Volume 15, Issue 3

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Volume 15, Issue 3

Fishers High School

February 2021

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{self love} /self ‘luv/

the feeling that your own happiness and wishes are important

Embracing Positivity Students find confidence in themselves, difficult situations www.fishersnthered.com


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February 2021

TABLE OF CONTENTS FEATURES COVID-19 Vaccine Mock Trial Body Positivity Political Timeline ARTS & CULTURE February Holidays Crystals Animal Print Fashion SPORTS Posistives for COVID-19 Girls Swimming Boys Swimming Boys Basketball Indy March Madness OPINION New Years Resolutions City of Fishers Evolutionary Linguistics Politics Editorial Crossword Front Cover: Junior Ethan Bravo walks into the sunlight of the sunset in a field. Photo used with permission of Ethan Bravo. Fishers High School 13000 Promise Road Fishers, IN 46038 317-915-4290 fax: 317-915-4299

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Check out fishersnthered.com for our latest stories!

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Also, stay updated on news on our social media platforms and get to know our staff a little better!

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Staff

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N the Red Staff Editorial Board

Grace Mossing Editor-in-Chief

Fletcher Haltom Copy & Opinion Editor

Riley Gearhart Social Media Director

Lily Thomas Features Editor

Rebekah Shultz Arts & Culture Editor

Emma Tomlinson Photo Editor

Ava Hunt

Ben Rosen

Anna Mossing

Katrell Readus

Nicholas Rasmusson

Emi Citoler

Malak Samara

Abigail Garrison

Andrew Haughey Sports Editor

Nate Albin Online Editor

Kristen Rummel Design Editor

Reporters


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Vaccine arrives Distribution begins as states start giving doses

COVID-19 Vaccine Key Information Vaccination tracker

National

9.7%

10

75

50

%

25

0%

8.8%

%

Indiana

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Received at least one vaccine dose

0%

0%

50

25

10

2.9%

%

National

75

2.3%

%

Indiana

%

Received both vaccine doses

Vaccines distributed

Indiana

0%

%

10

75

%

50

%

67%

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OVID-19 vaccines are now available to select residents in all 50 states. The vaccines coming from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna are the first COVID-19 vaccines that were approved by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA). Each state has their own set of guidelines when it comes to who can currently get the vaccine. According to the Indiana State Department of Health, all individuals over the age of 65, those who work or volunteer in healthcare facilities and first responders are currently eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. According to school nurse Heather Lee, they currently do not have a direct role in COVID-19 vaccine distribution. Senior Molly Venus volunteers at a health care facility meaning she is eligible to receive the vaccine. “I originally had a flex period during second period, so I just scheduled it then,” Venus said. “And then my schedule changed so I was on a Zoom call while I was getting the vaccine.” According to the Mayo Clinic, the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine can be given to people 16 and older. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the Moderna vaccine can be given to people 18 and older. Both vaccines must be received in two separate doses taken weeks apart. “It basically is [the flu shot],” Venus said. “They stick it [the needle] in your arm. The needle looks really big but they don’t put it in all the way. You don’t feel it.” Unlike the flu shot, the COVID-19 vaccine is an mRNA vaccine, a new type of vaccine technology that, according to the CDC, is able to protect against infectious diseases and bring about an immune response. “It is important for people to get the vaccine in order to reduce the spread of coronavirus,” Lee said. According to the USA Today COVID-19 vaccine tracker, as of Feb. 8. 8.8% of Indiana residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine and 2.3 % of Indiana residents have received both doses of the vaccine. Additionally, 67% of the vaccines received by the state of Indiana have been distributed. Nationally 9.7% of the US population have received the first dose of the vaccine and 2.9% of people have received both doses of the vaccine. West Virginia has the highest percentage of their population vaccinated with both doses of any state. Alaska has the highest percentage of their population vaccinated with at least one dose of any state. To get a vaccine in the city of Fishers, an appointment would need to be made on the city website. Currently the only vaccine location within the Fishers city limits and ran by the Fishers Health Department is on 116th Street and Brooks School Road where the Marsh used to be.

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rosenben000@hsestudents.org

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Ben Rosen

According to USA Today COVID-19 vaccine tracker Graphic by Ben Rosen

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February 2021

From the courtroom to Zoom Members navigate virtual competition while keeping spirits high Abigail Garrison

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garriabi000@hsestudents.org

ock Trial gives students the opportunity to act out court cases exposing them to a real courtroom environment. On each side there are two lawyers and three witnesses. “A lawyer’s role is to provide opening and closing statements, ask the witness questions, and push forward the narrative that they want,” sophomore Srilekha Dalvuluri said. The role of the witness is to help the lawyer by answering questions and stating facts and opinions about the case. Members compete with the goal to plead a better case and win against the other school. The Mock Trial team recently competed during the first week of January. This month they have two competitions coming up with county on Feb. 17 and regionals on Feb. 20. In a normal year, the team would normally compete at the Hamilton County Courthouse, but with COVID-19 restrictions they have to compete virtually. Sophomore Levi Johnson says that competing virtually takes away that feeling of being in a courtroom that you can’t get anywhere else. Another challenge of competing virtually is persuasion. While strong testimony and evidence are important, factors such as body language and eye contact help to influence the judges. “When witnesses and lawyers are trying to persuade the judge, body language, eye contact, and proximity are really important factors,” Dalvuluri said. “But over Zoom, it is much harder to persuade people over a screen.”

Even though COVID-19 has impacted their season, Mock Trial members have been able to keep their spirits high and strengthen valuable social skills. Both Johnson and Dalvuluri say that one of the most valuable skills they have taken from participating in Mock Trial is strengthening their public speaking. “I had speech therapy up until I was 12 and even now it still shows sometimes,” Johnson said. “I didn’t like people telling me I couldn’t be good at public speaking even though I enjoyed it, and so I set out to prove them wrong.” Bettering their public speaking skills is not the only thing that club members have taken away from their experience on the team. “In trial you don’t speak unless it is your turn, and everyone has a chance to talk,” Davuluri said. “It is very fair to both sides. I’ve used these kinds of skills in conflict resolution and during arguments.” 1 It is the general census from members that Mock Trial is an experience that they treasure as the club fosters a passion for learning more about law and the interworking of the judicial branch. “In mock trial, there is something for almost everyone,” Conde says. “If you’re into speech and debate, you’d probably enjoy being a lawyer and writing cases for the team. If you’re more into acting or theater, being a witness is a good way to bring a character to life during trials. Even if you’re not into either of those things, mock trial offers a community where people with all sorts of different interests meet to compete, so you’re bound to make a lot of new friends if you join the team.”

