UK, there was also a wine revolution in full swing. The Brits down south in Sussex and Kent have quietly toiled for decades recreating the craft of Champenoise viticulture and vinification. Like most wine regions of the world, the secret is in the soil, which mirrors the quintessential chalk across the channel. And despite whatever BS our President-elect says, global warming is real and has made these British regions perfect for grape-growing.   British bubbles had their own “Judgment of Paris” moment this spring when Sussex-grown Nyetimber won a French vs. British sparkling wine tasting. Expect this watershed moment to drum up even more interest. The British demand for the wines will certainly grow due to increased tariffs on EU products, and the international market is always looking for a inexpensive facsimile to Champagne. I’d expect to see a real push from distributors and wine shops by marketing these wines as the flavor profile of Champagne at a fraction of the price.  SEKT: Again, everyone is looking for inexpensive bubbles. Sparkling wine is an ever-growing market: it’s an upward trend that isn’t going to end anytime soon. Sekt, a term for Sparkling Riesling, could be the next Prosecco, thanks to the bright citrus quality and clean finish. The best versions of Sekt are dry and can be found in Germany and Austria. Strong importers like Vom Boden and Terry Theise will continue to show the potential of these wines.  SPATBURGUNDER:  When it comes to polar bears and Venice, global warming spells a certain doom. In the world of wine, its effects are less lopsided. Pinot Noir production in Germany has grown significantly over the past decade, and the styles are increasingly marketable to the average consumer. Major importers are recognizing Spatburgunder’s potential with a Pinot-frenzy clientele, and somms that are tired of selling the same old Russian River juice can geek out with a German Pinot placement. But perhaps the biggest turning point in 2017 for Spatburgunder will come from their French counterpart: with the yields in Burgundy plummeting for the next couple vintage releases, people will be hungry for an alternative. 

SEMI-IRONIC AND MARKETABLE AESTHETICS:

When it comes to polar bears and Venice, global warming spells a certain doom. In the world of wine, its effects are less lopsided. Pinot Noir production in Germany has grown significantly over the past decade, and the styles are increasingly marketable to the average consumer. Major importers are recognizing Spatburgunder’s potential with a Pinot-frenzy clientele, and somms that are tired of selling the same old Russian River juice can geek out with a German Pinot placement. But perhaps the biggest turning point in 2017 for Spatburgunder will come from their French counterpart: with the yields in Burgundy plummeting for the next couple vintage releases, people will be hungry for an alternative. w w w. f o o d b e v m a g . c o m | J a n u a r y 2 0 1 7


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INDUSTRY PRODUCTS

MEYDA CUSTOM LIGHTING INTRODUCES MOOSE

Through the Trees Pendant for the hospitality market A MAJESTIC MOOSE meanders in the woodlands as the Blue-Green mountain lake sparkles in the late afternoon sunshine against the Sunburst colored sky, creating an image that is perfect for a picture postcard or a great work of art. This is the latest design, Moose Through the Trees Oblong Pendant (66123) from Meyda Custom Lighting. This oblong pendant features stunning elegant art glass, which is complemented with decorative accents and hardware in an Antique Copper finish. The fixture is perfect for illuminating kitchen islands, dinettes, islands, billiard tables, counters and bars. It is deal for illuminating a wide range of rooms in resorts, hotels and restaurants. This pendant is custom crafted by Meyda artisans at the foothills of the spectacular Adirondack Mountains in Upstate New York. Custom sizes, styles and colors are available, as well as dimmable, energy efficient lamping options such as LED

The fixture is UL and cUL listed for dry and damp locations. About Meyda Custom Lighting Meyda Custom Lighting is a Meyda Tiffany Company, a leading manufacturer and designer of custom and decorative lighting and Tiffany lamps. Founded in 1974, the firm’s roots date back to the early 1900s supplying Tiffany Studios with original lighting products, including the original Coca-Cola stained glass fixtures.  With many years of designing, engineering and manufacturing expertise, Meyda develops innovations, technologies and value that transcend architectural lighting for any budget or economy. The firm’s diverse talent creates chandeliers, pendants, wall sconces, table and floor lamps, outdoor lighting and stained glass windows, to meet your exact specifications.  

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017

Meyda Custom Lighting is headquartered at 55 Oriskany Boulevard in Yorkville, New York. For more information, Tel. 1.800.222.4009.  Website:  www.meyda. com. Email:  Sales@meyda.com.


THE COMMUNITY

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Clean Food, Clean Wine, Clear Choice. Your discerning about what you put into life… and your body. A clean wine for anytime. With no residual sugar, chemicals, or additives…and dramatically fewer sulfites than the typical wine, FitVine is the low calorie clean wine option for friends who come together to exercise good judgement.

FIT FOR CONSUMPTION. Learn more about FitVine at fitvinewine.com Follow us @FitVineWine and join the

conversation at facebook.com/FitVineWine

w w w. f o o d b e v m a g . c o m | J a n u a r y 2 0 1 7


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HOSPITLITY NEWS

Aruba Marriott Resort Appoints New Executive Culinary Team Members Is pleased to announce the recent promotions of two leading members of their culinary team. Teddy Bouroncle has been promoted from Complex Executive Chef to Director of Food & Beverage Operations for the property and Romeo Penacino from Complex Executive Sous Chef to Complex Executive Chef. In addition to these promotions, the resort has appointed Aruba-born Ever de Peña as Complex Executive Sous Chef.

The One Happy Island’s Premier Resort Promotes Seasoned Property Chefs to Director of F&B, Complex Executive Chef and Selects New Local Executive Sous Chef Aruba Marriott Resort & Stellaris Casino is pleased to announce the recent promotions of two leading members of their culinary team. Teddy Bouroncle has been promoted from Complex Executive Chef to Director of Food & Beverage Operations for the property and Romeo Penacino from Complex Executive Sous Chef to Complex Executive Chef. In addition to these promotions, the resort has appointed Aruba-born Ever de Peña as Complex Executive Sous Chef.

Teddy Bouroncle has been promoted from Complex Execu-

tive Chef to Director of F&B Operations for the property. In his new position, he will be assisting the Complex Director of F&B in overseeing all the food and beverage outlets at the resort and ensuring culinary operations meet and exceed guests’ needs. 

Romeo Penacino has been promoted from Complex Executive Sous Chef to Complex Executive Chef. In his new role, he will continue to oversee all kitchen areas across the complex while improving guest and associate satisfaction and maximizing financial performance for the complex, as well  as maintaining the highest standard of culinary excellence.

Ever de Peña joins the Aruba Marriott culinary team as their

new Complex Executive Sous Chef  by way of  the Manchebo Beach Resort & Spa in Aruba where he served as  Executive Chef.  At Aruba Marriott, he will supervise all kitchen areas to ensure consistent high-quality product while guiding and developing the culinary team.

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017

A Peruvian native with nearly 15 years of culinary experience, Bouroncle came to Aruba Marriott Resort by way of the JW Marriott in Cusco, Peru in 2014 and has cooked all over the world from Singapore and Spain to Columbia and the United States. In his new position as Director of F&B Operations, Bouroncle will be assisting the Complex Director of F&B in overseeing all the food and beverage outlets at the resort and ensuring culinary operations meet and exceed guests’ needs. Bouroncle will focus on increasing revenue and the financial performance of the resort while also supervising a team of employees and maximizing guest satisfaction.


C H E F A P P O I N T M E N T S 27

Chef Penacino also brings valuable food and beverage experience and an international flair to Aruba Marriott’s culinary program starting his career as a Line Cook at the Hotel Melia in Argentina in 2000. Having worked his way up the hotel food chain in Argentina and then the Cayman Islands, Chef Penacino served as Restaurant Supervisor and Restaurant Chef at Grand Cayman Marriott Beach Resort for five years before joining Aruba Marriott in April of 2013 as Executive Sous Chef. In his new role as Complex Executive Chef, he will continue to oversee all kitchen areas across the complex while improving guest and associate satisfaction and maximizing financial performance for the complex, as well as maintaining the highest standard of culinary excellence. Chef Ever de Peña brings a slew of well-deserved culinary awards and an impressive knowledge of restaurant operations and international cuisine to the resort. Chef de Peña began his career in 2005 at the Renaissance Hotel in Aruba where he worked his way up from student apprentice to Junior Sous Chef and was most recently Executive Chef at the Manchebo Beach Resort & Spa in Aruba. At Aruba Marriott, Chef de Pena will supervise all kitchen areas to ensure consistent high-quality product while guiding and developing the culinary team. The strong leadership and culinary talent exhibited by Chef Bouroncle and Chef Penacino, who were instrumental in the repositioning of Aruba Marriott’s restaurants,

The strong leadership and culinary talent exhibited by Chef Bouroncle and Chef Penacino, who were instrumental in the repositioning of Aruba Marriott’s restaurants, Atardi and La Vista, now combined with the knowledgeable local perspective of Chef de Peña, will continue to raise the bar for food and beverage experiences at Aruba Marriott. About Aruba Marriott Resort & Stellaris Casino Aruba Marriott Resort & Stellaris Casino boasts 411 guestrooms – the most spacious on the island – each with large, private balconies overlooking lush landscape and the gorgeous waters of the Caribbean Sea. On property, nine restaurants and bars provide fare from light to elegant, while the largest casino in Aruba, a 6,500 square-foot spa, free-form swimming pool, the H2Oasis adults-only pool, and high-energy health club offer entertaining diversions. To obtain more information, call Aruba Marriott Resort & Stellaris Casino at 1.800.228.9290 or visit www.arubamarriott.com.

