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Anno 50 | N°10 del 21.10. 2019 | quindicinale | € 8,00 | www.fashionmagazine.it

Poste Italiane S.P.A. – Spedizione in abbonamento postale – D.L. 353/2003 (conv. in L. 27/02/2004 N.46) Art. 1, Comma 1 Lom/Mi/1769

Il magazine di news, business e trend

FULLY ENGLISH INTERNATIONAL EDITION

MAKING

THE FUTURE

HAPPEN Cover photo: Dior


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N° 10

SUMMARY

21 OCTOBER 2019

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EDITOR’S NOTE

LEADERS

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MARIE-CLAIRE DAVEU/KERING GROUP

“EVERYTHING NEEDS TO BE TRACEABLE”

12 BUYERS AT MILAN FASHION WEEK

POWER DRESSING STILL MATTERS

24 WHITE MILANO SUSTAINABILITY ISN’T JUST A FAD

28 SUPER

PUTTING THE ENVIRONMENT ON TOP

28 THEONEMILANO ON THE COVER

Dior, Spring-Summer 2020 Photo Imaxtree

BRANDS EMBRACE INCLUSIVENESS

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30 MICAM & MIPEL FACING THE FUTURE WITH AN ECO-FRIENDLY OUTLOOK 32 BEYOND MILAN PARIS REDISCOVERS ITS GRANDEUR

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N° 10

21 OCTOBER 2019 www.fashionmagazine.it

SUMMARY

37 67 BUSINESS 37 ON THE ROAD TO SUSTAINABILITY IT’S ALL ABOUT A FASHION PACT 38 ORSOLA DE CASTRO FASHION REVOLUTION

“FASHION MUST DISINVEST IN GROWTH AND INVEST IN WELL-BEING”

40 MATTEO WARD/WRÅD “TODAY, PRODUCTS NEED A PURPOSE” 42 FROM BLUE TO “GREEN” ITALIAN DENIM MAKERS KNOW HOW TO INNOVATE 44 TEXTILE FAIRS IN PARIS SMART AND RESPONSIBLE: TEXTILES LOOK AHEAD 50

58 FROM MILAN TO PARIS CANADA GOOSE’S DANI REISS: “AUTHENTICITY IS KEY”

97 WOMENSWEAR

60 STORE TO WATCH MILAURA’S NEW MILAN ADDRESS

103 ACCESSORIES

62 BEAUTY BUSINESS ITALY’S COSMETICS MARKET REACHES EUR422M

106 NEW TRENDS @ HOMI WHEN ACCESSORIES MAKE THE DIFFERENCE

TREND

67 CATWALK SHOWS

SPRING-SUMMER 2020

MIND OVER MATTER

79 WOMENSWEAR

SPRING-SUMMER 2020

CLEAN BANDITS

89 SPRING-SUMMER 2020 @ WHITE ONE PLANET

RELAUNCHING A HERITAGE BRAND

94 SPRING-SUMMER 2020

WALTER MAIOCCHI: “WE’RE BUILDING A FUTURE AROUND MADE IN MALO”

@ SUPER & THEONEMILANO

A BOHEMIAN SARTORIAL TOUCH AT MILAN RTW SHOWS

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SPRING-SUMMER 2020

BE KIND

SPRING - SUMMER 2020

A HINT OF GLAMOUR

PEOPLE

108 PORTRAITS/GABRIELE MAGGIO A LUXURY VETERAN SWITCHING GEARS AT STELLA MCCARTNEY 109 CAREERS 110 Q&A/SIMONA MARZIALI “I WANT TO GROW WITHOUT LOSING MY IDENTITY”

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pisaorologeria.com

+39 02 76 20 81


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Propelled by a surging global mood, the fashion world’s latest megatrend centers around the concept of sustainability. As youngsters around the world have taken to the streets, legitimately voicing their right to a clean planet, brands from the luxury and mass market realms alike are competing for the greenest profile. As welcome as this newly gained attention to environmental issues is, in many cases it somewhat strains credibility. Seeing brands who have defined themselves for decades in terms of serving whimsical and lavish lifestyles to propagate a sternly moralistic viewpoint is, to say the least, baffling. To a certain extent this suddenly born attitude resembles the pose attributed to France’s pre-revolutionary Queen Marie Antoinette, who countered the masses’ lack of bread with one of human history’s most dreaded slogans: “Let them eat cake”. Unfortunately, even if the true maternity of the quip remains unknown, this “generous” approach did not serve her well at all. Her fate is well known. In a world dominated by a growing desire for accountability, now as in the late 18th century, everyone who caters to a privileged and overfed clientele would be well advised to display the utmost pragmatism and humility. The apparel and accessories industries are currently being indicated as the second most polluting sector on earth. This, in itself, means strong action needs to be taken. In this issue we describe how, all along the value chain, innumerable players are redirecting their efforts and starting to contribute to what should, hopefully, amount to a sector-wide clean-up. It is, however, premature, on behalf of anyone, to be claiming success. We are talking about a gradual and strenuous undertaking, one that will most probably never be over. To design a couple of T-shirts made out of recycled plastic bottles is by far not enough. Likewise, we should not grow frustrated because of wrong “here and now” expectations. The problem has to be taken very seriously. The current pace of technological revolution offers many glimpses of hope, and many new ways of acting in a responsible, and yet enlightening and inspiring fashion. Whoever claims, though, to be a fully “sustainable” enterprise today, is not only misunderstanding the facts. He (or her) is an outright liar. The same holds true for who announces Armageddon tomorrow. The facts are being discovered as we speak. Humankind is strong and intelligent. We will cope. It will be the small steps who will carry us all the way.

EDITOR’S NOTE

The Importance of Staying Real

Mentre innumerevoli giovani in tutto il mondo chiedono di tutelare l’ecosistema terra, ogni genere di brand si è messo a competere per l’etichetta del marchio più verde. In molti casi questa improvvisa presa di coscienza è agli antipodi con l’atteggiamento avuto fino a ieri, quando accondiscendere ai più futili e fugaci umori sembrava la prima preoccupazione. Per essere credibili, l’importante è tenere i piedi per terra. Ben lungi dall’essere prossimi all’Apocalisse, bisogna umilmente continuare a costruire un percorso che rappresenta un lascito e una responsabilità per chi oggi scende in piazza, ma sarà presto chiamato a dare l’esempio.

Marc Sondermann

CEO & Editor-in-Chief

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INTERVIEW

MARIE-CLAIRE DAVEU/KERING GROUP

“EVERYTHING NEEDS TO BE TRACEABLE” Since its inception in 2013, French luxury conglomerate Kering is on the forefront of the sector’s fight for sustainability. In this interview with Fashion Magazine, Chief Sustainability Officer Marie-Claire Daveu explains her take on the group’s strategy and its specific steps towards establishing an environmentally and socially virtuous firm. BY MARC SONDERMANN

What objectives does Kering pursue on the sustainability front? We aim to develop a sustainable approach to luxury by enacting three principles: to care, collaborate and create. These pillars shape an ambitious strategy, in a world where reducing resource consumption and respecting people are absolute necessities. For us, to care means to reduce our environmental impact, as quantified by our environmental profit and loss (EP&L) by 40% by 2025 and to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by the same year.

What are the priorities? First and foremost, we want to change the status quo in terms of traceability and find disruptive innovations. Today, we know that we are able to reduce our environmental footprint by 20% by 2025. To fully reach our target and reduce it by 40%, we need disruptive innovation.

print along the supply chain. In terms of sustainable sourcing, we opened our own materials innovation lab in Italy as early in 2013. Also, we have put in place a sustainable cashmere program in Mongolia and a similar one for wool in New Zealand. Very importantly, we committed to carbon neutrality in September.

How do you operationalize the other two pillars? On the one hand, to collaborate means we strive for gender parity and salary equality across all levels of our group. We also want to preserve craftsmanship in our operating regions, ensure high working standards and share best practices across our supply chain. On the other hand, to create signifies innovation, by establishing materials innovation labs, pushing for alternative sourcing, investing in start-ups, and educating the designers of tomorrow.

In which areas have you been able to make progress? So far, we have been able to formalize and share demanding standards for raw materials and manufacturing processes as well as for animal welfare. Our first group EP&L has been published in 2015 and hence we have been publishing one a year. Last June, we went a step further and opened a Digital EP&L platform, to open source all our data. It is a pioneering tool, that allows us to know exactly where our impacts are, to measure them and then implement the right programs to reduce our foot-

How are you going to proceed with CO2 emissions? It is important to keep in mind that our first priority has always been to avoid and reduce our emissions. Only when this is not feasible, we offset. To avoid and to reduce emissions, the programs around sustainable sourcing are one of the key solutions.

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Marie-Claire Daveu, Chief Sustainability Officer of the Kering Group (© Jean-François Robert)

What does your commitment for carbon neutrality mean for Kering brands’ catwalk shows? With regards to Gucci, we have started


Some pictures showing Kering’s commitment for a sustainable luxury in every step of its chain: as Marie-Claire Daveau underlines, the priorities are traceability, a drastic reduction of emissions, disruptive innovations, demanding standards for raw materials and manufacturing processes, as well as for animal welfare. Last but not least, the group aims to promote ever higher working standards. The leitmotiv is Collaborate, Care and Create

offsetting all related emissions, from the travel emissions of 1,000 guests and 900 workers, including models, production staff and Gucci employees, to using recycled wood for the set and Forest Stewardship Council-certified paper invites. The brand will be the first fashion label to earn a ISO 20121 certification for its show, as this is the standard for sustainable event management today. Saint Laurent is also implementing several steps to reduce environmental impact. Equipment is rented or if produced it is either reused, upcycled or recycled. Single-use plastic for catering is banned and replaced by eco cutlery. The food comes from local producers using responsible practices. All power consumed at the event is produced by renewable means and biofuel is used to power the generators. Greenhouse Gas emissions are offset through forest conservation projects.

Can you quantify the impacts on the supply chain? This is the role of our EP&L. One of the key findings was that 90% of our impacts are in the supply chain, not within our own boundaries. Hence all the work that needs to be done on raw material sourcing and processing. Are you satisfied with the EP&L results? It is a tool that measures our impacts all along the supply chain, and transforms them into a monetary value. It is also a risk management tool. So it helps us a lot in leading our strategy. We are satisfied because, so far, we are on track on our target to reduce our EP&L by 40% by 2025. How important is it to communicate in this regard? It’s important to communicate about it, but it’s more important to act. Our open source

model aims to share our methodology and invite other companies to join us. Have you noticed in your clients an increasing intention of buying sustainable products ? What we know from our stores is that customers are asking more questions regarding the products. They are super well informed via the social media, and the young generation is much more sensitive to animal welfare and inclusivity. Which are the most recent Kering initiatives of whom you are most proud of? On October 11 we launched the K Generation awards in Shanghai, together with innovation platform Plug and Play. The aim is to fast-track sustainable innovation within luxury and apparel in Greater China. We offer a prize including mentorship and networking, and a 100,000 € ■ grant to the top winner. 

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Ph. Kent Wang

NEWS BY ELISABETTA FABBRI

SAVE THE DATE: FASHION’S CEO ROUNDTABLE, NOV. 7 The Ceo Roundtable on Commerce Innovation organised by the sector-leading magazines Fashion and eBusiness will take place on Thursday, November 7 between 9am and 4pm at Milan’s Palazzo Parigi. Fashion and private equity executives will lead the talks, followed by a ceo panel on how digital strategy is crucial for company growth. A deeper dive into the management of e-commerce pricing and best practices in online sales will also be at the top of the agenda. The summit will culminate in a discussion on sustainability and the presentation of the "Young Creative Leader of Tomorrow” award given in honour of the late Tsum director Andreas Schmeidler. In the afternoon a series of e-commerce best practices will be discussed.

A Louis Vuitton store in Hong Kong

Chanel

Hermès

CHINESE TOURISTS SWITCH TO JAPAN

CONTROLLING THE SUPPLY CHAIN

LVMH SALES RISE +17% IN Q3 DESPITE HONG KONG RIOTS

CHANEL AND HERMÈS INVEST IN LEATHER GOODS

The quarterly reports season starts in this period and the luxury goods listed companies begin to count the effects of the prodemocracy protests in Hong Kong, which have not stopped since June. LVMH posted strong third-quarter performance despite the anti-government protests in Hong Kong that have raged since June. Overall sales rose 17%, year on year, to 13.3 billion euro despite the 25% drop in sales from the former British colony, one of LVMH’s key markets. The Watches and Jewelry segment, which includes Tag Heuer, Hublot and Bulgari, grew by 5% in the three month period. Swiss watchmaking is swiftly losing market share in Hong Kong, its largest market. Exports to the area plunged 12.7% in August alone. Hong Kong sales represent between 5% to 10% of overall luxury sales, according to a report from Bernstein. Rbc Capital Markets estimated that the Hong Kong turnover of the majority of luxury brands suffered a drop of 30% to 60% between June and September. Headwinds are on the horizon. A slew of labels are bracing themselves for the year ahead. Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger owner Pvh and German fashion house Hugo Boss reduced their annual targets. Signs of hope are emerging, though. According to some sources, wealthy Chinese are making more purchases in Japan, but also in South Korea, Singapore and Australia.

To ensure the most strategic supplies in leather goods, Chanel is investing in Italy. In July it bought the Tuscan tannery Samanta by Attilio Gronchi, specializing in printed reptile, while more recently the French brand entered the capital of leather goods manufacturer Renato Corti, owner of factories in Florence and Milan, as well as Mabi, specialized in high-end bags in San Daniele (Udine) and Tuscany. For these two recent deals there is talk of a total investment of $169 million, feeding the network of thirty ateliers controlled by Chanel through its subsidiary Paraffection, which employs about 5 thousand people. To give further impetus to the leather accessories business, Hermès instead continues to open new production facilities in the motherland. In 2022 the second plant in the Ardennes should be ready, which, when fully operational, will provide work for 250 new employees. From 2010 to date, the Kelly bags manufacturer has opened nine leather goods factories and recruited over 2,100 craftsmen, exceeding a total of 3,400 employees including leather and saddlers. Next year a site will be inaugurated in Guyenne (Gironde), followed in 2021 by Montereau (Seine-et-Marne) and Louviers, in the Eure department. In the first six months of 2019 the Hermès maroquinerie-sellerie division achieved revenues of €1.65 billion, up 12% at constant exchange rates.

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PITTI IMMAGINE’S 7TH FASHION AND TECH SUMMIT The e-P Summit returns on October 23rd, at Milan’s Talent Garden Calabiana. Organised by Pitti Immagine, the summit will shine a spotlight on fashion and innovation. “Next Level Now” is the theme of the one-day event that will be jam-packed with talks and presentations on the future of fashion and retail. The program will consist, as usual, of presentations, discussion panels and keynote speeches with the participation of names such as Sandeep Verma (Allbirds), Franck Denglos (Adidas), Werner Bossenmaier (Timberland), Diana Dimitian (Levi's), Simon Breckon (Ellesse), Massimo Giorgetti (MSGM), Ronny Mikalsen (Carlings) and Gaetano Sallorenzo (Miroglio Fashion).

ITALIAN TEXTILE-FASHION SYSTEM SEES OVER €100 BN 2019 REVENUES In the first half of 2019 Italian textile-fashion exports increased by 7.2%, to 33.5 billion euro, compared to the same period of 2018. Exports outpaced imports, which inched up 2.1%, resulting in a trade surplus of 15.7 billion euro, up 13.6%, according to Italian Federation of Textiles, Fashion and Accessories, Confindustria Moda. Domestic consumption, which represents around 30% of total sales, fell by 2%. Confindustria Moda sees a 2.5% to 3% rise in revenues for the first half of the year. By the end of 2019, total turnover should reach over 100 billion euro, versus 95.5 billion euro in 2018.