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1. The Marion County Courthouse is where students would compete if competions were not virtual. Photo used with premission of Wikimedia Commons. 2. Infographic shows the positions on the team. Infographic by Abigail Garrison.


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“We were born to be real, not perfect,” freshman Katelyn King said.

“There aren’t many moments that I get to shine, but for the little time I do get to shine, it is the only thing I can focus on, like the sunset,” junior Ethan Bravo said.

Body Positivity

“Size doesn’t define your beauty,” sophomore Tina Atmani said.

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February 2021

Sophomore Kristi Lilek takes a picture in the sunshine on Jan. 8. Photo used with permission of Kristi Lilek.

Promoting positivity Movement encourages students to be more confident with their bodies Lily Thomas thomalil000@hsestudents.org Malak Samara samarmal000@hsestudents.org

“I always hype up my friends in the comments whenever they post a picture of themselves and direct message them to say how beautiful they are,” sophomore Kristi Lilek said.

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ifty percent of teens are self-conscious about their bodies, according to the National Organization for Women Foundation. In light of this, movements, such as the body positivity movement, have sprung up across the country. Organizations within the movement, like The Body Positive, aim to change the tone of conversation regarding body image by creating an accepting community that strays from potentially negative societal views. “I think it’s amazing, it’s great, and it’s something that needs to be done and it should have been done sooner,” freshman Saanvi Ibrahimpatnam said. “At least I feel like now, people who do struggle with it are a little more open. They’re aware that what they’re dealing with isn’t something that they only deal with. It’s a lot more open and so people can share and just feel a lot better, so I’m all for it.”

History of the movement According to an article from Penn State, the earliest form of body positivity dates all the way back to the Victorian era’s dress reform movement, which encouraged women to wear more sensible and practical clothing as opposed to the restrictive and objectifying fashionable clothing of the time. The next era of body positivity was in the 1960s, with a call to accept people regardless of their physical attributes. The movement today has much of the same message, while evolving to combat modern issues, such as a collective heightened exposure to unrealistically edited photos due to the availability of media. Many companies have contributed to the movement, from Dove’s 2004 “Real Beauty” campaign to Aerie’s promise in 2017 to not retouch or digitally alter their model’s photos in the spirit of setting realistic standards for women. “I think the body positivity movement has probably done a lot with fashion,” Meghan Farr, local therapist who helps with body

While on vacation, senior Kaylin Hoover poses for a picture. Photo used with permission of Kaylin Hoover.


Features image issues said. “We all wear clothes and that’s one of the ways we identify, so when you can actually go into a store and find different sizes for different shapes, I think that’s a real positive.”

Practicing positivity Farr helps her clients work on their body image issues by viewing it as a progression. For example, she may have them name one thing every day that they like about themselves, both internally and externally. “[The body positivity movement] lets people know that there is room for more than one type of person and you don’t have to look a certain way to be acceptable,” Farr said. “I think we all could use a little bit more of that.” The Body Positive, which provides and promotes body positive programs in schools and communities, says their main goal is to “end the harmful consequences of negative body image.” One of these consequences is not feeling good enough, which is a common cause of anxiety and depression according to Farr. “I just feel great about it, you know?” Ibrahimpatnam said. “Because I’ve struggled with it sometimes, especially when I was younger, and now I’ve been seeing all these beautiful women and men just showing how everybody’s perfect. It just makes me feel better because I don’t feel alone. I feel like ‘okay they’re right, I am amazing’, like I’m literally blessed.”

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Incorporating Positivity H O W T O C O M B A T B O D Y I M A G E I S S U E S

Journal

Detox

Keeping it relevant In order to keep the message of the movement going, Farr suggests continuing to talk about it and looking at it through different angles. “To me, it’s just loving the body that you were put in,” freshman Katelyn King said. “I mean, everyone has insecurities, no one can not have insecurities. That’s just a way of life, but having body positivity is being positive in your own body and being positive to other people’s bodies, not body shaming them or anything. Making sure that everyone feels welcomed and loved in their own body and being loved in your own body, too.”

Kee p a jou r n a l t h at y ou u se t o c h ec k -i n wi th y ou r sel f a n d f in d po si tive s a bo u t y ou r s elf to wr ite abo u t .

Tr y t ak in g a 3 - 7 d a y br ea k fr om s o ci al m ed ia a n d se e if n ot bei n g ex pos ed to c er ta in h a r m fu l fo rm s o f m e d ia h elp s.

Reflect

Health Concerns As the body positivity movement continues to gain traction, some critics have brought up complaints regarding the movement. Most critics bring up health concerns, as they worry the movement might encourage unhealthiness. “I think we still have to focus on our health in a physical sense,” Farr said. “We don’t have to look a certain way, there’s no exact right way to look, which I love that about the body positivity movement, but there are concerns.” According to Farr, some of these concerns come from studies showing that those who are overweight may be at a greater risk of having high blood pressure, diabetes and other complications. On the other end of the spectrum, being underweight can result in nutritional deficiencies and a weakened immune system, according to the United Kingdom National Health Services. “It’s not giving permission to just be unhealthy, but I think we keep talking about it and we don’t come from a place of shaming each other,” Farr said. “That does not work. In terms of behavior change, it’s not effective for lasting results, anyway.”

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Fi n d on e th in g y o u li ke a bou t y ou r sel f b oth i n ter n al ly a n d e xter n a ll y . For ex a m ple , m a y be y o u' r e a g oo d fr ien d o r y o u li ke y o ur ey ebr ows .

Shift thinking In stea d o f th i n ki n g a bo ut th e n ega ti ves, foc u s on th e p os iti ves . Fo r exa m pl e, th i n k ab ou t w h at y ou a r e go od a t, wh at y ou li ke a bou t y ou r sel f, e tc .

Evaluate Ta k e a lo ok a t w h at y o u ex po se y ou r sel f t o. W h o a r e y o u h a n gi n g ou t with ? W h a t c on ten t ar e y ou lo o ki n g a t ? I f th ere ar e n e ga tiv e im pac t s , c on s id er ta ki n g tim e a wa y fr om th e th i n g s t h at ca u s e th e m .

ALL INFORMATION FROM THERAPIST MEGHAN FARR INFORGRAPHIC BY LILY THOMAS

Icons made by Malak Samara.


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February 2021

Presidential pathway Historical moments result in Biden, Harris administration Grace Mossing

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mossigra000@hsestudents.org

fter a culmination of events leading to their rise in power, President Joseph R. Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris took office on Jan. 20, 2021. From beginning to end, this political year was marked with historical moments worth highlighting.

Nomination On April 8, 2020, Biden became the Democratic nominee after candidate Bernie Sanders dropped out on Super Tuesday. When searching for a Vice President, Biden chose to only look at women and ended up choosing past opponent, Harris, as his running mate on Aug. 11, 2020.