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F&B MAGAZINE

Q&A

YOU KNEW YOU WANTED TO BECOME PART OF THE BEVERAGE INDUSTRY… F&B EVERYONE HAS A STORY. TELL US HOW WHAT WAS YOUR “LIGHT BULB” MOMENT? I was in my 20’s working at a resort in St. Thomas, USVI, and one of the beverage managers introduced me to fine wine for the first time. Until that moment I had never considered wine as a beverage of choice. After a few vintage Champagnes and white Burgundies later I knew this was something special.

F&B

WHAT DOES A TYPICAL DAY OF WORK LOOK LIKE FOR YOU? There is never a typical day but an ideal day would consist of few vendor meetings, a wine tasting or two, meeting with the other food and beverage division directors to get the feel for what’s happening in the hotel. I also walk around the resort to spend time with sommeliers to see what’s going on in their worlds.

IS THE MOST REWARDING THING F&B WHAT ABOUT YOUR PROFESSION? The ability to work with some incredibly talented and like-minded people. Also having access to amazing wine is a big plus. THE BEVERAGE CULTURE LIKE F&B WHAT’S IN YOUR CITY? ANY REGIONAL TRENDS

IS THE MOST DIFFICULT PART OF F&B WHAT YOUR JOB AS A DIRECTOR OF FOOD AND

BEVERAGE? Learning to delegate. My first instinct is to do it myself but over a period of time I have realized that you need to let people who are very good do their jobs. I need to allow myself to see the big picture.

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017

YOU’VE OBSERVED? Miami, in the last few years, has really caught up to the national scene. We are seeing world class cocktail bars open and become very successful. In regards to wine, rosé is still on fire and showing no sign of slowing down. IS YOUR FAVORITE TRADITIONAL F&B WHAT COCKTAIL? Negroni 75% of the time. Old Fashioned rest of it


F&B MAGAZINE

Q&A

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WAS THE BIGGEST “BREAK” THAT F&B WHAT HELPED LAUNCH YOUR CAREER? Leaving a lucrative corporate gig to take a chance with a small independent restaurant group that allowed me to do what I wanted to do.

ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR SOMEF&B WHAT ONE CONSIDERING A SIMILAR CAREER

F&B

Don’t fall for shiny venues and fast talkers. Find places and people that have a track record of being successful in this very difficult business and copy all their moves. WHAT WERE THE LAST WINE / SPIRIT THAT REALLY MADE AN IMPRESSION ON YOU? 1970 Mayacamas Cabernet. That wine showed that California wines can be age worthy and great

CELEBRITY HAVE YOU ENCOUNTERED F&B WHAT OR SERVED THAT MADE AN IMPRESSION ON YOU? My first celebrity encounter was also the most memorable. I waited on Anthony Kiedis, lead singer of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, in the early 90’s. He as very humble and down to earth and insisted that I call him Anthony instead of Mr. Kiedis.

COULD CHANGE ONE THING ABOUT F&B IFTHEYOU INDUSTRY, WHAT WOULD IT BE? Find a way to balance work and life better.

IS YOUR DEFINITION OF SUCCESS IN F&B WHAT YOUR INDUSTRY? Respect of your peers, being looked up to as someone who is good at their job, reliable and strong operator.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR YOU? F&B Right now I am really

enjoying the chance the run a huge beverage program at an iconic venue. I always wanted to work overseas, so who knows.

WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN YOU’RE F&B LASTLY, RELAXING? 18 holes of golf in the morning. Steaks on the grill and great wines with friends in the evening.

Thank You, Director Syed SYED “SY” ALI:

Director of Food and Beverage at Fontainebleau Miami Beach, oversees all beverage operations and assists the General Managers and Sommeliers with the cocktail and wine programs of the food & beverage outlets at the landmark hotel. Syed oversees Bleau Bar, the hotel’s renowned lobby bar, Glow Bar as well as the cocktail and wine programs at Vida, Blade, La Côte, Michael Mina 74, StripSteak by Michael Mina, Hakkasan and Scarpetta. With sixteen years of hospitality experience, Sy brings working knowledge of the market and trends in beverage that will elevate the guest experience and further the success of Fontainebleau’s acclaimed Food and Beverage Department. w w w. f o o d b e v m a g . c o m | J a n u a r y 2 0 1 7


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CITY SCENE

Salt Lake’s booming dining and nightlife scene continues to wow après skiers and general visitors to Utah’s capital city.

A FLOCK of new restaurants, bars and cafes have just opened in one of the Top 10 “Foodie Cities” in the US, according to Wallethub. With more than a dozen artisanal coffee roasters, close to 20 brew pubs and a restaurant scene that embraces experimentation and clever reuse of the city’s existing architecture, Salt Lake has secured its place as one of the gastronomic stars of the West. It’s a metropolis that cleverly balances the performing arts and the great outdoors and serves up a vibrant urban lifestyle.

HOT TABLES CURRENT FISH & OYSTER

Generating buzz since it opened in 2015, the seafood emporium just made OpenTable’s list for 100 Best Restaurants in America for 2016. This cool industrial chic space under Executive Chef Phelix Gardner is located in what was Salt Lake’s original Ford auto dealership.

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017

TABLEX

Newly open by three chefs – Mike Blocher, Nick Fahs and David Barboza – in the Zions Park neighborhood, the minimalist design of TableX is the backdrop to dishes featuring Morgan Valley steak tartare, Christiansen Farm Berkshire pork and Idaho rainbow trout. HSL  Executive Chef Briar Handly serves seasonally and locally driven food ranging from beef cheek burgers to coddled duck eggs at the Salt Lake branch of Handle, a favorite in nearby Park City. HSL was named The Best New Fine Dining by The Salt Lake Tribune.


CITY SCENE

HSL

Executive Chef Briar Handly serves seasonally and locally driven food ranging from beef cheek burgers to coddled duck eggs at the Salt Lake branch of Handle, a favorite in nearby Park City. HSL was named The Best New Fine Dining by The Salt Lake Tribune.

THE REST

A subterranean speakeasy in the heart of downtown, filled with taxidermy, antiques and the inventive cooking of Chef Brendan Cagle, which might include honey-glazed beer-can chicken, fried brioche doughnuts and even a unique version of poutine. Its upstairs companion, Bodega, offers small plates

STANZA ITALIAN BISTRO & WINE BAR

Chef Logan Crew offers an array of small plates, fresh pastas and a wine list that stretches the length of Italy, served in a vast modern space that won the Best New Atmosphere award from

SHAKEN AND STIRRED UNDER CURRENT

Cocktails, seasonal craft beers and wine in a location adjacent to Current Fish & Oyster. Expect oysters, small bites, absinthe and seasonal cocktails.

WHISKEY STREET

Back in the mid 1800s, there were so many bars between today’s 200 South and 400 South along Main Street that LDS Leader Brigham Young dubbed it “Whiskey Street.” The name was revived for this gastropub that features a 72-foot long bar and serves more than 130 whiskies (among other libations).

BEER BAR

Next door to BarX, which opened the year Prohibition was repealed in 1933, is Beer Bar, both owned by Modern Family’s Ty Burrell. It’s Salt Lake’s version of a late night beer hall with more than 150 beers and a menu featuring house-made bratwursts, local breads and Belgian fries.

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THE MORNING AFTER THE HUB & SPOKE DINER Restaurateur Scott Evans’ fourth dining establishment (after Pago, Finca, and East Liberty Tap House) in Sugar House offers Southern influenced breakfast favorites such as Shrimp and Grits, Kentucky Hot Brown and Sweet Potato Pancakes.

PUBLIK COFFEE ROASTERS

Known for their single-origin roasted coffee and specialty toast made with locally produced breads and jams, the local chain just opened Publik Kitchen in the 9th and 9th neighborhood, with a full breakfast and lunch menu.Brown and Sweet Potato Pancakes.

Visit Salt Lake is a private, non-profit corporation responsible for the promotion of Salt Lake as a vibrant, modern destination brimming with unexpected dining, lodging, nightlife and entertainment options, a destination well-suited for convention and leisure travel alike. In partnership with Salt Lake County, Visit Salt Lake’s mission is to improve the area economy by attracting and providing support to conventions, leisure travelers and visitors while being a leader in environmental responsibility. For more information on all that Salt Lake has to offer, go to www.VisitSaltLake.com w w w. f o o d b e v m a g . c o m | J a n u a r y 2 0 1 7


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CITY SCENE

Photo By Isaac Brekken

Managing Partners- Joseph Marsco, Mark Purdy and John Wood

RESTAURANT, NIGHTLIFE INDUSTRY VETERANS LAUNCH STACKED HOSPITALITY Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


CITY SCENE

IN ADDITION to currently owning and operating Alizé at the Top of the Palms Casino Resort, Stacked Hospitality will kick off 2017 with a new dining concept which will be officially announced later this month. The company’s managing partners are Joseph Marsco, Mark Purdy and John Wood who bring a combined 68 successful years of experience in dining and nightlife to the business. Rochat is the legendary chef who created Andre’s Downtown in 1980, making it the city’s first off-strip fine dining restaurant. His cozy, neighborhood French restaurant would become one of Las Vegas’ most venerable and acclaimed restaurants and establish Rochat as a legendary trailblazer not only for the city but also for the culinary industry. “My staff is my family. I knew when I was preparing for the next phase, Joe and Mark would become the keepers of my legacy,” says Rochat. “With the addition of John and his nightlife experience, it’s thrilling to see the vision I created more than 35 years ago grow into this new company. This team is strategic, thoughtful and innovative. They honor history while transforming it for the next generation. I’m proud and thrilled to watch the future of Andre’s legacy unfold.” Marsco joined Rochat’s restaurants in 2001, opening Alizé. He held the position of general manager at Alizé for three years before becoming the director of operations and eventually managing partner for Andre’s entire restaurant group. He has more than 21 years of experience in opening and managing restaurants. He began his restaurant career at his family owned and operated Italian restaurant in Youngstown, Ohio.

