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ISSUE No

22

S P R I N G 2 019

Celebrating local shopping, dining, arts, events, and community

City of

Bethlehem The Thinking Bigger Issue


“Stone Wrapped” Janet Dance (Second Place)

“Ol’ Buzzard” Bob Hakun (First Place)

Handmade Desk by William S. Kelsey “A Cut Above” Merrill Weber (Third Place)

Ward Van Haute, Director/Curator Kate Hughes, Co-Director

A Design of the Times. AT B E T H L E H E M H O U S E Contemporary Art Gallery on Main Street, quarterly annual shows (complete with a fun party for each opening and closing!) feature original, innovative contemporary artwork by both emerging and established regional artists. And their unique space is set up to demonstrate the practical use of art in real-world modern interior design by exhibiting the works in a furnished environment—so you get to see what the art might look like in your own home. Bethlehem House Contemporary Art Gallery is a true original—stop by and say hello!

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459 MAIN STREET 610.419.6262 BETHLEHEMHOUSEGALLERY.COM

“Easton Hotspot” Andrea Grillo (Directors Choice)


Thinking BIGGER

Learn about some of the businesses thinking beyond the profit, to the bigger picture.

PAG E 1 8

giving back

authentic

Using the power of poetry for good: Matt Wolf.

Baking with passion and compassion: Danielle Konya of Vegan Treats.

PA G E 1 2

PA G E 8 IN THIS ISSUE

fresh faces

events

And of course,

great shopping, dining, arts, events, and community— as always.

Welcoming great new businesses to our City: Crave Bethlehem and ZEST.

What’s happening in Bethlehem this season. PA G E S 3 9 & 4 6

PA G E S 1 0 & 1 6

KEEP READING

#womenswork

social mission

Meet a few of the entrepreneurs behind women-owned businesses in Bethlehem’s Downtowns.

Proudly announcing our 2019 Social Mission Partner: Café the Lodge. PA G E 4 3

PA G E 1 4 Cover design by Alexandria Shope ISSUE 22

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SPRING 2019

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BETHLEHEM, PENNSYLVANIA

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THE THINKING BIGGER ISSUE


C R E AT E D A N D P R O D U C E D BY F I G I N D U S T R I E S Creative thinkers and makers with a forever mission of Design For Good. Learn more about our mission and meet our team at figindustries.com. PUBLISHER Fig Industries

WRITERS Kate Racculia Steve Neumann

DIRECTOR Kiera Wilhelm

DESIGNERS Ian Berg Josh Seibert Melissa McDade

C O M M U N I C AT I O N S Tina Interrante Erin Cusack Samantha Quisgard Anthony Gorick

PHOTOGRAPHER Karlo Gesner

P R I N T I N G PA RT N E R The Standard Group

INTERN Alexandria Shope

C O M M U N I T Y PA RT N E R S A N D C O N T R I B U T O R S ArtsQuest

PBS39

Historic Bethlehem Museums & Sites

IceHouse Tonight

Downtown Bethlehem Association

SouthSide Arts District

ALL THINGS SOCIAL Look for Fig Bethlehem on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for daily coverage of local entertainment, events, food, fashion, and community.

A D V E RT I S I N G I N F I G To find out how you can strategically and effectively market your business through the Fig communications package, contact Kiera Wilhelm at kiera@figindustries.com.

Fig Industries, LLC has made every attempt to ensure that all information contained in this publication has been obtained from reliable sources, but all such information is provided “as is” with no guarantee of completeness or accuracy. The views of contributors do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of Fig Industries, LLC. Fig Industries, LLC cannot be held responsible for errors or omissions contained in, or reliance made upon the contents of, this publication. Copyright: Copyright 2019 © Fig Industries, LLC. All rights reserved. Photography or page layout contained in Fig shall not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without the specific written permission of Fig Industries, LLC. Contact 717.394.7737 or info@figbethlehem.com.


A NOTE FROM FIG

for the greater good. S P R I N G I S A S E A S O N T H AT —literally— surrounds us with evidence of a renewed energy. Dormant seeds are beginning to sprout and push skyward. Streams are rushing with the thaw. Things are growing , moving. Spring feels like a perfect metaphor for what’s happening in Bethlehem these days. As our city vibrates with change, one can’t help but have a sense of rebirth. For those who have lived here a while, it’s a familiar feeling: Bethlehem has long been a community of forward-thinking individuals, with a creative, “thinking bigger” spirit that keeps the greater good at heart—and has gotten us through some big changes over the years.

(Senior Designer)

(Photographer)

That spirit is alive and well here today in the hardworking individuals behind so many of the businesses and organizations in our city. Entrepreneurs and changemakers are getting things done with intention and vision, thinking beyond profit and toward building a community for good. In this issue, we’re so pleased to share stories of those who are thinking about things a little differently. Stories of businesses who saw the future long ago, and took some risks to get there. Stories of sustainability and social consciousness, childhood education and community arts, redevelopment and renewable energy. Stories that we hope will continue to raise expectations and awareness for current and future leaders in our community.

The team at Fig strives to always think bigger, too—to do good, and to bring the beauty of Bethlehem to you four times a year (you can see Karlo and Ian up there with me in my photo; they work tirelessly behind the scenes to bring this book to life). We invite you to spend a little time with this issue, getting inspired—and maybe even thinking about your own big ideas. Then, when you’re ready, getting out there and making your positive mark on Bethlehem. There’s always room here for more. May your spring season be filled with big ideas that bloom, KIERA WILHELM & THE FIG INDUSTRIES TEAM


HOTEL BETHLEHEM

EXECUTIVE CONFERENCE CENTER


W H E N T H E Managing Partner of the Historic Hotel Bethlehem, Bruce Haines, was looking for ways to expand the hotel’s unique brand, he found the perfect opportunity less than a block away, when Valley Youth House relocated from their space in the International Institute for Restorative Practices building at 531 Main Street.

a business function at the main hotel.

There, he created the new Hotel Bethlehem Executive Conference Center, which is comprised of 5,000 square feet of meeting space across a main conference room and five breakout suites (all named for famous hotel guests, including Winston Churchill and Amelia Earhart). Additionally, it has an on-site kitchen to serve the same breakfast and lunch items that would be served during

The Executive Conference Center is geared toward providing the same upscale, elegant experience Historic Hotel Bethlehem is known for, while allowing corporate clients to have complete privacy to conduct their business without interference from the hotel operations—all with the benefits of having their event with the hotel. “This gives us the opportunity to expand what we offer,”

“It fits a niche our hotel struggles with— which is groups from 30 to 80 that are an awkward size for our larger ballrooms,” Bruce says. “And it ties in really well with what we are, which is a luxury boutique hotel—this basically becomes a boutique kind of conference center.”

437 MAIN STREET

Bruce says, “and have two, three, or four conference events going on at once.” The decor of the new space is tied to the hotel by its signature carpet, marble finishes, as well as a large modified portrait of the hotel itself in the reception area. And walking between the hotel and the conference center, there’s an opportunity for guests to explore Main Street and the shops—and to discover that they’re in the heart of a potential World Heritage site, thanks to the culturally significant buildings associated with the Moravian settlement. “Investing in our downtown with additional facilities,” Bruce says, “draws more people which benefits the entire community.”

610.625.5000

HOTELBETHLEHEM.COM

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AUTHENTIC Leading the way through innovation and example.

