Page 1

FORUM˜SPRING 2013 UNHURRIED AND UNCOMMON SINCE 1977 KILGORETROUT.COM

2013 FASHION:

SHADES OF BLUE

THE NEW RULES OF BUSINESS CASUAL SKETCHES OF SPRING


Su Misura Made to Measure is the Art of Personal Elegance Our promise is to deliver perfectly tailored apparel designed for your individual character from an unparalleled collection of Zegna fabrics. From personalized suits to entire wardrobes.


welcome

EAT. DRINK. MEET. REPEAT. A taste of the NEW Cleveland greeted our Apparel Forum colleagues as Kilgore Trout hosted the nation’s top clothing retailers.

“A

RE WE REALLY IN CLEVELAND?” was the surprised exclamation

we heard more than once as we led our colleagues on a whirlwind tour of the city. From the magnificent homes of South Park and Shaker Boulevard, through the lively Little Italy, past the new Farshid Moussavi-designed MOCA Cleveland and Uptown district, and to our final destination—Zack Bruell’s L’Albatros—our fellow Apparel Forum members continually had their Pantharella socks knocked off by the energy of the new Cleveland. These retailers hail from some of the nation’s great cities: Seattle, Denver, Dallas, New Orleans, San Francisco, Greenwich and others—and they know a vibrant city when they see one. Twice a year, we all get together to coordinate group merchandise purchases both in the U.S. and in Europe, share our best practices, review fashion trends, and discuss economic impacts on our industry. We provide one another an ad hoc advisory board, and together we publish this magazine. By collaborating, we are all able to provide our clients greater service and better value. And isn’t that what it’s all about? Collaboration has been an essential element in the comeback of our city as well. And many of you, our clients, have played important roles in the rebirth of Cleveland, whether at University Circle, one of our world-class hospital campuses, the rising Medical Mart, the Flats East Bank, the Horseshoe Casino, or the new Eaton headquarters taking shape just around the corner from our store. The renewed energy of the city is palpable, as is the energy of spring in store at Kilgore Trout. This season, we’ll collaborate with Polo Ralph Lauren, presenting the venerable designer’s collection of premiere classics, an edition of the iconic brand specifically for stores like Kilgore Trout—timeless and authentic, with superb attention to fabrics, craftsmanship and detail. Also new is PT01 Pantaloni Torino, the Italian line of hip, cool

trousers in khakis and colors with tailor-made quality and great treatments, and the inaugural collection of Gramercy Foundry, a new collection of shirts, knits, pants and jackets that promises “forged textiles and engineered styles.” Also new is Massimo Alba, with an Italian casual-chic style “designed to embrace the wearer.” Alba’s knitwear is woven and item-dyed in traditional workshops all over Italy, and his linen/cotton jackets wear with effortless nonchalance. Also with a foundation in traditional Italian design, our first collection from Roda uses time-honored techniques to craft gentlemen’s accessories of true luxury. For women, Andrea welcomes Es’ Givien, an eco-friendly jersey and knitwear line made entirely in Italy of natural fabrics, knitted and dyed with processes that respect the environment. Designed by a collaborative of three sisters in Verona (Gaia, Vivilla and Nives), every garment contains a printed message, hidden but within reach, a thought for the wearer alone linked to the theme of the season’s collection. Closer to home, Clover Canyon is designed and produced in Los Angeles, and reflects the joyful, eclectic spirit of California with vivid prints and streamlined silhouettes. We also launched Joseph, a clothing line with a cult following in Europe but little known here, and Dannijo, one of the hottest collections of necklaces, collars and jewelry on the planet. If you haven’t checked out all that’s new and vibrant in our city, a good place to start is the extraordinary new Museum of Contemporary Art in the Uptown District. Right now, we’re offering our customers complimentary museum admission for two. Stop by soon and ask for your pass. And if you spend $500 you’ll also receive a $100 gift certificate to a Zack Bruell restaurant, where your socks are certain to be knocked off, too. Happy spring! Wally Naymon, shopkeeper


28601 Chagrin Blvd. Cleveland, OH 44122 216-831-0488 kilgoretrout.com facebook.com/kilgoretroutcleveland EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Karen Alberg Grossman DESIGN DIRECTOR

Hans Gschliesser MANAGING EDITOR

Jillian LaRochelle PROJECT MANAGER

Lisa Montemorra DESIGNERS

Cynthia Lucero, Jean-Nicole Venditti CONCEPT DIRECTORS

Andrew Mitchell, Russ Mitchell MERCHANDISING DIRECTOR

Bob Mitchell DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION

Peg Eadie DIRECTOR OF PREPRESS

Hugh K. Stanton

FEATURES

BUSINESS JOURNALS FASHION GROUP

2

Welcome Letter

PUBLISHER

6

Upcoming Events

PRESIDENT AND CEO

56 Interiors: Risk Management 60 Music: Rodgers & Hammerstein Revisited

Stuart Nifoussi Britton Jones CHAIRMAN AND COO

Mac Brighton CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Christine Sullivan

FASHION 8

24 Sketches: Must-Haves for Spring

APPAREL FORUM Andrisen Morton DENVER, CO Garys NEWPORT BEACH, CA

32 Profile: Magnanni Footwear

Hubert White MINNEAPOLIS, MN

36 Style: Color Cues

Kilgore Trout CLEVELAND, OH

38 Books: A Sprig of Ivy 40 6 New Rules for Business Casual 48 26 Shades of Blue

Larrimor’s PITTSBURGH, PA Malouf’s LUBBOCK/SOUTHLAKE, TX Mario’s PORTLAND, OR/SEATTLE, WA Mitchells/Marshs HUNTINGTON, NY Mitchells/Richards WESTPORT/GREENWICH, CT Oak Hall MEMPHIS, TN

DEPARTMENTS

Rodes LOUISVILLE, KY

28 Ask Forum for Him

Stanley Korshak DALLAS, TX

30 Ask Forum for Her

Wilkes Bashford SAN FRAN/PALO ALTO, CA

34 Man of Style: Philippe Cousteau 54 Travel: A Grape Night’s Sleep 58 World Scene 62 Spirits: Bespoke Booze

Rubensteins NEW ORLEANS, LA

FASHION FORUM MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED IN 11 REGIONAL EDITIONS FOR MEMBER STORES OF THE APPAREL FORUM © 2013 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS JOURNALS, INC, P.O. BOX 5550, NORWALK, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • FAX: 203-852-8175; ADVERTISING OFFICE: 1384 BROADWAY, NY, NY 10018-6108, 212-686-4412 • FAX: 212-686-6821; ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THE PUBLISHERS ACCEPT NO RESPONSIBILITIES FOR ADVERTISERS CLAIMS, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS OR OTHER MATERIALS. NO PART OF THIS MAGAZINE MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE

64 End Page: Keep it Clean

PUBLISHERS. VOLUME 16, ISSUE 1. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.

