Issuu on Google+

Malouf’s Forum/The Substance of Style/Fall 2013

AFALLCHANGE FASHION OF SEASONS

CATCH CABIN FEVER

WARMING UP TO COOLER WEATHER

AL ROKER GETS PERSONAL JOURNEY TO AFRICA

WHY CUSTOM?

WHY NOT? WE DEBUNK SOME COMMON MYTHS


Malouf’s Kingsgate Center 8201 Quaker Avenue #106 Lubbock, TX 79424 806-794-9500 Southlake Town Square 190 State Street Southlake, TX 76092 817-416-7100 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Karen Alberg Grossman DESIGN DIRECTOR

Hans Gschliesser MANAGING EDITOR

Jillian LaRochelle PROJECT MANAGER

Lisa Montemorra DESIGNERS

Cynthia Lucero, Jean-Nicole Venditti CONCEPT DIRECTORS

FEATURES 4 28 30 32 66

Welcome Letter Designer: Heather Henry Profile: Rag & Bone Style: On the Rise Fitness: Hit the Mat

Andrew Mitchell, Russ Mitchell MERCHANDISING DIRECTOR

Bob Mitchell DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION

Peg Eadie DIRECTOR OF PREPRESS

John Frascone

BUSINESS JOURNALS FASHION GROUP PUBLISHER

Stuart Nifoussi PRESIDENT AND CEO

Britton Jones

FASHION 10 40 44 50

Fall Forecast: A Concrete Style 1 Suit. 7 Ways. Log House of Style The Fall Guy

DEPARTMENTS 6 8 36 54 58 60 62

Ask Michael Ask Kelly Man of Style: All About Al World Scene Spirits: Hi-tech Drinking Travel: African Adventure Food: America’s French Farm Boy 70 End Page: Restaurant Rules 72 At Your Service

CHAIRMAN AND COO

Mac Brighton CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Christine Sullivan

APPAREL FORUM Andrisen Morton DENVER, CO Garys NEWPORT BEACH, CA Hubert White MINNEAPOLIS, MN Kilgore Trout CLEVELAND, OH Larrimor’s PITTSBURGH, PA Malouf’s LUBBOCK/SOUTHLAKE, TX Mario’s PORTLAND, OR/SEATTLE, WA Mitchells/Marshs HUNTINGTON, NY Mitchells/Richards WESTPORT/GREENWICH, CT Oak Hall MEMPHIS, TN Rodes LOUISVILLE, KY Rubensteins NEW ORLEANS, LA Stanley Korshak DALLAS, TX Wilkes Bashford SAN FRAN/PALO ALTO, CA FASHION FORUM MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED IN 11 REGIONAL EDITIONS FOR MEMBER STORES OF THE APPAREL FORUM © 2013. PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS JOURNALS, INC, P.O. BOX 5550, NORWALK, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • FAX: 203-852-8175; ADVERTISING OFFICE: 1384 BROADWAY, NY, NY 10018-6108, 212-686-4412 • FAX: 212-686-6821; ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THE PUBLISHERS ACCEPT NO RESPONSIBILITIES FOR ADVERTISERS CLAIMS, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS OR OTHER MATERIALS. NO PART OF THIS

FALL/WINTER 2013 MAGAZINE MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHERS. VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.


2013 H.Stern速 | www.hstern.net


ATTENTION TO DETAIL is what has turned Eton into one of the world’s finest shirt makers. Founded in 1928 by husband and wife Annie and David Pettersson, Eton’s dedicated belief in quality and craftsmanship has helped spread their story from the small village in Gånghester in the west of Sweden to some of the world’s most exclusive stores. Today, Eton is still run by the Pettersson family and remains loyal to its heritage as a specialist shirt maker.

celebrating 85 years of fine shirt making 1928–2013


profile

and went to Mexico for a vacation. There I met a gorgeous girl called Glenna on the beach and followed her back to New York. She’s now my wife and mother of our three children.

What led you to start a fashion brand? MW: Five months after I arrived in New York, I decided I wanted to design a pair of rigid men’s jeans. After a lot of trial and error, I found a factory in Kentucky where these really skilled people had been specializing in making workwear for decades. Being exposed to the importance of craftsmanship, quality and authenticity informed our philosophy.

You’re both British but your line is based in NYC. MW: There’s so much to be inspired by in this city; there is this infectious energy and attitude, the creative spirit, the art scene and the way people aren’t afraid to commit to a look.

What’s the story behind the name Rag & Bone? DN: It was a play on our British heritage really, as rag & bone men are a part of English folklore. They wore trademark disheveled suiting and that appealed to us — that mix of tailoring and workwear.

REDEFINING URBAN STYLE

Marcus Wainwright and David Neville reveal the real story behind the Rag & Bone brand. By Jillian LaRochelle stablished in 2002, Rag & Bone has grown to encompass a full offering of men’s and women’s clothing, shoes and accessories. Wainwright and Neville blend their own British heritage with an edgy, modern sensibility inspired by downtown NYC. The result: effortless cool.

Which one of you is responsible for which aspects of the business? DN: We divide and conquer: Marcus focuses more on design and I take care of the commerce side of the business. We work very closely on brand building and share the same vision. MW: We’re still very small but we’ve also expanded our design team. They’re the best.

You won the Swarovski Award for emerging talent in menswear and the CFDA Menswear Designers of the Year award not long after launching. What do you hope to accomplish in the brand’s second decade?

How did you two meet? DN: We attended the same boarding school in the UK. Marcus was the year ahead of me so we were friendly but didn’t know each other that well. We became good pals during Marcus’ gap year — he was working in a bar in Portugal and I headed over for a holiday. Then we both went to university in the north of England and hung out on a lot of weekends. MW: Years later, I had enough of the rain in London

MW: We want to remain true to our brand’s core beliefs and continue our expansion globally, build upon categories (existing and otherwise), and most importantly, still enjoy what we’re doing.

30

Rag & Bone Pacific jacket in eggplant; Eccelston jacket in gray


MEPHISTO SHOES WITH

Soft-Air

TECHNOLOGY

SEDDY

MEPHISTO offers you comfort with modern design. The SOFT-AIRPLGVROHYHU\VRIWDQGĂ H[LEOHPLQLPL]HV the shock that results from walking. It protects your feet, UHOLHYHV \RXU EDFN DQG MRLQWV DQG SURPRWHV D KHDOWK\ environment inside your shoes.


style

ON THE RISE

Clockwise from top: Kerry Rhodes, Tahj Mowry, Adam Huss

Three up-and-coming stars talk clothes and cars. By Kelli Freeman way. I love boots, especially a pair of low-top distressed boots my father calls Oliver Twist style. Kerry Rhodes: My style depends on my mood. Generally I’m a clean-cut, tailored kind of guy. It feels great when something fits you well, straight and narrow. I wear custom-made suits to my games.

How would you describe your personal style?

You’re all really into cars. Tell us about your favorites.

Adam Huss: I’m not a big shopper, but I love clothing. My style icons are Johnny Depp and Ryan Gosling, and I’d say my taste is a mix of hip-hop, funk and grunge. I prefer a layered look, dressier denim, and old-school leather with a soft hand. Tahj Mowry: Number one: Don’t copy someone else’s style. Number two: Be comfortable and confident in what you wear and you’ll carry yourself that

Huss: I like a simple car that I can rely on, like my new Volkswagen Jetta. But there’s nothing like an old classic. A red Mercedes 560 SL: now that’s a ride you can go road-tripping in! Mowry: I have a white Audi S5 (which is faster than the A5). I love the blood-red leather seats and carbon fiber interior accents. This car gets me in trouble because it’s so fast and it distracts other drivers.

32

HUSS IMAGE BY MEAGEN MINNAUGH, HAIR BY CARLOS RODRIQUEZ

he scent of a brand new ride, a leather jacket or a good cigar can conjure up a feeling of success and satisfaction. Listen in as Forum chats with three talented men about to make it big. They’re all on different paths, but share a passion for fashion and the need for speed.


FALL 2013 We made Bills better by not changing a thing.速

I N T R O D U C I N G

FALL 2013

Jewel tones play off luxe textures and elegant finishes for flawless style from day to night, work to weekend

MINGWANGKN I TS .COM


It sounds like you guys appreciate the finer things in life. What do you do to give back? Huss: I support any charity working to find a cure for cancer, especially leukemia. Mowry: I support The Thirst Project, which builds wells and provides clean drinking water to villages in Africa. Rhodes: I wanted to give back to the community and the people who helped me along the way, so I created The Rhodes Foundation to support educational and financial advancement for kids in underserved high schools.

What’s something people would be surprised to learn about you? Huss: I am a nerd! I love comic books and super heroes (and want to be one). Mowry: That I’m a super reality TV fan! I love The Bachelor and The Bachelorette franchise and The Colony on the Discovery Channel. Rhodes: I’m actually a better basketball player than a football player.

TRENDS THEY’RE INTO

FALL ’13 SHOPPING LIST

• boots • color • layering • slim-fit sport shirts • taking risks

• cashmere hoodie • fitted leather jacket • perfectly tailored suit • sharp dress shoes • sleek high-tops

Actor Adam Huss has appeared in NCIS: Los Angeles, CSI: NY and films like Resurrection County and Is It Just Me? Next, Huss stars in the feature film Find Me, which he also associate produced. He caught the acting bug at a young age: “I come from a big family. When we’d get together, I’d write a script, bring my cousins in and we’d act it out.” His passion is to tell compelling stories that invoke deep thought and feelings from the audience. NFL safety Kerry Rhodes was first drafted by the New York Jets in 2005. He was traded to the Arizona Cardinals in 2010, and will wrap up his NFL career this season. Rhodes’ philosophy about life and ‘The Game’ are one and the same: “Be smarter than your opponent. Be prepared for anything and you’ll be successful. Do the hard work, study.” With his new production company, The Come Back Kids, Rhodes hopes to transition from sports to the silver screen. “I just completed my first documentary about athletes and their inability to handle stardom or manage their money. I minored in theater, so I can see myself behind the scenes.” Tahj Mowry grew up guest starring on Full House, Friends, Sister, Sister and Who’s the Boss? before landing his own Disney sitcom, Smart Guy. He’s been a working actor since the age of four and is just coming off his second season of filming the ABC Family sitcom Baby Daddy. How does someone who’s worked through his childhood find work/life balance? “Acting is a job. I love it, but it’s not all of who I am. You have to separate it from yourself and live your life without letting your career consume you.”

34

HUSS IMAGE BY CARREL AUGUSTUS, HAIR BY CARLOS RODRIQUEZ. RHODES IMAGE BY MARCEL INDIK. MOWRY IMAGE COPYRIGHT 2012 DISNEY ENTERPRISES, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

My next car may be a Mercedes-Benz G-Class, but I’m still an Audi guy! Rhodes: Cars are your babies! My favorite vehicle is my Range Rover, the first purchase I made once I got into the league. I get a new one every year. My second car is the first four-door Aston Martin Rapide in metallic gray, and one of the sexiest cars I’ve ever seen. I love it. My third car is a matte black BMW M3.


T H E U LT I M AT E T R O U S E R S


man of style

ALL ABOUT AL

But fortunately, when we had Superstorm Sandy and the Oklahoma tornado and those types of severe events, we were pretty much right on target. As our computer modeling improves, so does our accuracy.

How important are clothes in your life? What are your personal style preferences? I’d describe my style as fairly traditional: I don’t take major fashion risks; in fact, the biggest decision I had to make this season was cuffs or no cuffs on my pants. (I opted for no cuffs…) But what most distinguishes my style, I suppose, is that I’m not afraid to wear bold colors. I think it’s fun! For television, I like a tailored look. I used to be a basic blue blazer kind of guy, but as I’ve gotten older, I’ve evolved to more sophisticated Italian clothing. Zegna, Brioni and Kiton are among my favorite suit brands; sometimes I buy custom, sometimes off the rack. For weekends, I like The biggest decision to wear jeans or khakis I had to make this season with either a polo shirt or a classic woven shirt. was cuffs or no cuffs

on my pants.

Here’s what’s happening in Al Roker’s neck of the woods… By Karen Alberg Grossman What makes a great weatherman: accuracy or personality? Obviously it’s a combination of both, but accuracy is more critical than ever these days. With so many extreme weather events recently, getting it wrong can be life threatening. Of course, today’s improved technology enables more accurate forecasting. As for the personality part, whatever flavor you want, you can find it. Prefer a simple straightforward forecast, just the facts? You can find it! You want personality and showmanship, you can find that too. With so many TV channels, there’s a weatherman for every preference.

Is it fair to ask your accuracy percentage? It’s not a good question since I’m now forecasting over such a broad area. When I did local news in Cleveland or D.C. or Syracuse, it was easier because it was a clearly defined geography; now it’s the entire country.

(Lately, I’ve been buying checks.) I like easy comfortable sportswear and here, I’m less concerned about designer names.

Who are your fashion role models? Well Matt Lauer has definitely influenced my style since he always looks so perfect (probably because he worked at an upscale menswear store as a teenager…). If I had to pick a celebrity fashion role model, I’d say Daniel Craig and George Clooney. (But how likely am I to ever look like them?) Actually, a 75-year-old guy who I don’t even know became a fashion role model for me. I had spotted him at a fundraiser in Washington, D.C. wearing a fabulous black watch tartan dinner jacket; I asked him where he got it and he told me he bought it 40 years ago at the flagship Brooks Brothers store on Madison Avenue. So I went looking for that fabric and had a similar one made up for me by Zegna. I wore it to a red carpet

36


assignment and got lots of compliments!

Do you have a good luck tie? Not really. But I’ve been wearing a lot of Brioni ties lately: I like the heft. Also Zegna and Drake’s…

What about the slimmer-fit clothing they’re showing these days: are you wearing it? Not so much. For me, it will take some getting used to. Once you’ve been overweight, you don’t want to be reminded of when everything was too tight…

meet this incredibly brave woman whose courage changed the course of history, for not just African Americans but for all Americans. And Charles Schultz because I too am an avid cartoonist and comic book fan; I’ve always been in awe of his talents. (I still sketch a bit but I’m not really pursuing it these days.) Who I’d most like to interview? Probably Obama. I’d ask him about his views on climate change.

Other passions? I love cooking and reading. My most recent culinary accomplishment was grilled Chilean sea bass with roasted Brussels spouts and quinoa. My most recent great read was Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham.

Speaking of which, tell us about your new book. It came out in January; it’s called Never Goin’ Back: Winning the Weight-loss Battle for Good. It’s simply the story of my personal journey with weight loss. I think there’s a lot of good stuff that might help people along their own journeys, but it’s definitely not a “how-to” book…

What are you most proud of? Hanging in there: I’ve been working for the same company (NBC) for 30-plus years. And of course my three children: my 26year-old Courtney is a chef in New York City; Leila (14) is studying performing arts; my son Nicky (10) is a master in Tae Kwon Do. I would have thought you’d be most proud of your unique ability to connect with people... I don’t know that it’s such a special talent: I simply treat people the way I’d want to be treated. It’s how my parents raised us, and it’s the lesson I’d most like to teach my children. And while we joke around a lot on the Today show, it’s especially important that we’re never laughing at somebody, only with them.

“If it’s someone you love who’s overweight, the best thing you can do is shut up.”

What advice would you give to someone wanting to lose weight who has not yet begun the journey? I don’t believe in giving advice on weight loss since it’s got to come from within. For me, it literally took seeing my dad on his death bed and promising him I’d change my life… Everyone gets to that point eventually, but no amount of lecturing will do it. Look at Governor Christie — he has young kids and a young wife and after all these years he finally made the decision to take control of his future… No one could have persuaded him. So that’s the advice I’d give people: do it for yourself, not for anyone else. If it’s someone you love who’s overweight, the best thing you can do is shut up. Because guess what: we know we’re fat! We don’t live in a world without mirrors…

Who was your best interview ever and who would you like to interview next? My two favorites so far were Rosa Parks and Charles Schultz: Rosa because it was just such an honor to

Who is your personal hero? Probably New York’s Cardinal Dolan. I was raised Catholic (my mom was a devout Catholic, I lean toward Catholic Lite) but with Dolan, it’s less about his religion and more about his humility, his humanity, how readily he can talk about his own failings (e.g. losing weight!). I’ve never officially interviewed him but we spent time together in Rome for the installation of the new Pope, and we’ve had dinner a number of times. He’s a straight shooter and a pretty tolerant fellow; I truly admire him.

38


Maximize your investment in a classic cashmere suit with simple sartorial updates for any occasion.

1 SUIT. 7 WAYS. EXPLORE YOUR OPTIONS. Photography Jens Ingvarsson Styling William Buckley Grooming Katie Robinson


1

SPORTY STYLE

REPLACE YOUR SUIT JACKET WITH A LEATHER MOTO STYLE TO ROCK YOUR WORKDAY (OR WEEKEND).

2

VINTAGE PREP

BRIGHTEN A GRAY OUTLOOK WITH A KNIT TIE & COLORFUL PLAID SPORTCOAT. LO0KING GOOD!


3

CASUAL COOL

4

CHECK YOURSELF

TRADITIONAL WITH A TWIST: THIS WORN WITH DARK DENIM, A STRIPED SPORT SHIRT & SNEAKERS GIVE SHIRT & TIE PAIRING BRINGS YOUR BASIC SUIT TO A MORE CREATIVE SPACE. YOUR JACKET A LEISURELY LOOK.


MODEL: LEANDRO SOUZA, Q MODEL MANAGEMENT. TAILORING: JASON SANTIAGO. RING: PROPOSITION LOVE. WATCHES: TAG HEUER, PANERAI, BREITLING

5

LAYERED LUXE

WHEN THE TEMPERATURE COOLS, ADD LAYERS IN FALL’S WARMEST SHADES.

6

PATTERN PLAY

DON’T FALL FLAT: GRAPHIC CHECKS PROVIDE A SUBTLE CONTRAST AGAINST SOLID TROUSERS.


LOG PHOTOGRAPHY: SERGIO KURHAJEC

HOUSE

OFSTYLE

HAIR & MAKEUP: CLAIRE BAYLEY

STYLING: WENDY MCNETT


MODEL: PETER ARGUE @ WILHEMINA. SPECIAL THANKS: WILLIAM BUCKLEY, MICHAEL & DONNA FRIEDMAN.


YOUR GUIDE T O MODERN OUTERWEAR

Photography Jens Ingvarsson Styling William Buckley Grooming Katie Robinson

Don’t be afraid to mix textures, colors and patterns.

THE FALL GUY Outerwear classics get a modern update with new treatments and details.

A pocket square adds pop.


The lined lightweight material takes you through changing seasons.

Casual Luxury WITH FITTED SILHOUETTES AND LUXE DETAILS, THESE PIECES PULL DOUBLE DUTY FOR WORK AND WEEKEND.


Distressed fabrics look great with jeans. Wide lapels define shoulders. Donegal fabric is dressy but cool.

Double-Breasted

GO DRESSY OR CASUAL WITH THESE SIMPLE TIPS.

A nippedin waist keeps the look sleek.

MODELS: JONATHAN RILEY, MITCH FERRIN, CEDRIC @ FORD; LEANDRO SOUZA @ Q MODEL MANAGEMENT. TAILOR: JASON SANTIAGO.

Keep the length short for a modern take on casual.


Vests

PERFECT WITH YOUR FAVORITE SWEATER AND CHINOS, THEY PAIR JUST AS WELL WITH A SPORTCOAT AND TIE.


world scene

OPULENT ADVENTURES

S

ail off on luxurious explorations of two of the world’s most exotic locations: the Amazon River in Peru and Vietnam’s Mekong River. Aqua Expeditions offers three, four, or seven-day cruises on these two intriguing rivers, providing the opportunity for a variety of fascinating experiences, from visiting historic sites to piranha fishing. And they do it in great style. For the Amazon cruises, Aqua Expeditions provides either the 130-foot-long M/V Aqua, or the 147-foot M/V Aria. Both custom-built ships have airconditioned suites featuring sitting areas and picture windows with panoramic views. The M/V Aqua can accommodate 24 guests in 12 suites while the Aria has 16 suites with room for 32 guests, plus additional amenities such as an exercise room and an outdoor hot tub. Launching in 2014, the M/V Aqua Mekong is an extraordinary architectdesigned ship with a spa, screening room, outdoor pool and 20 guest suites with floor-to-ceiling windows, all offering magnificent views of Vietnam and Cambodia.

Experience life’s little luxuries. By Donald Charles Richardson

KEEP ON DANCING

S

IMAGE BY PAUL B. GOODE. FEATURED DANCERS LAURA HALZACK AND MICHAEL TRUSNOVEC

ince 1954, the innovative and sometimes controversial modern dance choreographer Paul Taylor has created 138 dances exploring a range of topics: life and death, love and sexuality, iconic moments in American history. These are set to music as diverse as medieval masses, baroque concertos, classical symphonies, Tin Pan Alley, and The Mamas and The Papas. Every season for the past 60 years the Paul Taylor Dance Company has toured the world, performing in over 500 cities in 62 countries. What better way to celebrate the diamond jubilee of this legendary company than by taking to the road again? In 2014, Paul Taylor will be presenting modern dance across America, from New York to San Francisco.

54


OMMMMM

A

s the year winds down, take a few days and disappear to Ananda in the Himalayas, a restored viceroy’s palace with a destination spa that focuses on India’s ancient arts of yoga, meditation and ayurveda. The new you is orchestrated by a team of qualified nutritionists, western and ayurvedic physicians, and spa therapists who create programs to meet individual goals. Concentrate on destressing, detox and cleansing, relaxation, anti-aging or weight and inch loss, all in a 24,000 square-foot facility with 24 treatment rooms, hydrotherapy facilities, a Beauty Institute, outdoor heated swimming pool, sauna, steam rooms and a fully equipped fitness center. Fortunately, your stay doesn’t have to be all exercise and dieting. Between treatments, you can play golf, go white river rafting, or enjoy an elephant photo safari.

GRAND ITALIAN GROUNDS

A

ldo Filicori and Luigi Zecchini founded Filicori Zecchini coffee in Bologna in 1919. After nearly a century, the company is still guided by the founders’ families and remains loyal to a philosophy that merges artisan passion and technological innovation. Together, the careful selection of the highest quality green coffee and the specific roasting process produce the particular aroma and flavor that makes Filicori Zecchini so impressive. So much so that many of the company’s coffees have earned the Italian Espresso National Institute’s certification, a designation reserved for only the best blends. Available in over 30 countries around the world, Filicori Zecchini coffee has just recently reached American shores. Buongiorno tutti!

LET IT BEE

T

here was a lot of buzz when bees recently checked into the InterContinental Hotels in Boston and New York. Yes, that’s right, bees. In keeping with the environmentally responsible trend among luxury hotels, the InterContinental’s green initiatives include the use of energy-efficient lighting, water conservation and recycling programs throughout the properties. On the roofs of these hotels, along with an herb garden, there will also be apiaries, attended by a traveling apiculturist (one who raises bees for honey). The hives are expected to produce 20 to 30 pounds of honey per year, which the hotels plan to bottle for gifts and amenities, use in cocktails and on special Honey Menus. Comb through the chef’s latest creations, including honeylacquered duck leg confit and honey almond madelines.

56


spirits

feeds highlight upcoming events. But McTear’s, a Scotland-based house, offers timed online auctions, extensive search and notification features, and “Text It,” a free preliminary valuation service allowing customers to snap a picture and text “value.” Meanwhile, ScotchWhiskyAuctions.com is a fully virtual auction house also based in Scotland, hosting weekly events. • Once you have those fancy wines and whiskies, what to do with them? You could buy a Sub-Zero and be done with it, but consider Seattle-based Phenol 55 instead. The new state-of-the-art facility offers not only storage, but also dedicated iPad-based tracking, interaction and bottle summoning. Individual QR codes and professional images help track your bottles, no matter the size of your collection. • While there are dozens of online wine and spirits stores, Caskers.com is the only one to both reflect the trend for flash retailing and curate rare and limited spirits and liqueurs. Offering members short-term sales, email and text updates, specialized clubs and exclusive pre-releases, “we curate carefully,” says cofounder Moiz Ali. “Men in particular don’t like rifling

HI-TECH DRINKING

Technology and alcohol move beyond cocktail apps. By Robert Haynes-Peterson Upgrade to Drinking 2.0, very aspect of our lives has become increasingly hi-tech. There’s no reason our enjoyment of fine wines and spirits shouldn’t also receive an upgrade. Sure, there are cocktail recipe apps, mostly of the ’80s party variety (Sex on the Beach, anyone?), but check out Drinking 2.0: • Wine connoisseurs should consider replacing their iPhones with the Vertu Ti. The latest release from this luxury brand (phones range from $9,600 to $11,500) features a “Vertu key,” providing direct access to professional concierge services including a top sommelier at Berry Brothers & Rudd, Britain’s most well-respected wine and spirits merchant. From exclusive wine tastings to upscale pairing, purchasing and auction advice, it’s unlikely the Pocket Wine app will measure up. • Wine and whisky auctions are increasingly accessible online. Most houses, like Bonhams and Sotheby’s, maintain fairly standard websites, and apps or RSS

like integrated mobile

through 1,000 products while they’re wine storage, tracking shopping. We keep the numbers down and bottle retrieval at so you can connect to the product and Seattle’s Phenol 55. find the story behind the distiller.” What could be better than speed and ease?

58


Knowledge. Wisdom. Truth


travel

AFRICAN ADVENTURE

Calling all thrill-seekers (who also crave fine wines, gourmet dining, spa treatments and more). By William Kissel

sit in awe as the open-air vehicle makes its way over an expansive field of oat grass in the northern Serengeti. Suddenly, we’re nose-to-nose with a herd of 400-pound wildebeests all with the same features: a buffalo’s face, a camel’s hump and a horse’s backside. Tens of millions of migrating animals, including the homely, docile wildebeest, call this northernmost region of Tanzania home. If you’re lucky enough to visit East Africa during the off-season (mid-December through March), when the animals are calving and before the great migration gets underway in late July, you’ll find yourself viewing this magical scene almost entirely alone. The endless stream of Land Cruisers that jockey for the best viewing positions during Africa’s peak months in the fall are nowhere to be found on this warm January day: it’s a peaceful moment in nature everyone yearns to experience but few actually do. We drive slowly through a herd of feasting elephants, one of which is nursing a day old calf. We watch three hyenas unsuccessfully stalk a rare black rhino and her newborn offspring, a trio of cheetahs

snake through the tall grasslands, and a lone lion nap under a thorny acacia bush. This is the Africa of your imagination. The panorama of wildlife has drawn visitors since long before the days when Hemingway came to hunt. But now, with the help of two of Africa’s most celebrated tour companies — Nomad Tanzania and Asilia, working in collaboration with Canadian custom tour operator Trufflepig — it’s time to revisit Africa’s original safari destination. East Africa’s safari outfitters have responded to competition for tourism dollars by building plush, deluxe camps and upgrading amenities to appeal to adventure-seekers who also want access to fine wines, spa treatments, pool time and other pamperings. Naturally, getting to these remote camps is a big

60

Below: The author’s tastefully appointed tent at the Serengeti Safari Camp


part of the adventure. A commercial flight via South African Airways to Johannesburg is just the first leg in a 36-hour journey. From there we board a second flight to Tanzania, where one of Tanganyika Flying Company’s 12-seat planes awaits to ferry us to Arusha, the gateway town to Serengeti safari. Here we board another small plane for a flyover of Tanzania’s famed Ngorongoro Crater (the largest intact volcano caldera in the world) to Ndutu, a rock-filled airstrip, where the first of many Land Cruisers awaits our arrival. We cross the snake-like Mara river past a pool of hippos and a few crocodiles, and continue on to Ubuntu, one of three mobile camps designed to follow the migrating animals. Rested and well fed, we travel another three hours to our first camp at Olakira. These mobile setups are actually lavish tent cities that require two full days and three trucks to relocate,

and each canvas structure is enormous by anyone’s standards. At both Olakira and Serengeti Safari Camp, tents are self-contained suites with oversized beds, sitting areas with lovely writing desks, and private bathrooms with a chemical toilet and stall shower in lieu of actual plumbing. Even in the remotest part of the world, these private sanctuaries are filled with little amenities to make outdoor living a four-star experience: gas- or battery-powered lighting, daily laundry service, and hot showers provided by stewards who boil water and fill your cistern on demand. Among Tanzania’s few permanent camps is Sayari,

which is operated by Asilia and listed as one of the top five new luxury lodgings in Africa. It’s located in a remote valley five miles from the border of Kenya, home to the Kuria tribe. A mobile camp that found its permanent home just four years ago, Sayari is something of an anomaly among African camps. Its 15 tented structures are shaped like the large tabletop mountain called Turner’s Hill (after Miles Turner, the first warden of the Serengeti), visible in the distance. The tents are outfitted Asian-style with teak floors, shoji screen walls and massive marble tubs to wash away the residue from the raw, dusty plains. It’s a bit disconcerting to be in one of these tubs when a leopard passes by, but the small creature comforts far outweigh the predatory creature discomforts. (Sayari, like most camps, provides each guest with his own private askari, or night watchman, to guard against wild animal attacks.) Unlike Sayari’s Zen Buddhist vibe, few sites scream Africa more than Lamai Serengeti, a one-year-old permanent camp developed by Nomad Tanzania on the rocky Kogakuria Kopje peaks, just a few miles from where the great migration across the Mara river begins. Honored with the 2013 Best New Property in Africa award, it boasts 12 sumptuously appointed thatched roof structures, each with its own wraparound deck. Resident game lingers just outside at sun up, and during the day the playful vervet monkeys can be spotted feasting on the sour plums that dangle from the native Ole Lamai trees, from which the camp gets its name. In case you haven’t guessed, a safari is not the time to catch up on your sleep. Instead, you’ll wake before sunrise for the first of two game drives of the day. Those initial hours on safari are the most adrenaline-filled, especially as you catch your first glimpse of the big five — lion, rhino, leopard, buffalo and elephant — everyone comes to see. Once you’ve spotted them, usually within hours, your mind will open to Africa’s other amazing flora and fauna. Lavish lunches and dinners after each drive offer the perfect opportunity to reflect in solitude or share stories with fellow travelers. And at day’s end, a surprise sundowner cocktail — a nightly African tradition — always awaits where and when you least expect it.

61

Left: Women of the Kuria tribe in full ceremonial regalia Above right: One of the spectacular bathtubs at Sayari camp


food

Daniel Boulud, right, with Tyler Shedden, taste testing in Toronto.

clam and parsley broth. My entrée, the duo of cumbra beef, consisted of a dry-aged strip loin alongside red wine-braised short ribs and spinach subric. The grapefruit givré — a frozen grapefruit shell filled with sorbet, grapefruit wedges and rose-flavored Turkish delight, crowned with fluffy threads of halvah and a torched sesame cracker — was a visual masterpiece that playfully juxtaposed textures and temperatures. As the man who invented the gourmet burger, Boulud naturally has ‘mad’ love for beef, and never strays far from the other three Bs: bacon, butter and brioche. I spoke with the master about his successes, his roots on the farm, and what he likes to cook with his daughter, Alix.

Is true fine dining a thing of the past? Fine dining is very much alive and kicking in the greatest cities of the world. But the definition, in many ways, has evolved.

How do you define fine dining? It doesn’t have to be pompous or boring. Fine dining is exciting and rare. For me it can be a $2.50 [piece of] sushi or sashimi made with the highest-quality ingredients. Or going to Brooklyn for the best pizza made with local clams, local herbs, the perfect crust… while

AMERICA’S FRENCH FARM BOY

Chef Daniel Boulud’s dishes are haute but homey, and always from the heart. By Shira Levine o eat a meal crafted by Daniel Boulud is to be dazzled with a full-sensory culinary experience. My epicurean evening took place in Toronto, at the James Beard award-winning chef’s latest restaurant project. Called Café Boulud (like its New York and Palm Beach counterparts), the fine dining hotspot is positioned within the glassy-chic Four Seasons Toronto, recently redone in exquisite style. The multi-cultural culinary Mecca already has its share of hip eateries, yet visitors and locals alike are hungry for a bite of Boulud. Dbar is the lobby bar and café, but it’s the mezzanine-level restaurant outfitted with Mr. Brainwash pop art pieces that has people talking. Indeed about the art (an unexpected pairing with French haute cuisine), but more about the equally jaw-dropping menu. My tasting began with octopus à la plancha followed by a British Columbian black cod persillade in a

it might be casual, it can be fine dining. Of course it’s about the food, but it is also very much about the service, and then the ambiance. Fine dining is about living well and enjoying life.

What is the universal thread that runs throughout your 14 restaurants? Detail. I pay a lot of attention to service and training. Even though fine dining is becoming more casual, it is also more focused on details, more and better service, with more attention paid to making the customers feel at ease with the experience.

You’ve been living in the U.S. for many years; do you still consider yourself a French chef? When you're French you can’t take it out of you. I live in America, and I love America; my daughter was born here. But I am certainly French.

American foodies have embraced regional Italian cooking. Do you think you have been suc-

62


IMAGE BY CHRISTIAN HORAN

Art by Mr. Brainwash is a lively addition to the décor at Café Boulud. cessful in spreading knowledge about French regional cuisines? Well, you tell me! I love all of it and I think it is fair to say people like my food. The cuisine regional — especially the specialties of cheese and charcuterie — is what has made me ‘stay French’ and feel so proud to cook French. Like many countries we also have the cuisine bourgeois: the food of the people. We have a history of cooking meals that are very elaborate yet very soulful. Then you have brasserie cooking for the big city; bistro is smaller scale and local. Lyon de bouchon is also very special: it’s the micro-scale restaurant where there is no choice on the menu because they serve you what they have made that day. It’s cooked with love. I have lived and worked all my life for haute cuisine: the best of the best. It takes a lifetime to master and it’s still never enough.

What city’s food scene inspires you most? Copenhagen is really exciting. I lived there 32 years ago and I could see then that this place was going to be something amazing one day. I love their street food so much. I love the little skinny hot dog with the tiny bun! There is so much young Danish talent inspiring the culinary world with the way they are thinking about and making food. I also love Charleston, South Carolina. San Francisco and Chicago are longtime favorite food cities.

“Fine dining is about living well and enjoying life.”

These micro-scale restaurants seem to be more appealing to today’s foodies. This is the challenge for young chefs. They open a place with $100,000; it’s a shack, but they cook amazing food. Yes, it is fine cuisine, but the idea is to elevate the town with a fine restaurant. You don’t want a town with all the restaurants imitating one another.

You grew up on a farm in France and weren’t always accustomed to fine dining. What do you make for a home-cooked meal?

I keep it really easy; I cook with my daughter sometimes. I live above Daniel so usually what I do is go down to the restaurant and grab a roast or a fish, and then on the spot propose something for us to make.

Can you envision making your own Jiro Dreams of Sushi film? Maybe Daniel Dreams of Butter? Not like that, but I am working on a documentary. It’s around a new cookbook I have coming out that celebrates 20 years of Daniel. It’s called My French Cuisine. It shows that I’m proud of my French identity and that no matter where I travel and what I experiment with, I still think French food is the best.

64


fitness

HIT THE MAT

Bikram Yoga is a 90-minute practice performed in a heated room (105 degrees Fahrenheit with 40 percent humidity). Created by Bikram Choudhury, it consists of a sequence of 26 postures and two breathing exercises. “It’s a common misconception that yoga is about sitting cross-legged and chanting,” says instructor Eoin Thomas Sharkey. “Bikram is an intense, physically challenging workout.” “Men generally think that yoga is somehow subsidiary to other, more macho forms of exercise,” says instructor Chris Totaro. “We see it all the time: the girlfriend brings the guy for his first class. He enters the room presumptuous and overconfident, but it’s not long before he’s gawking at the display of strength surrounding him.” Yoga is not just for flex-y, skinny people either; it’s actually more beneficial for those less flexible. The most common excuse is “I’m not flexible enough to do yoga. I can’t even touch my toes,” shares Corinne Idzal, a yoga teacher in New Consistent practice York City. “That’s like saying, will help to increase ‘I’m too sick to go to the doctor.’

strength, stamina and mental focus.

Think yoga has nothing to offer men? Think again. By Elise Diamantini here’s a reason athletes like David Beckham, Kobe Bryant, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Andy Murray moonlight as Bikram yogis. Murray, a pro-tennis player who’s currently ranked third in the world and is the reigning Olympic Singles Champion, credits Bikram Yoga for increasing his mental and physical endurance during matches. And Abdul-Jabbar has said that if it weren’t for Bikram Yoga, he could never have played NBA basketball for as long as he did with so few injuries. A consistent yoga practice has been known to increase strength, stamina, flexibility and mental focus, while decreasing stress. Yoga helps prevent and alleviate sports-related injuries by strengthening the muscles around major joints. It creates more flexibility, so it’s a perfect way to improve your golf or tennis swing. And on the superficial side: consistent practice will help you look great in that new modern-fit suit!

It will only get worse if you don’t do something about it.” Idzal says that in general, men are tighter than women because of the anatomical and physiological differences in their bodies. “Not to mention that ‘typical’ male sports tend to create tightness because of high-impact and repetitive movements.” Bikram yogi Anthony Rebholz says a lot of athletes, especially boxers, come into the studio because they need to find more flexibility for their sport. “Working out at the gym is all about contraction and resistance; yoga is about expansion and extending — opening up rather than closing down. Men work a lot of the primary muscle groups at the gym, but yoga works the secondary and tertiary groups. Yoga also makes you become more aware of how you move your body during other forms of exercise.” Totaro, who says he has been more or less injury free for the past decade, also points out that “strength and

66


flexibility have a reciprocal relationship. The more muscle mass built around a joint, the more the joint’s mobility is decreased. In other words, as weight lifters continue to add bulk, their joint flexibility continually decreases. The comprehensive stretching exercises in a yoga class allow for a more balanced relationship between strength and flexibility.” Yoga has also been known to help people heal their injuries, avoid surgery and wean themselves off medicine. A telling example from yogi Nick Graham: “A few years ago I was experiencing neurological problems: blackouts, migranes, extreme nausea. I was admitted to the hospital and for a week I was drugged, hooked up to machines and miserable. Soon after, I passed a Bikram studio and stopped in for my first class. After the best night of sleep in my life, I went back the next day, and the next. Finally I stopped taking my meds. All the while I was being tested for myriad things, but I just practiced Bikram as often as I could, and eventually my symptoms disappeared.” Yoga’s therapeutic effects are not limited to the physical. Those who practice report that it helps them focus, set goals and explore their potential. Plus, yoga helps keep your emotions in check. “You won’t act on

impulse,” explains instructor Jakob Schanzer. “This was a gradual change for me, but I noticed that I was reacting to things more calmly.” If you’re still not convinced, Idzal can offer a few more arguments: “Yoga is badass! You will sleep better, work better, relax better, make love better... Beginners are shocked by the life-transforming power yoga can have. Physical change is just the beginning.”

GETTING STARTED

Tips for beginners from Bikram Yoga instructor Corinne Idzal • Talk to your teacher before class and let him or her know you’re a beginner. They can ease your mind and give you modifications during class if you need them. • Go to class hydrated and on an empty stomach. • Take electrolytes before practicing yoga to help with stamina and muscle cramping. Natural sources like coconut water or green juice are best. • It’s not a competition. No one cares if you’re stiff or can’t hold a posture. Even that dancer with her feet behind her head is too focused on her own struggle to be judging you. • Go often, especially at first. You’re never the best at something the first time you try it, but the more you practice the better you’ll become.

68


end page

yourself; it’s generally better to be overdressed than underdressed and these days, a slim suit scores extra points. 7. Acquire the taste for a good cocktail, straight up. It’s cool to order and enjoy a classic — Manhattan, Rob Roy, Martini, Negroni, etc. — when you’re out on the town. (When in New York, do it at the King Cole Bar in the St. Regis Hotel.) 6. Suggest that your significant other also cultivate a favorite drink to enjoy before dinner. I love it when a lady replies promptly to a bartender’s request for her order. A confident response is sexy. 5. Red wine should be stored and served cool; experts suggest 57 degrees, not room temperature. However, it should be opened and set on the table about 15 minutes before you plan to enjoy it, so it can breathe and warm up just slightly. (Good restaurants know this.) 4. Never let your cologne precede your presence, especially in a restaurant, where fragrance and food smells are not a great combination.

RESTAURANT RULES

Stuff men should know (but probably don’t…) By Frank Schipani hen it comes to certain gentlemanly topics, including dress codes, a generation gap can often impede credibility. Receiving fashion advice from gray-haired guys in suits is not necessarily what young men crave, even if it’s what they need. That said, when it comes to wining, dining and women, experience counts. Here, the top 10 time-tested tips that are bound to score. 10. Always give the lady a facing-out seat (her back against the wall) in a restarant. A woman quite literally ‘dresses’ the room; she should have the observing seat to see and be seen. 9. Turn off your digital devices before entering a restaurant. You’re there to share an experience, not to worry about missed messages. (What could be more insulting?) 8. Always dress in a modern manner no matter where you’re going. Your appearance is how you represent

3. When making any kind of reservation, always note the name of the person you spoke to and the time you called. (Stuff happens; you may arrive only to have someone say “I don’t see your name here…”) 2. Better still, develop a relationship with the manager of a go-to place where you can get in on short notice. All popular restaurants say “We have nothing open but 5:00 or 10:00!” Fact is, they always save a table or two during prime time that they can easily give to loyal clients at the last minute. (If they know and like you, they’ll act like you had an actual reservation and simply make another party wait a little longer.) 1. Tired of dining out or ready for something more intimate? In addition to throwing steaks on the grill, learn how to make at least one dish for the stovetop or oven. May I suggest a basic tomato sauce for your pasta course? Buon appetito!

70

GETTY 1

When it comes to wining, dining and women, experience counts.


© D. YURMAN 2013

Kingsgate Center • 8201 Quaker Avenue, #106, Lubbock, Texas • 806.794.9500 Mon-Sat 10am-6pm Southlake Town Square • 190 State Street, Southlake, Texas • 817.416.7100 Mon-Sat 10am-6pm | Thurs 10am-7pm


M A L O U F ’ S F O RU M FA L L 2 0 1 3


Malouf's