BOTTEGA VENETA

WOMEN’S FASHION WEEK

BUYERS AT MILAN FASHION WEEK

POWER DRESSING STILL MATTERS Rich messages and a return to a simpler way of doing things were paramount at the Milan ready-towear shows. The Spring Summer 2020 collections marked a turning point at the commercial level. Ready-to-wear was ethically crafted with materials and components made to stand the test of time. Cult collections from Bottega Veneta, Versace and Prada were cases to be studied, while the new Gucci promises to be a total challenge, though more scouting could be done BY ANDREA BIGOZZI

Bottega Veneta was the hot ticket of the week. Jil Sander too one of our top picks of the city. As for Prada, I believe that Miuccia Prada is one of the greatest geniuses in the history of fashion. Speaking of genius, it is not possible not to mention Gucci

Linda Fargo Bergdorf Goodman

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VERSACE

MUST HAVE Spring-Summer 2020

Bottega Veneta

MULES

Brognano

VERSACE DOMINATES, GUCCI GROWS, INFLUENCERS FAME DIMS Versace emerged the winner over Gucci, at the Milan Spring/Summer 2020 shows - it wasn’t a victory of style, it was a win on social media. After Jennifer Lopez dropped the mic on the Versace fashion show, by strutting her stuff down the runway in her iconic jungle print dress, the buzz around the brand skyrocketed. The actess/singer’s surprise appearance at Milan Fashion Week generated 3.7 million social media interactions, three times that of Gucci, which had 1.2 million. Milan-based social media data firm Blogmeter said that on Instagram, Gucci still reigns supreme among marquis brands, while the influencer resonance was a “flop” at the latest edition of the Milan’s ready-to-wear shows. Brands instead conjured interactions on their profiles by publishing posts on their profiles featuring the work of their artistic and creative directors, among the ones of note: Jeremy Scott and Donatella Versace.

PASTEL COLOR

Drome Etro

LEATHER

a few seasons ago have become familiar faces. Among them: The Attico, Calcaterra, Plan C and Act N ° 1. “It doesn’t matter if they are large companies or new names on the rise,” said Silviano Vangi, Creative Director & Head Buyer Luxury Women’s Wear at Luisaviaroma.com. “The important thing is to dominate the luxury market segment: That’s where Made in Italy has no rivals.” In the same vein, Giulia Pizzato, buying and merchandising director of Rinascente, had no doubts about the potential of this fashion week: “The atmosphere was sparkling, finally, collections were full of concrete proposals. The ‘Made in Italy’ label definitely impacts our purchasing decisions.” From a commercial point of view, this edition of Milano Moda Donna could not have been better. In recent editions, buyers had become accustomed to speaking about the curiosities on the Gucci runway and the sort of impact they would have in-store. This time was no exception. The fetish whips of Alessandro Michele

TAILORED JACKET

Max Mara

et’s just skip over that bit from the New York Times, you know, the one saying that Milan Fashion Week is old news, and let’s cut to the chase with what the buyers had to say about fashion week: According to the consensus, a mix of aesthetic minimalism and luxury craftsmanship was the winning combination. The 2020 Spring-Summer collections on view fully met the demands of diverse international markets. For NYT journalist Vanessa Friedman, buzz words like “heritage” and “DNA” belied a series of creative deficiencies and the absence of a generational change, but for the more than 20 international buyers interviewed by Fashion, ready-to-wear looks by Prada, Bottega Veneta, Jil Sander and Max Mara are a testament to the fact that clothes that are mass produced in Italy can be unique and can appeal to the rest of the world. When it comes to emerging designers and fresh talent, the majority agreed that there needed to be more space. More contemporary brands that were “new”

MAXI BAG

Prada

L

ORANGE

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WOMEN’S FASHION WEEK

AT MISSONI THE CLIMATE CRISIS ROSE TO THE FORE

During the Global Climate Strike Week, Missoni gave each guest a solar-powered light designed by Olafur Eliasson. For every “Little Sun” bought, another is sold at a symbolic price to more than one billion people in the world living without electricity.

MAX MARA

NATALIE KINGHAM MISSONI

ACT N°1

The colourful, woven Bottega Veneta mules and the oversized intrecciato hobo bag will be the must-have items of the season, along with the peach slip dress with lace appliqué from Gucci, Fendi’s micro-beaded bags and Prada’s straw bucket bag

certainly did not go unnoticed, already an example for those who though there was still a lot of talk will follow in her footsteps,” said about the simplification of Massimiliano De Marianis, Folli Michele’s work and the viability Follie’s Senior Buyer. De Mariof Milan on an international anis said that he is willing to bet stage. The Versace fashion show that Prada’s collection had the dropped the mic on fashion week. most resonance among its MilanJennifer Lopez infamous strut ese peers. This opinion was down the runway in the legendary shared by Mario Grauso, presijungle print dress she wore to the dent of Holt Renfrew. Grauso Grammys nearly two decades said Prada‘s straw bucket bag and ago, garnered the most social menavy coat with silver sequin emdia impressions of all. The acbroidery made the list of next seaMario Grauso tress/singer accompanied Donason‘s must-haves. If we are lookHolt Renfrew tella Versace to greet the public, ing for a winner of the Milan in what served as the high point of fashion shows, that person is no all of fashion week. “It was a perfect moother than Daniel Lee, creative director of ment,” mused Tyler Franch, Fashion Director Bottega Veneta. In his second season with the of Hudson’s Bay. “Even if it was just a fleetItalian brand, the designer who worked under ing impression, it will be remembered by the Phoebe Philo was celebrated by the throngs entire fashion industry for a long time. In adof buyers and influencers who wore items dition, the dress will also lead to a peak of from his previous collections throughout tropical print garments.” And then there was fashion week. In fact this unprecedented Miuccia Prada, who conquered the audience brand popularity was not a reality under the with a new wardrobe that is made to last and late stewardship of his predecessor Tomas the announcement that her group will only Maier. Last season, some accessories, such as use regenerated nylon from next year. “A colthe square-toed sandals and the shell-pocket lection that is anything but predictable, a mix jackets, sold out in no time (as confirmed by of chic and courage, and whose message is a retailer), so much so that the brand is al-

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MATCHESFASHION.COM Fashion Buying Director

“The Prada, Jil Sander, Bottega Veneta and Fendi shows were my highlights this season. I especially loved Prada for its perfect wardrobe: the spring-summer collection will translate from catwalk to the wardrobe effortlessly. Jewellery from Jil Sander also stood out. And, how could I forget about Prada’s shoes and the gold chain bag at Bottega Veneta. I loved Jil Sander’s venue at Pinacoteca di Brera, with a lunar, all-white setup in the courtyard.”


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WOMEN’S FASHION WEEK GREEN CARPET FASHION AWARDS

CELEBRITIES AND MANY MORE TOOK CENTRE STAGE Celebrities and fashion industry leaders alike mingled in a bowl of crimson green at Teatro alla Scala on the last day of Milan fashion week. The Green Carpet Fashion Awards, also known as the “Oscars” of sustainable fashion were launched two years ago by Carlo Capasa (president of the National Italian Fashion Chamber) and Livia Firth (co-founder and creative director of Eco-Age), with the support of the Economic Development Ministry, the Italian Trade Agency and the City of Milan. The main highlight of the evening was when legendary actress Sophia Loren presented the Legacy Award to Valentino Garavani. Also those working behind the scenes had their 15 minutes of fame. I Was a Sari, a small, company based in Mumbai which repurposes vintage saris into new outfits, master embroiderer Pino Grasso, the gondoliers of Venice and Stella McCartney’s production team were also honoured on stage. (a.b.)

GUCCI

ready beginning to spot the emergence of first counterfeit goods from Lee’s collections. For the next season, it is impossible to My favorite predict whether Twisted Double collections were Strap Mules and Supersized Gucci, Jil Sander Braided Hobo Bag will be more Bottega Veneta successful. Many may agree with and Versace. Saks Fifth Avenue senior vice I’m happy to see that designers president and fashion director embraced colors Roopal Patel, who said anything for next summer. from Bottega Veneta “are mustThe best have” items. It is a sentiment accessories? For shared by other buyers including sure the Bottega Ida Peterson, Womenswear BuyVeneta sandals ing Director at Browns. “It’s imand Gucci’s whips possible not to think that Bottega were the most beautiful of fashRiccardo Tortato ion week.” Federica Montelli, Tsum.ru Head of Fashion at La Rinascente agreed. “Bottega Veneta is absolutely the fashion show with the major ‘itfactor.’ The waiting list for some key pieces has already started! The giant-Hobo, the crescent with a chain, the new clutch with frames are already ‘coveted’ (you can use this term, thanks) on Instagram.” But Milan is really still much more. And we don’t say it enough. Retailers, especially the international ones, have not been disappointed in terms of revenue. Case in point: Jil Sander, which unfurled yet another winning collection, proof that husband and wife duo Lucie and Luke Meier are continuing on a happy, positive path to revive the brand. Realities like La Rinascente, Mytheresa, Holt Renfrew, Browns, Galeries Lafayette have not hesitated to put the collection at (continued on page 18)

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FENDI

EKATERINA MOISEEVA BOSCO DI CILIEGI Fashion director

“Etro really moved me this season, with a return to the 1970s revisited in a contemporary and romantic way. Beyond the collection itself, this brand conjured a very engaging atmosphere. As for Sportmax, it a guarantee: its commercial value is ironclad. In general, a positive atmosphere permeated around Milan, reinforced also by brands, such as Peter Pilotto, which are normally at other international fashion weeks, took part. Among the new names to be mentioned, Act N ° 1, the brand designed by Luca Lin and Galib Gassanoff, has only been around for three years but I follow them with great interest. They have already been complimented for their originality and clarity of style.”


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1. François Henri-Pinault, chairman & ceo of Kering Group, with Ginevra Elkann, who gave him the Visionary Award 2. Doutzen Kroes holds her Social Media Changemaker Award. Standing with her, Sinead Burke and Eric Underwood 3. Group picture, with Carlo Capasa (National Italian Fashion Chamber) and Livia Firth (Eco-Age) center 4. Lorenzo Bertelli, who awarded Healthy Seas the Circular Economy Award 5. Valentino Garavani (The Legacy Award) with Sophia Loren 6. Stella McCartney (The Groundbreaker Award) with her team 7. Pierpaolo Piccioli with Pino e Raffaella Grasso. Pino Grasso, a.k.a the “master of embroidery”, received The Art of Craftsmanship Award 8. The speech of Elia Maramotti (Max Mara), one of the winners of the Cnmi Award in Recognition of Sustainability, with Nikki Reed and Ian Somerhalder 9. Gildo Zegna (Zegna Group), also awarded with the Cnmi Award in Recognition of Sustainability, was on stage with Alessandro Sartori 10. The Venice gondoliers (The Eco Stewardship Award), with uniforms by Emilio Ceccato made with 100% Pure Merino Australian Wool 10

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PAOLO MANTOVANI MANTOVANI Owner

“It was a positive fashion week overall, with just a few flaws. Designers erred on the side of caution. They touched on all the same themes and have perhaps forgotten the importance of presenting fashion designed for everyday life. I am very happy to see the jackets and tailoring on the catwalk. I liked Versace’s collection very much. I found it credible. Etro also impressed me. Among the presentations, the best organized was that of Alanui. Tiziano Guardini is also one to follow carefully. I liked his super colorful collection. I think it will be something that will be noticed in the store. It’s also a sustainable project, an aspect that - if well told to customers - can justify such a purchase.”

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LANE CRAWFORD Merchandising Director-Fashion (GMM Women’s, Men’s RTW)

“My favorite collection at Milan fashion week? I have no doubt at all. It was Bottega Veneta. Daniel Lee delivered a perfect collection. I really love the array of dresses, in particular the knit ones with the slits and portholes that allowed us to catch a glimpse of the body. There were also beautiful singlebreasted sheath and sequinned dresses for the evening. And then the use of leather - it was as soft as butter and infused baggy items like anoraks and trench shorts with an almost sporty lightness. Prada also hit the bulls eye with its return to simplicity, understated silhouettes and the mix of poor materials, such as cotton muslin, with macramé and sequins. These were pretty and feminine clothes you can collect. But if I have to mention the fashion show that I liked the most … it is definitely Versace, with the Jennifer Lopez’ grand finale. Simply extraordinary.Inclusion and diversity is a main theme that many companies in Milan have decided to embrace, just like they did in New York. I hope that this is not just a trend, but something that will truly manifest itself just like sustainability.”

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WOMEN’S FASHION WEEK

SILVANO VANGI LUISAVIAROMA.COM HEAD OF WOMENSWEAR

“This was Bottega Veneta’s fashion week, without any doubt. Daniel Lee is filling the void left by Phoebe Philo after her departure from Celine. He’s infusing fashion week with a very high level of fashion content. I agree with Gucci and Alessandro Michele’s choice to simplify things a bit. Some looks were straight forward without the need for the special effects that we’re used to, like tops and skirts with slits. On the youth front, we will pursue a special project with Nynne Kunde, a former student of the Marangoni Institute.”

the top of their list. Conquered by its minimalist aesthetics, combined with the highest level in luxury craftsmanship. “Luke and Lucie are working well on constructing the DNA of Jil Sander preserving it but always introducing different elements of novelty, especially with regard to the accessories category,” said Rie Hasahina, Chief Planner & Manager of Hankyu Hanshin Women’s & Men’s Fashion Merchandising Division. Then there is Etro which was lauded by Linda Fargo and Roopal Patel for the romanticism and freshness of the garments presented, especially the shirts. For Italian and international buyers, another fine example of a collection capable of incorporating a taste of innovation without it clashing with reality is that of Fendi. Spring Summer 2020 was marked Silvia Venturini Fendi’s first collection without Karl Lagerfeld, who was linked to the Roman maison for 54 years. Everyone watching the show, including Katie Holmes, among other A-list guests, noted the change. “Silvia’s revolution is simple, but brilliant,” some commented. “She’s a woman who designs for other women and constantly keeps in mind a women who is rooted in reality,” commented others. But these fashion shows also thrusted Milan in step with the cultural discussion that the wider fashion world is facing on other levels. Inclusivity and diversity and the environment were among the main social themes that were paramount to the shows. “It also happened in New York. I hope that it is not just a trend, but something destined to manifest itself,” said Nelson Mui of Lane Crawford. Following the G7 Summit last August and the UN Sustainability Summit that took place the same week, sustainability also resonated in Paris, where Dior planted trees and Chloé created a collection 18

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PASCALE CAMART GALERIES LAFAYETTE HEAD BUYER WOMENSWEAR

“Fendi, Bottega Veneta, Jil Sander and Prada were the best shows. The super fresh mood at Fendi won me over. Bottega Veneta managed to be conceptual and sexy at the same time, whilst still a brand for real women. Jil Sander has created a beautiful classic wardrobe for very elegant women. Prada remains an Italian brand, perfect for Italian women. La DoubleJ show in the gardens of the Four Season Hotel was spectacular. We didn’t find any new names. The London fashion week was more useful from this point of view.”

TIFFANY HSU

MYTHERESA FASHION BUYING DIRECTOR

“My highlights were Bottega Veneta, Jil Sander and Prada. They all had amazing show spaces and installations. Prada is always exciting and special. I mention Bottega and Jil because both shows were modern and demonstrated the best minimalistic aesthetic with maximal luxury craftsmanship. The Attico and Plan C are both great representations of the new coolness emanating from young Italian fashion designers, in a very different way. To me this is truly appealing. I love the Prada Foundation. In general, it’s such an amazing space. The set they build especially for the Bottega Veneta show was great.”

