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Volume XIII, Issue 3

Fishers High School

Nov. 19, 2018

Tiger Topics:

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Photo by Katie Wiseman.

SCULPTING THE CITY www.ďŹ shersnthered.com


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TABLE OF CONTENTS REALITY OF THANKSGIVING

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GLOBAL WARMING WARNING

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VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

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GIVING TUESDAY

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SCHOOL AIDES

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CODE RED

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DOWNTOWN ARTS

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FOOD REVIEW: MAMA NITAʼS

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“THE GRINCH” REVIEW

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FRIENDSGIVING CELEBRATION

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ASPIRING ARTIST: MAGGIE KIRKWOOD

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SETBACKS OF SPORTS DRINKS

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BOYS BASKETBALL

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BUSHCRAFTING

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WRESTLING

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ALBINʼS ANGLE: HOOSIER SPORTS

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H2H: CELL PHONES IN CLASS

Spotlight: Jacey Vore tumbles (Video) fhsnthered.com:

Teacher pilots improved Apple TV

fhsnthered.com:

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ABSTINENCE IN SEX EDUCATION

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NECESSITY FOR MENTAL HEALTH DAYS

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EDITORIAL: LOCAL ARTS STRENGTHEN

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CITY CULTURE

Harlem Wizards raise money for athletics

fhsnthered.com:

BEHIND THE COVER Three man band, a sculpture by Jeffery Mack, stands in front of Gallery 116 boutique on 116th St. Photo by Katie Wiseman.

WANT MORE?

Check out our exclusive online coverage

fhsnthered.com Fishers High School 13000 Promise Rd, Fishers, IN 46038 317-915-4290 fax: 317-915-4299

@fhs_NtheRed @fishershighnews


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Nov. 19, 2018

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Graphic by Drake Stallworth

Dark history of Thanksgiving unfolds in unanticipated way John Yun yunjoh000@hsestudents.org

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team floats off of roasted turkeys, and colorful arrays of food such as stuffing, sweet yams and green bean casseroles cover the table as families gather around to have a meal with the ones they love. A holiday where blessings are counted, Thanksgiving is an event usually associated with positive emotions such as happiness and love. However, the period after Thanksgiving was filled with bloodshed and wars. “In general, I see Thanksgiving as a time to give thanks and spend time with the people we love and care about over a meal and a long day of relaxation,� freshman Javi Morales said. The first Thanksgiving served as a treaty between

the Wampanoag natives and the English colonists of Plymouth known as Pilgrims. The treaty was an agreement between the two groups to help protect each other and share the knowledge of the land. However, to natives, this holiday is a reminder of betrayal and bloodshed, according to Business Insider. Just a generation after the alliance, the natives and colonists became embroiled in a war that devastated both sides. After many more colonists immigrated to America, the relationship between the two parties became strained as colonists took control of more land and spread diseases, killing many natives. A massive war broke out with many raids and killings between the two parties after


Features holiday that is considered peaceful and one of alliance. “Well that comes as a surprise to me because you never really hear about that,” sophomore Joey Foutty said. “I didn’t know that even happened.” There are many other aspects about Thanksgiving that are not mentioned in history classes. According to the New York Times, there is no evidence that natives were even invited to the meal. How the natives ended up eating a meal with the Pilgrims is still unknown to historians. Furthermore, there is no evidence that turkey was actually eaten. According to the New York Times, the only thing that is known is that Pilgrims harvested crops and that the Wampanoag brought five deer. “Much of American history is glossed over, avoiding the harsh realities regarding the treatment of groups who have been discriminated against on a variety of fronts,” social studies teacher Kelsey Ondish said. “For some, it is easier to believe the nice stories told to you in elementary school, than to recognize that many atrocities were committed by those who settled this land.” The role of Squanto is also simplified in the historical accounts told to young children. Students are taught that Squanto became a

Graphic by John Yun

N the Red 5 translator for the Pilgrims and helped teach them how to plant corn and the best places to fish. However, the untold story of Squanto is that, before the Pilgrims, he was sold into slavery after being caught by the English and came back to New England in 1619, only to find his tribe dead from smallpox, according to the New York Times. “We were taught when we were young so they had to make it appropriate, but America likes to see itself as the best country in the world and be known as the land of the free and not tell the full truth about everything,” Morales said. “I’m sure there are many other horrible things that have been done in history that not everyone has been taught or even knows about.” Ondish takes measures in her own classroom to make sure that these important facts are not left unheard and untold, going beyond just the school textbook. “In AP US History, we spend a lot of time talking about those who we do not traditionally find in our textbooks: Native Americans, women and other minority groups,” Ondish said. “We have already talked about King Philips’ War and will talk about what the Thanksgiving feast meant for colonists and the native population when we get closer to Thanksgiving break.”


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Global warming sparks arguments over topic

Nov. 19, 2018

Samuel Bauer bauersam000@hsestudents.org

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ildfires and worsening food shortages are problems that will come into effect within the next 40 years, according to the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change. The report, put out in October by the IPCC, states that combined global efforts must take affect in order to keep rising temperatures below the 2.0 degrees Celsius mark, which is intended to mitigate future climate caused problems. “The report really clarified that we have far less time than what was initially proposed, that we only have a certain amount of years before we start seeing major impacts around the world,” Environmental Advocacy Club President senior Ashdan Trexler said. “This is the generation to start solving the problem of climate change being unacknowledged, and we must act accordingly.” Teenagers around the globe are getting involved, not just in school clubs, but directly with the government as well. A group of 21 students

from around the US started a lawsuit against the government in 2015. They argue that the government, by law, has a responsibility to protect public resources such as land, water and the climate system because of the public trust doctrine. They are also suing the government over their original enactment that gives people their basic constitutional rights to life, liberty and property which will be affected by climate change. “Global warming is the single greatest threat to the planet and something everyone has a role in,” Trexler said. “A lot of politicians know the problem exists and yet do nothing about it.” A lot of the problem stems from people believing that global warming is not a real problem and that reports sent out by organizations like the IPCC are fake news, said Tom Harris and Timothy Ball of the Heartland Institute. This fight between believers and non-believers of global warming over what is fake news does not change the fact that people can help our world in a number of ways such as using reusable bags or bottles to eliminate waste, as stated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “When you think about being in high school, you may not think that there’s a lot you can do to help the environment,” AP environmental science teacher Heather Ferguson said. “There’s actually quite a bit, such as turning off unused lights, unplugging electronics, carpooling or even planting a tree, which can remove almost 50 pounds of CO2 every year.” Currently the lawsuit put into motion by the 21 students is being passed by the Supreme Court to advance, and the group has been able to proceed following attempts by the Trump Administration to postpone the trial. The group hopes to carry on the trial without any complications so they can shed light on the issue. “I think more schools need to acknowledge the problems of climate change,” APES student junior Ben Johnson said. “Schools are in charge of bringing up and informing or teaching students, which they’ve kind of failed at. But general independent research is also a great way to know more.”


