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Forum/The Substance of Style/SS 2017

SNEAK PREVIEW WAKE UP YOUR

WARDROBE WITH EVERYONE’S FAVORITE FOOTWEAR

INSIDER TIPS EXPLORE THE BEST OF MILAN

UNBELIEVABLE EATS FROM AROUND THE WORLD


GARYS FASHION ISLAND, NEWPORT BEACH 949-759-1622

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The Fashion Forum

DEL MAR PLAZA, DEL MAR 858-794-0740

PUBLISHER

Stuart Nifoussi ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Michelle Brown EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Karen Alberg Grossman MANAGING EDITOR

Jillian LaRochelle DESIGN DIRECTOR

Hans Gschliesser PROJECT MANAGER

Lisa Menghi DESIGNER

Jean-Nicole Venditti CONCEPT DIRECTOR

Andrew Mitchell DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION

Peg Eadie

44 Destinations: Milan Insider Picks

DIRECTOR OF PREPRESS

John Frascone

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FEATURES 44 46 50 52

Getting Sneaky

APPAREL FORUM Andrisen Morton DENVER, CO Garys NEWPORT BEACH, CA

Destinations: Milan Insider Picks Food: Over-the-Top Eats First Person: Fashion Class Wine: So You Want to Be a Sommelier?

Hubert White MINNEAPOLIS, MN Kilgore Trout CLEVELAND, OH Larrimor’s PITTSBURGH, PA Malouf’s LUBBOCK/SOUTHLAKE, TX

FASHION 10 12 18 28 34

Marios PORTLAND, OR / SEATTLE, WA Mitchells WESTPORT, CT / HUNTINGTON, NY

Profile: Brax Profile: Canali Profile: Billy Reid Getting Sneaky Style of the Sun Gods

Mitchells/Richards GREENWICH, CT Oak Hall MEMPHIS, TN Rodes LOUISVILLE, KY Rubensteins NEW ORLEANS, LA Stanley Korshak DALLAS, TX

DEPARTMENTS 4 8 14 20 24 54 56

Welcome Letter Ask Forum The Fashion Forum Man of Style: Michael Armstrong Designers: Inspired Design At Your Service End Page: Why Clothes Matter

Wilkes Bashford SAN FRAN/PALO ALTO, CA

FASHION FORUM MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED IN 11 REGIONAL EDITIONS FOR MEMBER STORES OF THE APPAREL FORUM. COPYRIGHT © 2017 FASHION FORUM MAGAZINE, A UBM ® PUBLICATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. UBM AMERICAS, 2 PENN PLAZA, FLOOR 15, NEW YORK, NY 10121. THE PUBLISHERS ACCEPT NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR ADVERTISERS’ CLAIMS, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS OR OTHER MATERIALS. NO PART OF THIS MAGAZINE MAY BE

50 First Person: Fashion Class

REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHERS. VOLUME 20, ISSUE 1. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.


Welcome to the spring 2017 issue of GARYS Forum magazine.

We are happy to report that the extreme drought appears to be over—at least the one that’s weather driven. The other drought that’s still persisting is in your closet, where you may be experiencing extreme boredom with your daily clothing options. The good news: that’s a problem we can help you solve! Consider alternate ways of presenting yourself this spring, then come in to GARYS and find interesting new styles from our array of top designers. Upgrading your footwear is a good place to start. Do you own really great sneakers? I’m not talking about the kind that you wear to the gym, but cool new models that look as good with dressy sportswear as they do with a suit. It’s now OK, in fact stylish, to be comfortable even when dressing up. And GARYS has the best selection of terrific footwear for miles around. Our associates will help you make the right choices that help you fit in even as you stand out. And what complements sneakers better than comfortable denim with stretch technology? Nothing! Especially when it’s in new spring colors and weights. We’ve got it at GARYS and we’re looking forward to helping you change up your look for the brighter days ahead. Remember, GARYS is the place where you’ll save valuable time working with our trusted advisors to find unique, high-quality clothes that define your personal style. If you’ve shopped with us before, we know your preferences, your history and body type. Being a GARYS customer means having someone who really cares helping you make the correct choices. So, come on in and hang out with us. You never know what wonderful things might happen. We’ve got your back, and anything else you need to cover. We hope to see you soon and often, John Braeger and the GARYS team

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ask

I’d like a new sport coat that’s not a basic blazer. What do you suggest?

Q:

I see a lot of guys wearing What kind of shirt would look shorter, tighter suits these great worn both with and days; is that still the look for 2017? without a tie?

Q:

Q:

Patterns, be they subtle or loud, are definitely happening in spring sport coats. We love the more muted plaids in shades of blue, berry or soft gray, but feel free to make a bolder statement if you dare, especially since these fashion-forward sport coats work as well with jeans and fivepocket pants as they do with dress trousers.

Only if you’re comfortable in it. The more important factor is that the suit should fit: anything too baggy or long is definitely out of style. Some general rules: shoulders should reflect your natural shoulder stance, sleeves should allow a quarter to a half-inch of shirt cuff showing, buttons on the coat shouldn’t pull, pants (whether flatfront or pleated) should feel comfortable, without ripples but without excess fabric. Trouser length should skim the top of your shoe, but a slight break is also acceptable. Fortunately, today’s suits in new performance fabrics enhance both fit and comfort. Let us show you a few exciting options.

There’s a new kind of shirt referred to as a hybrid: somewhere between dress shirt and sport shirt. Often, there’s a button between the traditional first and second button positions, so that even if you’re not wearing a tie, the impression is neater. Look also for sporty details like contrast fabric in the collar and/or sleeve cuff, contrast buttons, or brightly stitched buttonholes that won’t show if you’re wearing a tie. Speaking of new spring ties, why not try a more casual knit, or a seasonal blend with cotton, silk or linen?