THE ATTICO

inspired by the theme of reuse. But it is in Milan where efforts to create shows bearing conscious messages have delivered more convincing results, above all with the Green Carpet Fashion Award, the highlight of fashion week. Marni, as well, conveyed a joyful and poetic response to everything in the world. Marni’s designer Francesco Risso with this collection and the men’s collection last June, succeeded, according to experts, in addressing the environment, sustainability, multi-ethnicity and gender-fluid discussions, obtaining an understandable and commer-

cially concrete message. It was, overall, a fashion week that was aligned with the environmental and social debates gripping the world and governments. Unfortunately it was lacklustre in terms of new talent. “Funny how when the Italians think ‘young,’ it always seems to mean somewhere around 1975,” said Matthew Schneier of The Cut joked from his Twitter account, insisting he heard the joke from someone else in Milan. Schneiers comments were directed at Carlo Capasa, president of the National Italian Fashion Chamber, who says Milan is a laboratory


for new talent. Jokes aside, it is true that the weak point of Milan fashion week is a lack of emerging brands. While satellite events like the Fashion Hub Market abound, there are few new designers on the runway. Linda Fargo found time to visit the Fashion Hub, an initiative supported by the Italian National Chamber of Fashion. To France’s Pascale Camart, New York and London were more interesting for scouting. Even Milan’s Riccardo Tortato said Milan offers only a few names. “I really didn’t find any brands that were noteworthy,” said Tortaro, tsum.ru’s fashion director. The fresh acts that created a buzz have been the same for a few seasons: La DoubleJ, The Attico, Plan C and Act N °1. In the current market climate, buyers are looking to satiate consumers’ penchant for upscale goods with unique proposals. “Research is once again essential. Today a project that resonates is one that works well, independently of the label,” said Beppe Angiolini, one of the promoters of the Fashion Hub with Italy’s association of buyers CBI and owner of the Sugar boutique. (contributors: Alessandra Bigotta, Carla Mercurio) ■

ROOPAL PATEL SAKS FIFTH AVENUE FASHION DIRECTOR

“The must haves for next season? Anything seen at the Bottega Veneta fashion show: ready-to-wear, bags, shoes. The collection created by Daniel Lee responds to everything we’ve been waiting for: luxury, quality and refined elegance, to project brand codes into the future. Even Versace has left its mark, including the wider public in its grand finale, which featured Jennifer Lopez wearing the famous jungle dress. The show also didn’t disappoint; it was full of beautiful fashion, glamor, star power and drama. Among the highlights at the Prada show: Miuccia’s return to purity, elegance and simplicity is regenerating. There are different trends. The ones that convinced me the most are, in addition to the general return to the minimal, the trench and the short, the square blazer, the tailoring, the fluid dresses, the jungle prints, the leather and of course the oversized bags. Emerging players of note were La DoubleJ and Wandering.”

MARNI

STORIES OF SUSTAINABILITY AND PROTEST DURING FASHION WEEK Milan Fashion Week marked a turning point: In fact, many fashion houses have affirmed their ecological commitment. Marni’s creative director Francesco Risso made the fires in the Amazon rainforest a central part of his show, by designing a set made of palm trees crafted with recycled plastic. He also used recycyled fabrics, which he painted by hand, for his women’s collection.”Be part of the solution: React, Reduce” ... These are some of the slogans printed on F_wd sneakers, a new sustainable brand launched by Onward Luxury Group at Milan Fashion Week. Tiziano Guardini used the catwalk to sound the climate emergency alarm and wore a poster 14: 04-shirt.

Francesco Risso and Tiziano Guardini were among the designers who spoke out against the excess and waste generated by the fashion industry. The latter presented himself at the fashion show wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with the slogan “Earth Needs Heart.” TIZIANO GUARDINI

Thanks to all the fashion buyers met at MILAN FASHION WEEK for their support • Beppe Angiolini Sugar • Pascale Camart Galeries Lafayette • Massimiliano De Marianis Folli Follie • Linda Fargo Bergdorf Goodman • Tyler Franch Hudson’s Bay • Mario Grauso Holt Renfrew • Rie Hasahina Hankyu Department Stores • Tiffany Hsu Mytheresa • Natalie Kingham Matchesfashion.com • Paolo Mantovani Mantovani • Olga Mironova Boutique XXI secolo • Ekaterina Moiseeva Bosco di Ciliegi • Federica Montelli Rinascente • Nelson Mui Lane Crawford • Roopal Patel Saks Fifth Avenue • Lia Pagoni Gruppo Pagoni • Ida Petersson Browns • Giulia Pizzato Rinascente • Riccardo Tortato Tsum • Silvano Vangi LuisaViaRoma • Yukiko Yuzawa Concento Paris H.P. France

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TONET for

TONET TOWARDS A BIO AND ECO-SUSTAINABLE FUTURE MORE THAN JUST MADE IN ITALY EXCELLENCE. FOR TONET STYLE IS ALSO A QUESTION OF RESPONSIBILITY TOWARDS THE INDIVIDUAL AND THE PLANET. A MANTRA ENTRUSTED WITH THE BRAND'S GROWTH: FEEL GOOD Feel good. This means respect for the person and for the environment. This encapsulates the Tonet philosophy, a knitwear and womenswear brand founded in 2010 in Miane, a small town nestled in the hills of Treviso, which has since conquered the world, thanks to its made in Italy label and sophisticated allure, created by details and recognisable all-round quality. Let's take a step back, as acknowledging the Italian fashion scene is essential when considering the brand: Carella. Claudio Teso, today at the helm of his brand together with his wife Lella Tonet, heir of the founder and stylist, explains how "the company was created in the 60s as a small artisan workshop which top after top, transformed itself into a high-calibre enterprise, a partner of famous names including Escada, Gucci, FerrĂŠ, Kenzo, to name but a few". Its iconic tricot garments took Ame-

rica and England by storm during the 70s; inlay and jacquard pullovers took centre stage during the ensuing decade, followed by the first fabric inserts, which became fully-fledged parts of collections following the launch of Tonet. "A project which Lella and I took on with enthusiasm and vigour", Teso affirms. Over time, in addition to our core knitwear business, we also developed trousers, skirts, shirts, jackets, down jackets, right through to footwear, first introduced with the spring-summer 2020 collection". A total look currently exported to Europe, Russia, Kazakhstan, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Korea, Saudi Arabia, Canada and the United States. And Italy? "Despite the crisis it is undoubtedly a market we can build on. Our plans include the opening of a showroom in Milan, but even before the location itself we are looking for qualified people to whom we can entrust

www.tonet.eu

its management. Human capital is fundamental for us". And so we return to the "Feel good" concept: "The Person (with a capital P) is the company's focus. The search for their well-being and satisfaction with what guides us every single day", he explains. "This goes for colleagues, who transfer their ability onto our products, and our customers, who choose and wear them". This is why for Tonet, excellence is about protecting the health of people and the environment, first and foremost. Claudio Teso explains: "We vigorously embrace the idea of a more human future, with the individual at the centre of the universe. Therefore, we have undertaken the progressive elimination of plastic and nylon in packaging; we privilege the use of ecosustainable yarns and fabrics, along with low environmental impact dyes.". In short, growth with integrity.


www.tonet.eu


WOMEN’S FASHION WEEK

THE TORTONA DISTRICT’S CONTEMPORARY HUB

AT WHITE SUSTAINABILITY ISN’T JUST A FAD The show struck the right theme to attract independent retailers. The focus shifted to responsible fashion throughout the fair. As retailers and brands alter their approaches, the word now needs to spread to retail customers BY ELISABETTA FABBRI AND CARLA MERCURIO

W

ell-known brands, artisan realities, emerging designers and sustainability were all in focus at the White trade show last month, during Milan’s ready-towear fashion week. White Milano organisers said the number of visitors was up 3%, while the number of foreign buyers at the fair rose 9%. Responsible fashion was the leitmotif of the fair and was the main theme of the opening talk moderated by Fashion’s editor in chief Marc Sondermann. The awareness-raising programme Give a fok-us curated by Matteo Ward, the designer of Wråd, was in its third edition (see box) and was a must-see stop at White’s vast Via Tortona location. “Sustainability is just not a question up for discussion today. I think it is exceptional that we talk about it in this sort of environment. At first, it was an uncomfortable topic, now we talk openly about solutions,” says at opening talk Orsola de Castro, co-founder of Fashion Revolution (the movement for more responsible fashion), speaking on the opening talk. “We need to treat clothes with passion and ask ourselves why we are buying something. We need to ask where the clothes come from and how they are made,” she adds. Since we buy them, we are responsible for the lifespan of every single item. Education is important. “Education about what sustainability means needs to start in high school, or even befo-

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re,” says Marina Spadafora, who leads Italy’s branch of Fashion Revolution. “If I am paying too little, then certainly someone has not been paid enough or been treated unfairly,” she explains. Ines Aronadio, manager at Italian Trade & Investment Agency ICE, which promotes Made in Italy abroad, points to the food industry as a model for how fashion needs to educate buyers, as well as consumers. At White, brands and industrialists spread the wordthemselves. “We do everything in linen or cotton, using eco-compatible dyes. Linen comes mainly from Normandy, the rest is all produced by us locally,” said Luca Pagliani of LFDL-La Fabbrica del Lino. LFDL is a EUR1 (a certificate of origin that enables exporters in certain countries to export goods at reduced or nil duty) and Masters of linen (brand that guarantees excellence of European linen quality) certified company. In addition, 19 out of 20 LFDL employees are women. Now the company is waiting for organic linen to be suitable for the clothing industry as bio-linen is available only in the form of gauzes used by the dairy industry. Founded in 2014, Poetica Jeans is a denim brand made in Italy’s Marche region by Confezioni Elegant. At the fair, Poetica Jeans proposed a capsule collection of jeans in Italian organic cotton. Provided by a company called Imatex, the cotton fabric is produ-

ÇAPLAIT WINS THE INSIGHT WHITE AWARD

The Çaplait ethical footwear brand won this year’s Insight White award. Founded by Usman Manzoor, the Pakistanorigin label is hand made by local craftspeople.

POETICA JEANS

MOU


ced with lower energy and water than required by normal cotton denim and has a low carbon footprint through so-called Jeanologia technology. “The washing is done with ecological products that have a low environmental impact. We are recognized by the FairWays Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to protecting the environment. We offer a sustainable product because we care, and also because it’s trendy, but the demand is still low. For a ten-euro difference in price, buyers will pick their usual jeans instead of a ‘green’ one,” says Genny Manieri, who oversees the project. Roberto Collina, on the other hand, whose core business is Made in Italy knitwear, has started infusing eco-sustainable principles into his collections by crafting his upscale collections with eco yarns and fabrics, Gots-certified cotton and recycled cashmere. Last year he also used a special cashmere tinted by pigment derived from flower petals. “The will is there, but it’s been a gradual change. We’ve also made some radical choices at the company. We abolished plastic bottles and we only use biodegradable plastic packaging,” Collina says. “I think White organisers could give more visibility to the brands investing in research and development, even if retailers tend to risk less and less,” Collina suggests. He adds that the fair falls short in attracting international buyers, especially from the US and Asia. Daria and Franco Briguglio, the couple behind the Ibrigu brand, use innovative recycling methods to craft their collections. “We fell in love with vintage materials that are superior to many fabrics we see today. For our zero-impact creations, we take apart kimonos and transform them into other garments using creative tailoring techniques. Scarves become shirts, trousers or special finishes for jackets. For the winter, we reuse the furs and we employ artisans in small bottegas,” explain the Briguglios, who added that they produce in Salsomaggiore, except for the sewing, which takes place in the Veneto Region. They have noticed a revival of artisan workshops, as buyers return to Made in Italy. Mou enhanced their existing “Eskimo” boot with an upper made of palm leaf material. Sequinned sneakers also amped up their Spring Summer 2020 collection. Italy has always been Mou’s main market, but at White they also met Russian, Cypriot, French and Spanish buyers. At Canadian, the highlight was a duvet made with eco-feathers in a long and

LFDL

MUNÈ: JAPANESE FLAIR MEETS ITALIAN EXCELLENCE White’s Special Guest Munenori Uemuro of Munè says that Japanese culture is very much at the heart of all of his designs. “Everything I do is influenced by Japanese culture,” affirms the designer, who studied at Milan’s IED design institute and cut his teeth at Jil Sander. “I appeal to a refined woman, who leads an active life and who looks for clothes with that extra something — in the form of unique details and volumes.” Uemuro says that all the cotton for his shirts were supplied by Thomas Mason, which is owned by Italian textile maker Albini Group. Cotton was also mixed with viscose and technical materials that added a touch of “femininity,” the designer explained, adding that showcasing at White was positive. “Many buyers and journalists have come. At the moment, my brand is distributed in the USA, China and Japan, but I want to broaden my horizons and expand in Europe, especially in Italy.”  (c.me.)

ROBERTO COLLINA

IBRIGU

short version with a nylon exterior. “We don’t use recycled nylon yet, but I think we will get there. For now, it’s a necessary step,” the brand representative says, noting buyers from Japan, Canada, USA, Europe and Russia passed by their stand. “The use of eco-sustainable materials like adhesives and mastics and naturally dyed leather have become extremely important to production. As for the market, there is more demand for certifications,” asserts Matteo Malatini, Baracuda and Fabi sales manager. At White, sneakers and cowboy boots were the models that most impressed buyers (among them Russians, Japanese and Northern Europeans). “Sustainability

is very important to us, starting from raw materials, 90% of whom come from natural fibers,” say the managers of Hanami d’Or, a womenswear brand from Mirano (Ve), who noticed specific questions coming from buyers about the origin and materials each garment is made with. As for the consumers, they are curious about the raw materials and the processes that are employed in making the product. Hanami d’Or booked orders with retailers from the EU, while the demand from Russia, Csi and Asia was low. Tonet also is a proximity manufacturing player. The Treviso-based brand was launched in 2010 by Carella and now exports count for about 90% of the

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WOMEN’S FASHION WEEK GREEN BODY CHAINS FROM RUSSIA

Crafted with recycled materials and green metal: Omut’s body chains infused the fair with a unique twist. The Russian brand, designed by Nastya Klimova, was among designers selected to showcase at White from the Dear Progress showroom.

BRAZILIAN FASHION MAKES A SPLASH IN MILAN

Thanks to an agreement with Milan’s Senato 13 showroom and the Brazilian Consulate, White was able to boost the exposure of seven Brazilian brands, including companies that produce in Italy (Pictured: Amanda Medrado bags).