To pursue an interest in cooking and an ultimate desire to be a chef, he moved to New York to attend the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, New York. While attending the CIA, Marsco apprenticed in numerous high-profile restaurants including Lutèce with André Soltner, Le Cirque with Daniel Boulud and La Côte Basque with Jean-Jacques Rachou. He would continue his career in restaurant management by working at Bouley and CT, both located in New York and eventually move to Las Vegas to the Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino at the Masquerade Village restaurants which included VooDoo Lounge and Café, Mama Maria’s Cucina, Antonio’s and Buzio’s. Purdy’s experience includes years of creating memorable cuisine for his guests. Most recently, he was the executive chef at Alizé. During this time, he successfully blended Rochat’s traditional French cuisine with contemporary twists and accents, which propelled both Purdy and Alizé’s profile. His first job was at the age of 13 as a dishwasher in the kitchen of a modest Nantucket restaurant. He next moved on to another small restaurant, Morning Glory Café, where he started doing basic prep work for the chef and was eventually introduced to the poetry of plating food. After graduating from Skidmore College in Upstate New York, he moved to Washington, D.C. and became sous chef at I Matti. In 1996, Purdy returned to his native New York. He landed a job as an appetizer cook at Aureole under Chef Charlie Palmer. Chef Palmer was so impressed with Purdy, he brought him to Las Vegas to open Aureole at Mandalay Bay and then serve as chef de cuisine at Dry Creek Kitchen in the Sonoma wine country. By 1998, Purdy returned to Las Vegas and began his career with Rochat.

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Wood has 15 years of nightlife and hospitality experience working for multiple award-winning venues and million-dollar companies. Before joining Stacked Hospitality as a managing partner, he spent nearly 10 years as senior executive director at Wynn Resorts. During this time, the resorts’ nightclubs collectively amassed more than $100 million annually. In his position, he was responsible for numerous strategic areas of the business including marketing, customer development, VIP services, security, compliance, design and development. He also orchestrated the growth of one of the most successful VIP service programs in Las Vegas nightlife, receiving the “Nightclub and Bar Top 100” award for “#1 Nightclub” seven times from 2008 to 2015. While at Wynn, he oversaw multiple venues during his tenure including La Bête, Tryst, XS and Intrigue, as well as Lure Ultra Lounge. In 2012, he assisted with the creation and launch of the Botero Supper Club, which became Wynn’s first step toward the “vibe dining” experience. Wood is an Idaho native and has lived in Las Vegas since the late ‘90s, when he received his bachelor of arts degree in marketing from the University of Nevada Las Vegas. As for the name of the company, Marsco explains, “We named the company ‘Stacked’ because every guest’s experience is the result of a building process of sorts, ‘stacking’ one positive experience upon another. From the time the guest makes a reservation, to the moment they leave the venue, every interaction along the way. It’s a simple but powerful concept that resonates with our staff.”

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TRENDS IN CUISINE

Photo By: Sebastian Arguello

By Executive Chef Jean-François Bruel FROM HOLIDAY parties to a casual night at-home, cooks are increasing looking for alternative red meat options with health, wellness and exceptional taste in mind. Executive Chef Jean-François Bruel at the award-winning, two Michelin-starred contemporary French restaurant DANIEL, cooks with High Plains bison throughout the year. We asked him to create a dish for home cooks, and he developed a cocotte of fall vegetables to complement the rich flavors of our bison tenderloin. It’s a wonderful, colorful dish that can be easily adapted for any time of the year. High Plains Bison is known for superior quality and taste benefits, providing a delicious juiciness and tender texture, making it one of the most sought-after meats among steak enthusiasts.

tenderloin–a distinctive, succulent flavor with a hint of salty sweetness. For more recipe inspiration visit www.highplainsbison.com.

Bison boasts health benefits such as low cholesterol and low sodium, while providing a significant source of iron and a healthy dose of Omega 3 fatty acids. In this naturally lean red meat, the proportion of protein, fat, mineral, and fatty acids to caloric value makes bison one of the more nutrient-dense, guilt-free proteins available today. Chef Bruel’s one-of-a-kind dish features a vegetable cocotte of parsnips, wild mushrooms and shallot red wine sauce surrounding a sustainable all-natural five-ounce High Plains Bison Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


F&B HospitalityRESTAURANT Professtional - DIRECTOR NEWS OF BEVERAGES

MOVIES

4 FOODIES

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TRENDS IN TECHNOLOGY

REDIMARK SAVES GREEN BOTTLING SIGNIFICANT TIME AND MONEY WITH NEW DATE CODER Thermal Inkjet Coder Delivers Mobile Bottling Company with An Easy-to-Use, Reliable Coding Solution A new marking and coding company revolutionizing the small character printing industry, has allowed Green Bottling, a Portland-based mobile bottling company, to optimize efficiency and save hundreds of dollars a day with its TC12 thermal inkjet (TIJ) coder. Green Bottling began using the Redimark TC12 coder in the fall of 2015 to date code craft beer bottle labels at the various breweries it serves. It was the fifth date coding machRedimarkine Green Bottling tried and the first one that did not disappoint. “Since we began using the Redimark TC12, we have been able to save one and a half to two hours every day. We used to spend that much time just setting up and breaking down the costlier small character date coders we previously used,” said Mike Weksler, co-owner of Green Bottling. “The TC12 is not only saving us time and money, but also saving our customers time as well. The fact that we’re able to simply go online and order the exact equipment we need without a middleman is just an added bonus.” Green Bottling currently owns two TC12s and already has plans to buy a third. As a mobile bottler, Green Bottling switches rapidly between multiple SKUs and having the ability to change the date codes at a moment’s notice, while also having the flexibility to change the printing direction and orientation, has been key to the company’s success using the TC12. “The convenience of online purchasing at www.redimark.com for equipment and ink, and the simple setup and use has made life easier for Green Bottling.

ABOUT REDIMARK

Routine maintenance and difficulty with shortrun product changeover that the company experienced with their previous date coders added unwanted time to their in-field bottling service. With the TC12, Green Bottling no longer experiences these issues,” said Dean Hornsby, Redimark’s Brand Evangelist. “Companies like Green Bottling, who provide an efficient service for their customers depend on their own vendors to provide products that enable efficiency. At Redimark, we strive to make the purchase and use of our products as simple and easy as possible so folks like Green Bottling can focus on what they do best.” The Redimark TC12 is a remarkably simple system, which includes a touch screen tablet controller, thermal inkjet print head with cartridge-based ink, flexible mounting options, and RediNET wireless connectivity to deliver cloud-connected services.   Redimark’s coder and inks are available for purchase online at www.redimark.com.

Redimark is a coding and marking company that is revolutionizing the small character printing industry. Redimark’s coding technology and fast drying inks can mark a wide variety of materials, including plastics, paperboard materials, bags, pouches and films, labels, and aluminum. The company’s reliable small character printer and inks are available for purchase online and provide consumer products manufacturers with a less complicated, more cost effective, and more accurate marking and coding solution. For more information, visit the Redimark website at www.redimark.com. Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


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Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


FOOD TRENDS 2017

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Exceptionally Sweet and Tangy ! CAMEOÂŽ ELITE cherry tomatoes are

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BURGER OF THE MONTH

Walk-On’s Debuts The Big Buck Burger STARTING THIS SUNDAY, burger lovers will be invited to venture into

uncharted territory, as Walk-On’s Bis-

treaux & Bar introduces The Big Buck. What exactly is The Big Buck?

Great question! The new burger is an 8-oz. seared burger topped with melted cheddar cheese, venison chili, red onions, pickled jalapeños,

Baton Rouge-based Walk-On’s – voted “Best Sports Bar in North Ameri-

ca” by ESPN – now has 10 locations: three in Baton Rouge, one each in New Orleans, Lafayette, Houma,

Shreveport, Lake Charles and Bossier City, La., and one in Lubbock, Tex-

as. Other locations are on the way in

Zachary, Alexandria, Metairie and As-

lime crema and Fritos served on a toasted

cension Parish, as well as Dallas/Fort

ed-time burger even comes with a side of

and South Texas. Several additional

for your buck!

States are likewise on the drawing

brioche bun. For only $11.99, this limit-

Worth, Houston, San Antonio, Tyler

shoestring fries. Talk about a lot of bang

markets across the Southern United

For all the adults indulging in The Big

Buck, Walk-On’s recommends pairing

it with a Meiomi Pinot Noir for a truly transformational experience.

But don’t wait too long to visit your local Walk-On’s. This out-of-the-ordinary

board.

To inquire about franchising opportunities, qualified applicants may contact Walk-On’s Enterprises President & COO Scott Taylor at franchise@walkons.com.

Burger of the Month will only be around through Jan. 31.

For a complete menu and more information, visit WalkOnsEnterprises.com. ABOUT WALK-ON’S ENTERPRISES

Walk-On’s Enterprises is arguably the most distinctive restaurant company in America. Its concepts are fresh, fun and original, from Walk-On’s Bistreaux & BarSM – voted ESPN’s “#1 Sports Bar in North America” in 2012 – to Happy’s Irish Pub and Walk-On’s Catering. Additional growth lies ahead, as the company expands on its winning combination of delicious, affordable food and drinks presented in an uncommonly warm and friendly atmosphere. For more information, visit walkonsenterprises.com, or contact Ladd Biro at Champion Management at lbiro@championmgt.com or 972.930.9933. Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


BURGER OF THE MONTH

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THE BIG BUCK

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FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITIES

Walk-On’s Executes Deal to Expand in 5 Southern States Development agreement to bring 8 restaurants to Ala., Fla., La., Miss. and Tenn.; more than 50 franchised locations now in pipeline Walk-On’s Enterprises co-founder and owner Brandon Landry announced today that the company has executed an Area Development Agreement (ADA) for eight restaurants across five Southern states with The Shane Morrison Companies, a commercial real estate firm owned by Louisiana entrepreneur Shane Morrison. The company broke ground on its first Walk-On’s Bistreaux & Bar franchise location in Zachary, La., in early June.