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IMAGE COURTESY OF ETON

SPRING 2017 FASHION TIPS FOR HIM


HUGO BOSS FASHIONS INC.


profile

the

Bottoms

GERMAN BRAND BRAX IS QUICKLY BECOMING THE AMERICAN MAN’S GO-TO FOR PANTS. BY BRIAN SCOTT LIPTON

line

Sure, every man needs a great-looking blazer, a soft cashmere sweater and a well-tailored shirt, both to gain attention and feel put-together. However, without comfortable, well-fitting pants to complete the look, you’ve only won half the battle. So it shouldn’t be surprising that bottoms from German-based Brax, a company with over a century of experience, have become many men’s go-to since recently being introduced in America. Men have quickly grown to appreciate the brand’s durability, comfort, performance and consistency in fit (not to mention the fact that it offers a broad range of waist sizes). “What’s so great about these pants is that they’re dressy enough to go with a sport jacket, but casual enough to become what we call an anchor bottom,” says Russ Fearon, president of Throat Threads Apparel, the U.S. distributor of Brax. “The modern aesthetic, soft luxurious feel and stretch comfort create phenomenal value for the sophisticated-casual consumer.” Above all, though, Brax has become valued for its versatility. “American men have found they have a need for a more dressy pair of pants in their wardrobe than jeans, something they can wear to the office and then to a business dinner or a nice restaurant,” Fearon explains. As he points out, the pants’ fabric is a key selling point for Brax. “The Germans have been using the finest Italian and German weaving mills for their products for more than 100 years,” Fearon continues. “All the fabrics are exclusive to Brax, and we work with them closely to create something that is highly engineered, with a luxury feel, yet at a great price point for the American consumer.” (Most Brax pants retail for $189 to $249.) In addition, Brax pants are washable, and many men appreciate that convenience. “I think Brax has carved out a space all its own: a pant that is perfectly positioned between sophistication and leisure,” says Fearon. “And the one thing I know for certain is that whenever a new customer puts on a pair of Brax for the first time, they immediately say, ‘Wow!’”

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profile

Master of Giorgio Canali

Style

On what it takes to be the best.

BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

Would you share a brief background of the company?

expert tailors on an internal canvas structure, guaranteeing a more comfortable, durable and elegant garment. We take pride in using fabrics that represent the very best of local Italian mills; we work closely with them to design patterns and colors and blends so that the majority of our fabrics are exclusive.

Canali was founded near Milan in 1934 by two brothers, Giovanni and Giacomo Canali. The decades that have passed have seen the arrival of new generations, new energy and new vision for the company, but through all this, we’ve maintained our dedication and passion for our work. Today Canali is an undisputed international leader in tailor-made luxury with our own centers of production (all in Italy), more than 1,800 employees, 250 boutiques, and over 1,000 retail stores in more than 100 countries.

There has been much talk about fit in recent seasons: can suits get any slimmer? It’s not a question of slim or not, it’s more about a focus on freedom and spontaneity. Men expect their clothing to be elegant, comfortable and in synch with today’s lifestyle. A slimmer silhouette often gives a guy a more youthful, tailored look. Elegance lies in the right balance of numerous components, not on any extreme.

Did you always know you’d work in the family business? Not exactly, but it became sort of natural. Growing up in the company and being constantly exposed to various aspects of the business, I developed a growing interest.

How do we get American men to dress more Italian?

What are the joys and headaches?

If a man isn’t comfortable in what he’s wearing, he can never be elegant. That said, the secret to an ‘Italian look’ is sprezzatura—a term first made popular by Baldassare Castiglione in his 16th-century handbook The Book of the Courtier. He used it to express the uniquely Italian art of making things look effortless. A key element in Italian style is that an outfit never look forced, uncomfortable or unnatural. Anyone can achieve this by wearing garments that combine fine fabrics, expert cutting and beautiful design, all intrinsic to a Canali suit.

The joys and headaches reflect the pride and, at the same time, the responsibility of working in a company that bears your name. A business that your own family created and built gives you much motivation, but also a fair amount of pressure.

Who has been your mentor or role model? Definitely my father: he has transferred to me his passion and dedication. What’s more, he taught me respect for other people’s work and their efforts, and to always remember our responsibility towards the talented artisans who work here.

Can you talk about Su Misura? Canali’s Su Misura is the highest expression of the Canali experience, elevating the excellence of Canali craftsmanship to a new level. Our customers love the personalized and unique experience, where our experts analyze the specifications of your physique and then translate this information into a perfect suit incorporating the characteristics of comfort and elegance that are the hallmarks of our tailoring.

What differentiates a Canali suit from the competition?

How would you describe your personal style?

The secret to a Canali suit lies in its construction. We are proud to craft our garments according to time-honored sartorial tradition. Our suits are built by

I would define it as discrete elegance, updated but with a nod to classic. On weekends, I enjoy wearing sophisticated sportswear, but I often add a sport coat and dressy shoes.

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the FASHION forum

By Brian Scott Lipton

PACK IT UP!

W

ith airlines charging more each day for checked baggage and even for carry-ons, savvy business travelers are constantly searching for smart solutions that allow them to fit more apparel in one bag—and have it arrive at their destination looking just as fresh as it did in their closet. Europeanbased luggage maker Vocier’s C38 bag (part of its smartly curated collection) is one very clever answer to this nagging problem: the patented “Zero-Crease” system allows you to pack two suits in a special protected sleeve that gently curves around the interior of the bag, protecting your suits from wrinkles. In addition, there’s plenty of room in the interior pocket for shoes, shirts, socks, underwear and belts—even a wash bag to take everything back home!