SPRING/SUMMER 2013


events

ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA MTM FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, MARCH 8 AND 9

Join Ermenegildo Zegna Made-to-Measure Specialist Andrea Stringhini for the ultimate “Su Misura” experience. Discover the new spring/summer 2013 seasonal fabrics, and preview expanded in-stock collections from Ermenegildo Zegna and Z Zegna. Call or email your sales consultant for your personal appointment, or just stop in.

SAMUELSOHN MTM FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, APRIL 5 AND 6

Enjoy 10% off your Samuelsohn Made-to-Measure order at this event. Dorian Anderson will be in store with the latest fabrics and fits from Samuelsohn. Since 1923 when master tailor Lesser Samuelsohn emigrated from New York to Canada to develop his fine clothing line, Samuelsohn has been carefully hand-tailoring some of the finest suits made in North America.

VISIT KILGORETROUT.COM FOR ADDITIONAL EVENTS

OUR RESTAURANT DEAL IS BACK Spend $500 or more in one Kilgore Trout visit and we’ll reward you with a $100 gift certificate to any Zack Bruell restaurant. It’s our most popular offer, so take advantage soon. Through April 6, 2013 or while supplies last. Not valid with any other offer or discount. One per customer, please.


ART DIRECTION | CHRISTOPHER HIXSON PHOTOGRAPHY | ANDREW MCALLISTER MODELS | MEAGHAN CARRERAS & TED SIKORA


< FUZZI abstract printed sheath dress


D. EXTERIOR lace dress in midnight with chartreuse jersey lining

< ETRO linen jacket, cotton shirt, silk pocket square, linen pant and embossed crocodile belt


FUZZI cutaway cardigan, DL1961 jean

> ALLEGRI super-light nylon water-repellent jacket in brick red, MASON’S soft cotton shirt, GARDEUR 5-pocket jean The season’s denims are all about color. An assortment from GARDEUR shown.


ISAIA linen and wool jacket, wool trouser, cotton shirt, tie and pocket square, LEYVA belt > ESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; GIVIEN laser-cut micro-suede shift and jacket, LINEA PELLE leather clutch


FUZZI printed gauze skirt and asymmetrical tank

< MASSIMO ALBA linen/cotton trouser, striped cotton Cricket polo, linen/cotton Aston jacket, G. INGLESE gingham pocket square


GIMO’S Campionario navy goat suede jacket, RAG & BONE rough cotton 5-pocket jean, MASON’S linen shirt > HILTL cotton trouser in red, MASON’S linen shirt with assorted buttons


SAND linen/cotton sportcoat and check shirt, GARDEUR jean, LEYVA belt > SAMUELSOHN softly constructed jacket in wool and linen, MASSIMO ALBA cotton/linen stripe shirt, MASONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Torino trouser with ribbon waist


VINCE washed linen shirt, cotton tee, linen drawstring short

< 360 CASHMERE top, HUDSON jean


PAUL SMITH cotton Abbey sportcoat, VINCE short-sleeve henley, HILTL 5-pocket washed denim jean with mobile safe zipper pocket, TORINO tumbled glove cowhide belt with nickel buckle > JOSEPH python top and gabardine stretch leggings


RAG & BONE cotton and lambskin jacket, HUDSON boyfriend jean RAG & BONE silk blouse, quilted black lamb leather Highclare vest RAG & BONE silk Cherie dress


JOSEPH linen and gauze top, and turquoise legging

< HERNO boucle jacket, DL1961 Emma legging in Berkeley wash


BOGLIOLI textured linen/cotton suit, MASONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S soft cotton print shirt, SIMMONOT GODARD reversible belt in putty/white with nickel buckle > JOSEPH linen Greta dress, DANNIJO necklace


ASKFORUM

SPRING 2013 FASHION TIPS FOR HIM

Q:

Q:

Watching the new James Bond movie, I realized that all my suits are out of date. What’s up with this skinny look? Can I wear it if I’m not skinny?

Shoes run the gamut from bright athletic styles to cool wingtips to suede lace-ups to dress/casual hybrids that combine luxury leathers with hightech soles. Color is key, if not on the shoe itself then on the soles or laces. The possibilities are limitless: finally, a fun footwear season!

In fact, the men’s clothing industry has been pushing a slimmer model for several years now, but it took a hit movie and Daniel Craig to finally get the message across! Yes, today’s suits are narrower in the shoulder, chest and leg. The coat sleeves and flat-front pants are slightly shorter and

the overall effect is much more youthful. Our suggestion: try one or two suits in this updated model (we have options at many prices) before you replenish your wardrobe. You might also want a few slimmercut shirts and narrower ties (about three inches; the ones in your closet are likely three and three-quarters) to complement the trimmer-fit suits.

I’m seeing lots of color in men’s fashion magazines: is this just for the runway or are real guys wearing it?

Real guys are wearing it! Color has always been a factor in men’s sweaters, shirts and neckwear; only recently has it moved to bottoms. We suggest pairing bright color five-pocket pants with more neutral tops (knits, wovens, sportcoats). It’s a great look that’s surprisingly easy to pull off, once you take that first step.

Q:

After years of struggling with contact lenses, I’m seeing guys wear some very cool glasses. Should I switch over?

Absolutely! Whether or not you need glasses, eyewear is a hot accessory for men this season. We like bigger, bolder frames in black or tortoise for a pseudo-intellectual look (round shapes are hot!), vintage styles with a modern twist, as well as touches of color on the temple. Check out our great selection of optical-quality reading glasses that can readily accommodate almost any prescription.

28

COURTESY EYEBOBS

Q:

I read a study that said the first thing women notice on men is their shoes. So what shoes should I be wearing this spring?


ASKFORUM

SPRING 2013 FASHION TIPS FOR HER

one piece against an otherwise black and white outfit in strong graphic shapes— another huge trend this season. A black and white wardrobe is perfect for unpredictable weather, since you can layer pieces easily and veer towards one shade depending on the rain or sun. Plus, owning a variety of black and white items means you don’t have to pack as much when you travel; just mix and match, livening up each outfit with accessories. Color blocking continues its reign on the runways, though stripes are bolder than in seasons past. Pay extra attention to where the stripes hit on your body and make sure your garments are tailored for a perfect fit. You can even try color blocking on your accessories: just as on-trend but much easier to pull off. In bright colors or soft neutrals, a striped bag or shoe is a perfect way to provide some contrast in your wardrobe.