“I am impressed with Shane’s business acumen and how he has gone about building his successful organization,” said Landry. “He and his team are constructing a beautiful Walk-On’s in Zachary, and I am thrilled that he will also be leading our charge into these new markets, where I have always believed our brand would flourish.”

Walk-On’s is renowned for its signature menu featuring a taste of Louisiana served up in a game-day atmosphere by America’s Cheerleaders, who make sure every guest feels welThe agreement will introduce the come. Walk-On’s brand to eight new markets across four states, including “We are excited to bring Walk-On’s Auburn and Tuscaloosa, Ala.; Gaines- to these new states with Shane and his ville, Pensacola and Tallahassee, team,” said Scott Taylor, Walk-On’s Fla., Gulfport, Miss.; and Knoxville Enterprises President & COO. “Shane and Nashville, Tenn. Morrison will is a seasoned restaurant operator and likewise further expand the chain’s real estate expert, so we know our footprint in its home state of Louibrand is in excellent hands as we widsiana. With these and other recently en our footprint across the south.” announced commitments, Walk-On’s now has more than 50 franchise loca- Baton Rouge-based Walk-On’s – voted “Best Sports Bar in North Ameritions in its development pipeline. ca” by ESPN – now has nine loca“There simply is no sports bar brand tions: three in Baton Rouge, one each like Walk-On’s, given its unique in New Orleans, Lafayette, Houma, combination of outstanding LouShreveport and Lake Charles, La., isiana-style food, family-friendly and one in Lubbock, Texas. Other atmosphere and incredible service,” locations are on the way in Zachary, said Morrison, an LSU alumnus. “We Covington, Alexandria, Bossier City, are excited to be part of this growing Metairie and Ascension Parish, as organization and look forward to well as Dallas/Fort Worth, Houston, opening in these great new markets.” San Antonio, Tyler and South Texas. Several additional markets across the Morrison owns and operates company-owned units of Santa Fe Southern United States are likewise Cattle Company, Cody’s Original on the drawing board.

Roadhouse and Celebrity Theaters, as well as the commercial real estate company that bears his name.

In May 2015, New Orleans Saints superstar Drew Brees and his wife, Brittany, bought into Walk-On’s Enterprises as co-owners.

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017

Drew pointed out that Walk-On’s is “a great place to bring my family, teammates and business colleagues” and that they were excited to help “expand the brand across the nation.”

To inquire about franchising opportunities, qualified applicants may contact Scott Taylor at franchise@walk-ons.com. For a complete menu and more information, visit WalkOnsEnterprises.com. About Walk-On’s Enterprises Walk-On’s Enterprises is arguably the most distinctive restaurant company in America. Its concepts are fresh, fun and original, from Walk-On’s Bistreaux & BarSM – voted ESPN’s “#1 Sports Bar in North America” in 2012 – to Happy’s Irish Pub and Walk-On’s Catering. Additional growth lies ahead, as the company expands on its winning combination of delicious, affordable food and drinks presented in an uncommonly warm and friendly atmosphere. For more information, visit walkonsenterprises.com, or contact Ladd Biro at Champion Management at lbiro@ championmgt.com or 972.930.9933.


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R E S TA U R A N T T R E N D S

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

ANNA BOGDANOVA, HEAD OF BRAND, LOYALTYPLANT

5TO CONCEPTS HELP SHAPE YOUR

RESTAURANT CRM IN 2017 it and engage with it, so make sure you continually give reasons for new customers to install it and existing users—to log in. If customers know upfront what they are signing up for and are incented, they’ll be less likely to delete your loyalty app or unsubscribe from communications later on.

Although Millennials spend over 44% of their food dollars on eating out (which is a lot more than just a few years ago), they are not the easiest bunch to turn into regular customers. Older generations even more so due to typically larger income and evolving tastes. 2017 just might be the year of engagement crisis for fast casual restaurants and chains: people are getting really weary of similar marketing campaigns and messages they are constantly bombarded with.

overall activity on mobile devices now accounts for two-thirds of digital media time. So, here are five concepts to consider when defining your 2017 CRM strategy: Incentivize Your Customers to Share Personal Data

The success of your marketing efforts heavily relies on what you know about your customers, and your customer database needs to be a year-round priority. Keep in mind that nobody will fill out guest experience cards these days. What still works really well, Customers want to release their however, is engaging customers personal information on their own on their own terms, and mobile terms and in the easiest and most channels are great for that. 70% of rewarding way. mobile phone users actually want to have loyalty cards on their devices, If you have a mobile app, the and recent research shows that data gets richer as customers use

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017

Ideas: Make it a quick and easy experience for your customers to install your restaurant app and register their personal info using your wi-fi access. Offer an incentive like a menu item for the download. Consider an ongoing lottery with a regular prize like a meal for two: restaurant guests are usually much more inclined to share personal data if there is a drawing involved. 2. Get Laser Focused in Your Targeting Use the year end and Q1 to exhaustively analyze which tools your specific audience engages with most and reflect on which campaigns have worked effectively for your restaurant. Then consolidate your marketing to fuel these efforts. Carefully segment your audience for different campaigns


R E S TA U R A N T T R E N T S

and analyze results afterwards— you need to know exactly how effective your tactics are and who you are addressing. Make sure you target specific groups with highly tailored messages. Ideas: Segment your existing and potential customers based on demographics, favorite menu items, important dates, etc. A married couple doesn’t need an email about a “singles special” on Valentine’s—target your younger demographic instead. Nor should you send giant burger promos to your vegetarian customers. Track birthdays: we see a high 35% conversion rate on average for birthday incentives in the fast casual segment, so invite your customers to stop by a week before or after their birthdays.

social channels). Millennials represent the most “mobile-engaged” customer group, so you also maximize the use of tools like proximity notifications and actions on the go when targeting younger customers. Ideas: Consider investing in a digital ordering system, so that your regular customers can rapidly pre-order their meals and pick them up at lunchtime. Offer the newest mobile and digital forms of payments that attract mobile-savvy customers. Customers now expect brands to offer these convenient options, and this trend will only continue to intensify. 4. Find Creative Ways to Upsell

Your focus for Q3 could be on upselling and increasing the average check amount. It’s an In Q2 prioritize hands-on mar- obvious way to grow the restauketing campaigns and mobile chan- rant revenue, but the key here is nels for communications. We know to position the offerings as useful for a fact that mobile-based gam- recommendations and bonuses that ification works great as people will make your customers’ visits really enjoy collecting points for even more enjoyable and fun. visits or gaining a certain status at the restaurant. Using mobile apps Ideas: for these campaigns means you Offer additional points for can encourage active sharing of a larger check or discounts for pictures and engagement of your groups since summer is all about community (especially if there’s vacation and spending time with an additional incentive to invite friends and family. friends or share the message on 3. Focus on Mobile Apps

45

Use bounce-back coupons to give your customers incentives to come back within the first 7 days of their visit. Chances are, if customers visit twice in 1-2 weeks, they’ll be coming back again—we’ve seen consistent success with this tactic. 5. Measure Incremental Sales As you are reflecting on your results and reviewing your efforts in Q4, the emphasis should be on the incremental value of your marketing efforts. For example, based on the average number of weekly visitors, how many more people visited the restaurant since you’ve launched a particular campaign? Incremental value is probably the most important stat that you can gather by comparing historical data and your average numbers in a given week. Ideas: If you are operating a fast casual chain, run a promotion in two locations out of four that perform at the same level. Then compare the revenue and other numbers with the locations that didn’t run a promotion. Analyze historical data for the same location comparing the week of running a promotion with the previous week. Pay attention to specific issues you are trying to solve: for example, if you want to fill up the restaurant at off-peak hours, run a weekly comparison of the off-peak purchases.

What are the key takeaways for restaurant owners and marketers? Ditch simple offers in 2017 relying on the fact that a 10% discount or another free slice of pizza just don’t cut it anymore. Instead, start building committed customer relationships through highly targeted and personalized mobile campaigns that deliver incremental value to your business.

Anna Bogdanova is Head of Brand at LoyaltyPlant, a mobile platform that helps restaurant owners and marketers build rewarding customer relationships and harness mobile apps and CRM to elevate customer loyalty and revenues. w w w. f o o d b e v m a g . c o m | J a n u a r y 2 0 1 7


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TRENDS IN BEVERAGES

COLD-BREW BEVERAGE COMPANY ADDS PROTEIN TO COLD BREW COFFEE LINE FOR ADDED FUNCTIONALIT Y

High Brew Coffee®, an Austin-based natural beverage company, introduce their new ready-to-drink cold-brew coffee with added protein, Creamy Cappuccino + Protein, at this year’s National Association of Convenience Stores Show (NACS). This all new offering from High Brew Coffee® offers consumers the cold brew coffee that they have already grown to love with the added benefit and functionality of 12 grams of protein and 3 grams of fiber per serving.

Like all High Brew Coffee® varieties, Creamy Cappuccino + Protein uses a no-heat brewing process and has twice the natural caffeine of traditionally brewed hot coffee. The milk protein isolate is added to create a creamy and indulgent texture, while offering a satiating and convenient beverage experience in an 8oz can. This great tasting caffeine + protein combination is the perfect pick-me-up for those living an active on-the-go lifestyle. “This new product embodies the innovation of our brand and the ready-to-drink beverage space as a whole,” said David Smith, founder and CEO of High Brew Coffee®. “It is still our goal to fuel those who do and Creamy Cappuccino delivers on all fronts. We are proud to offer consumers this all new product that allows them added nutrition and a quick burst of energy on the go. We continuously seek to provide our consumers with an elevated coffee experience and the protein and fiber added to Creamy Cappuccino will do just that.”