MYTHS

business. Most of them are shipped to other European countries, the former USSR, Asia and the America. Tonet participates in other foreign fashion fairs to boost international business. “In general it seems a slack period for fashion fairs. Perhaps visitors prefer direct contact in showrooms,” its owners say. Calicanto, a bag company, sprouted up three years ago in Italy’s Riviera del Brenta district, which is known for its high quality workmanship and its integrated supply chain. Venice, where its parent company Idna Italia is based, is a creative inspiration for the collections, which includes Biennale-themed geometric bags or the Lido line, with wooden inserts echoing a beach’s deckchairs. After the success of the Ynot? bags, designed in Italy but produced abroad, owner Gioshi decided to launch a new line, N75, produced in the Vicenza area, using leather from the best national tanniers. “The foreign market is very interested in Made in Italy. The best markets are the rest of Europe, Russia and Asia,” a spokeswoman for the company notes. The idea is to conquer new multibrand stores but also to benefit from Ynot?’s existing network. The company hopes to launch its own e-store too. Finally, the Myths label is constantly researching recycled yarn fabrics and other low-impact materials. Myths’ sales manager Simone Bernardi said buyers are moderately interested in sustainability. “Buyers from Northern Europe are the most attentive and consumers are more

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GIVE A FOK-US HIGHLIGHTS SUSTAINABILITY White’s Give a fok-us project shone a spotlight on sustainable fashion by highlighting five main themes. Situated at the fair’s Opificio 31 location in Milan’s Tortona design district, organisers also showcased solutions. The California denim brand Boyish was present at the Water section, while Analytical Group shifted the focus to testing and certifications at the Chemicals section. The Waste theme hosted Econyl,which unveiled its regenerated nylon thread, while the Albini fabric and Supima cotton makers were at Traceability with a project developed with Oritain. Finally, People tackled the issue of communication and how to raise awareness about production practices, purchasing and transparency. This section was supported by the Fashion Revolution movement and the Pistoletto-Cittadellarte foundation, which brought designers from the Fashion B.E.S.T. platform.(e.f.)

savvy than ever,” he says. Myths fresco wool pants with vintage effects caught the eye of a good number of buyers at White, especially Italian ones. While Bernardi was satisfied with the quality of the buyers met in the Tortona district, mostly Italians, he voiced a proposal: “Why not concentrate the fair in just three days?”. ■

TONET

BUYERS SPEAK ✪ Ginevra Gozzoli Bernardelli Group - Mantova White always provides interesting insights. Among the brands that I prefer are Sofie d’Hoore and Wråd. I also appreciated the Give a fok-us project curated by Wråd’s founder, Matteo Ward. We are very attentive to sustainability, as well as our Z Generation customers. At the same time, they are not our main customers, yet we have a responsibility to educate them ourselves. Responsible fashion is a hot topic among buyers and I believe that in a few seasons, all buyers will dedicate a part of their store to it. At the very least top buyers could really pave the way for other independent retailers. Brands, however, must be more transparent and work on style and prices. Some items are priced too high.

✪ Federico Giglio Giglio Group - Palermo It was an edition enriched by a wide selection of new brands and young designers. I think sustainability will be an important topic in the future, but for now, our customers really aren’t attentive to sustainability - at least, not as much as they should


CALICANTO PELLICO

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be. At the moment they are still making choices based on the brand name and style. Raising awareness isn’t our job. I think brands should be responsible for that.

✪ Elisabetta Giannini Cose - Cremona I found White very rich in terms of its selection, the energy was positive throughout the fair. The Basement is still my favourite area. Brands that really impressed me were Bouboutic, Boysh, Nana Bags and Made for a Woman, the non-profit project from Madagascar. Give a Fok-us is a really good project and I really feel that it is linked to the energy that permeates the fair these days. At the moment, we are not receiving any specific requests regarding responsible fashion from end customers, though certain customers are moving away from furs and leather, preferring eco-versions of those materials. As for the brands, I think that only Stella McCartney has really managed to convince the public that she’s serious, probably because she was basically born with a green spirit.

✪ Umberto Cantarelli Umberto Cantarelli - Perugia When we come to this trade show, we always find interesting little brands that enrich what we offer in our store. We also visited the showrooms in Milan and Paris. I advise White organizers to make the layout more readable.

✪ Jakelline Baca Jakelline Baka - Ibiza The fair is very interesting. It has a wide array of brands. It’s also the place to find new talents, who helpfully are given the chance to showcase their brands on a global stage.

HANAMI D’OR

CHAMPIONING ARTISAN BUSINESSES

PRESERVING HERITAGE Season after season, White Milano strengthens its partnership with the fashion arm of Confartigianato, the Italian trade association that supports the nation’s artisans and small business owners. Based on recent data, the organisation brings together over 55 ,000 companies in the textile, clothing and leather sectors. The jewellery and eyewear sectors drive that number up to 79 ,000. In 2018, these companies generated 43.5 billion euro in global revenues and employed approximately 372,000 workers. Despite their small dimensions, Italy’s micro and small-sized textile, clothing and leather companies posted 10.3 billion euro in exports in 2018: more than double the export sales generated by counterparts in Germany, France, Spain and the UK. “We are in pole position to benefit from an uptick in foreign markets, as we have the support of regional associations, as well as Confexport, a unit of the confederation specialised in offering promotional services to companies,” says Confartigianato president Giorgio Merletti (pictured). There were many programs started in 2018

in collaboration with ICE (Italy’s trade agency) like a participation in Italian fairs (such as White Milano, Micam, Origin Passion & Beliefs and Homi) and abroad, but also concerned with bringing foreign buyers to Italy and organizing B2B meetings, training and tutoring sessions. The calendar of official events for the rest of 2019 includes promotional sessions in Russia, the EU and the USA, as well as training sessions in Southern Italy, with a focus on digital marketing, storytelling and export techniques. “We have just forged a collaboration with ICE and Amazon to promote and sell in a “Made in Italy” showcase on some Amazon foreign versions,“ Merletti adds. The association focuses on sustainability as a distinctive mark to highlight product quality and artisanal craftsmanship, a mix of tradition, design, research and innovation. “Our entrepreneurs are champions of creativity and are the custodians of our ancient traditions. They are also protagonists of custom-made creativity, interpreters of uniqueness and personalisation, and they also boast an unbeatable attention

to detail. Growth in fashion, like many other industries, is being inhibited by a slew of factors: limited access to financing, exorbitant taxes, oppressive bureaucracy, scarce public investments, infrastructural delays and high energy costs,” Merletti says, adding that all of these factors only hamper production. There is also a shortage of talent, as it is difficult to find skilled and well-trained workers. Merletti says this shortage represents a 43% gap within the entire workforce. In response to the slowdown in internal demand, Meletti affirms that it all boils down to educating the public. “We aim to educate consumers to recognise the quality of Italian products. We are currently fighting to obtain the necessary regulations to safeguard the 100% Made in Italy label. Also, we are engaged in anticounterfeiting campaigns, to inform the public about the risks associated with purchasing fake goods.” (e.f.)

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WOMEN’S FASHION WEEK

IBELIV This line of handmade

hats and bags celebrates the traditional craft of raffia weaving typical of Madagascar. About 600 female artisans participate in a project that is committed to perpetuating this craft. Its founder, Liva Ramanandraibe, is from Madagascar and is now based in France.

POPA This Spanish bag and shoe brand is based in

the Alicante region of the Iberian coast. Contemporary artisanal-made designs, crafted with raffia, natural leathers and cork, are at the heart of this project.

GAYNOR BONGARD The most

exquisite yarns are at the soul of this collection of luxury wraps and scarves with a sartorial flair. Made by a BritishItalian design team, the brand has just celebrated its 20th anniversary.

SUPER/FROM ITALY AND FROM THE WORLD

BRANDS PUTTING THE ENVIRONMENT ON TOP At the Super tradeshow Italian and foreign brands made a splash with their sustainable designs. Merging fashion-forward creativity with responsible environmental and social practices was paramount BY CARLA MERCURIO

MADE This Armenian

platform supports emerging creatives with the aim of developing rural areas. Made operates as an accelerator and incubator, in order to launch young businesses. Statement jewelry and accessories are the cornerstone of the project.

SABRY MAROUF

TRICOT-À-PORTER

The Milanese label founded by Gianfranco Barbieri is characterized by a production of handmade goods that are 100 percent made in Italy with natural fibers.

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A creative union between Ahmed Sabry and Daki Marouf resulted in an accessories brand that is managed from Cairo and London. In the pipeline is a bag line inspired by Ancient Egypt that also incorporates sustainability and is crafted with recycled materials. And they are just getting started.

THEONEMILANO

BRANDS EMBRACE INCLUSIVENESS AND SUSTAINABILITY In a fashion world normally dictated by trends and style, demand for inclusivity and sustainability are now revolutionising the industry as we know it. Driven by an increasingly aware customer, major industry players cannot avoid this rapid wave of change. These two macro trends are dictating future strategies and business models of companies great and small. Indeed, sustainability and inclusivity have also revolutionised TheOneMilano, the haut-à-porter trade show that is now at its sixth edition. The showcase brought 120 collections to Milan’s Fieramilanocity trade grounds. Of the total, 22% were foreign and included the participation of 3,700 international buyers. Inclusiveness meaning an umbrella concept that includes gender fluidity, was manifested onstage by the creations of Giorgia Andreazza. The acceptance of curvy forms was manifested by Kissa and Ulla Popken, and fashion that knows no geographical boundaries was manifested by Empathia. Overall, the show raised awareness that the global supply of raw materials is not infinite and the re-use and recycling of existing materials is essential for our survival. The industry was portrayed as seing in needs of rethinking the way its products are produced and distributed across the supply chain. The show also brought brands together that embrace eco-friendly practices: Blueberry for instance, a champion of natural, comfortable and affordable concepts, and Cinzia Caldi who specialises in handknit cotton and linen. Cora Bellotto, a nettle yarn specialist, Savart, a brand that crafts swimwear with Econyl and a footwear brand from Portugallo called Dotz were other exhibitors aligned with this philosophy.  (a.t.)


SINCE 1987


SHOE AND LEATHER FAIRS 1. A photo of The Arena in the Players District, a new space of Micam, dedicated to outdoor and sports footwear 2. Micam’s newly appointed president Siro Badon inaugurates The Arena space. Badon is joined by former soccer player Gianluca Zambrotta

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MICAM & MIPEL

FACING THE FUTURE WITH AN ECO-FRIENDLY OUTLOOK Now that Italy’s shoe and leather fairs have come to a close, the market contemplates new market trends and the pending needs of a new consumer generation BY ANGELA TOVAZZI

T

he attendance figures for the footwear and leather goods shows were positive, both for Micam and for Mipel. In terms of visitors, Micam retained stable at 44,000 visitors, while Mipel’s attendance rose a 19% compared to a year ago. Companies here said that competition is increasingly fierce, in line with a difficult economic situation and the B2C retail revolution. Export data of Made in Italy products in the first six months of 2019 showed mixed results. Overall, exports rose 8.4% for footwear and 27.5% for leather goods but overall the two sectors shrinked in terms of volume, confirming the gap in performance between the big names of luxury (which continue to churn out profits) and small and medium-sized

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enterprises, the backbone of the Italian economy, which struggle to keep up in globalised markets. “Additionally, there are many uncertainties - from Brexit to the US-China trade war,” says Siro Badon, new president of Micam and Assocalzaturifici (an association for the Italian footwear industry). “We cannot do anything other than put innovative ideas in place, such as the new Players District space at Micam, and develop initiatives to bring companies and buyers together, such as our Matchmaking project that was launched this season.” The result was a temple of outdoor and sports footwear, outfitted with mini soccer tournaments, bikers and free stylers and brands such as Lotto, Dolomite, Bjorn Borg, Cmp, Skechers and

Joma Sport were present, a testament to the success of sportswear. Comfort was a key theme. Thierry Rabotin, a brand made in Parabiago (one of the nation’s largest footwear hubs) books 90% of its revenues abroad. “We have always made beautiful and comfortable shoes,” says Andreas Schlecht, a second- generation member of the family that started the company that he now runs together with his brother Thomas. “This season we have invested in a new collection of sneakers with an innovative sole, catered to a young and smart public.” Greater attention to comfort was also embraced by Loriblu, who at Micam unfurled its diamond-inspired Prisma capsule collection. “Dynamic shoes, with more comfortable heels that are not


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just for 1,001 nights,” underlined Claudia Cuccù, daughter of the founders. Cuccù explained that the project is the result of a new industrial paradigm for the Marche’s company, in which experienced workers and crafts people work side by side with novice employees. After all, melding a new mindset with one rooted in tradition

U.S. POLO ASSN.

might just be the secret sauce to propel these older companies into the future. “Companies must make room for young people, because only a generational change will allow them to tune into the market. Training and innovation are our focus for the next few years,” affirmed Franco Gabbrielli, the new head of Assopellettieri (an association representing Italian leather goods companies). Sustainability was also a main theme throughout Milan’s Fieramilanocity’s trade grounds. The eco-theme was woven throughout the booths and among top brands - it was a narrative that took shape through various projects, including Signature and among brands such as Claudia Firenze, Lara Bellini and Plinio Visonà - just to name a few. Through storytelling, organisers and brands were able to show the behind the scenes making of an ecofriendly product and that sustainability is more than just a buzzword. ■

DOLOMITE

LOTTO

ON STAGE

Ciak Roncato ON THE PODIUM Ciak Roncato won the #Attaccatialtram (catch a tram) contest at Milan’s Mipel tradeshow. Participants were invited to take ispiration from Milan’s iconic trams, as a sustainable transport service.

Thierry Rabotin WANTED: ASPIRING DESIGNERS Parabiago celebrated its 20th anniversary this year. To fete the occasion, it invited young designers to participate in the “Design your Thierry Rabotin.” Three designers will be awarded at the upcoming winter 2020 edition of Micam.

NEW ANDREAS SCHMEIDLER PRIZE

Loriblu NEW VIA MANZONI STORE

FIRST EDITION OF MITTELMODA AWARDS RECOGNISES YOUNG TALENT Micam, Italy’s largest footwear tradeshow’s inaugural International Lab of Mittelmoda Awards 2019 honoured international students studying in European fashion and design schools. In partnership with Confindustria Moda, the fashion arm of Italy’s largest business association, nonprofit organisation Mittelmoda awarded the “Absolute Innovation Prize” to Esmond student Kuan Wang, a native of China. The “Absolute Creativity Prize” went to Cypriot Thomoulla Chrysostomou of Milan’s Naba. Chrysostomou has also won the Benetton Group’s Knitwear Award. Both Chrysostomou and Wang received the top prize sum of 3,000 euro. The jury was chaired by textile and fashion industrialist Matteo Marzotto. Fashion’s Editor in Chief Marc Sondermann was also a key member of the jury. Federica Meyer, a student at Florence’s Polimoda,

From left, Maximilian Langs, president of The Friends of Andreas Schmeidler Association, Schmeidler’s wife Elena Possenti, Federica Meyer and Marc Sondermann received the Andreas Schmeidler Memorial Award worth 2,000 euro. Schmeidler, the former chairman of Moscow department store Tsum, died unexpectedly one year ago. Lauded as “Young Creative Leader of Tomorrow”, Meyer also received a scholarship to study at Turin University within its the Executive Master in eCommerce Management and Technology 4.0, offered by the newlyestablished Associazione Amici di Andreas and Fashion magazine. Federica Meyer will also take part in our next CEO Roundtable, on November 7th at Palazzo Parigi in Milan.

The shoe brand spearheaded by CEO Annarita Pilotti, cut the ribbon on a new boutique on Milan’s via Manzoni 40, just a few blocks away from its old location at via Manzoni 19. The new space spans 100 square meters, spread out on two floors.

Lumberjack A STEP TOWARDS THE TOTAL LOOK Outdoor shoe label Lumberjack unfurled its “total look” menswear apparel at Micam. The line included shirts and slacks, as well as polos and outerwear.