Authentic: Danielle Konya IN 2000, WHEN Danielle Konya suggested to a Philadelphia restaurant owner who was offering the then-radical option of a vegan cheesesteak that he also offer vegan desserts, she was “practically laughed out of the restaurant.” She’d been baking cruelty-free, zero animalbyproducts desserts, and to prove him wrong, she baked him a vegan chocolate cake. He called her up and ordered four. She delivered those cakes, and within a few hours, he called again. The cakes disappeared in a heartbeat; could she bring him 11 more? At the time, Danielle thought, “How can I make eleven cakes? You’ve got to be kidding me!” Today, the CEO of Vegan Treats makes a lot more than 11 cakes. The first vegan bakery in existence has compassionately revolutionized baked goods since it opened in 2004. Located on Bethlehem’s north side, Vegan Treats operates out of a 4,500-square-foot retail bakery that produces desserts 24 hours a day with an 18-hour order turnover. But Danielle was providing premier vegan desserts wholesale since those fateful 11 cakes, building what is her passion for living things into a 50-employee business, beloved by sweet tooths and celebrities, vegans and baking aficionados, all over the world. The business may have grown beyond her wildest dreams, but the mission that drove her from the beginning continues to ground and inspire her. “I never stop being surprised by the magnitude of Vegan Treats,” she says—the customers who fly

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from Japan to Bethlehem for a delicious bite, the famous fans and accolades. But in the end, “it’s always about the animals.” She hopes that while every customer experiences confectionery delight, they are

READ THE FULL STORY ABOUT FIG AUTHENTIC AT FIGBETHLEHEM.COM

moved to “think with their fork.” She says, “Ultimately, I hope they feel some type of empathy. It’s a small but important way to connect with the other living beings on our planet. And to me that’s everything.”


CUT, COLOR,

C R E AT E

HEATHER ERDOSY, Owner/ President and stylist at The Warren salon, made Bethlehem her home in 1999. After working as a stylist in several salons, she decided to explore entrepreneurship. The challenge of opening her own place was daunting, but with years of industry experience to guide her, Heather—better known as Rabbit—knew exactly what she wanted to build. A place that was creative. Eclectic. And perhaps most importantly, kind. “My main mission was to lead my team into success,” she says, by creating a supportive

working environment where “we are all treated as equals.” A focus on kindness, thoughtfulness, and honesty guides The Warren’s approach to customer service, too. “It’s so important to listen to what people want, and to be honest about what works for them, their needs, and the integrity of their hair,” says Rabbit. Her goal is “to create a fun environment, where customers can feel fantastic inside and out.” She’s proud of the relationships she and her team have built over the years— their clients feel like family, Rabbit

says—and of the skills they all offer. “My team is beyond talented,” she says, “great at taking even the most basic haircut or color and elevating it to another level of stunning.” The Warren is a unisex salon, and offers barbering as well as creative colors and exciting, outside-the-box styles. The Warren moved to a new location on East Broad Street in 2018, and Rabbit and her team are in love with the new den. “I’m happy to be a part of the changes all over Bethlehem,” she says. “We really have something special here.”

253 EAST BROAD STREET

610.868.4247

THEWARRENSALON.COM

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F R E S H FA C E Welcoming new businesses to Bethlehem.

Ashley and Alex Berghuis

Fresh Face: Crave ASHLEY BERGHUIS KNOWS how to bring people together. The owner of Crave, a new healthy smoothie bar on Bethlehem’s north side, uses her natural skills as a community connector not just to make delicious, balanced, nutrientdense drinks for the regulars, but to bring those regulars closer together. Crave serves clean energies and smoothies made with Herbalife Nutrition products, which Ashley first began distributing after they helped her manage her weight. She’d struggled with weight loss for most of her life, but within a week of introducing the shakes into her diet, she noticed positive

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77 WEST BROAD STREET #11C

changes. Ashley intended to share her own experience with Herbalife through social media, helping clients online—but one day she drove by an empty retail space. She got a gut feeling that stuck with her, and launched her plan to create a welcoming spot where people could gather and start their own healthful habits. (Though with smoothie flavors like Banana Nut Muffin, French Toast, and Peppermint Mocha, you may forget you’re drinking something that’s good for you.) There’s a real focus at Crave on friends and family. Ashley’s husband Alex designed the Crave logo, the Crave Team took

610.905.0485

CR AVEBETHLEHEM.COM

an active role in building the space, and many of the people you will find behind the bar were once regulars that just fell in love with the products. “I hope people feel like this is a place where they can have a good conversation,” says Ashley. “We try really hard to leave the junk at the door, and just be a light.” The idea is not to just serve you and send you on your way, says Ashley. You’re welcome to hang out at the bright, inviting bar. Since Crave opened in May 2018, she’s watched relationships—and real friendships—get made, one tasty smoothie at a time.


GIVING BACK Making a difference in the lives of others.

Giving Back: Matt Wolf YOU MAY HAVE SEEN Matt Wolf around. At the Ice House, running the Experimento benefit show; or behind the reference desk at the Bethlehem Area Public Library, where he’s an information technician. Or in Bethlehem’s cultural scene, reading a poem or enjoying the vibe, a deep lover and supporter of local arts. The Northwest Bethlehem native and Liberty High grad honed his skills as a poet and arts enthusiast for eight years in San Francisco. Then he came home, and was drawn to hosting and

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booking shows, creating opportunities for new and seasoned artists to perform and collaborate. The Ice House Tonight Poetry night event, which he’s overseen since 2015, highlights a wide variety of artists, from writers to dancers, painters to musicians. Matt considers the Bethlehem Area Public Library his “home base.” His earliest memories are of the library, where he won a poetry contest in the second grade. Now a portion of the proceeds from A Journey, his first book of poetry—published by

LEARN MORE ABOUT FIG GIVING BACK AT FIGBETHLEHEM.COM

the library’s new BAPL Books imprint— goes to support the library. “There’s so much that connects,” Wolf says. In life, in the arts, in Bethlehem, and that mindful wholeness allows him to create and to give. “People have supported me so much, and now, in turn, I have the opportunity to give of myself, to help others, to bring them together. And the wheel of influence keeps turning." You can purchase Matt's book "A Journey" online at www.bapl.org/bapl-books


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K ARI KE YOCK

Imagevolution

LE SLIE YOUNG Imagevolution

R ANDY M AUT Z

Imagevolution

EL AY NEE POLENTES Imagevolution

JOANNE SMIDA R ACHEL ABOT T

Hand Cut Crystal

The Yoga Loft

JENNIFER

D E JESUS Steel City Realty

DANIELLE MULLIG AN

The Gem Shop

BRIANA LASKO Letteredgem

LIZ MOYZAN

Forté Salon

ANDREA DEJESUS

A-List Salon

SORAYA BALSHI

Seasons Olive Oil & Vinegar

KIM PLYLER

Sahl Communications

GINA MASOTTO Bonn Place Brewing Co.

