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Volume XIII, Issue 6

Fishers High School

March 18, 2019

Tiger Topics:

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Pp. 10 -11

Photo by Helen Rummel.

SHOOTING FOR MORE www.ďŹ shersnthered.com


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March 18, 2019

TABLE OF CONTENTS TRAFFIC UPDATE

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IMPOSTER SYNDROME

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RILEY DANCE MARATHON

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WE THE PEOPLE

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SPEECH TEAM

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PROJECT LEAD THE WAY

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SHOW CHOIR

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ASPIRING ARTIST: CARSON ULMER

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FOOD REVIEW: NOTHING BUNDT CAKES

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DOODLES & WHAT THEY MEAN

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CAPTAIN MARVEL REVIEW

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BASEBALL

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LACROSSE

20 - 21

TRACK & FIELD

22 - 23

MARCH MADNESS

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ALBINʼS ANGLE: BASEBALLʼS RELEVANCY

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H2H: THREE-DAY WEEKENDS

Science Olympiad innovates designs fhsnthered.com:

26 - 27

CELEBRITY HYPOCRISY

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UNKNOWN DANGERS OF FORMJACKING

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EDITORIAL: BENEFITS OF PROJECT-BASED

Invasive species threatens Billericay fhsnthered.com:

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LEARNING

Polar Plunge competitors jump into freezing water (Video) fhsnthered.com:

BEHIND THE COVER

Sophomore Gavin Powell fine tunes the T-shirt launcher in the C hallway afterschool for Robotics club on March 6. Photo by Helen Rummel.

WANT MORE?

Check out our exclusive online coverage

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March 18, 2019

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Parking lot changes aim to create safer conditions

Hallie Gallinat gallihal000@hsestudents.org

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The north parking lot receives changes with more on the way. Graphic by Hallie Gallinat, information provided by student resource officer Matt Ruhnow.

he final bell rings to end the school day. Students bolt to get to their cars before the CCA parking lot becomes crowded. However, the city of Fishers and police officers are working with the school to improve the parking lots to make them not only quicker to exit, but safe too. “We’re taking changes one step at a time,” assistant principal Steve Loser said. “We’ve made some incremental changes and tried some things with their guidance, so there’s probably more changes on the way.” Congestion in the parking lot persists as an issue. However, traffic is worse this year due to more students driving, according to school resource officer Matt Ruhnow. “Next year it’s going to be even worse because we’re going to have an additional 250 kids,” Ruhnow said. “All those kids, I’m almost positive, they have to provide their own transportation because they were supposed to go to HSE but they’re coming here. And HSE isn’t providing transportation for them.” To aid with the traffic jams in the parking lot, two new officers have been added to direct traffic at the Billericay exit. Students who park in the CCA lot must leave through Billericay Park. “I like it better because it’s shorter for me to get home,” junior Camryn Fulton said. “It’s less congested now.” Students must turn left as well, which prevents them from backing up traffic on Tiger Drive and 131st St. They cannot merge with parent pick up or bus traffic. “The issue that we were having there was that the kids were dumping into the parent pick up,” Ruhnow said. “It was taking forever to get people out of there.”

Another change affects the north parking lot near the soccer and football fields. Students who park there can only turn right and leave towards Sand Creek Intermediate. If students want to come back around, they will have to go from Marilyn Rd. to 136th St. and then back to Promise Rd. According to Loser, before this change, 131st St. would get crowded with parent pick up from FHS and from Sand Creek Elementary across the street. This change aims to prevent that congestion, but it is still a work in progress. More changes are on the way, such as additional speed bumps and crosswalk signs in the north parking lot. According to Ruhnow, students drive extremely fast in this lot, where pedestrians walk to their cars. The speed bumps and signs will be added at the end of March. To improve parking lot conditions, the school is hiring a transportation engineering company to conduct a traffic study. The company, called A&F Engineering, will place fifteen cameras around the campus that will monitor traffic. Data from this study pinpoints areas that need work, and improvements to these areas aim to help improve parking lots to be safer while also being efficient and fast. “Every decision we’re making right now is around student safety, whether that’s student pedestrians or student drivers,” Loser said. “We’ve got thousands of people moving in a half hour period on roads that weren’t designed for this level of traffic volume. We want to be purposeful and attentional, and sometimes in trying to solve a problem you’re going to create a new one.”

Drivers wait in line to leave the CCA parking lot on Feb. 26. Photo by Hallie Gallinat.


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Imposter syndrome masks conflict

Ashley Steele steelash000@hsestudents.org

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Top graphic by Ashley Steele. Bottom graphic by Sydney Greenwood.

eelings of self-doubt, insecurity or fraudulence make up the common signs of imposter syndrome. According to a 2011 study published in the International Journal of Behavioral Science, about 70 percent of people will experience an episode of imposter syndrome at least once. Imposter syndrome is “the idea that you’ve only succeeded due to luck, and not because of your talent or qualifications” according to Abigail Abrams, a journalist at Time Magazine. This phenomenon typically affects high achieving and skilled individuals who struggle to claim their accomplishments as their own doing. “One of the biggest reasons I experience imposter syndrome is because I don’t fit the perception that people have of me,” senior Elly Franklin said. “My family and friends place me on such a high pedestal, that I don’t feel I can live up to. I don’t want to be seen as fake because I can’t live up to their expectations.” The five categories of imposter syndrome include: the perfectionist, the superwoman/man, the natural genius, the soloist and the expert. Perfectionists set goals for themselves that are impossible to reach, and when they cannot reach their goals, they experience self-doubt about their abilities. Senior Lana Timmis falls into the perfectionist category. “I have perfectionism so my standards are always a lot higher for myself and other people,” Timmis said. “So while a lot of people would think it’s like good or acceptable work. I will hate it so badly because I always feel like I could have done better.” Superwomen/men often times try to cover up their insecurities about their work ethic by pushing themselves harder at their job or at school. People who experience this version of imposter syndrome force themselves to work longer hours at their job. Rather than gaining validation from the work they do, they gain it from doing the work itself. Natural geniuses judge themselves on how fast it takes them to understand or solve problems rather than the effort they put forward. When their understanding does not come immediately, they feel ashamed of themselves. “I’m in a lot of higher level classes and there are times when I’ve struggled in learning areas and understanding [lessons] and sometimes I’m a lot slower than other people,” junior Kayla Stoeffler said. “I have different learning disabilities. I’ve got anxiety and I’ve got ADHD and sometimes these can make things harder for me. When I have problems like that, I wonder ‘what if people find out that I have hard times with this’.” Soloists avoid asking for help at all costs; to them, doing so is a sign of weakness. They feel that if they do ask for help, they will be exposed as a fraud. An example of this is a student who would rather struggle and possibly risk their grade instead of getting help from their teacher during class. Experts judge themselves on how much they know. They fear that they will be exposed as inexperienced or unknowledgeable. These people will constantly try to increase their skill set so that they feel successful. The American Psychological Association created a list of ways to combat feelings of imposter syndrome. They say that people should “look at the evidence,” or in other words, people should address their goals and whether or not they are meeting them and that people should “celebrate their success” rather than brushing it off. Another way to fight these feelings is to fake it till one makes it because imitating confidence leads to one realizing those qualities in their daily life. The website also reminds people that many others feel the same emotions. Information according to Forbes. “I feel like self-acceptance is the key to a good mental state,” Timmis said. “I know I’m never going to feel like I’m perfect or feel like I’m good enough. But I feel that if I can accept that then I can at least continue with my life and know that my work is better than what I think it is in reality.”


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Riley Dance Marathon raises money, hope Marie Gabbard gabbamar000@hsestudents.org

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ver $100,000 was raised last year during the Riley Dance Marathon to go the Riley Children’s Hospital and this year they are trying to surpass that goal. The marathon takes place on March 22. Students, teachers and kids from Riley all come with one goal: raising as much money for the hospital as possible. Over the course of the night the attendees learn small portions of a dance and at the end of the night they perform it all together before a big reveal of how much money was raised. “Our goal is to beat last year’s number,” junior Chloe White said. “To raise as much money as possible for the kids.” White is part of the Riley Dance Marathon Club that is responsible for organizing the event. Members of the club each are responsible for raising money, as well as organizing and planning the dance marathon. They spend months leading up to the marathon planning the marathon itself and the events leading up to it. The club also raises money throughout the year, like at football games where they collect money during the Riley miracle minute. “Everyone’s goal is to raise at least $150,” White said. “We do that by selling suckers or chocolate and all of those proceeds go to Riley.” At the dance marathon, kids from Riley come and participate in activities such as a bounce house, games and a dance that everyone learns. Senior Lisa Harrington has attended the dance marathon in previous years and participated in the Riley fashion show.

