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ANDRISEN MORTON Forum/The Substance of Style/Spring 2014

SPRING FASHION

TROPICAL HIDEAWAY STYLE GUIDE: TIE ONE ON SCENE AROUND THE WORLD


Su Misura Made to Measure is the Art of Personal Elegance


welcome

Spring

FORWARD W

hen you’re in the clothing business, success depends on staying focused on what’s next. For example, as we introduce you to our spring/summer 2014 collections, we are already deciding what merchandise you’ll find on our racks and shelves next year. Looking ahead is woven into the fabric of everything we do. So you’ll be pleased to learn we recently committed to another 10 years in our fantastic Cherry Creek North location. Plus, the convenience of additional Saturday garage parking is now permanent. Finally, we are in early planning to make the store bigger and even better in the not-too-distant future. Thank you for your ongoing support and friendship. After 36 years in business, we are humbled to have multi-generational customers—fathers, sons and grandsons all shopping here. We continue our never-ending journey to seek out great product to keep you looking fantastic. Spring forward with Andrisen Morton. See you soon,

Craig & Dave

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We do not learn for the school, but for life


Andrisen Morton 270 St. Paul Street Denver, Colorado 80206 303-377-8488 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Karen Alberg Grossman DESIGN DIRECTOR

Hans Gschliesser MANAGING EDITOR

Jillian LaRochelle PROJECT MANAGER

Lisa Montemorra DESIGNERS

Cynthia Lucero, Jean-Nicole Venditti CONCEPT DIRECTORS

Andrew Mitchell, Russ Mitchell

FEATURES

10 My Three Sons: The Koelbel Men 12 A Conversation with Jack TerHar 14 What’s Up With Those Off-the-Wall Isaia Images? 16 Behind the Scenes: 2014 BMW Championship 18 Our People 22 Business: Family Matters 24 Essay: Cut Your Losses 52 Speed: Days of Future Fast

FASHION 20 26 28 30 38

Best Practices: Exceptionally Eton All Tied Up Profile: AG Color Check Italian Style

DEPARTMENTS 2 6 8 44 48 56 58 60

Welcome Letter Ask Craig & Lindsay As I See It… World Scene Food: May the Fowl Be With You Spirits: Made-to-Treasure At Your Service End Page: Speaking of Style

MERCHANDISING DIRECTOR

Bob Mitchell DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION

Peg Eadie DIRECTOR OF PREPRESS

John Frascone

BUSINESS JOURNALS FASHION GROUP PUBLISHER

Stuart Nifoussi PRESIDENT AND CEO

Britton Jones CHAIRMAN AND COO

Mac Brighton CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Christine Sullivan

APPAREL FORUM Andrisen Morton DENVER, CO Garys NEWPORT BEACH, CA Hubert White MINNEAPOLIS, MN Kilgore Trout CLEVELAND, OH Larrimor’s PITTSBURGH, PA Malouf’s LUBBOCK/SOUTHLAKE, TX Mario’s PORTLAND, OR/SEATTLE, WA Mitchells/Marshs HUNTINGTON, NY Mitchells/Richards WESTPORT/GREENWICH, CT Oak Hall MEMPHIS, TN Rodes LOUISVILLE, KY Rubensteins NEW ORLEANS, LA Wilkes Bashford SAN FRAN/PALO ALTO, CA FASHION FORUM MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED IN 11 REGIONAL EDITIONS FOR MEMBER STORES OF THE APPAREL FORUM © 2014. PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS JOURNALS, INC, P.O. BOX 5550, NORWALK, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • FAX: 203-852-8175; ADVERTISING OFFICE: 1384 BROADWAY, NY, NY 10018-6108, 212-686-4412 • FAX: 212686-6821; ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THE PUBLISHERS ACCEPT NO RESPONSIBILITIES FOR ADVERTISERS CLAIMS, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS OR OTHER MATERIALS. NO PART OF THIS MAGAZINE MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHERS. VOLUME 17, ISSUE 1. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.


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ask craig & lindsay Q: I always thought that jeans are jeans, but I’m told there’s a difference between dress denim and casual denim. What’s the difference? If you own trim-fitting jeans in a medium to dark wash with no tears or abrasions, feel free to wear them out to dinner with a sportcoat and tie if you desire, or with any kind of shirt or sweater. If you don’t own this type of denim, come into the store and try some on! Clean, dark jeans are perhaps the single most important item in today’s casual wardrobes. They work well with virtually everything you can think of. What’s more, many of today’s new denim fabrics contain a small percentage of stretch to ensure comfort, wrinkle resistance and a perfect fit! If your jeans are baggy in a light to medium wash (with or without tears or abrasions), save them for casual wear and don’t pair them with a slim modern sportcoat. Better yet, buy some jeans that fit.

Q: I own just one belt that reverses from black to brown. What more do I need? Just as there are dress jeans and casual jeans, there are also dress belts and casual belts. If the leather is smooth, shiny, burnished or exotic (alligator, snakeskin), it’s best worn with dress trousers or a suit. We love brown belts and brown shoes (leather or suede) worn with gray and navy tailored clothing! When you’re wearing casual pants (jeans, khakis, twills), the ideal belt might be a softer leather or suede. Fabric belts are also great in spring and summer (perfect for shorts!). Don’t be afraid of color or interesting buckles, both good ways to express some fashion flair.

Q: I’m seeing some strangely short pants on young guys these days, sometimes hitting above the ankle. Is this a trend? Shorter-length pants are definitely the way to go in 2014, but showing ankle is on the extreme side. We recommend a very soft break in the leg, with the hem of the pant just grazing the top of the shoe. If this seems too trendy for you, go a bit longer, but please: no hems dragging on the floor! If your pant leg covers the entire heel of your shoe, it’s too long!

“Clean, dark jeans are perhaps the single most important item in today’s casual wardrobes” 6


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as i see it...

Dave Morton

LOOKS INTO THE FUTURE

O

& DISCOVERS IT’S HERE. outside the store. My daughter Lindsay (Morton Gaiser) took up the challenge. She worked for Hugo Boss’s men’s tailored division in New York City, in Dallas for the luxury department store Stanley Korshak, and finally came back to Denver to work in management at Nordstrom. Since returning to Andrisen Morton, Lindsay has been growing her buying and merchandising knowledge by working with an undisputed master of the game, the one and only Craig Andrisen. She is also our marketing director. Her commitment to the business, our customers and our signature high-touch service is unquestioned. After all, it’s in her blood! So I couldn’t be more proud to share that the process is underway for her to become involved in our ownership structure. This doesn’t mean Craig or I will be riding off into the sunset any time soon. On the contrary, we both still love this crazy business. We’re truly passionate about selling beautiful men’s clothing. Perhaps most important, we live for the personal relationships we build with all of you. Now that I think about it, I can foresee Lindsay having to drag us both out of here before all is said and done!

ur business requires us to have a sixth sense about what customers will want to wear 12 months ahead. Fortunately, Craig and Lindsay are phenomenally talented at doing just that. Planning for the future of the store, our staff and our leadership is also important. I’d like to share some of this planning with you. First of all, the future of our fantastic Cherry Creek North location has been ensured, as we’ve just signed a 10-year lease extension. This has freed us to start ambitious plans to remodel and expand the store. If all goes well, the project will begin in mid-2015. It’s really going to be something special. Longtime customers know our staff has been rock solid for years. But a couple months ago, we had to say farewell to Tara, our extraordinary customer service leader for the past 17 years. She will be missed. We’ve also added some young blood to the sales team in Grant and Chris. (Read more about them on page 18.) Last but not least, in 2007 Craig and I created a family employment policy. That is, if any family member expresses interest in joining the business after college, they must first get five years industry experience

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Exclusive fabric by Loro Piana, “Extreme”


Walter Koelbel III

Walter “Buz” Koelbel II

MY THREE SONS

I

f you’re a Koelbel, the apple didn’t fall far from the tree just once, but four times. Walter Koelbel, Sr. was a visionary Denver real estate developer, business leader and noted philanthropist. His oldest son, Walter “Buz” Koelbel, Jr., joined the successful family business in 1976. A few years later, Buz met Craig Andrisen and a close lifelong friendship ensued. Buz supported his great friend by shopping at the original Andrisen Morton store, “even though I really couldn’t afford it,” laughs Buz. And he’s been a customer ever since. “Big Walt” (as Craig called him) became a friend and customer through Buz. Craig recalls fondly, “He always wanted short-sleeve shirts—in ecru, not white—with long collars. Plus a touch of polyester, because he hated wrinkles. And we gave him what he wanted.”