MAGNIFICENT OBSESSIONS Window dresser extraordinaire Simon Doonan prizes his “Prince head.” Fashion designer John Bartlett treasures his late father’s 1975 Cincinnati Reds World Series ring, while actor Tony Goldwyn proudly displays one of his family’s favorite heirlooms—a large Buddha statue—in the bay window of his living room. How do we know these things? Thank jewelry designer Monica Rich Kosann, who has interviewed more than 65 world-famous personalities about their favorite things in her impressive coffee-table tome, A Possession Obsession (Glitterati Incorporated). Kosann’s gorgeous photography accompanies each revealing interview, with words and pictures adding up to some of the most beautiful stories ever told.

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The Fashion Forum

CHARGE IT!

Cashmere and cotton are eternally chic, but two things currently at the height of fashion are sustainability and electric cars. So it’s no wonder that one of the world’s most fashionable hotel chains, The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, has installed charging stations for electric cars at select properties across the globe, from San Francisco to Barcelona. Two stations at each hotel allow drivers the ability to charge their cars for up to 150 miles in a mere two and a half hours. So the next time you’re on vacation, you have no excuse not to hit the streets—and you can feel good about doing it!

CURTAIN CALL

T

heater aficionados know that London and New York are the transcontinental capitals of this beloved art form, so it makes perfect sense that the exhibition Curtain Up: Celebrating the Last 40 Years of Theatre in New York and London has relocated from London’s Victoria & Albert Museum to New York’s Public Library for the Performing Arts. Through June, this special installation highlights how the theater districts of both cities have flourished and developed since 1976, and features designs, models, photographs, archival production materials and multimedia elements from such award-winning shows as Mary Poppins, Chicago, Wicked and many more. Fashionistas will be particularly delighted by the costumes on display, including masks from Phantom of the Opera, masks and African garb from The Lion King, and titular footwear from Kinky Boots. So make a run for the fascinating show while there’s still time. (Just don’t break a leg.)

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profile

Rock & Roll

Gent

THE AWARD-WINNING BILLY REID TAKES CLASSIC AMERICAN CLOTHING IN A MODERN DIRECTION. BY LAURIE SCHECHTER What makes your designs unique as well as American? I want to make clothes that are appropriate whether you’re living in Florence, Alabama or New York. I’ve spent much of my time in these two polar opposite worlds. I’ve realized that that “dual citizenship” continues to influence the collection and really helps bring a personal and real approach to the process.

What are your signature styles? Not so easy to answer as we cover many categories. People seem to love our outerwear, leather and knits. We try to put our own touches on each piece and hopefully, those subtle and often hidden details are what they fall in love with.  

illy Reid got his start in fashion helping out in his mom’s boutique in Amite, Louisiana, eventually founding his eponymous brand in 2004. His aesthetic, once described as “Southern gentility with rock & roll appeal,” pervades full product offerings for men, women, footwear and accessories. His emphasis on USA manufacturing, proprietary textile development and high-quality construction sustain the label’s longevity. Forum spoke to him about his legacy and his spring collection.

What key pieces should a customer always have? I would tell any man that he needs a good suit, a navy blazer, some jeans that fit and a well-worn leather brogue. You can pretty much start there and make it work.  

What new ideas do we find in your spring collection? This collection focuses on lightness in both color and fabric. I was really inspired by all the natural landscapes near my home, so we developed some prints using oysters, herons and palm leaves that we turned into short-sleeve shirts. We mixed these with washed linens, silks and easy luxury knits. Wearable and liveable.

What is your aim with every collection?

What are you most proud of?

We want to create pieces that become our customers’ favorites. I want them to be like furniture and live with you.

The community we’ve built around this brand. I get to work with my friends and interact with our community every day. We all place such a high value on authenticity and craftsmanship, and I hope that resonates.

How do your Southern life, early retail exposure, and music all inform your aesthetic?

What piece of advice would you give to your younger self?

My professional experience in retail and my personal experience having grown up with my mother owning a boutique certainly inspire my approach to business. My love for music and being based in Muscle Shoals is spiritual for us. It provides great creative energy.

If you want to get in the business, get your foot in the door and work your tail off. No job is a waste of time. Listen and learn.

And to your customer? Quality is key, and make sure you’re going to use what you buy.

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Featuring Marli


man of style

SOLE SEARCHING MICHAEL ARMSTRONG, EXECUTIVE CHEF AT NYC’S DREAM DOWNTOWN BODEGA NEGRA RESTAURANT AND SELF-PROCLAIMED SNEAKERHEAD, ON FOOD, FASHION AND FEET. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN How did you first become interested in food?

Growing up in the Michael Jordan era, I ran track and cross country so I had lots of Air Jordans. When I moved to NYC, I started collecting sneakers, especially retro-inspired styles. I have about 200 pairs now—Nike, Adidas, Reebok, Asics, New Balance and many others… My favorites: black/royal Air Jordans from 2001 that I bought a few years ago for $500 and blue Air Jordan 2s that I just donated to a gallery in Chicago. They sold at $1,500.

I always cooked for my family in Seattle starting at age 12 or 13. It just came naturally to me so I ended up in culinary school in Portland, where I then worked for a year or two. I moved to NYC on a whim; when the exec chef I was working with moved to Tao in Vegas, he called me to be his sous-chef. Bodega Negra is owned by Tao. The original is in London and we’ve recreated several of their signature dishes: quesadilla rustica, tuna ceviche, softshell crab tacos…

What other shoes do you wear?

Could you articulate the food/fashion connection?

Any advice to a guy looking to buy sneakers?