“The dance marathon was a lot of fun,” Harrington said. “Hearing all the stories from the kids was powerful.” There are other events leading up to the dance marathon, including a fashion show and mini dance marathons at the elementary schools, all of which go toward the final total of money raised at the end of the marathon. Senior Jason Nguyen also raises money for Riley, and as a cadet teacher, he has a personal commitment to raising money. “I went to the Sand Creek mini Riley Dance Marathon,” Nguyen said. “My kindergartners are Riley kids so I decided I have to dance for them.” Spirit week is the week before the dance marathon and there are various activities to raise money. On March 20 there is shirt decorating, March 21 is the fashion show and March 22 is the dance marathon. All of these activities go toward raising money for the Riley Children’s hospital so sick kids can be treated. During the fashion show, student volunteers model two different outfits by sponsors of the dance marathon. Students apply to be a model for it and they then raise money by selling tickets to the fashion show. Models get to try on different outfits and meet some of the kids who come from Riley. To sign up for the dance marathon it costs $25 and students can pick up forms outside of room C104. “We dance all day; we don’t sit down at all, “ Nguyen said. “We dance for the children.”

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1. Students dance together at the 2018 dance marathon. Photo by Kaylee Demlow. 2. During a varsity football game against Noblesville on Aug. 31, the Miracle Minute takes place where they collect money for Riley. Photo by Saraiah Evans.

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Abidemi Aregbe adjusts Evan Calvert’s tie before regionals on Nov. 10. Photo by Kaylee Demlow.

Unit two gets advice from their advisors before state on Dec. 9. Photo used with

permission of Elizabeth Paternoster.

The team gathers for a photo after placing second at state on Dec. 9. Photo used with

permission of Elizabeth Paternoster.

March 18, 2019

We The People returning to D.C. for nationals Ben McHenry mchenben000@hsestudents.org

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tate champions three of the last six years, top ten in the nation all three times they have attended, and most recently, eighth in the national competition, the FHS We The People program has a history of competing in Washington D.C. This year is no different. After winning regionals last November, FHS advanced to state, where they placed second to HSE. However, as both HSE and FHS have placed top 10 at the national competition numerous times before, FHS was still invited to the national competition, which takes place April 26 through 29 in Washington D.C. A guiding principle of American government for over 200 years, the U.S. Constitution is also a guiding principle in high schools all across the country. We The People is a governmentbased, competition-style class in which teams write papers over contentious, constitutionallygrounded topics in America, then present these papers in front of judges and answer followup questions over the heart of the issue. “As a competitor in We The People, we are separated into six different units based on different topics, and for each unit we have three separate papers that we need to write, each about four minutes long,” senior Olivia Craig said. “Then we have six to eight minutes of follow up, and the goal is to be able to argue our positions with evidence we’ve gained from Mrs. Paternoster and our advisors.” This semester, the team has been putting much of their energy into preparing for nationals, which entails different tasks for different units, as some units received similar topics to their state papers, and some received three entirely new topics they have to prepare for. “We got entirely new papers, so while there is a lot of overlap from our state papers, just about everything we are researching right now is entirely new to us,” senior Grace Fleetwood said. “Also, it has been a lot more rigorous because we do not have the class anymore, so everything is on our free time. And it can be hard to coordinate that because we all have different schedules.” Almost every school FHS will compete against at nationals is a state champion, many of which have focused their entire high school

careers on this one competition. Virginia’s Maggie L. Walker School for governmental relations and public policy, for example, is a four year program dedicated entirely to the We The People curriculum, and only the best of the best actually make the competition team. In order to compete with schools like this, the team has been preparing day in and day out. “Fishers High School has a one semester class, and we consistently end up top ten in the nation,“ We The People advisor Elizabeth Paternoster said. “The fact that we place just a few slots below schools like Maggie L. Walker says a lot about our staff and the volunteers that help us, and more than anything our students that make up the team.” While nationals is the primary focus for the team, according to Paternoster, the real rewards come from everything they learn from being part of such a prestigious program and how it can guide them in so many facets of their life beyond a high school competition. “Something I have learned is standing up for my opinion, because in competition you have to answer opinion based questions,” Fleetwood said. “As someone who has never really stood up for themselves, We The People has given me an environment where I can argue and speak my mind on something that really matters.” Some students have decided to pursue civics beyond high school, and have maybe found a potential career path through We The People. “I want to be a lawyer, which I didn’t realize until after I took We The People in eighth grade, and now I’m going to major in law and public policy at IU,” senior Malia Ulmer said. “So, for me, it has definitely had a huge impact, and in high school I realized what part of law I wanted to study, and what I was passionate about.” Paternoster believes the greatest takeaway for this team should not be where they place, but all of the life skills and relationships they have forged, and what they can accomplish with them. We The People students have gone on to graduate law school with top honors, and even work on Capitol Hill with different members of congress. “I try to tell my students all the time that trophies are made of wood and plastic, but being apart of my former students’ weddings and seeing them graduate from college, that lasts forever,” Paternoster said. “The skills that they develop, they use all throughout their lives, and we really do become a family, and that goes farther than any competition.”


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Speech, debate continue title as state champions

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Janie Van Overwalle vanojan000@hsestudents.org

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ucceeding in getting their members to nationals for the twelfth year in a row, the speech and debate team continued to carry their title. They placed first in sectionals and district, along with winning class 3A state champions for the fifth year. Speech and debate students participate in a combination of 14 speech events and five debate public speaking, acting and arguing events. Some of these events include duo, dramatic, program and humorous interpretation events, informative speaking, debate, extemporaneous, congress and platform speaking events. “There are kids who are doing theatrical events, argumentative or current event type events,” said head speech and debate coach Paul Kennedy. “There are also kids who decide to just write a speech about a topic they are very passionate about,” In interpretation events, students act out a story as multiple characters for about eight minutes, and these events can range from humorous interpretations to dramatic interpretations. Seniors Curren Gauss and Julia Garrison qualified for nationals with their DUO interpretation. The national competition will take place in Dallas, Texas during the weeks of June. 16-24. Junior Myra Kivett qualified for duo interpretation. For program interpretation, senior Kaylee Demlow for dramatic interpretation and senior Taylor Boledovich for humorous interpretation. In extemporaneous events, students have 30 minutes to prepare a ten minute speech related to current events. Senior Darrell Fischer qualified for nationals in U.S extemporaneous events. The traditional informative, original oratory and extemporaneous speaking are the platform speaking events, while congress and debate are focused mainly on current events and debate related topics. Sophomore Reagan Frank and junior Thasneem Najum qualified for nationals in informative events and seniors Maddie Butler, Malia Ulmer and Ana Gaston qualified for congress and debate events. Kennedy explained that in all of these events, students work in pairs or individually to gain points for their team. “To help people understand, I always compare speech and debate to a track meet,” Kennedy said. “On track, there are students who are running distance or sprints or shot put, but they are all part of the team together.” At the state event on March 9. seniors Joey Cerone and Max Kiethly won state champions in original performance, an interp event in which speakers write their own script to perform. While senior Gabriel Glover became the state champion for both impromptu and United State extemporaneous speaking (USX). The 2017-18 season was Glover’s first with the team in which he won impromptu and was second in USX, this year he defended his title and beat out other competitors for the two trophies. While speech and debate are trying to continue the title in state, they must improve their performance throughout the season. Peer coach and junior Ana Gaston says everyone on the team motivates each other because of the different leadership that comes with each student. “The officers and members all provide a community that fosters improvement, while also constantly providing admiration to others’ work,” Gaston said. Varsity team member senior Gabriel Glover says there can be a place for Senior Darrell Fischer shows off the IHSFA trophy everyone participating in speech and debate team. “There are so many different avenues you can take when in speech and after FHS was announced 3A first place champions debate,” Glover said. “It is one of the best decisions I’ve ever made.” on Mar. 9. Photo by Janie Van Overwalle


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March 18, 2019

PLTW moves toward future by creating career goals John Yun yunjoh000@hsestudents.org

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aking various science and math classes to prepare for vigorous courses and taking a part of internships to understand the career they want to have, many students go into college for a degree in a STEM field. Project Lead the Way is a nonprofit organization that creates a curriculum for schools that is designed to encourage students to find interest in these courses and careers. The company offers programs for engineering, computer science and biomedical science. According to the U.S. Bureau of Statistics, employment in STEM occupations grew by 10.5 percent between May 2009 and May 2015. The HSE district has leveraged grant and private funding, allowing them to train several teachers across schools in PLTW. Through training, the school hopes to prepare students for collegelevel engineering and biomedical coursework.

Engineering

Sophomore Stephanie Amory tests out a microscope to see if it works before placing a sample underneath it during her biomedical science class. Photo

by Symone Kinnebrew Ledford.

Students can, but are not required to, follow a four-year schedule for the program, where they take certain classes each year. These classes range from foundational classes to elective courses. Foundational classes focus on drawing, 3D modeling, and the process of engineering, and elective courses go into specific engineering disciplines like electrical and mechanical. “I actually went to college for engineering,” science teacher Jeffrey Fronius said. “So, I can give them a good feel for the difficulties of those classes and what they can expect.” The courses offered for the program are Introduction to Engineering Design, Principles of Engineering, Digital Electronics, Robotics Design and Innovation. Courses only offered at HSE include Civil Engineering and Architecture, Aerospace Engineering, Computer Integrated Manufacturing and Engineering Design and Development. Although some PLTW courses are only offered at HSE, FHS offers college dual credits through Purdue University’s College of Technology, where

a facility will be provided for the courses. Purdue Student Services Staff assist students with the specific application process in the spring. “The dual credit courses helped me get a grasp for what college-level classes would be like,” senior Thomas Brelage said. “The courses are more presentation based, and there are more college guidelines that we need to follow.” Forced to come up with a solution to a pressing problem, all PLTW engineering students are challenged to improve their collaboration skills and creativity. Through these activities, students gain knowledge and skills that they may later use in their STEM-related fields such as engineering and computer science. “I really like these classes because they have topics that aren’t usually offered in the curriculum and teach them in more challenging ways like deeply involved projects,” junior Zach Lagpacan said. For example, in Principles of Engineering, students are building marble-sorting machines, and they have to figure out how to sense what type of marble it is and sort them accordingly. “The class diversity is nice, especially in engineering, because there are so many fields, and it lets you get a better feel for what you want to do in the future,” Brelage said.

Biomedical Sciences

Similar to the engineering side, the program’s biomedical science program creates an environment in which students work together to find solutions to real-life problems by utilizing the same tools that professionals use in hospitals and labs. The biomedical side was designed to fill the gap of the careers that are in that field. In one of the projects, the students try to find how a fictitious dead woman died, and, through the process, students experience careers like 911 dispatchers and EMTs. “The biomedical classes have helped to not only expand my knowledge on anatomy and physiology, but have also reinforced my passion in biomedical sciences and made me realize my career goal of becoming a surgeon,” senior Audrey Wilson said. Although both branches have similar goals, the biomedical program does not have as many courses as engineering does. Courses include Principles of Biomedical Science, Human Body Systems, Medical Interventions, and Biomedical


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Science, Human Body Systems, Medical Interventions and Biomedical Innovation. “The benefits we have seen for kids taking this program is that what they take in biology and chemistry, they are able to apply in real world situations,” science teacher Tammy Snyder said. “They can also take more time to dig into the course while they can’t take that much time in classes like biology and chemistry.” Right now, teachers like Snyder and Fronius are seeing that more students are dropping off as the years progress and there are fewer students in the more advanced classes, and they believe that these course can really make an impact in introducing STEM fields. “The varieties of options that there are with these

classes have provided me with multiple outlooks and experiences in different biomedical sciences,” Wilson said. PLTW was seen to positively impact abilities in mathematics and science, according to a study by Dr. Robert Tai from the University of Virginia. In addition, 70 percent of high school seniors that took the program were intending to study a branch of STEM. “If they are definitely thinking about going into a biomedical career, it’s very beneficial to be able to apply what they have been learning in the traditional classrooms,” Snyder said. Although the four year course plan is designed to give the maximum experience of their respective fields, students can sign up for these classes any year that they want.

PLTW Engineering Schedule

Period 1: English Period 2: Geometry or Algebra 2 Period 3: Honors Biology Period 4: World Credit Period 5: Fine Art or World Language Period 6: P.E. or Intro to Computer Science Period 7: PLTW: Introduction to Engineering Design

Freshman Year

Period 1: English Period 2: Algebra 2 or Pre-Calc Period 3: Honors Chemistry Period 4: Elective Period 5: Fine Art or W.L. Period 6: P.E. or Intro to C.S. Period 7: PLTW: Principles of Engineering

Sophomore Year

Period 1: English Period 2: Pre-Calc or AP Calc Period 3: U.S. History Period 4: Physics Period 5: PLTW Elective or Robotics Period 6: Elective Period 7: Elective

Period 1: English Period 2: Government or Economics Period 3: AP Calc or Adv. Math Period 4: AP Physics or AP Chem Period 5: Robotics Period 6: PLTW Elective Period 7: Elective

Junior Year

Senior Year Information from Fishers High School. Graphic by John Yun.


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March 18, 2019

Show Choirs sing their way to state

Katie Wiseman wisemkat000@hsestudents.org

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The girls of Electrum sing their number “Can’t Hold Us Down.” Photo used with permission by Jolene Johnston.

s though they are controlled by the music, performers move across the stage. The marionettes of Electrum dance as if each note tugs on their strings, while the girls of Silver Sound enter the stage in their red capes and wolf costumes. Electrum is a mixed show choir with both male and female performers. Their show, “The Plight of the Marionettes,” was put together by choir director Greg Johnson. “They’re trying to symbolize the concept of being controlled by a puppet master,” Johnson said. “After the opener, it is very clear that they are dolls who come to life and are dancing as marionettes.” Their set consists of several songs they sing together, a number sung only by the boys and one sung only by the girls. The group has a costume change, and then as their closer, they perform a tap number to Pinocchio’s “I’ve Got No Strings.” “In the beginning, we start off as marionettes and then after our ballad, our strings are cut and we become free,” Electrum and Sound senior Lily Wann said. “The show is about learning to not be controlled and not have any strings.” Sound is the all-female show choir group. This season their show is based on the story of “Little Red Riding Hood.” Half of the girls are dressed as Little Red, while the other half of the group are dressed to portray the big bad wolf. “The premise of their story is going through the woods, the fears we face on our journey, the darkness we approach, how we handle that journey and all the emotions we go through,” choir director Tess Tazioli said. The show begins with the Little Reds feeling optimistic about their journey into the woods. Then as the show continues, the wolves appear and they learn about their similarities and differences. For their closer, they come together and sing Panic! At the Disco’s song “Victorious.” The choirs have a camp at the end of July and beginning of August where they start working on one of their numbers. They learn the rest of their choreography for the shows during first semester. “It takes all of first semester to learn all the choreography, learn all the songs and how they all work together,” Wann said. “Then we have to focus on our characters and how we feel during each song.” Both Sound and Electrum have rehearsal after school once a week during first semester, and then have rehearsals from 6-9 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. They take breaks to work on songs for


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March 18, 2019

Show Choirs sing their way to state

Katie Wiseman wisemkat000@hsestudents.org

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The girls of Electrum sing their number “Can’t Hold Us Down.” Photo used with permission by Jolene Johnston.

s though they are controlled by the music, performers move across the stage. The marionettes of Electrum dance as if each note tugs on their strings, while the girls of Silver Sound enter the stage in their red capes and wolf costumes. Electrum is a mixed show choir with both male and female performers. Their show, “The Plight of the Marionettes,” was put together by choir director Greg Johnson. “They’re trying to symbolize the concept of being controlled by a puppet master,” Johnson said. “After the opener, it is very clear that they are dolls who come to life and are dancing as marionettes.” Their set consists of several songs they sing together, a number sung only by the boys and one sung only by the girls. The group has a costume change, and then as their closer, they perform a tap number to Pinocchio’s “I’ve Got No Strings.” “In the beginning, we start off as marionettes and then after our ballad, our strings are cut and we become free,” Electrum and Sound senior Lily Wann said. “The show is about learning to not be controlled and not have any strings.” Sound is the all-female show choir group. This season their show is based on the story of “Little Red Riding Hood.” Half of the girls are dressed as Little Red, while the other half of the group are dressed to portray the big bad wolf. “The premise of their story is going through the woods, the fears we face on our journey, the darkness we approach, how we handle that journey and all the emotions we go through,” choir director Tess Tazioli said. The show begins with the Little Reds feeling optimistic about their journey into the woods. Then as the show continues, the wolves appear and they learn about their similarities and differences. For their closer, they come together and sing Panic! At the Disco’s song “Victorious.” The choirs have a camp at the end of July and beginning of August where they start working on one of their numbers. They learn the rest of their choreography for the shows during first semester. “It takes all of first semester to learn all the choreography, learn all the songs and how they all work together,” Wann said. “Then we have to focus on our characters and how we feel during each song.” Both Sound and Electrum have rehearsal after school once a week during first semester, and then have rehearsals from 6-9 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. They take breaks to work on songs for


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1 the fall and winter choir concerts in class and begin competing in January. “Everyone assumes that show choir is just something you do for a month and then it’s over with, ” Electrum junior Carrie Lause said. “We started in August, but the planning for the show started in May of last year It’s many long nights of rehearsals, lots of planning, choreography and vocals. It takes almost seven to eight months to put everything together.” The Silver Spotlight competition kicked off their season on Jan. 26. While Electrum and Sound did not compete since FHS hosts the event, they performed their shows for the first time. Their first competition was at Franklin Community High School Showfest. Electrum placed eighth and Sound placed fifth. Their last competition was March 2 at Avon. Electrum and Sound were both first runner-up in their divisions. Although both show choirs placed second at their last competition, they felt their season was “Victorious.” They performed at state finals on March 16 and then perform their competition shows one final time at the spring choir concert. “When you get teenagers together to sing and dance, there can be a lot of drama that happens off-stage,” Johnson said. “But on competition days, they really support each other. They stop competing against each other, they drop all of the teenage drama that happens in high school and they band together to create something artistic and beautiful.”

2 1. Silver Sound lunges at the audience during their performance of “No Roots.” 2. Electrum performs “I’ve Got No Strings” at the end of their show. Photos used with permission by Jolene Johnston.


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Senior Carson Ulmer works to produce a song on Oct. 17. Photo used with permission of Carson Ulmer.

March 18, 2019

Carson Ulmer crafts album Carson Lilley lillecar000@hsestudents.org

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fter a day spent writing lyrics, creating a beat, and mixing and mastering, senior Carson Ulmer sits back and replays the song he just created. Soon, it will be available to the public. Ulmer began producing music four years ago. Starting at age 14, he saved up money from his birthdays and Christmases in order to buy equipment. He started out using a computer, mini keyboard and a pair of headphones, but as he advanced, he added more plugins (software that allows for more effects) and invested in a beat machine. “Making a song is harder than people think,” Ulmer said. “There’s a whole process of mixing and mastering, which is what you do after you are done making everything and putting everything where you want it. I have to do all my mixing and mastering myself because I don’t have the money to pay professionals to do it.” Last November, Ulmer released an album called “Deeper,” which was inspired by Mac Miller’s album “Swimming.” Ulmer’s album includes eight rap songs and is available on all streaming services. “I found a lot of inspiration from two artists in particular; Earl Sweatshirt and Mac Miller,” Ulmer said. “They really influenced my style to be what it is today. I also just take from what I’m feeling because if I’m feeling something, I want to talk about it so I put it in a song.” Ulmer learned how to produce music through trial and error as well as from YouTube videos. In his free time, he enjoys watching YouTube to learn new things and then apply them to his own music. “For me, it takes a day or two to make a song,” Ulmer said. “Whenever I am trying to make a

song, I want to make it when it is fresh in my mind. If I wait too long, I won’t remember what I was feeling or how I wanted to get my message across.” In the past, Ulmer has worked with others to produce music. FHS 2018 graduate Nic Conde helped Ulmer produce two songs last year. “It’s surreal to be in the studio with him while he’s working on beats or songs,” Conde said. “One word or sound can spark inspiration for him and turn into a song and it’s amazing to witness that. In my time of knowing and making music with him, I have yet to meet someone as talented and genuine as he is.” Ulmer works on music production every day. To make a song, he usually starts with a beat and writes down lyrics, which he does in one sitting so he does not lose his train of thought. Once everything is recorded, he mixes and masters the song. This involves combining tracks to form an audio file and then ensuring the songs create a cohesive album. “Making music is really therapeutic for me,” Ulmer said. “I haven’t really gone to any therapists or anything, which I’ve heard a lot of kids doing. I sort of found my therapy through music because I can express myself and let things out and people can enjoy it.” Recently, Ulmer was accepted to Belmont University in Nashville, Tenn. He plans on continuing his music career there. “My ultimate goal is to be able to make a living out of music because I love doing it so much,” Ulmer said. “I like entertaining people, I always have. Even if music doesn’t work out, I want to do something that entertains others. It makes me happy.”


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Local shop whips up sweet treats

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Kristen Rummel rummekri000@hsestudents.org

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he sweet aroma of freshly baked cakes with all the charming decorations and the welcoming staff, it is clear that Nothing Bundt Cakes has plenty of offer. The atmosphere is incredibly calming and it welcomes new and old customers. It even includes an adorable slogan no one could forget: Be sweet to each other. You can find Nothing Bundt Cakes at many social events in the community such as Spark! Fishers and local sports events; with reasonable prices, friendly cashiers it is the perfect snack at social events. The bakery lists the events they will attend on their website and their local stores. The shop has ten main flavors that are available year ‘round to choose from. They have all the classics such as chocolate, vanilla, red velvet and carrot. They also serve new flavors that cycle in and out each month.

Lemon cake

The golden sponge cake balanced the of tart of the lemon without being exceedingly sweet, and the lemon flavor really came through as a pleasant surprise. The cream cheese frosting was just the right touch to the citrusy cake with a delightful lemon zesty scent.

Red velvet

The rich flavor of the cake was delightful. The velvety cake gave off an inviting aroma of chocolate and cream cheese that entices anyone. The bitter sweet chocolate chips added a crunchy texture than the regular cake.

Chocolate

Packed with flavor, the chocolate bundt cake had small chocolate chips that melted in my mouth. The sweet cream cheese smell of the icing and cake drew me in, the pair made the perfect sweet and savory dessert.

White Chocolate Raspberry

The moist cake had a pleasant fruity taste and the white chocolate added a welcome extra element to the ensemble. The frosting bonded perfectly with the flavors of the cake and added a smooth element to the fluffy cake. The friendly cashiers and other bakers make the trip quick and painless. They answer any questions customers might have and help them make the right decision based on what they are looking for. The shop creates special flavors for holidays such as Valentines Day, Christmas and Easter. The flavor this past year in December was Peppermint Chocolate Chip, in January it was Snickerdoodle, February and March is Peanut Butter Chocolate Swirl and in March going through April it will be Strawberries and Cream. My experience at Nothing Bundt Cakes was a delightful one. Their cakes were deliciously moist with the right amount of flavor and icing balancing out every bite. From the cute custom boxes the cakes come in, to all the trinkets you can buy with them, there is no doubt in my mind that this place is certainly sweet.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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2 1. A chocolate bundt cake sits on a plate ready for customers. 2. A display of cakes, cards and mugs awaits the customers. Photos by Kristen Rummel.


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Arts & Culture

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Doodling increases efficiency, holds secret meaning

Grace Mossing mossigra000@hsestudents.org Curren Gauss gausscur000@hsestudents.org

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ens scratch against paper decorating a note sheet with flowers, smiles and waves. A teacher’s voice carries on in the background as art appears on students’ assignments. According to Harvard Medical School, doodling is a form of fidgeting that has been proven to help with memory, increase focus and relieve stress. Doodling activates the brain’s default mode network, which is capable of creative insights and more accurate predictions. Many doodles even have a subconscious, hidden meaning. Junior Maggie Hay doodles because it gives her something to do when she gets bored sitting in class. She believes that doodling helps her focus on the teacher and what is being taught. “I doodle every day in almost every class especially when I’m feeling stressed,” Hay said. “I feel like it’s just a way that I release the extra energy that I have and take my mind off things.”

FLOWERS

Doodles of flowers, floral objects and different, leafy lettering are some of the few spontaneous drawings that cover Hay’s papers at school when she is feeling stressed. Many doodles have a subconscious meaning. Flowers show a gentle, passive or fragile personality and can be associated with environmentalism. According to 99 Designs, a freelance platform for connecting graphic designers, certain types of flowers have different meanings, too. Circular flowers with rounded petals indicate that the drawer is very friendly and amiable. Flowers with a circular center show kindness while pointy petals or thorns show distrust. The drawer could be known to push people away. While perky flowers symbolize openness and droopy flowers suggest an unwillingness to open up.

NAMES/LETTERING

Hay also doodles lettering and names. Names and initials show who the doodler is thinking of most even if it is just themself. The size of the doodle reflects the importance of the person to the drawer. According to the Daily Mail article “What do your doodles really say about you,” people that like to be the center of attention doodle their own name and initials. Many teenagers doodle just their first name to show a desire to go on their own life journey. When people doodle someone else’s name, it shows they are in the drawer’s thoughts. It could be for romantic reasons or simply because they are part of a problem the drawer is trying to deal with.

EYES

Graphic by Grace Mossing

Sophomore Olivia Larson enjoys different styles of art in her free time and sees this translate into her everyday life, mostly on her math notes. “I draw a lot of eyes,” Larson said. “They’re fascinating and there are so many different ways to draw them. Doodling is definitely a good creative

outlet, one that means I should probably be paying attention more in class.” Doodling eyes, like the ones Larson draws, can symbolize different facets of one’s personality. Big, open eyes indicate an outgoing person, while squinty, small eyes show someone who is afraid of self-reflection. The HuffPost article “What Your Doodling Says About You” by Emily Blatchford reports the drawings of faces is very personal. Just like the old saying goes, the eyes are the window to the soul, and those who find themselves doodling this feature may be searching for a deeper connection to themselves.

GEOMETRIC SHAPES

Ranging from smooth, curvy hearts to pointy staircases of triangles, another popular type of doodling shapes. This type of sketching involves two sides of the shape spectrum, geometric shapes and circular drawings. Geometric shapes with pointy edges, like triangles and squares, can be an indicator of a rational, logical thinker. People who lean toward sharper shapes may be good planners and triangles specifically can signify desires to have career/personal success. This type of doodling is favored by freshman Rishabh Bhadouriya who thinks more abstractly when he doodles. “I draw a lot of geometric shapes that make no sense,” Bhadouriya said. “I just let my hand go freely as I think.” Other shapes one might find themselves sketching are circular. Rounded shapes tend to symbolize love and femininity. From spirals to solar system planets, those who draw more circular shapes are more emotionally driven in life.

SKETCH NOTES

The last type of doodling is one that sophomore Cassidy Robertson does during most of her classes: sketch notes, which are a type of note taking where a student will draw things alongside their class notes that will help them remember the lesson concepts. “For me, doodling helps me stay more focused during classes,” Robertson said. “I’m actively doing something which keeps me from being zoned out in class.” This type of doodling requires students to be engaged during the lesson and helps them build skills to be able to multitask during class. Students visually connect the text to shapes and colors that will jog their memory on key concepts. From flowers to targeted note taking, doodling has been proven to help increase productivity. Time magazine reports in their article “Study: Doodling Helps You Pay Attention,” by John Cloud, that doodling can aid productivity. “I think doodling is really just to keep your mind focused,” Robertson said. “Even if you’re not the best artist, it’s something fun that you can do to help yourself.”

Doodles by sophomore Olivia Larson, junior Maggie Hay, freshman Ashley Rettig, freshman Joshua Villasol, sophomore Grace Mossing and seniors Katie Wiseman and Curren Gauss.

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The Bad

The Ugly

Compelling Hero Lousy Plot

Horrible Villain

Some Great CGI Tone Issues

Some Bad CGI

Graphic by Ben Grantonic.

Captain Marvel cracks jokes and skulls Benjamin Grantonic grantben000@hsestudents.org

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iant, explosion-filled space battles make up the most exciting parts of “Captain Marvel,” which premiered March 8. “Captain Marvel” follows Vers, an alien who crash lands on Earth after escaping captivity on a spaceship. While on Earth, Vers begins to remember a past life she may have once had on the planet. On the way, she teams up with Nick Fury, an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D, and picks up a “cat” named Goose. The best moments of the film involve Brie Larson’s character, Captain Marvel, who is excellently written with some of the funniest and most memorable lines in the movie. Captain Marvel’s escape from the prison ship is a great highlight of her character and she continues to crack jokes and crack skulls while escaping. Samuel L. Jackson’s character, Nick Fury, is also an interesting and entertaining character, with lots of development in the movie. The film shows Nick Fury in his prime, including a scene where he manages to steals the fingerprint of a government agent using tape. The movie even explains what happened to his left eye, a mystery from previous MCU (Marvel Cinematic Universe) films. Combining these results in one of the greatest parts of the film: Samuel L. Jackson’s and Brie Larson’s buddy cop dynamic. When on screen together, they bounce off one another amazingly well. In one scene that highlights this dynamic, Nick Fury finds Captain Marvel in a dive bar in the middle of nowhere. The two interrogate one another to prove neither is a shape shifter, then Marvel just begins to mess with Fury. This starts the banter between the characters. The movie under-utilizes this, even though they are together most of the time. Some characters are compellingly written, while most others fail to be interesting in any manner. One of these poorly written characters includes the main antagonist. The movie’s antagonist, YonRogg, is underdeveloped and uninteresting, with

no actual reasoning behind his evil shenanigans. The film acts as if the protagonist should respect or even care for this character, but never gives a reason why. In a scene at the end of the movie, Captain Marvel and Yon-Rogg face off. During this face off Yon-Rogg wants to fight Captain Marvel without superpowers, a call back to the beginning of the film, and Marvel just shoots him into a hill. The movie acts as if this is a big emotional triumph for Captain Marvel, without developing the villain enough to justify this moment. Yon-Rogg just comes across as a genocidal maniac with no actual driving force behind that. A comparable Marvel villain is Hela from “Thor Ragnarok,” a villain that has a similar goal. Her backstory is revealed enough to show that her goals are not unmotivated, making her a far more interesting villain than Yon-Rogg. The movie also has a mixed bag of CGI, being ground-breaking in one scene and outdated in others. The de-aging effect used on Samuel L. Jackson is some of the best in cinema. Though they somehow make CG Captain Marvel the most unrealistic thing since the Rock in “The Mummy Returns.” This also leads to one of the movie’s other major problems: tonal inconsistency. It will talk about the possibility of an entire people being destroyed, and then crack a joke the next scene. This makes some parts of the movie jarring and uncomfortable. One example of this is when one character is discussing the ramifications should the evil aliens achieve their goals, which include the extinction of the moral aliens. The film then shortly moves to a fight scene with plenty of jokes littered throughout. Ultimately, I give “Captain Marvel” a rating of 3.5 out of 5, a good movie with some mild problems. It is well worth seeing for casual moviegoers and Marvel super fans alike.


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Baseball players swing for advantage with superstitions Nate Albin albinnat000@hsestudents.org

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ormer Yankee Derek Jeter made sure to keep his plate appearances the same. He would walk up to the plate and tap his shoes four times. After that, Jeter would take only one practice swing. Lastly, he would take a final survey of the field. Superstitions can happen anywhere on the field. Whether pregame or before a plate appearance, little routines form naturally. While the Hoosier Crossroads Conference is not Major League Baseball, Tiger baseball players still have their own individual routines. For some, these occur when they go in to hit. “I put everything on in the same order,” junior Nick Lukac said. “I put my left batting glove on first, then the right. Then I put on my batting helmet, and I put on my elbow guard before I grab my bat.” For players like Lukac, superstitions help create a routine. They get the player ready mentally. Superstitions like Lukac’s are more organic and random, others are more deliberate. For some, it can be a spiritual moment. “I do the sign of the cross,” freshman Dominic Oliverio said. “Then I kiss my hand and look to the clouds above the center field fence.” Players believe that superstitions in baseball work to bring the person good fortunes and keep routine. It may be crazy, but if it gets results, the players think it can become crucial to their mindset. “Everybody has their own little superstitions that they believe in,” Lukac said. “We don’t want to mess around with them. It’s how baseball players go about their warm-ups.”

Individual players are not the only ones that have superstitions; last season’s state championship winning team had one particular superstition that the entire team decided to get behind. “We had a gnome that we kept in the dugout the whole postseason,” senior Kiel Brenczewski said. “Honestly, the gnome just kind of showed up. But if we didn’t have it, everyone was freaking out about how to get the gnome back to the dugout.” This year’s baseball team will look to repeat as state champions. There are not any special superstitions like the gnome yet, but they believe that this championship campaign will bring another brand-new superstition. “It’s a little early to tell with tryouts still coming up and all, but something will definitely pop up this season,” Brenczewski said. The baseball team’s official season is just starting. Tryouts for the baseball team were the week of March 4. The season will get underway on March 25 when the Tigers hit the road to take on Homestead before a spring break trip to Tennessee.

Returning Stat Leaders Hits*

Batting Average*

ERA

Strikeouts

74

.350

1.77

58

Senior Kiel Brenczewski

Senior JJ Woolwine

Junior Mason Thomas

Senior Jon Vore

All stats from MaxPrep

*Minimum 100 Plate Appearances

Junior Nick Lukac takes a practice swing in a 7-0 win over Avon on April 26. Photo

by Mya Ball.


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Lacrosse checks for improvement The boys scrap for the ball against Guerin Catholic at a home game, FHS lost 11-0 on April 19, 2018. Photo courtesy of

Tiger Tracks.

Varsity senior Drake Featherstone chases after the ball during home game against Bishop Chatard. FHS lost 12-6 on May 2, 2018. Photo courtesy of Tiger Tracks.

Rebekah Shultz shultreb000@hsestudents.org

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ith a net increase of 20,000 players, lacrosse has been growing for twelve years in a row according to the United States Lacrosse Organization in 2017. The NCAA sponsor for lacrosse says the sport has grown over 33 percent in that time. “My neighbor gave me my first stick and introduced me to the sport itself,” varsity senior Noah Monroe said. “The idea of lacrosse intrigued me and the idea of using a stick and pads instead of your hands in most sports was big for me, too.” Thomas Vennum Jr., author of “American Indian Lacrosse: Little Brother of War”, explains that lacrosse originated as a game that Native Americans had played since Europeans had come across the ocean. The game then spread to Canada and continues to attract more people each year. “It’s just a new sport that younger kids want to play a lot, it’s fun and it’s just growing more towards the west but it’s pretty big on the east coast,” varsity junior Nick Leath said. Players like varsity sophomore Evelynn Reilly and Leath have played since second grade and have continued to play the sport in high school for the love of the game. “My favorite part of lacrosse is that it’s not a systematic game really, it’s just free motion,” Leath said. The team prioritizes trusting each other on strategies for the game, the team depends on eachother’s success. “My favorite part about lacrosse is that success depends on how well the team works together as a unit. Nothing is dependent on one person. We all need each other to succeed,” varsity senior player Nina Dillard said. Recently, coach Ben Beasley took the role of the head coach for girls lacrosse after last year’s coach, Patrick Kelley, stepped down. Beasley has created an entirely new system for practices and strategies. “Beasley helps us practice harder and push us to bring out the most of our skills,” Reilly said. “He has also encouraged our team and driven us to play like we practice in the hopes of achieving more as a team this season.” Beasley also coaches the girls soccer team and encouraged many of the soccer girls to try out for lacrosse, which has added many new girls onto the team. Coach Chad Taylor, the boys coach, has been coaching for two years now after being assistant


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coach for five years. The girls varsity team huddled towards varsity coach Ben Beasley to practice “Coach Taylor has really emphasized the idea strategies on March 11, 2019. Photo by Nate Albin. of community,” Monroe said. “One of our mottos or ideals is the idea of brotherhood and everything we do builds it up. He made us closer outside of the field so that we could be stronger on the field.” Last season,the boys team was ranked 25th out of 32 teams overall in the state, ending with four wins and 13 losses. The girls team was ranked 13th out of 17 teams in the state, with five wins and 10 losses. The boys workouts and weights began earlier than they did last year, as well as trying to mix in new ways to play lacrosse like playing box lacrosse during some practices. These strategies may have an effect on how well the boys will play this season. Scholarship Stats shows that scholarships for lacrosse show that for men and women the odds of high school lacrosse players making the NCAA rosters is 9:1. Dillard is going to Delaware State University with a scholarship to play lacrosse. “I joined lacrosse because I wanted to try something new. I felt like my speed and quickness would be able to be applied to the sport,” Dillard said. “It’s a very fun sport and I’m glad I’m a part of it. Now that I have played it I am completely shocked with how it turned out. I didn’t know I’d fall in love with it, let alone be able to play at the next level in college.” The next home game for girls is on March 19 against Brownsburg and the next home game for boys is on April 10 against Westfield.

www.eyebrowsbyafraa.com 7246 Fishers Crossing Fishers, IN 46038 Store: (317) 537-2340 Mobile: (317) 403-5076 Located by Kroger at Allisonville Rd and 116th Street


March 18, 2019

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Sophomore Brynn Urban warms up before practice with laps around the football field March 11. Photo by Lance Marshall.

Track starts season Lance Marshall marshlan000@hsestudents.org

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he boys track and field team head into this season ranked third in the state for their state finals performance last year. As for the girls, who are ranked tenth in the state, they return several runners who qualified for the state meet last year. “We know it will be tough,” social studies teacher and girls head coach Andy Belloli said. “But we feel like we have a great chance this year to win many of our bigger meets.” Sprinters Last year, the Tigers qualified three individual sprinters and three relay teams for the state meet. For the boys, only the 4x100 meter relay and 4x400 meter relay teams saw the podium. The 4x100 consists of three returning seniors, Jason Lassic, HL Lewis and Cole Carrithers, who placed fifth with a time of 42.18 seconds. Carrithers and Lewis were also on the first place 4x400 team that finished in three minutes and at least a second before the team behind them. “I would say it was a pretty successful season,” Lewis said. “Alongside my great teammates, we were able to break the 4x100 school record and broke the 4x400 school record which allowed us to win first place in the state meet.” State qualifiers returning for the girls will be junior Tamia Perryman and senior Grace May. Perryman saw the state podium multiple times as she placed eighth in the 100 running a 12.22 and ninth in the 200 finishing in 25.35. Both May and Perryman were on the fourth placed 4x100 team that came .48 seconds away from second place. “The main goal for next season is to make that trip to state again,” Perryman said. “If I stick to myself and not worry about the other runners then I should be successful.”


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Sports Throwers This category is split into two events-which are shot-put and discus throw. The experienced group of throwers return most of their line-up as only one senior, Luke Martin, that threw varsity shot-put graduated. Martin was a mentor to the underclassmen throwers last season. “Our underclassmen learned a lot from Martin,” math teacher and head throwers coach Benjamin Wyss said. “For us, it’s not about replacing what left, but instead about building on who we were before.” At the Blue and White Relays, junior Hayden Tobias took home gold while throwing the shot-put 57 feet. The girls were represented by senior Olivia Willman who took fourth place with a 33 foot shot-put throw. “When I am in my motion, I try to focus on the little things and feel comfortable,” Tobias said. “I try not to overcomplicate everything that I have done up to that point.”

Junior Olivia Willman follows through her form as she releases the shot-put at practice March 11.

Photo by Lance Marshall.

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Jumpers As the jumpers return to a squad that was not represented at the state finals meet, they started this year with a big jump from last year at the Blue and White Relays held at Anderson University on March 2. Senior Anthony Campbell represented the boys team by, placing first in the high jump finals with a post of 6 feet, three inches and placing second in the long jump finals with a 22-foot jump. In the boys pole vault finals junior Derek James placed eight with a 9-foot jump. “I want to push myself to reach a 7-foot high jump and 24-foot long jump,” Campbell said. “To get there I will need to work on my form and bend my back more.” The girls took home first place in the high jump finals at the Blue and White Relays with help from Perryman with a jump of 5 feet, 4 inches. Furthermore, they also took first place in the long jump finals thanks to freshman Ella Scally, in her indoor track 5 and field debut. Also senior Emily 4 Monson tied for second with a jump of 4 feet, 10 inches in the long jump finals. Another second place finish was sealed by sophomore Allison Casey, who reached 11 feet in the pole vault finals. “My mindset going into these next few meets are to keep my nerves under control,” Monson said. “I know that not every meet is going to be a perfect one, and being okay with that I think will help me this season.” Distance The boys distance team saw one individual and 4x800 team qualify for the 2018 state meet including Indiana University commit senior Ethan Meyer, who finished 16th in the mile run, coming in at 4:21.95 “I think we can do something special this year,” junior Drew Smith said. “We have a solid athlete in almost every event, and not to be cocky, but I do not see any huge weakness in our team.” The girls will not be returning any state qualifiers from last year. At the Blue and White Relays the Tigers had two runners place in the top five in the girls 3200 meter run finals. Freshman Elizabeth Barrett was able to come in third place and senior Tessa Kraft followed six seconds after for a fourth place finish. “Our mindset for indoors is to get qualified in the best possible position for the Hoosier State Relays on March 23,” Belloli said. “Most importantly to gain experience that will help us as we move towards the IHSAA State tournament during the outdoor portion of our season.”

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Track and field will cap off their indoor season at the Hoosier State Relays at Indiana Univesity March 23. The boys will open their outdoor season Tuesday at home against MT Vernon High School March 26 at 5:30. While the girls season opener will be home against non conference opponent North Central High School Tuesday April 9.

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Duke freshman Zion Williamson smiles as he watches his team defeat the University of Miami 87-57, on March 2 at home. Photo used with permission of Tribune News Service.

March Madness dribbles with emotions of fans

Tony Martinez martiant000@hsestudents.org

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ixty-eight teams, three weeks, one goal: win the national championship. March Madness is an event for college basketball fans everywhere. Millions of Americans watch every year according to Statista. “My favorite part of March Madness has to be the upsets that occur during the tournament,” senior Drew Hoffman said.“You never know who’s going to win no matter what, and that brings a type of suspense I like while watching.” Upsets are just one out of the multiple things people look forward to during March. 1985 and 2014 had the most upsets at 13. Of the 34 national champions, only 20 of them have been one seeds in the tournament according to the NCAA. “My most vivid memory of March Madness for me personally had to be when IU played Kentucky in the round of 32 of 2016,” senior Abby Sutton said. “ Anyone who loves IU knows Kentucky is one of our rivals, so it was fun to see.” Indiana defeated Kentucky 73-67 in the second round of the tournament in 2016. They then went on to face a powerful North Carolina team and suffered a loss 101-86. March Madness is also well known for some of the injuries that take place. A notorious injury is the Kevin Ware incident of 2013 where he suffered an open fracture to his right leg which protruded several inches out of his skin.

“Unfortunately, my most vivid memory of March Madness is when Isaac Haas got hurt last year,” Hoffman said. “I feel like if he didn’t get hurt Purdue had a great chance to go all the way.” Isaac Haas is Purdue’s star big man who suffered a fractured elbow in last year’s tournament. Purdue fell in the sweet 16 of the tournament to Texas Tech in a close game of 78-65. March Madness fans often stream the games from the workplace to keep up with the basketball games. People who make more than $100,000 are 38 percent more likely to stream the March Madness games from their workplace according to Fortune. “Not only during March Madness does my family do this, but during the regular season too. We always sit in our lucky spots,” said Sutton. “When IU goes on a crazy winning streak, we always sit in our spots. If someone doesn’t, everyone goes crazy and freaks out.” Sports broadcasting channels like ESPN or CBS Sports use March Madness to attract viewers. Both of these stations are the main source for people tuning into the tournament. “I usually watch games on the March Madness app on my phone during class,” senior Jon Vore said. “I have definitely gotten caught in class before. Usually my teachers are calm about it as long as my class work is done.”


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Alb n's Angle

America’s Pastime fades into past time Ellie Albin albinele000@hsestudents.org

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ome of my favorite memories involve baseball. I am not just talking about the Cubs winning the World Series in 2016 - even though that is a personal favorite. I will always remember staying up until 2 a.m. with my dad and brother, trying to stifle our cheers so we would not wake up anyone else in the quiet house. But, no, that is not my only fond memory of baseball. I actually happen to like two teams - the Cubs, obviously - and the San Francisco Giants. I remember watching my Giants win the 2014 World Series as I was camped out in a sleeping bag in front of the television in the living room, watching alongside, you guessed it, my dad and brother. My memories of America’s Pastime go beyond just watching the game. One of my favorite movies is “A League of Their Own.” I watched it one muggy summer morning when I thought I had nothing better to do - little did I know it would impact me in such a profound way. Eventually, I graduated to films like “Moneyball,” which actually dove into an economic, mathematical and number-crunching aspect of baseball that still baffles me to this day. And then I took AP United States History. And that class, indeed, confirmed my theory on the importance of baseball. Because it really is not just a game - it is not like every other sport. Baseball has had an overwhelming impact on U.S. history. From cultural icons like Lou Gehrig becoming the face of ALS to Jackie Robinson making a progressive step in the ways of civil rights - baseball matters. It just does. And that is precisely why we cannot let it slip away as America’s Pastime - it is not only a part of who I am - it is a part of so many other people’s lives as well. Growing up in a house with a dad who played and loved baseball as a kid (and still loves it) does not just float over your head - you absorb that love and try to protect it. According to the National Library of Medicine, Americans spend between five and seven hours a day using various types of screens. Keene State College conducted a study revolving around a group of second graders who spent much of their lives (already) behind screens - and the researchers discovered that more screen time resulted in shorter attention spans. America’s unhealthy connection and obsession with the world of technology, social media and being “liked” has led to short attention spans - baseball’s kryptonite. As baseball gets older and attention spans grow smaller, fans are wanting the game of baseball to speed up - taking away from the beauty of having a timeless clock. For as much as I love the New York Times, Washington Post and USA Today, there comes a time in which they are just flat-out wrong about certain aspects of life. But, being a sports writer - and, not just a sports writer, but an avid sports fan - I can say that those news outlets are wrong. America’s attention span is already short enough. The more you cater to it, the shorter it gets. It is like giving candy to a baby (rather than taking it from a baby) - the more sugar you feed it, the more candy the baby’s going to want. The more rules we add and the more we cut the game of baseball, the greedier Americans will get. Before you know it, baseball will take 20 minutes. Slowly, the game will dwindle into oblivion, becoming just a mere hobby that once captivated Americans.

Baseball remains one of the United States’ most prominent sports, all the way down to the high school level, as seen above as FHS watches the game against Avon on April 26, 2018. But, the attempt to trim the time it takes to play a game is a slippery slope that could lead to negative consequences for its future as a staple in American history.

Photo by Mya Ball.


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HEAD TO HEAD

March 18, 2019

Four day weeks give better recuperation for the next Andrew Bauer bauerand000@hsestudents.org

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fter a long, stressful school day full of tests, projects and assignments, I go home to take a break and rest for a bit. Well, at least when I do not have work… but usually I do. At least the weekend is nigh and so are thoughts of catching up on sleep and finally hanging out with friends. That will be my chance to recuperate from this week’s trials, at least that’s the hope… but no. More work. This time it is housework. Hopefully, I still have Sunday. Still no. A full day is used for shopping in preparation for the next week. Homework to finish up before the weekend is out and finally I am done and can relax. I get a whole couple hours this time. Man, if I had just one more day that I could have to actually rest up and recuperate before the storm of the next week. This is what most people face in the United States today. The majority of students go to school for five days a week. Parents of those children go to work for those same five days. A two day weekend just does not give the body nor the mind enough time to relax before the rush of the next week. Transitioning a school week from a five-day week to a four-day week would allow for that extra day to actually relax. You could have all your work done from the last week and the preparation for the next week completed with an extra day to spend with family and friends or just taking a break. According to The Guardian, The University of Auckland conducted a pilot study of a company called Perpetual Guardian that switched to a four-day week. They monitored different attributes such as leadership, stimulation, empowerment and commitment. Over the course of the eight week study, Auckland found that stress levels decreased by eight percent and the work-life balance increased by 24 percent. During the study, there was also a 20 percent increase in productivity and the total amount of work done remained the same. This raises the question as to why schools do not already switch over if the numbers look so good. There is a state requirement that the Indiana Department of Education requires 180 days of school per year. Taking the fifth day off of each week would mean that at some point, one way or another, those missing days would need to be made up. A four-day week while adding an hour will not only give students more time to relax over the weekend, but will also increase class times slightly. This gives students an opportunity to get additional homework Photos by Ethan done and teachers additional time to teach. It provides the best of both O’Sullivan. worlds by giving both students and teachers time to reset and more time to learn.

“I think summer is long personally. An extra long weekend would be nice. It is a perfect amount of time off of school but enough time to remain in school too.” - Zoe Luckie, 12

“By the fifth day youʼre tired and itʼs harder to concentrate. So many things are squeezed into the weekend that it would be nice to have an extra day.” - Paige Kertes, 11

“An extra day would give us an extra day to relax. If we had an extra day each weekend, it would really help the mental health of students while being beneficial to others.” - Caleb Greer, 11


Opinion

Four days creates massive problems

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Samuel Bauer bauersam000@hsestudents.org

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our-day school weeks are becoming a wide spread reality, and our school district could be next. Less school, less work. It sounds great. But even the costs are not reduced enough to warrant such a drastic change in the calendar, and that is the primary reason for pursuing a four-day school week. According to the National Conference for State Legislature, schools that have already implemented four-day school weeks have only been saving 0.42.5 percent of their budget. Putting this into perspective, the National Center for Educational Statistics states that an average school district spends roughly $11,500 per student to attend. With a 3,500 student body size, our school spends over $40 million on its students every year, not including building use or transportation, among other costs. Factoring in the highest possible percentage, 2.5 percent would be saved toward the annual budget for students At most, the school will be saving roughly a million dollars, or roughly the cost for about 4 new buses, which is a much greater problem the district is struggling with. That is essentially pocket change for the Indiana Department of Education, especially considering a proposal was made that the Hamilton Southeastern School district’s $242.8 million budget be increased by 4 percent, as said by The Hamilton County Reporter. If they are expanding our budget, than it is evident they have the money. And that is not even the worst part of it all. Students will be forced to attend school for additional days added onto the end of the year to make up for the loss, taking away from summer vacations. Based on a law in Indiana, the Indiana Department of Education states that students who are in grades nine through twelve must be in attendance for at least six hours per day, or roughly 1,080 hours per year. Keeping this fact in mind, students spend roughly 36 five-day weeks in school based on an academic calendar. This means there would be an additional 36 days of school, taking off an entire month of summer vacation. Another opposition is that parents will be forced to help provide coverage for the students, even when their position does not allow it. Children’s parents generally work for a five-day week. This extra spending is a result of the parents who need to find a babysitter or caretaker to take care of their children while they are at work, placing more burden onto those parents. And less of that on the school themselves. All of this adds to the opinion that shorter weeks for school will end up complicating things for the future and in the busy lives of the students who are participating, and it will not be a large enough benefit for the schools.

“I believe we should have a five-day week because Friday is already like a weekend day, Saturday is a chill day and then Sunday is another chill day. That is already enough for me.” -Andrew Mayes, 12

“Even with four-day weeks we would probably receive the same amount of homework regardless of fewer days. With five-day weeks students and teachers can process their plans for the week.” -Tatiana Pardo, 11

“Four-day weeks would cause us to be more unproductive, by giving us more free time. Also teachers would give us more homework to make up for the lost time in school. - Jeremy Roesner, 11


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March 18, 2019

Harrison Ford (left) poses with Roman Polanski (right) after presenting him with the Oscar for Best Director on Sept. 7, 2003. Ford presented the Oscar to Polanski in Deauville, France because Polanski flew to France in an effort to avoid conviction after he pleaded guilty to raping a minor. Photo used with

permission of Tribune News Service.

Celebrities ooze hypocrisy

Sydney Greenwood

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greensyd002@hsestudents.org

he lives of the elite can be so enviable. They have money, beauty and influence. With exceptions such as activists Emma Watson, a UN Women Goodwill Amabassador, and Tom Hiddleston, a UK UNICEF amabassador, celebrities appear to lack basic morals. Ivanka Trump is a prime example. She promotes herself as a feminist, while her father brags about his ability to sexually assault women. She is somehow able to both condemn and support his actions, particularly when she denounced his comments as disgusting, but continually worked on his presidential campaign. This is not the first “do as I say, not as I do” attitude emitting from the White House. It has remained a cornerstone since the words “all men are created equal” were written in the Declaration of Independence while hundreds of thousands of slaves suffered and died. Currently, First Lady Melania Trump is working on her initiative, Be Best, to encourage kids to better themselves in the areas of well-being, opioid abuse and social media. The third aspect is particularly ironic, since her husband has insulted a grand total of 567 people, places and things on Twitter, according to the New York Times. His bullying has been so prolific that Time Magazine has an insult generator that provides a unique snub, provided by our President’s Twitter account. Hypocrisy extends far past politics. The celibacy of Catholic priests arises from a doctrine from the 12th century, but has little basis in the Bible. Of course, this has not stopped priests from sexually abusing children and impregnating women. This issue is so prevalent in the Church that the Vatican authored a secret document with guidelines to protect the children, according to CNN. There are no estimates for the number of children with priests as fathers, but Vincent Doyle, the son of a priest and creator of Coping International, claims that there are 50,000 users from 175 countries who are all “children of the

ordained,” according to the New York Times. Hollywood and its many celebrities have not escaped the epidemic either. In a post-#MeToo era, it can be difficult to imagine how someone could be accused of sexual assault and then not be ousted by their community. However, this occurred in the case of Roman Polanski. The Polish film director is best known for directing the “Pianist.” In March 1977, Polanski raped 13 year-old Samantha Gailey. Less than a year later, in February 1978, he pleaded guilty to the charge of illegal sexual intercourse with a minor. He even wrote about the rape in his biography, “Roman by Polanski.” Despite the damning evidence, it has not stopped A-list celebrities from continuing to work with him, including Kate Winslet, Johnny Depp, Harrison Ford, Pierce Brosnan and Ewan McGregor. Kate Winslet has defended her work with Polanski and Woody Allen, also accused of sexually assaulting a minor, saying “Having thought it all through, you put it to one side and just work with the person. Woody Allen is an incredible director. So is Roman Polanski. I had an extraordinary working experience with both of those men, and that’s the truth.” This did not stop Winslet from changing her tune when Harvey Weinstein was arrested, saying that she regretted her work with sex abusers. It was almost as if she had been ignorant of Polanski’s crime, ignoring it for several decades, because her art was more important than her morals. It has been made more than clear that celebrities are willing to show the public their true selves. While they promote themselves as supporting women, trying to better the lives of children and standing up for the victims of sexual assault, they are also willing to sacrifice their principles in exchange for more power and people should not idolize them for masquerading as activists.


Opinion

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Formjackers scare e-shoppers

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Ethan O’Sullivan osuleth000@hsestudents.org

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eople with common sense know not to click the mysterious links in their emails or use “password” as their password, but hackers are still out there stealing information with us being none the wiser. We need to open our eyes to nearly invisible threats. Formjacking, an emerging type of data attack that gained media coverage in February, highlights just how little control we have in our security. Formjackers infect business websites with malware that rips credit card information as users input it. They then sell that information to the highest bidder on the dark web or use it

themselves. Formjacking software is not just built into shady websites; it is injected into ordinary business domains. That leaves no links to click, no traps to fall for and no way of even knowing about the leak without advanced screening software. It barely even leaves a trace, and cybersecurity experts from Symantec say that instances of it have shot up by 117 percent over the last few months. Formjacking is a problem on the rise in an industry where qualified experts are limited, raising questions about how we can actually combat it. We have more than a few things to worry about.

password. Formjacking In fact, most formjacking is just the latest addition USER: HACKERS software was found on PASSWORD: FormJacking to the game, but this commercial websites like time the corporations Ticketmaster and British have oversight. When Airways, according to a companies do not corporate security company called CyTech. They properly encrypt user data, it leaves the door to also say that small businesses suffer the most user information wide open. from formjacking and other similar attacks due To some extent, we share the fault when to their smaller budgets and less sophisticated something happens to that data. Companies cybersecurity protocol. have the responsibility to keep it safe from Large entities will never be off the hook, external threats, but we still need to exercise though. Data breaches against large corporations more reason in how much information we leave have hurt billions of people throughout the 21st vulnerable century, constantly proving to us that nothing is So to say that users should only give personal sacred. data to trusted websites just no longer fits the Limiting online spending and doing it in bill. Online retailing is the most insecure sector, person as often as possible is a great way to with hackers making up around 90 percent of minimize the risk, but it can also increase your total login attempts to their sites, according to safety to do more shopping with pre-paid cards Shape Security. We cannot completely eliminate since they have no links to bank information. online spending, but the less we give hackers to Formjacking stems from the idea of data work with, the better. listening. Information that someone inputs In Stephen Hawking’s words: intelligence is all can and will be spied on, stored away and about the ability to adapt. Intelligent criminals used against them. With that in mind, the adapt to a system’s strengths by exploiting its kinds of information that people are willing weaknesses. Intelligent citizens, meanwhile, to store online should be cause for concern. adapt to a system’s weakness by emphasizing It is ludicrous to save credit card information its strengths. We need more intelligent citizens on user accounts, for example, because all acting as intelligent consumers - ones who know that information gets stored behind a simple how to spend money judiciously.

Graphic by Ethan O’Sullivan. Bank info

E-Commerce Sites


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Editorial Opinions: Should projectbased classes be required?

5 :Yes 3: No

STAFF Editor-in-Chief: Helen Rummel Copy Editor: Ashley Steele Web/News Editor: Ethan OʼSullivan Features Editor: John Yun Arts & Culture Editor: Carson Lilley Sports Editor: Ellie Albin Social Media Editor: Lance Marshall Unity Director: Hallie Gallinat Cartoonist Olivia Buchtenkirch Videographer Laney Kyle Reporters Nate Albin, Andrew Bauer, Sam Bauer, Marie Gabbard, Ben Grantonic, Ben McHenry, Curren Gauss, Sydney Greenwood, Tony Martinez, Grace Mossing, Kristen Rummel, Rebekah Shultz, Janie Van Overwalle, Katie Wiseman Photographers Mya Ball, Kaylee Demlow, Saraiah Evans, Symone Kinnebrew Ledford Principal Jason Urban Adviser Kristine Brown Associations IHSPA CSPA NSPA Quill and Scroll Printer: AIM Media

March 18, 2019

Hands-on approach paves way for career success

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eeing our articles in print for the first time is something our student staff members cannot easily forget, but for most others, the rigidness of high school becomes tiring and the traditional classroom setup only allows the apathetic attitudes of high schoolers to persist. It makes sense that a school with over 3,500 students would typically fall back on multiple choice testing. They are simpler to grade and prepare students for. They quickly highlight areas that need improvement, but that does not necessarily mean they will single-handedly prepare a student for college, let alone a realistic occupation. Classes that take a more hands-on approach, as seen in the We the People class (p. 8) and the Project Lead the Way program (pp. 10, 11), have pushed for students to take more initiative and develop their leadership skills. According to a study conducted at the University of California, Davis there is a strong, positive correlation between project-based learning and selfefficacy, intrinsic motivation and extroversion. These are characteristics that are quite difficult to teach through a traditional classroom setting. Project-based classes are readily available to everyone and cover an extensive number of subjects, yet are not pushed for as heavily as AP classes, which ironically, are mostly centered around a test. AP classes are excellent ways for students to push themselves academically and become even more beneficial for seniors seeking more freedom through the FLEX program, but they often lack the collaborative environment that is so important to education. Hands-on classes provide the extra resources needed to foster creative education. Many of these classes also include a time commitment outside of school. This allows students to continue learning outside of the seven-hour school day. Additionally, students can grow stronger ties with their peers. This blurs the lines between school life and personal life which helps students see school with a different mindset. According to Robert Frank, the executive director of the Hillside School and Learning Center in Los Angeles, teachers in his district are often, “pleasantly surprised how collaborative projects provide incentive and opportunity for students who do poorly when going solo,” reported the Los Angeles Times. Classes typically only give the incentive of grades, and for some students that simply is not motivating. Many immersive classrooms are centered around a goal or product. The We the People class seeks civic education throughout the year, and the yearbook staff treasures their creation after nine months of work. For this reason, students typically can find an alternate motivation for their schooling through unorthodox means. Thankfully, we have begun a transition to include classes like these in every student’s schedule. The class of 2023 will be required to complete a project, service or work based experience before graduation. While the criteria is still far in the future, the school labeled these courses as “employability skills” which helps to recognize their significance in the modern workplace. In an environment where all students are engaged in at least one class that functions as a community, it ensures that students can find their passion in school work. Instead of checking test scores, they can look back on something they created with purpose.


Opinion

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Rebuttal: Project-based learning is not for everyone.

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Graphic by Olivia Buchtenkirch.

Editorial Policy Tiger Topics N the RED is the official monthly newsmagazine of Fishers High School. It is distributed free to 3,500 students and over 300 school personnel. It is designed, written and edited by students. Opinions expressed in the newsmagazine do not necessarily represent those of the adviser, administration or staff. Letters to the editor may be submitted to A218, or to fhstigertopics@gmail.com. Letters must contain the writer’s phone number for verification. Letters to the editor will not be published anonymously. If there is any incorrect information, corrections will be made in the next issue.

ust like some people do not love worksheets, long lectures, taking notes or worrying about tests every week - some students do not conform to the idea of taking classes based on projects, even if it only comprises one or two classes in their daily schedules. Maia Bloomfield Cucchiara, an associate professor at Temple University, stated that there is no definitive way to assess the outcomes from project-based learning. That can be uncomfortable for students who like a more structured class. Even if it is just one class a day, everyone has had that one class that just ruins their day, week, month or even school year. Once project-based classes are incorporated into graduation standards, students will feel the same way they do now: constricted. When students have demands they are required to meet, they pull a Holden Caulfield and experience a need for rebellion, ready to quit school and seek independence. Projects are often tedious and require intense involvement - simply taking a test and being done with it is much more rewarding for some students - and the school needs to accommodate those needs as well.

Mission Statement As the student-run newsmagazine of FHS, Tiger Topics N the Red is dedicated to providing the staff, students and community of FHS with a timely, entertaining and factual publication once a month by means of public forum. In publishing articles that students enjoy reading, we are furthering both the educational experience and the expansion of FHS culture. The staff works to create a sense of unity and awareness and to allow the students of FHS to have a better insight to the world around them.


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ISSUE REVIEW

March 18, 2019

TWEET US YOUR ANSWERS FOR A CHANCE AT A PRIZE

@fhs_NtheRed

Across

2. One of We the People’s biggest competitors at nationals comes from which state? 5. What would a man who tries to cover up their insecurities by pushing themselves abnormally hard in their work be called? 6. Baseball player who famously become the face of the ALS disease. 8. Which European folktale has been recreated in one of this year’s choir sets? 9. One of the events leading up to the Riley Dance Marathon that showcases participants modeling in two different outfits. 11. Who was the head lacrosse coach before Ben Beasley? 12. A relatively new method of hacking that has significantly increased over the last few months.

Down

1. What additional expense would parents have to pay for if the school week was four days long? 3. Name of the album that Carson Ulmer released last November. 4. Which exit must students who park in the CCA use? 5. What was January’s special flavor at Nothing Bundt Cakes? 7. What mythical creature did the baseball team secretly keep stashed in their dugout in the postseason? 10. Who did Indiana lose to in March Madness in 2016?

Profile for Tiger Topics: N the Red

Tiger Topics N the Red: Volume XIII, Issue 6  

We feature clubs like We the People and Speech Team, delve into doodles, and more.

Tiger Topics N the Red: Volume XIII, Issue 6  

We feature clubs like We the People and Speech Team, delve into doodles, and more.

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