#WomensWork DOING OUR PART


JULIE AMANDA CASCIANO & KING Apotheca Salon & Boutique

ASHLEY MATLOCK Rise Above Hair Studio

MARY LOPRESTI VegOut

ELAINE PIVINSKI

Franklin Hill Vineyards

CARMEN TORO

Beauty Alibi

ADELE HOLLIDAY

Clementine Salon

ANN MARIE SUPINSKI AM Luxe

SHELLI TOPPING

Roasted Bethlehem

SHERRI KERSHNER KATE FLATT

Twisted Olive

RACHEL GRIFFITH

Apollo Grill

Social Still

JENNY LIM

Jenny's Kuali

DONNA MUGAVERO

Sheer Brick Studio

GENEVIEVE MARCON

Church Street Market

JENNIFER CENEVIVA

Edward Jones Investments

THANKS TO

Lynn Cunningham and Lauren Bertucci from the Bethlehem Chamber of Commerce for connecting Fig to these impactful and inspiring women.

R EC E N T STAT I ST I C S SAY T H AT

every day in the U.S. nearly 1,000 businesses are started by women—and that the percentage of women-owned businesses has more than doubled in the last 20 years. Bethlehem is doing its part: the 30 entrepreneurs in this photo proudly represent just

a small segment of dynamic, hard-working women who own businesses in our Downtown districts, and beyond. And there are plenty more where they came from. We’ve loved getting to know them, and we recommend you get to know them, too.

NOT PICTURED Candi Staurinos (Mayflower Lunch), Lisa Ronca (Cutters Bike Shop), and Annamarie Snow (Santoro’s Franks & Chili)

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AUTHENTIC Leading the way through innovation and example.

John and Anthony Trapani

Fresh Face: ZEST IF YOU WANT TO get a bird’s eye view of beautiful Bethlehem in any season, check out ZEST Bar & Grille, located at The Rooftop at 306 South New Street in the heart of the South Side Historic District. With its floor-to-ceiling glass windows and balcony seating, patrons can enjoy impressive views of Steel Stacks, the Hill-to-Hill and Fahy bridges, Bethlehem Library and City Hall and, of course, a good amount of the South Side itself. ZEST’s manager, Anthony Trapani, was born and raised in Bethlehem, an alumnus of both Bethlehem Catholic High School and Lehigh University. He also grew up

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306 SOUTH NEW STREET

610.419.4320

in the restaurant business—his father, John, created ZEST’s sister restaurant, the award-winning Grille 3501 in the West End of Allentown. “I started washing dishes when I was 14,” Anthony says, “and I’ve pretty much done everything besides actually going behind the line and cook.” When his father told him the owner of the building where ZEST is now located asked him about the possibility of putting a restaurant there, the younger Trapani was in his father’s ear right away. “I was one of the drivers behind it,” Anthony says, “because living in Bethlehem my whole life, I’ve seen what’s been going on on the South Side and the potential for it going forward.”

ZESTBETHLEHEM.COM

ZEST’s menu highlights the best of New American cuisine, putting a fresh twist on its sister restaurant’s menu, including sea scallops served with parmesan risotto, rosemary-lemon vinaigrette, baby arugula, and burnt onion puree. Opened in January, this spring ZEST will have outdoor patio space that will make the restaurant completely open air, giving the already exceptional restaurant a completely different feel. “You get a pretty unique view of Bethlehem,” Anthony says. “There really isn’t another kind of location with this kind of atmosphere.”


GATHER

FAMILY

CREATE

ENTERTAIN

RELAX

UNWIND

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Thinking Bigger BETHLEHEM HAS LONG BEEN

a community of forwardthinking individuals, with a creative, “thinking bigger” spirit that keeps the greater good at heart. On the following pages, you’ll read stories of folks who are keeping that spirit alive—entrepreneurs and changemakers who are getting things done with intention and vision, thinking beyond profit and toward building a community for good. These are stories of businesses who saw the future long ago, and took some risks to get there. Stories of sustainability and social consciousness, childhood education and community arts, redevelopment and renewable energy. Stories that we hope will continue to raise expectations and awareness for current and future leaders in our community.

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Bryon L. Grigsby MORAVIAN COLLEGE

F O R M O R AV I A N C O L L EG E , thinking big

is a part of its history—and its future. “We’ve been offering a revolutionary education for more than 275 years,” says President Bryon Grigsby. The College was founded in 1742, the same year that Bethlehem officially took its name on Christmas Eve. In those earliest days, unlike the handful of other pre-colonial schools in existence, Moravian wasn’t concerned with educating the sons of wealth and nobility alone. Moravian Bishop John Amos Comenius had a radical philosophy, one that guided the College’s founders: universal education. Moravian was the first school to educate

women, and the first to educate Native Americans in their own language. That spirit of universality, that “education should concern itself with that which concerns society,” guides Bryon and everyone at Moravian, from the students to the staff and faculty. And as society changes, so does Moravian. As an Apple Distinguished School, it provides each of its students with MacBooks and iPads so that the technological playing field is level and fair. And it imbues those students with a sense that education benefits the common good, and volunteering and serving their community is an important part of not only their studies but their lives.

Moravian’s mission is to develop individuals—for a reflective life, fulfilling careers, and transformative leadership. “We’re preparing students for the career they think they want,” says Bryon, “and the three to four other careers they most likely will have over their lifetimes.” Moravian offers professional programs in nursing, business, and education, in addition to a liberal arts undergraduate degree that readies students to never stop learning, to grow, and to adapt. As Moravian’s history demonstrates, treading a different path can open the way to the future.

1200 MAIN STREET

610.861.1320

MORAVIAN.EDU

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W H E N T H E WO R L D I S moving fast,

it’s quietly radical to think about the long term. To make smart investments. To work diligently with excellence and integrity. To build trust and genuine relationships. Those are the guiding principles of Evoke Solar, the Lehigh Valley’s most established designer and installer of solar electricity systems for homes and small commercial projects. Since 2013, Evoke has grown steadily from a one-man show, to a husband-and-wife team run by

Wes and Roshelle Checkeye out of their Hellertown home, to a growing family of a dozen employees. Wes first began working for Heat Shed— Evoke’s predecessor company—in high school, holding numerous roles in the company through college and beyond. When Heat Shed’s owner, Charlie Reichner, retired, another company purchased the business and it fell into bankruptcy soon after. Wes was compelled to act. It was a risk, but confident in the tremendous value of solar energy, he picked up the pieces— and founded Evoke Solar.

Roshelle & Wes Checkeye

Wes and Roshelle love the Lehigh Valley, and since Evoke’s founding, they’ve

EVOKE SOLAR

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323 LINDEN AVENUE, HELLERTOWN

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EVOKESOLAR.COM

been thrilled to watch interest in solar energy here grow exponentially. Their proximity to New Jersey, combined with the state’s renewable energy incentives, has brought them many clients over the state border, as well. “The benefits of solar have a ripple effect,” they say. Making renewable energy affordable and accessible helps homeowners and businesses save money and act meaningfully for the environment, which has a positive impact on the community at large. Clean, renewable energy helps sustain us all, and this truth is reflected in the respect with which Evoke runs their business. Going solar is a powerful experience, say Wes and Roshelle—for client, community, and for the team at Evoke. “The mutual respect and spirit of collaboration we experience as we work unites us.”


Adam & Kate Flatt/ Elaine Pivinski S O C I A L ST I L L / F R A N K L I N H I L L V I N E YA R D S K AT E A N D A DA M F L AT T O P E N E D

Social Still, the Lehigh Valley’s first distillery since prohibition, five years ago in a century-old bank building on Third Street. “When they built the building in 1919 you couldn’t legally drink,” says Adam—who also serves as master distiller—“and now we’re making booze in it.” The Social Still story starts on 60 acres in Northampton County, where Adam cut his teeth at Franklin Hill Winery—the award-winning vineyard established by his mom, Elaine Pivinski, in 1981. What Adam had learned in the wine business

was that people were no longer coming to a winery just for a purchase decision and going home to tell their friends about it—people were now coming out as a group together and sampling, and he realized it was more than just a simple transaction. “That’s why we chose a historic building,” he says, “with the modern distilling and the beautiful food and drinks, all of the sudden it’s an experience and not just a brand.”

own. “In the wise words of Crosby, Stills, & Nash,” says Elaine proudly, “‘teach your children well.’” And she did. In addition to an American-Fusion style menu and cocktails like no other, this micro distillery is also environmentally conscious, eliminating all their plastic straws and creating the hashtag #wedontsuck. They also donate five months of safe water for people in the developing world with every bottle sold.

Watching his mom grow an environmentally and socially conscious vineyard with deep ties to its community instilled in Adam a sense of responsibility to a world beyond his

“Social Still is a great continuation of what we do at Franklin Hill,” Adam says, “We’re always willing to take those kind of risks.” And think about the bigger picture, too.

530 EAST THIRD STREET 610.625.4585 SOCIALSTILL.COM 7 8 3 3 F R A N K L I N H I L L R O A D , B A N G O R | T A S T I N G R O O M : 5 5 9 M A I N S T R E E T 6 1 0 . 5 8 8 . 8 7 0 8 F R A N K L I N H I L LV I N E Y A R D S . C O M

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Josh & Marge Early J O S H E A R LY C A N D I E S

AT J O S H E A R LY, chocolate has been

in the family for five generations. In the early twentieth century, Josh Early III sold chocolate wholesale with a partner; his grandson, Josh Early V and his wife, Marge, first opened a candy store in Reading, and moved to Allentown in 1961. Amy Barnett, Josh III’s great-great granddaughter, grew up hearing stories of those early days—their house was next door, so if a customer came while she was making dinner, Marge would walk over to wait on them—and watching generations of her family create and sell sweet confections.

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Josh V’s vision for his business was clear. Work hard. Use quality ingredients, and give the customer a quality experience. Support the little guy; buy from other local businesses. There’s a “hierarchy of experience,” says Amy, “you know the go-to people” for certain tasks, but the organizational structure is flat. That’s another part of the Josh Early philosophy: “don’t ask anyone to do what you wouldn’t do yourself.” And today, because of the solid, qualityfocused business her grandparents built—“working, literally, side by side all their lives”—Josh Early Candies

BETHLEHEM: 3620 NAZARETH BETHLEHEM PIKE | ALLENTOWN: 4640 TILGHMAN STREET

does good in the community. For over a decade, they’ve raised money for local women’s health non-profit the Women’s 5K Classic, and are involved with the Lehigh Valley Center for Independent Living and the Volunteer Center of the Lehigh Valley. Working hard, staying humble, making good quality products, and doing good in the world. They may not sound like big ideas, because they’re so simple. But focusing on the little things—a delectable bite of chocolate, a business grown and tended with and like family—can have the biggest, sweetest rewards.

610.865.0580

J O S H E A R LYC A N D I E S . C O M


Derek Wallen ROASTED | LEHIGH VALLEY PRINTING STA R T I N G A B U S I N ES S isn’t easy.

Derek Wallen knows. He has launched a few, including Roasted, with Shelli and Chris Topping, a restaurant on Bethlehem’s SouthSide focusing on the freshest and healthiest organic, local food, and conscious of gluten free, vegetarian, and vegan options. And Lehigh Valley Printing (LVP), with Tim Brandt, a screen printing and embroidery company that once lived in a 200-squarefoot basement that has grown by a magnitude of 20 since it was founded. Managing growth while balancing risk is a

Photographed with Edwing Joseph of Edwing Joseph & Sons & Mary Lopresti of VegOut vegan café

challenge for any new business. Roasted and LVP are responding to that challenge by thinking creatively, and not just about themselves. Both businesses share their commercial space with entrepreneurial employees—providing low overhead support for getting new dreams off the ground. LVP shares office space with Edwing Joseph & Sons, a leader in custom tailored menswear, impeccable tailoring, suiting, and alterations. Edwing comes from a family of tailors, and “his work, the quality, is amazing,” says Derek. Roasted, meanwhile, shares space with VegOut, overseen by Roasted server Mary Lopresti,

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who runs the 100% vegan restaurant in the evenings while Roasted is closed. Ultimately, that’s what thinking bigger means: looking for opportunities, efficiencies, new ways to grow and to work, and imagining beyond your own business to support someone else’s. “I think ‘business for good’ is about community and support,” says Derek, “rather than making everything about the bottom line.” Between partnerships with local farmers and food producers, and space-sharing agreements with entrepreneurs, Roasted and LVP are doing just that: good.

610.849.2673

ROASTEDBETHLEHEM.COM

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Andy Cassano ZOELLNER ARTS CENTER AT LEHIGH UNIVERSITY T H E A R TS B E L O N G TO E V E R YO N E —and

then some, according to Andy Cassano, Administrative Director of Zoellner Arts Center at Lehigh University: they are “essential for creative, socially-engaged citizenry; for economic development and exploring assumptions about the world we live in.” That belief—that firsthand arts experience is a crucial tool for lifelong learning, and for emotional, societal, and cultural health—underpins the mission that drives Andy and everyone at Zoellner. Zoellner, a flagship cultural venue in the Lehigh Valley, is home to Lehigh University’s music and theater departments and art galleries, and presents a vibrant season of events and guest performances by hundreds of artists and speakers from around the block and around the world. And Andy is looking beyond Zoellner’s stages to bring arts access and equity to local children through Any Given Child, a national program stewarded by the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. Bethlehem is the 24th city in the nation to enter Any Given Child—and the first in Pennsylvania. The collective impact program, led by Zoellner in collaboration with the Bethlehem Area School District, and drawing on the experience of more than 50 local leaders, is establishing a vision “of a learning community,” says Andy, “where every child experiences, creates, and values the arts. It’s our hope that this not only improves the educational experience for children overall, but plays a long-term role in developing the creative economy for Bethlehem and the Lehigh Valley.” Andy sees Zoellner’s role as one of service: to the artists on its stages, and to the people of Bethlehem. Beyond the stage, Zoellner is committed to providing access and an understanding of the value of the arts, he says—“for the greater good of elevating the community we live in.”

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420 EAST PACKER AVENUE

610.758.2787

ZOELLNERARTSCENTER.ORG


Brian Carr SANDS BETHLEHEM | WIND CREEK

T H E B E T H L E H E M ST E E L plant on the

South Side was the economic engine of the Bethlehem community for nearly a century, employing thousands of people making the steel for the nation’s civilian and military infrastructure. But when the steel industry fell on hard times and the plant closed, it left a literal and metaphorical hole in the Bethlehem community at large. In 2009, Las Vegas Sands began to fill both voids with Sands Casino Resort Bethlehem, bringing back jobs and a sense of pride in the city. Now, Sands Bethlehem is poised to fulfill

the dream of repurposing the entire 128-acre site by selling it for $1.3 billion to Wind Creek Hospitality, which has already announced it will inject $190 million into the property before the final deal has been inked. This includes $100 million for repurposing Machine Shop No. 2, with one possibility being an indoor water park. The additional $90 million will build a second hotel tower, tied to the existing hotel, that will help accommodate the projected increase in visitors to Bethlehem by doubling their space to nearly 600 rooms, says Brian Carr, President and Chief

Operating Officer of Sands Bethlehem. The benefit to the Bethlehem community goes beyond new jobs and tax revenue, but other development projects that the new deal with Wind Creek Hospitality will stimulate. The site will no longer be primarily a casino and a hotel for casino-goers, but a much broader entertainment destination for a greater array of Lehigh Valley residents. “When all is said and done, this is going to be a good thing,” Brian says. “We’re going to see the promise of what we thought could happen in this community really starting to go.”

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PASANDS.COM

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B I L L G EO R G E C O F O U N D E D

Touchstone Theatre 38 years ago based on a big idea: to transform the way art was made. Rebalancing the traditional power structure—from a director with primary control to a collaboration where all performers are given creative agency—meant a vision could be shared in every sense of the word.

Over the years, the Touchstone ensemble has been an expression and a reflection of that philosophy, and of the soul of Bethlehem. Today, the ensemble is comprised of a core of six individuals, including Bill, Artistic Director Jp Jordan, Managing Director Lisa Jordan, General Manager Emma Ackerman, Education Director Mary Wright, and Ensemble Member and Director of Theater at Moravian College Christopher Shorr. “It’s a profound creative collaboration,” says Bill, one that is constantly evolving, and that has touched the lives of many in Bethlehem and beyond—artists and audiences alike, one generation to the next.

Touchstone Theatre FESTIVAL UNBOUND OCTOBER 4-13, 2019

Left to Right: Emma Ackerman, Jp Jordan, Bill George, Christopher Shorr, Lisa Jordan, (Not Pictured: Mary Wright)

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321 EAST FOURTH STREET

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TOUCHSTONE.ORG

That depth of experience, as an ensemble and as Bethlehemites, is what gives Touchstone its unique power in the community. Starting October 4, 2019, Touchstone will be presenting the ten-day Festival UnBound: a series of original art performances and happenings presented to mark the anniversary of its Steel Festival, created 20 years ago to help Bethlehem process the trauma of the Steel’s closing. A partnership with the City of Bethlehem, Festival Unbound will look to the past, celebrate the present, and create a vision for the future, for all. “It’s going to be a ton of fun,” says Bill. “We’ll be using the arts not just as entertainment but as an opportunity for transformation, exalting and celebrating our community.” Consider our calendars marked.


IceHouse DOUG ROYSDON

T H E I D E A O F “ L OV I N G L O CA L” is even

bigger than supporting restaurants and businesses. Loving local means engaging with what’s unique about your home city. It’s what Doug Roysdon, Artistic Director of Mock Turtle Marionette Theater, sees as the mission of the IceHouse: to provide a space for local art to flourish and be embraced by the community. The city-owned structure is a space where new talent and professionals can explore and examine the unique past and present of Bethlehem, all while building a “sustainable arts community”—a creative body linked to community groups, government, and citizens.

The IceHouse—which produced and stored ice for Bethlehem for decades—is a living piece of history. “You do go back to the nineteenth century,” says Doug. “People just love to be here.” And many folks are surprised to learn that this hidden gem hosts some 200 shows a year, as a venue for Lehigh Valley artists and nonprofits including Pennsylvania Youth Theater, Mock Turtle Marionettes, Touchstone Theatre, and the grassroots arts series, IceHouse Tonight. The goal “is to make it our place,” says Doug, “a response to our own community’s assets. That is, our local history, educational communities, and our diverse

56 RIVER STREET

populations. We want to do new and original art that takes risks and addresses our community issues.” With Doug’s vision and Eastern PA Arts Alliance board president Silagh White’s leadership—and in partnership with community nonprofits and the City—the IceHouse has the power to transform. “Not only do we want to build a stage for our local artists,” says Doug, “we want to raise them. It’s our job to support and develop our performers and advocates.” So that they may continue to share their stories—of what it means to live in Bethlehem and make art local.

610.865.7081

I C E H O U S E T O N I G H T. C O M

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Steve Kershner TWISTED OLIVE W H E N E M M A U S N AT I V E Steve Kershner and his wife Sherri decided to open Twisted Olive, they were determined to do things other restaurants weren’t doing. Like supplementing their menu with everything grown from their own gardens.

Part of the plan involved clearing a piece of land that was being overtaken by woods on their home property in Williams Township. “In the back of my mind, there was always going to be a large garden there someday,”

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51 WEST BROAD STREET

610.419.1200

Steve says, “and when the restaurant idea came into play I said, ‘Now we’re gonna make this garden bigger.’” One of the fruitful (pun intended) ideas to emerge from the garden is a unique, fully-stocked infusion bar. “We don’t buy any flavored alcohols at all,” says Steve. “We make all of our own, and that includes herbs from our herb garden and vegetables from our vegetable garden.” That summer lettuce in your salad? Straight from Chef’s garden. And every fall, the restaurant features a Butternut

TWISTEDOLIVEBETHLEHEM.COM

Squash Ravioli entree on the menu. “People start asking me for it in June,” Steve says. “And I have to say, ‘No, no, you have to wait for the squash to grow!’” And while there are definitely regular favorites offered, Steve is always looking to experiment, to put a fresh but approachable twist on the menu— hence the name, the Twisted Olive. “We didn’t want people to take us too seriously,” he says. “We like to keep it upbeat and casual.” And a chef-grown approach keeps it hyper-local, too.


Ann Marie Supinski AM LUXE APPAREL

M O ST P EO P L E K N OW AM Luxe, at the

corner of Broad and Main, as a carefully curated collection of clothing. Stopping by the shop is an experience for the senses: the feel of the fabrics, the visual presentation of each collection, the sound of a warm welcome, the fragrance of a candle burning. In the inviting space, every display is a stylish feast for the eyes. Owner Ann Marie Supinski— the AM in AM Luxe—opened her store after 38 years of industry experience with a vision of every client “leaving my shop feeling her day is better because she stopped by. Feeling confident and special with every purchase she makes.”

But AM Luxe has a mission to match: to be a place where “Community Support is in Fashion”. “Giving back to the communities where our employees and clients live and work is an important part of our commitment to social responsibility,” says Ann Marie. To this end, AM Luxe hosts regular Shop With Purpose in-store fundraising events that directly support nonprofits in our area. And she doesn’t stop there: Ann Marie also makes charitable donations, supports employee volunteering with local organizations, and provides mentorship and college internship opportunities for young women.

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In addition to building on AM Luxe’s collections and brands for women and men, expanding its private labels—AM Luxe Men, Ann Marie for women—Ann Marie plans to deepen its positive social impact over time. Building relationships with clients and with the community, understanding and serving the unique needs of both, is all part of the bigger picture—and key to the AM Luxe philosophy. “Focus on Business as Unusual!” says Ann Marie. “You want clients to feel the experience they have in your business is special, something they won’t find anywhere else.”

610.419.203

AMLUXEAPPAREL.COM

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Spencer Cobb EDGE RESTAURANT E D G E R ESTA U R A N T I S B U I LT on a simple idea: changing what you think is possible. “Our goal,” says co-owner Spencer Cobb, “is to remove the stigma that we need to be dressed a certain way, have tons of money, or be out for a special occasion in order to experience fine dining.” Edge focuses on quality and consistency, depth of experience—co-owner Timothy Widrick has been executive chef for almost all of Edge’s 17 years in existence—and a great environment.