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FASHION WEEK 1. Naomi Campbell ended Saint Laurent’s fashion show, wearing a black sequined blazer and matching pants 2. A SS 2020 coat by Balenciaga: models, but also architects like Neda Brady, mothers, artists, financial analysts strode on the catwalk

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THE “YELLOW VEST” EFFECT SEEMS FAR AWAY

PARIS REDISCOVERS ITS GRANDEUR Impactful locations and convincing collections provided the highlight of Paris’ ready-to-wear shows. Saint Laurent, Valentino, Balenciaga, Dior and the new Lanvin under Bruno Sialelli took centre stage BY ALESSANDRA BIGOTTA AND ANDREA BIGOZZI

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he “yellow vest” effect, which had a negative impact on last February’s ready-to-wear shows in Paris, faded like snow in the sun during the September edition of fashion week. “The splendour of the past had been missing for a while, due also to the Nôtre Dame tragedy, but this week it returned,” says Tiberio Pellegrinelli, a buying consultant for Italian multi-brand stores and owner of Area Ti. Paris fashion week was full of show-stopping events, staged around the city in its most famous landmarks. Saint Laurent’s collection took place at the foot of the Eiffel Tower, which never ceases to amaze buyers from near and far. The Chanel show with the new creative direction of Karl Lagerfeld’s right-hand Virginie Viard, on Parisian rooftops replicated in the Grand Palais, was an affair to remember. The Louis Vuitton setup was also impressive, while Dior unleashed its environmental message. Artistic director Maria Grazia Chiuri created a forest of 164 trees with Coloco (a

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Paris confirmed the revival of femininity

collective of urban landscapers and archiPancrazio Parisi tects), to be replanted throughout Paris. Parisi “She presented a collection which was very anchored to reality,” Pellegrinelli says. “Of course Saint Laurent’s success was worth noting, while I expected more from Hedi Slimane at Celine. The mood was too similar to six months ago.” Carmel Imelda Walsh, art director of Modes, laudes Balenciaga: “I was thrilled by Demna Gvasalia, who addressed themes of power and opulence. I like how he tests contemporary dressing codes. Among the new names worth noting: Thebe Magugu Dior’s collection and Kwaidan Editions.” Pancrazio Parisi, is anchored to the owner of the namesake family boutiques real market in Taormina, says that in addition to Saint Tiberio Pellegrinelli Laurent, Balenciaga and Valentino, in his Area Ti opinion the surprise collaboration between Dries Van Noten and Christian Lacroix was a show-stopper. Linda Fargo of Bergdorf Goodman also finds this partnership “extraordinary”. Bruno Sialelli from Lanvin broke out with a flawless collection, according to Nathalie Lucas Verdier of Printemps. “It was convincing,” says Federica Montelli of Rinascente. The Parisian catwalks said farewell to streetwear and rediscovered a more practical wardrobe, which was good news for buyers. The icon of Spring-Summer 2020 was an empowered woman with a sexy side. At the same time, this woman surprisingly revealed her vulnerability through tender touches, such as tulle and handmade lace I was thrilled by by Alexander McQueen. “Future best Demna Gvasalia at sellers? Long printed dresses, combinaBalenciaga tions of shorts, blazers and shirts, and Carmel Imelda Walsh sandals instead of sneakers. Paris confirModes med the revival of femininity,” Pancrazio Parisi concludes. ■

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Tel +39 010 562039

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ON THE ROAD TO SUSTAINABILITY

CHALLENGES IN PROGRESS

IT’S ALL ABOUT A FASHION PACT Sustainability is no longer a slogan: Italian players, from upstream to downstream in the supply chain, must start thinking in terms of a system. Taking action today to reap the benefits tomorrow is no longer just a challenge for visionaries, but for entrepreneurs BY ALESSANDRA BIGOTTA, ELISABETTA FABBRI, CARLA MERCURIO, ANGELA TOVAZZI

FASHION

1. The Marni SS20 fashion show: many of the items on display were made with organic fibers and part of the setting was in recycled plastic. The brand is introducing a collaboration called Marni Miao with the Miao Ethnic group in China: the project will feature a selection of pieces, available from March 2020 in Marni stores across China 2. A SS2020 model by Stella McCartney: 75% of the outfits seen on her catwalk in Paris were made out of sustainable materials

CONSUMPTION 1

98 MLN TONS

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ustainability was the common thread of this last round of catwalk shows, textile fairs and womenswear events. Moreover, the final part of fashion month coincided with the global demonstrations of Fridays for Future. As many know, the fashion industry is the second-most polluting on the planet, after oil. It is estimated that it consumes 98 million tons of non-renewable resources a year, 93 billion cubic meters of water and emits about 1.2 billion tons of CO2. Of 100 billion pieces of clothing produced annually, less than 1% is estimated to be recycled. People are increasingly aware: according to a study by fashion search engine Lyst, from October 2018 to March 2019 online searches for the words “sustainable fashion” for 2 million global consumers in more than 12,000 estores boomed compared with April-September 2018. These keyword searches grew by +300% in Finland, +274% in Denmark, +235% in Germany, almost +100% in the United States and +78%

OF RENEWABLE

in Italy, better than in the UK their high quality. A few RESOURCES A YEAR (+73%) and France (+48,5%). days before, Moncler con93 BN M3 The wave is growing and the trolling shareholder Remo OF WATER line between ethics and busiRuffini was recognized for ness is becoming more subtle. what he called “an extra93 BN TONS Our country has a “sustainaordinary result”: the comOF CO2 ble” DNA in fashion, with pany was named Industry manufacturing clusters Leader for textiles in the of excellence - where Dow Jones Sustainability leading foreign luxury brands find Index. Moncler, together with Zegna, Armathe right production partners - and ni, Prada, Ferragamo and, indirectly, Versace storied families who have with Capri Holdings, holds the Italian flag created international branhigh among the 32 signatories of the Fashion ds from scratch, combined Pact: an industry-wide commitment to reach with the power of a complezero emissions of CO2 before 2050 and te textile-clothing chain. At 100% of renewable energy in the chain bethe Green Carpet Fashion fore 2030. François-Henri Pinault (Kering) Awards we saw faces from leads the group, with Emmanuel Macron’s the leading Made in Italy support. Smaller companies know that they families collect prizes for cannot twiddle their thumbs and watch, and their new efforts. Gildo Italy’s still fragmented players should be Zegna was awarded for the somehow inspired by the Fashion Pact. In recycling project #usetheethe following pages we look at challenges, xisting, and Elia Maramotti insights and experiences, in an age when su(Max Mara) for the group’s Castainability is becoming an increasingly remeLuxe technology, whereby raw levant financial benchmark for a company’s 2 materials, even if recycled, retain value, as well as its digital fitness. ■

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ON THE ROAD TO SUSTAINABILITY ORSOLA DE CASTRO/FASHION REVOLUTION

“FASHION MUST DISINVEST IN GROWTH AND INVEST IN WELL-BEING” Companies need to revolutionise their business models and prioritise their employees, while individuals have the power to enact change through responsible consumption, says the co-founder of the Fashion Revolution movement BY ANGELA TOVAZZI

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ore than six years have passed since April 24th, 2013, when 1,138 workers were killed and more than 2,500 people were injured under the rubble of a textile factory in Rana Plaza, Bangladesh. Since then, ethical fashion designer Orsola De Castro and entrepreneur and designer Carry Somers have been fighting to raise awareness among consumers and urge companies to alter their business practices, in order to avoid a tragedy like this to ever happen again. Circular economy aims to eradicate a system that promotes fast fashion, to extend the life of a garment and to optimise the value of products. How can companies safeguard profits, whilst embracing waste-free production? It is true that there is a contradiction and we must talk about it openly. There is an urgency and the only way to address it, is to begin to disinvest in the concept of growth and invest in that of well-being, both socially and environmentally. Someone has to start saying: I will produce less, but I will produce and pay better. What we have before our eyes is a mess: I am not afraid to use this word. We are aware of the enormity of clothing that ends up in

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landfills, because we have calculated it. Fashion companies provide work, but they must slow down and change their business models. Fortunately, we are beginning to make profits in other forms: second hand clothing is growing 21 times faster than fast fashion. Today it is worth 24 billion dollars, but it will reach 51 billion in 2023. Today people buy more than in the past and get tired of what they wear very quickly: how can they make a difference? People must activate, they have to speak out more. We don’t need six miniskirts or an industrial quantity of clothes. With responsible consumption we can alter the behaviour of the entire system: but we must infuse value into each product, so that it can be used longer or be repaired. This is the message that needs to impact brands, in order to change the course. How do you think Italian textile companies are enacting change? Italian companies operate in small dimensions. In large companies, change is difficult, while in smaller, leaner ones, the seed of transformation can grow faster.

ESG Goals: Communication is Key The fashion sector has come under fire as one of the most polluting industries in the world. Hope is arising from Italy, where industry leaders are ready to roll up their sleeves, in order to ensure a more sustainable future regardless of profits Global Strategy recently released its OsservatorioPmi 2019 report on the state of Italy’s small and medium sized companies that constitute the backbone of the Italian economy. In its report, this year including a “Sustainability and Value Creation” focus, the management consulting company pinpoints 722 excellent companies with above-average economic and financial performance. Deemed as the roster of ‘excellent’ companies, some 71% of them hail from the manufacturing sector, headed by the machinery sector, while fashion companies come in fourth. “From a series of interviews, we extrapolated that ‘excellent’ companies are already proactive in the environmental sphere and fashion seems to be more poised than other sectors,” said Stefano Nuzzo, Global Strategy equity partner, in charge of the OsservatorioPmi. The Global Strategy sustainability survey shows that most of the 722 companies that were pinpointed by the study are already familiar with the acronym ESG, which stands for Environmental, Social and Governance, the three pillars of the UN principles for responsible investments. In addition, seven out of 10 companies

FASHION SNIPPETS Blauer

The totally recycled fiber Repreve, patented by Unifi, has been used for this eco-friendly casual jacket

Prada Re-Nylon

This backpack was made with 100% recyclable Econyl by Aquafil, which can be regenerated an infinite number of times

Pepe Jeans Footwear

Sneakers of the No.22 capsule collection are covered by a film in titanium dioxide that under UV rays removes up to 80% of nocive nitric oxide present in polluted air


THE SUSTAINABILITY DIMENSIONS ENVIRONMENTAL

SOCIAL

• Resource management • Waste recycling • Emissions/Energy efficiency

ESG

• Employee (turnover, engagement, training, etc.) • Labour standars/Human rights • Community relations

GOVERNANCE • Business Conduct and Ethics Code • ESG strategy • Pay practices

have already formalised procedures, in at least one of the these three aspects, with a preponderance of the environmental factor, with respect to social and governance issues (note that the share of women on boards is only around 20%). Only 4% of the total were active in all of the three ESG areas. Less than a third of the participants could identify a direct correlation between the adoption of ESG policies and the creation of value for their business, even if 44% already integrated those ESG assessments into their supply chain decision-making process. Moreover, less than one out of two companies claims to have defined a real sustainability strategy. “Fashion has a very vast supply chain and companies often do not have the possibility to control everything. Complicating matters more, there are too many certifications necessary for each sector. As a result, the end customer does not perceive the virtuous behaviour of each company and does not buy consciously. The

Circular Fashion: “It’s Important but What is 6 it all About?”

Source: Global Strategy

companies involved should make it clearer that their products have less of an impact through communication,” Nuzzo advises. A clear strategy would also make companies interesting in the eyes of institutional investors, who increasingly take into account ESG factors, although for the moment it remains complex to objectively measure non-financial performance. “If companies have not thought about a detailed strategy, it is plausible that they can be worth less in the future, contrary to those who boast respectful practices within their own company and towards the environment,” Nuzzo adds. “It is possible that some fashion entrepreneurs are moving only for marketing purposes. I don’t think they should be labeled beforehand: it is however a way to move consciences and consumers” he admits. “The positive aspect of the ‘excellent’ group, in particular, is that companies start from an ethical choice regardless of returns.” (e.f.)

Brands should be responsible for coming up with more 1 7 SECONDHAND ON DEMAND accessible solutions, said & CUSTOM & VINTAGE MADE 42% of those interviewed. 2 GREEN The survey also showed that RENT, LEASE & CLEAN & SWAP less than a third of consumers 3 5 were aware of what the term According to an online survey HIGH QUALITY REPAIR, REDESIGN 4 & TIMELESS “circular fashion” means, commissioned by second-hand & UPCYCLE FAIR & DESIGN ETHICAL failing to define all seven luxury fashion marketplace pillars of sustainability (see chart). Vestiaire Collective to Atomik The definition adopted universally, Research, 77% of fashion consumers according to Vestiaire Collective, is the one said that sustainability is important. In March coined in 2014 by Dr. Anna Brismar, head 2019, the study polled 18,000 individuals of the Swedish consulting company Green between the ages of 18 and 50 worldwide - in Strategy. Circular fashion refers to clothing, Europe, America, and Asia-Pacific. Some 39% shoes, and accessories “designed, produced of the total stated that the fashion industry and delivered to be used and to circulate in should make more efficient use of resources a responsible and effective manner within and 41% responded that the industry should society, for as long as possible and under the offer a wider array of sustainable choices. best conditions, to then be safely reintroduced Over 33% said that greater awareness or into the biosphere safely, when no longer more accessible information on the topic needed for human use.” (e.f.) would allow consumers to be more proactive.

Chiara BoniLa Petite Robe with Sensitive Fabrics by Eurojersey (Pef certified)

ITALY’S TEXTILE SECTOR PRIORITISES TRACEABILITY Celebrated and often abused, sustainability mantras abound across the textile and fashion sector. Global pressure has driven companies to create a more virtuous supply chain, beginning from textile. “There is no sustainability without traceability,” says Marino Vago, the president of Sistema Moda Italia, Italy’s core fashion federation. He adds that voluntarybased operating instruments that measure a company’s environmental impact are key to the future. Vago cites European Commission-backed initiatives and other European Commission services, such as its harmonised methodology for the calculation of the environmental footprint of products and organisations (including carbon emissions). Among the methods employed at an EC level are the Product Environmental Footprint (PEF) and Organisation Environmental Footprint (OEF), which are recommended by the commission as common methods to measure and communicate the lifecycle environmental performance of products and organisations, resulting in an in-depth analysis of 16 indicators that photograph the environmental performance of a company’s products and processes throughout their life cycle. Such measures facilitate a company’s goaloriented efficiency strategies.  (a.t.)

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ON THE ROAD TO SUSTAINABILITY MATTEO WARD / WRÅD

Chiorino Technology, a historic Biella-based company, active in the finishing of leather for the luxury sector, presented its Green Collection at Lineapelle, with combined solutions of chrome-free and metal-free leathers as well as finishes without solvents or from renewable sources

CIRCULAR ECONOMY

LINEAPELLE: THE TANNING INDUSTRY IS PUT TO THE TEST The leather industry has been attacked for many years as a sector that is neither sustainable nor ethical. Organizers of the Lineapelle trade fair, Italy’s main showcase for leather, accessories and fabrics, have tried to debunk that assertion, avowing that Italian tanneries have adhered to the highest green standards for some time, as its members are responsible for recovering unwanted waste from the meat industry (cattle and pig skins) that would otherwise end up in landfills, rather than killing livestock for the sake of fashion. This is why the Unic-Concerie Italiane national trade association has launched a large communication campaign aimed at end consumers - with the intention also clarifying the previously “distorted message,” fuelled by animal protection activism. The fair has organised several workshops on sustainability and animal welfare in order to ensure the quality of the final product. The fair which ran from Oct 2 to 4, in Milan, dedicated a section to the circularity of the tanning industry. Dubbed The Leather Re (cycling) Exhibition, the project is now in its second season. Italy’s tanneries, in the first six months of the year, saw a 7.3% decrease in production value and a 11.9% in volume of finished leather goods, in line with the crisis of other sectors like the automobile and the footwear industry. (a.t.)