About High Brew Coffee Born from the adventure of a lifetime and raised in Austin, TX, High Brew puts expertly crafted cold brewed coffee in a can to enjoy whenever and wherever you want it. High Brew Coffee is made from 100% Fair Trade Arabica beans that are cold brewed over time, not heat. We believe that great coffee helps you navigate anything the day throws your way, that’s why we cold brew every batch to be smooth, bold and full of natural energy with way less sugar. High Brew is for the go-getters, trend-setters and the do-ers. It’s an elevated coffee experience with a can-do attitude and it’s now available in 6 ready to drink shelf stable flavors. It’s the cold brew for those who do. For more information, please visit www.highbrewcoffee.com. Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


TRENDS IN BEVERAGES

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SOUR BEER IN RECENT YEARS, trend experts have noted a dramatic shift in consumer flavor preferences to more stimulating flavors; two-thirds really enjoy tangy, 31% sour and 11% bitter – all nearly double from three years ago. Beverages, such as beer, are no exception as breweries look to appeal to the changing consumer palates. Due to their unique sweet-tart taste, Montmorency tart cherries (and their juice) are cropping up in a variety of beverage innovations. A handful of breweries have recently incorporated tart cherries into recipes, including:

ANGRY ORCHARD, In a new extension to their Orchard’s Edge hard cider line, The Old Fashioned, which debuted in March 2016, is made with five apple varieties and is aged on oak with dried tart cherries.

DESCHUTES BREWERY , Their Dissident brew is fermented for 18 months in a mixture of pinot and cab barrels and has a punch of Oregon Montmorency tart cherries, green apples and vinegar.

TRITON, A Belgian-style Pale Ale that has been appropriately soured with lactobacillus acidophilus providing green apple, tart cherry, grapefruit and even apricot notes. The Barn Phantom is infused

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E AT I N G H E A LT H Y

CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST

WELLNESS CHEF, SUSTAINABLE FARMER AND RESTAURANTEUR

CHEF ERIN WADE VINAIGRETTE AND MODERN GENERAL

Convenience has an ineluctable appeal, its own force field and magnetism. Growing up, there was almost nothing I loved more about vacations than room service. There remains something slightly rebellious about eating a meal in your robe and slippers, like playing hooky on normal dining formalities.

There is a texture and a magic specific to eating houses that cannot be digitalized. A great restaurant is after a feeling, a feeling that roots us and connects us to our memories and our physical beings and one another. It’s Also A Pretty Rough Trade.

Restaurants – healthy successful restaurants – make around a 15 percent profit margin. If a restaurant signs up to be one of the “partnered” restaurants with UberEats, for instance, they are charged 30 percent Without much of a debate, we are per transaction. That’s outside of the at risk of becoming a takeout nation delivery fee charged through to the and trading away the slow appreci- customer. Restaurants lose money on ation of the sights, sounds, smells, the the meal and the profit is effectouch and taste that should define tively transferred to -- or parasitized the experience of food. We are also by -- the delivery app. about to surrender any direct connection to the people who prepare The pitch to restaurants is that higher our food. That empathy counts. It’s sales will make it right down the simple: when someone is looking line. But these networks don’t make you in the eye, you really don’t want money delivering food, just like him to cry in (or about) his soup. Google doesn’t make money being a search engine. They are out to Restaurants build a customer base monetize the information generated People traditionally come together over on that familiarity – and we do it and through food. Perhaps now more with human labor, human flaws and by the networks of people using the than ever, with our patience with each human kindness. We learn our cus- service. other thin and our civic fabric fraying, tomers’ quirks and they learn ours. we need that grounding connection. We know that Darcy Robertson likes Because the value of these companies will ultimately depend on scale, Which is why I am asking you, my fellow Romesco dressing and cherries on what they are ultimately gunning for Americans and restaurant-industry insid- her Cobb. We know that Dr. Smith is not the delivery market, which is ers, to put away your phones and give likes his to-go Salacho meat on the only about $4 billion, or even the food delivery apps like Favor, UberEats side so it doesn’t wilt the romaine. off-premise consumption market, and Grubhub a rest—for the sake of our We know this before they tell us, which is an estimated $200 billion. although they always do. business and our customers’ health. But as someone who has spent the last 15 years building a business growing and serving organic and sustainable food, I worry about the hidden costs of convenience.

Put down your phone and pull up a chair.”

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


E AT I N G H E A LT H Y

Chef Erin Wade

In one of it’s less frequently quoted passages, he imagines a future industrial eater, increasingly passive and unable to question the true cost of what they are being sold:

“They will grow, deliver, and cook your Convenience has an ineluctable food for you and (just like your mothThey want the $500 billion the er) beg you to eat it. That they do not restaurant industry at large comyet offer to insert it, prechewed, into mands. And they want to insert your mouth is only because they have themselves into as many of those found no profitable way to do so. We transactions as they can. may rest assured that they would be By offering delivery as a sort of glad to find such a way. The ideal inhypnotic carrot, they will soon have dustrial consumer would be strapped a relationship with customers that is to a table with a tube running from primary and defining. Restaurants, the food factory directly into his or having lost their customer relationher stomach. “ ship, will be forced to slash costs. That means choosing ingredients of He wrote this as a perversely exaggerlesser quality and firing people. It ated conceit in 1989, and yet sounds might even mean formerly sensible like an almost-plausible mission statecompanies might one day end up ment for a disruptive start-up in 2016. employing robots and 3-D printers to It appears “they” have now found a squirt molten meat goo into burger way to make prechewing profitable: shapes to be delivered to your door just make it an app. by drones. Restaurants today are caught in the early stages of the same dynamic that hit post-war American farms. Increasingly, farmers became addicted to the very things that were causing their troubles—synthetic fertilizers, expensive seed and dangerous chemicals. The industrial farming paradigm wreaked havoc in farming communities and compromised soil health, ecological diversity, food quality and nutrition, and yet it was decades before any widespread dissent took hold. WENDELL BERRY was the voice of that resistance long before hipster restaurants (like mine) began printing his words on their staff uniforms. His essay The Pleasures of Eating reads like a prophetic rallying cry.

Conveniences tend to obliterate the realms they are conveniencing, just as flavorless melons became the new normal of industrial farming. But the very word convenience implies the existence of an alternative that is less efficient but more of something else. In the case of restaurants, or food in general, the something else is community, quality and, perhaps most important, joy. Isn’t that what restaurants are for, after all—moments of joy and togetherness? As consumers, when we choose convenience, we have to accept that we are not choosing a momentary ease, but setting a new and enduring normal. We should ask ourselves if we are willing to pony up the old one along with our dollars.

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ABOUT ERIN WADE Running a working farm for 15 years and a thriving restaurant for 10 years, Wade has an up-close perspective on the challenges and rewards of sustainability, the nuances and wiles of consumer behavior and the brutal realities of running a small business. Wade graduated from Harvard with a degree in English & American Literature and Language She moved to the high desert of New Mexico to become a self-taught organic farmer. She lectures on soil health and high-desert farming and is currently working on a sustainable food hub in Bastrop, Texas near the newest location of her restaurant concept Vinaigrette. Wade’s Vinaigrette opened its first location in 2008 in one of the hottest and fastest growing market segments of the restaurant industry. With three Vinaigrette locations, a retail store and two farms in her burgeoning and sustainably-minded enterprise, Wade has proven her ability to anticipate trends in consumer demand and society as they apply to food and eating. Her perspective on how her industry is changing and what the future may hold are backed by 15 years of close observation of food, farming and health.

Q&A

WITH CHEF ERIN • NEXT PAGE

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F&B MAGAZINE

Q&A

Q&A

WITH CHEF ERIN WADE

F&B EVERYONE HAS A STORY. TELL US HOW YOU KNEW YOU WANTED TO BECOME PART OF THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY…WHAT WAS YOUR “LIGHT BULB” MOMENT? EW The idea and menu items for Vinaigrette had been marinating for a while, but then one day I drove past a small vacant sort of broke down building and said “that could be my little salad shack.” And then I formed an LLC called The Salad Shack and wrote a business plan and so on and so forth. Took another three years to get open! F&B IN ONE WORD DESCRIBE YOUR RESTAURANT. EW Nourishing Can I have a second word? Joyful. F&B WHAT ARE THE PROS AND CONS OF TODAYS FOOD APPS? EW Pros—for a restaurant, they can allow restaurants of many kinds to cater to convenience. They allow restaurants to advertise to and influence customers in a very sniper-like way. Both of these factors make it possible that this could increase volume in sales for certain restaurants. EW Cons—Restaurants lose their direct relationship with their customer, which is very dangerous in my opinion. It is part of our brand equity and important to our autonomy. The price structure is not sustainable for restaurants and it will ultimately put a downward pressure on food quality. Restaurants work incredibly hard to create a whole experience for guests. That work depends on a lot of people who earn a livelihood through our industry. Dining is about more than just eating food, it is about the whole experience that supports it. I worry that our obsession with convenience, which is encouraged and expanded greatly by food apps, erodes the experience and quality of dining. F&B WHAT SHOULD TODAYS RESTAURATEUR CONSIDER WHEN MOVING TOWARDS THIS TECHNOLOGY? The long term. What the real cost is. How important owning our relationship to our customers is. Apps want to encourage loyalty first and foremost to their networks, not to the restaurants. Also, digital networks are very powerful, and their value depends on scale. So ultimately they aren’t just fulfilling the to-go demand. They want to be involved in as many restaurant transactions as they can. PAGE 50 Food & Beverage Magazine Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


F&B MAGAZINE

Q&A

51

The fact that as more people sign up for these apps, the marginal benefit they confer will go down and the marginal cost up.

F&B EW

TECHNOLOGY AND NATURALISM HAVE NOT ALWAYS WORKED WELL. YOUR OPINION? Well, when a technology comes along and offers convenience and a way to magically increase volume, it is very hard to say no. But technology has often come at the expense of autonomy and sustainability, as it did in post-war farming. Nitrogen-based fertilizers and pesticides and herbicides, based on war technologies, created extremely high yield for farmers in the short term. But they became one of many middlemen in the supply chain that ultimately took profit margin away from farmers and drove down costs in a way that made it next to impossible to make a living. And they damaged our soils, our ecosystems, our water and the quality and nutrition of our food. Also, a lot of the early high yields were because the natural soil health was leveraged. Farmers needed more and more of the expensive chemicals and fertilizers to get the same results—they became trapped in a sort of addictive cycle.

EW

I see a parallel in the technologies restaurants are coming to depend upon. The early users have the most to gain, but could really lose in the long run. Like the old restaurant joke goes, “I’m losing money on every table, but I’m making it up on volume!” Our numbers do tend to work out over a certain threshold of sales; we have to have high enough sales to make money. But if we continue to give up our profit margin for the promise of sales volume, we will find ourselves in a precarious position of having lost our profitability and our autonomy. When sales drop, many restaurants will go out of business or have to drastically hack back their food and labor costs.

F&B EW

SHOULD A NEW RESTAURANT INCORPORATE THIS TECHNOLOGY? I would not. We take deliveries that customers place through those apps, although we might stop even doing that, but we are not signed up with any of them. There’s a real quality concern too, having a delivered meal be a customer’s first impression of your food. If the food shows up sloshed and depressed, the customer isn’t going to convert. I think restaurants, especially new restaurants, need to have total control of quality and first impressions. Delivery services do most restaurant food a disservice.

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F&B EW

F&B MAGAZINE

Q&A

DOES FOOD APPS BENEFITS THE CUSTOMER? They offer convenience. Convenience is nice. I love room service. I love pizza delivery. I love eating pizza in my jammies in bed, even. But there are costs to convenience that we all need to consider. While I absolutely appreciate the allure of these conveniences, customers need to realize they are choosing something that will change the business and the quality of food in America, and probably not for the better. Plus, this trend moves us more toward a culture of mindless eating—a trend we need to stop for the sake of our health. People are rushing through meals, more distracted on their phones than ever today. In order to achieve wellness, people need to carve out more time to eat and enjoy their food. This is just as important as what you’re eating, and I think many Americans are missing this piece, which I’m afraid more delivery and convenience will make worse, not better.

F&B

IN YOUR OPINION ARE THERE ANY APPS ON THE MARKET THAT YOU WOULD RECOMMEND? EW I think restaurant people need to band together and fill this demand for delivery themselves, in cooperatives that care about food and put restaurants first. Call me if you interested. J F&B FOOD AND BEVERAGE TRENDS TEND TO CHANGE, WHAT DO YOU SEE IN THE NEW YEAR? EW I hope people start talking about farming and sustainability again and the opposite of convenience for a while. F&B WHAT CELEBRITY YOU WOULD LOVE TO COOK FOR OR, HAVE COOKED FOR? EW He isn’t really a traditional celebrity but he is in my book: Wendell Berry! Or Louis CK who is my favorite comedian ever. F&B BEST THING ABOUT BEING A CHEF IS? EW I don’t really consider myself a chef in the traditional sense. But, we people who create good food get to nourish and delight hundreds of people every day. Eating is very emotional, and it can impact people in a really special way. Also, restaurant people are funny. I laugh really hard pretty much every day. Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


F&B EW

&B

F

EW F&B EW

53 F & B M A G A Z I N E Q&A HOW DO THE TERM GLUTEN-FREE, MAKE YOU FEEL? HOW DO THE TERM GLUTEN-FREE, MAKE YOU FEEL? Oh, a little sad. Our menu is almost entirely gluten free, so that is good. But I wish HOW DO THE TERM GLUTEN-FREE, MAKE YOU FEEL? Oh, a little sad. Our menu is almost entirely gluten free, so that is good. But I wish customers would focus more on what they can eat, and what is lovely and nutritious and Oh, a little sad. Our menu is almost entirely gluten free, so that is good. But I wish customers would focus more on what they can eat, and what is lovely and nutritious and nourishing, rather than so much on ingredients to be terrified of, to make taboo and customers would focus more on what they can eat, and what is lovely and nutritious and nourishing, rather than so much on ingredients to be terrified of, to make taboo and eliminate. I am the kind of person who, if you tell me I can’t have something, will crave and nourishing, rather than so much on ingredients to be terrified of, to make taboo and eliminate. I am the kind of person who, if you tell me I can’t have something, will crave and fixate on that very thing. So even if I want to avoid something for a while, I never give eliminate. I am the kind of person who, if you tell me I can’t have something, will crave and fixate on that very thing. So even if I want to avoid something for a while, I never give myself rules. I try to focus on the positive not the negative. That is part of the inspiration fixate on that very thing. So even if I want to avoid something for a while, I never give myself rules. I try to focus on the positive not the negative. That is part of the inspiration behind Vinaigrette—a healthy place that doesn’t make you feel deprived, or like eating well myself rules. I try to focus on the positive not the negative. That is part of the inspiration behind Vinaigrette—a healthy place that doesn’t make you feel deprived, or like eating well is a sacrifice. A more balanced approach. behind Vinaigrette—a healthy place that doesn’t make you feel deprived, or like eating well is a sacrifice. A more balanced approach. is a sacrifice. A more balanced approach. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE WITH ASPIRATIONS OF BECOMING A WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE WITH ASPIRATIONS OF BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL CHEF? WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE WITH ASPIRATIONS OF BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL CHEF? Work on a farm and learn to make compost. PROFESSIONAL CHEF? Work on a farm and learn to make compost. Work on a farm and learn to make compost. LASTLY, WHAT DO YOU TO WHEN RELAXING? LASTLY, WHAT DO YOU TO WHEN RELAXING? I read, make collages, garden, loaf around in my PJ’s, take naps and write. LASTLY, WHAT DO YOU TO WHEN RELAXING? I read, make collages, garden, loaf around in my PJ’s, take naps and write. Thank You, Chef Erin I read, make collages, garden, loaf around in my PJ’s, take naps and write.

Wade’s Vinaigrette opened its first location in 2008 in one of the hottest and fastest growing market segments of the restaurant industry. With three Vinaigrette locations, a retail store and two farms in her burgeoning and sustainably-minded enterprise, Wade has proven her ability to anticipate trends in consumer demand and society as they apply to food and eating. Her perspective on how her industry is changing and what the future may hold are backed by 15 years of close observation of food, farming and health. For More Information on Chef Erin Wade: By Clicking Here

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R E S TA U R A N T N E W S

Two iconic New York Restaurants join forces for the first time to kick off 2017 with the ultimate one-two punch (In sandwich form)!

This January, brace yourself for the most anticipated collaboration of the year, as two culinary powerhouses come together to create a total knock-out of a fried chicken sandwich: the Black and Blue, brought to you by Blue Ribbon Fried Chicken and NYC favorite Black Tap, known for their craft burgers and outrageous milkshakes that have become viral sensations. The first of Blue Ribbon Fried Chicken’s monthly sandwich series for 2017, the Black and Blue, coats Blue Ribbon’s fried chicken, this time buttermilk-dredged and, twice-breaded, in their housemade spicy oil, Nashville style, adds pickled cucumbers, and lays it all between two toasted buns slathered in Black Tap’s signature buttermilk-dill dressing. “You couldn’t ask for a better combination,” said Joe Isidori, the Michelin-starred chef/owner of Black Tap. “Blue Ribbon’s hot chicken with our buttermilk-dill dressing is an unforgettable mix of flavors – you’ve got to try it for yourself!”

Bite into this thrilling collaborative sandwich at both NYC and Las Vegas locations of Blue Ribbon Fried Chicken, throughout the month of January. The Black & Blue sandwich will also be available at all Black Tap locations for a limited time from January 2022, 2017. Blue Ribbon Fried Chicken NYC is located at 28 East First Street, New York, NY 10003 and is open 7 days a week from 11am – 2am. BRFC NYC welcomes guests on a walk-in basis.  For more information, please visit http://blueribbonfriedchicken.com/nyc-east-village/ or call 212.228.0404. Blue Ribbon Fried Chicken at Downtown Summerlin is located at 1770 Festival Plaza Drive – Suite 200, Las Vegas, NV 89135 and is open Sun – Thurs from 11am – 9pm and Fri – Sat from 11am – 10pm.  BRFC LV welcomes guests on a walk-in basis.  For more information, please visit http:// blueribbonfriedchicken.com/ las-vegas-summerlin/ or call 702.329.9300.

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017

Black Tap has three locations in NYC. The first is 529 Broome Street which is open Monday – Wednesday 11am12am, Thursday – Saturday 11am-1am, and Sunday 11am – 12 am. Black Tap Down is located beneath this location, and has the same hours. Their Meatpacking District location is at 248 West 14th Street, and is open Sunday – Wednesday from 12pm-11pm, and Thursday – Saturday 12pm – 1am. Black Tap’s newest space in Midtown is located at 136 West 55th street and is open Sunday – Wednesday from 12pm-11pm, and Thursday – Saturday 12pm – 1am. For more information, please visit


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INDUSTRY SUPPORTING

Presqu’ile Winery is happy to announce that

Photo by Mark Velasquez

it has raised $10,670 for the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County. For the entire month of November, Presqu’ile accepted donations to the Foodbank in lieu of wine tasting fees, with the goal of raising much-needed funds for the Foodbank during the critical holiday season. In addition to providing more than 440 complimentary tastings, Presqu’ile matched all donations dollar for dollar. The funds raised were presented to the Foodbank on Wednesday, December 7th by members of the Murphy family, the owners of Presqu’ile.   The Foodbank plays a critical role in the lives of many people in the Santa Barbara County community. In fact, one in four people in the county received food support last year from the Foodbank, with nearly half of those being children. In addition to giving out almost 10 million pounds of food last year, the non-profit Foodbank is a leader in the county, providing education and other resources to a network of hunger-relief charities and their communities. “The Foodbank does incredibly important work,” says Presqu’ile Cofounder and President Matt Murphy.

Darlene Chavez, development coordinator of Foodbank of Santa Barbara County, with Cameron Porter, Matt Murphy, and Amanda Murphy of Presqu’ile

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017

“Their efforts make a profound and meaningful difference in the lives of people in our community.”


THE COMMUNITY

“We are incredibly grateful to Presqu’ile Winery for this generous donation, and their commitment to their local community,” says Erik Talkin, CEO, Foodbank of Santa Barbara County. “Their contributions come at a critical time for the Foodbank, and will enable us to continue our mission to build a food secure community.” ABOUT PRESQU’ILE Located in the heart of Santa Barbara County’s Santa Maria Valley, Presqu’ile (pronounced pressKEEL) is a small, family-run winery dedicated to making exceptional cool-climate Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. Designed and planted to create a diverse tapestry of vineyard blocks, the sustainably certified, 73-acre Presqu’ile Vineyard features an array of clones, exposures and elevations. Made using this estate fruit, and grapes from a handful of the finest vineyards in the valley, Presqu’ile’s wines capture the essence of their vineyards and vintage, and have earned acclaim for their elegance and balance. For more information, visit www.presquilewine.com.   ABOUT FOODBANK The Foodbank of Santa Barbara County is transforming the health of Santa Barbara County by eliminating hunger and food insecurity through good

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nutrition and food literacy. The Foodbank provides nourishment and education through its award-winning programs and a network of over 300 member non-profit partners. In Santa Barbara County, one in four people receive food support from the Foodbank; over 146,198 unduplicated people of whom nearly 35% are children. Last year, the Foodbank distributed 10 million pounds of food — half of which was fresh produce. For more information, visit www.foodbanksbc.org.

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FRONT OF THE HOUSE

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


FRONT OF THE HOUSE

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FRONT OF THE HOUSE

Front of the House®: The Perfect Ingredient for Any Dish For nearly 15 years, Front of the House®, a Food & Beverage industry leading authority on tabletop trends, has been the main ingredient in millions of Perfectly Plated™ dishes worldwide. From appetizers to dessert, Front of the House® designs and manufactures the ideal serving solution for any occasion. Prior to the meal being served, it has to be artfully created in the kitchen. Front of the House® Kiln™ Ramekins, Mod® Pots, and Stainless Steel Harmony™ Bowls in Matte Brass and traditional stainless finish, are perfect vessels for your mise en place. They can also be used to serve sauces alongside your sweet and savory dishes. Organically-shaped Kiln™ Ramekins are made of durable, high temperature porcelain with a colorful reactive glaze making them available in five earthy colors; Leek, Blood Orange, Chili, Vanilla Bean, and Pepper. Mod® Pots, crafted in Front of the House’s® proprietary signature superwhite glaze, are an excellent way to eliminate clutter from any tabletop, bar, or buffet. Paired with Front of the House’s® Bamboo Mod® Pot Holders, they are a stylish tabletop and passed hors’ doeuvres serving solution for condiments, dressings, dipping sauces, and toppings. Stainless Steel Harmony™ Bowls in Matte Brass and traditional stainless finish are an innovative take on an otherwise traditional round bowl. These sleek bowls are double-walled, highly-durable, and commercial dishwasher safe. Kiln™ Ramekins, Mod® Pots, and Stainless Steel Harmony™ Bowls add a contemporary look of elegance to any tabletop and accent any many item taking it from drab to fab.

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


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FRONT OF THE HOUSE

CEVICHE’S PANAMANIAN RESTAURANT AND BAR WILMINGTON, NC

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


# P E R F E C T LY P L AT E D C H E F S

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Q&A with

Chef Edson Juarez F&B • WHY CHOOSE FOH DISHWARE? EJ • FOH dishware are high quality and has the chip warranty that

was important to us. And it provides the perfect backdrop for our food to stand on its own.

F&B • HOW IMPORTANT IS PRESENTATION? EJ • Presentation is very important because it like a unique signa-

ture of a chef and gives people an image of how the food will taste.

F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE WAY TO PLATE? EJ • My favorite way to plate is start with the sauce and stack upward with starch, veggies, protein, the the garnish

F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE LINE FROM FOH? EJ • We use the Tides super white porcelain line. F&B • DO YOU HAVE ANY PLATING TRICKS YOU CAN SHARE? EJ • Tongs are your friend, Be fast, and have confidence F&B • WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE THIS WAS YOUR CAREER PATH? EJ • I chose this career path when I started cooking and discovered

that food has deep meanings in different cultures and a friend of mine inspired me seeing his talent.

F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE INGREDIENT TO COOK WITH? EJ • My favorite ingredients are cumin, coriander, garlic, onion, and chilies

F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE WHITE WINE? FAVORITE RED? EJ • My go to red is Roscato Ross Dulce from Italy and pretty much any white wine but I love Cambria Chardonnay

F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE DESSERT? EJ • There is nothing better than a nice clean Lemon Sorbet.

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FRONT OF THE HOUSE

F&B • WHAT CELEBRITY YOU WOULD LOVE TO COOK DINNER FOR? EJ • I would love to cook for Enrique Olvera from Mexico City. F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE DESSERT? EJ • I would have to say bread pudding or gelato! F&B • CHEF WHOSE STYLE OF COOKING YOU REALLY DIG? EJ • Chef Grant Achatz who is chef and restaurant owner. He is known for his progressive cuisine and molecular gastronomy

F&B • BEST THING ABOUT BEING A CHEF IS? EJ • Best part of being a chef is being able to be creative and how a simple sauce can change the reaction of people when they first taste my food, it inspires me to create new things.

F&B • HOW DO THE TERM GLUTEN-FREE, MAKE YOU FEEL? EJ • I feel that the food will not taste as good if I modify it, however I do honor requests and it challenges me to think outside the “Bag of flour”.

F&B • EJ •

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE WITH ASPIRATIONS OF BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL CHEF?

The advice I would give an aspiring chef is keep working hard, follow your dream, and never forget where you came from.

F&B • LASTLY, WHAT DO YOU DO TO RELAX? EJ • I enjoy my down time spending it with my family.

ABOUT CHEF EDSON JUAREZ:

Chef Edson Juarez was born in Oaxaca, Mexico where all the best ingredients come from. He grew up cooking with his grandmother and mother where he learned to appreciate the comfort and love that delicious food can provide. Hunter Tiblier grew up in Panama, Central America, surfing, fishing, and picking mangoes at the bus stop on the way to school was inspired to bring fresh, healthy, Panamanian food to Wilmington after retiring from a 26 year career in the Army. Along with his new wife Laura, who is trained as a registered nurse, they took a big leap of faith and built a small vibrant tropical restaurant that feels like a mini vacation once you step inside. Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


# P E R F E C T LY P L AT E D C H E F S

Harmony Plate

Harmony Plate

Harmony Plate

Harmony Plate

Harmony Plate

Harmony Plate

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FRONT OF THE HOUSE

SUVICHE, MIAMI FL

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


# P E R F E C T LY P L AT E D C H E F S

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Q&A with

Chef Jaime Pesaque F&B • WHY CHOOSE FOH DISHWARE? JP • When selecting dishware we wanted to go with a line that

would provide great quality while still remaining cost efficient. We also found a styles that were a perfect match with the restaurants look and feel as well as ideal for the desired presentation of our food.

F&B • HOW IMPORTANT IS PRESENTATION? JP • For us, presentation is very important because it really affects

the customer’s perception of the food being served. When a dish is visually appealing, it truly adds to the dining experience and that’s what we hope to every time. Serve dishes that not only taste good, but also look good!

F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE WAY TO PLATE? JP • Clean, simple and in a way that is true to our style of cuisine. F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE LINE FROM FOH? The Ellipse Collection has to be one of my top picks – we use a JP • lot of these in our restaurants. F&B • DO YOU HAVE ANY PLATING TRICKS YOU CAN SHARE? JP • I don’t have any tricks, I just think less is better. But it is important to choose the right plate keeping the color of the food in mind.

F&B • WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE THIS WAS YOUR CAREER PATH? JP • I knew cooking was my calling since childhood, I don’t know what

I’d be doing if I weren’t a chef. My biggest inspiration was my cultural roots and passion for eating. It’s in my blood to create delicious food and I’m passionate about crafting beautiful flavor profiles and dishes.

F&B • WHO WAS YOUR GREATEST COOKING INFLUENCE? JP • There are two chefs who influenced me the most. First is Jack Benoit, who is French, but lived in Lima for 15 years and was one of my instructors. Also, in Spain there’s Joan Roca from El Celler de Can Roca, a three Michelin star restaurant where I worked for some time.

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FRONT OF THE HOUSE

F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE WHITE WINE? FAVORITE RED? JP • Any Italian dry wine is perfect for me. F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE INGREDIENT TO COOK WITH? JP • Aji Amarillo, fish and potatoes. F&B • WHAT CELEBRITY YOU WOULD LOVE TO COOK DINNER FOR? JP • Malala Yousafzai, she is a very inspiring person. F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE DESSERT? JP • Anything with chocolate, lucuma or bananas. F&B • CHEF WHOSE STYLE OF COOKING YOU REALLY DIG? JP • Brad Kilgore from Alter, he does an excellent job at everything he does and is one of my favorite chefs in Miami.

F&B • BEST THING ABOUT BEING A CHEF IS? JP• Having the opportunity to create something that people love, enjoy and brings them together!