Three generations of Koelbel men in real estate, and in Andrisen Morton. 10


Carl Koelbel

Dean Koelbel

Buz became president of the company in 1985. Fast-forward to 2010. Carl Koelbel, the third generation, joined the company after two years at the Urban Land Institute in Washington, D.C. Today, Carl heads Koelbel Urban Homes and the low-income apartment division, helping make the company more successful than ever with several exciting new real estate platforms. At age 30, Carl is the oldest of Buz’s three sons. Next comes Walt Koelbel, 28, who works in commercial real estate transaction management for CBRE. The youngest is Dean Koelbel, now 26. Dean recently spent two years leasing commercial office space in Chicago. He’s now director of leasing for Industry Denver and working with his father and brother on a unique collaborative office space project in Denver’s RiNo (River North) neighborhood. Buz encouraged his sons to shop at Andrisen Morton, but did it in an unconventional manner. He sat the boys down a couple

years ago and handed them a printed memo about dressing better, “all the way down to polished shoes, shoe trees and collar stays,” recounts Carl. “It was a tutorial about the importance of first impressions,” says Buz. “That what you wear and how you look says a lot about who you are, how you regard yourself, and how you do business.” The brothers all groaned remembering their dad’s memo, but apparently they took his message to heart. Son Walt adds, “Dean, Carl and I all meet and do business with people much older than ourselves, so dressing well is important for credibility. Especially when they’re expecting guys with gray hair!” Buz beams. So does Craig. He’s known these boys since the day they were born. It is safe to say Walt Sr. would burst with pride knowing his grandsons will carry on the Koelbel family tradition of leadership, vision, giving back and looking good.

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profile Fine Cars. Fine Clothes.

One Fine Gentleman. A CONVERSATION WITH JACK TERHAR

A

the new Ghilbi and Quattroporte, as Maserati is the first premium luxury car to enter the market with “affordable” all-wheel-drive vehicles. At approximately $75k for the Ghilbi or $110k for the Quattroporte, they compete well with higherend Mercedes and BMW models, but offer the sexiness, speed and performance of Italian engineering and design. Jack started shopping at Andrisen Morton in the late ’90s and became good friends with Dave and Craig. They share a love of fine men’s clothes, golf and a similar business philosophy. “Service has built our company,” Jack says proudly. “Andrisen Morton lives and breathes service like we do. It’s why we both have such amazing repeat business. It’s also why I not only shop there, but partner with them.” “What makes Andrisen Morton special are the people. I’m treated with respect, kept happy over the long term, and I’m literally among friends. Not just Dave and Craig, but Lindsay and everyone in the store. It’s a special place and that’s the way I strive to run my own business.” When he’s not working at the dealership or traveling for business and pleasure, you’ll find Jack in Vail, enjoying the slopes and relaxing. Evidence of another of Jack’s passions is found in the heart of the village: he owns Vail Fine Wines. Jack believes in giving back to many community charities and non-profits, including the Broomfield Community Foundation, National Jewish Health, the DCPA and DAM, and The Morgan Adams Foundation, among others. It seems every Andrisen Morton customer has a story of a time when the store helped out in a pinch; Jack is no exception. A couple hours before he was to attend a blacktie event downtown, he realized his trusty old tuxedo had seen better days. He rushed to the store, and within 90 minutes walked out looking like a million bucks in a beautiful new, fully tailored tuxedo. “That’s service!”

t first glance, Jack TerHar, Jr. wouldn’t strike anyone as a gear-head. Especially when he’s wearing his signature Isaia or Zegna suits. But oh yes, Mr. TerHar is that and so much more. Born and raised in Broomfield, Jack began working at his father’s Ford dealership at age seven, cleaning parts shelves. He was doing oil changes by the time he was 10, and ultimately worked in every department, learning the business from the wheels up. Since becoming president of Sill-TerHar in 1989, Jack has transformed it into one of the most successful familyowned dealer groups anywhere. Today, they sell Ford, Lincoln, Mazda, Volvo, Aston Martin, Jaguar, Lamborghini and Maserati. Interestingly, prior to joining the dealership full-time in 1973, Jack also ran a men’s clothing store at the Denver Dry. “That is where I fell in love with clothes,” he says, “and I’ve been in love with them ever since.” We met in his beautiful new Maserati showroom, flanked by the 2014 Maserati Ghilbi, Quattroporte and Gran Turismo Convertible. Jack is quite excited about

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What’s up with those

off the wall ISAIA images? ISAIA produces “single-image” ad campaigns. These single-image ads are designed to tell a story that carries on from year to year. The ISAIA ads and images are produced to reflect the essence of a true “ISAIA man.” One who is passionate, not afraid to cry, to admit fault, to be in love, or to seek redemption.

The story began with the 2010 ISAIA brand campaign… showing the ISAIA man confident and full, tasting all that is in front of him.

The 2011 campaign shows the ISAIA man in a miserable state… crouched in a corner, oozing sadness, guilt and remorse. What has happened?

2012 reveals the unintended consequence of scorning a woman… A martini thrown into the face of the ISAIA man. (Thankfully he is wearing ISAIA’s exclusive Aqua Spider fabric, resistant to stains and liquid mishaps… a foreshadowing?) This begs the question: What did he do to deserve this angry reaction? The next scene appears in ISAIA’s 2013 image… Our guy is leaning up against a confessional, prepared to ask for absolution from his sins. It now becomes clearer: something serious has happened. We just don’t know what it is…

The answers begin to unfold in the new 2014 campaign... A man must accept the consequences. We find him in the unfortunate position of holding an out-of-control baby boy. It is tempting to conclude that one must reap what he sows.