Q:

There are many gorgeous lightweight scarves out there, but how can I wear them in the warmer months?

Adding a statement necklace to your outfit is the easiest way to instantly liven up your basics. Come in to discover the gorgeous new styles from Dannijo, a favorite among celebrities and one of the hottest accessory brands around! Co-founders Danielle and Jodie Snyder advise that when you’re wearing such an eye-catching piece, “remember to keep it simple everywhere else and make your necklace the focal point.” They also reveal that for

this season, the hottest elements to look for

especially a sheer style in airy cashmere or

are “anything oxidized, touches of turquoise,

a cotton/cashmere blend. When it does get

cornelian and lots of white!”

warmer, untie it and drape it over your

Q:

shoulders as an easy wrap.

Color always plays an important role in my spring/summer wardrobe. Are there any particular color trends I should look for this season?

We’re also starting to see silk scarves come back as a fashion item. Look for them in the same geometric, striped or color blocked patterns popular in RTW styles. To get even more use out of your scarf collection, tie one

Beautiful blues! From azure to turquoise,

up and wear it as a headband or wrap it

there’s a shade out there that looks good on

around your waist like a belt.

everyone! If you’re not comfortable with the boldness of blue, tone it down by popping

30

The most important style advice of all: wear what makes you feel good!

COURTESY DANNIJO

Q:

Statement necklaces were all over the runways this season. How can I wear them?

You can wear a scarf pretty much all year,


profile

GLOVES FOR YOUR FEET

MAGNANNI SHOES OFFER THE FINEST IN FIT—AND FLAIR. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

ebastián Blanco had been working in shoe factories since he was 12. In 1954, at the age of 44, he decided to start his own business. With only five employees, he began making shoes out of a small workshop in his own home in Almansa, a factory town in southeastern Spain specializing in leather goods production. Two years later he partnered with shoe salesman Antonio Garcia to form Blangar. When Blanco’s only son Pascual turned 14, he began learning shoe design and pattern making from his father. At just 16, Pascual became the lead designer, introducing more elegant styles and rebranding the company as Magnanni (after going to a movie with his future wife Rocio, where he was impressed by Italian actress Anna Magnani).

Footwear Trends for 2013

• Single and double monkstraps • Mixed-media: leathers, suedes and textiles • Drop tassels

32

In 1968, Pascual married Rocio, and the couple later had five sons (Sebastián, Miguel, Pascual, Julio and Luis) and a daughter (Rocio). Today the entire third generation of Blancos occupy key positions at Magnanni. Pascual, the third son of Pascual and Rocio, is in charge of distribution in the U.S. and Asia, and reveals that although his father is technically retired, “the company is like another son to him. In my opinion, my father is the best shoemaker in Spain, and we still learn from him every day.” When asked about the difficulty of working alongside five siblings, Pascual laughs. “When we discuss business, it’s usually informal… and loud! Sometimes we get on each other’s nerves, but then we go out afterwards and have a beer. We’re a very close family.” Still based in Almansa, Magnanni continues to construct all its footwear by hand using only the highest quality European leathers. Magnanni is known for its use of the complicated, labor-intensive Bologna construction. But the end result—a foot wrapped 360 degrees with leather, as a hand in a glove—is worth it, giving each shoe exceptional flexibility and comfort. “We make the shoe so the lining wraps around your entire foot,” explains Pascual. “Some brands use a hard insole, but we have soft molded leather. It conforms to your foot faster so there’s never a long breaking-in period.” The last, a metal or plastic piece shaped like the human foot over which a shoe is formed, is another vital part of any shoe design. Magnanni’s are all carefully constructed in house to ensure quality and consistency. “Even if they don’t realize it, the last is the first thing people feel when they try a shoe on,” Pascual says. “We’ve found a successful fit, but we’re always testing and developing it to make it better.” The company also hand-paints all of its leathers with exclusive dyes, natural creams and polishing rags, imparting each pair with a one-of-a-kind finish and a deep, rich coloration. The perfect final touch on the shoes you’ll wear for a lifetime.


man of style

A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE PHILIPPE COUSTEAU MAKES ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION LOOK GOOD. BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

TOP RIGHT COURTESY BBC. BOTTOM LEFT AND NEXT PAGE COURTESY ADAM LARKEY.

hen Philippe Cousteau was a boy, he wanted to be a fireman. Then, on his 16th birthday, his mother and sisters gave him a present: a research trip to Papua New Guinea. Since then he’s been traveling the world, from enduring the cold of Antarctica to providing humanitarian aid in war-torn Sarajevo. A self-described “explorer, social entrepreneur and environmental advocate,” Philippe Cousteau is the 32-year-old son of Jan and Philippe Cousteau Sr. He is also, of course, the grandson of legendary Captain Jacques-Yves Cousteau. “My grandfather taught me to always innovate... always question,” he says. “Each of us has the responsibility to make the world a better place.” Cousteau takes this responsibility very seriously. For him, exploring the connections between humans and the environment is as important as exploring nature itself. He is cofounder of Azure Worldwide, a strategic environmental design, development and marketing company. Along with green site design and planning, eco-tourism and new media, they’re using interactive gaming “to help people understand how their actions impact the environment.” Cousteau is also a special correspondent for CNN International, hosting the Going Green series and reporting on environmental and humanitarian issues. He serves on the boards of directors of The Ocean Conservancy, the Marine Conservation Biology Institute, the National Environmental Education Foundation and the National Council of the World Wildlife Fund. He has also testified to Congress on ocean management and off-shore drilling.

34


has a charming sense of humor. His personal style is both classic and delightfully unique. In a dress shirt (no tie), a vest and jeans (with a jacket draped over his suitcase), he also wears two cords around his neck—one featuring a carved cow horn from

In addition, Cousteau is president of EarthEcho International, a non-profit organization he founded with his sister and mother, whose mission is to encourage youth to take action that restores and protects our water planet. “My grandfather was a wonderful storyteller and communicator,” Cousteau reveals. “He believed you could change society through kids.” Following this philosophy, EarthEcho combines education, balanced advocacy and a commitment to action, providing programs and tools for students to undertake local projects to help the environment. It also includes training in citizen journalism, workshops that teach young people how to write and tell stories about the environment and the world they live in. “If they can learn [how to write], their words have meaning. They have power,” he emphasizes. Cousteau is the co-author, with Cathryn Berger Kaye M.A., of Going Blue: A Teen Guide to Saving the Oceans, Lakes, Rivers, & Wetlands (Free Spirit Publishing, 2010) and Make A Splash!: A Kid’s Guide to Protecting Our Oceans, Lakes, Rivers, & Wetlands. “We’ve seen firsthand the passion young people have for the environment. EarthEcho’s focus is to empower youth to make a difference…. Adults often tell me they now recycle because their kids insist on it.” xtending his social and environmental work to the financial realm, Cousteau has partnered with AdvisorShares Investments to launch the Global Echo Exchange Traded Fund on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE: GIVE), as well as to form the GlobalECHO Foundation, a 501 (c)(3) for which he serves as co-founder and chairman. “The GlobalECHO Foundation is dedicated to supporting projects and organizations that have the power to transform communities and inspire positive change well beyond their geographic boundaries,” he explains. Despite the seriousness of his business, Cousteau