Debates With the COVID-19 pandemic, only three debates took place before the election: two presidential debates and one vice-presidential debate. Citizens who watched these debates were split between appallment or support of these debates. “I didn’t like how they were moderated,” senior Catie Laverty said. “It was either leaning Republican or leaning Democrat, and I was upset with both candidates not letting the other one speak. They kept cutting each other off, so I felt like there wasn’t time to learn anything.” The first presidential debate was defined by interruptions by both Donald Trump and Joe Biden, resulting in the Debate Commission’s decision to mute microphones at the second presidential debate. Freshman Casey Alexander supported this decision as he believed that it made them more comprehensible. “With interruptions, it becomes less about who can get their policies out and more about who can interrupt the most and who is the loudest,” Alexander said. “It’s kind of like a third grade classroom.”

Election Day The presidential election looked different this year with widespread mail-in voting as well as early voting. While both happen in normal election years, they were much more popular this year as people wished to avoid close spaces so as to not contract COVID-19. “Mail-in voting was a positive method that should be looked upon and expanded moving forward,” sophomore Sarai Parks said. “It provided a safe way for people to vote during the pandemic. Not only did it help with that, but it helped reduce the disenfranchisement of people of color while voting.” Nonetheless, there was some opposition to mail-in voting. Concerns ranged from worries of fraud to votes being lost in the mail. On November 7, the election was finally called with major news stations such as Fox News, CNN, and CBS calling Pennsylvania for Biden in the electoral college, getting him to the 270 votes necessary to claim the presidency. Citizens who were apprehensive of mail-in voting, including Trump, claimed the win illegitimate.

Graphic by Grace Mossing.


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N the Red On Jan. 6, the police expelled tear gas on the crowd of people raiding the Capitol. Photo used with permission of Wikimedia Commons.

Insurrection Inauguration On January 6, protesters stormed the Capitol On inauguration day, Kamala Harris was sworn as members of Congress counted the Electoral in as the first woman and woman of color Vice College votes for a final time. Members of President. Casey and Parks believe that this is an Congress fled to the basement for safety as important step for the United States as a nation and police tried to keep protesters at bay. It was the a historical moment to be remembered. first time the Capitol has been breached since “Being a young black woman, this has impacted the War of 1812. me to a great extent,” Parks said. “I am finally being “It was extremely disheartening to see how represented in a high power of government. This they got treated as opposed to Black Lives is something I never thought I would see. It’s truly Matter protests,” Parks said. “They were able inspiring. Progress is finally happening and I am so to hold conversations incredibly grateful to witness and take pictures it.” with police officers. This just highlighted Biden/Harris the drastic difference Administration between how different Biden started his groups of people are presidency by signing 22 treated in America.” executive orders in his first Trump inciting this week, more than any other violence at a rally past president. Most of these earlier that day is a policies have been to reverse point of contention. executive orders instituted This belief ultimately Kamala Harris, a senator at the time, speaks at the by former President Trump. led to the House He has also prioritized 2019 Iowa Democratic Wng Ding at Surf Ballroom of Representatives policies on climate change, in Clear Lake, Iowa. Photo used with permission of impeaching him for immigration reform, the Wikimedia Commons. a second time. The economy, COVID-19 safety difference was that 10 Republicans also voted to measures and social equity. impeach the former president this time around. Laverty hopes that they protect the economy “I’m disappointed,” Laverty said. “I really wish and keep money within the country. Alexander they wouldn’t have done that because they have has hopes that they are quicker with COVID-19 been pushing peaceful protests, especially after information. the Black Lives Matter movements, that we’re “They should be brief and limited to what we not so destructive.” know instead of wild predictions,” Alexander said.

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February 2021

Four more weeks of holidays Something to celebrate every week of this month Kristen Rummel rummekri000@hsestudents.org

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ebruary is the shortest month being the only one in the entire year with 28 days. With being so short, it still provides many important dates and holidays that people around the world celebrate.

Groundhog Day - Feb. 2 Falling on Feb. 2, midway between the winter solstice and the spring equinox, Groundhog Day is based off of the Christian celebration Candlemas. Christians believed that a sunny Candlemas meant another 40 days of winter. Soon after, Germans developed their own version, choosing a native animal, groundhogs, as their annual forecaster. The first official Groundhog Day took place on Feb. 2, 1887, in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. Now, yearly celebrations are held in Punxsutawney where spectators and thousands of locals gather to watch the groundhog make its prediction. At the celebration, food, speeches and “g’speil” (plays or skits) are performed. During the entire event, Pennsylvania German dialect is the only language allowed to be spoken. The groundhog is named Punxsutawney Phil and has been predicting the weather for 135 years ever since the Pennsylvania club came to be in 1887. He is accurate about 40% of the time, according to Stormfax Almanac’s Data and sees his shadow about 85% of the time. Once he sees his shadow, it is believed that winter will continue for six more weeks. If he does not, then spring should be on its way.

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Ash Wednesday - Feb. 17

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Officially known as the Day of Ashes, Ash Wednesday is when Christians confess their sin and profess their devotion to God. During mass, a priest will mark a cross on the foreheads of the worshipers with the ashes of palms, burned on the last Palm Sunday. The ashes represent a person’s grief and mourning of their sins and that the worshiper belongs to Jesus Christ. Ash Wednesday marks the start of the Lent. This is when Christians believe Jesus was resurrected. It is believed that Jesus died for their sins on the cross, and that is what Easter celebrates. The lent period leads up to Easter and throughout this time traditions like fasting, prayer and almsgiving will be practiced. This will last for about six weeks before Easter. “The ashes represent God breathing life into dust and creating us, and it gives me a sense of being wonderfully made by my creator and that he chose life for me,” junior Lilian Mcvay said.

Valentine’s Day - Feb. 14 Various theories exist as to how Valentine’s Day came to be the holiday celebrated today, but no one knows for certain. Theories range from ancient roman rituals to theories about the Catholic Church attempting to cover up the pagan celebration Lupercalia. Cupid has roots tied to the Greek god of love, Eros. According to Greek poets, Eros used gold arrows to make others fall in love. The baby-like angel depicted on cards now was not created until the Hellenistic period. The holiday was not popularly celebrated until the 1700s, but by the middle of the 18th century, it was common for friends, family and lovers to exchange words of affection and gifts to show their appreciation for each other. “I think Valentine’s Day is less about relationships and more about showing people that they’re cared for and loved,” junior Bella Soto said. “I hope to be able to bring people some joy this year. I plan on leaving gifts at my friends’ doorsteps.”