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Vocational schools offer unique opportunities Ben McHenry mchenben000@hsestudents.org

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lumbers, nurses, therapists, technicians, graphic designers-all examples of practical jobs today, and ones that do not necessarily require a college degree. Vocational training is an alternative career path for students, and it provides opportunities that a traditional university may not. “A vocational school will train you in specific skills, and employers are looking for people that have those skills and certifications, so in that way, it’s different than a university,” college and career counselor Linda Brown said. “Learning skills for a career is much more intentional at vocational schools.” Indiana has over 7,000 manufacturing companies and employs over 500,000 people, making it the largest employer group in the state. While this may be the case now, these numbers could begin to wane as it has been difficult to entice students to consider these careers. “We need more students and adults to enter into technology and vocational education, so that they can have careers in manufacturing,” Stephanie Wells, Vice President of Workforce Development for the Indiana Manufacturers Association, said. “Our biggest barrier to growing our manufacturing businesses is that we don’t have enough skilled talent to fill the jobs.” A common misconception about vocational training is that it pertains to physically demanding labor jobs, but this is not always true. Health service jobs such as a nurse or EMT can be entered through vocational training. The J. Everett Light career center has a health careers program at FHS where students work both at school and the JEL career center at North Central High School to learn important skills pertaining to a health career. “The health careers class consists of nurse aide training, anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, and health careers,” health careers teacher Stacey Young, said. “The students go to a nursing home for their clinicals and use their training to take care of elderly residents. It is a great opportunity to see if this is something that interests them, while earning college credit in the process.” As technology progresses, people often hear that human labor for these vocational jobs will become less necessary. But according to the Georgetown

center, there are over 30 million vocational jobs in America that do not require a bachelor’s degree, more than ever before. There is now an intertwinement of technology and human workers, working hand in hand to develop and manufacture advanced technology, and Indiana leads this field nationally. According to Area Development, as of 2013, Indiana ranks first in percentage of manufacturing employment, at 16.7 percent. “Opportunities in vocational training are not the same as they were 50 years ago.” Stephanie Wells said. “With our ever-changing global economy, most manufacturing jobs are very high tech. Digitalization and the internet are changing the way in which we manufacture goods. Our production workers will be working on the cutting edge of developing technology. That’s what today’s vocational school is all about.” Not only can vocational schooling provide a stable career, but it can provide financial stability as well. The average vocational job salary is $35,720, and vocational schools average two years to complete, compared to at least four years for a bachelor’s degree. This means vocational students can earn roughly $71,000 dollars by the time a four-year college student even graduates. Also, according to The Simple Dollar, the average cost of a vocational degree is $40,000, as opposed to $154,000 for a bachelor’s degree, so less of their income will be put towards paying off student debt. College will be the next step for a lot students, but a concern of staff is bringing awareness to alternative opportunities “[FHS staff] needs to provide as many options as we can for students to find careers that will meet their needs and interests, and that’s where we need to do more work, is helping students find their passions,” Brown said. “Giving students as many options as possible is very important, as not all students think a four year college is in their future.” Students who are interested in learning more about vocational opportunities should go to www.jelcc.com or consider talking with a JEL teacher or counselor about what best suits their interests and needs.

Vocational Decline statistics on the struggle to fill vocational positions

30 million number of jobs in America that do not require a bachelor's degree and pay at least $55,000 a year.

Up to 74%

of firms that predict a shortage of qualified skilled trade workers

3.5 million vocational jobs that will need to be filled over the next 10 years as a result of retirement of the current workforce

62% of firms

in America are struggling to fill important vocational positions

$122,410

Average salary of air traffic controllers, a job that does not require a four year college degree

Sources: cnn.com, forbes.com, bls.gov, reuters.com, businessinsider.com


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Graphic by Janie Van Overwalle. Information from Giving Tuesday website.


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Challenging students to give Janie Van Overwalle vanojan000@hsestudents.org

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ir grows cold and people gather inside to warm themselves up with food and family. However, there remain some who have no choice but to look on through the window, unable to afford the same luxury. Giving Tuesday, an internationally recognized event, has worked to solve that problem for six years. Giving Tuesday takes place on Nov. 27 this year, the Tuesday following Thanksgiving and Black Friday. This event is meant to jump start the charitable seasons. Many non-profit organizations in the Fishers area are participating in Giving Tuesday. For example, Conner Prairie and Fishers Youth Assistance Program along with HSE Schools Foundation participate in Giving Tuesday. Librarian Renee Isom says the school has been participating in Giving Tuesday for at least ten years. “The media center often creates a space for Giving Tuesday to take place for people to set up their opportunities for giving,” Isom said. “This is an opportunity for students to promote a cause or organization for fellow students to give to.” Isom believes these organizations or causes can include donating and supporting local organizations that students have close ties to, connecting them personally to the event even more. Executive director of the HSE foundation Justin Hirnisey believes this is also a way for teachers and people outside school staff to give back to students who participate in Riley events and donate often. “Giving Tuesday is also a time to celebrate and recognize the hard work demonstrated in our district,” Hirnisey said. The community provides an easy way for students and staff to donate. Bins will be located around the school with a cause or organization labeled on it. They can range from Toys for Tots

to Hamilton County Humane Society to Village to Village. Although these organizations ask for different items, they can agree that any donation is helpful. There are multiple organizations and causes to pick from and, according to Isom, a lot of organizations can be overwhelming. “When there are many choices on who to give donations to, it tends to spark more conversion than action and people tend to not be able to decide who to give to, so they don’t at all,” Isom said. Sophomore Jill Snyder said she would like to be part of the community by donating but knows she cannot participate in donating to every organization. “I would definitely donate but I would feel overwhelmed and bad that I wouldn’t be able to donate to every organization,” said Snyder Isom said if our town were to continue Giving Tuesday in our building, there will need to be further action taken among students rather than just talk about the event. To prevent that, the school can start by spreading out the organization bins around the school to prevent students from overwhelming about what organization to donate to. Although there are some people who do not have time to drop off clothing or other donations which is why Giving Tuesday created a website for people to easily make money donations to any organization, not only in their local area but anywhere around the world with a simple search. Anyone who is feeling generous can participate in Giving Tuesday and share about how they supported an organization by posting a selfie with #GivingTuesday. “Not only will schools benefit from the donations, but they will feel the support from the entire community,” Hirnisey said.

Students participate in Giving Tuesday in CCA on Nov. 29, 2016 by providing information about their causes. Photo courtesy of Tiger Tracks.


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Aides assist students, staff all around school Marie Gabbard gabbamar000@hsestudents.org

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tudents snap their heads around to look at the classroom door when a strong knock occurs. A student wordlessly hands the teacher a brightly colored pass, slipping in and out quickly. This student is an office aide working to help around the school. When most people have a study hall in their schedule, they choose to spend that time working on homework or talking to their friends. But for others, they choose to spend that time helping others as a student aide. Students can aide in many different parts of the school including the guidance office, dean’s office, attendance office, CCA office or for any teacher who agrees to it. Different aides have more work than others, like office aides hand out passes while teachers aides do not. Senior Alex Overdorf is an aide in the media center, and he does tasks that he says makes him feel more involved with the school. “A lot of people think that library aides do nothing,” Overdorf said. “But no, we run passes and we do art designs, a lot of different things come from the media aides.” Some of the art designs he worked on were themed displays like banned book week and a Thanksgiving display about what students are grateful for. On the other hand senior Chloe Yorn who has been a teacher’s aide multiple semesters for two different teachers does not think she has had that much work as a teachers aide. She gives out reminders, sorts papers and does whatever else

At the attendance office student aides sophomores Kaylin Hoover and Brynn Urban sign out people who are leaving early. Photo by Nya Thornton

the teacher needs done on a specific day. “I do some obscure tasks like cutting up laminated papers,” Yorn said. “But most the time I’m just working on homework.” Becoming an aide has no grade requirement so freshman through seniors can aide. Some people believe that there should be a limit though. “I honestly do not think that freshman should aide. There’s a level of maturity that you need.” Yorn said on the issue,“Once you’re later on in high school you know that you don’t want to aid for classes just because your friends are in that class.” Sophomore Luke Kraft aides for attendance and has aided for the main office in the past. He thinks that underclassmen should be aides. “I think it just depends on your level of maturity,” Kraft said. “It’s true as a freshman I was not that mature.” Senior Sam Durnell also aides for the attendance offfice where she signs students out and distributes passes. “I thought it would be fun to aide instead of sitting there doing nothing,” Durnell said. When students are aides they also get more interactions with teachers and administrators in the school. For example, when a student is running passes they interact with teachers they do not have in a class. “I definitely think that teachers are more approachable if you aid,” Overdorf said. “You then have someone in this school that you can go to when you have a problem.”