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“TODAY, PRODUCTS NEED A PURPOSE” We are in the midst of a system revolution that goes way beyond organic cotton or recycled nylon, says Matteo Ward, co-founder of the Wråd brand, art director of White Give a fok-us BY CARLA MERCURIO

What is your aim at Give a fok-us, the public hub at the White tradeshow exhibition dedicated to sustainability? With Give a fok-us, we aim to promote a concrete, responsible activism on the part of companies, brands, buyers, students and the public at large. We try to address every issue starting from the awareness of the status quo and proposing answers. But it is up to us to re-invent the paradigms of the fashion system and for this to happen we need to open up the floodgates of research to pave the way for creative synergies, re-envisaging the new dynamics of a symbiotic economy. Sustainability in fashion: where are we now? The concept of sustainable fashion does not really exist, there are methods of production, consumption and/or supply of resources that are more or less responsible towards the environment and society. And today many companies are starting to face one or more of these aspects. But the biggest problem is another: sustainability cannot mean “a strategy to guarantee constant and infinite sales and production growth, in line with the expectations of our new target customer”. Unfortunately that’s exactly what I perceive from big companies. This infinite growth is not compatible with a planet with finite resources. What is the most pressing challenge for the industry? There are two macro-problems that transcend the sector. The first is a problem of information asymmetry, which has led to a market

that is based on mass, low-quality production that actually harms the environment. The second is the incompatibility between the concept of sustainability and the production and consumption system that is the basis of our system today. This theme implies the need to catalyse the transition from linear individualism to circular production dynamics based on collaboration. We are in the midst of a system revolution, which must be approached with a holistic vision that goes beyond organic cotton or recycled nylon. The product must have a purpose and offer a service. How virtuous are Italian companies? In Italy the production of fabrics, finishes, washes and dyes is excellent. These companies can help brands to re-position themselves and re-invent their modus operandi. I do not believe that the Made in Italy brand is synonymous with brand responsibility however, on the contrary. It is fundamental that brands become an expression of truth. Wråd is more than an eco-friendly clothing brand … I co-founded Wråd with Victor Santiago and Silvia Giovanardi in order to catalyse positive change. At the beginning, in 2015, we tried them all to understand how to contribute to the cause, to become a start-up and to file a patent for dyeing fabrics with recycled minerals with an accelerator program endorsed by Perpetua. One of our products, Graphi-Tee received the RedDot Award for Best Product Design. Today we are a Focus Design Studio with a single goal: change. At the moment, we are investing in boosting education with Fashion Revolution (we reach almost 6 thousand students per year), as well as research and development aimed at innovation, and fashion design with Wråd, as well as third-party artistic consultancy and strategic communication. ■

Wråd’s cofounders: starting left, Victor Santiago, Silvia Giovanardi and Matteo Ward


ON THE ROAD TO SUSTAINABILITY

Two items by Atelier&Repairs made with Candiani’s sustainable denim fabrics

FROM BLUE TO “GREEN”

ITALIAN DENIM MAKERS KNOW HOW TO INNOVATE Denim has a huge environmental footprint. Some Italian companies have found ways to make this beloved fabric also eco-friendly BY CARLA MERCURIO

E

veryone should know by now: denim production has a strong impact on the environment. It is estimated that this superpopular fabric accounts for 35% of world cotton production, and making one pair of jeans consumes 3,000 liters of water if you include cotton cultivation, production and the washing processes. Not to mention the pesticides, harmful chemicals and energy consumption that lead to the creation of our favorite pair. The good news is that the solutions to many of these problems already exist or are now being tested. Italian companies have been energetic about innovations in making denim more kind to the environment. “You can do beautiful things without damaging the environment. We are at the point where we can bring back a lot of work to Italy, where we no longer pollute while enacting certain treatments,” explaines Stenilio Morazzini, ceo of Montega, a Rimini-based producer of specialty chemicals for textile treatments. Mon42

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tega was founded 39 years ago, and began focusing on sustainability over the last decade. Rudolf Group, the German multinational chemical company based in Munich, has recently opened Hub1922 in Busto Arsizio near Milan, where it researches new fabric treatments in close synergy with brands and retailers. It often bases its ideas for innovative fabric treatments on nature itself, says Alberto De Conti, head of Rudolf Fashion Division. “We looked at lotus leaves and the wings of certain insects to develop a treatment with fluorine-free resins that is applied to the fabrics and makes them water repellent,” he says. “The trousers also get less dirty and dry sooner, resulting in a considerable saving of water.” Tonello in Vicenza has focused on expertise in treatments and washing machines, with 8,000 machines sold all over the world, all 100% made in Italy. “We invest about 10% of turnover in research and development and this has allowed us to stay in Italy and make

quality products,” explains Alice Tonello. “Thanks to a washing machine with sustainable systems such as ozone or nebulizer technology, producers can make a garment with 90% less water and harmful chemicals. And the process is transparent, because we have created a software that reads how much has been consumed to wash a garment in terms of water, energy, steam and time.” One of the great challenges right now is to make consumers aware of the importance of social and environmental responsibility. Candiani, a Lombardy-based company that has been producing denim since 1938 with a focus on 360-degree sustainability, emphasizes the importance of spreading the word leveraging on its green fabrics, like the ones that save up to 75% of water and 65% of chemicals needed to produce a pair of jeans. “We want to talk about the goals achieved not only at a B2B level but also wihin B2C,” says Simon Giuliani, global marketing director. “That’s why every year we organize an Open Mill at our company where we invite producers, retailers, sustainability experts and influencers to come and have a look. We recently opened a store in Milan where we sell our customers’ brands exclusively Made in Italy or Made in Los Angeles. We are also focusing on storytelling through videos targeted at consumer level.” Reuse, reduce, recycle, repair and respect are the principles guiding Berto Industria Tessile. “We have developed a fabric with 65% recycled cotton in collaboration with the Marchi & Fildi company from Biella that used our fabric scraps,” says Francesca Polato, marketing manager of the Padua-based company. “We also make a denim in organic cotton and dyed with natural indigo. Both are certified according to the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS).” Sustainability does not mean sacrificing fashion content. In partnership with Berto, Paolo Gnutti founded PG Denim in 2017. His goal is to express an alternative and creative point of view on denim, with a responsible approach. Fabrizio Consoli of Blue of a Kind, a Milan-based denimwear brand, is on the same wavelength: his fabrics are made entirely from scrap. “We have moved from the ‘take, make and dispose’ model to a circular process that follows the ‘reuse, reduce and recycle’ path, giving an added value to the garments in terms of aesthetics and creativity,” he says. “The fashion approach must change. Today there are 65% more clothes in the closets than there were 15 years ago. And we use these clothes half of the time we used them then.” ■


ISKO

ABOLISHING WASTE WITH R-TWO R-Two is a ground breaking platform launched by Isko, the Turkish denim company that owns two important hubs in Italy: the Creative Room in Castelfranco Veneto, a space that is dedicated to design, research and designer support and the Iskoteca of San Benedetto del Tronto. The latter is a denim library that houses over 25,000 denim samples. R-Two is a platform that includes textile concepts made with a mix or blend of reused cotton, obtained from production loss with Content Claim Standard Certification (Ccs), and recycled polyester certified to Recycled Claim Standard (Rcs) or Global Recycle Standard (Grs), depending on the percentage used. “The platform is so versatile that all of our existing bestsellers can be converted to a R-Two fabric - a spokeperson of the company esplains -. Next season, our goal is for over 50% of our collection to be made with these fabrics” (c.me.)

SUSTAINABLE RESEARCH ADVANCES

MONTEGA’S GREEN EVOLUTION Montega, a leader in laundry, dyeing and chemicals for textile treatments since 1980, with a focus on denim, began focusing on sustainability over the last decade. Over the years, the company has expanded its lines of environmentally-safe products. The Montegaverde Line, the Iso14006 EcoDesign and the numerous eco-certifications it has obtained are testament to the company’s efforts to reduce pollution derived from chemical dyes, detergents and treatments. The company, led by Stenilio Morazzini, counts numerous fashion brands among its top clients. About 80% are from Italy, while 20% are from abroad. Its textile treatments represent the lion’s share of its business: roughly 65% of its revenues (4 million euro in 2018) were generated from this sector. Looking ahead, sales momentum in 2019 could lead to growth abroad, as the company continues to focus on research and development not only for denim, but also for silk, wool and synthetic fiber treatments. In addition, the company is investing on its M-Lab Garment University project, that has led to the development of eco-friendly application processes through the use of machinery designed to reduce the consumption of water and chemicals. Looking ahead, the company’s efforts to develop its EcoDesign certified chemicals will go hand-in-hand with the My Eco System program. Technical research and learning are inline with the company’s overall goal to make its sustainable practices a reality across the industry. (c.bo.)


TEXTILE WORLD TEXWORLD

IN THE FAIRYLAND OF FASHION, BIO-COUTURE COMES TO THE FORE

PREMIÈRE VISION

SMART AND RESPONSIBLE: TEXTILES LOOK AHEAD The Smart Creation area, formerly known as the Smart Square, almost doubled. Conferences and research at the fair put sustainability and the customer first BY ALESSANDRA BIGOTTA

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ustainability is taking over the whole supply chain and was the central theme of the Première Vision textile fair in Paris, a showcase for over 2,050 brands that welcomed 56,000 visitors. A sign of the uptick in eco-offerings, the fair’s Smart Creation section increased to 50 from 28 exhibitors in just one year. According to a study by Première Vision and France’s IFM-Institut Français de la Mode, almost 50% of Europeans bought at least one eco-friendly garment in 2019. About 5,000 consumers in France, Italy, Germany and the US were interviewed for the study. The findings pointed to 50% of French consumers admitting that they didn’t have enough knowledge to target the right sustainable product. Consumers said also that quality materials are an important factor in the purchasing process: most of them prefer

natural fibers and even recycled raw materials. They expressed disdain for polyester, acrylic, polyamide and leather. The majority of French consumers think that a fashion item should be produced in its country of origin (80%), while 46% said products should be Made in Europe. Some 65% of Italians prefer Made in Italy products. McKinsey and Camera Nazionale della Moda, an association of Italy’s top brands, were at the center of the “Sustainable development is growing, but is it selling?” panel, where it was revealed that 76% of consumers believe more in “hard-core”sustainability (in terms of processes, working conditions, traceability and animal welfare) than in “soft-core” or token sustainability, which includes communication campaigns and collaborations linked to the public image of a brand. ■

EUROJERSEY BETWEEN ECOCONSCIOUSNESS AND 3D PRINTS

THE NEW RECYCLED VERSION OF THINDOWN

ITALIANS TOOK TO THE STAGE AT THE PV AWARDS

Sustainability and performance: Eurojersey, which launched the SensitiveEcoSystem program for its Sensitive Fabrics 12 years ago and recently obtained the PEF certificate, presented a collection with 3D effects, digital prints, that was multifunctional and easy care.

At PV an item by Thindown, the 100% Made in Italy down fabric patented by Nipi, was selected among the innovators in the Sports & Tech section. The company also launched Thindown Recycled, in 100% recycled post-consumer down and 100% recycled fabric.

At the PV Awards Italian Lanificio Luigi Colombo (photo) was the the Grand Jury Prize winner. Bonotto took the PV Fabric Fashion Smart Creation Prize and Lyria, another Italian, won the PV Fabric Handle Prize.

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Messe Frankfurt France focused on the theme “The Fairyland of Fashion” at the recent edition of the Texworld textile fair. Sustainability was a major theme, not only inside the stands of over 1,000 exhibitors from every corner of the planet, but also due to the “Salon to Salon” Avantex exhibition. A fascinating theme was biotechnology and its role in the production of advanced materials for design and fashion from bacteria, yeasts, fungi and algae. The exhibition was curated by Sabrina Maroc, founder of the OpenBioFabrics collective, which focused on the evolution of biocouture over the last 15 years - from Lee’s bioengineered denim jacket in 2006 to The North Face’s Moon Parka, a limited-edition model that will be sold from next midDecember. The parka is crafted with Brewed Protein, made by Goldwin and Spiber. Texworld means an international network, that is not limited to the event in Paris. One of its next events will unfurl in Ethiopia, a country where Western brands (including Italian ones) are increasingly investing in setting up production facilities. Texworld Addis Abeba, integrated by Texprocess Addis Abeba, will take place in the Ethiopian capital from November 9 to 12, during the Africa Sourcing and Fashion Week. (a.b.)


DIGITALMIND GROUP

www.mclassics.eu

V.O.F Service Italia s.r.l.


TEXTILE WORLD

ON STAGE Albini Group 100% TRACEABLE COTTON

NEWS AT INTERTEXTILE SHANGHAI

Hyosung: the Korean Way to Recycled Fibers From creora regen to eco-soft creora, the Korean spandex giant is out in front with cutting-edge sustainable solutions

Spandex maker Hyosung is investing heavily in recycled fibers. At Intertextile Shanghai the Korean giant presented an updated version of its range of recycled creora regen and polyester fiber fabrics. According to Mike Simko, global marketing director, “we were the first to bring ​​recycled spandex to Shanghai with our creora regen. Our eco-soft spandex creora contributes to energy savings through low-temperature printing, and has both a delicate elasticity and a more intense white tone.” Functional fibers, such as nylon and polyester, are now available in a recycled version, from Mipan regen aqua X nylon to askin polyester, including anti-pilling polyester fiber and polyester regen aerolight, suitable for all seasons. The British brand FatFace has launched an eco-friendly range of swimwear using Mipan regen. Hyosung’s fabrics also offer functionality and high performance. Creora ActiFit is antiUV, durable and resistant to chlorine and sea water. It was presented in the BlueZone at Munich Fabric Start, along with Aerolight, a high-count filament polyester fiber which is soft to the touch, resembling natural fibers. (a.b.)

At Première Vision Albini Group launched its first 100% scientifically traceable Supima cotton, created in partnership with the Supima cotton growers’ association and Oritain, the world leader in forensic science. A guarantee of transparency from the cotton field to the point of sale, thanks to a vertically integrated supply chain (photo, Stefano Albini).

Tollegno 1900 ON TOUR ABROAD Tollegno 1900 presented its FW 2020/2021 yarns collection in Florence in June, and in September/ October the company returned to the limelight in a tour between Europe and Asia. In Paris, French buyers appreciated most of all the eco-innovative product Explorer, a remarkable fine untreated wool, while in China - during Italian Yarns at Shenzhen Harmony 4.0 in 100% Extrafine Merino took centre stage. Further stops were in Seoul and Tokyo. These events took place in partnership with the Filati Promotion Consortium, the Feel The Yarn brand and the Italian foreign trade agency ITA/ICE.

A PROJECT REDUCING, TIME, COSTS, ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

Marzotto Lab and BSamply Partner for Digital Transformation

With its brands Redaelli, I Tessuti di Sondrio, Nuova Tessil Brenta, Linificio e Canapificio Nazionale, Lanerossi and Marzotto Home, Marzotto Lab occupies a prominent position as one of the historic players in the global textile industry. BSamply is a startup founded in 2017 in Los Angeles: a digital showroom for textiles, leather, yarns and accessories, specialized in highquality materials for fashion brands. The two have joined forces: starting last September, in fact, part of the Marzotto Lab catalog is available in Bsamply. com, accessible to both existing and potential customers, who can preview the collections and sample them in a quick and simple way. Through BSamply, Marzotto Lab will be able to manage the entire order process, both online and offline, drastically reducing time, costs and environmental impact. (a.b.)

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Tessitura Attilio Imperiali FULL SPEED AHEAD ON INDUSTRY 4.0 Tessitura Attilio Imperiali’s year-long investment push into an Industry 4.0 “smart factory” is bearing fruit. Its factory can now boast real-time updating of production planning to “telediagnosis” and predictive maintenance by the manufacturer or accredited suppliers. Technicians can control and manage the looms remotely. All of this is made possible by intelligent machines, that are interconnected and connected to the Internet.