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Arts & Culture

Lunar New Year - Feb. 12

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Graphic by Kristen Rummel

The ancient Chinese Lunar calendar was a religious social guide. This calendar would reset according to whichever emperor held power and differed among regions. The earliest known lunar calendar existed as early as 14th century B.C., Shang Dynasty. The calendar was typically created according to the lunar phases, solar solstices and equinoxes. Chinese New Year and Lunar New Year are two different celebrations with different meanings. Chinese New Year is based on the lunar calendar, so the first full moon of the Lunar New Year is considered Chinese New Year. It typically begins with the new moon that appears sometime between January and the end of February. The moon phase lasts about 15 days and ends with the Festival of Lanterns. Many celebrations and holidays depend on a lunar calendar, like Diwali and Holi are celebrated between the winter and spring months but their exact dates are affected by the lunar calendar and will change based upon that. Diwali is the festival of lights and Holi is the festival of spring and color. “For Diwali, we would do more of what we call ‘pooja’ which is basically reciting prayers and such towards our deities and making food offerings known as ‘prashadh,’” junior Raj Kadiki said. “As a family, we do fireworks and light candle lanterns since that festival is essentially the festival of lights.”

5 1. Groundhog sitting, gazing out at the field. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia. 2. Punxsutawney Phil on Feb.2 preparing for the annual ceremony. 3. Ashes places on womens forhead in cross shaped strokes. Photos taken from Wikimedia. 4 & 5. Clipart and icons courtesy of Pixabay.


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February 2021

Spirituality on the rise Internet revives popularity of traditional practices Emi Citoler

citolemi000@hsestudents.org

Emma Tomlinson

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ew age spirituality recently experienced a spike in pop culture. People are finding the practice on social media sites like TikTok or Instagram, but spirituality is not a new practice – it has been practiced for centuries across multiple cultures. Many practices that are spiritual, such as chakras and meditation, are adapted from East Asian religions. The spirituality practiced today is called “new age spirituality”, which refers to spiritual beliefs that have rapidly grown in the West in the 20th and 21st centuries. There are many ways to practice spirituality, which is an umbrella term for practices such as tarot, manifestation and crystals. Any person who practices some part of spirituality has a different interpretation of what it is. The general idea of spirituality is being connected to something bigger than one’s self. Unlike many religions, there are no rules for someone who is spiritual. Those who identify as spiritual can pick and choose different practices. For example, one may practice tarot but not use crystals.

TAROT

In the 16th and 17th centuries, tarot was a card game, but today people use it for a different purpose: predicting the future. A tarot deck has 78 cards in it, each card with its own meaning. The interpretation of the cards is left up to the reader of the deck. Those who practice tarot first ask the deck a question. These questions can cover a multitude of topics ranging anywhere from relationships to personal growth. Then, the user shuffles the cards around until a certain number, depending on the user’s choice, slips out and then the user will read or interpret the spread. “I usually describe tarot to people as connecting with your own energy to bring a message out based on your own intuition and energy,” junior Zooey Russell said. Intuition is listening to an inner voice, similar to trusting a gut feeling. For those who are spiritual, tarot is a common way to exercise their intuition as well as become connected to one’s higher self. Higher self is what many spiritualists refer to as the state of consciousness that is larger than one’s self. “[Practicing tarot] truly keeps me happy and I’ve always wanted to be spiritual,” sophomore Cory Wilcher said. “It also really calms me.” Infographic by Emma Tomlinson


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MANIFESTATION

People who practice manifestation believe that it is possible to put something into physical reality through affirmations, feelings and beliefs. The law of attraction, which is the basis for manifestation, is the idea that one will attract what they put out into the universe, usually through their thoughts. There are a variety of methods and ways to manifest. Some choose to practice it through meditation, visualization or writing the manifestations down in a journal. People who practice usually find a method that resonates with them and do that on a daily basis. “I like both writing and daily affirmations,” junior Kassi Whalen said. “I know that daily affirmations are really popular because they are quicker and easier to do than other methods like writing.” Daily affirmations include repeating a phrase, usually a want of some type. Those who manifest can choose whether to do this aloud or in a journal. The affirmations are said in the present tense, including phrases like “I am” or “I have.” Those who manifest can also meditate in order to completely focus on their manifestation. Daily affirmations can be as simple as “I am confident” or as complex as the person decides.

CRYSTALS

Like manifestation and tarot, crystals are dependent on the user’s energy. Holding or placing crystals on one’s body are popular methods of use. It is thought to create emotional, physical and spiritual healing. Each type of crystal can have a different intention or purpose. Crystals are popular within the spiritual community, as a way to start out practicing spirituality. “I feel like there are definitely different situations where I would feel attracted to different [crystals],” junior Izzy Slick said. “I would say I am attracted to ones that fit with my situation at that moment. How I pick which one is definitely depending on the intuitive feelings.” It is recommended to cleanse and charge crystals after buying them. Cleansing is creating a clean slate with the crystal’s energy. Many do this by using incense, salt water, natural light or sage. Charging crystals is believed to restore the crystal’s natural energy. Some do this by holding it, using selenite – a self-charging crystal – or placing it near moonlight or sunlight. “The energy the crystal is giving off is going to attract the energy that you are seeking,” Whalen said. “My favorite crystals are rose quartz and malachite.”

MEDITATION

Meditation, practiced by many religions, is the act of clearing one’s mind and focusing on their breathing. This practice allows those who Infographic by Emma Tomlinson meditate to anchor themselves to the present. “I definitely do it most at the end of the day because I like to unwind and relax. It helps me forget about whatever stressed me out that day and let go of reality for a bit,” junior Zooey Russell said. There are many forms of meditation. Like other practices in spirituality, meditations can be unique to anyone who practices it. A beginner’s way to meditate is to find a space where one is comfortable, take a seat, and begin to feel one’s breath. Some people count their breaths or note when they are inhaling or exhaling. Russell believes that meditation can be difficult when a person is just starting out, and she advises to concentrate simply on breathing in order to keep one’s mind from wandering. Many beliefs practiced within spirituality come from East Asian religions like Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism. With the recent rise in practicing spirituality, many concerns have arisen about the lack of respectfulness of where the practices come from. “I wanted to practice these things but I don’t practice any of these Eastern religions. I didn’t want to whitewash anything or appropriate any sort of culture, so what I try to do is keep myself educated,” Whalen said. “Educating yourself on the actual principles and what they talk about and teach in these religions, making sure that it si not the Westernized verson.”


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Spotlight on fashion A fashion review on the trend of animal print Rebekah Shultz shultreb000@hsestudents.org

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nimal print has been a staple in the fashion industry since the 1930s. Throughout the 1900s, this fashion statement represented sophistication and chic to edgy and wild, according to Ohio State University. Now, faux animal prints are worn some way or another with no label. “I love prints, I’m so glad they are coming back in style,” sophomore Ella Newman said. “I think they can make any look pop and give a 2000s vibe since that’s super hot right now.” The style of animal print is trending on Pinterest, showing girls posing with styled outfits full of animal print pieces. Some prints include cheetah, cow, zebra and snakeskin. The print is put onto bucket hats, slip dresses, midi skirts, silk tops, puffed shirts and the list goes on. An Instagram poll was given to FHS students on Saturday Jan 30 about whether enjoyed or disliked animal print. With a poll with over 104 votes, 67 people loved the trend but 37 people said they were not a fan “I do not like animal print in fashion,” senior Rai Singh said. “I see many designer brands reuse the same print over and over again. Using the same print for different products can be a bit repetitive and it overlooks other elements in the product.” Popular stores and big chains like Macy’s, Old Navy, Forever 21 and Nordstrom all sell animal print items. For example, Nordstrom Rack currently has over 4,649 items of inventory that portray animal

Information from Ohio State University

print. For example, Nordstrom Rack currently has over 4,649 items of inventory that portray animal print. Clothing store chains find designer runway trends and make them more accessible to the general public. When a pattern or design by high fashion designers catches the eye of the public, chances are that that pattern or design will be seen soon enough. According to the Lovetoknow blog, fashion trends begin with either runway shows, street style, celebrities wearing the item, fashion bloggers or from popular fashion locations (Milan, Paris, New York City, London). For the past two years, as well as fashion week in Milan 2019, many designers, such as Dolce & Gabbana, Alberta Ferretti and Blumarine, incorporated animal prints into their 2020 fashion lines. Few designers for their 2021 fashion line added animal print pieces like Gannie and Rotate. However, Veronika Lipar, who speaks to fashion trend analytics, still predicts that animal print will be back in style. “I personally am obsessed with prints,” senior Jenna Wallace said. “I love that they came back into style, it is a super fun way to show uniqueness and add spice to an outfit.” To pair an outfit together with an animal printed piece, Newman recommends wearing animal printed pants with a basic shirt or crop top. “If it is zebra pants I would recommend adding a pop of color like green or orange,” Newman said. “To spice any look up, add some accessories and a cute leather jacket or puffer coat if it’s cooler.”

Infographic by Rebekah Shultz


Arts & Culture

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Senior Jenna Wallace styles zebra pants from Shein, a white crop top from Brandy Melville, and a thrifted jacket worn at a friend’s house on Oct. 29. Photo provided by Jenna Wallace

Junior Danielle Moriarty dresses in a purple tank top, an oversized denim jacket and zebra pants from Shein in downtown Noblesville on Nov. 28. Photo provided by Danielle Moriarty.

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February 2021

Boys and girls swim teams celebrate their wins against Noblesville on Dec.15, 2020. The boys team won 141-44, and the girls won 128-58. Photo by Leen Mahmoud.

Spot the difference COVID-19 restrictions shake up sports and create a new environment for athletes Katrell Readus

readukat000@hsestudents.org

Riley Gearhart

gearhril000@hsestudents.org

Girls Cross country runners gather before their meet at Pendleton High School on Aug. 26, 2020. Photo by Kailey Santiago.

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he lack of in-person fans, team interaction, and energy have been challenges that athletes have had to face head-on. Due to the coronavirus, restrictions have been put in place on these teams, such as wearing masks and social distancing. Student-athletes no longer get to hear the cheers of the crowd or gather with teammates in the same way they had during previous seasons, but according to some athletes, it was not all bad. The IHSAA suspended all spring sports seasons in April 2020 due to the spread of the coronavirus, shortly after the HSE school district began virtual learning. Rather than completely giving up on their training, certain athletes took advantage of the abundance of time and focused on their athletic improvement. Junior cross country and track athlete Elizabeth Barrett said that although she was upset she could not compete in the spring, she was grateful for the extra time that she had to focus on running. “Something that I did during that time was I listened to my body a little bit more,” Barrett said. “I could focus on some nagging injuries, and I focused a lot more on nutrition and sleep. Since we didn’t have to go to school, I could do my workouts when I felt best during the day.” In July 2020, the district allowed athletic teams to begin meeting in person with restrictions in place, such as wearing a mask whenever athletes were not doing any physical activity. Freshman cross country runner Jacob Dowd says that one of the changes their team made was having two different practices. The boys team had a varsity and a junior varsity practice in order to prevent the spread of the coronavirus on the team. “It affected our season a lot,” Dowd said. “Not a ton of people got to actually compete, so there were a lot less races.” Although these changes were not what teams were used to in the past, freshman Kate Thomas said that the girls basketball


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team took advantage of them in order to help them grow closer. The team writes “basketball is not who we are, it’s what we do” in a notebook every day after practice to remind the players of the unity that they have. While in a two-week quarantine, the team had practices over Zoom, checked in with an assigned buddy every day and had a virtual team bake-off. “It didn’t even feel like we were apart,” Thomas said. “After those two weeks, we came back and it felt like I had just seen them yesterday because we did so many things to stay connected.” Despite some athletes feeling more bonded to their team with coronavirus restrictions, others experienced a lack of connection. According to Barrett, the lack of time that she had with her teammates was one of the hardest challenges that she had to overcome while training alone in the spring. “I learned that things were not going to be easy, and I had to make a choice of whether or not I wanted to push through it,” Barrett said. “Even though I may not have seen an outcome, I had to make the choice to keep going and work hard.” Even with the changes that the coronavirus brought to all athletics, Barrett and Thomas both agree that they grew a greater appreciation for the normalities of their sports. Thomas says that in the future, she will not take little moments with her teammates for granted, like bus rides and team huddles. “I learned to appreciate the time that you have because you never know when it could be taken away,” Thomas said. “Appreciate all of the moments with your team. You’re so lucky just to get to play the sport with the people you love. Appreciate every moment of it, Cheerleaders cheer on the football team at their game on Sept. 18, 2020. Photo by Kailey Santiago. because you don’t know when it could end.”

Infographic By Riley Gearhart.

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February 2021

Wading through obstacles

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Girls swim team comes back through pandemic to have strong season Nate Albin albinnat000@hsestudents.org

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fter last season’s historic second place finish, the girls swimming team has faced new challenges. From the initial stay-at-home order in early spring, to having to find a place to swim, to not knowing if they would even have a season, they have had to adapt. Once the school closed on March 13, the team had no pool. To stay in shape as a team, the coaches would hold weekly Zoom workouts where they worked on activities such as yoga and dryland work. During this period, swimmers had to get creative to stay in shape outside of the weekly Zoom. “I have an outdoor pool in my backyard and we heated it up,” senior Charlie Ramey said. “Me and a couple of teammates would train out there and we would have three-hour workouts, which wasn’t very enjoyable.” When restrictions were lifted but the school remained closed, the team went to the Forest Park pool and the Riviera Club for morning and afternoon workouts throughout the early parts of summer. By mid-July, the team was able to swim again. “All hopping into the water again was weird,” junior Kalli Agapios said. “It was kind of exciting but mostly weird. Getting back in the pool was a bonding experience. No one expected a pandemic to happen. As a team, we got closer and stronger together trying to overcome this thing happening in our world.” Despite everything, there were still freshmen trying to get acclimated to high school and high school sports. Freshman Avery Stein has been a club swimmer for approximately 10 years, but this is her first year in swimming at the high school level. “It’s way different than club,” Stein said. “It’s nice to be swimming for your school. It’s interesting to come in during this season. I think the memories will be good to have. I’ll be able to say I went through COVID and still had a good

season.” The team was separated for months due to restrictions. Despite this, they found ways to stay connected safely and build team unity. “People call us a cult,” Ramey said. “During the peak of COVID, we all talked to each other and had Zoom meetings to talk to each other, but once it all started to die down, we would go on bike rides together. It’s so important to stay together and get through it all.” In a sport like swimming where athletes have many long practices, they believe that unity is vital to persevering. “The team would not have done as well as we are doing right now if we weren’t this connected,” Ramey said. “All of us motivate each other and we all want each other to get better. There is no bad blood and we’re all working toward the same goal. It builds our team confidence.” The season for them, and all other winter sports, was in jeopardy in late November. With COVID-19 cases rising and HSE schools deciding to go 100% virtual, swimmers were worried it may all be over before it began. That is when Ramey, with the help of teammates, decided to try something. “So, I made a petition,” Ramey said. “There were rumors that the Fishers Health Department was going to shut down athletics. Swimming is a part of my life and is very connected. If it was taken away from us, everyone would be heartbroken. We were like ‘Oh my God, we need to do something about this.’ Sophomores and juniors need a good season for recruiting.” Ultimately, the season has gone on. Agapios, Ramey and Stein all praised their coaches for working extra hours to make sure FHS and opposing schools have been safe. Despite these efforts, there have been some hiccups that have caused mental


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hurdles for the athletes to compete with. “Right before the new year, I just came out of quarantine,” Agapios said. “I was contact-traced and was thinking how my season was over. That was a distraction in my life. I had to learn how to get rid of it and think about the now.” The team as a whole has avoided a team-wide shutdown, but other schools have not been quite as lucky. “It’s been really hard seeing other schools have to quarantine,” Stein said. “I think we’ve been very careful. We know times are tough and it could happen. We take it seriously because our season means so much to us.” To these swimmers, swimming is a major part of their lives. For some, it gives them what they need to push through struggles in other parts of life. “Swimming is my escape from reality,” Agapios said. “When something else is stressing me out, practice really takes my mind off of it. It’s a completely different atmosphere. The people around you make your attitude a lot better. For me, it’s pretty important to do the sport that I love.” With all the possible distractions, the swim team is still undefeated. With the postseason in full swing, the Tigers still believe in themselves. “It’s not to show anyone else we are capable,” Agapios said. “It’s to show ourselves ‘Yes, we can do this.’ It’s going to hurt because every sport you do is going to hurt. Preparing yourself for the pain you’re going to have when you’re in the water and working for your team will get you there.”

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2 1. Freshman Avery Stein adjusts her goggles before her race at the Feb. 4 sectional meet at Fishers High School. 2. Stein steps up to the platform ahead of the preliminary race. 3. Junior Kalli Agapios smiles upon seeing her results in her race on the scoreboard. 4. Agapios prepares for her prelim backstroke race. Photos by Nate Albin.


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February 2021 Junior Sebastian Otero performs a front three-and-a-half at a home meet on Jan. 22. Photo by Kathleen Tran.

Flipping for success

Boys diving team experiencing good season Nate Albin

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albinnat000@hsestudents.org

hile one side of a natatorium features eight-person races, the other side is reserved for the sport of diving. Rather than going for speed, the divers aim for precision. Led by juniors such as Will Jansen and Sebastian Otero, the boys diving team is off to a strong start. For coach Jimmy Russ, he feels they were ready from the very beginning of the season. “We definitely came in strong from training during our off season which has resulted in multiple wins throughout the season,” Russ said. “The pandemic did not slow us down one bit.” With the school pool being closed until September 2020, off-season training was not normal. From doing home workouts to going to the Forest Park pool in Noblesville, they are confident in the work they put in. “It (the pandemic) was actually beneficial,” Russ said. “It let the athletes kind of rest and reset. When we finally started training again, it was awesome, they were ready to go.” So far, the team has been able to avoid COVIDrelated issues. This means they have gotten the chance to focus on perfecting their craft. “The first part is a hurdle,” Jansen said. “When we walk down the board and lift up one leg and one arm, that’s a hurdle. Some practices, we’ll only focus on that. No flips, no dives.” From there, they begin to add the pieces to make a dive. The next step is working on the rotations. “We’ll do something called spinners,” Jansen

said. “If I’m doing a front two and a half instead of doing hurdles, I’ll do it just standing at the end of the board. That’s a good practice for getting a lot of rotation. Then, you just have to combine the two and then finish up with the lineup, which is the entry.” At meets, the diver will sign up for their specific dives before the meet. In a competition, they have to do at least one dive from every direction. Over the course of the season, they build up their dives and add in new pieces. “When we learn new elements, we do a lot of lead ups and progression work,” Russ said. “We make the athletes feel as confident as they can so there is no doubt.” Jansen says that one reason this season has gone so well is that he is having fun. For others like junior Paul Kelley, it helps him through challenging practices. “We are all really good friends outside of diving, too,” Kelley said. “We’re excited to see each other and there’s rarely any drama. It’s just diving and we have fun, too.” As the end of the season approaches, Russ has one goal: he wants all his divers at their best going into championship season. Mentally, he knows how to talk to his divers to get them in the best mindset before their biggest dives. “Truthfully it depends on the athlete,” Russ said. “Some athletes need more of the uplifting ‘you got this, you are doing great.’ Some need more of the ‘okay you need to step it up, get your mind right’ speech.”


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Junior Charlie Smith, junior Jeffrey Simmons, senior Lucas Prewitt, junior Bryce Williams and senior Drew Turner walk onto the court at the beginning of the game against HSE on Dec. 18, 2020. Photo by Emma Nguyen.

Funds for the future Basketball team raises money for new equipment Andrew Haughey

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haughand000@hsestudents.org

osting approximately $3,500, the VertiMax system has been the central focus of the boys basketball team’s fundraising goals since November. The team started raising money for the machine by selling tumblers with their own logo, as well as the logos of other sports teams, printed into the side. The VertiMax, a performance-enhancing machine specifically developed for athletes to improve their vertical jumping capabilities and explosiveness, seemed like the most obvious choice to sophomore Myles Stringer. “Nothing else really came to mind that was better for us at the time,” Stringer said. Head Coach Garrett Winegar said there was another goal that he had in mind for the team in the future beyond simply obtaining the VertiMax. “We have a couple of Dr. Dishes, where the machine basically surrounds the rim of the hoop, and when you shoot the ball it rebounds and shoots the ball back out to you,” Winegar said. “I would like to get what’s called a Gun, which is just a different brand, but they have some newer, nicer models that could help us.” In addition to raising money for better equipment, fundraising helps the team to establish a common goal that they can all work towards together, according to Winegar. “When you set goals in fundraising, it can help to tie in that [team] bond,” Winegar said. “For example, we had a goal to raise money for the VertiMax, and they achieved that goal so we were able to get it.” While fundraising has helped the team bond over achieving specific pieces of equipment for each other, junior Charlie Smith said that being

forced to quarantine multiple times has also helped to strengthen that bond. “It [quarantining] was tough on all of us, and we all missed being able to play, practice and be around each other, so it helped in a sense that we all went through it together,” Smith said. Smith added that the team already had a strong bond established with each other and that when the team is off the court they continue to stay in touch. “The team stays involved with each other outside of games in many ways. Whether it be texting in a group chat, playing pickup basketball with each other or playing Xbox or PlayStation, we all have really good chemistry and are friends off the court,” Smith said. Stringer provided additional context as to how the team operates when they are off the court. “In the group chat, we text some stuff about practice and some stuff about games, but also some motivational stuff to keep the team together,” Stringer said. “Guys going to hang out with each other outside of basketball is the type of stuff you need to have that chemistry and that good environment.” According to Winegar, all of the different ways that the team connects and works together contribute to the building of their unique culture. He added that being a new coach this season did make it challenging at times to initiate the culture he would prefer, but that the team has taken well to the challenge. “Our culture is pretty simple: try to be the hardest working team, the toughest team and the best defensive team in the state,” Winegar said. “I think our guys have bought into that and it’s showing on the court.”

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2 1. Junior Charlie Smith drives past defender Mo Awad on his way to a layup on Dec. 18, 2020. The team lost to HSE 65-51. 2. Junior Jeffrey Simmons tips off against senior Dalton Retzner on Dec. 18, 2020. Photos by Emma Nguyen.




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Government unleashed Fishers Health Department unnecessary, disrupts government power balance Ava Hunt

huntava000@hsestudents.org

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Information provided by Fishers Health Department website. Graphic by Ava Hunt.

he city of Fishers continually ranks among the best towns to live in within the United States. That being said, its residents trust that their leaders will make decisions that are in the best interest of the community. Whether that has been occurring over the past year is debatable. The decisions that have been handed down by local government and other officials have potentially been more detrimental to its residents and businesses. The Fishers Health Department, created on April 24, became one of only three city health departments in the state of Indiana. Even though the Hamilton County Health Department (HCHD) was founded in 1919 and has served Fishers ever since, Mayor Scott Fadness decided that the creation of the new department “provided the necessary public infrastructure” for the community. Board officials engaged in inadequate deliberation regarding this decision, as there was little discussion nor serious questioning except from the opposing voter, Councilor Jocelyn Vare. Not to mention, the community was given a 24-hour notice to establish a new health department and the HCHD was given less than a day’s notice, as well. Fadness assured the community that the $2 million from cash reserves needed to fund the Health Department would not result in a tax increase for the residents of Fishers. However, with the restrictions that have been placed on businesses like curfews and smaller size capacities and the lower tax revenues that have resulted therefrom, a tax increase may be necessary to keep the local government and it’s oppressive policies afloat. In their current role, the Fishers Health Department puts in place guidelines they believe will best serve their constituents, but these guidelines are more forceful and extreme than those of the HCHD. The Fishers Health Department drafted its own color-coded scale that indicated what regulations the community should follow and sent out corresponding advice that the Hamilton Southeastern School system should follow. The HCHD acted more as a support system, answering calls and pointing school leaders to guidance from the Indiana Department of Health and Department of Education. Precedence and experience were two factors the Fishers Health Department failed to take into account when constructing their guidelines. In other words, the department went solo in regard to their response to COVID-19 and appointed Dr.


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2 Lane, an OB-GYN and not an epidemiologist or other infectious disease expert, to lead the escapade. The big, bad Fishers Health Department put a lot of pressure on the school district to comply with their advice. In July, HSE changed its re-opening plan to starting virtually based on safety concerns and data from the department. It wouldn’t have raised as much of a concern if any of the other school districts in Hamilton County started virtually, but that wasn’t the case. Hamilton Southeastern was the only school district to begin school 100% virtually and not offer an in-person option. I recognize that the teacher supply was a factor in the decision to start virtually, but I cannot help but wonder if the newly-created department’s advice was steering teachers away. The inconsistency within the department’s advice also raises a concern. In September, HSE waited until Fishers had returned to the yellow category in order to shift to hybrid learning. In January, HSE returned to hybrid learning while the community resided in the red category, which is the severe risk category and contrary to the department’s arbitrary standards previously presented to the school district. The creation of the department disrupted Fishers’ oncethriving balance of autonomy between our government and its constituents. It also added more disorder to a havoc-reeking event, the pandemic. The choice to switch health departments during the middle of a pandemic was not a necessary one.

1. A banner outside the new COVID vaccination site indicates where participants should go. 2. An old Marsh was turned in to a vaccination site by the FHD. 3. A sign outside the COVID testing site points where people should enter. Photos by Ava Hunt.


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Verbal alterations

February 2021

The benefits and science of evolutionary linguistics Fletcher Haltom

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haltofle000@hsestudents.org

hile many associate evolution with biology textbooks and finches, the process of evolution can be applied to a variety of other fields in order to explain phenomena and conduct research. Evolutionary linguistics, one such science that derives its premise and explanation from Darwin’s theory of evolution, is a complicated field that has more of an effect on daily lives than one may think. Language is constantly evolving and changing, and this change is far more beneficial than it is detrimental for the speakers. By using evolutionary linguistics, this process can be both measured and understood. The science of evolutionary linguistics arose primarily out of necessity, as linguists required a specific science to apply to the changing of languages over time. At its most basic, evolutionary linguistics discusses and measures historical alterations to languages, however minimal they may be. The study of linguistics is far more pertinent to cultural and social relations than it is given credit for, especially considering the current political and cultural climates in America. In 1996, for example, the Oakland school board brought about a nationwide controversy regarding the recognition of a separate dialect spoken by many students, now referred to as African American Vernacular English. Many were outraged by the official recognition of a language that they wrote off as ungrammatical slang. However, the Linguistic Society of America recognized the legitimacy of this language and its evolution, writing that these characterizations were “incorrect and demeaning”. Language can be unnecessarily divisive for different groups, but evolutionary linguistics demonstrates how we are more similar in our language than we are different. Verbal differences are brought about by various causes. As University of California-Berkeley linguistics and phonology professor Juliette Blevins notes, phonetic changes play a large role in how languages change over time. Blevins cites inheritance, phonetic alterations and natural linguistic selection as factors that affect the evolution of language. Interactions among different cultures and people, especially young people, are also incredibly influential in the progression of language, as no two people have the same linguistic profile. These repeated interactions, along with other factors, create new words or phrases that alter the use of language in specific groups or

cultures. Examples of newly created words or phrases can be found littered throughout the English language. Words can be borrowed from other languages, as in “per capita”, or shortened, as in “veggies”. They can be created via combination, like “smog”, or derived from names, such as “braille”. They can even be brought about by minor pronunciation changes. The point being, new words and phrases arise constantly as a result of cultural and social developments. In 2020, due to both global events and the political climate of the year, certain words and phrases changed their meaning and connotation drastically. In some cases, brand new words arose specifically to describe a phenomenon or discuss a topic. “Zooming”, “pods”, “bubble”, “eLearning”, the list goes on. These changes and creations may seem relatively meaningless, but they reflect rapidly changing cultural and social circumstances. Asking any given person in 2010 what a “Zoom” is would no doubt elicit a reaction of confusion. Now, the word, and many associated words, are ingrained into everyday American vernacular. Even presently, words are changing and evolving around us. In January, Merriam-Webster added words, phrases and abbreviations such as “decarceration”, “cancel culture” and “BIPOC” to their dictionary. This expresses the changes to our language that are being made every day due to a variety of factors. Our language is constantly evolving in order to keep up with society on a country-wide and worldwide level. Language is continuously developing. That is a scientifically proven fact, but linguistic changes are not signs of the degradation of language or the downfall of speech as we know it. Complaining about new “slang” or labeling linguistic changes as “ungrammatical” is unproductive and fruitless. These developments are a direct result of both science and the principles of evolution, and protesting against them is confoundingly pointless. New words or phrases that prove useful for the general public will remain in use, regardless of what critics believe about how proper they may be. Change, especially now, should be embraced, and linguistic change should be recognized for the beneficial scientific advancement that it is.

Graphic by Fletcher Haltom



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A journey of self-love Teenagers find power within themselves

We start idolizing other people and their bodies, forgetting how thankful we should be for our own.

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oving the body we come in should not be as difficult as it is, but for some reason it seems to be a constant struggle for people of all ages. According to the Park Nicollet Melrose Center that provides treatment for eating disorders, 80% of women do not like the way they look and 34% of men are dissatisfied with their bodies. As a child, no one thinks about what they look like. All that mattered was how we used our bodies. It gave us the ability to run, jump, and be active. We were beautiful because our parents told us that we were, and there was no reason to doubt it. But then we grew up. Growing up ruined everything. We started comparing ourselves to everyone we knew. Who has the prettier eyes? Who can do their hair better? Who can dress the best? All of this before even taking in weight, the dreaded question. It always seems that people are too heavy or too light, there is never a medium standard. Every part of ourselves was brought into question. When people start to question your identity and beauty, it’s hard not to question it yourself. People fall into this endless cycle of trying to please the people around them instead of seeing themselves for who they are. People develop eating disorders, body dysmorphia, anxiety and so much more. People look at social media to find pictures of “perfect” people with “perfect” bodies and get obsessed. We start idolizing others and their bodies, forgetting about how thankful we should be for our own. Our bodies are what allow us to live the life we live. They are the vessels we spend our lives in and we don’t get another one. So let’s take our bodies back. Starting the journey to body positivity is a trial in itself. It requires disregarding your inner securities and what other people may think of you and lots and lots of practice, but self-care and self-love are worth the effort. Beginning steps can be simple. Give yourself daily affirmations of one thing you love about yourself and try to pick something new every day. Tell yourself something that you’re thankful your body can do for you such as dance, sing, run, etc. Find a way to be healthy and feel good in your body, and take time for yourself to do something you love. Next, try surrounding yourself with more positive people and be that positive person for your friends and community around you. It is so easy to get caught up within oneself and forget that other people are struggling too. We can open our eyes to other people’s struggles and be a motivator for their own self-love journey as well. Last, see yourself as a whole person. We are more than one imperfection we are hopelessly infatuated with. Build yourself up and the people around you. Build a community of self-love starting with you. You are beautiful and you deserve to be here today in your body. Start believing in yourself because I promise other people believe in you, too.


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EDITORIAL QUESTION Do you feel confident in your body?

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YES - 3 NO - 6

Graphic by Grace Mossing

EDITORIAL POLICY

Tiger Topics N the Red is the official monthly newsmagazine of Fishers High School. It is distributed free to 3,500 students and over 300 student personnel. It is designed, written and edited by students. Opinions expressed in the newsmagazine do not necessarily represent those of the adviser, administration or staff. Letters to the editor may be submitted to A218, and must contain the writer’s phone number for verification. Letters to the editor will not be published anonymously. If there is any incorrect information, corrections will be made in the next issue.

MISSION STATEMENT

As the student-run newsmagazine of FHS, N the Red is dedicated to providing the staff, students, and community of FHS with a timely, entertaining and factual publication once a month by means of public forum. In publishing articles that students enjoy reading, we are furthering both the educational experience and the expansion of FHS culture. The staff works to create a sense of unity and awareness and to allow the students of FHS to have a better insight to the world around them.


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Issue Review

Down: 1. Which position in mock trial provides the opening and closing statements? 2. Whose job is it in mock trial to help the attorney push their narrative? 4. The style of animal print is trending on what social media platform right now? 6. What is the first part of doing a dive? 9. Where do some people write down manifestations? 11. What news outlet is tracking COVID-19 vaccine distribution? 13. In July of 2020, athletic teams were able to start meeting with the requirement of _________ when athletes were not doing physical activity.

Across: 3. What abbreviation was added to Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary in 2021? 5. What month was the Fishers Health department created? 7. What is the name of the rebounding machine that the basketball team is looking to purchase? 8. In what month do 80% of New Year’s resolutions fail? 10. When doing mock trial over zoom what element do competitors feel they lack? 12. Which fashion analyst made the prediction that animal prints will be back in style? 14. What day of the week did people protesting the election storm the capitol? 15. What is a way to combat body image issues that involves taking a 3-7 day break from social media? 16. What is Indiana University’s basketball arena called?