The restaurant itself is relaxed and informal, and the staff is managed for success. “Treat people with respect,” says Spencer, “pay them a fair wage,” and never, “under any circumstance, micromanage.” Empower employees to learn from their mistakes, and you’ll promote growth and loyalty. And every single staff member, from the dish room to the general manager, receives an annual holiday bonus. “We treat our staff as family,” says Spencer, “because in a lot of ways, we are all family.” This philosophy of respect, positive connection, and giving back extends well beyond the four walls of the restaurant. Deeply committed to the community they’re proud and grateful to be a part of, Edge’s goal is to host an event every single month where 100% of the funds from the event’s food sales are donated to a designated charity. Edge has plans to expand, and to open more locations throughout the Lehigh Valley. Each will have its own unique spin but preserve the spirit that is Edge: casual but special. Focused on quality and service, and driven to “give back to the community through charity, create a reputable working environment, and provide a service,” says Spencer, “that promotes pleasure.”

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74 W E S T B R O A D S T R E E T , S U I T E 2 2 0

610.814.0100

E D G E R E S T A U R A N T. N E T


Timothy Fox FOX OPTICAL

I T D I D N ’ T STA R T O U T A S A

promotional idea. Fox Optical began hanging a rotating gallery of local art in their South Side office because “we love art, and we knew so many artists looking for a place to be seen.” To Dr. Tim Fox and his husband (and optician) Mike Belletti—a fiber artist with deep connections to the Bethlehem art scene—it seemed a natural extension of their community spirit. “Over time,” says Tim, as the gallery brought in new customers and delighted existing ones, “we realized, wow, this is marketing!” Since Fox Optical opened in 1998, they have shown more than 100 artists,

mostly local, in their gallery space. And that philosophy—creating change out of genuine interest and thoughtful intent—informs every part of their business, which provides far more than an eye exam. The boutique optical shop offers personal care, fashionable frames, a holistic consideration of all the ways that sight (and being seen) affects an individual—and a sweet canine greeter. Bella, Tim’s 12-yearold bearded collie, has been coming to work since January 2007. Now semi-retired, the gentle pup remains a terrific ambassador for Fox Optical.

“It changes people,” says Tim, especially new customers who don’t expect to see a dog in a medical office. “Their voice pattern changes, their demeanor changes—‘oh, there’s a dog here!’. Dogs reduce stress, and promote positive interactions between people.” Bella and the gallery, participating in First Fridays and the SouthSide Arts District events, are all part of the bigger picture for Fox Optical, which is about caring for the whole person and the whole community. “Vision is more than just glasses or contact lenses,” says Tim. “It’s how we see the world.”

28 EAST THIRD STREET

610.332.2400

FOXOPTICAL.COM

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“ P EO P L E D O N ’ T R E A L I Z E H OW

accessible public art can be, and the impact it can have,” says Stacie Brennan, Senior Director for Visual Arts at ArtsQuest, the nonprofit that owns and operates the ArtsQuest Center at SteelStacks and the Banana Factory Arts Center. People may also not realize that the Banana Factory, located on 25 West Third Street, is a community arts center. That means that the building is free and open to the public every day, and includes exhibitions, artist studios, and arts classes. “These are just a few of the many ways we’re

providing access to the arts,” Brennan says. “An extension of this is our public arts program, which gives artists the opportunity to make an indelible mark on the community.” For the past three years, ArtsQuest has worked with community groups and businesses to install five largescale murals and sculptures by regional artists across Bethlehem. They are also in the process of securing locations for additional murals and sculptures in preparation for SouthSide Arts and Music Festival on May 3rd and 4th.

Stacie Brennan BANANA FACTORY ARTS CENTER

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25 WEST THIRD STREET

610.332.1300

B A N A N A F A C T O R Y. O R G

ArtsQuest welcomes everyone to participate in its programs, regardless of financial circumstances. Scholarship and tuition assistance are available for those who qualify based on financial need, and they always offer free family programming at all of their festivals and events. “Our goal is to continue to expand access to the arts, and opportunities for artists in the community,” Brennan says, “in order to make it a visible reminder of how the arts provide an opportunity for individuals to feel ownership over, and get excited about, being a part of the city and their community.”


Angela Zanelli & Jill Pereira

Angela Zanelli

Jill Pereira

LEHIGH VALLEY READS “ I T ’ S S O M U C H M O R E T H A N reading. It’s breaking the cycle of poverty and improving quality of life in our region.”

Reading proficiency by third grade is the most important predictor of high school graduation and career success. Yet last year, a third of Lehigh Valley students left third grade reading below grade level. Lehigh Valley Reads, a partnership between PBS39 and United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley, aims to tackle the problem by focusing on key areas: early childhood education, school attendance, summer learning opportunities, and trauma informed classrooms.

Jill Pereira, Senior Vice President of Education and Impact at United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley led the charge by helping to develop and organize five coalitions that drive this important work. Overseen by United Way staff, they’re made up of hundreds of volunteers from communities all across the Lehigh Valley. “That’s where the work is being done,” says Angela Zanelli, PBS39 Campaign Director for Lehigh Valley Reads. “My job is to help develop the strategy and systems so that this important work can expand to reach all 17 school districts in the Lehigh Valley.”

ANGELAZ@LEHIGHVALLEYREADS.ORG

The goal is to have, by 2025, 100% of Lehigh Valley students reading at grade level by the time they leave third grade. It’s an ambitious undertaking, encompassing two counties and affecting more than 220,000 students. “We want every kid to be able to live up to their potential,” Zanelli says. “It’s so much more than reading. It’s breaking the cycle of poverty and improving quality of life in our region. The United WayPBS39 partnership is unique,” she says. “I’m excited to be part of a team building something that has the potential to go even further than just the Lehigh Valley.”

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Celtic Cultural Alliance

C E L E B R AT I N G C E LT I C H I S T O R Y AND TR ADITION IN BETHLEHEM FOR 32 YEARS AND COUNTING

T H E C E LT I C C U LT U R A L A L L I A N C E (CCA) has been celebrating the history and tradition of the seven Celtic Nations—Scotland, Wales, Ireland, Brittany, Cornwall, Isle of Mann, and Galicia—for 32 years in Historic Downtown Bethlehem. CCA’s premier event is the beloved Celtic Classic Highland Games & Festival, but there’s so much more! From genealogy workshops, musical presentations, and history lectures to hands-on art classes and a Tartan Day Celebration, they’ve got something going on all year long! Mark your calendars for the Parade of Shamrocks, which will turn Main Street green on March 16th. If you wish to celebrate your Celtic heritage in a bigger way, consider volunteering at the Celtic Classic.

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TO STAY CURRENT WITH ALL CCA CULTUR AL EVENTS OR VOLUNTEER, VISIT WWW.CELTICFEST.ORG.


WE GET EVENTS! Mark your Calendars!