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Students find aid with Code Red

Andrew Bauer bauerand000@hsestudents.org

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3 1. Freshman Ethan Furniss identifies and fixes a software problem in a student laptop during third period in the Tech Center while listening to tips from the technology specialists. 2. Laptops seeking repair are placed into a cabinet, and are ordered by the part that needs replacement or fixing. 3. Code Red can fix many different devices found around the school including school-issued laptops, printers, landline phones and projectors. Photos and graphics by Andrew Bauer.

ithin the back room of the Media Center lies the Technology Center with Code Red inside. Code Red is a student technology team that is trained to help support device-related issues. After training, interns complete many of the same tasks that the tech specialists do for the building. Interns learn how to fix both hardware (physical damage) and software (anything programmable) issues for many different devices. However, Code Red can only open up school issued devices, so personal devices cannot usually be taken in for hardware repair that requires opening up the device. If students do happen to have a problem with a personal device, they can still visit the Tech Center to gain advice on what steps to take to fix their device. “We can help fix software issues of personal devices,” technology specialist and Code Red advisor Joseph Krutsick said. “Hardware issues are a bit more difficult because it requires opening up the system and we can’t do that without taking responsibility of it. The best thing we can do is determine what the problem is and point you towards a repair place that can fix it.” Code Red, along with the two tech specialists, can repair most devices within the school including projectors, school laptops, iPads, Apple TVs and landline phones. Reimaging, for instance, can fix many software problems by simply wiping all programs, and re-installing them. “Physical problems are easier to detect as compared to software problems where they are harder to detect,” junior Code Red member Austin Cummins said. “Most hardware issues can be determined by simply examining the device, while software takes some digging to find.” When students spend hours of their time online, this is ample time for them to accidentally stumble upon malicious software or viruses. Students can follow rules to reduce the risk of stumbling upon harmful software. “To avoid a virus or malware, it is actually recommended to not use a VPN as a VPN service just sends your data to a random source,” Cummins said. “This is more common in free VPNs. Visiting unauthorized sites or clicking on ads also runs the risk of encountering different kinds of malware.” All students who are well versed in computer science can join Code Red. Those who want to join should talk to their counselor. Prerequisite courses are not required; however, previous knowledge is recommended for incoming freshman to participate. Students will get a one hour credit towards their internships over one or two semesters. Code Red continues to evolve. “Code Red members are officially classified as interns,” technology specialist and Code Red advisor Rick Aker said. “This year the interns are now in [the Tech Center] with us, and have been entrusted with the actual repair of the laptops.”


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HEADLINE WHEEE Katie Wiseman wisemkat000@hsestudents.org

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s though they are controlled by the music, performers move across the stage. The marionettes of Electrum dance as if each note tugs on their strings, while the girls of Silver Sound enter the stage in their red capes and wolf costumes. Sound is the all-female show choir group. This season their show was based on the story of “Little Red Riding Hood.” Half of the girls dressed as Little Red, while the other half of the group dressed to portray the big bad wolf. “The premise of their story is going through the woods, the fears we face on our journey, the darkness we approach, how we handle that journey and all the emotions we go through,” choir director Tess Tazioli said. The show begins with the Little Reds feeling optimistic about their journey into the woods. Then as the show continues, the wolves appear and they learn about their similarities and differences. For their closer, they come together and sing Panic! At the Disco’s song “Victorious.” Electrum is a mixed show choir with both male and female performers. Their show, “The Plight of the Marionettes,” was put together by choir director Greg Johnson. “They’re trying to symbolize the concept of being controlled by a puppet master,” Johnson said. “After the opener, it is very clear that they are dolls who come to life and are dancing as marionettes.” The show consists of several songs they sing together, and number sang only by the boys and one sang only by the girls. The group has a costume change, and then as their closer, they perform a tap number to Pinocchio’s “Got No Strings.” “In the beginning, we start off as marionettes and then after our ballad, our strings are cut and we become free,” Electrum and Sound senior Lily Wann said. “The show is about learning to not be controlled and not have any strings,” The show choirs have a camp at the end of July and beginning of August where they start working on one of their numbers. They learn the rest of their choreography for the shows during first semester. “It takes all of first semester to learn all the choreography, learn all the songs and how they all work together,” Wann said. “Then we have to focus on our characters and how we feel during each song.” Both Sound and Electrum have rehearsal after school once a week during first semester, and then have rehearsals on Tuesdays and Thursdays for three hours after school. They take breaks to work on songs for the fall and winter choir concerts but have learned the whole show for competition before winter break, and begin competing in January. “Everyone assumes that show choir is just something you do for a month and then it’s over with. We started in August, but the planning for the show started in May of last year,” Electrum member junior Carrie Lause said. “It’s many long nights of rehearsals, lots of planning, choreography and vocals. It takes almost seven to eight months to put everything together.” The Silver Spotlight competition kicked off their season on Jan. 26. While Electrum and Sound do not compete since FHS hosts the event, they perform their shows for the first time. Their first competition was at Franklin Community High School Showfest. Electrum placed eighth and Sound placed fifth. Their last competition was March 2, at Avon. Electrum and Sound were both first runner-up in their divisions. Although both show choirs placed second at their last competition, they felt


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Community paints way for local artists, ambitions

Curren Gauss gausscur000@hsestudents.org

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Off the corner of Handles Ice Cream and Yogurt sits “Blue Rose Junction” by Craig Martin. Photo by Curren Gauss.

ustling traffic and construction zones come with the continuing developments in the ever-growing downtown area of Fishers. However, amidst all the road work, some more artistic projects continue to be added to the city. In 2013 the Fishers Community Art Master Plan was completed and was spearheaded by the Fishers Arts Council. Since then, the Fishers Arts Council has overseen different public art projects for the Nickel Plate District. “The murals’ primary role is to advocate for the arts in local communities and serve eastern Hamilton County,” city planner Ross Hilleary said. “Public art is about connecting members of the community together.” One of the murals, the cool-toned “Blue Rose Junction” by Craig Martin, was painted on the side of Handel’s Ice Cream and Yogurt in the summer of 2018. The owners wanted a piece that would make their shop an anchor of downtown, and Martin wanted to make sure he celebrate the vibrancy and energy of the area. “‘Blue Rose Junction’ took a bit of time,” Hilleary said. “The artist, the building owner, the local business and the mural committee, all had to be on the same page.” While Martin’s mural took months for completion, other smaller-scale projects can be quicker. These include the Nickel Plate District painted signal boxes, which only take a couple of weeks before being installed. “As [the FAC] moves forward we hope to bring other unique forms of art to Fishers,” Fishers Arts Council member Shwa Hall said. “I believe that Fishers has the potential to become a hub for the

arts in Hamilton County as well as for Indiana at large.” Senior AP art student Cora Mizimakoski recognizes the same potential in Fishers and hopes to watch the area become similar to Broad Ripple or the Carmel Arts District. “Local art spreads the word and inspires people,” Mizimakoski said. “I know I’ve been inspired. It makes you want to create your own.” Funding for the downtown projects comes from the Nickel Plate Arts as well as private donations. Artists are chosen by the Fishers Arts Council through Request for Qualifications (RFQ) where the artist submits examples of their work and information about themselves. The artists are compensated for their time via a grant. The art scene in Fishers has just started growing and there are no plans to stop anytime soon. While plans for new murals continue, the painted art does not stand alone. “Siege The Day” by Kevin Huff, a 12’ tall sculpture, sits outside the Meyer Najem headquarters and “3 Man Band” by Jeffery Mack, a musically inspired sculpture, is located outside Gallery 116. “I believe art, both in the form of public art, but also through the performing arts, is all about gathering the community together. The Nickel Plate District wouldn’t be what it is today without the amazing performing art venues, but they would just be a stage and grass if it wasn’t for the artist that brings them to life,” Hilleary said. “All of it combined creates the sense of place that we as residents and visitors, enjoy so much about the Nickel Plate District.”


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5 1. Sculpture “3 Man Band� plays on outside of Gallery 116 in downtown Fishers. Photo by Curren Gauss. 2. On the corner of Blaze Pizza sits one piece of the painted electrical box series. Photo by Elena Barry. 3. A painted electrical box can be found on the corner of 116 and Handels. 4. A second electrical box displaying a blue cat adorns the streets in Downtown Fishers. 5. Also on the corner of the ice cream parlor hangs this piece by Nekoda Witsken. Photos by Curren Gauss.

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To learn more about local art, the annual arts crawl and how to get involved, visit fishersartscouncil.com.