F&B • HOW DO THE TERM GLUTEN-FREE, MAKE YOU FEEL? JP • We understand that some of our customers may have special dietary restrictions and we are happy that many of our menu items can be made gluten-free.

F&B • JP •

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE WITH ASPIRATIONS OF BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL CHEF?

If it’s your passion, stick to it, work hard and be open to learning as much as you can. It will pay off in the long run.

F&B • LASTLY, WHAT DO YOU DO TO RELAX? JP • I enjoy spending time with my family, especially my two daughters. ABOUT SUVICHE

Launched in 2010, SuViche is the perfect combination of Japanese and Peruvian cuisines. With four locations in Miami-Dade and Broward Counties including Wynwood, Brickell, Miami Beach and Las Olas, SuViche offers a variety of beautifully crafted and explosively flavorful sushi rolls, ceviche and sautéed Peruvian specialties. Two locations, Wynwood and Las Olas, are also home to the first Pisco Bars in South Florida featuring homemade Pisco infusions with fresh herbs, fruits and spices. Going beyond traditional recipes, SuViche provides fresh, fast and affordable cuisine. For more information, please visit www.suviche.com or call 954-656-3663 and follow SuViche on Facebook.com/suviche, on Twitter. com/suviche and Instagram.com/suviche. Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


# P E R F E C T LY P L AT E D C H E F S

Ellipse & Harmony Plate

Harmony Plate

Harmony Plate

Mod Platter

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Nouvelle Plate

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FRONT OF THE HOUSE

CRAFTKITCHEN CAFÉ & BAKERY, HENDERSON, NV

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


# P E R F E C T LY P L AT E D C H E F S

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Q&A with

Chef Jaret Blinn F&B • WHY CHOOSE FOH DISHWARE? JB • Ever Changing, FOH is always growing and improving. You can tell that they are staying on top of the market trends and creating their own trend..

F&B • HOW IMPORTANT IS PRESENTATION? JB • Extremely, guests first eat with their eyes. FOH plates do a great job of showing of any food presentation

F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE WAY TO PLATE? JB • I have always liked plating product on any white plate, the contrast of white and color allows the food to speak for itself.

F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE LINE FROM FOH? JB • Right now I really like the Harmony line F&B • DO YOU HAVE ANY PLATING TRICKS YOU CAN SHARE? JB • The good thing about FOH is they have plates for anything. From messy, to clean, straight lines, to components there is something for every style of chef.

F&B • WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE THIS WAS YOUR CAREER PATH? JB • Just loved cooking with family growing up. Some people grow up reading books, mine was reading a cook book.

F&B • WHO WAS YOUR GREATEST COOKING INFLUENCE? JB • Family...Just loved cooking with my parents and grandparents with Italian roots. Professionally, I have worked with so many great chefs. Just always being open to learn from each one of them has helped me grow.

F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE WHITE WINE? FAVORITE RED? JB • Now a days there are so many different variety so many good wines. I’m a huge fan of Pinot Noirs...well balanced that can go with many food options. Whites... Rieslings, not too dry with a bit a sweet and acidity are always tasty.

F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE INGREDIENT TO COOK WITH? JB • Sweet applications.. I have always loved vanilla beans and Stone fruits. Savory applications would include Spring vegetables of baby artichokes, spring peas, fava beans...

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FRONT OF THE HOUSE

F&B • WHAT CELEBRITY YOU WOULD LOVE TO COOK DINNER FOR? JB • Going back to my Bay Area Roots... I’d have to go with the greatest quarter back and wide receiver of all time. Joe Montana & Jerry Rice.

F&B • WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE DESSERT? JB • It sounds boring, but I like simple, and enjoy a great vanilla bean ice cream or gelato

F&B • CHEF WHOSE STYLE OF COOKING YOU REALLY DIG? JB • There are so many great chefs these days. Chefs are now able to showcase what they can do with the power of social media! I love my style and what I do, but I have so much respect for all chefs that grind it out in their own way!

F&B • BEST THING ABOUT BEING A CHEF IS? JB • The biggest reason why we opened CRAFTkitchen was so that I could just play and create food. Anything, anytime, whatever is in season!

F&B • HOW DO THE TERM GLUTEN-FREE, MAKE YOU FEEL? JB • Easy! Make something that tastes great!!! My wife developed a gluten

allergy so we take it very seriously. You can create really great tasting food if you just spend the time to make it from scratch or use creative substitutions. We want all our guests to the same experience no matter if they have any food allergies.

F&B • JB •

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE WITH ASPIRATIONS OF BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL CHEF?

It’s going to be a grind! The time & commitment that you spend putting in, is what your going to get out of it. You just know if you have a passion and palette for food. The more you learn and move around the quicker you will develop. This is one of the best industries to ex-

F&B • LASTLY, WHAT DO YOU DO TO RELAX? JB • It’s all about FAMILY... I love being around my kids and whatever they

want to do. I coach my kids club baseball, and play various sports with him at home. I cook, bake and create with my daughter who is curious about food and art. That all makes me happy.

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017


# P E R F E C T LY P L AT E D C H E F S

Square Mod (R) Saucer & Cup

ROOT (R) Board

Round Harmony Plate

ROOT (R) Board

Harmony Bento (TM) Duo Plate & Slanted Cup

Square Mod (R) Plate

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ABOUT CHEF JARET BLINN

CRAFTkitchen’s Jaret Blinn lives by the golden rule of eats: feed people how you would want to be fed. An awarded pastry chef with nearly two decades of experience at renowned high-end resorts everywhere from the Ritz Carlton’s in Maui to San Francisco to The Famed Le Cirque / Circo at the Bellagio and Red Rock Casino & Hotel in Las Vegas. Jaret eventually decided to take his favorite leap of faith yet, leaving the Five-Diamond world that built him behind in order to follow his true passion: creating a kitchen of his own where he was free to do one thing–play. In 2015, CRAFTkitchen was born out of Jaret’s desire to provide his community dishes full of personality in a space that never takes itself too seriously–one chockfull of energy, life and growling stomachs.

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TRENDS 2017

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INDUSTRY NEWS

BUILDING ON SUCCESS OF ACME MARKETS PARTNERSHIP

ROSATI ICE EXPANDS MARKET TO POPULAR SUPERMARKET CHAINS ACROSS THE COUNTRY

Sam soon became known as “The King of Water Ice,” having his popular ices sold from horse drawn wagons throughout the city and at the New Jersey shore. Rosati Ice, celebrating its 105th year as an innovator in the Italian ice industry, will partner with supermarket chain Acme Markets for a fifth straight year. With this partnership, Rosati will continue marketing their widely popular 2 quart party pail in Acme stores during the summer months.  The Rosati Party Pails will be available in Classic Cherry, Classic Rainbow (cherry, lemon, and blue raspberry), Mango, and Root Beer flavors, as well as the strawberry lemonade flavor, “American Hero Ice.”  In addition, Acme offers Rosati Ice onthe-go with 10 ounce Italian ice cups, complete with a wooden spoon included under the lid. https://blacktapnyc.com/ or call 917.639.3089.

The success seen in Acme stores has allowed Rosati Ice to expand to other chains so that more customers can experience their delicious Italian ice. East Coast-based Weis Supermarkets sells the popular 2 quart pails during the summer months, while Whole Foods stores in the southern United States keep their stores stocked with Coconut Water Ice, Coconut Water Ice with Pineapple, and Coconut Water Ice with Mango, available in 10 ounce cups.  The three new flavors, all made with natural and healthy coconut water, will also be available in Acme Markets.  The expansion marks a turn in the Italian ice industry, as products are now more readily available at retail locations as opposed to standalone scoop shops.

Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017

As Rosati expands to more stores in different parts of the country, so does the appeal of the product’s unique “scoopability” feature. Unlike other Italian ices, Rosati Ice products do not freeze when they are stored in the same freezers as ice cream when sold at retail.  Rosati V.P. of Great Taste, Al Everetts, created a new formulation that would make Rosati products’ texture manageable and enjoyable, even when stored at colder temperatures.  With this new formula, Rosati Ice can be stored for longer periods of time, allowing customers to enjoy their favorite flavors for longer.  All of Rosati Ice products are made with natural sugar, unlike many Italian ice companies that use high fructose corn syrup in their recipes.


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Since being introduced in 2014, the 2 quart party pail has been a popular product, as customers value the savings and convenience that the scoopable product provides. “When we first began our partnership with Acme, we were selling 4 quart pails, and they just weren’t convenient for our customers to bring with them to social gatherings, the beach, and other summertime activities,” said Rich Trotter, president of Rosati Ice. “Acme got behind our idea for the smaller party pails, and the success we have seen with the product has allowed the market for it to expand,” said Trotter.   Rosati Ice was founded in 1912 by Sam Rosati, an Italian immigrant who made his first Italian ices cranked by hand in the basement of his West Philadelphia home.  The company grew and Sam soon became known as “The King of Water Ice,” having his popular ices sold from horse drawn wagons throughout the city and at the New Jersey shore.  In the mid 50’s, the company moved to its current headquarters in Clifton Heights, PA and management was taken over by Sam’s daughter Rosemary and her husband Jim Salomone.  In 1997, the company was sold to their son-in-law, Dave Schumacher and Rich Trotter, its current owner.  The company is America’s oldest Italian Ice manufacturer.

Rosati Ice’s headquarters and manufacturing plant are located at: 201 East Madison Avenue in Clifton Heights, PA 19018 Telephone: 610.626.1818     Email: info@rosatiice.com Website: www.rosatiice.com    Facebook: facebook.com/rosatiice

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Food & Beverage Magazine |January 2017

Food & Beverage Magazine January 2017  

2017 TRENDS: Creation To Consumption Cover Story: Organic Valley-Grassmilk Yogurt 2017 Industry Promotions and Appointments Upcoming Events,...

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