TEXTILE WORLD FROM PREMIÈRE VISION TO FASHION WEEK

Fulgar at the Forefront of Sustainable, Traceable Yarns

THE PLANET AGENDA GROWS

The Lycra Company Launches Lycra EcoMade

Fulgar amps up the development of its ID system: Q-Nova by Fulgar takes centre stage at Milan’s Ready-to-Wear shows

Fulgar, leader in polyamide 6.6 and covered elastomers, figured prominently during Europe’s fashion and textile month. At Première Vision, the Mantova-based company presented Evo by Fulgar, its eco-friendly portfolio of yarns. The Din Certco-certified line is derived from castor oil. It’s sustainable but also ultra light, and crafted with super-stretch, breathable fibres. Fulgar’s Q-Nova by Fulgar, a polyamide 6.6 micron yarn, is 100% Made in Italy and made with regenerated raw materials. Fulgar is currently working on obtaining additional certifications. Also the company developed an innovative ID traceability system that renders the yarn’s recycled fibres recognisable to governing bodies and consumer associations. The company continues to enhance its ID technology, so that one day, consumers will be able to identify the product’s origins in-store via a special scanner, as well as a special label that identifies exactly where the yarn comes from. Other products like Amni Soul Eco, a biodegradable polyamide 6.6, accelerate a garment’s decomposition process. Q-Nova by Fulgar was chosen by Daniele Niboli for his Spring/ Summer 2020 collection. The designer, who embarked on a solo career after working with Loro Piana, Dolce&Gabbana and Blumarine, used Q-Nova by Fulgar for his fashionforward stockings and tights crafted with reflective materials like dévoré satin (photo). (a.b.) FILO’S 52ND EDITION

FiloFlow Showcases the Results of its Sustainability Poll The first FiloFlow research study about sustainability launched by Filo, the international exhibition of yarns and fibers, was unveiled at Palazzo delle Stelline in Milan. A 52-question poll was sent to 101 exhibitors, in order to measure their commitment to ethical and environmental causes. 35% of the companies that were contacted completed the questionairre. Of those who did take the poll, 82% said they already use materials made with pre and post-consumer recycled and/ or biomaterials, while 96% said their products are crafted with certified materials. Some 86% said they have at least one certification, while 89% said their company has hired a sustainability point-person. “We are counting on increasing FiloFlow’s membership and are planning an ad-hoc space inside the Trend Area of the exhbition,” the event’s manager, Paolo Monfermoso says. (a.b.) 48

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AT MUNICH FABRIC START MORE SPACE FOR INNOVATION Li Edelkoort (Trend Union), Tricia Carey (Lenzing Fibers) and Erik Bang (H&M Foundation) were just a few of the speakers at SusTechability, one of the most popular panels at the Munich Fabric Start textile fair. Boasting over 20,300 visitors, MFS “chronicles the changes taking place - from the pure and simple research of fabrics, visitors are privy to exclusive content,” Munich Fabric Start managing director Sebastian Klinder comments. At the fair the HighTex Awards were presented to the companies most committed to innovation and sustainability: Portugal’s Rdd Textiles, Italy’s M.T.T. Manifattura Tessile and Brugnoli were among the recipients. (a.b.)

The first Lycra branded elastane made of post-industrial materials, Lycra EcoMade, now joins the EcoMade family composed of Lycra, Lycra T400, Coolmax and Thermolite fibers. The Lycra Company, a multinational company specialized in the production of fibers and technologies for clothing and hygiene, is thus updating its Planet Agenda: a platform of innovations that, as Jean Hegedus, head of sustainability, explains, “focuses on the development of studies, technologies, products and processes that can contribute to making the industry more sustainable, focusing on three interdependent areas of action: the product, manufacturing excellence and corporate responsibility. The priorities are a reduction of waste, a safe and transparent use of chemistry, the life cycle of garments and the use of resources in an environment-friendly perspective”. For several months now, the Lycra 166L fiber, used in weaving, has obtained the Gold Level Material Health certification of the Cradle to Cradle institute. Regarding certifications, all the Lycra Company’s clothing production plants are certified according to Appendix 6 of the OekoTex Standard 100. (a.b.)


NEWS RELAUNCHING A HERITAGE BRAND

WALTER MAIOCCHI: “WE’RE BUILDING A FUTURE AROUND MADE IN MALO” After the brand re-joined the Milan Ready-to-Wear calendar lineup, management aims to open new stores, reach EUR20M by 2020 and return to profit 1

BY ALESSANDRA BIGOTTA

H

igh-end knitwear brand Malo has been making luxury cashmere since 1972. Founded in Florence by two brothers Alfredo and Giacomo Canessa, it is more than just an average sweater maker. Its new stakeholders are working on reviving the brand and using its vanguard heritage to enhance its image on a global scale, expanding in terms of revenues, innovation, sustainability and stores. “Our label is not just ‘Made in Italy,’ but Made in Malo,” Chairman Walter Maiocchi tells Fashion at the brand’s Spring-Summer 2020 presentation in Milan, where crafted products with upscale materials, like silk and Makò cotton, were showcased. The collection now counts about 140 menswear ensembles and 180 looks for women. Maiocchi, who is also the CEO of Italian refrigeration company Zanotti SpA, bought a majority stake in the ailing knitwear maker for about 10 million euro in 2018 together with two partners. The deal safeguarded jobs for 109 individuals employed within Malo’s factories in Campi Bisenzio (Florence) and Borgonovo Val Tidone (Piacenza). “Today that number has risen to 129 and we brought 90 percent of our knitwear production back to our factories. We are reinvesting in training and reviving the knitting trade school that has been dormant for 15 years,” Maiocchi says, adding that in mid-December the company will launch its e-store and will focus on expanding its social media presence. Consolidated revenues for 2019 are expected to top 15 million euro and reach the 20 million mark by 2020, as the company works on boosting exports to a share of 60% from a current 40%. Malo has 11 mono-brand stores, six of

SUSTAINABILITY IS A PRIORITY

LIU JO: RESTYLING IN MILAN AND A NEW PARTNERSHIP WITH ME CONTRO TE Liu Jo stood in the spotlight during the Milan fashion week, thanks to the re-opening of its iconic flagship in Corso Vittorio Emanuele (as pictured), which presents the universe of the brand on 350 sqm. and three levels: from clothing to accessories, to Luxury, Eyewear and

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1. Walter Maiocchi, Chairman of Malo 2. A proposal for Spring-Summer 2020 3. The monobrand store in via Montenapoleone: the brand is going to open other stores

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which are in Italy, and is going to open three more stores in Naples, Moscow, and Monte Carlo. Its apparel is also carried in 130 multibrand stores, 60% of which are abroad. Management is planning to open a showroom in the United States to penetrate the US market, once very important for the brand. Today, Italy is Malo’s number one market, followed by Japan, Russia and Spain. Sustainability is a main focus: “We are eliminating plastic as much as we can, from packaging, and we strive to create products that can be reused and that are built to last, for years to come, and that won’t create textile waste. Furthermore, we are focused on production and hope to unfurl a line of cashmere made with natural, un-dyed yarns.” ■

Fragrances lines, but also Better, a sustainable line of jeans made with Candiani fabrics. Chairman Marco Marchi “took to the streets” for Fridays For Future movement, inviting his employees to demonstrate for the climate: “It is a symbolic action with a strong value for me, part of a wider commitment on this front,” he says. Finally, the brand unveiled an agreement with Sofia Scalia and Luigi Calagna, known as Sofì and Luì of Me Contro Te: it will make a kids’ shoes capsule collection together with the duo, very popular on social media, which will be on sale from the current season. (a.b.)


D'ANIELLO BOUTIQUE for

LUXURY ARRIVES IN SALERNO WITH D’ANIELLO BOUTIQUE THE D’ANIELLO GROUP AMPLIFIES ITS RETAIL PRESENCE WITH A NEW BOUTIQUE IN SALERNO, JUST A STONE’S THROW AWAY FROM THE AMALFI COAST. FIVE HUNDRED SQUARE METRES ON TWO FLOORS, DESIGNED BY BACIOCCHI ASSOCIATI. “FROM HERE WE ARE INCREASINGLY OPENING OUT TO AN INTERNATIONAL CLIENTÈLE” Eight large windows directly facing out onto corso Vittorio Emanuele, Salerno’s major shopping street, unveil a luminous interior, characterised by asymmetric, steel-covered pillars, transparent and modular screens with dynamic contents, aluminium exhibitors and a pink bronze counter right in the centre. On the floor below, a street art work by Jorit Agoch features triumphantly on the main exhibition wall, emphasizing the store’s strong metropolitan identity. A project by Baciocchi Associati, in synergistic collaboration with the customer, with juxtapositions of metals, cement and velvets. The new temple of luxury, 500 sqm over two floors, is destined to become a mecca for fashion addicts, integrating

set-ups of clothing and accessories for men and women, selected from a vast range of niche and luxury brands, with whom the store will also develop exclusive collaborations. For the time being, the latest d'Aniello opening completes a distribution network consisting of another four stores in Villaricca, Giugliano and Aversa, in addition to the digital channel. The d’Aniello’s explain how “This location, a stone’s throw away from the Amalfi Coast, is part of the group’s plans for expansion, with boutiques and e-commerce, it is opening out to an increasingly international audience. With passion, research and innovation, we have transformed the old dressmaker’s in Villaricca into a global reality”. The d’Aniello fashion

www.danielloboutique.it

adventure first began at the turn of the twentieth century, in the family’s atelier, a single workshop in the province which in a short space of time became synonymous with fine clothing throughout the area, including the city of Naples. This was followed by the first boutique, with a selection of the best designer brands, managed tastefully and with acumen, followed by an opening in Giugliano and two stores in Aversa, a must for all shopping enthusiasts in Campania. But that’s not all. Today the group is considered one of the most prestigious businesses on the international retail scene and since 2013 it rightly features on “The Best Shops” list by Camera Italiana Buyer Moda.


NEWS

NEW PATENTS

Freddy Unfurles The N.O.W. Following the success of the Wr.Up model, the sportswear brand is on a roll.

After selling over five million pieces of Wr.Up, the iconic pants famous for their lifting, smoothing and shaping effects, entrepreneur Carlo Freddi is back in the game with a potentially new icon. “Never stop dreaming. Dreaming is the spice of life,” he says, speaking to journalists at the

company’s headquarters in Marcellise, a small town situated in the hills of Verona. Inside the company’s creative office, Freddi is relaxed, wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with “Dreamer” as he chats about his latest project: the N.O.W. pant. N.O.W. is an acronym for Not Only Wr.Up. “There has never been anything like this before. It’s a five-pocket pant with an extremely comfortable and elastic slim fit that adapts to the body, thanks to the versatility of the bi-elastic denim effect jersey,” the entrepreneur says, as he showcases N.O.W. to the audience. Outfitted with invisible belt loops at the waist, the model is available in both regular and skinny bottom. The N.O.W. Yoga variation is only available in skinny bottom and features a high waist line with a pivotable band. “The perfect pants,” reads the slogan of the new collection by Freddy. It promises a fitting, yet unconstrained shape: a solution for metropolitan life but also for sports, because it facilitates “impossible movements”. “If you try it, you’ll buy it,” comments Freddi, who founded the Chiavari, Liguria-based company in 1976 at just 19 years of age. Since then, he single-handedly grew the business, which now boasts a turnover of 50 million euro. The Wr.Up model alone generated almost half of the revenues last year. The new N.O.W. models will be available in stores with FallWinter 2019/20 and will be distributed in over 60 Freddy monobrand stores and in multibrand stores in 44 countries around the world, as well as online.  (a.t.)

LUISA SPAGNOLI’S SECOND CATWALK SHOW

“Following The Rome Reopening, We’ll Focus On International Expansion” Luisa Spagnoli has returned to Milan to showcase its collection on the catwalk for the second time in a row. Backstage, CEO and creative director Nicoletta Spagnoli, great-granddaughter of the late-founder (who is also the creator of the Perugina “Baci” chocolates) looks back on the brand’s success. Luisa Spagnoli had a 4% increase in retail revenues in the first half-year. ”Our evolution continues,” CEO explains. “We are exploring new markets and revamping our retail image, an initiative which is at the core of our progressive restyling.” After implementing this new concept into about forty monobrand Luisa Spagnoli stores, the road map involves a revamp of another 20 locations. “We want to renew another 60 spaces by the end of the year,” Spagnoli says. Next October, the brand will cut the ribbon on the newly reopened store on Rome’s Via Frattina. The company will continue with other openings abroad in markets that single-handedly stand for about 15% of turnover (totalling 130 million euro in 2019), Spagnoli explains. “We have ample room for growth.”

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MIA BECAR MAKES A SPLASH IN MILAN A meeting of chance is how the Mia Becar shoe brand started. Founded in 2018 by two empowered Mexican women, Betzabe Gonzalez and Carolina Lujan, the joint venture began when the duo was on its way to Harry’s Bar in Venice, discussing ideas. That’s when Betsy’s husband casually came up with the name. As the two entered the Italian landmark, they spotted Christian Louboutin standing before them and they took it as a clear sign that they had to start their own line. “We believe in signs and that one was all we needed.” The duo went on to study bespoke shoemaking in New York and then moved to Milan to complete their training from the masters at Ars Sutoria, a world leading school for footwear designers. A little bit of Hollywood mixed with Milanese panache and Italian savoir-faire is the essence of the collection that was presented during Milan’s fashion week. At the moment, the shoe line is only available online, where small capsule collections of 12 models are released on a regular basis. While Italy is at the heart of the brand, its founders hope to open physical stores in the near term.  (c.bo.)

Store openings in Düsseldorf, Kuwait City and Dubai are on the verge of taking place. Australia is also a key market. “We are talking about a market that is extremely receptive for our brand and where we are growing so much so that we will open another store in Melbourne, the second in the city and the fourth after having opened two stores in Sydney. With over 200 monobrand stores (of which 52 are abroad), the strategy going forward will be increasingly focused on Europe, a region where we directly manage stores and we don’t have the need for a local distribution partner,” she says. Spagnoli’s son Nicola Barbarani says that e-commerce will also be crucial to the brand’s growth strategy. “We inaugurated an e-commerce unit in 2015, which is growing 40 percent year on year, thanks to an integration with offline and omni-channel services,” he says. Digital currently accounts for 2% of the company’s turnover. “The goal,” the young entrepreneur concludes, “is to grow by 5 to 6%, by bringing the operations of the online platform inhouse to better manage our online business.”  (a.t.)


MATHIAS FACCHINI/SWINGER INTERNATIONAL

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Genny: “The Future is in the Green. And we are at the Forefront” Upmarket label Genny has launched a series of eco-denim items made with Smart Indigo technology. Meanwhile, the brand is moving its boutique in Milan. Mathias Facchini, president of Swinger International, chats with Fashion about future plans and an upcoming store opening in a European location

Sustainability is a hot topic right now. Where is Genny at this stage? We continue to pursue the values of ​​ quality, craftsmanship and sustainability which are the very essence of ​​Made in Italy. Across the board, we are making low environmental impact and refer to a local supply chain, as our suppliers are within 100 km of the company. Genny’s eco-denim garments made a splash at Milan’s ready-to-wear shows. Can you tell us more? We’ve been active in sustainability for years now. For Spring/Summer 2020 we are introducing a series of denim items made with natural linen fiber. Through the Smart Indigo technology, the fabric is dyed using

energy instead of chemical agents, reducing water consumption and, at the same time, ensuring lasting colors. What projects do you have in store for Genny at the retail level? This year we will move our Milanese boutique from Via Verri to Via Della Spiga, a more central location within the Quadrilatero district. Our strategy is focused on four 2 monobrand boutiques and on building our multi-brand presence in selected department stores, in Italy and abroad, which currently amounts to over 150 stores. Meanwhile, we are evaluating the possibility of opening a mono-brand store in Europe, in London or in Paris .

brand through licences, and started with eyewear and fragrances. There will be important news in the immediate future, but it is premature to reveal it now. What is the impact of online sales on overall revenue? E-commerce represents more than 10% of Genny’s revenues. We are fine-tuning some aspects to make it an increasingly efficient channel that guarantees an exclusive shopping experience - like customer care dedicated to ad hoc services and on- demand customisation. How do you expect to close 2019? We expect to close 2019 with a turnover of more than 10 million euros, up 20% versus 2018.