Historic District Clean-Up APRIL 27

Tunes At Twilight Thursdays

MAY 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 • JUNE 6, 13, 20, 27 • JULY 11 & 18

Summer Restaurant Week JUNE 23 - 29

Vegfest JULY 13

Harvestfest OCTOBER 5

EXPERIENCE BETHLEHEM!

www.GetDowntownBethlehem.com

Advocating for small businesses in the historic, arts, and shopping districts. WHO WE ARE The Downtown Bethlehem Association is a council of The Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce. W H AT W E D O We aim to revitalize, rehabilitate, promote, and advance downtown business areas within the City of Bethlehem. JOIN US Have questions about the downtown, current events, or just curious about how to get involved? Visit getdowntownbethlehem.com. Find out about the benefits of being a member of the DBA by contacting Lauren or Tim at LaurenB@lehighvalleychamber.org or TimB@lehighvalleychamber.org. GETDOWNTOWNBETHLEHEM.COM

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U N I Q U E P I E C E S W I T H H I S T O R Y A N D A S T O R Y. Owner Matt Kriner and the team at RustiK Rehab take pride in giving old and forgotten materials a second chance. Antique warehouse framing, 19th-century barn beams, and salvaged live edge lumber can be transformed into anything from farm tables to coffee tables, from desks to decor, from bars to barn doors to built-ins, and more. Everything that Rustik Rehab creates is a truly unique, one-of-a-kind piece made from reclaimed materials—with history and a story.

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CONTACT JENNIFER GROSS: JGROSS@HISTORICBETHLEHEM.ORG

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I N T R O D U C I N G O U R 2 0 1 9 S O C I A L M I S S I O N PA R T N E R

Cáfe The Lodge

AT F I G , we believe in the power of a community that works together to identify needs and find solutions—one that creates connections and is passionate about helping its neighbors. We believe in the mission of Café The Lodge—our 2019 Social Mission Partner. Please consider supporting and surrounding them this year. I F YO U ’ R E L O O K I N G for a place to eat well and do good, we’d like to introduce you to Fig Bethlehem’s 2019 Social Mission Partner! Located on Bethlehem’s South Side, not only does Café the Lodge have a diverse selection of great food and a tranquil terrace in the back—it explicitly employs and empowers those with mental health diagnoses. “We are thrilled to be Fig’s Social Mission Partner of 2019,” said Ian Panyko, Director, “and we look forward to showing the Valley that the employees of Café the Lodge are

the faces of mental health recovery.” The café is a part of a larger holistic recovery program called The Lodge—in which consumers engage in a small community and support each other daily. Funded by Northampton County Mental Health, The Lodge offers guidance in establishing independent living routines and wholesome lifestyles, providing employment and volunteer opportunities at Café the Lodge as well as recreational and educational events for its members and for the community at large—including an ongoing “Artists in Recovery” exhibit,

427 EAST 4TH STREET

featuring artwork from residents, staff, and community members. The Lodge houses 12 individuals in the community, while Café the Lodge employs up to 18 individuals at any given time. The end goal is to give people the skills for independent living and competitive employment in the community, whether in another restaurant or somewhere else. “Our program is interesting,” says Ian, “because we don’t say, here’s what you need to do. Instead, we ask, what do you need to do to be well?”

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The Sands is dedicated to SouthSide business growth.

SPRING

SouthSide ON THE

SATU R DAY, A PR I L 27, 2019

PREPARE YOUR TASTE BUDS for a Chili Challenge like no other at the SouthSide Arts District’s Spring on the SouthSide Community Festival & Chili Cook-Off. Entering their 24th year on Saturday, April 27th SouthSide Arts District is welcoming more than 20 competing chilis to contend for the Title of People’s Choice Best Chili and the Celebrity Judge’s Top Choice! Last year’s 2018 winners—The Bayou &

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SOUTHSIDEARTSDISTRICT.COM

A List Salon & Spa (People’s Choice) and Social Still (Judge’s Top Choice)—will be contending again to hold onto their crown. Chili Tastings will be stationed throughout the shops and restaurants of Third and Fourth Streets. Chili passports and maps will be available online at www. southsideartsdistrict.com or that day at the registration booth on the Greenway

between Adams and New Streets. A $10 passport will get you 10 tastings to enjoy or share. NEW this year—the ULTIMATE CHILI PASSPORT—giving you access to try all 20+ Chili Competitors that day for $18! Bring a canned food donation in support of New Bethany Ministries and the Hispanic Center Lehigh Valley’s Food Pantry, and you will receive a $2 discount on your passport!


The festival day includes: Photo by Peter Hershey

11 A M - 3 P M

12 P M - 5 P M

Cops ‘N’ Kids 13th Annual Celebration of Reading and the Arts & Sciences W H AT: Free entertainment, free books, free food, crafts, science experiments, and more! WHERE: Northampton Community College Fowler Family SouthSide Center at 511 East Third Street.

Two new Beer Gardens will be added to the festival this year! Molly’s Irish Grille & Sports Pub will be hosting their Beer Garden outside of their location on Fourth & New Streets. And Bonn Place Brewing, along with other brewers & spirits, will be hosting their Beer Garden outside of Bonn at Mechanic and Taylor streets! Be sure to bring your Musikfest Mug!

CO P S ‘ N ’ K I D S C E LE B R AT I O N O F R E A D I N G

11 A M - 5 P M

C H I LI CO O K O F F C E LE B R AT I O N Chili Tastings will be stationed throughout the shops and restaurants of Third and Fourth Streets! Pick up your passport at the registration booth located on the Greenway between Adams & New Streets. W H AT: Enjoy 10 tastings and vote for your favorite chili. Enjoy live music, sidewalk sales, live art demonstrations, vendors on the Greenway, and FREE crafts for the kids! NEW this year—the ULTIMATE CHILI PASSPORT—giving you access to try all 20+ Chili Competitors that day for $18!

N E W B E E R G A R D E N S AT M O LLY ’ S I R I S H G R I LLE A N D B O N N P L AC E B R E W I N G

4PM - 5PM

H OT P E P P E R E AT I N G CO N T E S T & WINNER ANNOUNCEMENTS Only the strong survive at Homebase Skate Shop’s HOT Pepper Eating Contest. Watch local heroes dive into the depths of spicy peppers, and see a new champion be crowned! Then stay for the announcement of our People’s Choice & Judge’s Choice Chili Winners! For more information visit southsideartsdistrict.com or call 610.419.9180 to speak with Missy Hartney, the SouthSide Arts District Downtown Manager.

For more details on these events, visit S O U T H S I D E A RT S D I ST R I CT.CO M 77 SANDS BOULE VARD RESERVATIONS: 877.726.3777 PASANDS.COM

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Amy Perdue

T H E S O U T H S I D E A R T S D I S T R I C T is the Lehigh Valley’s

home for art, entertainment, shopping, and dining. From vast art galleries to unique boutiques, fantastic restaurants and special events, the SouthSide Arts District is one of the most eclectic places to live, work, and play! Whether you’re looking for fashion-forward threads, strong, vibrant signature pieces for your home, a delicious meal, or a slice of history; the SouthSide Arts District is the Art & Soul of Bethlehem.

SPRING / SUMMER C A L E N DA R O F E V E N T S

Ramiro Davaro

FI R S T FR I DAY

A P R I L 5 T H , M AY 3 R D , J U N E 7 T H On the First Friday of every month, Bethlehem’s SouthSide Arts District comes to life, celebrating arts, culture, and music. Guests are invited to visit local art galleries, unique boutiques, salons, and shops, all while enjoying food and drink samples and specials. The evening also features a homegrown concert series from the Underground Music Collective—showcasing more than 10 local musicians all evening long throughout the shops and restaurants of Third & Fourth Streets!