“ADULTS OFTEN TELL ME THEY NOW RECYCLE BECAUSE THEIR KIDS INSIST ON IT.” Zanzibar, the other a silver shark tooth—as well as numerous bracelets, including one made of wooden beads from South Korea, another of Guatemalan embroidery, and a silver one from his fiancée. Due to his busy schedule, which on any given day might include taping a television segment during a jungle trek, then attending a fundraiser or making a personal appearance, Cousteau has had to learn which clothes work for him in various settings. For TV appearances in the wild, he chooses blue cotton shirts and khaki pants; he even has the pants tailored for a perfect fit. For casual wear he likes jeans (which he lets his fiancée pick out), and on dressier occasions, he prefers three-piece suits. (Recently Cousteau “is into vests,” in part because they offer pockets for his latest passion: pocket watches.) The sense of adventure that has taken Cousteau all over the globe for his work is also reflected in his private life. He even has a list of things he thinks he (and every man of style) should be able to do: fix things around the house, ride a motorcycle, drive a stick shift, tie a bow tie, choose the best wines and spirits, prepare good meals, and barbeque. And what does a man who travels 300 days a year do for vacation? Cousteau smiles. “When work is swimming with great white sharks, a day off is sleeping in.”

35


style

SPRING 2013 FASHION SIZZLES WITH BOLD HUES. HERE’S HOW TO WEAR THEM. BY LENORE RICH

COLOR CUES To get out of a lackluster neutral zone, a few tips: Determine your best colors and wear them near your face. You’ll have a healthy glow. Your eyes will be brighter, your teeth whiter, you’ll look more alert. Knowing your personal color palette will prevent costly mistakes (like buying clothes that just end up hanging in your closet). A professional color analysis is the best option, but you can also do it yourself. Under natural lighting, hold a fabric up to your face, alternating between cool, blue-based tones (blue-reds, true blues, black, white) with warm, yellowbased shades (yellows, oranges, beiges). It should be obvious: either cool or warm colors will be more flattering. (FYI, the vast majority of American men look best in cool shades; hence white or light blue dress shirts rather than beige, and gray or navy suits rather than brown.) Accessorize! If some of your favorite clothes are in the

‘wrong’ color, add a scarf or sweater in the right shade. Eyeglasses, hotter than ever, are a great way to bring ‘correct’ color to your face. Men should consider adding color with great ties, scarves, socks, belts, shoes (and shoelaces!), or other mood-elevating accessories. This season’s essential buy: five-pocket pants or jeans in bold color. The good news: just pick a shade you love! It’s okay to wear a wrong color away from your face; just make sure the top is in your right color! But remember: color blocking that cuts the body in half looks best on tall, thin model types, which most of us are not. While skin tone is the most important factor in finding your best colors, make-up and hair color matter. Fortunately for the men out there: most guys look great with gray hair, as long as it’s the right shade of gray. See a professional colorist and go from drab to dynamic.

The Color-Mood Connection Ronny Dutra, dance instructor at Dance With Me studios in Stamford, Connecticut, confirms that color evokes mood. “People need visual cues to Tango, a passionate dance, evokes feelings of fury, mystery and attitude. I wear a red tie and my dance partner wears red lipstick and strong eye makeup, enhancing the intense facial expression inherent in this dance. Although the quintessential black or red tango dress may seem cliché, it’s totally relevant. Latin dances—caliente and spicy—scream for reds, yellows, oranges and sparkle. But a graceful elegant waltz begs for soft blues and pastels to set the scene—picture a fairy tale Princess gliding across the dance floor...”

36

LEFT FERNANDA RESENDE. ABOVE COURTESY SCOTT JAMES

reinforce feelings and create a state of mind. For example, the Argentine


CAN A MANʼS TROUSER OR JEAN, A BASIC ITEM OF CLOTHING, BE TRANSFORMED INTO A “MUST HAVE?” ̶KILGORE TROUT THINKS SO

T H E U LT I M AT E T R O U S E R . . . AND JEANS


books

The hottest trend in menswear is also one of its oldest. By John Jones

A SPRIG OF IVY

that we might describe as classic or even stuffy, like tweed suits or white bucks, actually evolved from golf and tennis attire of the time. “Princetonians were also credited with introducing the sport jacket,” appropriating Norfolk hunting jackets by updating the construction and wearing them with unmatched trousers. The relaxed style was then broadcast to the world by the most closely watched celebrity of the day, Prince Edward of York (the Duke of Windsor). Eschewing the formality of court dress that his great-grandmother, Queen Victoria, would have demanded, the Prince became fascinated with this sportive style and elevated it to a whole new level (the subject of an essay in the book by Dr. Peter McNeil, a professor of design history at the University of Technology, Sydney). Particularly after abdicating the throne of England, he popularized wearing relaxed, informal clothes in public settings, including shortsleeved knits, bright colors and tartans... clothing we see today even in office settings. The Ivy Style exhibit bravely showed how modern brands have been influenced by the movement, from Michael Bastian’s trim, preppy looks to Thom Browne’s cuttingedge parodies and, of course, Ralph Lauren’s entire oeuvre. But perhaps to get the best look at the future of men’s fashion, we should return to the college campus. Maybe one day we’ll all be wearing compression-fit T-shirts and drawstring sweatpants to work. On the other hand, if we look to royals like Prince Harry for inspiration, we may be headed to the office completely nude.

38

Ivy Style: Radical Conformists by Patricia Mears is published by Yale University Press and The Fashion Institute of Technology.

COURTESY FIT

After touring a recent exhibit at The Museum at FIT called Ivy Style, which celebrated the fashion that evolved from the campuses of the Ivy League schools—Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, U-Penn and Yale—in the early part of the last century, I picked up the accompanying book (also called Ivy Style). In its preface, curator Patricia Mears states that despite the recent recession, apparel brands have been under pressure to produce more collections, more garments per collection and to get into more product categories. The trend doesn’t necessarily mean the items are better... just that there’s more of them. As a result of this overproduction, Mears writes, “I wanted objects that were well made, with real purpose.” She found that designers and other fashion cognoscenti were all returning to the Ivy heritage for “a look that transcends and endures….” In fact, she goes on to differentiate “preppy” from “Ivy” and to show that much of what we take for granted as conservative, classic dressing was, at the time, antiestablishment and revolutionary. Mears shows that “no other university defined Ivy Style as fervently and as beautifully as Princeton in the 1920s and 1930s.” Due in part to its somewhat isolated location, sportswear—clothes literally worn to play sports—became “around-the-clock attire.” Clothes


RELAX. WE MAKE LOOKING GREAT EASY.


PHOTOGRAPHY: STEPHEN CIUCCOLI STYLING: JOSEPH UNGOCO GROOMING: VASSILIS KOKKINIDIS FOR FORD ARTISTS

Take note.

NEWRULES FOR BUSINESSCASUAL You heard it here first: Casual Fridays are becoming less casual, even on Fridays, even in the summer! The new Business Casual is just as relaxed but nowhere near as sloppy. Clothes that fit. Colors that flatter. Luxury fabrics that beg to be touched. (Well, maybe not in the office…) Score points with the boss, with the women, with PERFORMANCE your mother… Look better, feel better, perform better. Here, in the pages to ENHANCING follow, the new rules for Business Casual.


1

Rule

IMPORTANT: IT’S OKAY TO LOOK LIKE THE BOSS!

You’ll never be denied an opportunity because you look too professional. On the other hand, clothes that work for the gym or backyard could very well hold you back. As the saying goes: Dress for the job you want, not the one you’ve got…


Rule

2

A SPORTCOAT IS ALWAYS APPROPRIATE!

Why not try a modern unconstructed version, (unlined, minus the padding) worn with a lightweight knit top or shirt and tie? (Bows are back, especially for young guys!) Note too the five-pocket pants in nondenim fabrics. Fit is key!


3

Rule

BEST FOOT FORWARD.

Women know, and guys are learning: itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about the shoes! For spring 2013, we love lace-ups in soft leather or suede; have fun with color!


4

Rule

FOCUS ON ACCESSORIES.

Cool socks: check! Perfect watch? Essential. Bracelet? Adds personality. A great bag or backpack? Of course! And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t overlook your belt and wallet. Make sure they convey the impression you want to make.


5

Rule

INVEST IN A GREAT SPRING JACKET!

Since you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need a whole wardrobe of them, pick something really special. (Suede in the spring is very Italian!)


Rule

6

MODELS: KERSCH, Q MODEL MANAGEMENT; PIERRE BARRERA, RED MODEL MANAGEMENT

JEANS IN THE OFFICE:

Unless you’re meeting with formal clients, jeans are okay. Just make sure you’re wearing perfectly fitted premium denim in an even-tone dark wash. Paired with a sportcoat, a cardigan, or even a shirt and tie, dressed-up denim is fine with us. (Just ditch the big baggy stuff and wear great shoes!)


26

PHOTOGRAPHY: SERGIO KURHAJEK STYLING: WENDY MCNETT HAIR & MAKEUP: CLAIRE BAYLEY

SHADES of BLUE This spring, the world’s most universally beloved color — and the color that somehow magically looks good on everyone — is everywhere! In a stunning spectrum of solids, prints, textures and patterns, when it comes to blue, the sky and the sea are the limit. So get your blue on!


Aquamarine A Azur Az ure Baby b Bluebeerry C ribbean Ca Ceru r lean Cobalt C rnflower Co Denim Heather He Indiigo Miidnight Navyy Ocean P cific Pa Peacock Periwinkle Powder Robin’s Egg R yal Ro Sapphire Sky Steel Teal Turquoise Violet


Aquamarine Azure Baby Blueberry Caribbean Cerulean Cobalt Cornflower Denim Heather Indigo Midnight Navy Ocean Pacific Peacock Periwinkle Powder Robin’s Egg Royal Sapphire Sky Steel Teal Turquoise Violet


travel

A GRAPE NIGHT’S SLEEP LUXE WINERIES THAT ACCOMMODATE BEYOND THE TASTING ROOM. BY SHIRA LEVINE

Sleeping where you drink doesn’t necessarily mean you’re a wellpickled grifter, but the warm buzz from a few glasses of pinot noir undoubtedly nudges most of us into a deep rest. When spending a snug few nights within a winery, exclusivity, top-notch amenities and epic landscapes combine to make a sensational bottle taste that much better. We got our teeth red to bring you three of our favorite winery refuges, encouraging you to toss the keys on the mahogany table, stay the night, and wake up to a crisp sparkling white…for breakfast!

CASTELLO DEL TREBBIO IN PONTASSIEVE, ITALY

Anyone can drink good wine in Italy, but not everyone can say they’ve clinked glasses and spent the night in a medieval castle.

Located atop the San Brigida hills roughly a half-hour from Florence, the castle-turned-mansion villa is surrounded by lush grape vines, olive groves and saffron crocuses. Trebbio offers a subtle modernity while respecting history and tradition. (Castles are made of stone and get cold, so central heating and electricity are fêted where they can be found!) The castle tower that once protected the fortress still stands, but now serves as a welcoming entry. The estate warden, although retired, still greets guests in traditional clothing, and the dungeons with their once murderous hooks remain to hold Chianti hostage in Trebbio’s wine cellar. The cave-like restaurant is a relatively recent addition, whose dishes enhance the celebrated Riesling/pinot grigio blend and the aforementioned Chianti. Built by the Pazzi family, Renaissance-era Florentine bankers, the castle first changed hands in the 14th-century after a bloody clash with the Medici clan. But today, romance is the main focus on Trebbio’s 800 acres. The property hosts many a bride and groom from around the world, as well as those seeking a fairy tale setting for any occasion. The villa is separated into three apartments, each rustic and cozy with its own patio, private garden and swimming pool. (Those who plan to cook or bring a chef should request the one previously occupied by the owners; it has the most modern appliances.) Guests can arrange activities like Italian language courses, painting or cooking classes and horseback riding. Hiking and biking trails lined with chestnut trees and olive groves lead from the villa to the lake and the local village.

54


JORDAN WINERY IN HEALDSBURG, CALIFORNIA The picturesque roads that snake through Northern California’s wine country don’t just lead to Napa and Sonoma. About an hour northwest is Healdsburg, an insider’s enclave. Filled with fab foodie spots, the town is rich with wineries that reap their fruits from the crossings of the Russian River, Dry Creek and Alexander Valleys. Within that dynamic topography lies the 1,500-acre, family-owned Jordan Winery. Tastings are open to anyone with a palate, but a night’s stay within the 18th century-esque château (actually built 37 years ago for a reported $15 million) is only for oenophiles in Jordan’s loyalty program. Earn reward points through the purchase of two award-winning wines, a cabernet sauvignon and chardonnay that have impressed chefs and sommeliers since 1976. Built by the architects responsible for George Lucas’ Skywalker Ranch, the château includes seven unique rooms, each with high wood beamed ceilings, red tiled floors and authentic Louis XIII antiques. Below the suites is the regal dining room and Chef Todd Knoll’s kitchen, where he and his hospitality director wife Nitsa marry epicurean innovation with tradition using the freshest ingredients from the plentiful garden outside. Fava greens, cremini mushrooms and haricots verts are just a few of the treats served on Baccarat crystal and Madeira linens to overnight guests like Bono, Pierce Brosnan and Michael Mina. After dinner, the lucky are invited to enjoy a glass (or two) in CEO John Jordan’s private 1920s-style hangar. Besides a bar, pool table and vintage shuffleboard, he keeps his bright yellow piper cub plane and a museum quality collection of World War I and II-era memorabilia on display to dazzle those who wander in

MATETIC WINERY IN CASABLANCA VALLEY, CHILE The Casablanca Valley, a midway point between Valparaiso and Santiago, is a wine region just 11 miles from the water, bathed in cool breezes and morning fogs from the Pacific. The result: a ‘premium cool valley’ where chardonnay and sauvignon blanc vines can thrive. Just southwest of Casablanca is the futuristic-looking Matetic Winery, discreetly tucked into the slope of a hillside within the San Antonio Valley. Pioneering 21st-century enotourism, the avantgarde property features a dramatic oval barrel cellar and two swish tasting rooms replete with a waterfall. Try the organic pinot noir, syrah, sauvignon blanc and chardonnay within the gleaming wood and glass winery, then take a short drive to the elegant yet rustic La Casona. The traditional colonialstyle estancia and hacienda is also a working family ranch and vineyard that sits on 27,000 acres hugging the Rosario Valley. The adobe guesthouses are chic and stylish thanks to a 2004 renovation. Seven rooms are each named after a wine and enhanced with a private terrace. They boast four-poster beds and rich damask curtains that flank windows with views of palm trees and verdant wild gardens (though the views from the swimming pool are some of the most staggering). Dining options include the gourmet restaurant Equilibrio or a private chef who prepares indulgent breakfasts and dinners. Organic and sustainable is the agenda, so guests can expect mostly handcrafted ingredients, from homemade breads and sheep’s milk cheeses to honeys and jams made from grape, fig, papaya and pomegranate trees growing on the land. (There’s even a family-run cheese operation to tour on the property!)

55


interiors

RISK MANAGEMENT

Kelly Wearstler lays it all on the line to make a grand statement on style. By William Kissel hen Mies van der Rohe uttered his famous words “God is in the details” to an admirer of his design work, the German-American architect might just as easily have been speaking about the work of Kelly Wearstler, the entrepreneurial designer whose thought-provoking and detail-driven designs for boutique hotels and opulent homes have redefined the concept of modern glamour. Whether designing the decadent black, white and daffodil yellow interiors of Palm Desert’s Viceroy Hotel (one of the many Viceroys she’s designed from California to the Caribbean), putting the finishing

touches on her recently launched women’s fashion label, or drafting pieces for her new line of furniture and wall coverings debuting this spring, Wearstler—a former Playboy centerfold turned style-bending interior designer—is a self-described risk-taker who finds genius in the most off-beat places. “I can find inspiration in vintage books and fashion, or spend hours in a button store and see one that inspires a pillow,” says the Australian-born designer, who shares her Los Angeles home with her husband, real estate developer Brad Korzen, and their two young sons, Oliver and Elliott. “The smallest things in everyday life—colors, prints, patterns—all fascinate me,” she says.

56


Those everyday musings have been turned into magical pieces for the home, office or wardrobe: everything from bedding and draperies to jackets and day dresses. Wearstler and her signature studio, KWID, have quickly become one of the world’s most sought-after design firms, primarily because her work transcends style and place without appearing too studied or overly trendy. To that end, Wearstler is not afraid to combine elements of Hollywood Regency, Rococo, Streamlined Modern and Chinoiserie in the same room, nor is she averse to mixing textures and materials such as velvet, gold leaf, tortoise shell, buffalo horn, stainless steel and glass, among others, resulting in her own kind of decorative anarchy. “All of my interiors are fun, yet still sophisticated and elegant; they are spirited and soulful and full of elements that are raw and refined,” says Wearstler, whose stamp is on countless boutique hotels and residential estates as well as Bergdorf Goodman’s signature restaurant, BG, in New York City. Currently the effervescent designer is at work on a new luxury hospitality group’s first hotel property in San Francisco, while also putting the finishing touches on her first collection for The Rug Company and her dinnerware line for Pickard Fine China. “To me there is no place for rigidity in design,” reveals Wearstler, who is fond of what she calls ‘unexpected style.’ “Unexpected style is mixing different periods together, or creating tension in a room with different pieces of furniture and color. Mixing 10 different woods and four different fabrics creates something truly unexpected. But if you know what you’re doing, it can look very seamless and pleasing to the eye,” she maintains. he daughter of an engineer and a wannabe interior designer, Wearstler grew up surrounded by beautiful and unusual objects, textures and colors. “My home was always in a state of flux; I’d come home from school and the living room would be an entirely different color,” she says, referring to this constant evolution of style as a rhapsody, coincidentally also the name of her new book for Rizzoli. “Rhapsody is about a bunch of things, different periods, scales and textures, coming together to create a beautiful space,” she explains. “I’ve always wanted to inspire people to take risks and to create environments that feel spirited.” Wearstler’s signature is always apparent in her works—if you know where to look. “I would say my signature is sculpture. But they are usually very modern, not fussy,” she says. “I like animals and figures and busts. Those are my favorite accessories because they bring a human element to a space. Furniture brings a human element as well, but for me, I just love animals: they add surprise. So in the Viceroy Hotel in Palm Springs, for instance, I put greyhounds in all the doors to make it a bit more interesting.” Surprises notwithstanding, great thought and purpose is behind every choice.

57


world scene GARDEN VARIETY

T

his spring and summer, you could plant a few geraniums… or create your own private paradise. A simple patch at a small house in London, a garden featuring an Italian cascade in California, extravagant parks on great estates in France and Belgium: French landscape artist and garden designer Francois Goffinet develops the concepts and personally oversees the realization of his projects all over the world. Gardening aficionados who prefer to do it themselves can still have a touch of the master with pieces from Monsieur Goffinet’s recently introduced classical garden furniture collection, which includes a wood chair, armchair, footstool, stone table, tent and planters. He also offers advice: “Take care of the site and the genius loci.”

Experience life’s little luxuries. By Donald Charles Richardson TALENT SHOWS

T

BILL WESTMOORELAND

he brilliant singer/songwriter Ann Hampton Callaway has composed over 250 songs for television, Broadway and Off-Broadway. Her music and lyrics have been performed and recorded by talents as diverse as Liza Minnelli, Patti LuPone, Michael Feinstein, Carole King and the legendary Barbra Streisand, who asked Callaway to write lyrics to a Rolf Lovland melody entitled I’ve Dreamed of You. (She liked the finished product so much she sang it to James Brolin at their wedding.) Last year, the Boston Pops commissioned Callaway to create and perform a show based on music performed by Streisand. On opening night, at Boston’s famed Symphony Hall, the audience gave her nine standing ovations. Starting this spring and continuing into the autumn, Callaway is taking the Barbra Streisand Songbook on the road, performing with symphony orchestras across the country in cities from Washington to Pennsylvania.

58


RIVER WORLD

R

osa River Cruises sail along historically fascinating waterways. There’s the Blue Danube cruise that meanders up this romantic river to Slovakia, Hungary, Serbia and Croatia. The cruise along the Rhine docks at castles, cities (including Mozart’s birthplace) and the mysterious Black Forest (both ships offer travelers private tours of museums and great châteaux). On board, local, often rare wines are served. There’s a spa with one-way glass walls (so guests can view the passing scene while having a treatment), gym, lounge with a dance floor, sun deck, swimming pool, putting green, whirlpool and shuffleboard court. The restaurant features regional dishes; if you’re too entranced by the view to go inside to eat, the chef will arrange to have your dinner served on deck.

VINO DA CANTARE

A

few miles from Florence near the small village of Lajatico is the Bocelli vineyard, which has belonged to the family of world-famous tenor Andrea Bocelli for generations. (Andrea’s sister-in-law Cinzia and brother Alberto manage the azienda and greet guests; Mama Bocelli can often be found hand-tying vines in the fields.) Next time you’re touring the Tuscany region of Italy, you might spend a charming afternoon visiting with the Bocellis and tasting their wines, then stop for dinner at Ristorante La Vallata just a short distance away. This restored farmhouse has several Bocelli wines in the cellar, or you can choose a favorite at the vineyard and bring it with you. Settle on the terrace surrounded by cypress and olive trees dating back to the 1700s and dine on entrées the chef creates to pair with the Bocelli wines.

59


music

RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN REVISITED London. Not just any studio, but Abbey Road Studio, where John, Paul, George and Ringo recorded most of their music from 1962 to 1970. Ted Chapin didn’t have to imagine it. He lived it and confides that “it was pretty cool.” But instead of hearing the legendary Beatles, he listened with pride and admiration as the talented British conductor John Wilson coaxed his handpicked orchestra—comprised of many of the U.K. and Europe’s finest first-string players—to bring to life the film orchestrations of Rodgers & Hammerstein. Wilson has produced countless orchestrations for film, radio and TV, and his lifelong love of musicals has led him to restore the scores of numerous classic films including High Society and Singin’ in the Rain. “I listened to a CD many years ago of movie music by John Wilson. I’d never heard of him before, but immediately became a fan,” says Chapin, president and CEO of the New York-based Rodgers & Hammerstein: An Imagem Company. “It led me on a quest to find this person who conducted with such guts and passion. I wanted him to take a look at the repertoire that I represented.” Chapin and Wilson would eventually meet at the BBC Proms, share their zeal for all things R&H, and agree to collabo-

rate on a project. The culmination of that mutual admiration is EMI Classics’ Rodgers & Hammerstein At The Movies, the first re-recording of many of R&H’s most beloved songs since the original movie soundstage sessions. “There is nothing in existence with this type of integrity,” boasts Chapin. “John has shaken up R&H’s music and said, ‘Listen to this: it’s pretty extraordinary. Don’t take it for granted.’” Since debuting to critical acclaim in the U.K. last fall—ahead of Coldplay, the Beach Boys and Katy Perry—the recording has enjoyed comparable notoriety in

60

THE ANATOMY OF A CLASSIC, SEVEN DECADES LATER! the United States following its February 2013 release. How could it not with a selection of 15 classics from Oklahoma, Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I and The Sound of Music in their stunning original film orchestrations? Almost seven decades after Rodgers & Hammerstein first collaborated on Oklahoma, the universality and signifi-

CHRIS CHRISTODOLOU / SIM CANETTY-CLARKE LICENSED TO EMI CLASSICS

Imagine taking the long and winding road to a recording studio in


“The recording opened to critical acclaim in the U.K. last fall, ahead of Coldplay, the Beach Boys, Katy Perry…” al opera star who made his Broadway debut as cance of their music and message has never Emile de Becque in South Pacific and who also been stronger—both in the U.S. and abroad. performs Some Enchanted Evening on this John Wilson saw the reaction firsthand when recording. he performed the duo’s iconic music at the Pittsinger says he’s in awe of “the genius of BBC Proms and received a huge public John Wilson. He captured the essence, the flavor, response that grew with each subsequent perthe text and the color of the film formance. He was gratified by the strong reacorchestrations. It’s inspirational tion to a legendary team that to be a student, curator and he believes champion of this music, which “gave us a serves as a great tribute to the completely lasting relevance of Rodgers & new sort of Hammerstein.” Interestingly, musical South Pacific was the first where the musical featuring R&H as both songs were writers and producers. One of seamlessly the most successful partnerintegrated ships in the history of into the plot American musical theater, and pushed the their musicals have collecplot forward. In tively earned 34 Tonys, 15 addition to this, Oscars, two Pulitzer Prizes you got terrific and two Grammys. tunes and beauFor this unprecedented recording, Wilson tifully crafted chose what he considered to be “all the best lyrics.” tunes... where the orchestrations show off the “If you’re a general fan of Rodgers & orchestra.” He also showcased a broad crossHammerstein, you will hear in these performsection of characters—“the Rodgers & ances such a degree of energy, clarity and pasHammerstein types”—and intentionally cast sion, it’s like hearing them for the first time,” great singers who are also respected actors. explains Chapin. “Everyone knows the notes “John is smart at getting all the goods to make that make up these songs, but when you hear music,” adds Chapin. “I think Mr. Rodgers and them played by John Wilson, you sit Mr. Hammerstein would be thrilled by the up and say ‘Wow!’” results. They’d say, ‘Whoa, that’s what we And that’s exactly what wrote… and that’s exactly the way we happened to David John Wilson wanted it to sound.”’ Pittsinger, the internationconducts his

orchestra in the legendary Abbey Road Studio.

MUSICAL MUSINGS ON MEN’S STYLE Ted Chapin: “God love the blue blazer is all I can say! Women always travel with lots of clothes on hangers, but if I’m gone for a threeday trip, I can do it all with a blue blazer. Brioni is the suit that looks best on me, so I guess I now have ‘a brand.’ And I like to have fun with neckties, an absurd category of clothing when you think about it....” David Pittsinger: “I feel very close to Emile de Becque’s style: clothing that’s refined, but expressive. I love lifetime classics—like Zegna and Armani—that make you feel impeccably dressed and pressed. But I also admire the styling of Robert Graham, whose color palettes, hand-stitching and tattoo-inspired designs are dramatic yet elegant.”


spirits

BESPOKE BOOZE

OPPORTUNITIES FOR SAMPLING FINE AND RARE WHISKIES (OR STORING YOUR OWN COLLECTION), ARE INCREASINGLY POPULAR. BUT THEY DON’T ALWAYS COME CHEAP.

Single malt fans have more options than ever to customize their drinking. By Robert Haynes-Peterson It’s an excellent time for connoisseurs of single malt Scotch whisky. Distilleries are expanding, production is up, with more iterations of fine and rare releases than ever before. For those seeking even more unusual drinking options, a cottage industry of whisky clubs and concierge services has arisen to assist in customizing your whisky experience like never before.

1494 Club: A New York-based whisky club directly targeting high earners, 1494 honors the private social clubs of the 19th century. Founder David Clelland has secured an undisclosed townhouse in Manhattan where members can convene for tastings and curate their personal collections. Founding Members ($175,000) gain access to Scotland distillery and golf course trips via private jet, while Collector memberships ($25,000 and up) also boast many perks. “I wanted to offer an experience, and a lifetime commitment for collectors,” says Clelland.

The Whisky Dog: Founder Nicholas Pollacchi is an affable, stylish young Scotsman who has worked all angles of the whisky trade. What he felt was missing were private tasting events customized to meet a company’s or individual's needs. Meet The Whisky Dog. “We’re all about sitting down with the client and creating the kind of experience they want to create. Is it focused on high-end, rare product, or is it a one-to-one Scotch 101 seminar with younger executives?” asks Pollacchi. In addition to offering a large range of specialty whiskies, Pollacchi can customize events to include extras like fine cigars, a bespoke tailor, food pairings and musical entertainment.

Branded Whisky Clubs: Groups like the Glenlivet Guardians, 1801 Chivas Brotherhood and the Custodians of The Dalmore provide extra perks for your favorite brands. Sign up online and gain access to early releases of new expressions, private tasting events and more. The Glenlivet Guardians, for example, have sole access to the Guardian Single Cask Edition (about $300), and to a threeday "Whisky School" at the Speyside distillery, including the opportunity to bottle your own whisky.

The Scotch Malt Whisky Society of America: This branch of the popular Edinburgh-based Society allows members the opportunity to sample and buy rare single-cask expressions, custommade for SMWS. Bottles are identified by number (i.e. Cask No 106.18) rather than distillery, to allow the whisky to speak for itself. The date of distillation, number of bottles and tasting notes are printed on each bottle. Membership is $229 (which includes a kit with four sample whiskies), and an annual renewal fee of $60. Members also get discounted admission to tasting events.


EPSTEIN DESIGN PARTNERS, INC.


KEEP IT CLEAN

(wine, coffee, etc,); oil-based (butter, car grease, body oil, that pesky Bain de Soleil); or dye (blueberries, permanent markers) all require different methods of removal. One of the biggest mistakes you can make is attempting to remove the stain yourself. You risk destroying the fabric as well as permanently setting the stain. Your dry cleaner has the expertise to remove most stains, even invisible ones left by perfumes and cologne that can wreak havoc over time. Here are some questions to ask before entrusting a dry cleaner with your fine garments: • Do they send out the garments or clean them on-premise? • Do they wrap specialty buttons to prevent scratching? • Do they hand-iron and offer hand-finishing? • Will they pre-measure and block those expensive Chanel, Brunello Cucinelli or St. John knits to their original shapes so they won’t distort during cleaning? • Do they offer rush services and tailoring? • Is home pickup and delivery available? A couture cleaner will provide all these services. To be on the safe side, always do a trial run with a less-loved garment before committing an important piece to their service. And one last tip: When it comes to suit separates, have both pieces cleaned even if only one needs it so they show the same wear. Until someone invents a virtual wardrobe from which to wipe away life’s mishaps, the best option is to bring your fine threads to the professionals. Your apparel will thank you.

GETTY 1 / CHRISTIAN ADAMS

end page

lathered in SPF 4 Bain de Soleil Orange Gelée while sipping a Gosling’s Bermuda Rum Swizzle poolside is the ultimate way to enjoy a good book on vacation. But this indulgence comes with a price, as evidenced by my friend’s oil-stained designer cover-up. But life is meant to be lived, and unseemly mishaps are bound to happen (if you’re having fun). We all want to prolong the life of an expensive Zegna suit or Chanel dress that has lived through many good times. However, dunking it in the infinity pool isn’t the solution. The best way to protect your investment is to use a reputable dry cleaner who knows how to care for high-end fine designer apparel. As we’ve all discovered, some dry cleaners are better than others. So what makes one superior? A top-notch dry cleaner has a professional relationship with retailers of fine garments and often designers themselves. This helps him identify the fabrics and the best way to clean and ultimately save your expensive garments. Your fine clothing retailer can direct you to the most qualified dry cleaner for the brands they sell. A couture cleaner’s knowledge encompasses the proper way to treat fancy embellishments such as beading, feathers, leather and suede. Discuss with your cleaner what caused the stain to help him or her decide on the proper method for its removal. (Be honest!) Different stains, such as protein-based (dairy, blood); tannins

PREVENT YOUR CLOTHES FROM GETTING AS DIRTY AS YOUR BEACH READ. BY HANS GSCHLIESSER

64


“Only that day dawns to which we are awake.” H EN RY DAVI D TH OREAU

Awaken your senses at Walden, a 1000-acre sanctuary in the heart of Ohio’s great Western Reserve. Experience championship golfing at Club Walden. Enjoy AAA Five-Diamond® hospitality at the highly acclaimed Inn Walden. Retreat to the tranquility of Spa Walden, and if you are too enchanted to leave, Live Walden in a custom dream home. To set a new course, visit www.yourwalden.com or call 888 808 5003.

walden


KILGORE TROUT FORUM SPRING 2013

Kilgore Trout  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you