Behind the scenes of the 2014 BMW Championship with our friend

GEORGE SOLICH

T

he love of golf and selling fine men’s clothes is what brought Craig and Dave together as friends and business partners decades ago. With the 2014 BMW Championship coming to the Denver area at the prestigious Cherry Hills Country Club this September, the connections between the game and the store are even more pronounced. Craig is a long-standing Cherry Hills member, as are more than a few of the store’s best friends and customers. Among them is George Solich, the general chairman of the 2014 BMW Championship. George asked Craig to be a member of the Cherry Hills BMW Championship Executive Committee. Conducted by the Western Golf Association, the BMW Championship was formerly The Western Open, which began play in 1899, making it the second-oldest golf tournament in the U.S. All proceeds from the 2014 BMW

Championship will benefit the Evans Scholars Foundation, which awards full tuition and housing college scholarships to caddies based on academic achievement and financial need. George grew up caddying at The Broadmoor Golf Club in Colorado Springs. Actually, it was his older brother Duffy, already a caddie there, who first dragged him to the caddie yard. “I didn’t know it at the time,” says George, “but that was a real life-changing event that I’m forever grateful for.” George fondly looks back on his caddie experiences as a great summer job. “You’re outdoors, getting exercise, meeting successful people, earning a little money, plus learning the great game of golf.” The brothers also had one other motive to be caddies—to earn Evans Scholarships. And both succeeded. Widely acknowledged as being instrumental in bringing the BMW Championship to Cherry Hills, George modestly

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Evans Scholars Foundation at a Glance Established by famed amateur golfer Charles “Chick” Evans, Jr., the Evans Scholars Foundation provides full tuition and housing college scholarships to deserving caddies across the country. Since 1930, more than 10,000 outstanding young male and female caddies have attended some of the nation’s finest universities thanks to the Evans Scholarship. In 2012-13, 870 Evans Scholars were in school at one of 19 top universities around the country, including the University of Colorado, Boulder. Applicants are evaluated and compete on four core areas—caddie record, academics, financial need, character and leadership—for the limited number of available Evans Scholarships. More than 200 high school students earn the Evans Scholarship each year. The program is funded by contributions from more than 100,000 golfers across the country, as well as Evans Alumni and all proceeds from the BMW Championship.

gives credit to other factors. First and foremost, the iconic club has a history of hosting many great championships. Secondly, Cherry Hills is “arguably the best caddie club in the West,” George says proudly, which dovetails into support of the Evans Scholars Foundation. And finally, he notes the hard work of his Executive Committee and the dedication of the club’s members, as well as the staffs of the Western Golf Association, the PGA TOUR, and BMW’s sponsorship team. One unique aspect of the tournament is the Evans Scholars Cup, being held on Monday of the tournament week. It is the only Monday during a PGA TOUR event when the host course is not in use by the pros. Playing positions have been sold to individuals and corporations to participate in support of the Evans Scholars Foundation. There will be 28 foursomes—with caddies—playing the same golf course the pros will compete on the next day. The event has sold out.

Wednesday’s Pro-Am is another unique opportunity and one George calls “the best Pro-Am on the PGA TOUR, because you’re absolutely guaranteed to play with one of the top 70 players in the world.” Plus, only three amateurs will be teamed with a PGA TOUR pro, instead of the usual four, making it a far more intimate and memorable experience. Proceeds from the sold-out Pro-Am will also benefit the Evans Scholars Foundation program. Eventually, the conversation circles back to his relationship with the guys. “Number one, both Craig and Dave are great friends,” George says. Then he shared another little-known personal connection he has with the store. “People know I was an Evans Scholar, but not too many know Dave Morton was also an Evans Scholar at CU. I think that’s pretty neat.”

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Get to know some of us a little better.

Big shoes to fill. Grant Davis, Footwear Specialist You may have seen him coming in and out of the store over the past year, as he was initially hired as our delivery driver. But with his impressive retail background—he learned the shoe business in Nordstrom’s famous women’s shoe department—we knew Grant Davis was destined for bigger things. Growing up in Denver’s northern suburbs, Grant wanted to be an actor, and starred in some high school productions. Though his dream of movie stardom never materialized, his appreciation of looking like one pointed him to retail—a perfect outlet for his outgoing nature and charm. Celebrity look-alike: Georges St-Pierre, UFC Middleweight Champion; Bruce Willis Hobbies: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, weightlifting and movies Favorite vacation spot: Miami’s South Beach or anywhere there’s surfing Known for making: Pasta shells stuffed with ricotta and authentic spicy Italian sausage What he’d wear every day if he could: Isaia suit with custom DiBianco wingtips, or JBrand denim and Vivek V-neck T-shirts Why AM is special: “Three words: service, service, service.”

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An MBA in our midst. Chris Smith, Sales Associate Welcome new sales associate Chris Smith to the team. An Army brat, Chris grew up in California, Germany, Panama, Wisconsin and Kansas. He joined the Navy following high school, and later earned a business degree from Pittsburgh State University. He relocated to Denver to work in the oil business in 1996, and went to school part-time for his MBA. Somehow, Chris discovered his true calling was the men’s apparel business. With no previous experience, he became Rookie of the Year at Neiman Marcus in 2007. Not surprising, as he is very easy-going and quite knowledgeable. He joined the Andrisen Morton family in August 2013 and we’re very glad he did. Our customers agree! Celebrity look-alike: Seth Rogen Hobbies: Sports and music, but mostly baseball: he played first base and he is a HUGE Rockies fan Favorite vacation spot: Turkey—for its people and history; hopes to visit Argentina and Iceland in the near future Known for making: Filet mignon with dry rubs What he’d wear every day if he could: Nice jeans and T-shirts Why AM is special: “We each have the freedom to do whatever it takes to serve our customers. I felt very limited at my last job. Plus, it’s not every man for himself—we all work together for the sake of our customers.”

She helps everything look marvelous. Alicia Neri, Presser & Facilities Manager A native of Durango, Mexico, Alicia Neri immigrated to America in 1982 to find better opportunities in life—and she has worked very hard ever since. She joined the Andrisen Morton family in 2007 as the tailoring department’s presser, and we’re so fortunate to have her. In addition, Alicia has recently taken on new responsibilities as the store’s facilities manager. She makes sure the store always looks its absolute sparkling best! Although working quietly behind the scenes, Alicia plays an invaluable and integral role in giving our customers the very best experience. Hobbies: Exercising, jogging and reading Favorite vacation spot: Yearly trips to Mexico to visit family and go to the beach Known for making: Green chili, tamales and posole Why AM is special: “The people are so wonderful!”

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best practices

Exceptionally

ETON CRAFTING THE WORLD’S FINEST SHIRTS. By Karen Alberg Grossman

How did a little, family-run shirt business in Sweden get to be the best-selling shirt company in America, possibly in the world? I recently had the opportunity to join a group of upscale menswear stores for a visit to Eton headquarters in Ganghester, Sweden and its design studio in Stockholm. Knowing Eton is one of the hottest brands in the luxury market, we were eager to experience firsthand the culture, commitment and quality-obsessed artisans at this amazing company. As with all great companies, success starts at the top. Eton CEO Hans Davidson (third generation, the company was founded by his grandparents in 1948) and senior advisor Jan Borghardt were incredibly candid about their journey. As Borghardt explains it, “The Swedish mindset discourages arrogance: you should never think you’re too great. For many years, Hans and I were making all the decisions and it was

hard for us to let people contribute. But we soon realized that we might be the problem, so we gradually established a teambuilding culture that encourages creative thinking. An intense passion now permeates the company; our people love coming to work…” Eton is a vertical business, managing every stage of the shirt-making process from cotton Hans Davidson and Jan Borghardt at the helm during a boat cruise in Stockholm.

It’s been said there are more chemicals in a cup of British tea than in an Eton shirt…” Hans Davidson, Eton CEO 20


production to creative to sales. They Ca g F or Your Ertin use only extra-long staple cotton on Shirts HOME W (Pima from California and Giza from ASHING : • Unbutt on the sh Egypt), renowned for its luster, durairt and fo instructio llow care ns on lab el. bility and softness. (Only 0.7 percent • Do not overfill w ashing m set on lo achine; of the world’s cotton is ELS.) They w spin. • Once w ashed, h ang shir then partner with top mills that spin t on hanger an d stretch collar, cu fr ont plack ff and the cotton and weave the ets softly . Do not the shirt. wring fabric. “We work with • Option al: Light iron for an mills in Italy, finishing extra touch. Switzerland and France,” PROFES SIONAL LAUNDR explains Eton creative • Ask yo Y: ur cleaner to use lig and no st ht press director Sebastian arch. Pre ssing is n recomm ot ended fo Dollinger, a talented r collar, cu front pla ff and ckets. young artist whose inspiration wall for spring 2015 includes a Hindu magazine cover from the 1950s, a Led Zeppelin album cover, and various images of airplanes, flamingos, vintage pinball machines and Mexican skulls worked into a cool Sebastian Dollinger paisley. “We work with our weaving mills very early poses in front in the process and buy up their capacity far in of his spring advance, which is why the designs are exclusive.” inspiration board. Also unique to Eton shirts: a notable crispness, thanks to a special process that allows wrinkle resistance in the most ecologically safe way possible. “Cynics say it’s impossible to attain our level of wrinkle-free without chemicals,” Davidson explains. “But with our finisher in Switzerland, we invented a (40-step) method that actually rearranges the fibers of the cotton rather than coating the fabric with chemicals. It’s been said there are more chemicals in a cup of British tea than in an Eton shirt…”

FAST FACTS ON ETON: • The collection is sold in only the finest stores in 42 countries. • An Eton shirt is ecologically correct, from growing the cotton (using crop rotation) to dyeing the yarns to packaging and shipping. • Eton uses more cotton per square millimeter than most luxury brands. • They are famous for color clarity (there are 250 different shades of red alone!) and exclusive designs (they use no fabrics available on the open market). • Eton offers a variety of different fits and stocks numerous styles in each. The fit is exceptional because all measurements are carefully graded across sizes. • Eton collars and cuffs are unique: the founders invented an exclusive method of sewing them inside out. • Buttons are made of pulverized mother of pearl that Eton re-casts for added strength, and they’re strategically placed to allow for open collar-wearing. • Each shirt requires at least 100 minutes of cutting and sewing. • Much of the machinery used in the production process was conceived by Eton, and much hand craftsmanship is involved. • Eton ties are also exceptional, made at the finest factories in England and Italy. • The male model who is currently the face of Eton has a notable scar on his cheek. “Patrick represents adventure and risktaking,” explains global brand director Robert

Why invest in a luxury shirt? It will look better, wear longer and get more compliments than any shirt you own!”

Inghamn. “He’s the James Bond-type of guy that women love:

Craig Andrisen

always stylish and cool, even when facing extreme danger…”

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business

WHILE FEW FAMILY BUSINESSES ENDURE OVER MULTIPLE GENERATIONS, those that do have figured out the secret, and it extends

FAMILY BUSINESSES SUCCESSFULLY PASSING THE BATON FROM ONE GENERATION TO THE NEXT.

way beyond world-class customer service. It’s about knowing customers and shopping the market with individuals in mind, doing closet consultations and being on call 24/7. It’s about bringing in special or limited-edition items that the big stores can’t get, and always backing up their product because it’s the family name on the door. It’s also about gently leading customers out of their comfort zone to try new fashion and upgrade their image. For the Mitchell family, who operates the Mitchells, Richards, Marshs and Wilkes Bashford stores, the customer is a member of an extended family. “I’m second generation and we’re passionate about our family business,” says Bill Mitchell. He and his brother Jack have handed over the reins to the third generation but are still very much involved. “It may seem very trite and simplistic but because we’re a family business, we treat our customers like family. Early on, when my parents started this business, their first customers were their good friends.” Says Dave Morton at Andrisen Morton in Denver, “People can buy luxury goods anywhere these days—online, at major chains or with a local family business like us—so whoever executes customer service at the highest level wins that game.” Lisa Slesinger, the third generation at Larrimor’s in Pittsburgh adds, “It’s knowing names, birthdays, hobbies, where their kids go to school. I’ve met more than one senior executive at the major stores who has said, ‘What I wouldn’t give to know my customers.’” Wally Naymon of Kilgore Trout in Cleveland isn’t just proud of the rela-

GETTY1

Dizzy’s Club-Coca Cola, Jazz at Lincoln Center

MATTERS By Harry Sheff

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BRAD FEINKNOPF

Family


ULTIMATELY, THE LOCAL

FAMILY BUSINESS ISN'T RESPONSIBLE TO SHAREHOLDERS, BUT TO ITS

CUSTOMERS AND THEIR COMMUNITY. tionships he has built with his customers, but of the relationships that have formed between customers at his store. “More than once people have referred to KT as kind of a Cheers, where everyone knows your name. Because we are a neighborhood store, the gatherings we have on a busy Saturday have renewed many relationships between clients. Some business deals have even come to fruition due to chance encounters! I always joke (half-heartedly) that KT should get two points of any deals that were germinated here. I would probably be in St. Barths now!” Ultimately, the local family business isn’t responsible to shareholders, but to its customers and their community.

other for Sports Illustrated. There’s no entitlement here. Just because their last name is Mitchell doesn’t give them the key to the men’s room.” Andrisen Morton has a similar five-year policy. Dave Morton’s daughter Lindsay worked for Hugo Boss in New York, Stanley Korshak in Dallas and Nordstrom in Denver before joining the family business. “Does that ensure success? Not necessarily, but I guarantee that if someone walks out of college and presumes they have a role in the family business, it will not work,” Morton says emphatically. That sort of rule doesn’t just serve to vet family members and prepare them to join the business—it ensures that the next generation of leadership has a fresh perspective so that the business can evolve and stay relevant. “The power of youth is unique stuff,” affirms Morton. Any disadvantages to running a family business? “The disadvantages are like those in a marriage,” says Carl Slesinger. “You expect your wife to read your mind, and in a marriage or a family business, that’s not fair. I can’t expect my daughter to understand what I’m thinking, I need to articulate it. And be open to her ideas. You have to put your ego aside and be proud of the fact that you can do it.” Bob White of Hubert White in Minneapolis issues a final reminder to remember all the other ‘families’ that make any family business flourish. “As I reflect on our upcoming 100th anniversary, I always conclude that it’s been all about family. Our staff has always been like a family; our suppliers, in more cases than not, are family owned and operated; and of course our clients are part of our extended family,” he shares. “All of this ultimately leads to my family. I have been fortunate enough to have had the rare opportunity to work with both my dad and my son, but there is so much more to this business than my immediate family. The successes we have enjoyed during the years since my grandfather started this business would not have been possible without these many, many families.”

PREPARING THE NEXT GENERATION A popularly quoted statistic has it that 90 percent of family businesses don’t survive through the third generation. So what are the 10 percent that thrive doing right? It’s a combination of things. “I wanted my children to come into the business because they had the desire and commitment, not because they felt obligated to,” explains Carl Slesinger of Larrimor’s. His daughter Lisa worked for 15 years at major corporations before she returned home to join Larrimor’s. “You can’t just walk onto the sales floor and say to customers, ‘Hi, I’m so-and-so’s kid!’” quips Lisa. “I wasn’t just Carl’s daughter; I had experience that no one else here had.” For a family as large as the Mitchells, new generations joining the business have made it necessary to institute some official policies. “We’re not a rule-based family but we do have rules besides honesty and integrity,” says Bill Mitchell. “My brother Jack and I started this with the third generation that now runs the company: Regardless of how long our kids may have worked here in high school and college, they had to go out and work elsewhere for at least five years. It could be anywhere. Take my nephews, the copresidents of our company now: one worked for IBM and the

“OUR CLIENTS ARE PART OF OUR EXTENDED FAMILY.”

23


essay

RE-EVALUATE YOUR WARDROBE AND

Cut Your Losses By Hans J. Gschliesser

I vividly recall my cocky college roommate (an accounting major) lecturing anyone who would listen: “It’s not how much you make; it’s how much you keep!” Those words, delivered with the hubris of youth, still resonate for me. Unfortunately, they do not apply to my overstocked clothing portfolio, as I’ve been practicing a buy-andhold wardrobe strategy. It’s gotten so bad that when there’s a special event on the horizon, I become so traumatized at the prospect of retrieving the right tux from that entangled black hole that I run out and rent one (despite owning several already). The painful truth: No matter how good an investment it was seven years ago when your waist was as trim as the economy, some things no longer fit. Forget about squeezing into those artfully distressed but now uncomfortably tight jeans that have strolled in and out of style several times over the years. Forget the suits with the big shoulders and flowy pleated trousers: even if they still fit, they’re far too outdated to be respectable. We understand: you were simply caught up in the moment when you bought that ridiculously loud red tartan sportcoat

while vacationing in the Scottish Highlands. Blame it on the single malt if you must, but why hold on to it longer than The Macallan ages in its cask? Clearly, guys tend to fall victim to what economists and psychologists call the Effect of Sunk Costs. Yes, you made a monetary and mental investment when you decided to buy it, but now that it no longer holds any real value to you, why not just toss it? If you’re like most of us, you don’t want to appear wasteful, but what do we gain by holding on to stuff we never wear? Suggestion: rather than let your underused clothes languish in your overcrowded closet, how about getting a great return on those investments by donating them to a local non-profit? If you find the process too overwhelming, call a professional advisor (e.g. one of our sales associates) to help rebalance your wardrobe. Not only will your fashion-savvy consultant suggest what should stay and what should go, he’ll also offer some great ideas on how to update your overall style. The net result: an uncluttered closet, an uncluttered mind, and the spiritual dividend that comes from helping those in need. My new axiom is out with the old and in with the new. Or to paraphrase my college roommate: it’s not how much you own, but how much you wear.

24

GETTY/LASSE KRISTENSEN

WHAT DO WE GAIN BY HOLDING ON TO STUFF WE NEVER WEAR?


2.5-3.0” NARROW

2.0-2.5” SKINNY

ALLTIED UP!

THE FINISHING TOUCH THAT MAKES ALL THE DIFFERENCE.

T

hose in the know view ties first and foremost as fashion accessories, divorced from the dress codes of 30 years ago. While ties paired with suits are still mandatory in some corporate office environments, many guys don’t see them that way: to younger generations, ties in narrower widths and materials like cotton or wool are fashionable accessories that go just as well with jeans and an unconstructed blazer... or no jacket at all. Take note that ties have been steadily slimming down over the last 10 years, from an average of 4 inches in 1994 to 3.25 inches today. Several widths (as illustrated above) are now acceptable, as long as they’re in proportion to your jacket lapel. With the pressure off, you’re free to add neckwear to almost any outfit, for almost any occasion. There’s no better way to show your unique personal style.

PHOTOGRAPHER: JENS INGVARSSON. STYLIST: WILLIAM BUCKLEY. TAILOR: JASON SANTIAGO. MODEL: EMANUELE @ MAJOR MODELS

3.0-3.5” MODERN


LITTLE-KNOWN NECKWEAR FACTS 1.

Louis XIV began wearing a lace cravat at the age of seven, igniting a trend that spread across France.

2.

In the early 1700s, leather collars called “stocks” were worn around the neck to protect major blood vessels and encourage soldiers to hold their heads high during battle.

3.

Published in 1818, Neckclothitania or Tietania contains the first printed use of the word “tie” in reference to neckwear.

4.

The long, thin necktie style still used today was born during the industrial revolution, when factory workers needed simple, unfussy neckwear that wouldn’t come undone.

5.

When soldiers returned home from WWII, the Bold Look (characterized by ties that were up to 5 inches wide) showed their eagerness to break free from the conformity of military uniforms.

6.

Since September 2007, doctors in British hospitals have been banned from wearing neckties because they are laundered less frequently than other clothing items.

7.

In their book The 85 Ways to Tie a Tie, physicists Thomas Fink and Yong Mao assert that there are exactly 85 possible ways to knot a conventional necktie. Of these, Fink says, “just over a dozen are sufficiently handsome or different from each other to be worn.”

8.

International Necktie Day (or Cravat Day in Croatia) is celebrated each year on October 18th.


profile

Known for a super-soft hand, luxurious fabrics and vintage washes, AG’s jeans are American made and manufactured in its 400,000 sq. ft. Los Angeles factory. For spring 2014, AG is stepping up its game with cuttingedge styles for both men and women. Here, we highlight the must-have items for spring 2014.

WHAT YOU NEED NOW.

a soft

Mix

MEN’S MUST-HAVES Every man’s closet should have a mix of denim and nondenim bottoms. Color is king, but not as bright as past seasons. Think earth tones: grays, beiges and greens. COLORED SELVEDGE: AG is injecting its signature style into the selvedge denim craze that’s currently trending in menswear. (Selvedge refers to denim woven on a shuttle loom with a finished edge to prevent fraying.) AG uses a dyeable, comfort-stretch fabric (unique because most selvedge denim is not dyeable and raw). Key colors for spring are blues, greens, khakis, washedout blacks and whites. As AG’s men’s sales manager Jake Campbell explains, “White denim is very cool and poised to make a comeback for spring. It looks great with sportswear and has that elegant nautical feel.” Also exciting is the brand’s “double indigo” jean; it’s twice-dyed so when you roll up the cuff, it’s blue rather than white. LUXE CHINOS: Non-denim pants are the hot item for spring. AG’s super-luxe colored chinos are made of Italian fabrics in sueded cottons, giving these pants the most luxurious look and feel. This modern, tailored-fit chino is offered in both five-pocket and trouser styles. These versatile pants can be dressed up with a blazer, or worn like jeans on the weekend. This season’s casual palette will feature colors like soft grays and khakis.

NO ONE DOES CASUAL LUXE QUITE LIKE AG.

WOMEN’S MUST-HAVES The theme for spring is sophisticated-chic in a neutral monochromatic color palette (creams, beiges, whites). MOTO-INSPIRED: Moto styles were a huge trend for fall/holiday, and will only gain popularity for spring. AG is updating the trend with The Reagan, a moto-inspired style with chic seaming and zipper details. Pick up a pair in one of this season’s must-have muted tones like beige, nude and white. TWILL TROUSERS: Relaxed silhouettes are gaining traction in women’s fashion, and a more sophisticated style is the twill trouser. AG’s trouser fit is available in essential twill and has a slim, tapered leg. This twill style looks great in the season’s muted monochromatic colors as well as gray and faded black. —Elise Diamantini

28


di Bianco

TM

scarpe

Prima i Piedi www.scarpedibianco.com • info@scarpedibianco.com


COLOR CHECK

SPRING 2014 BRINGS A FRESH TAKE ON PRINT AND COLOR. DISCOVER THE LUSH HUES OF THE TROPICS, SET ON STUNNING VERANDAS UNDER A CANOPY OF PALMS AT THE MOORINGS RESORT & SPA IN ISLAMORADA, FLORIDA.

PHOTOGRAPHY: SERGIO KURHAJEC HAIR/MAKEUP: CLAIRE BAYLEY STYLING: WENDY MCNETT / WIILLIAM BUCKLEY


BRING ON THE

BLUES


BE PLAYFUL WITH PLAIDS, SETTING EXOTIC BRIGHTS AGAINST BOLD NEUTRALS.


IT’S A SHORTS

STORY


Style

A CRASH COURSE IN EASY ELEGANCE, FROM THE WORLD’S MOST WELL-DRESSED MEN.

PHOTOGRAPHER: JENS INGVARSSON. STYLIST: WILLIAM BUCKLEY. TAILOR: JASON SANTIAGO. MODELS: EFREN @ MSA, JHANELLE @ MAJOR, EMANUELE @ MAJOR.

ITALIAN


Brown Shoes PAIR PERFECTLY WITH GRAY OR NAVY SUITS IN A MODERN SLIM FIT.


Spring Layering GETS YOU THROUGH THE SEASON IN STYLE, WHILE WHITE TROUSERS BALANCE COLOR ON TOP.


Tailored Outerwear DOUBLES AS A BLAZER WHEN WORN WITH A DRESS SHIRT AND TIE.


PLAY WITH

Prints & Patterns IN BOLD COLOR (AND SKIP THE SOCKS).


Lightweight Knits LEND AN EFFORTLESS COOL TO SLIM COLORED CHINOS.


world scene

BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

Experience life’s little luxuries. TOUJOURS PROVENCE

BRUNO PRECHEMINSKY

Quietly sequestered among the vineyards, olive groves and lavender fields in the South of France is the sleek, modern, nearly 750-acre Terre Blanche Hotel Spa Golf Resort. Here, golfers are welcomed with two championship 18-hole courses and the Leadbetter Golf Academy, featuring the world’s top instructors. Spend the morning improving your swing, then pass a lazy afternoon at the infinity pool (with a breathtaking view of the Southern Alps), or get pampered in the elaborate and opulent spa. Since you’re in France, you should do a lot of eating and drinking. Terre Blanche makes it easy with four restaurants that serve fresh local dishes and superb wines (the rosés are especially excellent). Finally, retire to one of the elaborately homey villas scattered among the pine trees, where you’ll find seclusion and every contemporary comfort. It’s like having your own private Provence.

A COUNTRY PORT

foothills of the Smoky Mountains in eastern Tennessee, has been a favorite American destination for generations. Along with the comfortable cottages, award-winning food, and vast number of activities offered at Blackberry Farm, food, beverage and wine director Andy Chabot has assembled a commanding collection of 8,500 wines. The rare vintages include 25 madeiras and 20 ports. Chabot introduces guests to these notable after-dinner wines with flights: side-by-side tastings of three, such as the 1834, 1863 and 1875 madeiras, or ruby, tawny and white ports. For the true port connoisseur Chabot suggests VV from Niepoort (released only twice in the history of the company, just 999 bottles of this tawny port were produced), which he describes as “an elegant way to ease out of the evening.” 44

IMAGE BY BEALL + THOMAS PHOTOGRAPHY

BLACKBERRY FARM, a stylishly pastoral resort at the


IT JUST FITS.


world scene

PICTURING THE WILD WEST

For more than a century, cowboys and cowgirls have gathered at the Cheyenne Frontier Days to compete at the rodeo, dance the two-step and recreate the Old West. There’s also an art show. This July more than 60 of the country’s contemporary artists celebrate America’s frontier past—its culture, its magnificent scenery and the western way of life—in paintings, sculptures, wood and alabaster carvings, and Navajo weavings. The Cheyenne Frontier Days Western Art Show begins with a preview, followed by a reception at the Wyoming Governor’s Mansion. A western dinner and cocktails are served throughout the evening while the sale takes place, and guests dance the night away to the sounds of a live band.

M

EASY RIDER

ission Motorcycles has recently introduced the Mission RS, an innovative and high-performing electric motorcycle. Merging stunning looks with state-of-the-art technology, the Mission RS has a 120 kW (160 hp) electric motor integrated with Mission’s InfiniteDrive, which offers control and performance levels never before seen in any electric vehicle. The result: a pure motorcycle experience. Marchesini competition-legal and race-spec forged magnesium wheels are included in the optional GP Package, making the Mission RS ready to compete on the world stage. Production of the Mission RS is limited to 40 editions; naturally, each bike purchased is hand-delivered within North America.

ON THE WATERFRONT

This summer, experience the great outdoors at Miami’s Viceroy Hotel. For evenings there’s Fifty, a new rooftop indoor/outdoor lounge perched atop the 50th floor. Recline on chaise lounges or hang out at the bar and private pool and stare at the stars (or the city lights). During the day, head for the 15th floor and make a splash in the 300-foot infinity pool (Florida’s longest), an 80-person hot tub (the world’s largest) and a wading pool, which together add up to a water complex the size of a football field.

46


GHIBLI

INTRODUCING MASERATI GHIBLI E V E R Y D AY E X C I T E M E N T Maserati Ghibli touches all the senses. It blends Italian style, exclusivity and perfect proportions with a luxurious interior that pushes the boundaries of comfort and spaciousness. Its powerful twin-turbo V6 engine delivers exhilarating acceleration in an all-new sedan that offers sporting performance, luxury and style -- a combination that only Maserati drivers are privileged to experience.

Starts at $65,000. Available with Q4 intelligent AWD.

www.sthmotors.com 303.469.1801 125 Alter Street Broomfield


food MAY THE

FOWL

FRIED CHICKEN GETS DRESSED UP.

BE WITH YOU

By Donald Charles Richardson

SO WHAT IF VERSIONS OF FRIED CHICKEN have been eaten since ancient times in Europe and Asia, chicken fried in palm oil has been a longstanding staple in West African cuisine, and the Scots were early proponents of frying chicken in fat? (Some even credit them with introducing the technique to the United States.) Despite its worldly history, fried chicken has become an inimitably American dish. After all, how many other countries celebrate National Fried Chicken Day? (July 6th, FYI.) It’s almost impossible not to love fried chicken. It’s crispy, satisfying, delicious, and like all great comfort foods, it can even evoke nostalgia: memories of Sunday family dinners, summer picnics or late-night refrigerator raids. (Few things in life are quite so satisfying as discovering an overlooked chicken leg.)

Although fried chicken has always been popular, these days it’s become so fashionable that even elitist gourmets are crying fowl. And cooks all over the country are keeping abreast of this current passion for poultry. Raised on a farm, Mildred Cotton Council spent years learning and creating her recipes. In 1976, she finally opened Mama Dip’s Kitchen (Mama Dip was her childhood nickname) in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where she continues to turn out some of the best fried chicken in the country. “I’m a country cook. I can tell how a chicken is raised by the taste,” she asserts. When asked if she has a special recipe, Mama Dip explains that she has “never called it a recipe” before sharing her prep routine: she soaks the chicken in a big tub filled with salt water, then rinses it off, dips it in flour and adds black pepper.

48

THOR SWIFT

Thomas Keller's Ad Hoc


“Best not to freeze for fried chicken,” she cautions. “People get chicken on sale and put it in a freezer, [but you] need a fresh chicken to begin with. Every day we get a delivery.” Mama Dip always serves her fried chicken with biscuits. Another tip she’s generous enough to reveal: “I started making biscuits with plain self-rising flour with a little extra baking powder mixed in there. It’s really good.” Other restaurants, vying for the cock of the walk title, have come up with their own inventive methods of making fried chicken. In Portland, Oregon, David Kreifels, one of the three Chicken and waffles at Birch & Barley

lion potato salad, pimento mac ‘n cheese, creamed kale and roasted garlic mashed potatoes, and presented alongside 12 different dipping sauces, including buffalo hot, satan spicy, homemade ranch buttermilk, barbeque and honey mustard. It stands to reason all the attention on this essentially simple American dish was eventually bound to ruffle the feathers of famous chefs. Renown for the gastronomic experiences he creates at his legendary French Laundry and Per Se restaurants, Thomas Keller salutes home cooking with Ad Hoc in Yountville, California. Here, chef de cuisine Katie HaganWelchel treats chickens like poultry royalty. Using only local birds no larger than 2.5 pounds (to promote even cooking), the chicken is cut into 10 pieces and spends 12 hours in an

partners who’ve created Simpatica and Laurelhurst Market (named in 2010 as one of the best new restaurants by Bon Appétit) says they only serve fried chicken from the butcher shop on Tuesdays at Laurelhurst Market, and at brunch on Sundays at Simpatica. The chicken is soaked in buttermilk overnight, dusted with a blend of curry powder, flour, salt, pepper and paprika, then fried in oil. The spice coating allows the chicken to develop a nice crisp at a lower oil temperature. It’s allowed to “rest” after frying and Kreifels says, “As it cools the crust gets crispier… and the crust stays on because of the lower heat.” Their chicken is served with waffles in fruit syrup. In Washington D.C., Birch & Barley’s fried chicken and waffle dish is so popular that husband and wife team Kyle (chef) and Tiffany (pastry chef) Bailey have opened another restaurant, GBD (Golden, Brown & Delicious), that highlights fried chicken along with their gourmet doughnuts. You can actually order a fried chicken sandwich with a doughnut as the bread. (Truly, you can!) GBD uses 100 percent hormone-free chickens plunged into a buttermilk brine then fried fresh to order. It’s served with sides like crème fraiche biscuits, scal-

IT’S ALMOST herb-lemon brine (to help the meat stay juicy). It’s IMPOSSIBLE air dried to room temperature then dredged in flour mixed with garlic, onion powder, paprika, cayenne NOT TO LOVE FRIED pepper, salt and black pepper. Next it’s dipped in CHICKEN. buttermilk, then returned to the flour mixture and finally fried in peanut oil. Chef Hagan-Whelchel uses two different fryers—one for white meat, another for dark— pointing out that dark meat takes longer and she prefers to cook it at a lower temperature (320 degrees) than the white (340 degrees). Fried chicken at Ad Hoc is on the menu every other Monday and served with corn bread and seasonal vegetables. It’s also available in a box lunch at Addendum in the garden behind Ad Hoc, from Thursday through Saturday. When you get right down to it, whether simple or sophisticated, fried chicken at its best is soul-satisfying food you eat with your fingers while having a really wonderful time. “Fried chicken somehow emotionally resonates with everybody,” says Hagan-Whelchel. “It’s a thread through all of us… it just makes you feel good.”

50

DAVID REAMER

Laurelhurst Market Steakhouse & Butcher Shop


PEOPLE WILL DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING TO GET INTO THE 2014 BMW CHAMPIONSHIP. And all you have to do is buy a ticket. The top 70 players from around the world will compete in the PGA TOUR’s FedExCup Playoffs at Cherry Hills Country Club in September, 2014. Purchase your tickets today at BMWChampionshipUSA.com.

©2013 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name, models names and logo are registered trademarks.


speed DAYS OF

FUTURE FAST

THE NEXT GENERATION OF HIGH-TECH TRANSPORTATION IS ALMOST HERE. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON Huddersfield student Mac Byers. His concept is inspired by classic zeppelins and incorporates vertical lift technology from AerosCraft (a company producing high-tech dirigibles for cargo transport and hoping to be online commerically by 2016). Byers envisions his helium-supported floating cruise ship as an open design, allowing passengers to explore spacious catwalks, viewing areas, bars and large private sleeping quarters. The frontiers of private commercial space flight, meanwhile, continue to be dominated by two pioneers: SpaceX and Virgin Galactic. Despite promises of speedy delivery of civilian passengers into low-earth orbit and higher (SpaceX is convinced they’ll be able to do private fly-bys of the Moon and land their proposed Dragon spacecraft on Mars in this century), the industry seems rife with delays. Virgin Galactic’s space program hasn’t yet taken off (pun intended), and SpaceX appears (from the outside) to

HERE WE ARE IN 2014; where are the flying cars and jet packs? Not everyone’s given up on the dream: From highspeed rail and solar-powered cars to wacky personal transport and luxury airships, innovators and idealists continue moving the world forward, one hovercraft at a time. Some of our biggest dreamers continue to look towards the sky. Last year, Terrafugia, a Massachusetts-based aerospace company, announced it was officially in the flying car business. The Transition is a compact, street-legal vehicle which can fly in and out of airports using retractable wings, looks and drives like a car on the road, and costs around $280,000. Now the company hopes to produce the TF-X, a four-seat hybrid electric vehicle capable of making vertical take-offs and landings. Despite the reality of private jets and luxury airliners, some innovators still envision demand for a classic airship. The Aether Cruise Experience is a design project created by University of

IMAGES COURTESY OF HAMMACHER SCHLEMMER, SPACEX

SpaceX's Dragon, a proposed Mars lander

52


It’s time to play follow the leader. Again.

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The race exemplifies some of the challenges of bringing a solar-charged, off-the-grid car to market. “We calculated that if we applied the parameters of our competition to a Nissan Leaf [a small electric car priced—and taxed—at the luxury level in Australia], it would do the event in 28 days rather than four days,” says Chris Selwood of World Solar Challenge. “It highlights the cap between cutting-edge efficiency and commercial limitations.” What if you’re burning to buy a piece of the future today? Hammacher Schlemmer has been providing such opportunities for years, with electric bikes and hovercrafts filling the pages of their catalog (and their newly remodeled Manhattan flagship store) alongside high-tech razors and poolside fireplaces. Most recently, the company introduced two tantalizing personal submarines: one that looks like a Killer Whale ($90,000) and a two-person submersible for studying the ocean floor ($2 million, training and certification required). “We’re always looking for unusual modes of transport,” says Stephen Farrell, director of merchandising. “In the flying world, there is a loosening of ultralight aircraft regulations, making it easier for people to fly personal aircraft.” Perhaps he has the skinny on when we’re getting those jetpacks we’ve been so long promised. “We’re getting pretty close,” says Farrell. “It’s basically in the hands of military contractors. When they’re legal, safe and available, Hammacher Schlemmer will sell them!”

be focused on commercial space over passengers (though it is currently competing for a contract to shuttle astronauts to the International Space Station). Sierra Nevada, another contender, conducted a test flight in October of its Dream Catcher space plane in which landing gear malfunctioned, causing minor damage. eanwhile on the ground, progress seems to be racing along. Japan, long known for its high-speed, magneticlevitation bullet trains, is now marketing the technology to other countries. Northeast Maglev, a Washington D.C. company, is hoping to build a superconducting maglev train to the Northeast Corridor, potentially chopping the three-hour trip between D.C. and New York to one. And Elon Musk, co-founder of SpaceX and the brains behind the electric Tesla S sports car, floated a concept last year for a pressurized tube rail called Hyperloop, which theoretically would make the trip from LA to San Francisco in 35 minutes. Musk seems to vasillate between claiming to be too busy to make this more than a pipe dream, and promising a working prototype by 2015 through the new spinoff company Hyperloop Transportations Technologies. Either way, the idea has caused buzz on the internet and piqued the interests of investors. Electric cars are becoming a daily reality, but unplugging them completely from existing fossil fuel sources remains a hurdle. The World Solar Challenge is a semi-annual 1,865-mile, four-day race across the Australian desert which attempts to draw new ideas out of universities and think tanks around the world. Sunswift, a team out of New South Wales, introduced Eve, a four-passenger, twodoor car which averaged speeds of 50 MPH through the race, and topped out at 80. “The greatest challenges were the design trade-offs between aerodynamic efficiency, solar array output and driver/passenger comfort,” says Alexander To, director of Sunswift’s business team. Though the car finished the race 90 minutes ahead of its competition, passenger weight handicaps and judging on practicality left Eve third in its category.

M

INNOVATORS AND IDEALISTS KEEP MOVING THE WORLD OF TRANSPORTATION FORWARD.

Hammacher Schlemmer’s Killer Whale Submersible

Dirigible prototype from AerosCraft

54


spirits

Made-to-Treasure RESORTS AND RESTAURANTS OFFER GUESTS ONE-OF-A-KIND DRINKING EXPERIENCES. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

Jimmy Russell. Often the restaurant will craft a signature or private selection cocktail. Chef Marc Murphy's bar/restaurant Kingside, in Manhattan's luxe new Viceroy Hotel, features a custom Michter's Whiskey (aged in a custom deep-char barrel) in its own barrel-aged Manhattan. At Emeril Lagasse's Las Vegas venues, he drops a custom Buffalo Trace Eagle Rare single-barrel reserve into three seasonal cocktails: The NOLA Mule, the Bourbon Milk Punch and the Autumn Pomme. Bam! Such exclusivity isn't reserved for whiskeys: Herradura tequila offers a Buy the Barrel program to restaurants around the country, including several Richard Sandoval properties in New York; at contemporary Japanese eatery Shibuya in Las Vegas, you'll find exclusive sakes dubbed Neo-Tokyo and Hachiko; and at Four Seasons Milan, you can order a custom Italian (sweet) vermouth. "It's wonderful to see people come back and select new barrels for seasonality or specific food pairings," says Morris. "Restaurants and resorts are finding they're selling out so fast that they're saying, 'we've already got to do this again.'"

56

IMAGE BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

IT'S NO LONGER ENOUGH to order a standard blended whisky, or even an 18-year expression of your go-to Scotch before dinner. The latest trend: custom barrel selections and blends exclusive to specific restaurants, bars and resorts. Such custom and one-off bottlings have been around for years through high-end liquor stores and private tasting societies. But as the cocktail and fine drinking scenes evolve, more bars and restaurants are clamoring for a customized spirit. Woodford Reserve Bourbon offers two programs for restaurateurs and beverage managers: A single-barrel selection, and an unusual two-barrel blend, which sees the venue working directly with master distiller Chris Morris to create an exclusive whiskey, the selections winnowed down from over 100 possible barrels. "As far as I know, we have the only program like this," says Morris. Destinations like The Cloister at Sea Island (Georgia), The Edison in Los Angeles and the St. Regis in Atlanta have taken advantage. "It's so fun to watch the dynamics of each account: Some want a sweeter blend, some spicier. It's always unique; you can't replicate a two-barrel batch." Michael MacDonnell, beverage director at the Monte Carlo in Las Vegas, concurs: "Uniqueness is one of the top selling points. Nowhere else in the world has it, and when it's gone, it's gone forever." The resort offers an exclusive Knob Creek sin-

THE LATEST TREND: CUSTOM BARREL SELECTIONS AND BLENDS EXCLUSIVE gle-barrel reserve Bourbon and TO SPECIFIC is now offering the first-ever RESTAURANTS, BARS AND Russell's Reserve select single RESORTS. barrel from Wild Turkey Distiller


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at your service

MADE-TO-MEASURE For the ultimate clothing experience, indulge in made-tomeasure suits, sportcoats, shirts and trousers, or even ties. The world’s finest fabrics and designers mean yours will truly be a fit like no other.

ALTERATIONS With six full-time master tailors and seamstresses on staff, we don’t mess around when it comes to the finished product. Expert alterations are always complimentary with every new purchase.

For that hard-to-buy-for kinda guy, give the gift of Andrisen Morton. Stop in or give us a call. We’ll take care of the rest.

CLOSET CONSULTATION

Whether before, during or after business hours, we are happy to arrange special appointments in the store to assist you with your shopping needs. Just call and we’ll make it happen.

Is the closet full, but you still can’t find anything to wear? Call in the style pros of Andrisen Morton for a personal closet consultation. You’ll get an objective view of your entire wardrobe and a friendly nudge to gently help you weed out the old, tired and worn to make room for the new.

HOME/OFFICE VISITS

PERSONAL DELIVERY

Sometimes business or life gets in the way of finding time to stop by the store. But no worries. We’re more than happy to come to your home or office. So give us a shout and we’re there…

Whether in metro Denver, Colorado Springs, Fort Collins or Vail, if you need a purchase delivered, rest assured you’ll receive it when and where you need it… with a smile.

SPECIAL APPOINTMENTS

Going above and beyond for customers is the heart and soul of Andrisen Morton’s culture. We believe great merchandise combined with great service is the only way to exceed clients' expectations.

GIFT CARDS

COMPLIMENTARY GIFT WRAP There’s gift-wrapping and then there’s Andrisen Morton giftwrapping. It’s always complimentary and always with the utmost style and a dash of panache.


SPRING 2014

Knowledge. Wisdom. Truth

The Slowear family of brands offers you the best in terms of fitting, fabrics and finishings. Slowear clothes are designed to live longer. Enjoy the Slowear brands

TROUSERS

KNITWEAR

SHIRTS

JACKETS


ON MATTERS OF STYLE, SWIM WITH THE CURRENT. ON MATTERS OF PRINCIPLE, STAND LIKE A ROCK.” — THOMAS JEFFERSON

WHETHER YOU’RE BREAKING DOWN BARRIERS IN PURSUIT OF YOUR DREAM JOB OR ENJOYING A NIGHT OUT WITH YOUR CLOSEST FRIENDS, BEING SURROUNDED BY THE RIGHT LIFE-GIVING CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES CAN EQUIP YOU WITH THAT JUJU TO MAKE EVERYTHING GO YOUR WAY.” — CONNIE WANG & MARISSA ROSENBLUM

FOR IT. — Edith Head

of

Style

OPEN ALL

DOORS. — Thomas Fuller ’’ “Good design, much like good ballet, must look completely effortless. No one wants to see how hard you’re working.”

INNOVATION! ONE CANNOT BE FOREVER INNOVATING. I WANT TO CREATE CLASSICS.” — COCO CHANEL

WHATEVER YOU WANT

DRESS

Speaking

“GOOD CLOTHES

— JAMIE WOLF

YOU CAN HAVE IF YOU

“NINETY PERCENT OF WHAT YOU SEE WHEN YOU LOOK AT A PERSON IS HIS CLOTHING. SO OF COURSE IT MATTERS!” — TOM KALENDERIAN

’’

“STYLE IS A LUXURY, AND LUXURY IS SIMPLY WHAT MAKES YOU HAPPY.” — Deborah Needleman

“One should either be a work of art, or wear a work of art.” — Oscar Wilde 60


T H E U LT I M AT E T R O U S E R


ANDRISEN MORTON FORUM SPRING 2014

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