It’s a symbiotic relationship. Dining out is more than just good food: it’s dressing up, it’s see and be seen, it’s a mood and an energy. These days, the trend is away from fine dining toward a more fun casual experience— in both food and fashion. A suit and tie is great, but not mandatory. It’s often about cool streetwear and the right sneakers. It’s about handcrafted food and artisan cocktails in a fun, relaxed, comfortable setting.

Buy what you love, don’t worry about trends. It’s about how you rock it. It’s about confidence. A lot of designer companies are now creating high-end dressier sneakers that don’t look like basketball shoes. I really like them but I don’t own them. It’s not my personal style. (Although I wouldn’t mind trying some Saint Laurent hightops…)

From where comes your passion for sneakers?

Could you tell us about a recent recipe you’ve created?

Like much of my generation, I’ve always loved street style, rap music, the hip-hop lifestyle. (And New York City embodies it all!)

We partnered with The Foundation and Under Armour to launch Steph Curry’s new sneaker. The featured dish: red curry chicken…

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Most chefs wear clogs, but I wear only sneakers. I don’t even own dress shoes (but I do own one pair of cowboy boots). I work on my feet 70 hours a week so I need comfort, support and slipresistance. I wore Air Force Ones to my wedding (after tailoring the suit to showcase the sneakers). I gave custom Nike 10s as gifts to my groomsmen.


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designers

INSPIRED DESIGN WE ASKED OUR MOST FASHIONABLE FRIENDS ABOUT THE IMPACT OF ART ON THEIR CREATIVE PROCESSES.

ARNOLD BRANT SILVERSTONE, HICKEY FREEMAN & SAMUELSOHN I came across this photograph of rock formation called The Painted Desert, a visually wondrous place in the Badlands of Arizona. The band of colors struck me as ethereal. It stayed with me for days and I ultimately designed a

BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

whole collection for Hickey Freeman spring/summer 2017 inspired by it with layers

MIKE FAHERTY, FAHERTY

of dusty rose, tan and putty.

From an early age I was interested in art and found myself practicing it

The arid essence of

frequently. I was lucky enough to grow up near New York City, so I had

the desert image natural-

access to some of the world's greatest museums. Early on I was drawn to

ly led to crafting a looser

more classical art styles like Impressionism, but through my education I

silhouette, which is a

was exposed to more eras of art and I found myself most excited about the

pendulum swing from

Abstract Expressionistic works of Gerhard Richter. His beautiful use of

the previous season. We cut the interior canvas of our jackets on the bias for

color inspires me to this day.

a fashionable drape. We hand-tailored incredibly light canvases and interlin-

When I started following Richter's artworks, it became clear to me that I

ings for feather-light construction combined with summer’s most exotic fab-

was mostly drawn to his

rications. Silk runs throughout the collection to add quiet strength to tissue-

use of color combinations.

fine fabric and to add a whisper of luminosity.

As I made my way into the fashion world, I fell in love with designing textiles

BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI

and creating my own color combinations in

I have a passion for literature as an art form and really value reading. My favorite and most-read book is Mediations by Marcus Aurelius. I have drawn many life lessons from his words and messages from the stories he writes. I discovered the book early on in my career and it has guided me in my life since. I instantly connected with its messages and the writings have become close treasures. I have read this book numerous times and continually take away something new each time I read its passages. The foundation of the brand and the collection begins with the philosophies and ideologies that I believe in, many of which I discovered through the teachings of Marcus Aurelius. Just as the great philosophers value legacy, humanity and living a full life, these principles are carried with us as we design the collection each season.

prints and plaids, which are found throughout my collections at Faherty. You have to walk a fine line when creating textiles and prints that stand out so that they are still easy to wear with the rest of your wardrobe. When you walk into a museum or gallery and Richter is on the wall, you are immediately drawn to his use of color. But as you get closer, there is an easiness to the color combinations that makes them seem less daunting. That's always my intention when designing our textiles: at first you're drawn to them from across the store, but as you approach them, they become more inviting to wear.

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BOB CORLISS, ROBERT TALBOTT In my mind the most thoughtful and inspirational painting is Michelangelo’s The Creation of Adam, part of the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. The two hands coming together is such a powerful image and it talks about anything being possible. It’s motivational as well as beautiful. But to tell you the truth, our surroundings are our biggest inspiration. We live in a really special location—The Monterey Peninsula—and Carmel in particular is one of the most spectacular places on the planet. Mountains, valleys, oceans in beautiful colors; we call it God’s canvas. The weather patterns are very dynamic, but it never gets extremely hot or cold. We have different people from all over the world visiting at all times. Those factors all influence the colors and styles that make up our collections. The design process is a collaborative journey between our creative director Mark Calder and his very talented team. We started as a neckwear company and have an archive that houses every design dating back to 1950, also a source of endless inspiration for us.

SEBASTIAN DOLLINGER, ETON If I had to choose one work of art that really blew my mind I would have to say La Divina Commedia by Dante, and Botticelli's depiction of it in La Carte de l'Enfer. I really didn't know who Dante was or what La Divina Commedia was when I picked it up at 18 years old. It was an Italian version that I bought in London and I could hardly understand anything, but I tried my best. Then I read it through in English online and it was more an experience than just a book. Hard to put words on it. I would not say that a specific piece of art has inspired me or my work though. I always walk around with my eyes open. Having to constantly come up with new ideas and concepts to develop

GIANLUCA ISAIA, ISAIA

into mood boards for our brands means that I can’t

My favorite works are the Napoli landscapes of Giacinto Gigante. Napoli is at the heart

get stuck too long in one idea.

of everything we do at Isaia. These references are seen in the way we create each piece