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Mama Nita’s serves signature slices Katie Wiseman wisemkat000@hsestudents.org

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3. 1. Pizzas prepped for the taking are displayed on the buffet line. 2. A colorful chalk-written menu hangs above the buffet. 3. Warm breadsticks ready to be placed on hungry customers’ plates are stacked on the buffet line. Photos by Katie

Wiseman

empting smells of garlic and cheese greet customers as they enter Mama Nita’s pizza. Large ovens baking fresh pizza and an open-buffet lined with an assortment of food fills the restaurant with an aroma that leads customers directly to the counter to place an order. The buffet offered five pizzas, two types of breadsticks with either cheese or marinara, a dessert pizza, brownies and salad. They continuously made new pizzas in the back to add to the buffet while we ate, so there was always pizza available. My only complaint with the buffet is that nothing was labeled. We were unsure of what we put on our plates until we tried them, all of which we found to be delicious. The pizza crust was soft inside with a slightly crispy outer layer, allowing the sweet pizza sauce to soak into the crust. We determined a few of the toppings include sausage, chicken, bacon, onions, tomatoes and peppers. My personal favorites were the dessert pizza and the breadsticks. The dessert pizza, covered in cinnamon with a drizzle of icing, tasted much like a cinnamon roll. The breadsticks were soft, doughy and had a subtle hint of garlic butter, making them flavorful enough to stand on their own without the need for cheese or marinara sauce. The Mama Nita’s Pizza off Allisonville road opened in August, making it their third location in Indiana, after their New Palestine and Greenfield locations. One of the store’s main draws is their pizza buffet. They offer a $5.99 lunch special and $7.49 dinner special. While their menu offers a large variety of pizza, breadsticks, salad and desserts when they carry out, customers also have the opportunity to try everything with their all-you-can-eat buffet when they dine in. The dinner special and a drink cost less than $10.00. Vibrant walls of pink and neon green greet customers as they enter Mama Nita’s Pizza. The walls lined with wooden booths and tables are each accompanied by their own chalkboard for customer’s entertainment. The restaurant has only ten tables, an inadequate amount of seating for a busy lunch hour, and there is not a lot of leg room at the tables. However, the size and layout contribute to the warm and cozy environment. Mama Nita’s Pizza offers a distinctive dining experience, surprising prices and delicious food, making it a great place to eat when dining on a budget. I highly recommend this place to anyone who is looking for a quick and flavorful meal.

Rating: 4.5/5


Arts & Culture

Modern Grinch steals moviegoers’ hearts

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Rebekah Shultz schulreb000@hsestudents.org

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ou’re a mean one, Mr. Grinch” is a beloved, recognizable phrase during the holiday season. The Grinch is a staple character during the Christmas season, to watch and get into the holiday spirit. “The Grinch,” released on Nov. 8, was Animated by Illumination Animation who also produced “The Lorax” in 2012 and the “Despicable Me” movies. It is a movie that families can enjoy during the holidays to get a good laugh and keep the younger kids, as well as teenagers entertained. The movie is appropriate to watch with kids or adults of any age. This film shows that families are not pictureperfect, with Cindy Lou’s mom being single and taking double shifts in the hospital. All Cindy Lou wants for Christmas is for her mom not to have to work so much. In the two previous Grinch movies, Cindy Lou has two parents. However, this adaptation focuses on Cindy Lou’s appreciation for her single mother. Compared to the original movie, “How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” that came out in 1966, this new movie is better suited to entertain the current generation. Moments such as the dog, Max, making the Grinch breakfast and having a dog elevator, add laughter to the room. “The Grinch” also has clearer graphics compared to the original film. The animation is updated and is comprised of 3D art instead of 2D. The movie is filled with songs from famous singers such as “You’re A Mean One, Mr. Grinch” and “I Am the Grinch” by Tyler the Creator. Additionally, Pharrell Williams narrates the film, providing an enthusiastic voice and rhyming throughout the movie. In this adaption, the Grinch, voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch, is shown in a new light. First of all, his house up on the hill seems more like a mansion compared to the original, which made his house look like a cave and was very dingy. The Grinch is also kinder than how he was portrayed in the original, with him being neighborly to his somewhat friend, Mr. Bricklebaum, voiced by SNL’s Kenan Thompson. Many audience members smiled and laughed in the theaters as the movie made new additions to the original story. Many funny moments included a yak named Fred, who would try to replace Max the dog, and the Grinch’s piano playing. Diversity was also included, with people of

color throughout the movie. There is a mixed family as well, which is a new addition. The producers ensured that more people can relate to the characters instead of just displaying Caucasian families. I would recommend this movie. Despite small changes in the plot and the addition of new characters, it is a cute movie to watch during the holiday season. In all, the message of being grateful for what you have is not lost in this new adaptation.

“The Grinch” movie poster features The Grinch, voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch and his dog, Max. The movie was released Nov. 9. Photo used with

permission of Tribune News Service.

Rating: 3.5/5


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Friendsgiving allows people time to celebrate Grace Mossing mossigra000@hsestudents.org

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Recipe from Paul Casey

Arts & Culture

Graphic by Grace Mossing

ith families spread out, there is not always time to travel, so people plan an event called Friendsgiving with food and sometimes different activities held around Thanksgiving. They celebrate their friends and colleagues and express their gratitude for one another. According to USA Today, the word and celebration of Friendsgiving came into play around 2007, but it did not gain momentum until 2011 when the word was used in a Bailey’s Irish Cream commercial. Friendsgiving gives people a chance once a year to celebrate a part of their lives: their friends. Since she was eight, sophomore Alison Casey has celebrated Friendsgiving on Thanksgiving. Casey’s Friendsgiving consists of a group pitch-in with several of their family friends. The host family provides the turkey and traditional Thanksgiving dishes. All of the guests bring appetizers or desserts to share with everyone. One of Casey’s favorite dishes to bring to Friendsgiving is pumpkin pie cheesecake bars. She believes that bringing food helps show the hosting family her and her family’s gratitude for their friendship. Casey also brings strands of fake leaves with lights connected, so glowing fall colored leaves decorate the house. Another one of their traditions is to watch football. Junior Mya Ball celebrates Friendsgiving with her friends and immediate family every Black Friday after some shopping. It started about five years ago when her family and neighbors all moved into the same neighborhood. The event is huge and held at Ball’s backdoor neighbor’s house. Guests consist of neighbors, as well as their neighbor’s family and friends. “We have a strict no Thanksgiving food rule, like no Thanksgiving food whatsoever because it’s Friendsgiving,” Ball said. “We usually bring my grandma’s black bean salsa or puppy chow, honestly anything that’s not Thanksgiving related, not even turkey.” Talking goes on for hours as the group catches up and shares new details about their lives. Ball believes that showing appreciation for her friends plays an important part in Friendsgiving. “I tell them how thankful I am for them,” Ball said. “I know that actions speak louder than words, but sometimes words are very powerful. I just give them a reminder, like ‘guys thank you for being there for me’.” Friendsgiving spans beyond students’ homes. The English department has a pitch-in, organized by English teacher Lauren Glasco. “It’s really important for us to see each other because we’re all so spread out that I can go for weeks without seeing some of my friends that are on the other side of the building, so it’s a good way to carve out that time,” Glasco said. She sent out a sign-up sheet, and teachers brought some of their favorite Thanksgiving recipes. English teacher Jordan Nel brought a cranberry sauce she wants to make for her family Thanksgiving this year and tried out by

making it for the English teacher get together. She and her co-workers show gratitude to one another in everyday situations through their actions and words. “I think we do a good job of trying to help each other in times of need, whether it’s really serious times or just a quick I really need your help on this,” Glasco said. “I’m really impressed with the way that we work together to do that, kind of drop everything because we all have so much to do and make sure that we help each other out.” Friendsgiving extends to all people even those who do not celebrate Thanksgiving and is a simple way to celebrate friends. “Since my family is scattered across the United States I’m grateful to have a community of close friends who we are able to spend Thanksgiving with,” Casey said.

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English teachers Marina Gibson and Erin Domokos talk with plates full of Thanksgiving food as they celebrate Friendsgiving while Ben Beasley and Ross Springman speak to others at their table. Photo by Grace Mossing.

Sophomore Alison Casey decorated her kitchen to reflect a fall theme with colorful leaves and flowers to get ready for a Friendsgiving setting. Photo by Alison Casey.

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Maggie Kirkwood experiments with makeup

Carson Lilley lillecar000@hsestudents.org

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oices blare from the phone perched on the counter, guiding viewers on how to contour their face in order to accentuate their cheekbones. With concentration, senior Maggie Kirkwood follows these instructions in an effort to learn something new. Kirkwood became interested in makeup after receiving a lip gloss kit in fifth grade. It motivated her to start wearing makeup to school and experimenting with different types of cosmetics, such as eyeshadow and concealer. “I taught myself how to do makeup from watching YouTube videos,” Kirkwood said. “I would watch them repeatedly and sit on my bathroom floor and just follow everything they did.” On herself, Kirkwood enjoys natural makeup. However, when she does other people’s makeup she likes to explore glam options that are bolder. Her favorite brands include Two Faced, NARS and Maybelline. “I love doing makeup because it allows for so much creativity,” Kirkwood said. “You can wear it out in public which is different than normal art

In preparation for Halloween, senior Maggie Kirkwood displays a festive makeup look on her Instagram page Sept. 30. Photo used with permission

of Maggie Kirkwood.

which is stuck on a canvas. You can show makeup off.” Kirkwood finds inspiration for technique from artists Nikki Tutorials and James Charles, who use their YouTube platforms to post makeup tutorials. By following them, she continuously strives to improve her skills. “When I first started makeup, my looks were kind of rough,” Kirkwood said. “Since then, I’ve improved at blending eyeshadow and figuring out how to match makeup to skin tones.” In order to pursue her passion in school, Kirkwood joined Tech Crew, where she does makeup for plays and musicals. She has done makeup for “White Christmas,” “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “Seussical,” “Fishers Night Live” and is contributing to “Bring it On” this year. “Last year we had a makeup artist studying theater makeup at Ball State come in, and she gave us a basis. Then we came up with ideas on our own too,” Kirkwood said. “Junior Riley Mosson and I came up with the Bird Girl looks for the ‘Seussical’ together.” Recently, Kirkwood’s friends convinced her to create an Instagram page for her makeup, called makeupbymaggiek, which led to her developing a website as well. From there, friends started to ask her to do their makeup for homecoming and prom. “I realized that I could start advertising my makeup because I didn’t realize people would like it as much as they did,” Kirkwood said Kirkwood charges $30 to $40 to do other people’s makeup. She has clients bring their own foundation and concealer so that the coloring matches. “I had Maggie do my makeup for prom because I didn’t want to go to someone I didn’t know and have it be awkward to sit there in silence while they put makeup on my face,” senior Savannah Kennedy said. “Some people do really dark makeup for prom and it comes out looking cakey, but hers was so good.” As well as doing makeup for prom and homecoming, Kirkwood’s cousin asked her to do makeup for her wedding this month. Kirkwood hopes to pursue cosmetics in the future. Though she plans on studying business or communications in college, she is considering going to cosmetic school afterwards. For now, she can be found in front of a mirror with a makeup brush in hand, improving her most recent looks.


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Morgan Joiner, sophomore

Alec Green, senior

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Graphic by Ellie Albin

Energy drinks fuel students Ellie Albin albinele000@hsestudents.org

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lacier Freeze, Lemon Lime and Fruit Punch: these are just a handful of flavors one may reach for when exhausted after a workout. While energy drinks may seem like the perfect go-to during a post-workout break, research shows that they may not be the best for recovery. The original sports drink, Gatorade, was created by the University of Florida in 1965. Kidney disease specialist Robert Cade embarked on a mission to discover why football players lost so much weight during practice. According to the University of Florida, Cade’s research led him to conclude that players lost so much weight due to sweat. When the players sweat, they lost vital electrolytes, such as sodium and potassium, which created a chemical imbalance within their bodily systems. Thus, Gatorade was invented. When used properly, Gatorade replenishes electrolytes and hydrates. Drinks such as Powerade and Glaceau Vitamin Water provide the same benefits. However, overconsumption of Gatorade and other similar sports drinks can be detrimental to the body. “I feel awful after having a sports drink; my stomach hurts so bad,” junior Amelia Anderson said. “Especially while I’m playing sports. Drinking sports drinks is like water slosh belly times ten.” After water, the second ingredient in Gatorade is sugar, hence why athletes may suffer from

stomach aches. According to The Science of Eating, high amounts of sugar in the long-run may lead to tooth decay, heart disease and obesity. This has caused some students to move away from intense energy drinks and toward smoothies. “I drink Green Machine from Naked because it’s really tasty and good for you,” junior Benjamin Hamilton said. “You get the added bonus of it not being literally just sugar water.” At the end of the day, water remains the most vital drink when going through a workout recovery. According to Fit Day, water must be consumed after all exercise in order to compensate for the water lost during exercise - even on simple walks. If the conditions are warm enough, and a person walks at a brisk enough pace, one can lose a pound of water weight - just from sweat. This loss of water puts a person at risk of dehydration and severe medical complications. To avoid this, some students make it a priority to obtain enough water regularly. “I do drink enough water since I don’t drink any other drink besides water on a daily basis,” junior Kyla Pruzin said. “I bring water to school and drink it at every meal.” Along with research proving that water is the most beneficial post-workout drink, coaches often discourage their athletes from consuming too many energy drinks. “My coaches are water people,” Anderson said. “They don’t say not to have sports drinks, but we always have a cooler of water, no matter what.”


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Basketball rolls into new season Tony Martinez martiant000@hsestudents.org

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1. Senior Josiah Matthews steers his way into the paint in a 52-46 win against Pike High School on Jan. 5. Courtesy of Tiger Tracks Yearbook. 2. Facing off against a Pike defender, Willie Jackson looks for an opening. Courtesy of Tiger Tracks Yearbook.

ead coach Matthew Moore gets ready for the season with his new team in off season conditioning. Last year, the Tigers went 12-12 on the season with eight of those 12 losses coming by four points or less in overtime. “I expect us to continue to be competitive and put ourselves in a position to win games down the stretch,” Moore said. “We need to grow from last year’s experiences and make the proper adjustments to finish those close games.” This year the Tigers have some returning players that will be on the starting roster: Willie Jackson, Terry Hicks, Emmanuel Davis and Roman Molden. “I’m excited to go against new teams. We get to play against people we’ve heard about but never really played,” Long said. “My goal for this season is to be a leader, and lead our team to win a sectional championship.” This season, the Tigers will take on four new teams in their season. Mount Vernon, Columbus East, Lafayette Jeff and Columbus North are the new 4A opponents. The team faces these new opponents because they are branching out deeper in the 4A division. The team follows the motto “Build Believe Belong;” Moore emphasizes this in practice every day. The team does team building excercises to build chemistry with each other every practice. “We need continued pursuit by our older players to demonstrate to our younger players what it takes to be a Tiger,” Moore said. “Willie Jackson and Josiah Matthews are the two players that I feel have the ability to positively impact our direction if they choose to do so.” Senior Willie Jackson has been playing varsity minutes since his freshman year of high school. Last year, Jackson averaged 9.3 points, 3.6 rebounds and 2.0 assists per game. “I expect us to do really well this year,” Jackson said. “We’ve learned and picked up a lot of new stuff that Coach Moore has instilled in our offense and defense. Overall, we have a different style from last year and I think it will fit well with us.” The Tigers are having a slight more focus on the defensive side of the ball. They want to execute more in tight, late game situations to secure the win. “I always look forward to the challenge that playing new teams in new settings can bring to a program,” Moore said. “I feel we are able to add a few teams whose style of play will better prepare us for the teams we will need to beat to win our sectional more so than in years past.” The Tigers continue to prepare for the first game of the season against Lawrence Central on Nov. 20 at home at 7 p.m.