Are you planning to launch new product lines? We are in favour of a complete lifestyle

In which markets are you present today? Our top markets are USA, China and the Middle East. Above all, the American market is fundamental for the growth of the brand. The fact that many overseas celebrities choose our dresses for international red carpet events is a clear sign of appreciation.  (c.me.)

the label, the license for the production and distribution of the brand on the EMEA market (except France, managed by the Parisian company Central Way) by virtue of a tenyear agreement with purchase option. After the first two steps aimed at repositioning the label in Italy through a wholesale distribution network focused on independent multi-brands and the development of foreign markets

(Spain, Portugal, Greece, Belgium, Bulgaria and Poland, with Scandinavia being defined), Nemesis is ready to enter phase three. “In January we present a capsule for Fall-Winter 2020, on the market between June and July next, which is based on the roots of the label, with great attention to details and fabrics. This proposal will allow us to develop a wholesale network in medium to high-end stores, giving visibility to the label, which currently has 200 premium customers,” anticipates Sovernigo. Subsequently it will be time for the opening of franchised singlebrand stores and of direct stores later on. “We are evaluating a participation at the next Pitti Uomo Fair in January”, reveals Sovernigo, who is ready to launch a new e-shop with the Spring-Summer 2020 collection. Meanwhile he plans to introduce womenswear, alongside menswear, and looks at a production upgrade: “We are working on reintroducing made in Italy to part of the collection”. (c.me.)

GIANFRANCO SOVERNIGO/NEMESIS

MCS: “It’s time to go Back to the Roots of the Brand” The MCS rider is back in the limelight. The brand (formerly known as Marlboro Classics) is on track with an ambitious development plan, deployed by the Italian company Nemesis, owned by Gianfranco and Valter Sovernigo. It starts from the roots of the label, beginning with the resumption of the historical logo. “The core product will remain linked to American-inspired heritage, with a strong link with Italian design and an eye on current affairs”, recounts Gianfranco Sovernigo, co-owner of the Montebelluna company, who brought the label back to the barricades after a bankruptcy in 2017 flatlined three brands owned by Emerisque (in addition to Mcs, Henry Cotton’s and Marina Yachting). Last year Nemesis acquired from Mcs Brand Management Company, the current owner of

1. Mathias Facchini, president of Swinger International 2. An outfit made with a special ecodenim fabric on the Genny SpringSummer 2020 catwalk

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NEWS INTEGRATED SHOPPING

Patrizia Pepe Unveils its Teleport Project

BAGS FOR NIGHT & DAY

De Marquet Plans EU, Japan, US Expansion De Marquet, the label founded by designer Raffaella Iten Metzger in 2016, is ready to expand its distribution with new stores in Italy as it develops new models and inks new collaboration deals

Artist Raffaella Iten Metzger, designer and founder of the De Marquet brand, named after her greatgrandmother, a Viennese noblewoman, says that the future is often linked to the past. Her elegant, inter-changeable bags perfectly reflect tradition and consistency, as well as the beautiful family ritual of passing favorites from one generation down to the next. Her iconic Night&Day bag was envisaged for a woman on-the-go and transitions into an evening bag or a day time bag. The Wipoprotected model comes with covers and bases that can be switched in just two quick clicks. The flaps are available in a variety of materials - from Tuscan calf leather to more casual ones like raffia. Based in Switzerland, De Marquet has a mono-brand store in Bern, as well as a presence at PKZ. Looking ahead, De Marquet expects to build its presence in Italy, which currently makes up about 20% of its sales. It also hopes to grow in France, England and Germany, while at the same time, it focuses on expanding its retail presence into Japanese and American department stores. Iten Metzger is working on developing other models around Night & Day. A micro-size, following the launch of the midi and the mini, is on the horizon. She has also announced several limited edition collaborations, inking a deal with fashion illustrator Izak Zenou, as well as with jewellery houses for the jewel collection. (c.bo.)

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To travel “Back to the future” you don’t need a DeLorean, just a good integrated communication strategy between online and offline channels. That’s a reality Patrizia Pepe knows all too well. During the Milan ready-to-wear shows, the accessible luxury brand presented the upstyling of its Milan flagship store in-line with its Teleport project that integrates online and offline shopping. In mid-October, the company, controlled by manufacturing firm Tessilform, unveiled the new patriziapepe. com as part of its overall strategy to entice millennial consumers. At Via Manzoni 38 location, the store was equipped with screens that allow location-based online shopping. The store was also styled with a “Glam Rhapsody” concept, a theme that ties the world of disco with fashion. The same theme and digital upgrade were a major part of Patrizia Pepe’s new Florence flagship that opened October 9th and spans 150 square meters. For the collection that was presented at the brand’s via Ferrante Aporti headquarters, creative director Patrizia Bambi played on mixes of materials and contrasts. The hashtag #PatriziaPepeMirage was a core part of the collection’s feel, an aesthetic journey contaminated by exotic boho-chic glamor that incorporated light-weight and fluid garments. It also infused an upbeat California style awash in acid colors that revisits casual workwear style. Spring/Summer 2020 accessories include the iconic Sleepy Fly bag in suede, as well as models in washed nappa leather adorned with “Fly” jewelry, which also extended into bijoux pieces and keepsake good luck charms. (c.bo)

MALÌPARMI PLANS TO DOUBLE ONLINE SALES Malìparmi unfurled its new integrated e-commerce site, which offers a personalised and seamless shopping experience. Its advanced features were developed thanks to tech partner FiloBlu. “In 2018, the brand’s online sales were in-line with the sales booked by one of our best performing offline stores, driven by growth rates between 15% and 20% over the last two years,” said Annalisa Paresi, president of Malìparmi and daughter of founder Marol Paresi. Paresi said that she hopes the online store will “double online revenues over the next three years.” The three Fs at the core of the online project stand to indicate Malìparmi’s style - Free, Familiar, Fantastic. In synthesis, the three Fs reflect the brand’s experimental spirit, its openness to the world and its easy and comfortable approach to life. It also expresses the brand’s elevated creativity, which is illustrated through its flair for colour, prints and craftsmanship. Italy is currently the main driver of online sales, while 44% of e-commerce sales are generated from international markets. “France, Spain, Germany and Austria are performing well, as they are historically digital-soriented” Paresi said. The company posted 25 million euros in turnover in 2018 and should close the year with singledigit growth, in line with indications received in the first half of 2019. The idea is to post a progressive increase in exports (Europe, as well as the USA and the Far East) but without going overboard. “We want to grow in a sustainable way, which is compatible with our production, where the handmade component is very strong.”(e.f.)


SIMON BRECKON/ ELLESSE

who had worked predominantly on industrial sport design. The shoes became instantly recognisable for their futuristic aesthetic and striking details such as logo imprinting on the outside of the shoe.

“We Enable People to Express Themselves” Ellesse Global Brand Director Simon Breckon talks about the brand repositioning strategy and new projects

How much does this segment weigh on total turnover? Footwear will represent around £50m of total sales by 2023 and is growing nicely all around the world.

How do you explain the renewed interest in Ellesse and what are you doing to ride the wave? I think our authentic heritage in tennis, ski and fitness combined with a flamboyance and distinctive approach is what new generations are relating to. We want to remain a brand that enables you to express yourself, yet underpinned with technical aspects, typical of streetwear.

Are you planning collaborations with fashion designers or others? Yes, we have a full program and have worked on this during the past year. More news to follow.

What’s new in the sneaker business, which is licensed to Nice Footwear? We have returned to our archive to build both fashion and sport styles. We brought in a bespoke design team to evolve and bring back some incredible models there that set the brand apart. The Indus model, for example, represents the desire to evolve the chunky fashion trend as well as relaunching our most famous Tanker cupsole. Produced in 1983, Tanker is perhaps the first collaboration in the history of footwear. Ellesse collaborated with Austrian designer Marc Sadler

What are your upcoming distribution projects, off and online? During the last year we have elevated our design of the heritage collection to open up top-tier distribution. We are also bringing more personality to our sports streetwear to appeal to the multibrand sports consumer and channel. We will also be launching a best top tier LS collection and program. We have overhauled our approach to footwear re-establishing the brand with archive styles launching tiered distribution to create franchises. We have also built brand experiences both in our new ecommerce platform and site and have created a global retail store concept currently being tested in Hong Kong and China.  (e.f.)

IMPROVE YOUR Garment finishing

Are you planning new brand extensions? We are actively relaunching our top tier technical product in ski, tennis and fitness as well as technical personality led sportswear.

saving ENERGY AND COSTS

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INTERVIEW FROM MILAN TO PARIS

CANADA GOOSE’S DANI REISS: “AUTHENTICITY IS KEY” Following the opening of the Canada Goose boutique on Milan’s upscale Via Spiga, the brand will open in Paris by the end of the year: a step in its international expansion. While sticking to its core DNA, the brand widens its offer also through a collab with Korean designer Juun. J BY CARLA MERCURIO

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anada Goose continues its European expansion. Following the opening of its London store on Regent Street in 2017, the brand cut the ribbon on its Milan store, on the fashion capital’s high-end Via Spiga last September. The opening coincided with the launch of an e-commerce platform for the Italian market. The Canada-based company is famous for its winter wear and will also unveil a new Paris store on rue Saint-Honoré by the end of 2019. President and CEO Dani Reiss has been at the helm of the Torontobased company since 2001. Reiss, a third-generation member of the company’s founding family, chatted with us about the key to its success. In fiscal 2019, ended on March 31, 2019, sales increased 41% to 831 million Canadian dollars, versus 591 million dollars in fiscal year 2018. And the company estimates to reach 1.4 billion dollars by 2022. “Authenticity is a very important value for us,” says Reiss. “Our loyalty to Made in Canada has led us to become the first and only internationally recognised Canadian luxury brand”. Authenticity, for Canada Goose, means having the responsibility to support the country where the brand was born, reviving endangered production processes, supporting the communities of the North of the country or fighting for the conservation of the polar bear. It also means expanding the offering while remaining faithful to the brand’s DNA. The ethos behind the brand also applies to projects and collaborations. Canada Goose unfurled a collaboration with Korean designer Juun.J on October 18. The capsule includes four iconic pieces that were shown in Paris. A highly selective distribution strategy has been planned for it, and the Milan boutique has been pinpointed as one of its key locations. After the opening in Milan you will land in Paris before the end of the year: what are your challenges in the European market? Europe - specifically Italy - was one of the 58

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first markets where our brand took off and we still have very many opportunities in this market. Opening our new store in Milan is something that I have always dreamed of, and follows the launch of our Italian online shop. We also recently launched our fall campaign called “Live in the Open,” and it features Alice Pasquini, who is an Italian street artist that exemplifies our values. Are you planning to open other stores in Europe and in other areas of the world, in addition to Milan and Paris? This year we’ll open a total of nine stores around the world. In North America, our Edmonton and Minneapolis stores have already started business and we will both open in Banff and Toronto before the end of season. Finally, the plan includes three stores in China, one of whom we already opened in Shenyang. How did you envisage the layout of the Milan store? Each of our stores marries the global Canada Goose aesthetics with custom local details. The Milan store tells the Canada Goose story in its own way, combining elements of both Canadian and Italian heritage. An exciting feature is our “Cold Room,” where

1. The new Canada Goose store in Milan. The brand is present in 49 countries and boasts an international network of 15 stores, plus selected wholesalers and e-commerce platforms 2. Dani Reiss, Canada Goose president and CEO

temperatures drop as low as -25 degrees celsius to help customers pick the right jacket. What are your product strategies? Our plan is to continue delivering functional products that work, including new innovative products from our core collection. We are excited to see such a strong response to our knitwear and Spring collections, as our fans discover new ways to incorporate Canada Goose products in different climates and for different uses. Do you plan to continue on the path of brand extension? We will always remain true to our heritage. It’s very important that any new category leads with function and purpose; just as we’ve done with our expansion into lightweight down, Knitwear, Rainwear and Windwear. What is the key to your winning strategy? Authenticity lies at the core of Canada Goose. Years ago, when other apparel manufacturers moved their businesses offshore to chase better margins, we stayed in Canada because I believed that to be an authentic brand with strong, iconic values and to make the warmest jackets for the coldest places on earth, they had to be manufactured in Canada. ■


KEN CHEN / TMALL

“We are More Than Just a Luxury Showcase” Tmall, the Chinese online B2C marketplace headed by Alibaba, brings high-end goods from all over the world to about 670 million Chinese consumers. But there is space for emerging talents, also thanks to the China Cool project

While Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba and Swiss luxury conglomerate Richemont where ready to announce the birth of their Feng Mao jointventure, beginning with the opening of a Net-a-Porter flagship within Alibaba’s Tmall Luxury Pavilion, in Europe Tmall finished its “China Cool” tour through the international capitals of fashion with an event in Paris, on September 29th. Under the spotlight, Peacebird and Eifini, two Chinese emerging labels who showcased at the French city’s Hôtel Salomon de Rothschild. In Milan, Shushu/Tong (see photo) and Yirantian made their runway debut during the fashion week at the Salone dei Tessuti venue. We chatted with Ken Chen, marketing director of Tmall Consumer Platform. What are the concrete goals of the “China Cool” project? Tmall is known as the gateway to China’s consumers for top

luxury and fashion brands around the world, but we also see ourselves as a cultural bridge to help showcase what is a very exciting moment for Chinese fashion on the global stage. Chinese design has risen dramatically over the past 5 to 10 years. What is Tmall nowadays? Tmall is the leading online B2C marketplace in China, where more than 670 million Chinese consumers shop. Think of Tmall as mall operator: we bring the traffic, consumer insights, marketing tools, payments and logistics solutions. Tmall enables the brand to fully own the storefront, the relationship with consumers and the full experience. It also has a dedicated platform for luxury and premium goods, The Luxury Pavilion, that offers brands ranging from apparel and beauty to watches and luxury cars. Chanel, Bottega Veneta, La Mer, Valentino, Burberry, Tod’s, Versace, Stella McCartney, Moschino, Maserati, Guerlain and Givenchy are among our top brands. How many brands are there on Tmall today? We have more than 190,000 international and Chinese brands on Tmall across a variety of categories, some 75% of which are the world’s most valuable consumer companies. Fashion is probably our most important category and is expanding rapidly. We continue to see strong growth on Tmall, both from brands who want to be on Tmall and consumers who are shopping on Tmall. In fact, during the last quarter we posted 44% growth in core commerce revenues. (c.me.)

w! o n r e Regist

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STORE TO WATCH

“ MILAURA’S NEW MILAN ADDRESS

THE STORE THAT EXPLORES BEYOND THE RUNWAY GETS BIGGER

When I worked at La Rinascente and at Zegna Group, I was in charge of merchandising for a single brand. Now I basically do the same job but I can freely roam across the world’s best collections.

Laura Poretti

Just four years after emerging onto Milan’s competitive shopping scene, the concept store has not only grown in square meters but also amped up its selection of brands and products that reflect its owner’s distinctive flair. BY ANDREA BIGOZZI

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n a matter of years, Laura Poretti’s shop has evolved from a tiny boutique to a flagship store packed with fashion-forward ensembles, researched accessories brands and fanciful objects. At the new location, which houses 250 labels, the pace was quick. Poretti originally opened her concept store on Milan’s Corso Garibaldi, in the heart of Brera. The new space is still on the same street but has grown significantly in size, which is a testament to her success. “The retail space has multiplied, the merchandise has grown by at least 40%, and above all, I have managed to realize a dream: to transform a small retail project into a company with a team of 10 people,” says Poretti, who worked as a purchasing manager and buyer at La Rinascente and also as general merchandiser and fashion coordinator at Zegna, for its Agnona brand. At Milaura, you can find brands from a broad array of different countries (Italy, France, China, Japan, United States, Great Britain, