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Forum/The Substance of Style/Fall 2013

FALL FASHION

CATCH CABIN FEVER DESIGNERS GET PERSONAL THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT: GOLF GOES DIGITAL


welcome

WELCOME TO THE FALL 2013 OAK HALL FORUM MAGAZINE ere at Oak Hall and at our “vineyard vines by Oak Hall” stores in Memphis, Nashville and Birmingham, we’ve been preparing for the transition from summer to fall and winter for over a year. We hope our efforts will turn your shopping this season into an enjoyable adventure worthy of multiple visits to all four stores to see what’s new in the coming months. Within this issue you’ll find articles on people, fashion trends and lifestyles that we thought you’d find of interest, as well as our Must-Haves feature that highlights the selections our buying team has made with your input in mind. No business could flourish for 154 years as Oak Hall has without embracing the latest technology. We have accomplished this with our ever-changing website, an active presence on Facebook and communicating via email to thousands of our customers, like you, to inform you of in-store special events, trunk shows and special offers throughout the year. Your loyalty, support and friendship over the years drive us to try to exceed your expectations every time you walk through our doors. We thank you and look forward to seeing you many times in the coming months at one, two, three, or all four of our stores. With best wishes always, Will, Bill and Bob Levy and your friends at Oak Hall

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OAK HALL 6150 Poplar Avenue Memphis TN 38119 901-761-3580 oakhall.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Karen Alberg Grossman DESIGN DIRECTOR

Hans Gschliesser MANAGING EDITOR

Jillian LaRochelle PROJECT MANAGER

Lisa Montemorra DESIGNERS

Cynthia Lucero, Jean-Nicole Venditti CONCEPT DIRECTORS

Andrew Mitchell, Russ Mitchell MERCHANDISING DIRECTOR

Bob Mitchell DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION

Peg Eadie DIRECTOR OF PREPRESS

John Frascone

FEATURES 2

Welcome Letter

8

A Match Made in Southern Heaven

12 Trunk Shows & Events

BUSINESS JOURNALS FASHION GROUP PUBLISHER

Stuart Nifoussi PRESIDENT AND CEO

Britton Jones CHAIRMAN AND COO

Mac Brighton CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Christine Sullivan

68 Fitness: Hit the Mat

APPAREL FORUM

72 Tech: In Full Swing

Andrisen Morton DENVER, CO Garys NEWPORT BEACH, CA Hubert White MINNEAPOLIS, MN

FASHION 6

That Was Then, This Is Now

13 Fall 2013 Must-Haves

Kilgore Trout CLEVELAND, OH Larrimor’s PITTSBURGH, PA Malouf’s LUBBOCK/SOUTHLAKE, TX Mario’s PORTLAND, OR/SEATTLE, WA Mitchells/Marshs HUNTINGTON, NY Mitchells/Richards WESTPORT/GREENWICH, CT

56 Designers: Talking to the Talent 64 1 Suit. 7 Ways.

Oak Hall MEMPHIS, TN Rodes LOUISVILLE, KY Rubensteins NEW ORLEANS, LA Stanley Korshak DALLAS, TX

DEPARTMENTS 50 Ask Forum 52 Man of Style: All About Al

Wilkes Bashford SAN FRAN/PALO ALTO, CA FASHION FORUM MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED IN 11 REGIONAL EDITIONS FOR MEMBER STORES OF THE APPAREL FORUM © 2013. PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS JOURNALS, INC, P.O. BOX 5550, NORWALK, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • FAX: 203-852-8175; ADVERTISING OFFICE: 1384 BROADWAY, NY, NY 10018-6108, 212-686-4412 • FAX: 212-686-6821; ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THE PUBLISHERS ACCEPT NO RESPONSIBILITIES FOR ADVERTISERS

62 Food: America’s French Farm Boy

CLAIMS, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS OR OTHER MATERIALS. NO PART OF THIS MAGAZINE MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE

76 End Page: Restaurant Rules

FALL/WINTER 2013 PUBLISHERS. VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.


ATTENTION TO DETAIL is what has turned Eton into one of the world’s finest shirt makers. Founded in 1928 by husband and wife Annie and David Pettersson, Eton’s dedicated belief in quality and craftsmanship has helped spread their story from the small village in Gånghester in the west of Sweden to some of the world’s most exclusive stores. Today, Eton is still run by the Pettersson family and remains loyal to its heritage as a specialist shirt maker.

celebrating 85 years of fine shirt making 1928–2013


fashion 101

That wasThen...

Shoulders are too constructed, heavy, thick and wide.

Jacket Wider lapels and longer jacket length are dated and stale.

Pants are too full and baggy with multiple pleats.

Shoes These dated wheels with the thick soles are way too chunky.

Cuffs Skinny cuffs with baggy pants? Forget about it!


> the new suit This is Now...

Lapel is narrower with a higher notch.

Jacket is more fitted, and closer to the body.

Sleeves on the jacket are narrower and slightly shorter.

Pants are flat-front, more sculpted and slightly shorter.

Fabrics with built-in technology woven into the cloth lend themselves to a trimmer fit.


A MATCH MADE IN SOUTHERN HEAVEN

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Oak Hall places its first order of men’s VV product.

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01

vineyard vines enters the handbag market. It’s a beach bag! It’s a book bag! It’s the original Classic Tote!

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Few people out there can say their first day of work involved selling ties out of the back of a Jeep.

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Before we traded in our loafers for flip flops, and our suits for Shep shirts, vineyard vines was just an idea. We started out selling ties out of boats, jeeps, beaches—you name it. We’ve come a long way since then, and it means the world to us that the Levys took a chance on a couple of guys with just a little more than a dream. After meeting a few people who enjoy fishing as much as we do, we knew we were going to make a great team. 3 amazing stores later, we’ve learned that they’re just a bunch of dreamers themselves and we couldn’t be happier to be on board.


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Oak Hall begins ordering VV women’s product.

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vineyard vines profiles: Stories of people living the dream become a catalog staple.

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The first vineyard vines store opens on Shep & Ian’s favorite island of them all, Martha’s Vineyard.


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Our College Collection and NFL Collection make their debut.

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vineyard vines turns 10 years old!

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vineyard vines Memphis opens!


vineyard vines Birmingham opens!

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vineyard vines is named the OďŹƒcial Style of the Kentucky Derby! Talk about thoroughbred style.

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vineyard vines Nashville opens!


FOR MEN

SEPTEMBER 11TH & 12TH — ZEGNA TRUNK SHOW SEPTEMBER 12TH — ZEGNA SHOP GRAND OPENING PARTY SEPTEMBER 16TH THROUGH 20TH — FALL CUSTOM CLOTHING WEEK SEPTEMBER 18TH — HAMILTON SHIRTS TRUNK SHOW SEPTEMBER 21ST -— FALL TRUNK SHOW & COOKOUT OCTOBER 16TH & 17TH — ZEGNA TRUNK SHOW NOVEMBER 2ND — “OAKTOBERFEST” FALL TRUNK SHOW & COOKOUT NOVEMBER 7TH — BARBOUR REWAXING EVENT & WILD GAME COOKOUT BY HOG & HOMINY

FALL TRUNK SHOWS FOR LADIES

&

events

SEPTEMBER 4TH, 5TH & 6TH — LAFAYETTE 148 TRUNK SHOW SEPTEMBER 11TH, 12TH & 13TH — NEIL BIEFF TRUNK SHOW SEPTEMBER 26TH & 27TH — ST. JOHN TRUNK SHOW OCTOBER 3RD & 4TH — WOLFORD TRUNK SHOW OCTOBER 16TH THROUGH 19TH — FALL TRUNK SHOW NOVEMBER 2ND — “OAKTOBERFEST” FALL TRUNK SHOW & COOKOUT NOVEMBER 7TH — BARBOUR REWAXING EVENT & WILD GAME COOKOUT BY HOG & HOMINY NOVEMBER 7TH & 8TH – KAROLINA ZMARLAK TRUNK SHOW


PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN BLOEMER

Canali sportcoat Zegna tie Rag & Bone dress

MUST-HAVES FOR FALL 2013


Canali sportcoat Knit tie


Nellie Partow top and pants Jordan Alexander earrings and cuff


Haute Hippie beaded jacket and jumpsuit Lulu Frost earrings and necklace


Isaia sportcoat and shirt


Hart Schaffner Marx three-piece suit Eton dress shirt Knit tie


Catherine Deane dress Lulu Frost earrings


Eton dress shirt Knit tie Incotex trousers Torino belt


Rebecca Taylor leather-sleeve coat J Brand RTW leather pant


Scott James sport shirt and jacket Bonobos chinos Torino belt


Haute Hippie quilted leather jacket and ruffle front blouse AG distressed denim


Vince tee, thermal hoodie and vest J Brand twill pant


Southern Tide sport shirt, sweater and jacket J Brand jeans


Peter Millar sport shirt and quarter-zip sweater


Southern Tide sport shirt and quarter-zip pullover


Barbour Commander jacket, sport shirt and sweater Citizens of Humanity jeans


Vince color block leather jacket, skirt and leggings Lulu Frost earrings


Alan Paine button sweaters


Scott Barber sport shirt Alan Paine sweater


True Grit western cord sport shirt and pullover J Brand five-pocket jeans Dylan vest Vince sheer detail sweater Rag & Bone denim


True Grit pullovers


Jordan Alexander jewelry


Jordan Alexander necklaces Dylan hoodie Vince leather pant


Lida Baday dress Jordan Alexander earrings


Vintage Chanel handbags


Scott Barber sport shirt Jack Victor sportcoat


Brioni made-to-measure suit, dress shirt and tie Karolina Zmarlak dress Jordan Alexander earrings


Zegna made-to-measure suit and fabric swatches


Hamilton dress shirts and fabric swatches


Incotex trousers Persol sunglasses


Oak Hall’s exclusive 1859 wrinkle-free sport shirts


Johnston's of Elgin blankets


Cotton Brothers sport shirts


Flynt cord sportcoat Scott Barber sport shirt Johnston's of Elgin scarf


Hiltl five-pocket flannel trouser


Bills Khakis vintage twills


ASKFORUM

FALL 2013 FASHION TIPS FOR HIM

do about this? I’m tempted to go over the fabric with fine sandpaper but I worry I might make it worse.

Q:

It’s to adjust the tightness of the sleeve, although not all makers offer this option. In any case, kudos to you for wearing French cuffs and cufflinks, adding a touch of class to your sartorial style. We hope you’re also trying bowties, pocket squares, tie clips and/or boutonnieres, all of which add personality to your executive look.

some of the new high-tech fabrics that are moisture wicking, antimicrobial and amazingly comfortable. Try them in fashion colors and patterns if you dare.

Q:

I’ve noticed that my darker, harder-finish wool suits (even the expensive ones) tend to pick up shine after dry cleaning. Is there anything I can 50

Q:

What’s the proper length for pants these days?

Definitely shorter than they used to be, now that slimmer leg styles are popular. While we don’t recommend showing your ankles (although young trendsetters are doing it!), we do suggest just a slight break to no break at the top of the shoe. Unfortunately, lots of guys are still wearing their pants with a big break or even a double break: we feel that excess fabric bunched up on slim pants is a bit unflattering.

COURTESY EDWARD ARMAH

Q:

I recently bought some Boxer shorts are not dress shirts with French working under the new cuffs. On the inside part of each slim pants I’ve been buying. cuff, there are two cufflink What type of underwear should holes, while on the outside part I try? We suggest trim boxer briefs in of the cuffs, just one. Why?

Skip the sandpaper and cut back on the dry cleaning. If your suit gets soiled, spot cleaning is best; dry clean as infrequently as possible. Other tricks of the trade: buy some good cedar hangers and leave space between suits in your closet; rotate your wardrobe so that you don’t wear the same suit on consecutive days. Most importantly: update your wardrobe with a new suit or two every year or so. With today’s slimmer fits, what’s in your closet is likely to look somewhat dated.


man of style

ALL ABOUT AL

But fortunately, when we had Superstorm Sandy and the Oklahoma tornado and those types of severe events, we were pretty much right on target. As our computer modeling improves, so does our accuracy.

How important are clothes in your life? What are your personal style preferences? I’d describe my style as fairly traditional: I don’t take major fashion risks; in fact, the biggest decision I had to make this season was cuffs or no cuffs on my pants. (I opted for no cuffs…) But what most distinguishes my style, I suppose, is that I’m not afraid to wear bold colors. I think it’s fun! For television, I like a tailored look. I used to be a basic blue blazer kind of guy, but as I’ve gotten older, I’ve evolved to more sophisticated Italian clothing. Zegna, Brioni and Kiton are among my favorite suit brands; sometimes I buy custom, sometimes off the rack. For weekends, I like The biggest decision to wear jeans or khakis I had to make this season with either a polo shirt or a classic woven shirt. was cuffs or no cuffs

on my pants.

Here’s what’s happening in Al Roker’s neck of the woods… By Karen Alberg Grossman What makes a great weatherman: accuracy or personality? Obviously it’s a combination of both, but accuracy is more critical than ever these days. With so many extreme weather events recently, getting it wrong can be life threatening. Of course, today’s improved technology enables more accurate forecasting. As for the personality part, whatever flavor you want, you can find it. Prefer a simple straightforward forecast, just the facts? You can find it! You want personality and showmanship, you can find that too. With so many TV channels, there’s a weatherman for every preference.

Is it fair to ask your accuracy percentage? It’s not a good question since I’m now forecasting over such a broad area. When I did local news in Cleveland or D.C. or Syracuse, it was easier because it was a clearly defined geography; now it’s the entire country.

(Lately, I’ve been buying checks.) I like easy comfortable sportswear and here, I’m less concerned about designer names.

Who are your fashion role models? Well Matt Lauer has definitely influenced my style since he always looks so perfect (probably because he worked at an upscale menswear store as a teenager…). If I had to pick a celebrity fashion role model, I’d say Daniel Craig and George Clooney. (But how likely am I to ever look like them?) Actually, a 75-year-old guy who I don’t even know became a fashion role model for me. I had spotted him at a fundraiser in Washington, D.C. wearing a fabulous black watch tartan dinner jacket; I asked him where he got it and he told me he bought it 40 years ago at the flagship Brooks Brothers store on Madison Avenue. So I went looking for that fabric and had a similar one made up for me by Zegna. I wore it to a red carpet

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Available at

www.oakhall.com


assignment and got lots of compliments!

Do you have a good luck tie? Not really. But I’ve been wearing a lot of Brioni ties lately: I like the heft. Also Zegna and Drake’s…

What about the slimmer-fit clothing they’re showing these days: are you wearing it? Not so much. For me, it will take some getting used to. Once you’ve been overweight, you don’t want to be reminded of when everything was too tight…

meet this incredibly brave woman whose courage changed the course of history, for not just African Americans but for all Americans. And Charles Schultz because I too am an avid cartoonist and comic book fan; I’ve always been in awe of his talents. (I still sketch a bit but I’m not really pursuing it these days.) Who I’d most like to interview? Probably Obama. I’d ask him about his views on climate change.

Other passions? I love cooking and reading. My most recent culinary accomplishment was grilled Chilean sea bass with roasted Brussels spouts and quinoa. My most recent great read was Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham.

Speaking of which, tell us about your new book. It came out in January; it’s called Never Goin’ Back: Winning the Weight-loss Battle for Good. It’s simply the story of my personal journey with weight loss. I think there’s a lot of good stuff that might help people along their own journeys, but it’s definitely not a “how-to” book…

What are you most proud of? Hanging in there: I’ve been working for the same company (NBC) for 30-plus years. And of course my three children: my 26year-old Courtney is a chef in New York City; Leila (14) is studying performing arts; my son Nicky (10) is a master in Tae Kwon Do. I would have thought you’d be most proud of your unique ability to connect with people... I don’t know that it’s such a special talent: I simply treat people the way I’d want to be treated. It’s how my parents raised us, and it’s the lesson I’d most like to teach my children. And while we joke around a lot on the Today show, it’s especially important that we’re never laughing at somebody, only with them.

“If it’s someone you love who’s overweight, the best thing you can do is shut up.”

What advice would you give to someone wanting to lose weight who has not yet begun the journey? I don’t believe in giving advice on weight loss since it’s got to come from within. For me, it literally took seeing my dad on his death bed and promising him I’d change my life… Everyone gets to that point eventually, but no amount of lecturing will do it. Look at Governor Christie — he has young kids and a young wife and after all these years he finally made the decision to take control of his future… No one could have persuaded him. So that’s the advice I’d give people: do it for yourself, not for anyone else. If it’s someone you love who’s overweight, the best thing you can do is shut up. Because guess what: we know we’re fat! We don’t live in a world without mirrors…

Who was your best interview ever and who would you like to interview next? My two favorites so far were Rosa Parks and Charles Schultz: Rosa because it was just such an honor to

Who is your personal hero? Probably New York’s Cardinal Dolan. I was raised Catholic (my mom was a devout Catholic, I lean toward Catholic Lite) but with Dolan, it’s less about his religion and more about his humility, his humanity, how readily he can talk about his own failings (e.g. losing weight!). I’ve never officially interviewed him but we spent time together in Rome for the installation of the new Pope, and we’ve had dinner a number of times. He’s a straight shooter and a pretty tolerant fellow; I truly admire him.

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FALL 2013 Casual luxury for men


designers

TALKING TO THE TALENT

Get to know your favorite designers. By Jillian LaRochelle

WHAT DO YOU NOTICE MEN DOING WRONG IN THE WAY THEY DRESS?

Eton’s Sebastian Dollinger: Some guys tend to buy the wrong size. In the U.S., the most common mistake seems to be that people buy things way too big. In Scandinavia, on the other hand, it’s generally a case of things being too tight. Gianluca Isaia: They take themselves too seriously. You must feel confident in your clothing without trying too hard to impress anyone else. Robert Graham’s Robert Stock: They don’t know how to put a jacket on properly. You have to put it on and straighten it out. It’s always hanging crooked on the shoulders or not laying flat across the chest. John Varvatos: They think too hard about the uniform and not creating their own personal style.

WHICH NEW ITEMS SHOULD A MAN PURCHASE TO UPDATE HIS WARDROBE THIS SEASON?

Brunello Cucinelli: Men don’t take enough time in the morning to get ready. When men prepare for the day, they should ask themselves what they’re feeling that day, with whom they’re meeting, what they’re planning to do. Men should pay more attention to the clothes they put on each day. The extra 20 minutes will speak volumes about the person they want to be that day.

Brunello Cucinelli BC: This fall, every man should own the Milano jacket, an ultra-light nylon style that he

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ROBERT GRAHAM SWEATER, JOHN VARVATOS BOOTS

Sebastian Dollinger


can easily layer underneath his sportcoat, or over it, depending on the look and the occasion. SD: Invest in a good pair of shoes for rougher weather and a new crisp white shirt. GI: One of my favorites this season is the Cortina double-faced wool overcoat. It mixes classic sartorial details with contemporary elements. Also, the printed Donegal jacket has a very unique look. The fabric uses the latest in printing technology, and it comes with our signature sunglass pocket, measured to the exact dimensions of the original military-issued aviator. RS: Don’t underestimate the importance of socks; add a few fun pairs to your wardrobe. Sweaters are also making a comeback. JV: A suede jacket and a great pair of boots.

WHAT’S YOUR GUILTY PLEASURE?

WHAT’S YOUR GO-TO OUTFIT FOR A FESTIVE HOLIDAY GATHERING? Gianluca Isaia BC: I have five fixes, which I suppose you could call guilty pleasures: cashmere, cognac, chocolate, cigars and Champagne. SD: I buy shoes and coats that cost more than small cars… GI: Cannot tell you...my secret vice is a secret! RS: I’m addicted to the New York Rangers. I’m amazed by how hard the puck is and that it zooms toward them at 120 miles an hour. JV: Collecting vinyl, especially vintage vinyl records.

WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING IF YOU WEREN’T A DESIGNER? BC: I love my work and I have always desired to do this. SD: I want to run my own hotel one day. The ideal location would be in a forest by a lake. GI: I would love to be a small luxury hotel keeper. RS: I would probably be a psychiatrist. I feel like I’m always giving my employees therapy anyway! Or I would have loved to be a drummer. JV: I love architecture, and of course my real passion

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ETON SHIRT

BC: I love wearing our gray cashmere 1.5-breasted tuxedo for a special event. This has become my signature and I love the way it makes me feel: formal enough for a holiday gathering, but it’s comfortable enough to wear every day. SD: My brown leather boots, washed out jeans, and one of our denim shirts. That’s it. GI: Isaia denim with a tuxedo jacket. RS: A few years ago we made a jacket called the Maharaja, embroidered with 25,000 miles of silk thread. Worn with jeans and velvet slippers, it’s perfect for a party. JV: A timeless black tux jacket with a white formal shirt, a scarf and jeans.


T H E U LT I M AT E T R O U S E R S


would have been to be a musician.

WHAT WOULD IT SURPRISE PEOPLE TO LEARN ABOUT YOU?

one place I cannot resist for a getaway. SD: Esalen in Big Sur, CA. GI: Capri. RS: I love the Caribbean Islands, I love Italy, I always have a great time in Asia… Since I can recharge in only a day or two, I love spending a few days in a lot of different places all over the world. JV: The island of Mustique.

WHAT’S A QUOTE YOU LIVE BY?

John Varvatos SD: I studied particle physics. GI: Maybe that I like to read mindfulness books, or that in the summer, I wear sandals, handmade in Capri, to make my suits a little less dramatic. RS: I’m hardworking but I really need my downtime. When I was younger I was into all kinds of Zen meditation, so I’m extremely capable of just unplugging and ignoring everything. JV: I’m pretty laid back and a bit shy.

WHERE DO YOU GO TO ESCAPE?

BC: I’m inspired by the fascinating St. Benedict, who advised the abbot responsible for his monks to be both rigorous and gentle, a demanding master and a kind father. SD: Live now! GI: It is not possible to buy great style. Every man must create his own. RS: I’d just like people to say about me, “He was a good guy.” JV: It’s only rock’n roll, but I love it!

BC: I like very much to stay at home with my family and my wife, but if I have to plan a trip, I love going to the mountains, especially to the Dolomites in the north of Italy. There you can find beautiful landscapes and nature lives all around you. In the summer, I love Isola di Cavallo, a small island between Corsica and Sardinia. I stay at the Hôtel and Spa Des Pêcheurs. This is

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ISAIA CORTINA COAT, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI MILANO JACKET

Robert Stock


P R O U D S U P P O RT E R O F


food

Daniel Boulud, right, with Tyler Shedden, taste testing in Toronto.

clam and parsley broth. My entrée, the duo of cumbra beef, consisted of a dry-aged strip loin alongside red wine-braised short ribs and spinach subric. The grapefruit givré — a frozen grapefruit shell filled with sorbet, grapefruit wedges and rose-flavored Turkish delight, crowned with fluffy threads of halvah and a torched sesame cracker — was a visual masterpiece that playfully juxtaposed textures and temperatures. As the man who invented the gourmet burger, Boulud naturally has ‘mad’ love for beef, and never strays far from the other three Bs: bacon, butter and brioche. I spoke with the master about his successes, his roots on the farm, and what he likes to cook with his daughter, Alix.

Is true fine dining a thing of the past? Fine dining is very much alive and kicking in the greatest cities of the world. But the definition, in many ways, has evolved.

How do you define fine dining? It doesn’t have to be pompous or boring. Fine dining is exciting and rare. For me it can be a $2.50 [piece of] sushi or sashimi made with the highest-quality ingredients. Or going to Brooklyn for the best pizza made with local clams, local herbs, the perfect crust… while

AMERICA’S FRENCH FARM BOY Chef Daniel Boulud’s dishes are haute but homey, and always from the heart. By Shira Levine o eat a meal crafted by Daniel Boulud is to be dazzled with a full-sensory culinary experience. My epicurean evening took place in Toronto, at the James Beard award-winning chef’s latest restaurant project. Called Café Boulud (like its New York and Palm Beach counterparts), the fine dining hotspot is positioned within the glassy-chic Four Seasons Toronto, recently redone in exquisite style. The multi-cultural culinary Mecca already has its share of hip eateries, yet visitors and locals alike are hungry for a bite of Boulud. Dbar is the lobby bar and café, but it’s the mezzanine-level restaurant outfitted with Mr. Brainwash pop art pieces that has people talking. Indeed about the art (an unexpected pairing with French haute cuisine), but more about the equally jaw-dropping menu. My tasting began with octopus à la plancha followed by a British Columbian black cod persillade in a

it might be casual, it can be fine dining. Of course it’s about the food, but it is also very much about the service, and then the ambiance. Fine dining is about living well and enjoying life.

What is the universal thread that runs throughout your 14 restaurants? Detail. I pay a lot of attention to service and training. Even though fine dining is becoming more casual, it is also more focused on details, more and better service, with more attention paid to making the customers feel at ease with the experience.

You’ve been living in the U.S. for many years; do you still consider yourself a French chef? When you're French you can’t take it out of you. I live in America, and I love America; my daughter was born here. But I am certainly French.

American foodies have embraced regional Italian cooking. Do you think you have been suc-

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IMAGE BY CHRISTIAN HORAN

Art by Mr. Brainwash is a lively addition to the décor at Café Boulud. cessful in spreading knowledge about French regional cuisines? Well, you tell me! I love all of it and I think it is fair to say people like my food. The cuisine regional — especially the specialties of cheese and charcuterie — is what has made me ‘stay French’ and feel so proud to cook French. Like many countries we also have the cuisine bourgeois: the food of the people. We have a history of cooking meals that are very elaborate yet very soulful. Then you have brasserie cooking for the big city; bistro is smaller scale and local. Lyon de bouchon is also very special: it’s the micro-scale restaurant where there is no choice on the menu because they serve you what they have made that day. It’s cooked with love. I have lived and worked all my life for haute cuisine: the best of the best. It takes a lifetime to master and it’s still never enough.

What city’s food scene inspires you most? Copenhagen is really exciting. I lived there 32 years ago and I could see then that this place was going to be something amazing one day. I love their street food so much. I love the little skinny hot dog with the tiny bun! There is so much young Danish talent inspiring the culinary world with the way they are thinking about and making food. I also love Charleston, South Carolina. San Francisco and Chicago are longtime favorite food cities.

“Fine dining is about living well and enjoying life.”

These micro-scale restaurants seem to be more appealing to today’s foodies. This is the challenge for young chefs. They open a place with $100,000; it’s a shack, but they cook amazing food. Yes, it is fine cuisine, but the idea is to elevate the town with a fine restaurant. You don’t want a town with all the restaurants imitating one another.

You grew up on a farm in France and weren’t always accustomed to fine dining. What do you make for a homecooked meal?

I keep it really easy; I cook with my daughter sometimes. I live above Daniel so usually what I do is go down to the restaurant and grab a roast or a fish, and then on the spot propose something for us to make.

Can you envision making your own Jiro Dreams of Sushi film? Maybe Daniel Dreams of Butter? Not like that, but I am working on a documentary. It’s around a new cookbook I have coming out that celebrates 20 years of Daniel. It’s called My French Cuisine. It shows that I’m proud of my French identity and that no matter where I travel and what I experiment with, I still think French food is the best.

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Maximize your investment in a classic cashmere suit with simple sartorial updates for any occasion.

1 SUIT. 7 WAYS. EXPLORE YOUR OPTIONS. Photography Jens Ingvarsson Styling William Buckley Grooming Katie Robinson


1

SPORTY STYLE

REPLACE YOUR SUIT JACKET WITH A LEATHER MOTO STYLE TO ROCK YOUR WORKDAY (OR WEEKEND).

2

VINTAGE PREP

BRIGHTEN A GRAY OUTLOOK WITH A KNIT TIE & COLORFUL PLAID SPORTCOAT. LO0KING GOOD!


3

CASUAL COOL

4

CHECK YOURSELF

TRADITIONAL WITH A TWIST: THIS WORN WITH DARK DENIM, A STRIPED SPORT SHIRT & SNEAKERS GIVE SHIRT & TIE PAIRING BRINGS YOUR BASIC SUIT TO A MORE CREATIVE SPACE. YOUR JACKET A LEISURELY LOOK.


MODEL: LEANDRO SOUZA, Q MODEL MANAGEMENT. TAILORING: JASON SANTIAGO. RING: PROPOSITION LOVE. WATCHES: TAG HEUER, PANERAI, BREITLING

5

LAYERED LUXE

WHEN THE TEMPERATURE COOLS, ADD LAYERS IN FALL’S WARMEST SHADES.

6

PATTERN PLAY

DON’T FALL FLAT: GRAPHIC CHECKS PROVIDE A SUBTLE CONTRAST AGAINST SOLID TROUSERS.


fitness

HIT THE MAT

Bikram Yoga is a 90-minute practice performed in a heated room (105 degrees Fahrenheit with 40 percent humidity). Created by Bikram Choudhury, it consists of a sequence of 26 postures and two breathing exercises. “It’s a common misconception that yoga is about sitting cross-legged and chanting,” says instructor Eoin Thomas Sharkey. “Bikram is an intense, physically challenging workout.” “Men generally think that yoga is somehow subsidiary to other, more macho forms of exercise,” says instructor Chris Totaro. “We see it all the time: the girlfriend brings the guy for his first class. He enters the room presumptuous and overconfident, but it’s not long before he’s gawking at the display of strength surrounding him.” Yoga is not just for flex-y, skinny people either; it’s actually more beneficial for those less flexible. The most common excuse is “I’m not flexible enough to do yoga. I can’t even touch my toes,” shares Corinne Idzal, a yoga teacher in New York City. “That’s like saying, Consistent practice will help to increase ‘I’m too sick to go to the doctor.’

strength, stamina and mental focus.

Think yoga has nothing to offer men? Think again. By Elise Diamantini here’s a reason athletes like David Beckham, Kobe Bryant, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Andy Murray moonlight as Bikram yogis. Murray, a pro-tennis player who’s currently ranked third in the world and is the reigning Olympic Singles Champion, credits Bikram Yoga for increasing his mental and physical endurance during matches. And Abdul-Jabbar has said that if it weren’t for Bikram Yoga, he could never have played NBA basketball for as long as he did with so few injuries. A consistent yoga practice has been known to increase strength, stamina, flexibility and mental focus, while decreasing stress. Yoga helps prevent and alleviate sports-related injuries by strengthening the muscles around major joints. It creates more flexibility, so it’s a perfect way to improve your golf or tennis swing. And on the superficial side: consistent practice will help you look great in that new modern-fit suit!

It will only get worse if you don’t do something about it.” Idzal says that in general, men are tighter than women because of the anatomical and physiological differences in their bodies. “Not to mention that ‘typical’ male sports tend to create tightness because of high-impact and repetitive movements.” Bikram yogi Anthony Rebholz says a lot of athletes, especially boxers, come into the studio because they need to find more flexibility for their sport. “Working out at the gym is all about contraction and resistance; yoga is about expansion and extending — opening up rather than closing down. Men work a lot of the primary muscle groups at the gym, but yoga works the secondary and tertiary groups. Yoga also makes you become more aware of how you move your body during other forms of exercise.” Totaro, who says he has been more or less injury free for the past decade, also points out that “strength and

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HUGO BOSS FASHIONS INC.


flexibility have a reciprocal relationship. The more muscle mass built around a joint, the more the joint’s mobility is decreased. In other words, as weight lifters continue to add bulk, their joint flexibility continually decreases. The comprehensive stretching exercises in a yoga class allow for a more balanced relationship between strength and flexibility.” Yoga has also been known to help people heal their injuries, avoid surgery and wean themselves off medicine. A telling example from yogi Nick Graham: “A few years ago I was experiencing neurological problems: blackouts, migranes, extreme nausea. I was admitted to the hospital and for a week I was drugged, hooked up to machines and miserable. Soon after, I passed a Bikram studio and stopped in for my first class. After the best night of sleep in my life, I went back the next day, and the next. Finally I stopped taking my meds. All the while I was being tested for myriad things, but I just practiced Bikram as often as I could, and eventually my symptoms disappeared.” Yoga’s therapeutic effects are not limited to the physical. Those who practice report that it helps them focus, set goals and explore their potential. Plus, yoga helps keep your emotions in check. “You won’t act on

impulse,” explains instructor Jakob Schanzer. “This was a gradual change for me, but I noticed that I was reacting to things more calmly.” If you’re still not convinced, Idzal can offer a few more arguments: “Yoga is badass! You will sleep better, work better, relax better, make love better... Beginners are shocked by the life-transforming power yoga can have. Physical change is just the beginning.”

GETTING STARTED

Tips for beginners from Bikram Yoga instructor Corinne Idzal • Talk to your teacher before class and let him or her know you’re a beginner. They can ease your mind and give you modifications during class if you need them. • Go to class hydrated and on an empty stomach. • Take electrolytes before practicing yoga to help with stamina and muscle cramping. Natural sources like coconut water or green juice are best. • It’s not a competition. No one cares if you’re stiff or can’t hold a posture. Even that dancer with her feet behind her head is too focused on her own struggle to be judging you. • Go often, especially at first. You’re never the best at something the first time you try it, but the more you practice the better you’ll become.

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tech

“When people see themselves for the first time on video, they generally think about quitting golf,” laughs Chuck Quinton, founder of RotarySwing.com, an online instruction site. “But you can’t make a change without realizing exactly what you’re doing wrong. That may seem incredibly obvious, but you’d be surprised how many people don’t know what their swing looks like.” Golf analysis took a huge leap forward in the mid-’90s, Quinton says, when cameras capable of capturing high-speed athletics became smaller and more affordable than the TV-sized cameras previously required. Improved camera technology, combined with analysis software that previously cost thousands of dollars but which is available today from a $5 app, means instructors can now measure just about everything and qualify cause and

IN FULL SWING

Virtual data can help improve your physical game. By Christian Chensvold t a press conference following this year’s Masters Tournament, Tiger Woods was asked what he thought of 14-year-old golf phenom Tianling Guan. He credited golf apps that use high-speed video analysis for the success of today’s prodigies, who’ve grown up with laptops and smart phones as integral pieces of golf equipment. They’re accustomed to filming themselves, and more important, they’ve learned to analyze what they see. Whether it’s Konica Minolta’s SwingVision camera, which can break down Tiger’s swing into 18,000frames-per-second slow motion on your TV screen, or a grainy cell phone clip of a high handicapper struggling to improve, technology has brought unprecedented insight into the mechanics of the golf swing. But how many golfers are brave enough to uncover the naked truth of their faulty swings?

Technology has brought unprecedented insight into the mechanics of the golf swing.

effect in a student’s faulty swing. The most important thing video analysis reveals, says Quinton, is a golfer’s impact position: golf’s so-called moment of truth. The number of faults that can lead to a poor impact position are myriad, and are all revealed under the ‘CAT-scan’ of golf analysis software. For a membership fee, RotarySwing.com lets golfers upload biweekly video clips for analysis by instructors, who write up what they’re seeing and suggest drills and changes. The workload, Quinton says, is bordering on overwhelming. His staff of 25 certified instructors shares the duties, with one full-timer devoted entirely to swing reviews. Most of RotarySwing.com’s students use the golf app by V1, which founder Chris Hart says is an indispensable tool in a golfer’s perennial struggle to keep his sanity. V1 costs a mere $4.99 and uses a smart

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phone’s camera to record golf swings, which can then be analyzed with software that measures body angles and compares clips of good and bad shots side by side, all of which users can store in a virtual ‘locker room.’ Clips can also be uploaded directly to coaches for professional analysis (cost varies). The company is currently working on score tracking and shot analysis features that will allow golfers to hit a bucket at the range and get a full set of data on where their shots went, a far more reliable means of ball flight tendencies than short-term memory. This will be combined with a golfer’s performance during their rounds of play. “There’s what you do on the range and what you do on the course,” says Hart, “and we want to have it all in one spot from which you can get feedback.” That’s right: you’ll soon have a convenient portable database with stats on all your slices, shanks and missed two-foot putts. While apps are cheap and convenient, nothing compares to today’s indoor golf simulators, which combine virtual play on famous courses such as Pebble Beach with advanced analysis software and multiple camera angles. XGolf’s top-of-the-line laser-based system goes for about $65,000. About half of sales are to indoor golf facilities, the other half to private homes. The simulator allows users to get side-by-side swing comparisons with clips of their favorite pros. And a feature called On Course Training makes lessons more engaging. “A student practicing 96-yard wedge shots can have it set up as an approach shot on a specific hole at Pebble Beach,” explains XGolf’s manager of sales and business development Ryan D’Arcy. “They can see the results as the ball lands on different

parts of the virtual green.” As with any other piece of technology, there are upsides and downsides. In golf there’s a common issue called ‘paralysis by analysis,’ the point at which the golfer has so many technical thoughts in his mind he can no longer trust his swing to the part of the subconscious that controls muscle movement. Obsessing over angles and positions on your smart phone at the range can be as bad as texting at the dinner table. “Once you begin to leverage video analysis, you have to learn when to close the door,” says Quinton. “Every golfer goes through paralysis by analysis at one time

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING VIDEO ANALYSIS REVEALS IS A GOLFER’S IMPACT POSITION: GOLF’S SO-CALLED MOMENT OF TRUTH. or another, and you need to be your own doctor and recognize the symptoms. [Relying on] video analysis can be a very slippery slope if you’re not careful.” In the same press conference in which he mentioned how much technology is helping the next generation of golfers, Tiger Woods talked about visiting Korea, where indoor golf simulators are extremely popular. New players hit on them exclusively and religiously for six to 12 months, he said, then head outdoors “and have perfect golf swings.” They all look the same, he noted, but maybe sameness is a fair trade-off for perfection.

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FALL 2013 We made Bills better by not changing a thing.速


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yourself; it’s generally better to be overdressed than underdressed and these days, a slim suit scores extra points. 7. Acquire the taste for a good cocktail, straight up. It’s cool to order and enjoy a classic — Manhattan, Rob Roy, Martini, Negroni, etc. — when you’re out on the town. (When in New York, do it at the King Cole Bar in the St. Regis Hotel.) 6. Suggest that your significant other also cultivate a favorite drink to enjoy before dinner. I love it when a lady replies promptly to a bartender’s request for her order. A confident response is sexy. 5. Red wine should be stored and served cool; experts suggest 57 degrees, not room temperature. However, it should be opened and set on the table about 15 minutes before you plan to enjoy it, so it can breathe and warm up just slightly. (Good restaurants know this.) 4. Never let your cologne precede your presence, especially in a restaurant, where fragrance and food smells are not a great combination.

RESTAURANT RULES

Stuff men should know (but probably don’t…) By Frank Schipani hen it comes to certain gentlemanly topics, including dress codes, a generation gap can often impede credibility. Receiving fashion advice from gray-haired guys in suits is not necessarily what young men crave, even if it’s what they need. That said, when it comes to wining, dining and women, experience counts. Here, the top 10 time-tested tips that are bound to score. 10. Always give the lady a facing-out seat (her back against the wall) in a restarant. A woman quite literally ‘dresses’ the room; she should have the observing seat to see and be seen. 9. Turn off your digital devices before entering a restaurant. You’re there to share an experience, not to worry about missed messages. (What could be more insulting?) 8. Always dress in a modern manner no matter where you’re going. Your appearance is how you represent

3. When making any kind of reservation, always note the name of the person you spoke to and the time you called. (Stuff happens; you may arrive only to have someone say “I don’t see your name here…”) 2. Better still, develop a relationship with the manager of a go-to place where you can get in on short notice. All popular restaurants say “We have nothing open but 5:00 or 10:00!” Fact is, they always save a table or two during prime time that they can easily give to loyal clients at the last minute. (If they know and like you, they’ll act like you had an actual reservation and simply make another party wait a little longer.) 1. Tired of dining out or ready for something more intimate? In addition to throwing steaks on the grill, learn how to make at least one dish for the stovetop or oven. May I suggest a basic tomato sauce for your pasta course? Buon appetito!

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When it comes to wining, dining and women, experience counts.


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