Page 1

APRIL 2017

COMPLIMENTARY

the PROJECT issue


FROM THE EDITOR DESIGN&LIVING

I can do that PHOTO BY J. Alan Paul Photography

...ha.

love antique stores, boutiques and especially any shopping experience that can immerse us in handcrafted or repurposed treasures. In a fast-paced world driven by technology, there is just something extraordinary about the idea of taking time to handstitch a pillow or breathe new life into an abandoned antique. Let me stress the word, "idea." I didn't say that I actually do these things. In fact, I'm one of those people that routinely says things like, "I can do that," or "That would be easy to make." After visiting with multiple makers, I've come to realize that I am not the only one that commits this irritating, verbal crime. For every craft show or handmade festival these artisans sell their work at, they have to endure hundreds of people chattering about how easy their work must be and how they absolutely could also make that. After experiencing the process of varied artisans over the past three years, I have finally resolved to

10

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

admit that no, I will probably never make, repurpose, stitch or chalk paint that. Okay, maybe I will attempt a handful of these projects. I might even finish one or two, but if I'm being honest with myself, I don't remember the last time I had even four to six hours to devote to one singular project outside of work and raising a family. In one of my interviews last year, a woman who repurposes furniture summed it up quite well. As she explained it, those same people making boisterous comments about how they'll easily tackle that project often don't realize what it takes to create the finished product. She had spent years collecting and testing out the right tools and materials to complete her projects, eventually surrendering her entire backyard as a workshop and storage area for building material. To find interesting pieces, she spent nearly half her year scouting out salvageable material with her family in tow, and the other half of the year cleaning, sanding, painting and building her creations, from scratch. Beyond that, many of these makers' projects require ample time, a certain skill-set as well as artistic ability. The good news is that anything is possible if

we're willing to learn, have the time to devote to it and truly appreciate the process as much as the end product. Someday, maybe in retirement I'll fulfill all of my repurposed dreams. I might even learn how to sew on that highly intimidating sewing machine my mom gifted me years ago. Not to worry though, I plan to prioritize. I'll start with learning to fix the hems on my dress pants versus throwing them away. Stitching my own curtains and decorative pillows will just have to wait. As always, thank you for your wonderful story ideas, feedback and support over the past few years. This is one more issue we couldn't wait to debut to our readers, filled to the brim with local talent we loved writing about. Sincerely,

TRACY NICHOLSON Associate Publisher/ Editor tracy@spotlightmediafargo.com


2017

CONTENTS DESIGN&LIVING

APRIL

FEATURES

36

THE PROJECT ISSUE

Makers get ready to make. If you have daily dreams of making someone else's trash your repurposed treasure or have spent your days pining over Pinterest, this issue is tailor-made for you. We've gathered a few local pros to share the tricks of their trade and see the projects that will make us want to create. Meet the people behind the projects and see what inspired these local trendsetters to become experts in floral arrangements, repurposed furniture, fabric, antiques and wood design.

39

FAVORING FOCAL POINTS

Just like an airplane needs a runway to land, so do our eyes when we walk into a room. This month, Maria Bosak of Eco Chic Boutique showed us how to create a focal point using a rustic wood wall.

45

SAY HELLO TO GRACE 1972

Meet husband and wife duo, Audra and Matthew Mehl, co-owners of Grace 1972. Though she balances Grace 1972 with her career in software license and consulting sales, Audra Mehl has had a passion for decorating ever since she could remember.

61

ARTISANAL ILLUSIONS

Tom Kemmer of Kemmco is emerging as the area's first three-dimensional wall artist. We took a tour of his Fargo shop and he introduced us to an astonishing sight.

73

DIY FLORAL ARRANGMENT

This month, Love Always Floral opened their doors to us for an exclusive workshop with owner and whimsical joy-bringer, Christy Tehven. In this article, we'll share what we've learned about designing floral arrangements for your home.

ON THE COVER This month, we invite you to pull up a chair and page through our project issue. Our cover proudly features The White House Co.shop and one of their wonderful wall displays. Photography by J. Alan Paul Photography

14

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

79

WELCOMING THE WHITE HOUSE CO.

The White House Girls have been bringing vintage flair to the FM area with their furniture rental business for the past two years. See inside their recently opened store nestled in the heart of Downtown Fargo.

95

REUPHOLSTER AND RENEW

Kristi Sailer of Horace, North Dakota, has mastered the lost art of sewing. Now she uses her expertise to breathe new life into old furniture.

103

DIY MAXIMIZING SMALL SPACES

We may pass through the entryways and halls of our houses countless times per day, but we often neglect to decorate them. See how Katie Sullivan has transformed these transitional spaces in her own home using a faux-wainscoting technique.

123

DIY DESIGN WITH TREVER HILL

Using products from only local stores and DIYers, designer Trever Hill staged rooms inside the historic Union Storage building in Downtown Fargo. Hill then broke each room down piece by piece, giving us three looks anyone can replicate at home.

UPCOMING ISSUE Next month, we'll take to the streets and local boutiques to find the latest decor to help our readers spring into summer. This will be one shopping issue you won't want to miss.


DESIGN& LIVING APRIL 2017 Design & Living Magazine is a free publication distributed 12 times a year. Our mission is to showcase all that the Red River Valley has to offer in terms of interior design, architecture and landscaping, profiling the people that make these possible. We also strive to provide a quality and fun reading experience and improve the way of life in our community. The publication is mailed to homes across the US and has stand distribution throughout North Dakota and Minnesota. PUBLISHER

Spotlight Media LLC

PRESIDENT

Mike Dragosavich

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER ASSISTANT EDITOR

Andrew Jason Tracy Nicholson Becca Opp

DESIGN/LAYOUT

Sarah Geiger, Matt Anderson, Ryan Koehler

CONTRIBUTORS

Maria Bosak, Tyrone Leslie, HBA of F-M, Katie Sullivan, Trever Hill, Becca Opp, Tracy Nicholson

COPY EDITORS WEB EDITOR ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS OPERATIONS MANAGER SALES MANAGER MARKETING/SALES

SOCIAL MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHY

DELIVERY

Erica Rapp, Andrew Jason, Becca Opp, Tracy Nicholson Samantha Stark Nicole Houseal Heather Hemingway

Layne Hanson Tracy Nicholson, Paul Hoefer, Tank McNamara, Jenny Johnson, Luke Albers Becca Opp, Tracy Nicholson, Samantha Stark Paul Flessland, J. Alan Paul Photography, Maria Bosak, Morgan Schleif, Northern Stories, Katie Sullivan, Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique, Thomas Rex Kemmer, Dan Francis Photography, Alan Kasin at Notion Media, renderings provided by Lux Communities Mitch Rapp, Hal Ecker, Nolan Kaml

Design & Living Magazine is published by Spotlight Media, LLC. Copyright 2017 Design & Living Magazine & designandlivingmagazine.com. All rights reserved. No parts of this periodical may be reproduced or distributed without written permission of Design & Living Magazine and Spotlight Media, LLC is not responsible for, and expressly disclaims all liability for, damages of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance on such information. Spotlight Media, LLC accepts no liability for the accuracy of statements made by the advertisers.

Spotlightmedia ADVERTISING: 701-478-SPOT (7768) spotlightmediafargo.com Send change of address information and other correspondence to: Spotlight Media Inc. 15 Broadway N. Suite 500, Fargo, ND 58102 or info@spotlightmediafargo.com


MEET THE TEAM

TANK

SAM

20

MIKE

LAYNE

ETHAN

ANDREW

NATE

PAUL

NICOLE

JOE

ERICA

BECCA

SARAH

RYAN

HEATHER

RYLEE

JENNY

PAUL

JESSE

BRADY

MATT

TRACY

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

LUKE

Meet Spotlight Media's Other Magazines

CEO Convos: Ryan Fritz In a wide-ranging second installment Fargo INC!'s CEO Convos, Office Sign Company CEO Ryan Fritz dishes on everything from why he still cleans the toilets to decision fatigue to why he wants his company to be a "yardstick of quality."

of

The Rise What completes a team? Is it the coach? Maybe it's the star player or the bench players, thriving in their one or two specialties. Some would say it's the underclassmen. The young athletes who bring energy whenever called upon. That's what the April issue is all about. The rising stars in the Bison program who are destined to define the NDSU program.

Style + Shopping For April's issue, Fargo Monthly shopped local. Browse through more than 120 items found at local shops and boutiques and get some inspiration for refreshing your wardrobe or staying up-to-date with unique gadgets and trends. Look no further, because the FargoMoorhead shopping scene has got your back, just like your favorite jacket.

Learn more about Spotlight Media at spotlightmediafargo.com


CONTRIBUTORS DESIGN&LIVING

MEET OUR CONTRIBUTORS At Design & Living, our goal is to create a publication that is just as much fun to read as it is to view. Here are the writers and contributors who so affably use their time and talents to tell a story and give our pages purpose.

MARIA

KATIE

TYRONE

TREVER

BECCA

Contributor Maria Bosak is the owner and creator of Eco Chic Boutique, which has retail locations in Fargo and Bismarck. Bosak is the founder of Junk Market, a twice-a-year, two-day event featuring the best in repurposed furniture, vintage finds and unique handmade products in the Upper Midwest. She is highly sought-after for her expertise in painted furniture, vintage design and entrepreneurship. Bosak loves combing garage sales, auctions, estate sales and flea markets to find that unique piece that brings joy to your home without breaking the bank.

Katie Sullivan is a freelance writer with a passion for interior design. She writes about the rewards and challenges of decorating and customizing her family’s first home on her lifestyle website, prettydomesticated.com. Her formal training in journalism at the University of Minnesota, combined with her husband Daren’s carpentry skills, results in dynamic DIY content for their website’s readers. Katie’s work has been published by various media outlets, including the St. Paul Pioneer Press and Scary Mommy. Connect with her on Facebook at Pretty Domesticated and on Instagram at PrettyDomesticated.

Tyrone Leslie founded Heritage Homes in 1995. It is a custom residential homebuilding company serving the FM metro and lakes areas. He serves as the Home Builders Association of Fargo-Moorhead’s president this year. He is also a director on boards for the North Dakota Association of Builders and National Association of Home Builders.

Trever Hill has been the owner of Trever Hill Design in Fargo since 2009. He was also the Specialty Shop Manager of Scheels Home & Hardware. Hill works on both residential and commercial projects around the FM and lakes areas. He has been a valuable contributor and an award winning designer nominated in various local polls. Hill was recently awarded 'Best Interior Decorator' in Design & Living's People's Choice Awards in 2016.

Becca Opp is the Assistant Editor of Design and Living Magazine, where she writes print and social media content. Opp graduated with a degree in English Education with an emphasis in communications from NDSU. On the weekends, she is also a Content Strategist for Others, a fair trade boutique in Downtown Fargo. When she is not writing about other people's homes, Opp is busy renovating her own apartment inside of a 114-year-old house.

BOSAK

24

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

SULLIVAN

LESLIE

HILL

OPP


HBA EDITORIAL DESIGN&LIVING By Tyrone Leslie, HBA President, Heritage Homes

Shiplap, barn doors, gourmet kitchens It's all in the details at the Spring Parade of Homes

Tyrone Leslie founded Heritage Homes in 1995; it is a custom residential homebuilding company serving the FM metro and lakes areas.

Photography by Nathan Stang, In-House Advertising The home will be one of four luxurious featured homes on the Parade, for which the cost is $5 to tour. The home was built by Designer Homes of Fargo-Moorhead. Proceeds from the featured homes benefit Home Builders Care of F-M Foundation.

S

The HBA of FM promotes an environment in which members and their businesses can prosper.

pring is finally here, and our countdown begins for the Parade of Homes! With over 90 entries, this year's 57th annual event is one of the largest ever. We've also expanded it to three weekends, April 22-23, 28-30 and May 5-7, giving you more options to tour all of the beautiful homes showcased by this event.

You can explore the Parade three ways: 1. Browse paradefm.com: This eventdedicated website allows you to research the builders, see the map, view the homes, photos and renderings and search by city, number of bedrooms, number of bathrooms or minimum square feet. You can also get tickets and access information like event FAQs, copyright details and what goes into earning professional designations that many of our builders have. 2. Download the mobile app: This is all of the information from the Parade magazine and website for your pocket. You can browse information on each home. Plus, it can help you navigate from house to house, search by price range and make notes on your favorites.

30

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

3. Pick up an event magazine: For those who like flipping pages and unfolding a map, Parade of Homes magazines detailing each home entry will be at all Hornbacher’s stores April 17-May 7. The magazine is a full-color publication with a half page dedicated to each home entry. Homes are represented in full color, with 3D renderings. The homes listed are in numerical order from west to east. The magazine includes a detailed pull-out map to each Parade entry, as well as a condensed listing of all homes entered in the event sorted by price and builder. Parade attendees should register for their free general admission ticket or purchase their luxurious featured homes ticket at paradefm.com or through the app. Remember: admission is free to tour the majority of our homes (luxurious featured homes cost $5). Simply register to attend

the event and print out your ticket with a QR code or have it available on your mobile device, when you enter the homes. The Spring Parade of Homes has four luxurious featured homes priced at $750,000 and above that raise funds for Home Builders Care of F-M Foundation, the HBA of F-M's charity. Pay $5 to view all four homes by Carpenter Homes, Designer Homes of Fargo-Moorhead, Fargo Modern Homes and Heritage Homes. Home Builders Care Foundation is dedicated to showing that home builders care about our community by awarding scholarships to local students interested in the construction trades and working on projects that support housing in the area. We hope you have a great time touring homes to see everything that our industry has to offer.

For more information, contact: hbafm.com info@hbafm.com facebook.com/ HBAFargoMoorhead twitter.com/hbafm Blog: homebuildersassociation. areavoices.com


36

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


The

PROJECT ISSUE Makers get ready to make. If you have daily dreams of making someone else's trash your repurposed treasure or spend your days pining over Pinterest, this issue is tailormade for you. We've gathered a few local pros to share the tricks of their trade and see the projects that keep them craving new creations. Meet the people behind the projects and see what inspired these local trendsetters to become experts in floral arrangements, repurposed furniture, fabric, antiques and wood design.

37


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

Favoring FOCAL POINTS Have you ever walked into a room and felt immediately uncomfortable or scattered in that space? On the contrary, have you ever walked into a space and immediately felt at ease? I believe the reason for these feelings is the use (or lack thereof) of focal points in design. Just like an airplane needs a runway to land, so do our eyes.

BY MARIA BOSAK | PHOTOS BY MORGAN SCHLEIF

39


??? DESIGN THE PROJECT &LIVINGISSUE DESIGN &LIVING

after before

This month, we tackled this problem in my Fargo store called Eco Chic Boutique. When I would walk in the front door of the store I began to feel as if there wasn’t an attractive focal point, so we created a rustic wood wall on the far side of the store to not only be the backdrop for a beautiful linen couch but also to draw the customer's eyes across the store. It was amazing how this one change transformed the entire space. Let me walk you through the simple steps that I used to achieve this beautiful focal point.

Materials Used

• Black latex paint • Paint roller • Tung and groove pine boards • 1x3 Pine boards • Dark Wax By Annie Sloan • Lint free cotton cloths • Nail gun • Miter saw • Level

Cost $115

40

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

Total Time on Job

We spread the job out over two days. The first day was two hours of staining the boards and the second day we spent three hours completing the wall.

Disclaimer

Before we get started, let me first state that I am by no means a finishing carpenter. My methods are simple steps I’ve taught myself and I’m sure there are other ways to get this job done that a finishing carpenter would use, but I want to encourage you to try a project like this in your home. I think you will find it rewarding and you'd save yourself some money, but please always use safety and caution when working with electrical or plumbing. Since this project didn’t involve either, I decided to give it a shot myself.


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

step by step focal wall

1.

Put one coat of black paint on the wall and let it dry. This helps to camouflage any areas where you may see through cracks or knot holes in the wood.

2.

Stain and seal your wood. I prefer to use Dark Wax by Annie Sloan, but you can use a traditional stain and polyurethane if you wish. I like the simplicity of wax, because it binds into the grain of the wood and dries quickly, so you can handle the boards immediately after applying the wax. Note We decided to flip the boards and use the back side of the boards for a more rustic look. The back of the boards are rougher and grab the wax, creating a darker and more textured effect.

3.

Measure your wall and cut your boards. Since I decided to run the boards vertically for a little more interest and was working with 8-foot boards and 10-foot ceilings, I cut a stack of 2-foot boards to finish each run. This left a seam two feet off the floor that I later covered with overlaying trim to add definition to the wall and hide the seam. Note If you wish to lay the boards horizontally and leave the end seams visible, you would just cut three to four various sizes of boards and decide on a pattern, then repeat this pattern and lay your wood boards like bricks so your seams don’t stack on each other and are separated by a few other boards. This consistent and spaced out pattern will keep your wall from looking messy.

42

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

4.

Check the square of your wall using your level or a carpenter’s square. If you find that your wall is not square, make a slight adjustment with your very first board to square the wall. Nail the top of your first board and then hinge it until it is square before you nail the bottom. There may be a slight gap at the wall but this can be covered later by the trim board.

Speaking of focal points, here are a few other examples we used in different rooms at our house as we’ve remodeled this past year.

5.

Nail your boards to the wall. In this case, I started left to right, working with the upper 8-foot boards. I would stop every fourth board and check to make sure they were still square from top to bottom. If there was any adjustment needed, I would nail the top of the board and hinge to the right as needed to bring it back into square. This is where the black paint you applied comes into play. If you left a thin separation between boards it won’t be obvious because of the dark wall. Once all the 8-foot top boards were in place, I continued in the same manner with the shorter boards along the floor.

Black French Doors: When someone pulls up to your house, is there a striking focal point for their eyes to gaze upon?

Black Four Poster Bed: Your focal point can be furniture as in the case of this black four poster bed in our guest bedroom.

Dark Mantle: Using contrast in color and materials is always helpful when creating a focal point.

Bathroom Floor Tile: Focal points don’t always have to be up. Sometimes you can use the floor as a foundational focal point.

6.

Trimming out your wall. Using larger one-by-three boards that you stained in the same manner as your tongue and groove pine boards, trim the edges of your wall and over any seams. If you wish to overlay a few corner cross bars for interest I think you will be surprised how much it adds to a wall. This simple detail will add a ton of interest.

7.

Celebrate! I'm a sucker for simple changes with big results. After completion, I stood with the Eco Chic team members that helped me with the wall and we simply took in the new view. We’ve done these kind of changes dozen of times with paint and decor, and every time we are amazed at the transformation. Then we popped some party poppers just for fun. We worked hard. We earned it. We may have even celebrated with a tasty dessert. That sounds like us.

Want to connect with Maria? Maria Bosak Eco Chic Boutique maria@ILoveEcoChic.com 701-356-6600 You can also follow the #farmhouseproject on Instagram @ecochicboutique

43


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

Say Hello to GRACE 1972 When opening the door to Grace 1972, it's hard to say if you are walking into in a shop that sells repurposed furniture and decor or a gluten-free bakery. The answer is both–or rather, you are standing in a store that is half Grace 1972 and half Mehl's Gluten-Free Bakery, both run by the Mehl family. While Mehl's Gluten Free Bakery is owned by by the Mehl Brothers, Grace 1972 is owned by married couple Matthew and Audra Mehl.

BY BECCA OPP | PHOTOS BY PAUL FLESSLAND

45


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

Meet Audra Mehl: saleswoman, mother to three and the mind behind Grace 1972. Though she has a successful career in software license and consulting sales, Audra Mehl has had a passion for decorating ever since she could remember. Audra Mehl recalled her childhood, which she spent rearranging the living room furniture while her mother was away at work. Matthew Mehl takes care of day-to-day operations in the store so that Audra Mehl can continue her current career and express her creativity through Grace 1972.

46

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

The concept of Grace 1972 started with the intention of having a small cabinet in the corner of her husband's bakery selling products from her blog, but it soon grew into something bigger. Open since February 6, 2017, Grace 1972 features vintage and repurposed pieces, some made by local artisans and others sourced from all over the United States.

For example, one of Audra Mehl's vendors is a nurse who makes farmhouse signs on the weekends. "I really wanted Grace 1972 to be a place for local artists to showcase their work," Audra Mehl said. "You find that artists aren't typically people who do that for their livelihood. I want this to be lucrative for my vendors, so I buy their pieces outright."


Though she only has a handful of vendors, Audra Mehl didn't have a hard time finding inventory for Grace 1972. "I've naturally gravitated toward people who are likeminded with similar interests," Audra Mehl said.

Audra Mehl even has a picker who brings primitive pieces all the way from New England and the southern United States.


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

Naming the Store

"Everything has a story and has history," Audra said, standing beneath old windmill blades turned wall art. Even the name Grace 1972 has a story. When Audra Mehl realized her dream of opening a home decor store, she struggled to come up with a name that felt right. Finally, she chose a name that honors both her husband and her mother. "Grace" is a word that helped Audra and Matthew Mehl reconcile their marriage in 2015, which you can read more about on her blog. Meanwhile, 1972 is a reminder of how Audra's mother, a pretty "towngirl" who married a farmer, was living in a trailer in the middle of a dirt field with a baby on her hip in the year 1972. Audra's mother now lives in a blue farmhouse on the same land, sewing pillows for Grace 1972.

For more information, please contact: Grace 1972 Audra and Matthew Mehl @grace1972design 1404 33rd St. S. Unit H, Fargo You can also follow Grace 1972 on Instagram at @_grace_1972_ and read Audra's blog at audramehl.net.

49


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

Meet the MEHLS Audra & Matthew Mehl Home Tour After showing us around Grace 1972, Audra and Matthew Mehl invited us over to their house and you guessed it, their home was just as gorgeous as the store. However, Audra Mehl wasn't always in love with the 1990s split-level. This crafty couple told us about their projects as well as when and why they asked for help. Audra and Matthew are experienced DIYers. Before they bought their current home, the Mehls flipped one house and renovated a 5,000-square-foot home on the Wild Rice River. You can read more about the Flip House and River House on Audra's blog, audramehl.net. Now the Mehls live in a split-level in South Fargo, which they have dubbed The Lighthouse because of all of the natural light from the south facing windows.

BY BECCA OPP | PHOTOS BY PAUL FLESSLAND

51


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

Living Room In the living room, Audra Mehl chalk-painted the fireplace, which used to also be oak. She then distressed the paint to achieve a farmhouse chic look. That's not all the Mehls have in mind for the fireplace, though. Audra and Matthew Mehl have found a piece of reclaimed wood from Dakota Timber Company that they are going to use in place of the mantle. They are also planning to replace the mirror above the fireplace with a shiplap or reclaimed wood feature. For another update, Audra Mehl ordered light fixtures from wayfair.com and Matthew Mehl installed them himself.

52

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

54

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


Kitchen In the kitchen, Audra and Matthew Mehl made the decision to have the cabinets painted by a professional based on their past experience in the River House, in which they spent 40 hours painting the cabinets. This time the Mehls hired Rick Van Dyke Painting to refinish the kitchen cabinets in the Lighthouse while Scott Johnson Painting did the trim. Audra and Matthew Mehl then added wrought iron pulls to the drawers and cabinet doors to give them a farmhouse look. Also in the kitchen is a table that Audra Mehl purchased years ago from Conlin's Furniture, which her husband recently refinished. Audra Mehl also put a new coat of paint on the chairs. "I actually asked her if she would give me permission to take a crack at it, and I said that if she didn't like it we would go table shopping," Matthew Mehl said. "I wanted to give it a lot more character, so I worked it with a sander. I used the outdoor version spar urethane–it's meant to handle moisture if there's a spill. You'll never find a table quite like this now because we've both put our own personal touches on it."


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

Parlor Off the kitchen is a parlor, which leads to Audra Mehl's office. One of the Mehl's favorite pieces in the parlor is a cabinet from Gathered that the couple had originally planned to display in the store. Instead, the Mehls liked it so much that they decided to use it in their home.

56

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

58

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

"DIY RUNS IN THE FAMILY," Matthew Mel laughed.

Office The office is Audra Mehl's girl nest. "This is where I spend my days," she said. In the room is a repurposed crib that Audra Mehl's grandmother transformed into seating. Audra Mehl gestured toward the vintage piece, "This was my grandpa's crib when he was a little boy, and my mom slept in it, and I took a nap or two in it as well."

59


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

Artisanal ILLUSIONS Tom Kemmer of Kemmco Combining his love of art, music, skateboarding and woodworking, Tom Kemmer of Kemmco is quickly making a name for himself as one of the area's first three-dimensional wall and furniture artists. Breaking the mold from a popular reclaimed wood wall trend, Kemmer takes his unusual practice of patterns and elevates them to new heights with walls that captivate the eye. Inside his Fargo shop, Kemmer took us on a tour of his latest furniture pieces and patterned wood art, then introduced us to an astonishing sight just beyond the shop's walls.

BY TRACY NICHOLSON | PHOTOS BY J. ALAN PAUL PHOTOGRAPHY AND TOM KEMMER

61


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

The last time we stopped by the new Dakota Timber Co. shop in Fargo, we noticed an an intriguing design, something we'd never encountered in the hundreds of homes we've toured. Within the new showroom's space was the most mesmerizing, reclaimed wood wall with a three-dimensional cube-like pattern. Always curious on the latest design trends, we had to find out just who had built this incredible wall and exactly how they built it. Owner Seth Carlson directed us to Tom Kemmer of Kemmco. Newer to the business, Kemmer moved back to the area just five years ago after a stint living in the Twin Cities and most recently in the woods of Pine River.

Skateboard Inspired

Finding inspiration in the woods, Kemmer started building retro-style cruiser skateboards five years ago while living amongst the trees. "That just kind of progressed," said Kemmer. "My dad was a flooring contractor and so I would come back here and work with him and go back out to the woods. I was doing this back and forth trying to resist moving home," laughed Kemmer. Life in the woods for Kemmer meant hunting, fishing and smoking meat. "We did a lot of foraging, there's a lot of edible mushrooms out there. We had a nice section of land on the Pine River and did whatever suited our fancy," said Kemmer. These days, Kemmer has planted his roots in Fargo with his partner and their two children.

Once an art and photography student at MSUM, Kemmer has strong roots in music and skateboarding as well. However, it wasn't until he crafted his own skateboard just a few years ago that he decided on his current calling of handcrafted furniture and reclaimed wood walls. His knowledge of art and symmetry combined with his past flooring experience proved to be the perfect combination for creation.

62

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


Creative Collaborations

This past year, Kemmer focused his attention on woodworking. With his dad now retired, he segments his time between reclaimed wood flooring and walls through Dakota Timber Co. and creating custom furniture pieces in his shop. Today, people contact him for virtually anything that requires woodworking with a little more creative expertise. "People call up and present ideas for furniture or flooring and we'll usually do a few sketches based on the conversation," said Kemmer.

These days Kemmer will build and install most anything when it comes to wood. "We do a lot of floors, furniture, bars, mantels, barn doors, case and base, along with some general contracting. I like collaborating, that's one of the most exciting aspects of this," said Kemmer. "When somebody tries to convey an image to you with words and you get to bring your take on it. It's really organic, you get to bounce ideas off of each other. It reminds me of school, when you sit down and brainstorm and try to come up with something and make it the best it can be." "I love problem-solving with furniture because there's tons of problems," explained Kemmer. "How are we going to get this in the house? What if we made all the legs to come off and they were all the same plate so they could be interchangeable? We figure it out and work through them."


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

Reclaimed wood wall with three-dimensional, cube elements at Dakota Timber Co. in Fargo

Wall Illusions

When Dakota Timber Co. asked Kemmer to install a reclaimed wood wall, they had no idea how it would soon take on a life of its own. Originally planning on doing a more typical white-washed wood wall, the idea just didn't seem novel enough for this new space. "We thought it might be too boring, but he wanted a clean design, so I said, 'Let me sketch some stuff out' and I researched geometric patterns and played around with them in here, making little swatches to figure out the angles and what our process would be," explained Kemmer. "There was going to be a feature piece in the middle, but we decided to ditch that because it would be too distracting. We wanted the pattern to kind of take you. When you do that repetition and keep that consistency and your eyes aren't able to focus on one thing, that's

when it really gets three-dimensional," said Kemmer. "We incorporated more of what we did at Wild Bill's (Sports Saloon) at the top where it breaks apart and deteriorates into various lines and cubes. It's kind of like Tetris, where the pieces just fall into place. I wish it was that easy. It's particularly difficult when it gets to the borders, then all your angles go crazy and it's a lot more time consuming." For the Dakota Timber Co. wall, Kemmer worked three full days on it with a helper for two. "To put it into perspective, a more typical wall that size, if we were just doing a horizontal pattern, would take me about five hours by myself," said Kemmer. With this game changing design a success, Kemmer is itching to try out one of his many other patterned and three-dimensional ideas. Now he's just waiting for the next adventurous client that will give him the go-ahead.

Breaking the Mold

"My main idea with that wall was, let's break the mold. 99 percent of these are done horizontal, they're not mixing palettes, they're doing burly and really one kind of style. I could probably put up a horizontal wall in my sleep," said Kemmer. "From working in the cities, I am definitely used to clients that aren't afraid of trying something new. I'm starting to see that more in this area. One of my clients here had me do an 18-foot fireplace surround for, the owner really thinks outside of the box. She used a white, a grey and a dark in hers. It almost has an eight-bit video game feel to it, with segmented lines. We did the corners in metal with old square-head bolts and floating shelves. "

65


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

With a few other high-profile projects under his belt like his work at The Sanctuary and Wild Bill's Sports Saloon, Kemmer is quickly becoming unanimous with creative spins on typical designs.

Wild Bill's Sports Saloon became his first abstract wall design project using reclaimed wood in various textures and colors. "That wall was completely free-form. She gave me one reference photo, it looked like a bedroom and it was just kind of beams and layering of wood in different depths, very three-dimensional," said Kemmer. "I told her I couldn't do it exactly like this, but I could do what's in my head, a slightly different version of that."

Mobile wet bar at The Sanctuary Events Center in Downtown Fargo

For the wall at Wild Bill's, Kemmer was given three kinds of wood to work with, a white-washed, grey and dark brown. "Because I've always been intrigued with the lines of circuit boards and circuitry, if you look at the Wild Bill's wall, you go in the there and follow the pattern and it kind of leads you through the whole thing, with lots of triangles too," said Kemmer. "For this one, I had been watching a lot of Ancient Aliens and I think the idea of Illuminati, the pyramid with they eye was mimicked in this using a wood knot that was cut in a triangle. I like to feel it out as a go."

Artful Appreciation

Having worked in the construction industry for most of his life, Kemmer can tell you that his focus now comes with a certain amount gratification. "I can't say I enjoyed flooring as much as what I'm doing now. There's awesome floors and you can do some really cool stuff with them, but 90 percent of them are the same old thing and people don't really care. You're just a guy crawling around on their floor," said Kemmer. "When you build a piece of furniture for them, it's just a different outcome. Their mind explodes and they're wickedly grateful, and it makes you feel better at the end of the day. It's great to know that they appreciate it. I like variety–I like to know that I'm not going to go to work everyday and do the exact same thing, that I'm going to get challenged." "One person brought in a giant grainery door and she wanted a dining room table made out of it. Every summer on the farm she had to white-wash that door, and now they're tearing it down, so she wanted to do something with it," said Kemmer. "Those kind of projects are awesome, it's got history that's personal to them and to her family. You take this big chunk of wood and two months later you have this modern-rustic dining table. Then I did a simpler design for a bench and a couple other end-tables for her siblings." 66

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

Reclaimed wood wall with three-dimensional elements at Wild Bill's Sports Saloon in Fargo


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

Showing us the array of steel legs in his wood shop, Kemmer said the idea behind them is that they're all interchangeable and can be used with any type of top.

Modern Design versus Traditional Technique

This summer Kemmer has plans to start working on traditional woodworking techniques with a focus on mid century modern furniture. "This is kind of a melding of modern and rustic in some ways. I play a lot with steel and work on mid-century type of furniture and cabinetry and meld it all together," said Kemmer.

Shop Art

Whenever Kemmer finds himself lacking inspiration, he takes a look around his shop and searches for his next great pattern. "When I'm in here and I'm sick of doing whatever I'm working on and I'm cutting a piece of wood and I see repetition or pattern, I'm attracted to that," said Kemmer. "So these laminate cuts, I started shaving a bunch off and you see this repeating pattern, so I do quick, little assemblages, little art pieces that get your mind off the real project. It kind of gives me a break and lets me come back to what I'm supposed to be doing."

68

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

Embracing Imperfections Getting Leggy

Referencing a piece of wood from down south, Kemmer explains that this is this finger-like growth of wood at the base that inspired a series of leg designs. This particular leg design was fabricated for his palm tree tables. "The idea was that they would possibly be plant stands or small end tables," said Kemmer.

While showing us his eclectic selection, Kemmer pointed out wood with origins from the Globe Mill in Superior, Wisconsin. "When Seth at Dakota Timber Co. first started out, he was just down the road from us and he was getting a lot of this at the time. It's pretty cool because it's all cribbing," said Kemmer. "You've probably seen the sections around town where they stack same size boards, nail it together, start with a 2x12, then go to a 2x10 every four feet or so. This wood kind of had a design that looked like the bottom of a river from all of the grain that washed down it. It also has really cool colors from grain and rust wear."


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

Modern Design versus Traditional Methods

"All the people I've met, places I've traveled, it opened up a wide world that encompassed art, music and everything else. That's skateboarding's fault," laughed Kemmer. Last Summer, he spent time in London working on a film, but his travels to Japan a few years back were his favorite. "It's just such a culture shock. I'd like to go back and befriend carpenters there, they do woodworking on a totally different level. I've been watching a lot of YouTube videos and traditional carpentry, getting away from the power tools. We live in a society that wants their project done now, a lot of that artisan work takes much more time. With traditional methods, it can take three months to build a rocking chair, but you'll never have to buy another one and it will get passed down through the generations."

Hawk's Nest

Having visited countless shops and studios, we thought we'd seen it all. After a quick jaunt through the wood shop, Kemmer led us upstairs to show us a unique space hidden behind the wall, but well-known by those who matter the most to him. Kemmer created the Hawk's Nest, an indoor skatepark that hosts The Fargo Skateboarding Cooperative, which was founded in 2011. "I lived in Minneapolis-St. Paul for about ten years playing music and making art, and there's a couple places like this in the cities and I was lucky enough to be part of that," said Kemmer. "So, when I moved back I decided I wanted to do that here."

70

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

Kemmer and the co-op have hosted fundraisers called the Clean Skate Project, where artists from Fargo to Minneapolis contribute their time to designing and painting old skateboards that were raffled off to benefit the co-op's operational costs.

Peering over the ledge of the upstairs loft, we were left gaping at the massive skatepark Kemmer had hand-built and designed over six months. As we left the loft area and headed down another staircase, we stood at the bottom of the skatepark where we were able to take in the full expanse of his custom creation. Upstairs, Kemmer, a prior MSUM art and photography student is also working on creating more office space for his business as well as a printmaking and music studio. Kemmer has been a drummer in multiple bands, but claims his most successful venture was with a band called The Danforths, comprised of all MSUM students.

For more information, contact: Kemmco 302b 39th st N, Fargo 651-402-2061 kemmco@gmail.com Or search Kemmco on Facebook


71


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

diy FLORAL ARRANGEMENT A Workshop with Christy Tehven of Love Always Floral Christy Tehven is known for bringing joy to her customers at Love Always Floral. This month, Design & Living Magazine wandered into her shop for a special tutorial on how to make a floral centerpiece that would add a dash of romance to any home decor. Now we'd like to share her advice, from us to you. BY BECCA OPP | PHOTOS BY PAUL FLESSLAND

73


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

Ingredients from left to right: Baby Eucalyptus, Pink Lisianthus, Pink Ginesta, Tess Garden Rose, Dusty Miller, Silver Dollar Eucalyptus, White Hydrangea

step one

Gather the Ingredients Much like a chef who finds joy in baking pastries, Tehven referred to the components of our floral arrangement as ingredients. For this particular piece, we used two different types of eucalyptus and dusty miller as our greens. For our blooms, we used white hydrangeas, tea garden roses and pink lisianthus. We also used pink ginesta as a filler.

74

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

For our arrangement, Tehven chose a vase that bells out because it allows the greens to sit naturally. However, she said, "You can use any vase at home. I think the best part of floral design is that there are no rules, which is unique to our style at Love Always Floral."


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

step two

Prep and prune "Any time you get hard greens or florals to work with they never come in the way that you want them to use, so you have to prune off the bottoms because you never want leaves in your vase."

"Clip the ends of your stems to keep them healthy. Always cut long, so if they sit too high you can keep cutting."

75


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

step three

step four

Add the Blooms Arrange the Greens and Filler "We like to mix greens. I think the most underutilized part of a floral arrangement is the greenery, and that creates your foundation and your whimsy. Sometimes I like to focus on one side and build it up for an asymmetrical look. Only use the greens you need, and set some off to the side for later."

76

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

"For the blooms, start with the hydrangea because that's what all the other flowers are going to live around. I usually put it off to the side in the front. For the filler, I like to use a smaller, textured flower off to the side. Next, I'll take our garden roses and place them before I cut to see what it will look like. I like to arrange them in groups so it's not polka dotted, working from the largest blooms like hydrangea, to the smallest like the lisianthus."


step five

Add a Little Something Extra "I always recommend designing a front and then working your way back. At the end, take some greens to fill out the rest of the vase."

For more information or to set up a private floral design lesson, contact: Christy Tehven Love Always Floral hello@lovealwaysfloral.com 701-205-8710 You can also follow Love Always Floral on Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram.


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

The Girls Katie Schiltz, Samantha Klinkhammer and Amanda Rydell are all three co-owners of The White House Co.

Welcoming THE WHITE HOUSE GIRLS The White House Girls have been bringing vintage flair to the FM area for the past two years. You might know them as a furniture rental bsuiness for special events, but they have recently opened a store. Nestled between Twenty Below Coffee and Love Always Floral, The White House Co. has found a home in the heart of Downtown Fargo.

BY BECCA OPP | PHOTOS BY J. ALAN PAUL PHOTOGRAPHY AND NORTHERN STORIES

79


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

The Space

The girls have been talking about opening a store in Fargo for a couple of years, but they were waiting for the perfect space to open up. Like a true thrifter, Schiltz said, "When we found this spot and Christy Tehven of Love Always Floral, we weren't going to let her out of our sight."

Sisters Schiltz and Klinkhammer have been dealing vintage dĂŠcor in some shape or form since 2011. Back then, the sisters held flea markets at their parent's farm, which is where the White House moniker comes from.

Rydell joined the party in 2015. She first became acquainted with the sisters via social media because of their mutual appreciation for each other's aesthetic.

81


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

The Antiques

The White House Co. is home to an assortment of vintage furniture and antique dĂŠcor. When talking about the store, Rydell, Klinkhammer and Schiltz described it as a cross between West Elm and Anthropologie, but with locally sourced products.

On The White House Co. side of the wall, Schiltz's husband installed brick that looks as if it was original to the building. Then, the trio refinished the original hardwood floors themselves.

Though the White House Co. is chalk-full of rare finds, the store has a price point for everyone. For example, one of their high-end items is a large metal filing cabinet, while smaller items like vintage prints would be accessible for a wide variety of customers.

The White House Co. shares a partial wall with their neighbor, Love Always Floral. Because both The White House Co. and Love Always Floral often work with brides and grooms, this arrangement made for the perfect marriage.

83


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

Every week Schiltz, Klinkhammer, and Rydell restock inventory and restyle the store. Having spent years collecting furniture and dĂŠcor for the store, the three have warehouses full of things to chose from.

The Business

The store hours are Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or by appointment. This allows for Schiltz, Klinkhammer and Rydell to continue their furniture rental business and to thrift for new inventory on the side.

As they prepared to open the store, The White House Girls looked toward other local business owners as mentors. "There are so many inspiring small businesses in Fargo, such as Ashley from Unglued, Roxanne and Connie from Modern Textiles, Ashley from Aendee or Maria from Eco Chic—she was a huge one. We were like, if they can do this, we can do it," Schiltz said.

For more information, please contact: The White House Co. 14 Roberts St. N, Fargo thewhitehouseco.com @thewhitehouseco 701 866-7531 You can also follow the White House Co. on Instagram @whitehouse.co and find them on Facebook by searching The White House Co.

84

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

For the Love of F.A.R.M. When you go to the Fargo Antiques and Repurposed Market, you'll feel like a kid in the candy shop, and not just because they sell old fashioned candy. With two locations and over 100 vendors, you won't believe the selection that F.A.R.M. has to offer. BY BECCA OPP | PHOTOS BY PAUL FLESSLAND

87


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

F.A.R.M. is co-owned by business partners and cousins Kris Johnson and Kristi Bixby. While the Fargo location is operated by Johnson, Bixby is in charge of the location in Moorhead. The Fargo F.A.R.M. location is a warehouse full of stalls to explore. This consignment store not only offers antiques and repurposed furniture, but what truly sets them apart is that they salvage as much as they can from farmsteads and other old buildings scheduled to be torn down. From wood trim to clawfoot tubs, these fragments of historic houses might have been lost if not for F.A.R.M. "We got most of the wood from a farmstead," Johnson explained. "We got a call and they said, 'We're going to burn the house down. If you want some of this stuff, come out and get it,' so we pulled out the trim, sideboards, doors and even columns, and this was all just going to be burned to the ground." "That's one thing we like to do, is rescue stuff like that, and then we resell it...A lot of people that buy it are redoing an old house and they need something that matches what's in there, and you can't buy a lot of that now," Johnson said.

This 1960s doll house was modeled after a North Dakota farmstead and has been donated to F.A.R.M. for display purposes only.

"I just ran into a guy who came in that said he has 20 farmsteads that are wanting to be torn down, and he just doesn't know what to do with all of it. We're working with him now to try to expand this area."

89


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

Another thing that makes F.A.R.M. unique is the claybased paint that they sell. Unlike chalk paint, claybased paint takes a long time to dry out. However, the end result of the clay paint closely resembles that of chalk paint. The clay-based paints come in a variety of colors. "We can do almost any color in the rainbow. If we don't have the color here, we usually can get it within 24 to 48 hours. We just send them an order and they will overnight it to us," Johnson said. "We can get it in the eight or 28-ounce or we can even get the gallons if you are doing a bigger project." Cottage Paints is based out of Minneapolis and their slogan is, "No stripping, sanding or primer needed." "Make sure that it's cleaned and dry and then you can paint," Johnson recommended. Cottage Paints offers a natural alternative to beeswax, which is often used as a varnish. Though beeswax produces a beautiful effect, the application process can be very time consuming. This alternative gives a similar look and feel in a fraction of the time. Cottage Paints are also available in flat and satin, and their many glazes can be used to create a variety of finishes. F.A.R.M. vendor Kelly Smiler has used Cottage Paints and had good things to say about their antiquing glaze. "I actually have started working with the antiquing glaze, and I absolutely love it. I will not use Dark Wax again. I can control the glaze so much more than I can control the Dark Wax." 90

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

Though they've been open for a year and a half, F.A.R.M. is still one of the best-kept secrets in Fargo-Moorhead. Many customers are drawn to F.A.R.M. by word of mouth. However, they also have a growing social media presence that has been an effective way to get the word out about F.A.R.M.

92

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


For more information, please contact: F.A.R.M. - Fargo Antiques and Repurposed Market Fargo Location 5258 51st Ave. S. Fargo 701-356-9199 thefarmantiques@yahoo.com Moorhead Location: 420 Center Ave., Moorhead 218-303-1742 fmantiques@cableone.net You can Find them on Facebook by searching Fargo Antiques & Repurposed Market Or FM Antiques & Repurposed Market


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

REUPHOLSTER and RENEW Fabric Fashionista Kristi Sailer What many consider a lost art, Kristi Sailer of Horace, North Dakota, has mastered. Sewing gorgeous pillows and repurposing furniture for the past 20 years, Sailer's talents have become a hot commodity at a time when the words hand-stitched and homemade sound like music to our ears. We'll take you inside her rural studio to see where her meticulous craft of sewing meshes seamlessly with repurposing. BY TRACY NICHOLSON | PHOTOS BY PAUL FLESSLAND AND ADDITIONAL PHOTOS PROVIDED BY BURLAP RUSTIC CHIC BOUTIQUE

95


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

With television shows such as "Fixer Upper" and an entire network devoted to DIY, an interest in all things repurposed has spread like wildfire. Many antique stores now offer booth spaces for selling repurposed items and stores like Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique sell handcrafted items likes Sailer's linen pillows. Though some claim this to be a recent decorating trend, people like Kristi Sailer know that this trend has not simply appeared, but evolved.

Stitch by Stitch

Sailer grew up watching her mom and aunt sew clothing for the family, teaching her the basics of sewing. After college, Sailer branched out into home decor sewing when it was not a trend, but born out of a necessity to create things in a more cost efficient way. For Sailer, her story began with a friend asking for help with her new baby's nursery. After the project was completed, the friend suggested Sailer create a career out of it. Finishing school and expecting her first child, Sailer decided to give this path a chance if it meant being able to stay home and raise her children. The years to come would mean working long hours sewing and repurposing furniture late into the night after her kids were asleep. This would become a career path that never felt like work. "It feeds my creative," said Sailer. "Every day is different for me and I'm never working on the same thing, which I really like."

96

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


Four years ago, Sailer and her family moved from Downtown Fargo to their rural home in Horace, where she now has a basement studio. Half of her space is devoted to repurposing furniture while the other half is inhabited by sewing machines, walls of fabric, pillows, thread and buttons. "I usually have a fabric or upholstery piece that I'm working on and some painted pieces at the same time," said Sailer. To keep the process moving seamlessly, Sailer rotates between projects to allow for paint to dry and fabric to arrive.


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

Pioneering the Process

Her love of repurposing furniture came along with her love of antiques. "We once owned an old home so we were always picking up furniture," said Sailer. "Part of it was that I enjoyed doing it and part of it was that it was more economical to fix and repair, re-stain and refinish things ourselves. I'm a sucker for old-style furniture, especially if you can take an old piece, maybe a family member's, repurpose it and use it in your home. If it's still around, it's probably well made."

Much of Sailer's decorating, sewing and upholstery skills were self-taught, although she did do a short apprenticeship for upholstery. To learn how to make slip-covers, Sailer accepted the challenge given by a friend who wanted one made for a wingback chair she had just purchased. "I told her, 'If you buy the fabric, I'll make the slip-cover.' So, it started with trial and error," said Sailer. "Most fabric isn't very expensive so you can try something and if you don't like it, just like paint, you can do it over again."

Fabric Frenzy

Searching out the best fabrics begins online for Sailer. She once relied on Mill End Textiles, but since it's closing, these days, she prefers to shop online or travel to Minneapolis for the best selections. "Right now. I'm working with a lot of twills and linens with the trend of white on white that comes from (HGTV's "Fixer Upper") Joanna Gaines," said Sailer. "But, I like the old brocades, tone on tones, especially with older furniture pieces. Burlap is really fun to work with just because it's a utility type fabric, but it's a neat texture and there are a lot of ways that people are using it now that it wasn't intended to be used for. It's just a really cool fabric and it's super cheap."

99


As far as linen goes, Sailer thinks this trend is here to stay because of its timeless and classic appeal. "You're never going to go wrong with linen drapes and slipcovers, especially in the lakes area," said Sailer. "I think slipcovers in twills and linens, anything washable is so practical. I don't think this trend is going anywhere. But, I also see a return to more traditional, maybe less greys and more color in fabrics and furniture." The pillows Sailer makes are sold at Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique in South Fargo and are always a highquality, synthetic-down pillow form that you can't find elsewhere locally. "It's a wholesale dealer that I use, so it's a much nicer pillow than what you'll find at fabric stores," explained Sailer.

Sewing Stash

Her studio employs an antique refrigerator cabinet with refashioned drawers Sailer found at a local antique shop. Each drawer is designated to accommodate an array of thread options, zippers, buttons and various other sewing necessities.


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

With a decline in the number of people who have sewing abilities, Sailer's craft is nearing status as a lost art. "Even with the apprenticeship I did on upholstery, just to find somebody that was doing it and willing to share was not easy," said Sailer. To those interested, Sailer recommends trying basic upholstery classes at Mac's in Fargo, books or online tutorials.

Seamless Success

DIY Advice

If you want advice from Sailer, she will tell you to buy only what you love and recreate it to fit your space. "These chairs were an Ethan Allen chair in a cherry finish," Sailer explains, pointing at the painting side of her studio. "Most people wouldn't even consider them because they were outdated, but they're rock-solid chairs and the design is funky and cool. Nobody was going to give them a second look with that cherry finish, but if you do a more modern and updated finish, all that furniture is reusable." Sailer explains that some furniture pieces are just more difficult, but if you're a DIYer and really want to try something with not much experience she encourages it. "Start on something easy like a dining room chair cushion. There won't be much to tear down or put back together," said Sailer. "What's nice about starting with a chair is that you'll learn a lot by taking it apart. Having the right tools are essential, too. A lot of people, if it's a first-time project, don't know what tools to use."

Sailer admits that there are rules to decorating and fabric, but for a successful project, buyers just need to remember that it's their space and they should do what they love. "Sometimes you find something that you love and you might not have a purpose for it right away, but you might find that along the way." As she gives us the quick tour of her kitchen, it's obvious that Sailer lives what she says. The rules of her design are just as she pleases, made out of any material that she finds beautiful–mixed metals, repurposed materials and beautiful antiques. Business has definitely picked up for Sailer, not only because of her high-quality finished products, but also due to the change in times. Many of the known upholsterers in town are retiring, and her craft has become even more of a rarity. "There's a lot of talent in this town. Even when you see what's at Burlap and what people can do, it's not just the physical skill that these people have, it's the intellectual creativity that comes into as well," said Sailer. "I do it because I love it. It's just part of me. I'm just lucky that I get to do a job that I love and it doesn't feel like work every day. Anybody can try things. It can be a self-taught skill, you just have to learn along the way."

Find Sailer's work: Most of the work Sailer does is custom work for clients on referrals. She manages these by appointment and usually goes on-site to the homes to gauge the extent of the project. Her hand-sewn pillows and repurposed furniture can be found at Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique in South Fargo. Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique 3401 University Dr. South, Fargo 701-566-8176 burlapboutique@cableone.net For more information, contact: Kristi Sailer 701-361-7047 kris000@cableone.net

1 01


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

diy MAXIMIZING SMALL SPACES We often pass over the smaller or transitional areas of our house, such as halls and entries, in favor of decorating rooms, seeing them only as utilitarian. Get me where I want to be, hallway! Take my coat, entry! But a nicely-decorated hallway and entry are like the right pair of shoes. The rooms of your house might look great independently, but without something pulling it all together your house may come across as unfocused or incomplete. A well-designed hallway and entry are the finishing touches that pull a home together. Most of us don’t have the huge entries and wide halls we see in magazines. My entry certainly couldn’t fit a sophisticated round table and my hall is just wide enough to walk down. Let’s be honest, seeing pictures of elaborate homes with perfect décor is intimidating. It may seem like you can’t get the look in your own home unless you have oodles of space. Don’t let a lack of square feet get in the way of greatness. Sophisticated, and dare I say grand, transitional areas are within reach, no matter how small the space.

BY KATIE SULLIVAN | PHOTOS BY PAUL FLESSLAND

103


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

think architectural My favorite way to add edge without taking up valuable space is to take to the walls. Small spaces can handle drama, particularly architectural drama, and my favorite way to add impact is wainscoting. It can be traditional, modern, country or quirky. Besides its ability to adapt to a range of styles, molding helps protect high traffic areas from unwanted scuffs. Our household is all about compromise, so our wainscoting of choice is a mix of modern and traditional. Plus, we don’t like things to get too complicated, so we skipped a few of the traditional steps, like adding paneling, in favor of creating a more faux wainscot look. The easier the better in our book.

10 4

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

How we installed our wainscoting

before

after 1.

Determine Height. Decide what height you want the wainscoting. We went with about one-third of the way up the wall.

2.

Refinish Walls To Be Flat. If your wall texture is already flat. If so, you can skip this step, the mess and the sore arm muscles and move on to step three. However, if it is textured like ours, keep reading.

3.

Add The Chair Rail. We used liquid nails to adhere our chair rail to the wall. Then we used a finishing nailer to secure the molding to the studs.

Throw some plaster onto the bottom portion of your wall. We used wallboard joint compound and applied it with a 12-inch taping knife. After it dried, we sanded the wall smooth with a sanding sponge. Repeat as needed. Our walls are pretty heavily textured. It took three applications.

4.

Mock Up The Picture Frame Molding. We used painters tape to mock up a few options, eventually settling on about 4-inch spacing between, above and below each frame.

GET THE LOOK

5.

Install The Picture Frames. Using the tape as a guide, we measured twice and cut once. Okay you caught us, sometimes we cut more than once, but to minimize waste, make sure you measure carefully. We made 45-degree miter cuts so the pieces could be nailed into place like a picture frame.

Butterfly art – Pheromone Christopher Marley from McNeal & Friends

106

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

6.

Touch Up The Walls And Then Paint. We touched up the wall texture as needed and filled the nail holes with wood filler. Then slapped on three coats of white paint. For a more details on how we installed the molding visit prettydomesticated.com


THE PROJECT ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

Decorating a small entry When space is limited and you need the area to be functional, it is more important than ever to edit your selections. While it’s okay to have a few purely decorative items to add character, in our case it’s a tree, the majority of your selections should be practical.

before

after 108

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

tip Expand with Mirrors. Mirrors visually double the width of your space. Plus, having a mirror on hand to double check your appearance as you rush out the door isn’t a terrible idea.

tip Go Bold. Pick a dramatic paint color or wallpaper, or simply paint your front door a bright color.

tip No entry? Carve one out. Is your entry so small that you don’t even have one? Find a corner or wall space near the door and add a mirror, and bench or narrow console table. Voila! You have an entry!

While I would have loved to have a console table, due to the galley layout of my entry, it wasn’t in the cards. Decorative items would have been falling off the table constantly. Instead, we opted for a custom bench by Grain Designs. It’s stylish, modern and most importantly functional. It’s a comfortable place to take off your shoes.

GET THE LOOK

Wall Color – Sherwin-Williams Agreeable Gray Wainscot – Sherwin-Williams Simply White Door – Sherwin-Williams Waterfall Overhead Light – Pottery Barn Bench – Custom by Grain Designs Rug – vintagerugshop.com Yellow Pillow – Room & Board Black & White Pillow – Target Fur throw – Hobby Lobby Mirror – McNeal & Friends Plant – Fiddle leaf fig from Bachman’s Planter – Modernism Case Study Planter. Available at Room & Board Hooks – Pottery Barn

111


DESIGN&LIVING THE PROJECT ISSUE

step 5

Frames – Custom at Michael’s, Pottery Barn, West Elm and Room & Board.

Arranging a gallery wall Wainscoting on its own may not be enough to liven up a narrow hall. Get a perfect gallery wall without poking a bunch of holes in the wall by planning ahead. 1. Curate an array of items. This could include kids'

sketches, professional art, personal photographs, etc. The options are unlimited, but make them diverse.

2. Keep things simple and pick a color scheme. Our selections are mostly pastel.

3. Matching mats make the display look collected,

not chaotic. However, it’s okay to mix in a few matless designs.

4. White frames are always a safe choice. Mix in a few

For more information, contact: Katie Sullivan hello@prettydomesticated.com

5. Test drive your layout. Cut out paper into the

Connect with me on social media Facebook - @ Pretty Domesticated Instagram - @PrettyDomesticated

metal or wood frames to keep things from getting too boring.

dimensions of each piece and tape the mock-ups onto the wall. Leave a few inches between each frame and keep adjusting the layout until satisfied.

6. Get hanging!

For details on where to get the decor featured and for more in-depth tutorials, visit my blog at prettydomesticated.com.

113


RENTAL DESIGN&LIVING

114

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


DESIGN&LIVING RENTAL

Q&A with

THE RETREAT

AT URBAN PLAINS

Escape the ordinary and take a tour through Lux Communities' new luxury condos, The Retreat at Urban Plains. Donna Block, Lux Communities Vice President of Operations, answered our questions about this unique, upscale living experience. By Becca Opp Profile photo by Paul Flessland, interior and exterior photo by Dan Francis Photography, wide shot of living area by Alan Kasin at Notion Media, renderings provided by Lux Communities

115


RENTAL DESIGN&LIVING

The Retreat at Urban Plains will offer efficiencies as well as one, two and threebedroom apartments and townhouse rentals thanks to Enclave Development, the developer and general contractor for this project. These units range from 600 square feet to nearly 2,000 square feet and will offer residents beautiful views of Urban Plains pond as well as private decks.

Q: What was the initial vision for these apartments?

A: "The vision for Retreat at Urban Plains was, as the name suggests, to create a retreat for people to come home to every night. Residents will enjoy a free coffee bar, fitness room, billiards and game den, outdoor fire pit, pet-friendly apartments, art-filled

116

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


hallways, underground heated parking and high-style and professionally designed interiors of the common areas. "This is way more than an apartment. It’s an inspiring place to call home. In the end, we wanted to create a for rent environment, an experience, secondto-none in our region. We think we hit the mark at The Retreat."

The location for The Retreat at Urban Plains is along an upcoming Fargo Parks lazy stream, playgrounds, green space, gazebos and other outdoor entertainment. These outdoor amenities are surrounded by retail and restaurant options, the Sanford Family Wellness Center, SCHEELS Arena and the new Sanford Hospital. "It’s one of the best locations for upscale, maintenance-free rental living in the FM Area," Block said.


RENTAL DESIGN&LIVING

Q: What features make these apartments upscale?

A: "The Retreat features underground heated parking year-round. The interior finishes were carefully chosen to wow. Each apartment features granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, tile bathrooms, tile backsplashes in the kitchens, washer

118

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

and dryer hookups or in-unit washer and dryers, central air and free, highspeed internet. "T.L. Stroh Architects and Interiors tackled the interior design. They are locally famous for many high-end condominium projects downtown, as well as upscale homes and office buildings."


RENTAL DESIGN&LIVING

Q: How many units are currently filled and how many are still available?

A: "Since we just finished our third phase of this project. We still have a variety of floor plans available. Whether someone is looking for a townhouse rental, an efficiency or one bedroom, or a two or three bedroom, we can help them get settled in at The Retreat."

120

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

For more information, please contact: The Retreat at Urban Plains 5000 28th Ave. S. #213, Fargo 701-478-4314 livewithlux.com


DIY DESIGN

DESIGN&LIVING DIY DESIGN

BY Tracy Nicholson and Trever Hill PHOTOS BY J. Alan Paul Photography

T

o keep in line with this issue's project theme, designer Trever Hill went on a DIY design mission. Hill shows our readers how to pull together a room using local stores and a little design savvy know-how. To showcase the final designs, he staged each room inside the historic Union Storage building in Downtown Fargo and broke down every accent piece to show how to build and create a truly finished look anyone can replicate. TRICKS OF THE TRADE

"I often hear from people they don't know which stores carry which trends. The trick is, every store has something that can fit into the trend or style of your home," said Hill. "You can see how I demonstrate this through all of these vignettes. There's at least one item from each store."

SHOP AROUND

"I wanted to do these room settings so people could really see how varied the items are that I use for each design," explained Hill. "They come from all different local stores, but it still looks like a unified design. I personally love finding different pieces at numerous stores. Every store has something unique to offer." Hill frequents many smaller boutiques such as O'Day CachĂŠ in Downtown Fargo to find globally-inspired items that are brought back from overseas. "Some of the other stores I love, like McNeal & Friends and Eco Chic Boutique, are also smaller boutiques, but they have a keen eye when shopping at market so their stores are filled with unique and exclusive items," said Hill. "Stores like these generally have a specific look and items that are unique to their store, which is why boutiques are a popular place to search out great statement pieces. People that shop at these boutiques can find items specifically made to achieve the look they have grown to love." 123


DIY DESIGN DESIGN&LIVING REDEFINING YOUR SEARCH

If you're on the search to refresh your style, Hill suggests keeping an open mind and shopping around, even at stores you might not think fit your style or the latest trends. "Many products are interchangeable in a variety of spaces, styles and trends," said Hill. "For example, some 'farmhouse' items can be used in a 'global' or 'neoclassical' space and still work perfectly." Hill also recommended mixing in high-end pieces with more affordable pieces to balance your budget. These high-end pieces will help set the tone for the room, and the rest can then be achieved in a more cost efficient fashion.

DIY

LIVING ROOM

"This globally-inspired room uses cultural inspiration from all over. The indigenous patterns mixed with pieces found all over the world make this space cozy, relaxing and eclectic," said Hill.

Sofa Room & Board, $1,499

Wicker chairs McNeal & Friends, $374

Antique chest coffee table O'Day Caché, $480

Fiddle Lead Fig tree Furniture Mart, $429

Hayden side table HOM Furniture, $229

Spotlight floor lamp HOM Furniture, $299

Wooden horse HomeGoods, $39.99

Ellen Degeneres rug in Global Living Vignette McNeal & Friends, $925

Grey/Ivory pillow Eco Chic Boutique, $99

Fringed linen pillow McNeal & Friends, $45

Glass jug and Myrtle greens McNeal & Friends Jug $66, greens $14

Basket and throw HomeGoods, Both $24.99

Clay smash bank O'Day Caché, $5

Metal watering jug O'Day Caché, $129

124

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


DESIGNDESIGN &LIVING &LIVING DIY DESIGN STORE

125


DIY DESIGN DESIGN&LIVING

126

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


DESIGN&LIVING DIY DESIGN

DIY

DINING ROOM

"The twist on a neoclassical dining space is timeless and full of glamour," said Hill. "From the Hobnail accents to the mirrored buffet, this space doesn't fall short of a highend feel. The place setting is a great example of using cost effective items with high-end pieces. The plates and glassware are from the dollar store, while the beautiful blush vase on top of the plate is imported from Europe."

Brindleton area rug HOM Furniture, $479

Round dining table McNeal & Friends, $1,496

Ghost chair HomeGoods, $69

Small mirrored buffet HomeGoods, $199

Hobnail plates and glassware Dollar Tree, $1

Blush sphere vase and Botanica McNeal & Friends, V$22, B$3

Pink Floral Centerpiece HomeGoods, $24.99

Pink Mercury Glass Votives O'Day CachĂŠ, $7-$10

Greenery in vase HomeGoods, $59.99

Taupe pink lumbar pillows Eco Chic Boutique, $89

127


DIY DESIGN DESIGN&LIVING

DIY

FARMHOUSE SITTING AREA

Magnolia Home chairs Eco Chic Boutique, $495

"Farmhouse is on trend and loved by many for its relaxed and repurposed feel. You can find amazing farmhouse items at nearly any store in town," said Hill. "Some of the best places to shop are at markets and local boutiques to find that special and unique piece."

Waffle weave throw blanket McNeal & Friends, $90

Farmhouse side table Eco Chic Boutique, $149

Ladder Junk Mart, $75

128

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

Chair pillow HomeGoods, $24.99

Floor lamp HOM Furniture, $169

Fringed linen pillow McNeal & Friends, $45

Antique basket O'Day Caché, $45

Wild flowers HomeGoods, $19.99

Candle sticks Gordmans, $17.99

Blossom trees HOM Furniture, $119-$199


DESIGN&LIVING DIY DESIGN

For more information, contact: Trever Hill Design 701-235-0031 treverhilldesign@gmail.com treverhilldesign.com

129


DESIGN&LIVING HOME TOUR

A PRESIDENTIAL ABODE Robert Leslie Home Tour

Last year, we took you on a tour of Designer Homes President Robert Leslie's previous residence in our "Builders at Home" issue. This year, Leslie invited us to tour his newly constructed presidential abode in The Wilds. See his home for yourself at the Spring Parade of Homes Tour. BY Becca Opp | PHOTOS BY Paul Flessland

Stone - Hebron Brick Company Dryvit - Ottertail Stucco & Stone

1 31


HOME TOUR DESIGN&LIVING

Located in The Wilds neighborhood, the building was completed in early March. Leslie himself came up with the home design, which was then drafted by Bronson Mathiason of Designer Homes. Cheyenne Jundt, design coordinator at Designer homes, was then responsible for the interior design.

Kitchen Leslie described the design of this home as, "a warm mix of contemporary and craftsman," which can especially be seen in the kitchen. The kitchen has custom cabinetry and also features stainless steel, Sub-Zero appliances.

Cabinets - Braaten Cabinets Countertops - Spaulding Stone Backsplash - Floor to Ceiling Carpet One Appliances - Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery Flooring - Floor to Ceiling Carpet One Interior design by Cheyenne Jundt 132

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017


DESIGN&LIVING HOME TOUR

133


DESIGN&LIVING HOME TOUR

Fireplace - Hebron Brick Company Cabinetry - Braaten Cabinets

Living Room One thing that Leslie really wanted to do was take advantage of the views in his design. Soaring windows in the living room let in an abundance of natural light. Ceilings ranging in height from nine to 13 feet create the illusion of even more space in this 6,600-square-foot house.

135


DESIGN&LIVING HOME TOUR

Bathroom

Cabinets - Braaten Cabinets Flooring and tile - Floor to Ceiling Carpet One Interior design by Cheyenne Jundt 137


HOME TOUR DESIGN&LIVING

Audio-visual system - Custom Cinema and Sound Interior design by Cheyenne Jundt

Media Room The media room boasts three rows of elevated seating and a custom sound system.

138

DESIGN & LIVING | A P R I L 2 017

PARADE OF HOMES INFO Leslie's presidential abode will be fully furnished and decorated in preparation for the Spring Parade of Homes tour. The upcoming parade dates are Saturday and April 22-23, April 28-30 and May 5-7. To learn more about the Spring Parade of Homes, you can visit the Home Builders Association of Fargo Moorhead's website at hbafm.com/events/parade-homes.

For more information, contact Designer Homes / Remax 4342 15th Ave. S. Suite 105, Fargo Phone: 701-492-5057 Fax: 701-492-5055 info@designerhomesfm.com designerhomesfm.com


DESIGN&LIVING HOME TOUR

139


Design & Living April 2017  

If you dream of making someone else's trash your repurposed treasure or spend your days pining over Pinterest, this issue is for you. We've...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you