I wish I could say that Botticelli shines through

of clothing: Neapolitan tradition mixed with a contemporary point of view. What I also

my collections, but I can't (LOL). However, I always

like about this painter is that he was introduced to his craft by his father, just like I was

do my best and push myself so that whatever we set

introduced to sartorial tailoring by my father, Enrico Sr.

our minds on doing, we do it properly and put our

The colors in his pieces struck me first. They have a very dreamlike effect, but com-

hearts into it. In an ideal world I could spend one

bine different styles and techniques. I also like that he was a little bit of a rebel amongst

year on every collection. The hardest thing working

the Academy of Fine Arts in Napoli. This makes him very interesting as he did not try

in fashion is that it is so cyclic and with this constant

to conform his style too much.

need of news, you always feel that there is never

Just like Gigante we don't try to conform to trends. We like to create new ideas. We

enough time. But that's just how it is. Perhaps one

stay true to our DNA and don't change everything based on what the industry tells us.

day consumption will have to slow down and the

We observe what is happening around us, but remain true to who we are. Also, the

world will only focus on producing really well-made

depictions of Napoli that Gigante created are seen in each of our inspirations for the

stuff that's built to last for a decade. I'm proud that at

season. Napoli is always at the heart. We play with color the way a painter does. It’s just

Eton our goods last for a very long time.

a different art medium.

26


Getting

SLEEK LEATHER TRAINERS ARE A GREAT COMPLEMENT TO FIVE-POCKET PANTS. With a lightweight jacket and cool cotton shirt, this will become your go-to spring look.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SHANE LAVANCHER. FASHION DIRECTION BY MICHAEL FUSCO. STYLING ASSISTANCE BY LEAH SNOW.

PETER MILLAR OUTERWEAR, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA SHIRT, PETER MILLAR PANT, W. KLEINBERG BELT, SHINOLA WATCH, MAGNANNI SNEAKER

SNEAKY


Kick your career into high gear with a fresh take on business casual. CRISP WHITE SNEAKERS AND A FITTED

BOGLIOLI SUIT, ZEGNA SHIRT, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI SNEAKER

KNIT SHIRT KEEP YOUR SUMMER SUIT SPORTY AND CHIC.


Top with a perfect polo and structured sport coat for a look that can take you from work to weekend.

ROBERT TALBOTT SPORT COAT, FAHERTY POLO, W. KLEINBERG BELT, KENTON MICHAEL BRACELET, JOES JEANS DENIM, LANVIN SNEAKER

THE CLASSIC JEANS AND SNEAKERS COMBO GETS A STYLISH UPGRADE WITH SUEDE.


ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA OUTERWEAR, FAHERTY POLO, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI JOGGER, SHINOLA WATCH, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA SNEAKER

STEP OUT OF THE GYM AND INTO THE PAGES OF GQ WITH SOFT, SLIM JOGGERS AND STYLISH SLIP-ONS. A half-tucked tee and performance outerwear keep things from getting sloppy.


ISAIA SPORT COAT POCKET SQUARE, ETON SHIRT, FAHERTY SHORT, TRASK SNEAKER ISAIA SPORT COAT ANDAND POCKET SQUARE, ETON SHIRT, FAHERTY SHORT, TRASK SNEAKER

When dressing up your shorts, trade the tired WHEN DRESSING UP YOUR SHORTS, DITCH THE sneakers. LOAFERS AND LET loafer look for burnished leather There’s no better way BURNISHED SNEAKERS THERE’S NOLEATHER BETTER WAY TO KEEPSUBIT IN. COOL, COMFORTABLE AND CLASSY. to keep it cool, comfortable and classy.


Sneaker

STYLES

CLOCKWISE FROM T O P LEFT: BRUNELLO CUCINELLI Denim Chimera Sneaker LANVIN Ivory Suede Matte Captoe Sneaker MAGNANNI Cristian Gray Leather Sneaker TRASK Rylan Tan Italian Buffalo Sneaker


STYLE OF THE SUN GODS PHO T OGR APHY: SERGIO KURHAJEC HAIR: MARCELINO MAKEUP: CL AIRE BAYLEY WARDROBE: WENDY MCNETT S T I L L- L I F E P H O T O G R A P H Y : B R I A N K L U T C H S T I L L- L I F E S T Y L I N G : A L E J A N D R A S A R M I E N T O F O R H A L L E Y R E S O U R C E S

THIS SEASON, DISCOVER AN ARRAY OF FRESH, POWERFUL LOOKS THAT SHINE AS BRIGHTLY AS THE SUN.


POLO & SWEATSHIRT: FAHERTY

EXPLORE CONTRAST AT THE INTERSECTION OF LIGHT & DARK.


TSHIRT, SWEATER, JACKET & JEANS: ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA SUNGLASSES: AMERICAN OPTICAL


CANALI PT01


TRASK


L.B.M. 1911


ETON


ROBERT TALBOTT BALDASSARI


ELEVENTY


TRASK


INSIDER PICKS

The best places to eat, drink, party (and recover) in this world fashion capital. BY MARIO BISIO When I’m in Milan twice a year on buying trips, I have a few favorite restaurants. For lunch, I love Bagutta. Known as “the trattoria of trattorias,” it’s a fun place with colorful art and wonderful food. I usually order a salad and a pasta. My favorite is the simplest: pasta pomodoro that’s out of this world. Another good lunch option: the cantina in the Kiton Palazzo, the Milan headquarters for this esteemed clothing company. Their mozzarella arrives fresh every day by train from Naples. You cannot find anything more delicious than caprese salad with the best mozzarella, the freshest tomatoes, the purest olive oil… While it’s open only to industry insiders, I invite our customers to join us anytime! For dinner, I love Da Ilia. I go for their incredible risotto, their perfect veal Milanese, their special ensalata tropical and any of their homemade pastas. For fish, I choose La Risacca 6. Both the

raw fish and the cooked dishes are simply prepared from the freshest seafood in Milan! I also can’t resist their spaghetti vongole—molto buono! Of course, one must make time for cocktails. Be sure to check out the bar at the Diana Majestic Hotel. It’s behind the curtains, and super cool. For amazing views to go with your cocktails and tapas, try the Radio Rooftop: it’s the best place to contemplate Milan’s skyline and take in the energy of the city. My favorite hotel is the Principe di Savoia: it’s an old hotel with an amazing history that’s been the place to stay for cosmopolitan society since the 1920s. There’s also a fabulous workout facility on the rooftop level. It’s not inexpensive, but I’ve been going there for so long that it feels like home. Of course the main activity in Milan is fashion, and the best way to absorb it is over a cappuccino or an aperitivo. Just sit,

sip and stare as the bestdressed people in the world pass by. As for shopping, you can find fabulous inspiration in the Corso Como neighborhood. I suggest you take notes in Milan but save the actual purchasing for when you get back home, just in case you need to make a return! Finally, to lift your spirits, be sure to visit the Duomo. Go in the daytime when there’s sunlight and absorb the immense power of this magnificent structure. Its majesty and spirituality are truly life-affirming.

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FROM TOP: SHUTTERSTOCK/ALEXANDRE ROTENBERG, LA RICASSA 6, LA RICASSA 6, SHERATON DIANA MAJESTIC, RISTORANTE DA ILIA, SHUTTERSTOCK/MURATART

destinations

Milan:


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S P R I N G 2 017 F O OT W E A R C O LLE CT I O N

AARON


OVER-THE-TOP

EATS

In the name of total satiation, we traveled the world to dine under spectacular circumstances. BY SHIRA LEVINE 46

HOTEL DE GLACE IMAGE © DANY VACHON.

food

Climatic Cuisine There’s roughly a three-month window during which you can experience Quebec’s Hôtel de Glace (right), where you’ll quickly learn how chill feasting within an ice castle can be. Critical resources: hearty grub, puffy coats and a generator. Pop-up icy dining with an Arctic atmosphere is certainly a northern thing. Kemi, Finland’s Snow Castle, maintains a temp of -5 Celsius while serving local salmon, perch and lamb. Austria’s Kitzbühel Alps is home to Alpeniglu Dorf, an igloo restaurant serving fondues and boasting an open-air snow bar, as well as an ice church.

Epic food is subjective. Sometimes, a culinary adventure awaits domestically, in one’s very own hometown. But sometimes the most tantalizing feasts are those over-the-top experiential ones in far-flung locations. We compiled a list of global dining and imbibing spots that left tasty impressions on the mind—and better still, the palate.


Sea(in)side Fare Who doesn’t love a swim-up bar? The Lagoon Bar at Iceland’s Blue Lagoon (previous page) is restorative twice over courtesy of healing waters and a signature cocktail for a full detox/retox encounter. In Costa Rica, at Tabacón’s Arenal Pool Bar, a ceviche dish served in waist-deep thermal waters doesn't cramp those seeking splashy crater views. The waters are rich in calcium, lithium and silica, and are naturally heated by the Arenal volcano’s magma. Barbados' Crystal Cove had us (rum) punch drunk in love with the waterfall entry to a cave bar where fish from the very waters guests wade in is prepared to order. And Las Vegas' Tropicana Hotel offers noshes to those who swim up to the waterproof blackjack table. But next level al fresco comes in acqua. In Bora Bora’s otherworldly lagoons, Tahitian tour operators curate motu picnics, Polynesian suckling pig feasts set in shallow sandbar’d waters.

worth traveling for. In southeast Wales, she’s Pauline Griffiths, owner of the unsuspecting Art Shop & Chapel. Located in Abergavenny, the café with courtyard garden is tucked below an old chapel and behind a market hall. What makes Griffiths like Waters are the ingredients: beetroot, leeks, curly kale and pheasant. Favorites? Grilled cheese with hawthorn berry ketchup, turmeric

golden mylk and oat milk lattes. Back across the pond, Woodberry Kitchen (above left) tantalizes in Baltimore. Chef Spike Gjerde is Charm City’s midAtlantic sourcing Alice Waters. The slowcooked turkey potpie with rutabaga cream and kohlrabi, rabbit dirty rice with buttermilk fried saddle, and koshihikari rice and snake oil are swoonworthy. Foodies at Anguilla’s CuisinArt

Resort should expect nothing less than a hydroponic farm-totable experience given, well, the gigantic onsite hydroponic garden (above right). Chef Jasper Schneider’s veggies nourish the menus of five foodspots at the resort, and the Caribbean Sea’s bounty of finned foods round out the fresh and local dishes: lionfish, snapper and lobster, oh my!

IMAGE CREDITS

Luxe Local Feasting

O

utside of California, there’s an “Alice Waters of” in a few special places. Indeed there’s but one Chez Panisse, but the finest and freshest seasonal ingredients culled by successors are a gourmet challenge

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Class

Learn to ignore changing fads and ace your look with updated classics. BY HANS GSCHLIESSER

“YOU CAN’T BE SERIOUS,” respond-

go-to piece for spring 2017. Try Canali’s Kei jacket or a soft coat from Zegna or Samuelsohn. You’ll see the light. Throw it on over anything and immediately feel confident. • Fitted shirts will make you look 10 years younger. If you’re hard to fit, custom is a great option (and it won’t break the bank). • Never undervalue the importance of accessories. Without throwing your world off its axis, you can upgrade any look with something as simple as a printed pocket square, a great belt, fun socks or standout shoes. • Give your wardrobe a fresh look by mixing it up. Pair your dress shoes with jeans and try leather or suede sneakers with your suit. Wear your go-to sport coat with either jeans or dress pants. As Luciano Barbera explains it, “Dress up your sportswear and dress down your formalwear.” • Explore spring’s many alternatives to denim: five-pocket pants in lightweight stretch fabrics that fit and feel terrific. Yes, blues and tans are forever, but why not consider a pair in a more interesting shade (or pattern)? • Take advantage of our well-curated assortments and knowledgeable sellers. Their suggestions will open your eyes to new clothes that might just get you excited about menswear again.

ed my inner Little Lord Fauntleroy to the magazine my wife thrust in front of me. It was filled with images of spring men’s fashion, and breezy as it might be, it’s hard to visualize myself swooshing around in a Yohji Yamamoto men’s pleated skirt, or a tailored suit with shorts, or any of the attention-getting androgynous looks parading down today’s runways. We men like to believe that our minds are occupied with loftier thoughts than deciphering fashion trends. Yet as much as we insist we don’t care about clothes, on some primal level we do. Our end game is to stay relevant and not look like lost transports from forgotten decades. We’re living in the 21st century, and you’ve probably Iconic style transcends time: noticed menswear trending trimmer, Pierce Brosnan evolving with the times without (1995) and Cary pushing the envelope. It manages to be Grant (1959) look modern by incorporating innovative great in any era. fabrics and tailoring techniques, so the new looks are now as comfortable and easy-care as they are fashionable. In other words, today’s clothing will give you an enviable nonchalant style without drawing unwanted attention. For while I don’t mind engaging in an occasional fashion conversation, I’m certainly not interested in being the conversation. As Yves Saint Laurent noted, “Fashion fades, style is eternal.” With that in mind, here are a few tips to achieve a winning look and up your style game. • Buy investment pieces from timeless designers like Canali, Zegna and Brunello Cucinelli. They’re on top for a reason: you can’t go wrong with quality tailoring and enduring style. • Owning a versatile sport coat is mandatory. Think of it as the Swiss Army knife of your wardrobe. Comfortable, well tailored, lightweight and easy to dress up or down for any occasion. Let it become your

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TOP:JOHN STODDART/GETTY IMAGES; SUNSET BOULEVARD/CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES

first person

Fashion


wine

SO YOU WANT TO BE A

SOMMELIER?

There’s more to it than drinking great wines… BY LESLEY RUBENSTEIN spirits at New Orleans’ iconic Commander’s Palace, owned by the Brennan family. “We have an extensive wine program,” Davis says. “Everyone can find something familiar here, but the real joy is to take guests on a journey that’s a little outside their comfort zone.” The wine cellar complements the restaurant’s “haute Creole” cuisine and reflects Davis’ passion for rare and underrepresented wine, history and food. Wine enthusiasts have taken notice: for the last five years, Commander’s has been a recipient of The Wine Spectator Grand Award, widely perceived as the most prestigious recognition in the world of wine. In 2016, Commander’s was nominated by the James Beard Foundation for the best wine program in America; The Daily Meal named its wine list the best in the U.S. “Wine and food go hand in hand,” is Davis’ mantra. “Wine is very much part of the meal in flavor and texture.” Commander’s has raised the staff’s level of wine knowledge by making the Court of Master Sommeliers Program mandatory for employees. Under Davis’ direction, 40 servers, plus managers, bartenders, kitchen staff, chefs and owners, passed the Introductory Course and Examination, the first level of the program. Twelve Certified Sommeliers, having attained the second level, walk the

t starts with a passion for wine, a love of learning and an ability to retain lots of details about grapes, geography, terroir, etc. It ultimately becomes a journey of research, deductive tastings, pairings, pourings and intense exams to finally become certified. Master Sommelier Dan Davis took his first sip of alcohol in college and tried his first taste of wine at the encouragement of a friend at a local tavern. Today, he serves as the director of wine and

Above, the wine room at Commander’s Palace. Below left, Master Sommelier Dan Davis.

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a Master Sommelier as a guest in an imaginary restaurant with an imaginary wine list. He or she can order any type of wine, and the candidate must know all about it. Candidates must also suggest wines for the guest’s hypothetical food order, conduct a mock service of a bottle of wine or Champagne, and serve an after-dinner drink. “Being certified is a very real credential with value. Basically, the Court of Master Sommeliers is saying that if they were running a restaurant, they’d hire you as a sommelier.” To take the Advanced Course, candidates must apply. They need a minimum of five years in the industry and must be accepted into the program, which provides a glimpse of what to expect from the third exam and, if invited, the fourth level: The Master Sommelier Diploma Exam. The process is difficult, and candidates spend years of grueling hours in preparation; only a small percentage eventually pass. Currently, there are only 125 men and 24 women in the U.S. who can call themselves Master Sommeliers. The unique opportunities, however, make all the hard work worthwhile. “A highlight for me was being with seventh- or eighthgeneration winemakers in Burgundy and having them pull a 1917 bottle out of a cave, where their great-grandfather had hidden it from the Nazis. They popped it open, and we drank it, with much joy. It doesn’t get better than that.”

restaurant’s floors. Says Davis, “Education is the key to everything: it fosters a passion that the sommeliers bring to the customers. We’ve created a genuine wine culture.” Davis says the training is critical to a restaurant’s success. “Servers need to know the quality of the wine, and why it works in a specific context. They need to be able to pronounce vocabulary and feel comfortable talking about wine in a professional— but approachable and friendly—manner.” The Introductory Class is a two-day course led by Master Sommeliers that culminates in an extensive exam. It’s allencompassing, covering everything important to know about wine. Students also practice blind tastings and serving, although these skills are not tested at this level. “When I see my staff move from ‘Oh, I get to drink wine’ to ‘Oh, I get to sell this wine and provide an experience for the customer,’ I know the program has worked.” The Certified Examination, the second level, requires students to engage in self-directed studies followed by a three-part exam that tests theory, tasting and service. “You walk into the room to find two glasses of wine: one red and one white. You have 25 minutes to taste the wines and tell the Master Sommelier what they are. Then you take an exam that is fairly grueling, much harder than level one.” During the service portion of the exam, each candidate waits on

CURRENTLY, THERE ARE ONLY 125 MEN AND 24 WOMEN IN THE U.S. WHO CAN CALL THEMSELVES MASTER SOMMELIERS.

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service

At Your

Going above and beyond for customers is the heart and soul of the GARYS culture. We believe great merchandise combined

with great service is the only way to exceed clients' expectations.

MADE-TO-MEASURE

GIFT CARDS

For the ultimate clothing experience, indulge in made-to-measure suits, sportcoats, shirts and trousers. The world’s finest fabrics and designers mean yours will truly be a fit like no other.

For that hard-to-buy-for kinda guy, give the gift of GARYS. Stop in or give us a call. We’ll take care of the rest.

ALTERATIONS With master tailors on staff, we don’t mess around when it comes to the finished product. Expert alterations are always complimentary with every new purchase.

SPECIAL APPOINTMENTS Whether before, during or after business hours, we are happy to arrange special appointments in the store to assist you with your shopping needs. Just call and we’ll make it happen.

CLOSET CONSULTATION Is the closet full, but you still can’t find anything to wear? Call in the style pros of GARYS for a personal closet consultation. You’ll get an objective view of your entire wardrobe and a friendly nudge to gently help you weed out the old, tired and worn to make room for the new. We’ll be happy to donate any unwanted items to our friends at Working Wardrobes.

PERSONAL DELIVERY If you’re in the area and need a purchase delivered, rest assured you’ll receive it when and where you need it… with a smile.

SHOP ONLINE No time to stop by the store? Visit us at garysonline.com and receive complimentary ground shipping on all your purchases.

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BEER & WINE WHILE YOU SHOP Shopping can be stressful. Sit back and relax with your beverage of choice while one of our stylists takes care of your wardrobe needs.

COMPLIMENTARY GIFT WRAP There’s gift-wrapping and then there’s GARYS gift-wrapping. It’s always complimentary and always with the utmost style and a dash of panache.


The Vibe Boxer Brief Every pair of SAXX Underwear houses our patented BallPark Pouch™ construction. Designed for contact-free support, this 3D hammock-shaped pouch keeps everything in place, thanks to mesh panels that prevent skinagainst-skin friction, and no exposed stitching for chafe-free comfort.


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WHY CLOTHES MATTER Musings on the art of dressing. BY JARROD WEBER

n my life, clothing has always been a family affair. My earliest memories of fashion date back to my mom encouraging me to select my own outfits when I was six years old. I didn’t realize it then, but this was the beginning of my addiction to clothing. Or more accurately, to the importance of wearing the right clothes. Even at that young age, matching items in my limited wardrobe felt like a huge responsibility. Although I tried to get my mom to help—“Mommy, which sneakers go with this sweatsuit?”—her response was always, “Which do you like?” Years later, when I was in law school, Weber, right, with a female friend was praising my fashion his dad, a fashion executive. sensibility to a group of students. One of the students remembered me from high school as “the guy who would tuck his flannel shirts into his sweatpants!” My father is a successful fashion industry exec who has headed big companies like PVH and LVMH. One of his maxims is that how you package yourself is as important as how you package your products. How you dress is one component of this; how you speak, how you treat people and how you think are other factors relevant to success, in business and in life. But clearly, your style says a lot about who you are. Your ability to put yourself together tells a story. Are you neat or sloppy? Modern or traditional? Creative or conformist? All these cues send a signal. Clothes tell your story before you even open your mouth. Is this fair? Nope, but it’s reality. Or as my father would say, “Fair is for kids.” I, for one, believe in suits. I believe in dressing up, in looking the part. I practiced law for almost nine years at a firm whose dress code

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was “business casual unless seeing clients.” Unfortunately, few guys have a real handle on business casual, and it was embarrassing how some of these educated lawyers would come to work. My father always taught me that there’s no substitute for good taste. I have learned that in a business environment, it pays to always look your best. These are not your friends, they are associates and, like it or not, you’re competing. The senior-most people at the firm set the example, and they always looked professional, even on days with no client contact. Bottom line, it never hurts to look your best at all times. And I believe that most men look their best—most professional, most in control— when wearing a suit. Think of a general in the military, or a pilot: the uniform paints a picture of competence and strength. In the military there are precise rules for how to dress: not a single button can be out of place or a lapel creased. These rules are there for a reason: to create an image of order and respect.  I’ve recently given up law for a career in fashion, where my style consciousness serves me well. Although creative casual is acceptable, you’ll always find me wearing a suit, and almost always with a tie. Ties are no longer mandatory these days, even in fine restaurants, but they’re a great way to complete an outfit and add a note of distinction and personality. I sometimes wonder whether, in my designer suits and ties, some people might consider my style a bit too perfect, too contrived, too planned out when in fact, I’m just a guy who appreciates nice clothes. Be that as it may, let’s all take the time to appreciate the person inside the clothing: the substance behind the style. For that, I have learned, is what truly matters.


GARYS FORUM SS 2017

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