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Nature enthusiasts use survival skills Nate Albin albinnat000@hsestudents.org

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reshman Andrew Haughey’s tousled hair bounced up and down upon his forehead repeatedly as he continued his march from one side of the woods to the other holding a hefty tree trunk with fellow freshman Spencer Smith. It would be a mistake, in their opinion, to call this camping or hiking; no, this is bushcrafting. Bushcrafting is any outdoor activity that would help a person in a situation in which they would be working for survival. This can include shelter construction, fire building, finding ways to get food and much more. Due to this, the term, popularized in the UK and Australian outback, allows for loose interpretation of what counts as bushcrafting. “It is the art of going out to the wild and adventuring,” Smith said. “That to me is bushcrafting.” Through online forums and many videos on YouTube, bushcrafting has found its niche in America. Now that it is here, crafters like Haughey have said that it can be a very peaceful activity and one that draws you back to the woods. Haughey and Smith, along with freshman Fletcher Haltom, spend many weekends out in the woods bushcrafting. Once they go out into the woods, they must face the problems nature gives them with what they find.

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2 1. Freshmen Fletcher Haltom, Spencer Smith and Andrew Haughey sit inside of their latest build, a lean-to, during fall break in Marion county. 2. The dangers of bushcrafting are shown as Haughey tumbles into a creek while crossing. Photos by Nate Albin.


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Some crafters allow the use of tools, while others see that as sacrilegious. At its core, though, bushcrafters feel there is a common theme. “Gather, build, create,” Smith said. “Bushcrafting is anything you want it to be as long as it involves building with nature.” Haughey is credited by the group as being the one who introduced the activity to the others. Since they started, they have found many easyto-join online forums, such as bushcraftusa.com, where people of the craft from all around the world share their work, teach newcomers and support each other. At first, they did not know what they were in for. “It was 2015 at my old house,” said Haughey. “I saw the woods, and I’m like ‘I’ve got to get out there.’ I found the bushcrafting community, and it was really tight-knit and loving, so we joined it.” To these students, some of bushcrafting’s appeal comes from the creativity that it allows. They believe that one does not win or lose an expedition, but that this is just something they do for enjoyment. “There is no rhyme or reason to it,” Haltom said. “We just go out and build. It is something I can enjoy with friends and have fun.” Out in the woods, anything can happen. The weather can suddenly make a sunny day a rainy mess and cause them problems. The ground may be rock solid and cause problems digging. There may simply be a lack of sticks, but a successful build is not always the only reason for bushcrafting. “Bushcrafting is a great way to bond,” Smith said. “Especially if trees are falling nearby.”

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3. Haltom peers through the walls of the structure during an inspection. 4. Due to a lack of lumber on the ground, Haughey looks to the trees for better materials. 5. Haughey uses a piece of wood to excavate a hole for a post. 6. Haltom and Smith work to put up the top piece of the lean-to. 7. Smith barks over to fellow bushcrafters across the creek. Photos by Nate Albin.


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Team lunges towards season Lance Marshall marshlan000@hsestudents.org

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n four years, the Tigers have experienced three head coaches. The team has wrestled with these changes, but have worked to rebuild the team every year. “The team’s thought process about each season has definitely changed” varsity junior PJ Pritchett said. “Having multiple coaching changes can make it difficult to have a consistent season especially when trying to adapt to the new coaching.” Varsity head coach Frank Ingalls wrestled at Lawrence North High School and went on to wrestle division one for Indiana University. After college, Ingalls returned to his old high school to be the varsity assistant coach for seven years, helping them win two state titles. He then went to HSE to be the varsity assistant coach for five years before coming to FHS. “Since Coach Ingalls is older than our past head coaches, he has more knowledge to share,” varsity senior Truman Able said. “In our practices, it is more technique and breaking it down move by move rather than rushing through the moves like the past.” Before Coach Ingalls entered the picture there was coach Ethan Harris who led the Tigers for two seasons with a career record of 22-20. After Harris left head coach Jason Cook took the reins for one season. “Our first coach worked us to death and our second coach had easy practices while working on mainly technique,” varsity junior JD Farrell said. “While coach Ingalls is a mix of both of hard practices and work on technique.”

Last year, the Tigers posted a 4-2 head-to-head record and sent two wrestlers to semistate, with one advancing to state. Junior JD Farrell, who did not place at semistate, and 2018 graduate Alexander Strueder, who placed fourth at semistate. Strueder did not place at state. “My goal for this season is to place at state,” Farrell said. “To achieve this goal I have been examining my weaknesses and strengthening them by finding the best competition in the room and practice with them.” The captains from last year, Strueder and 2018 graduate Teegan Heiniger, were the only seniors that made it past sectionals. The Tigers also had nine wrestlers qualify for regionals. “We have lost some pretty valuable guys to graduation, injury and loss of interest,” Farrell said. “Although, our senior class is looking very powerful and our lowerclassmen definitely have potential.” Seven out of the nine wrestlers who qualified for regionals will be returning. The Tigers will get their first look at HCC opponent Zionsville High school in the Westfield Invitational on Dec. 1. Last year Zionsville placed 12th at the state tournament, but only sophomore Logan Wagner from their state group will be returning. “I am very excited for this season,” Able said. “Last season was filled with injuries so I am taking it step by step and focusing on the small goals.” Coming up on their schedule is a meet at Muncie Central High School on Tue. Nov. 20. Last year the Tigers were able to defeat Muncie Central 40-36.

Senior Cole Ludlow eyes down Muncie Central opponent looking for an opening in 40-36 win on Dec. 7, 2017. Courtesy of Tiger Tracks Yearbook.


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Sports most important part of Indiana’s culture Ellie Albin albinele000@hsestudents.org

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asketball hoops grace the driveways of suburbia, captivating hopefuls who dream of wearing the red-and-white candy stripes. Black-and-white checkered flags flutter in the wind throughout the month of May, signifying the arrival of the “Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” Dedicated Colts followers, who were named the best football fans in the book “1st and 10: Top Ten Lists of Everything in Football” by Sports Illustrated Kids, line up outside Lucas Oil Stadium every Sunday, seemingly forgetful that their Indianapolis Colts went 4-12 in the 2017 NFL season, with a 2018 season that is not looking too bright, either. But, it does not matter, because sports are sports. Enough said. And that, that mentality, is Indiana. Forget the corn and soybeans. Forget the limestone, too. Sports have been the most defining, and most important, part of Indiana culture since the 20th century. Without sports, well, the outsiders are right: Indiana is just a cornfield. If sports were not important to the Hoosier state, then Westfield would not have built the state-ofthe-art, 400-acre Grand Park complex, complete with a humble dose of 26 baseball diamonds, 31 multipurpose fields and 750,000 annual visitors. So, Westfield built their economy around sports. And, 30 years earlier, Indianapolis did the same. On March 29, 1984, the Colts left Baltimore. Where to? Indianoplace - yep. Not a typo. Even Hillary Clinton agreed that this was a “no place” - later claiming that statement was a joke, however. But, still, why would the Colts come to Indianapolis? The answer: Indiana was in the midst of becoming a major league city. William Hudnut, Indianapolis’ mayor during the Colts’ move to the city, wanted the city to revolve around professional sports, and that is what he got. Hudnut initiated this sports movement with the building of the Hoosier Dome. While it may seem somewhat rude that Indy, in a sense, stole an NFL team from another city, Hudnut’s goal was to create a culture for Indianoplace, to make the city and state an Indiasomeplace. And, the mayor succeeded. Because then the Super Bowl came. As stated by Sporting Charts, Super Bowls draw well over 100 million viewers every year now, which meant many eyes were on Indianapolis on Feb. 5, 2012 - Super Bowl XLVI. The NFL is not the only league that has helped to cement sports as the most defining element of Indiana culture, though. The NCAA headquarters are in Indianapolis, which runs college sports. Also, the men’s Final Four in basketball has been held in Indianapolis seven times, with their eighth in 2021. But, perhaps the most beautiful tradition of Indiana is the Indianapolis 500. Since Ray Harroun won the inaugural race in 1911, the state has been associated with cars that speed over 230 miles per hour, gallons of milk, checkered flags and one long yard of bricks. Those are a lot of pretty cool attributions to be associated with - and it is all thanks to sports. Sure, the competitive sporting spirit gets pretty mushy sometimes. Sports are full of cliches about hard work, teamwork and fighting your way to the top - but those cliches are cliche for a reason. They are what society builds culture around - society focuses on those ideas because they are important. And, that is exactly what Indiana capitalized on. They took those cliches and turned them into culture - one great, complicated, controversial and important sporting culture.

The RCA Dome, originally called the Hoosier Dome, attracted the Colts to the city in 1984. The team now plays in Lucas Oil Stadium, which was built in 2008. Photo used with permission of Wikimedia Commons.


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Nov. 19, 2018

Phones in schools raise problems for performance Hallie Gallinat gallihal000@hsestudents.org

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n each classroom, the school placed a red binder. A student has to sign it if the teacher spots them on their phone. Teachers decide the punishment, such as a call home, themselves. While all teachers have one, students still access their phones. In order to combat this, a stricter ban is needed. According to Oxford Learning, a tutoring website, students check their phone in classrooms 11 times a day on average. With that much time spent on phones, it takes a toll on a student’s attention and classwork. Not only that, but students interact less with others said Good Life Good Choices, a non profit organization. Students would rather play on their phones than interact with others and this can impact their social skills. Even more dangerous issues can rise from phones in the classroom, such as cyberbullying, which often occurs behind the teacher’s back and is harder to notice than bullying. Though controversial, many schools across the world have banned cell phones. One school in France banned the use of cell phones in the building and test scores went up by 6.4 percent, said the Guardian. Students also began to interact more with each other. A school in Maine placed a strict ban on use of cell phones after a student committed suicide from cyberbullying, said Sun Journal, a newspaper in Maine. Students would get warnings before the third offense, where a parent would have to come pick up the phone. Since the ban, students focus more in class and are interacting more. Phones would not have to be banned from the school premise. Students from the Maine school keep their phones in their backpacks. The Toronto Star reports that one school in Ontario requires students to place their phones in a locked pouch. Both of these bans have been successful. One argument against banning cell phones says that without phones, students have no way to contact their family. However, landlines still exist in most schools and students can use them if they need to contact home. In the modern world more people own cell phones and receive them at younger ages. It is important for these young people to learn that school is a place for learning, not for texting.

“If a student is using their phone excessively, their phone should be taken away for the class period.” - Zach Clar, 10

“I donʼt think they should really extend beyond a warning, just for the sake of respect for the teacher. Beyond that, theyʼre making the conscious choice not to engage.“ - Gracey Scholl, 10

“Even though you can use them to make videos and as calculators, they should be banned during lessons.” - Cate Pattern, 10


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Phone use drives modern classrooms Ethan O’Sullivan osuleth000@hsestudents.org

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Photos by Andrew Bauer.

ell phones in classrooms might be as polarizing as pineapple on pizza. Misused, it is a fast track to chaos and loss of control. Nonetheless, they offer a wide array of uses that are ultimately necessary for survival. First of all, phones put parents at ease. According to the Pew Research Center, 48 percent of parents use their child’s phone to track their child’s whereabouts. Letting students access phones in the classroom lets parents communicate directly with their children about anything from arranging a pickup after school to making sure that they are okay in an emergency. As stated by the Pew Research Center, 92 percent of teens access the internet daily. With the use of smartphones, that number increases to 94 percent. Most schools use one-to-one computing and provide every child with a device, but in those that do not, phone service gives upwards of 1 million additional teens the ability to use the internet as an educational tool. Computers are more comfortable and powerful to use, so phones best suit a support role in the classroom. I can have a source pulled up on my phone while I quote it in an essay, use a stopwatch app to budget my time spent reading a textbook chapter or verify a fact on the internet during a lecture without distracting people. A phone is only a threat to education when it is used without the right mindset, but that obviously applies to every tool. Teachers tend to assume that anybody on a phone is not paying attention. butt students could waste just as much time using any other device. Making technology the foundation of a modern classroom comes with the sacrifice of oversight. Cell phones are not just used for social and leisure. Some companies provide smartphones to their employees, which results in 24/7 access, savings after buying in bulk and compatibility across the board. In fact, 71 percent of employees spend over two hours per week doing company work on their phones, according to Fierce Mobile IT, accessing the Internet is more popular through a mobile device rather than a desktop. Allowing phones in class allows students to learn from misusing it. When a student goes to college or starts a career, it is less likely that their professor or boss will crack a whip at the first sight of a phone. Today’s high schoolers will lose their job or fail their class when they underperform. Demanding practice of that self-discipline early on can spare them grief when it means more.

“We can get information rather than taking out our laptops and typing everything in. Itʼs faster to type on your phone.” - Nicole Olivia, 11

“I think that cell phone usage is more of a self-control problem. Cell phones should be used but regulated.” - Austin Lu, 10

“I think theyʼre alright until they become a distraction because then they can cause bad grades. I think there should be limitations but they should not be taken away.” - Luke Dillon, 11


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Students deserve to learn nitty gritty about birds, bees

Sydney Greenwood greensyd002@hsestudents.org

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Seniors Drake Stallworth and Jillian Meyer demonstrate the expectations of abstinence-only sex education. Photo by Helen Rummel. Graphic by Sydney Greenwood.

our subjects that no one talks about at the dinner table: politics, finances, religion and one more that likely surpasses all of them- sex. Considering the way that we view sex education in our country, it is no wonder that STDs in America are now considered a public health crisis, according to CNN. Perhaps the most terrifying fact about abstinence-only sex education in Indiana is that it is permitted to distribute medically inaccurate information. The programs lie about the effectiveness of contraceptives against pregnancy and diseases, as well as the risks of having an abortion. Only 20 states require information on contraception, as stated by the Center for American Progress. According to the ACLU, over 80 percent of these programs violate medical ethics by lying to students, from misinterpreting basic scientific facts to smearing the line between religion, science and politics. The barrier between religion and politics is meant to keep one religion from dominating all others, because all religions do not share the same beliefs. Abstinence-only sex education completely ignores this, and promotes predominantly conservative religious ideals, according to the Berkeley Political Review. They do not condone the use of contraception as they believe that it is akin to abortion, according to the Huffington Post. Under the current conditions of abstinenceonly education, even if a couple decides to use contraception, the odds are that it will not be used properly because they have not been taught how to. Abstinence-only sex education programs, if they refer to contraception, only mention it in terms of failure rates, according to Advocates For Youth, when success rates are much higher if the

contraception is used correctly. “Kids don’t abstain. The only question is whether they will have [sex] in a physically and emotionally healthy environment…. Abstinence programs assure they won’t,” said Marty Klein, a sex therapist, educator, author and public policy analst said, as stated by Jenny MacKay in the Teen Pregnancy journal. Health and medical ethics are not the only things at risk with abstinence-only sex education. As it is religiously conservative based, it is heteronormative and disregards the needs of LGBTQ+ students. Teaching LGBTQ+ sex education is illegal in seven states and creates a hostile environment for LGBTQ+ students at school, by spreading negative stigmas and stereotypes, according to the Atlantic. Alabama law declares “that homosexuality is not a lifestyle acceptable to the general public and that homosexual conduct is a criminal offense under the laws of the state,” according to NBC News. In January, the Indiana Senate passed a bill that allowed for parents to opt out of sex education for their child, according to the Indy Star. Although there is no demonstrated demand for parents to decline what their child learns about in school, now every student will have differing degrees of knowledge concerning the birds and the bees. This law does not educate students, but limits them to their parent’s beliefs. The purpose of a school is to educate students, not to lie to them. All information presented at education institutions should be factually accurate and completely separate from religion, otherwise students’ learning will be restricted. Abstinenceonly sex education programs only set students up for failure.


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Mental health days further end mental health stigma Ashley Steele steelash000@hsestudents.org

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fter stressful weeks full of studying, testing and completing assignments, students may determine that they need to take a day off for themselves and de-stress. Usually when they do so, their parents call them in under the pretense that they are sick. However, what they are actually taking is a mental health day. While calling in under false pretenses does not harm anyone, it creates a stigma around taking a mental health day. Since the district aims to help end the stigma surrounding mental health at their schools, students feeling that they cannot say they are taking a mental health day represents the opposite of their goals. As of this school year, the district has hired 13 mental health professionals to cover the 22 schools in the district. FHS, HSE and the Focus Day Program all have full-time counselors while the rest of the 10 counselors cover the other schools in the district part-time. On top of this, the schools have shifted the focus of the guidance counselors from their student’s post-high school learning to how their students are doing in their current educational and personal lives. Also, both high schools have Stigma Free Clubs, which aims to normalize talking about mental health, and similar clubs are being started at lower grade levels. Yet, the district still does not include mental health days in their list of excused absences found in each school’s student handbook. Due to this, even if students were to call in for a mental health day, their absence would be marked as unexcused. According to the HSE School District’s website, mental health includes a person’s overall emotional, psychological and social well-being. Since not every student decreases their stress

levels through talk therapy, the new approach of the guidance counselors and the availability of the mental health professionals that the district has provided will not support every student’s attempt to become mentally healthy. The district needs to accept mental health days for the allotted eight excused absences each semester so students can focus on these aforementioned aspects in their lives without being punished for it. Outside of school, the stigma surrounding mental health days is just as prominent. Bridge by Instructure, an employee development software, conducted a survey of 1,000 employees and found that only 11 percent of them were encouraged to take a mental health day. However, many companies like HubSpot, American Express and Olark are open to their employees taking mental health days and provide ways to cope with mental health as a part of their insurance. Some ways people can address their mental health during these days include taking care of activities they had not yet been able to do, catching up on work they are behind on and communicating with friends and family. This would be a day for them to take time out of their normal schedules and dedicate it to themselves. While workplaces and the district may fear that people will abuse their ability to take mental health days, these would be no different than taking a day off due to personal illness. As with these absences, people will need to determine whether taking a day off will benefit them and makeup whatever they miss that day. At the school level, there remains no reason the district should not include mental health days in their list of excused absences. In fact, it would help the school in their attempts to end the stigma around mental health sooner.

Information from Right as Rain by UW Medicine and NAMI. Graphics by Ashley Steele.


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Nov. 19, 2018

N the Red

Editorial Opinions: Do the murals in downtown Fishers draw in more business?

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5: Yes 3: No

STAFF Editor-in-Chief: Helen Rummel Copy Editor: Ashley Steele Web/News Editor: Ethan OʼSullivan Features Editor: John Yun Arts & Culture Editor: Carson Lilley Sports Editor: Ellie Albin Social Media Editor: Lance Marshall Unity Director: Hallie Gallinat Cartoonist Olivia Buchtenkirch Videographer Laney Kyle Reporters Nate Albin, Andrew Bauer, Sam Bauer, Marie Gabbard, Ben McHenry, Curren Gauss, Sydney Greenwood, Tony Martinez, Grace Mossing, Rebekah Shultz, Janie Van Overwalle, Katie Wiseman Photographers Nya Thornton Principal Jason Urban Adviser Kristine Brown Associations IHSPA CSPA NSPA Quill and Scroll Printer: AIM Media

Public Arts Programs provide more than color

s the line for cold treats at Handel’s grows ever-longer, customers gather along the decorated mural. Some take snapshots of each other in front of the colorful mural to post on social media, while a small group of friends walks by on their way to the Nickel Plate Amphitheater for a concert. This is not just the picture of a lively Friday night, but additionally, a well-functioning business model that should be embraced by our community. An effective city center utilizes the arts, which is why we have seen the unveiling of different projects from the Nickel Plate District [see pp. 12-13] this year. The city of Fishers has recently shifted our gaze to the likes of Noblesville’s Historic Arts District. There, visitors have access to an artistic community that pre-dates Indianapolis. Locations such as Logan Street Sanctuary, a selfdescribed haven for all artists, and productions like the annual Shakespeare in the Park are major components of the Noblesville culture. The heart of Fishers houses several art galleries and places for people to create their own art. Its homegrown restaurants and unique antique shops give the city charm, but it comes at a cost that does not go unnoticed by taxpayers. “Percent for Arts” refers to a government funded program that puts 0.5 percent to 2 percent of public building construction funds towards public arts. While only adopted by some states, the University of Massachusetts Amherst claims these kinds of programs, “seem strongly influential for delivering public art to the public, allowing for creative collaborations and the shaping of publicly owned landscapes.” Fishers does not have a specific government-funded program to support the arts, but Nickel Plate Arts funds many of the projects taking place this year. The organization is a non-profit primarily funded by “Visit Hamilton County” among other groups such as Duke Energy and Imavex. Imavex, a company that specializes in marketing, holds an office in downtown Fishers which would explain their desire to improve the area. While it may appear as money wasted, funds that goes towards bettering public image is never in vain. When these companies invest in projects such as the city murals or the outdoor Amphitheater, they draw in more visitors and therefore revenue. According to The Travel Industry Association of America, 65 percent of tourists say they traveled to see a cultural, arts, heritage, or historic activity or event while on a trip exceeding 50 miles. Without these new additions, the highlight of Fishers is simply the local Ikea. Commissioning artists to display their work in Fishers adds to an already proud artistic presence. Top art students in Fishers receive invites to the District Art Show to commemorate their work. In their high school career students are required to continue the arts through their classes. A simple way for students to put this education to use and support an up-and-coming art scene would be to visit these locations themselves or partake in new events the city hosts in the area. Several student music groups performed over the summer at the first Spark!Fishers, meanwhile Imavex sponsors local art competitions available to high schoolers. When these events are broadcast amongst the community, we are creating a new step in the artistic realm Fishers’ history. If this trend continues, Fishers could invest in larger scale art programs that go beyond street art, which does not just benefit a few pedestrians. It is an investment in our future.


Opinion

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Graphic by Olivia Buchtenkirch.

Editorial Policy Tiger Topics N the RED is the official monthly newsmagazine of Fishers High School. It is distributed free to 3,500 students and over 300 school personnel. It is designed, written and edited by students. Opinions expressed in the newsmagazine do not necessarily represent those of the adviser, administration or staff. Letters to the editor may be submitted to A218, or to fhsnthered@gmail.com. Letters must contain the writer’s phone number for verification. Letters to the editor will not be published anonymously. If there is any incorrect information, corrections will be made in the next issue.

Mission Statement As the student-run newsmagazine of FHS, Tiger Topics N the Red is dedicated to providing the staff, students and community of FHS with a timely, entertaining and factual publication once a month by means of public forum. In publishing articles that students enjoy reading, we are furthering both the educational experience and the expansion of FHS culture. The staff works to create a sense of unity and awareness and to allow the students of FHS to have a better insight to the world around them.


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N the Red

Nov. 19, 2018

ISSUE REVIEW

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4. What color passes are the dean’s office? 5. Which wrestler advanced to state last year? 7. What is the motto of the basketball team? 10. Only 20 states mandate education on the topic of ______. 11. What is the name of the Instagram page where Maggie Kirkwood promotes her makeup? 13. How many mental health professionals did the HSE district hire this school year? 15. The term friendsgiving was first coined in a _____ for a major whiskey and liquer company. 16. One of the responsibilities of the aids includes handing out ______.

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1. About how many years does the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change say we have left until we start seeing irreversible effects of global warming? 2. What year was Gatorade invented? 3. What is the last name of the actor who voices the Grinch? 4. Mama Nita’s serves their food using a _____. 6. Where did the Colts play prior to the construction of the Lucas Oil Stadium? 8. This is the largest employment industry in the state. 9. What staple Thanksgiving food wasn’t eaten during the first Thanksgiving? 12. What ice cream shop has a mural painted on the side of its building? 14. Within the community of bushcrafting, there is some debate over the use of _____.

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Tiger Topics N the Red: Volume XIII, Issue 3  

We tackle our city's culture, education, and more.

Tiger Topics N the Red: Volume XIII, Issue 3  

We tackle our city's culture, education, and more.

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