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ISSUE 03 WINTER 2018

GOOdspeed THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE

I N S I DE

THE SPIRIT OF THE BUCKET SAILING ON THROUGH IRMA’S WAKE

COLONIAL CHARM CONNECTICUT’S GRAYBARNS

KILIM KOOL

THE DUO BEHIND RES IPSA


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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Sailing into 2018 T H E W I N T E R G E TAWAY I S S U E “Two-thirds of the Caribbean is just obliterated,” said a friend today, almost four months after Hurricane Irma ripped through the area. And once again, I was reminded of the incredible sway of the media with its heavy favoritism of gruesome imagery. However, what matters more is how easily—and better yet, how truthfully—I was able to correct his perception. Far from obliterated, our island destinations of St. Barths, Anguilla and Puerto Rico, all severely impacted by a hurricane’s deadly force, have each fought back, rebuilding and regaining what was lost in the destruction and currently are as alive as perhaps they’ve ever been. Having just returned from the islands of Puerto Rico and St. Barths, I can sincerely state that “obliterated” is hardly a term I would apply to either territory. Instead, I would choose words like “healing,” “communityoriented” and “unified” to illustrate what I saw and experienced. As an annual visitor to these islands, I would also assert that this was one of my favorite years to visit, not only because I bore witness to the strength

and fortitude of the islands’ residents, but also because I was able, with my miniscule contribution of a simple visit, to show my support for their enduring land and distinct communities. In a similar vein, we chose to highlight the annual regattas of Antigua and St. Barths in our Winter Getaway issue because their early commitment to hosting the events this year, despite the locations’ hindered capabilities, is an emblematic gesture of support, both for the islands’ future and beloved past. The loyalty of the two regattas and their sponsors was immediately evident. We, too, are grateful for these bountiful and beautiful islands that clearly no hurricane could ever obliterate. We encourage you all to visit them—and to keep visiting them—especially during this time of rebuilding, when your tourism is a clear stamp of support. Also in this issue is another rebuild story, albeit one borne from purposeful and studied intent, involving the complete restoration of a historic property. This past fall, GrayBarns opened in Connecticut, offering a welcome, freshly modernized country inn and tavern, whose calm, sanctuary-like ambiance provides the ideal getaway—even if just for a few hours—during the doldrums of winter. Whether to the Caribbean sunshine or the fresh snow and coziness of the Northeast, we hope all our readers get the chance to truly get away this winter. MEG NOLAN | mnolan@flytradewind.com

LETTER FROM THE FOUNDERS

Tradewind On the Water Our cover shot showcases the lovely 42-foot Swan, Corban, which I have had the opportunity to sail twice. The first time was for the annual New Year’s Eve Around the Island Race in St. Barths, and the second time was an unforgettable six-day delivery sail from Bermuda to St. Barths. Sailing is not only great fun, especially for us pilots, but an enormous draw for tourism in the Caribbean. We were thrilled when we learned that the organizers of the annual Bucket Regatta and Les Voiles on St. Barths did not hesitate to host their events despite this challenging year. We look forward to attending the regattas and being a part of the enduring spirit from which they emanate. Photo: Christian Oth

Sail fast. Goodspeed!

DESTINATION LEGEND:

MVL = STOWE, VT PAGE 2 | GOODSPEED MAGAZINE

ERIC ZIPKIN | ezipkin@flytradewind.com DAVID ZIPKIN | dzipkin@flytradewind.com

ACK = NANTUCKET

ANU = ANTIGUA

AXA = ANGUILLA

BOS = BOSTON

MVY = MARTHA’S VINEYARD

NEV = NEVIS

SBH = ST. BARTHS

STT

= ST. THOMAS


ISSUE 03 WINTER 2018

GOOdspeed Photo: Cory Silken

THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE

TabLE of COntents Flight Plan

4

T H E L AT E S T A N D G R E AT E S T IN OUR NINE DISTINCT D E S T I N AT I O N S ......................... 4 Beach Grabs to Get, Antigua’s Classic Yachts, Sultry Slippers and Space Age Suits

Control Tower

The Hangar

20

H O S T S W I T H T H E M O S T ........ 16 The vivacious couple behind Maya’s Restaurant

C H A M PA G N E TA S T E . . ............. 20 Tips from our Somm-in-Residence, Épernay’s Jenny Benzie

24

O VE R TH E RI VE R AND TH RO UGH TH E W O ODS.......... 24 Touring the impeccable renovation of Norwalk’s newest inn and restaurant, GrayBarns

THE SPIRIT OF THE BUCKET.... 32 In its 23rd year, the St. Barths Bucket is primed to toast the spirit of its inimitable hostess, the island

In Every Issue C A L E N D A R .............................. 14

V E C T O R ................................... 38

Not-to-miss events in our destinations

Tradewind’s routes and current happenings

H I D D E N H AV E N S .................... 22

S U N D O W N E R S ........................ 40

Lintilhac Park, Stowe

Tradewind’s pick for where to best toast the sunset

©2018 Tradewind Aviation, LLC | Goodspeed is published four times a year by Tradewind Aviation. | EDITOR: Meg Nolan | DESIGN: Ann Zipkin | ann-design | AD SALES: Whitney O’Connor: advertising@flytradewind.com | ON THE COVER: Photograph by Jean Jarreau WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 3


IN CLASSIC FASHION A N T I G U A’ S C L A S S I C YA C H T R E G AT TA WITH PHOTOGRAPHY BY CORY SILKEN

PAGE 4 | GOODSPEED MAGAZINE


FLIGHT PLAN

ANU

Delightfully relaxed despite its impressive cadre of boats, Antigua’s annual Classic Yacht Regatta buoys the Caribbean regatta scene year after year. of the Antigua Classic Yacht Regatta, a beloved regatta that sees over 50 entries a year. Don’t be fooled by the annual event’s relatively young age; the racing of classic boats has been an Antiguan pastime since the early 1960s—after all, every boat was a classic back then. But it wasn’t until 1987, almost 30 years after the first race to Guadeloupe and back, that the race committee of Antigua Race Week felt a distinction must be made for the older generation and their full keels, and thus the Antigua Classic Yacht Regatta was officially born. Blame it on the rum for the slow start, but it took three years for some truly impressive ships to take notice, such as Endeavour and the six-meter Spirit of St. Kitts. And then, only nine years later, the regatta created the first Spirit of Tradition Class, which allows newer boats fashioned in old designs to race against the classics that inspired them; it is now sailed all over the world. LAST YEAR MARKED THE 30TH ANNIVERSARY

This year, the 31st Annual Regatta will take place April 18th through the 24th. The traditional large sponsors like Panerai and Mount Gay are onboard to return and, given the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, everyone is especially eager to get their boats down to Antigua and support the beleaguered Caribbean region (though fortunately Antigua was not among the hardest hit). One such regular is yachting and luxury lifestyle photographer Cory Silken—his images can be found throughout the regatta catalog and on their website. Silken is returning for his 15th year in 2018. We sat down with the Newport-based lensman to understand the distinctive character of the Antigua Classic Yacht Regatta and gather a few tips on how to best navigate it. SEE MORE PHOTOS

www.CorySilken.com

WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 5


FLIGHT PLAN

INTERVIEW

WITH CORY SILKEN

What distinguishes the Antigua Classic from other regattas? The Antigua Classic holds an interesting distinction as the world’s meeting place for classic yachts. Boats from the Mediterranean, North American and South American fleets converge on Antigua to compete against one another.

What is one of your best memories covering the Antigua Classic? The big schooners! Probably my debut year was one of the most exciting, as it was also the debut of schooner Eleonora, which is a replica of the Herreshoff design Westward. It’s still particularly exciting whenever a new restoration or replica comes to compete, as many use this event as their racing debut. The J Class often competes here as well, and it was extraordinary to experience Ranger’s debut at the Antigua Classic.

What makes the Antigua Classic such a draw for boat owners? There is great camaraderie among classic yacht owners, and the event has a welcoming, friendly mood around it. The racing is well run, and the recent sponsorship by Panerai has been fantastic. Of course, the hospitality of the locals and the sailing conditions in Antigua are fabulous, too.

What’s one of your favorite things to do in Antigua off the water? Shirley Heights is a fantastic spot to take in the sunset with a rum punch. Taking a tour with Adventure Antigua is a nice break from sailing, as is a helicopter flight with Caribbean Helicopters.

What tip could you offer a first-time entrant and/or spectator at the Antigua Classic? First-time entrants should be aware that the Classic Regatta is won with team spirit. If they want to race aggressively, Antigua Sailing Week is the following week. They should also be prepared for the potential for big breeze and big seas, although that isn’t always the case. Spectators can get a nice vantage point on the starting line up at Shirley Heights or Windward Beach. Capable sailors can often find a crew position by chatting up the skippers in the bar.

PAGE 6 | GOODSPEED MAGAZINE


BOSTON • CHESTNUT HILL • GREENWICH (800) 225-7088  www.shrevecrumpandlow.com


MVL

FLIGHT PLAN

SPACE INVADERS BURTON UNVEILS THIS YEAR’S OLYMPIC U.S. SNOWBOARD TEAM UNIFORM AND IT’S OUT OF THIS WORLD.

In early November, Vermont-based Burton Snowboards revealed their custom-designed 2018 Olympic uniforms for the U.S. Snowboard Team. and they mark the fourth Olympic Games where Burton has partnered with U.S. Ski & Snowboard to create the uniforms. This year the uniforms will be worn for the halfpipe, slopestyle and the first-ever big air snowboarding competitions. According to Burton founder Jake Burton Carpenter, Burton can ensure that the U.S. riders will “have outerwear they can trust to perform at the highest level with a look they have input into and ultimately respect.” Inspired by the American space program, the uniform features a retro-futuristic design with a liquid metal look, owing to an exclusive iridescent silver fabric coated in very fine, real aluminum that was woven on a vintage loom in Italy. THIS YEAR’S GAMES WILL BE IN PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA,

Burton custom-developed the fabric solely for the 2018 uniform by infusing an extremely lightweight aluminum-coated fabric typically used for audio equipment with highly technical properties ideal for snowboarding in any weather condition. The end result is a supertechnical, lightweight and waterproof fabric that reflects and deflects light as well as sound. The competition jacket also features hand-drawn patches of the American flag and USA, using a Space Age font. Keeping things irreverent, the inside of the jacket features sewn-in patches with Korean translations of phrases like “Do you speak English?” and “Wish me luck!” There’s also a down one-piece that is even more spacesuit-like, featuring bright white non-woven Dyneema® fabric, which is the world’s strongest fiber. Extremely lightweight, breathable and waterproof, the fabric is reminiscent of the iconic 1960s moonwalk suit. The uniform also includes a lightweight down insulator in a “moonbeam” colorway and drirelease wool base layers in “international orange,” a signature color used by the American space program for astronaut suits. Leather mitts, fleece gloves, tech tees and beanies complete the uniform. According to Head Designer Greg Dacyshyn, “I have always loved the astronauts’ suits, because not only do they have such a cool and amazing aesthetic, but they also were designed to function under the most extreme conditions, so this gave us an incredible platform to push the innovation and technology of the garments as well. My hope is that these pieces help the athletes go where no rider has gone before.” FOR MORE INFORMATION

check out www.burton.com

PAGE 8 | GOODSPEED MAGAZINE


Official Partners

Main Partner

9TH EDITION

LES VOILES DE ST. BARTH photo © Christophe Jouany - conception/mapisbh@orange.fr

APRIL 8/14, 2018

COLLECTIVITE DE SAINT-BARTHELEMY

LESVOILESDESAINTBARTH.COM


FLIGHT PLAN

ACK

KILIM KOOL T H E D Y N A M I C D U O B E H I N D FA S H I O N B R A N D R E S I P S A N O W C A L L S N A N T U C K E T H O M E

You know when lawyers throw in the towel to create a leisure goods company predominantly made from centuryold Turkish kilims, there’s a sincere passion behind the business. Or, as they say, they simply “recognized the world needs fewer lawyers but more happiness.” and smaller accessories, four-yearold Res Ipsa is led by the dynamic duo of Joshua Moore and Odini Gogo. The gentlemen hail from Atlanta but are recent transplants to Nantucket, having just bought a home in 2017. The products are sold both online and in retail shops all over the U.S., including locations in Martha’s Vineyard, Darien, CT, and Nantucket, as well as abroad in Japan, China and France. And they are ever in demand, given that quantities are always limited due to their handcrafted nature. The men are quick to point out that nothing they produce is machine-made. They also cite travel as the core inspiration behind their eclectic, handmade designs. SPECIALIZING IN LOAFERS, TRAVEL BAGS

Though they began by making ties, it was a singular trip to Istanbul where they had a serendipitous encounter with a manufacturer that led them to switch gears and focus on utilizing Turkish kilims. The majority of the manufacturing is still done in Turkey. The duo makes a point to get out

on the road for inspiration, traveling at least six times a year. “As we travel we are always looking for things that catch our eye, and then we interpret them to be more relevant to our customer,” explains Moore. “For instance, our beaded belts are hand-beaded by women of the Massai tribe in Kenya with designs utilizing nautical flags or the words ACK, WTF and OMG.” Just who is that customer? Split evenly between men and women, Gogo describes them as “people who value travel, have a certain taste level, don’t necessarily want to look like everyone else and trust their own taste enough to buy it.” The shoes, the top-selling item though the backpack is a close second, are done in both a classic Albert Slipper loafer silhouette and a more contemporary rubber-soled sneaker slip-on with an interior waterproof lining, ensuring no soggy toes. And, as the guys aptly note, they are perfect for the cobblestones. LEARN MORE

www.resipsausa.com WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 11


FLIGHT PLAN

Photos: TruckieLoo Photography

MVL

NATURAL SELECTION STOWE’S ONLY NATURAL WINE BAR

With over 56 chemicals legally allowed in wines sold in the United States, it’s no wonder people are starting to ask questions about just what is in their glass.

DON’T MISS Cork’s wine

club, called The Crush, that includes six bottles (three reds and three whites) every quarter.

Cork Wine Bar & Market are prepared with answers and, better yet, some delicious offerings of organic and biodynamic wines produced naturally, meaning little to no chemicals. In fact, Cork’s wine list is exclusively made up of natural wines, which are unofficially designated as wines grown from organic grapes, sometimes biodynamically, but more importantly, produced with minimal technological intervention in the winemaking process and no added chemicals. So, for those who dislike sulfites, this is where you belong. FORTUNATELY, THE GOOD SISTERS BEHIND STOWE’S

Cork features over 150 natural wine bottles ranging from familiar favorites like Chenin Blanc from the Loire to lesser-known grapes such as Teroldego from northern Italy. Owner and Stowe native Danielle Nichols, together with her younger sisters, is passionate about bringing awareness and enjoyment of natural wines to their beloved Vermont and creating what Danielle calls a “comfortable wine scene.” The 35-seat wine bar is open Wednesday through Monday and serves organic fare to accompany the wines, such as a locally sourced charcuterie plate of cheese and sausages, house-made ravioli and maple-braised local pork belly. Ensuring a relaxed atmosphere and approach to wine, Cork also offers ticketed wine dinners every first Tuesday of the month, live music with a jazz musician every

PAGE 12 | GOODSPEED MAGAZINE

Wednesday evening and an engagingly named wine club, The Crush, that includes six bottles (three reds and three whites) every quarter. But perhaps most emblematic of their devotion to all things natural is their Growler Fills program where customers can purchase an Eco Vessel growler that holds 750ml (the same as a regular bottle of wine) and fill it from Cork’s wine kegs, currently featuring Workbook’s blends from Santa Rosa, California, and then earn the 10th fill for free. It seems that letting nature take its course never tasted so good. FOR MORE INFORMATION

check out www.corkvt.com


FLIGHT PLAN

BEACH BLANKET BINGO

Goodspeed’s grabs for sand and sunshine

Beach Umbrella by Basil Bangs $249 | BASILBANGS.COM

Riviera Towel Company’s Channel Islands Round Terry Beach Towel $58 | RIVIERATOWEL.COM

The Beach Glass $10 | AMAZON.COM

Rana Hat with Pom Poms from Yosuzi $330 | YOSUZI.COM

Yeti Roadie 20 in White $200 | YETI.COM

Nuu Wake, a waterproof, sandproof, wireless Bluetooth speaker $149 | NUUSPEAKERS.COM


Photo: Gérald Tessier

CALENDAR

FEBRUARY 1–4 ANU

Superyacht Challenge

9–12 ANU Jolly Harbour Valentine’s Regatta

17 MVY

Martha’s Vineyard 20-Miler & Amity Island Relay

25 MVL Stowe Derby

PAGE 14 | GOODSPEED MAGAZINE


MARCH

APRIL

15–18

9–14

27–29

SBH

SBH

ACK

St. Barths Bucket Regatta

Les Voiles de St. Barths

Daffodil Festival

15–18

18–24

28

AXA 28th Annual Moonsplash Music Festival

ANU Antigua Classic Yacht Regatta

ANU Round Antigua Race

25 NEV 16th Annual Nevis to St. Kitts Cross Channel Swim

WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 15


HOsTS

with the Most

R A N D Y A N D M AYA G U R L E Y O F M AYA’ S O N S T. B A R T H S

Open for 34 years, Maya’s Restaurant is a veritable institution on St. Barths. Its beloved owners, Chef Maya and her affable husband Randy, are themselves as much a part of the restaurant as the fresh daily fare. A trailblazer with the idea of a daily changing menu, Maya remains steadfast to her ethos of keeping PAGE 16 | GOODSPEED MAGAZINE

things clean and simple and centered around fresh seafood. Her desserts, like front-of-house man Randy, however, are constants. Having met on the island over 40 years ago and lived together on a boat (for years!), their partnership is as strong as the legacy they’ve built.


C O N T R O L T O W E R | R A N D Y & M AYA G U R L E Y

Maya’s is practically a landmark on St. Barths. What’s Maya’s secret to longevity? RG: From the very beginning it was Maya’s idea to change the menu daily and to prepare the best-quality items she could find. From the opening day this is what she has done. When we opened in 1984, there was very little variety in the products available. The local fishermen provided us with mahi-mahi, red snapper, yellow tail snapper, wahoo and yellow fin tuna. Slowly the supplies improved, and slowly our clientele increased. If there’s a secret to Maya’s Restaurant’s longevity, it must be that she has never changed her idea of what the restaurant should be. The location along the harbor with the yachts anchored in the distance was a big advantage. MG: My involvement in the restaurant is very personalized, and people appreciate this kind of treatment. I try to show them a little bit of my way of cooking, which is Creole. We also offer a new experience every night, which has allowed us to stay interesting.

How did you and Maya meet? Was it love at first sight? RG: Maya and I met on St. Barths in the late 1970s. She was incredibly attractive and she ignored me for a week or so. We finally had a few conversations. I had a sailboat for charter, and she was here helping a cousin who was managing the Emeraude Plage Hotel. I had a charter in Antigua and I didn’t have crew. I invited Maya to come with me. As soon as she realized how charming I was . . . MG: It was definitely love at first sight.

Randy, you’re from Nantucket, another island we favor. What comparisons between the two islands do you see— both past and present? RG: Nantucket and St. Barths have similarities. Back then, both had insular communities. St. Barths was even more so because the original families had spent so many generations in hardship. Nantucket had its glorious and rich history. St. Barths’ history was always one of struggle for substance. Now, of course, the people who visit St. Barths are often the same ones who frequent Nantucket. I think the independent attitudes of both islands’ populations are their greatest similarities.

For the first-timer, what’s the must-order dish on the menu? RG: The theme of Maya’s Restaurant is simplicity. The local fish, simply grilled, is always a good bet. MG: It can be one thing today and another thing tomorrow. The desserts stay the same because our concept is a basic family-style dinner. Maya’s To Go has all the fancy French desserts, but the restaurant is more family style where we make three cakes and our own sorbets and ice cream.

down. The structures of the kitchen and bar, the deck and the roof above it remained intact. All the peripheral buildings, the toilets, the dishwashing area and the storage area to the right of the entry gate disappeared altogether! We have had the insurance inspectors make their assessments, and we have had the estimates for the various enterprises to rebuild and replace what is needed. It’s a long process and it cannot be rushed. MG: It is difficult, of course, right now, not just with the repairs but also with the workers and the transportation. We are concentrating on Maya’s To Go while we rebuild the restaurant. We are very lucky to have this business as well.

Any future plans for Maya’s, perhaps an expansion? RG: I think one of the reasons for our continued success is that we are happy doing what we do on the scale on which we do it. Bigger is not always better. MG: Maya’s To Go was our expansion. The idea was that the people who are staying in the beautiful villas can enjoy good food in the villa and not have to go to multiple stores for the shopping. We wanted to create something that would be open from 7 to 7 where people can pick up dessert or anything for a picnic lunch or a nice dinner without having to go to all the stores or cook.

As a longtime resident of St. Barths, what do you hope will result positively from this forced rebuild? RG: Just after the storm passed, there was a wonderful sense of community. We had survived Irma together. People were so courteous and helpful. I hope that community understanding survives the reconstruction.

It’s been a tough year. How did Irma affect Maya’s?

MG: I hope the storm will force people to think about the future of the island. I think at one point it got out of hand with construction and big business pushing around the old businesses like us. We must find the middle ground for all of that. Evolution is always good, but we must be aware. St. Barths gave me the opportunity to express myself through food, and I am very grateful for that. This is where I made myself known. I am lucky.

RG: Irma was a beast. The worst of the storm hit the north side of the island. The restaurant was well washed by the seas crashing

LEARN MORE

www.mayas-stbarth.com

WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 17


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E R N A Y P N ÉW I N I R I T S E

A

D

S P

Champagne Taste M A I SO N

FO N D É E

À

N A N T U C K E T

GOODSPEED’S SOMM-IN-RESIDENCE AND BUBBLES QUEEN J E N N Y B E N Z I E

As the co-proprietor of Épernay Wine & Spirits on Nantucket, Jenny Benzie is not just well regarded for her considerable wine knowledge, but she’s also widely trusted when it comes to the Nectar of the Gods. Her credentials are as vast as they are impressive,

ranging from Advanced Sommelier with the Court of Master Sommeliers to Certified Wine Educator (CWE) and a Diploma of Wine & Spirits (DWS) with the Wine & Spirits Education

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Trust (WSET). Faith in her prowess extends ashore too—she is a participating sommelier in the annual Wine Spectator New York Wine Experience and has been a wine judge for the American Fine Wine Competition. But

perhaps the accolade that gives us the most envy is her official title of “Champagne Taster,” which, according to Dom Perignon, means she repeatedly “tastes the stars.”


C O N T R O L T O W E R | É P E R N AY

Where did your passion for wine and spirits begin? While waiting tables after college, I was the server who was always most engaged at the staff wine tastings. When I moved to St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands, I got a job as a wine steward at Caneel Bay Resort, and that is where my wine career began. I was so intrigued by the stories behind the wine—the people who made it, the family history of the wineries, the combination of how food and wine enhance an experience when served together.

What is it about wine and spirits that keeps you engaged? Every year is a different vintage in the vineyard; it is never the same twice. There are always new, innovative beverage products being brought to market throughout the year. This makes it easy to stay engaged with what’s happening in the industry as it is ever evolving.

What do you think differentiates Épernay from other wine stores? Kirk Baker and I are a dynamic sommelier team with different backgrounds in the industry. While Kirk has worked in restaurants and is a Certified Sommelier, he also has experience in the sales and distribution side of the adult beverage business, as well as aspects of working for and managing a diverse portfolio for a national importer. For myself as an Advanced Sommelier, I have experience working in a multitude of fine dining environments that cater to the type of clientele that we have on Nantucket. Combining our resources enables us to discover opportunities on the front end behind the scenes, then deliver those goods and services to our clients while exceeding their expectations.

It gets cold and dark on Nantucket during the winter; what’s in your glass that keeps you warm and cheerful? We drink plenty of bubbles and rosé. Champagne allows us to celebrate the days of winter when we get to relax, regroup and plan for the upcoming year. Rosé reminds us that beach days are more than just July and August since we get to live on an island all year long.

What are a few wines that you are particularly proud to carry at Épernay? We have an extensive selection of Champagnes, obviously with the name of the store. Pol Roger “White Foil” Brut NV is always in

stock and a go-to for any occasion; it’s the perfect balance of “we have something to celebrate” and “that something is right now.” Kirk is a huge fan of Keenan Winery on Spring Mountain and Ridge Wines in Santa Cruz, as they were some of the first wines he ever had when starting in the wine business. Oh, and we met at an Opus One luncheon many moons ago, so we always try to keep that in stock as well!

For the budding wine aficionado, what’s your best advice on how to approach learning more about wine? One day at a time. If you read a little each day, you will have the compound effect of wine knowledge. I don’t mean just read scores and tasting notes, but if you are really interested, you need to find out where the wine came from and how it is grown. It is a farm product after all!

If you could only return to one wine region every year, which one would it be and why? CHAMPAGNE! There are so many different villages to explore, and each one produces bubbly with a different grape varietal composition, from different vineyard sources and with several different offerings each year from the Champagne houses.

What’s the most curious or unexpected thing you’ve tasted lately? Red and white wines from Etna in Sicily have been both great crowd pleasers and interesting enough without being too funky. I think Chenin Blanc is completely underrated for its chameleon-like performances, including dry sparkling Vouvray that rivals other lower price point sparkling wines from around the world.

Where is one of your favorite spots to grab a glass of wine on island? I finally made it to The AfterHouse recently and made sure to visit again in the same week before they closed for the season. Their wine list is super creative and nicely cultivated, along with being price friendly for the exciting wines they are offering. Be sure to ask Alison anything about the wines she has chosen; you will not be disappointed! FOR MORE INFORMATION

www.epernaywines.com WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 21


HIDDEN HAVENS LINTILHAC PARK, STOWE

Photo: Teresa Merelman

Far from tucked away, this haven is hidden in plain sight, accessible right from Stowe Village on the Stowe Recreation Path. A five-and-a-half-mile groomed greenway designated for non-motorized recreation, the Rec Path is beloved by joggers, walkers, bikers and picnickers alike. Lintilhac Park can be found at the beginning of the path, right behind the Stowe

PAGE 22 | GOODSPEED MAGAZINE

Community Church, and is particularly serene, according to Stowe photographer Teresa Merelman, during a snowy morning when you can hear the West Branch River and the bells of the Community Church against the soft patter of snowfall.


WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 23


Over the River AND THROUGH THE WOODS Introducing Fairfield County’s brand-new GrayBarns on the Silvermine River

PAGE 24 | GOODSPEED MAGAZINE


T H E H A N G A R | G R AY B A R N S

Though it is tucked into the woods and overlooks the Silvermine River, Connecticut’s brand-new GrayBarns on the Silvermine River is no typical Grandmother’s house—unless, of course, Grandma lives in a classic white colonial with cool, cosseting interiors reminiscent of a boutique hotel in the South of France.

WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 25


opened its doors, revealing a gleaming and extensive renovation of the former Silvermine Tavern in Norwalk, Connecticut. Originally made famous by former guests such as Elizabeth Taylor, who honeymooned at the inn, and Spencer Tracy, who is rumored to have polished off more pancakes than any other diner, the Silvermine Tavern was a refuge for urbanites coming out of the city as well as a local watering hole for the thriving artist community of the Silvermine area. Today, it beckons the same glamorous (and hungry) clientele with its fresh, cosseting interior design, thoughtful restoration and community-oriented persona. THIS PAST FALL GRAYBARNS ON THE SILVERMINE RIVER

Purchased in 2015 by the Glazer Group, a local, family-run development and design team that specializes in historic preservation and high-end residential development, the site was a formidable challenge, but one owner, Andrew Glazer, was instantly drawn to, given his affinity for older houses and their history. He and his designer wife, Marsha, were so committed that they sold their home in Rowayton, CT, and moved into a home next door to better oversee the head-to-toe renovations. The Glazers, together with their daughter Nikki, spent two years salvaging and renovating each of the spaces. They preserved what they could—sourcing what they needed as locally as possible— and more often than not,

PAGE 26 | GOODSPEED MAGAZINE

designing and building the furnishings themselves. “We’re like an atelier,” explains Nikki, utilizing the skill sets of all three to build, design and successfully manage the property. A sizable endeavor, GrayBarns includes a small village with four private homes, all built by Glazer and quickly sold; an adjacent events barn brought down from upstate New York whose gray color is the property’s namesake; the 100-seat Tavern, which is housed in the original 17thcentury grist mill; the six-suite Inn whose origin is a small textile mill; and the forthcoming Mercantile, a café and mixed retail space with a secondfloor spa and four annex rooms just across the street. Despite the multiple structures, the feeling when on property at GrayBarns is one of total cohesiveness. So disciplined were the Glazers in their design aesthetic that every room complements the next, staying true to its organic, high-touch character, refined and familiar at the same time. Since its opening in September, the Tavern has been met with a tremendous response from the locals, who love mingling in the beautiful, light-filled space with its salvaged wood beams, slip-covered couches, gray-board walls sourced from a mill upstate and the original tavern dining chairs, smartly updated with a high-gloss treatment and cozy fur


T H E H A N G A R | G R AY B A R N S

Originally made famous by former guests such as Elizabeth Taylor, who honeymooned at the inn, and Spencer Tracy, who is rumored to have polished off more pancakes than any other diner, the Silvermine Tavern was a refuge for urbanites coming out of the city as well as a local watering hole for the thriving artist community of the Silvermine area.

WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 27


Since its opening in September, the Tavern has been met with a tremendous response from the locals, who love mingling in the beautiful, light-filled space with its salvaged wood beams, slip-covered couches, gray-board walls sourced from a mill upstate and the original tavern dining chairs, smartly updated with a high-gloss treatment and cozy fur throws over their backsides.

PAGE 28 | GOODSPEED MAGAZINE


T H E H A N G A R | G R AY B A R N S

throws over their backsides. Chef Ben Freemole hails from Montana and most recently worked in the Hudson Valley. His preference for simple, freshly grown fare (ramps are a specialty) pairs nicely with Marsha’s kitchen garden, spied from both the Inn and the Tavern’s windows. The menu is approachable, eschewing pretentiousness in favor of what they call elegant country food. Their wine and cocktail lists are also a draw, with bottles that will both appease and challenge their guests, while the cocktails offer the ideal spectrum from classic to today’s penchant for tequila and mezcal. Private events in their top-floor space, featuring its own powder room and complete technological capabilities, are already in high demand. The Inn’s six king suites are in keeping with the historic nature of the building, meaning no two are alike, though all are quite spacious and similarly appointed with Marsha and her daughter Nikki’s signature luxurious, country-modern aesthetic. The focus on preserving the building’s heritage is evident right away with the lobby’s wide plank floors and rustic beams, while the various soft goods such as vintage suitcases, cashmere throws, steel sconces from Pergola Home and antique telephones in the guest rooms showcase the careful attention to detail. Furnishings are from Soho Home, Terrain, Lillian August, Design Within Reach, Tucker Robbins or, more often, custom by the Glazers’ artisan carpenters, while the only featured art is by New York photographer Peter Margonelli. Rooms 5 and 6 are particular favorites with spacious proportions, sweeping views across the river and delicious, Frette linen-adorned four-poster beds. Perhaps what resonates most though when at GrayBarns is how wonderfully appropriate the property feels for today. Everything from the evergreen-laden garden landscaping to the preserved historic facades and soothing textural interiors feels ever so fitting for what we desire out of a contemporary gathering space or refuge. Lucky are we that the Glazers are community-minded and intent on giving back, for GrayBarns is a striking model of what community can be. FOR MORE INFORMATION

www.graybarns.com

WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 29


WHERE THE SKY MEETS THE OCEAN...

www.hotelchristopher.com

Pointe Milou, 97 133 St BarthĂŠlemy I reservations@hotelchristopher.com I T.+(590) 590 27 63 63


A New Perspective on Real Estate Gayle Oberg

Mike Hickey

Pam Plummer

Zoe’ Bedell

We here at Little River Realty would love to meet you once you touch down. Give us a call, we are happy to pick you up, and show you the real estate options available around town and on the Mountain. We pride ourselves on our independent status, and in depth knowledge of Stowe and surrounding areas. We would love nothing better than the opportunity to put our expertise to work for you.

254 Mountain Road, Stowe, VT | info@LRRVermont.com | 802.253.1553 | LRRVermont.com

WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 31


SPIRIT BUCKET

of the

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THE HANGAR | THE BUCKET

Despite Irma’s gale force winds last year, the 23rd Annual St. Barths Bucket Regatta is trimmed up and ready to showcase the regatta’s enduring character and undaunted support of its island hostess. For over two decades, the St. Barths Bucket Regatta has enticed superyachts and the fine sailors who steer them to come together, compete and celebrate over a three-day event that showcases the beauty of the island. No strangers to enviable locations, the superyachts seem perfectly at home among St. Barths’ stunning scenery, signature French Caribbean charm and epicurean delights. Yet after speaking with owners, sponsors and event directors, it’s not just the Bucket’s location that has the boats returning year after year, but also its signature noncommercial, jovial competitive spirit.

WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 33


Founded in 1986 on Nantucket by three yacht captains, Roger Janes, Peter Goldstein and John Clyde Smith, who were on island to celebrate Mandalay owner Nelson Doubleday’s birthday, the first Bucket was a 15-mile race that featured seven boats and showcased the speed and capabilities of the large sloops when pitted against one another. Though the results that day were inconclusive, a spirited tradition was born. In fact, that premiere event is credited with bolstering the concept of pursuit racing or what’s known as a chase race. In a chase race, each boat has its own start time for safety and then is calibrated to the yacht’s speed handicap; the first yacht to cross the finish line wins, which means some classic competitive finishes to delight spectators. The Nantucket Bucket grew to an annual event that went on every August until 2002 when it PAGE 34 | GOODSPEED MAGAZINE

relocated to Newport, RI. There it continued until 2016; now known as the Candy Cup, it is run out of the Newport Shipyard in the same vein as the Bucket. The St. Barths Bucket began in 1995, once again inaugurated by Doubleday’s Mandalay and her captain, Ian Craddock, who was down there with the boat during the winter months. With just four boats at the initial regatta, the race’s humble beginnings were not without flair. First there was the infamous Le Mans start: a crewman starts on land, downs a daiquiri and then races a tender out to the anchored yacht to mark the start of the race, only to repeat the same shenanigans to earn the finish. It’s a storied tale and, needless to say, a one-year wonder.


THE HANGAR | THE BUCKET

“Everybody in the business loves the Bucket, but we don’t go down there for business. We go down there to spend a great time with our yacht owners and, if anything, help them have a spectacular time onboard their boat.”

The following years remained relatively relaxed, but each year interest grew, the class size became bigger and a more formalized event became a necessity. Hank Halsted was brought in from Newport to manage the event alongside St. Barths local Melanie Smith, and they obtained permissions from the St. Barths government and French Waterways. The first rule was to limit entries to 30 boats, which seemed like a lot when there were only seven or eight, but soon entrants grew to 15 and then 20 by 2005. That’s when both a professional race committee and formal sponsors came onboard. These included Perini Navi, Holland Jachtbouw, Royal Huisman Shipyard, Alloy Yachts and Vitter’s Shipyard, who were glad to support what they saw as an incredibly successful industry event where the owners enjoyed themselves and the boats were given a chance to truly perform.

Bruce Brakenhoff, Jr., Steward of the Bucket and President of Perini Navi USA, explains, “Everybody in the business loves the Bucket, but we don’t go down there for business. We go down there to spend a great time with our yacht owners and, if anything, help them have a spectacular time onboard their boat.” He adds, “Sure, you can network and show off your stuff, but you can’t quantify it. It’s against the unwritten rules. There’s no marketing, just networking. We keep it as noncommercial as possible. It’s an industry party for our owners.” And what a party it is! It’s hard to deny the boisterous photographs of Friday night’s famous “yacht hop.” For Lisa Hobbs of Bank of America, which has been a “Friend” of the Bucket for the past 15 years, it’s her WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 35


favorite night. “We get to meet so many interesting people,” she says. “The energy is fantastic and the yachts look spectacular all lit up in the harbor.” Hobbs also agrees that while the event has clear business objectives, it’s never overt. “We continue to sponsor and participate because we like the low-key nature of the Bucket,” she says. “We sponsors are all there to enhance our businesses, but it’s not aggressive in nature. We originally got involved with the Bucket to increase our exposure to the large sailing yacht market and the industry professionals who serve that market. It worked! We participate in all of the events, providing an opportunity for us to mingle with the yacht owners, builders, brokers and other industry professionals, and it’s a lot of fun. In the end, it’s about bringing in new business, and we’ve been successful at doing so—just by being there.” Of course, no major event, especially one that attracts some of the world’s greatest wealth, remains low-key forever. Thus in 2014, potential buyers came knocking. The Stewards were offered a chance to match the bid before it was sold, and fortunately, according to Brakenhoff, none of them “wanted to go that route.” So, by banding together, despite some of the originals no longer being in business, they were able to pool their resources, entice newcomers like Rybovich to come aboard and allow the

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Bucket to remain under the same management, ensuring that the unique spirit of the event stays intact. Alas, predatory money and commercialism are not the Bucket’s only threats, and this past year Mother Nature came down hard on the regatta’s beloved location in the form of Hurricane Irma. This year’s Bucket has seen a rallying cry from the superyachts to ensure the regatta goes on and continues to celebrate its distinctive host. According to Peter Craig, Event Director and Race Chairman of the Bucket, “Attracting a large, credible fleet of boats to St. Barths after the horrific event of Irma is crucial. We know it will be great for the island. And what better reward can we give to the island than to show up with such a large fleet of superyachts?” At the time of print, M5, a 246-foot sloop and the largest single-masted superyacht ever built, was confirmed to attend her first Bucket ever this year. There’s little doubt the Bucket wouldn’t be the Bucket without its iconic setting. As Craig says, “There’s only one St. Barths. And while the other ports for the Superyacht Regattas (Palma, Antigua, Bitter End Yacht Club) are lovely, no other place has the same caliber of restaurants, bars, entertainment and shopping. Nor do they have the same reliable 10- to 15-knot


THE HANGAR | THE BUCKET

tradewinds.” He explains that because of the consistent high breeze, “every day we can provide challenging and different course options. We have 30 different course options we can run—other venues can’t do the same. We can race around islands and rocks and provide varying course lengths to support both the super-fast boats and the slower, older boats that can’t point upwind.” As the race director for the past eight years and previously the director of Key West Race Week for 22 years, Craig brings a wealth of experience to the Bucket and is tasked with ensuring fair competition and interesting courses, ultimately making sure the right yachts are sailing against one another. There’s no doubt the race has grown more serious over the years and the competition is fierce, with a cadre of professional sailors, former America’s Cup sailors and Volvo Race champions all together in the room at the Skippers’ Meeting. For Craig, the biggest challenge is maintaining the longstanding spirit of the Bucket—the relaxed daiquiri-infused energy— but also providing a balance for the owners who want competitive racing. “Since we have up to 40 boat entries, which far exceeds any other regatta,” he notes, “we can break the group into classes with similar performing characteristics, which is always important to both the sailors and the owners.”

In 2016, the Bucket introduced the Corinthian Spirit Class, a class that races without a spinnaker, which immediately separates them both from the burden of carrying more sails and the stringent handicap rules that command the other classes; for instance, their handicaps can be adjusted between races. Last year the class had four competitors and, at the time of print, three of them have already signed up to return. As Craig puts it, “It’s like going back in time. It welcomes the ‘non-must-win’ owner, plus the captain doesn’t have to be burdened by overly preparing the boat.” A three-day event that, if done right, can be stretched to five or six days to ensure maximum enjoyment of both the setting and the racing, the Bucket is a seminal event, particularly this year as the island, its people and its many admirers band together to persevere through their recent hardship. As a veteran Bucketer, Brakenhoff notes, “To date, the Bucket has enjoyed this amazing synergy of great boats and great people in both business and sailing, who have put aside all their other stuff to come to St. Barths and just have a great time.” Let that notion prevail this March, and the regatta will not be just an incredible sporting competition but an event that celebrates and honors a signature joyous spirit, alive and well on St. Barths today. FOR MORE INFORMATION

www.bucketregatta.com WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 37


VECTOR

TRADEWIND AVIATION COMFORT | CONVENIENCE | SAFETY

Tradewind Aviation was founded in 2001 on the premise that every flight deserves the highest-quality aircraft, crew and service. Headquartered at the Waterbury-Oxford Airport (OXC) in Connecticut with operational bases at Westchester County Airport (HPN) in White Plains, New York, and San Juan International Airport (SJU) in Puerto Rico, Tradewind operates 21 aircraft for on-demand private charter and scheduled “Shuttle” service throughout the U.S. and Caribbean.

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San Juan St. Thomas St. Barths

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Northeast Routes

SHUTTLE FLIGHTS OFFER THE COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE

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flights are operated from the New York area to Boston (BOS), Stowe (MVL), Annapolis

agencies as compared to the majority of on-demand charter operators.

Martinique

Nantucket (ACK) and Martha’s Vineyard (MVY) and depart from private charter FBO terminals. In the Caribbean, Shuttle flights are operated between San Juan (SJU), St. Barths (SBH), Nevis (NEV), Antigua (ANU) and St. Thomas (STT).

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— United Airlines interline connection to St. Barths, Anguilla and Nevis from Newark, Chicago, Houston, Cleveland, Washington, D.C. and beyond

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—B  ritish Airways interline connection between London and St. Barths

without incident since 2001, Tradewind Aviation exceeds the FAA, ICAO and

—A  RG/US Gold rated carrier | Virtuoso network preferred operator

industry standards for aircraft equipment, pilot training and maintenance.

Tradewind is a preferred air supplier of the Virtuoso network. PAGE 38 | GOODSPEED MAGAZINE

Tradewind Aviation has been awarded an ARGUS Gold rating, which is held by less than 20% of all US-certificated charter operators.

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We would very much welcome the opportunity to provide our superior level of service for your next journey. Our flight department is available 24/7 and happy to assist you. Contact us today!

Photo: GĂŠrald Tessier

WINTER GETAWAY 2018 | PAGE 39


SuNdowners Tradewind’s latest pick for where to best toast the sunset

HENRY’S HARVEST TODDY RECIP E

— Hot apple cider (.25 oz.) — Honey syrup (.05 oz.) — Lustau sherry (.21 oz.) — Four Roses bourbon (.66 oz.)

METHOD

To a cup of hot cider, add the honey syrup, sherry and bourbon. Stir briefly. GARNISH: cloved

apple slice

PAGE PAGE4040| |GOODSPEED GOODSPEEDMAGAZINE MAGAZINE

H E N RY ’ S AT H A R B O R V I E W H O T E L — A beloved spot on

Martha’s Vineyard, Henry’s Bar features sweeping waterfront views, but it’s the cocktails, best sipped from the rockers on the front porch, that keep us coming back—no matter the season. Here’s our favorite to keep us warm during the days when the sun sets earlier.


Clothing for Men, Women, & Kids.

NEVER RULE OUT A SICK DAY.

GOODSPEED The Tradewind Magazine | Issue 03 | February 2018  

A luxury inflight magazine from Tradewind Aviation, highlighting the latest and greatest from their distinct destinations.

GOODSPEED The Tradewind Magazine | Issue 03 | February 2018  

A luxury inflight magazine from Tradewind Aviation, highlighting the latest and greatest from their distinct destinations.