Lauren Kuhn

S PR I N G O N TH E SO UTH S I D E A P R I L 2 7 TH

Prepare your taste buds for a Chili Challenge like no other at the SouthSide Arts District’s Spring on the SouthSide Community Festival & Chili Cook-Off. Entering its 24th year on Saturday, April 27th SouthSide Arts District is welcoming more than 20 competing chilies to contend for the Title of People’s Choice Best Chili and the Celebrity Judge’s Top Choice! With live art demonstrations, free crafts for the kids, live music and 2 NEW BEER GARDENS, there’s something for every family member at Spring on the SouthSide. Join on the SouthSide’s Greenway to say goodbye to Old Man Winter and hello to Spring! Passports on sale soon!

S I P & S LI D E S U M M E R COCK TA I L C R AWL J U N E 15 TH

The summer has arrived and the SouthSide is celebrating with sidewalk sales, live music, and a delicious Summer-themed Cocktail Crawl. Enjoy 10 summery, sample sized cocktails (such as mojitos, margaritas & piña coladas) from your favorite SouthSide restaurants and shops! Sip and Slide your way through the SouthSide, Saturday June 15th from 1 – 4pm. Must be 21 to join the fun! Passports on sale soon!

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Rafael Menendez & Family of Maltas Con Leche

casino hotel outlet center 9 restaurants event center

SOUTHSIDEARTSDISTRICT.COM The Sands is dedicated to SouthSide business growth.


Denton Burrows

A R E YO U A N A R T I S T ? M U S I C I A N ? WA N T T O V O L U N T E E R ? Contact Missy Hartney, SouthSide Arts District Downtown Manager at 610.419.9180, or learn more at SouthSideArtsDistrict.com or on Facebook! Dripped on the Road

DID YOU KNOW? The SouthSide Arts District is a nonprofit Main Street Revitalization Program. Overseen by Downtown Manager Missy Hartney, committees of volunteers made up of business and nonprofit leaders volunteer their time, energy, and ideas to build a vibrant and sustainable SouthSide Downtown. The Design Committee, chaired by Stacie Brennan, Senior Director of Visual Arts at ArtsQuest, is dedicated to streetscape improvement projects—including expanding public art, floral arrangements, and street banners that energize and beautify the streets of the SouthSide. In 2018, with help from Lehigh University’s Dr. Karen Beck Pooley and with the support of the Lehigh Valley Arts Council and Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, the SouthSide Arts District was able to install six temporary murals on the South Bethlehem Greenway during ArtsQuest’s SouthSide Arts & Music Festival.

Joseph Iacona

This year, with the additional support of a Northampton County Capital Improvement Grant, those works will be given permanent homes on business walls throughout Third and Fourth Streets! In addition, a brand-new set of temporary murals will be installed on the Greenway during Spring on the SouthSide Community Festival & Chili Cook-Off (April 27th), and will remain there during the SouthSide Arts and Music Festival (May 3rd & 4th). These, like those from the previous year, will then be added to the streetscape in 2020. It’s the hope of all those involved in the SouthSide Arts District’s Design Committee that new murals can be added to the Greenway and Streetscape each year for visitors and residents to enjoy and to continue to make art accessible to everyone who visits the Arts District.

Devyn Briggs

77 SANDS BOULE VARD RESERVATIONS: 877.726.3777 PASANDS.COM

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Unconventional Pottery for Unconventional People HANDCRAFTED IN THEIR Pottsville

studio, Mud & Maker’s playful pieces blend artisan technique and colorful rustic aesthetic with just the right amount of snarky wit. Mud & Maker believes each day is unique—just like every piece of pottery they make. Visit them this season in their brick and mortar shop, at their booth at MAYFAIR (dates below!) or Easton Farmers’ Market, or online.

6 SOUTH CENTRE STREET, POTTSVILLE

484.650.2745

MUDANDMAKER.COM

fun for the entIre famIly

friesseion

aDm

May 24-26, 2019 Art. Food. Performance.

cedarcrest.edu/mayfair @CCCMayfair

cccmayfair

@CCCMayfair


FOOD WITH INTEGRITY

MADE WITH LOVE

SERVED WITH LOVE OWNERS MARIA VERZINO AND TIM MEASE believe that all good things start with

the first step. From their 100% local Pennsylvania-raised pork to delectable prepared dinners, everything on Saylor’s shelves represents their thoughtful and conscious approach to food. Maria’s your cook, and Tim’s your (third generation!) butcher. It’s their hands, guided by their hearts, that craft the Saylor’s experience—making it their mission to provide not only the best in customer service, but food you can trust, made with love.

F R E S H H O M E M A D E T R E AT S

D E LI C I O U S G R A B & G O

LO C A LLY S O U RC E D M E AT S

1105 MAIN STREET, HELLERTOWN

610.838.6363

SAYLORSANDCO.COM

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Photography by Napthali Foster, CURE Kenya

INTERESTED IN JOINING a community where you will live well locally with opportunities to do good globally? Darlene Smith recently went on a Garden Spot Village Travel with Purpose Trip to Kijabe, Kenya where she and a team served with CURE International for a week. Their physical presence, warm smiles, and generous hugs offered hope and joy to the children and their families.

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“I’ve left a mark on their lives, but they left a bigger mark on me,” Darlene says. “My heart will always be there. I’ve been searching to find my purpose. During this trip I found my purpose. I want to help more people around the world.” Your best stories have yet to be lived. Explore the opportunities Garden Spot offers to help you live yours. Read more: gardenspotvillage.org.

433 SOUTH KINZER AVENUE, NEW HOLL AND 717.355.6000 GARDENSPOT VILL AGE.ORG


Learning

EXPERIENCED.

At River Valley Waldorf School our children learn by doing—in a tech-free and nature-based environment. From pre-K through 8th grade, our Waldorf-trained faculty nurtures the individual spirit of each child with compassion and respect. We educate the whole child through creativity, activity and purpose—preparing self-confident, independent thinkers who are culturally aware, socially responsible and globally conscious. To learn more or to schedule a visit, call admissions at 610.982.5606 or email admissions@rivervalleyschool.com.

1395 Bridgeton Hill Road • Upper Black Eddy, PA 18972 • 610.982.5606 • rivervalleyschool.org


Celebrating local shopping, dining, arts, events, and community in the city of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

F I G B E T H L E H E M .C O M

L U AG I S A T E AC H I N G MUSEUM. WITH A NETWORK of six

galleries across three campuses and a permanent collection of more than 15,000 objects, Lehigh University Art Galleries transforms learning through encounters with original works of art, advancing creative collaboration with all fields of study. LUAG is proud to announce its newest venue, The FairchildMartindale Study Gallery. Its inaugural exhibition, Pedro Meyer: Truth from Fiction, showcases a pioneer of digital manipulation in contemporary photography. Continuing through May 24, 2019. Free and open to the public. 8 EAST PACKER AVENUE 610.758.3615 LUAG.ORG

HOURS: MON -THU 8AM - 10PM | FRI 8AM - 5PM | WEEKENDS 10 AM - 5PM

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Profile for Fig Industries & Fig Magazine

Fig Bethlehem Spring 2019  

Fig is a hyper-local guide to shopping, dining, arts, and entertainment that brings both voice and vision to great small destinations. Our c...

Fig Bethlehem Spring 2019  

Fig is a hyper-local guide to shopping, dining, arts, and entertainment that brings both voice and vision to great small destinations. Our c...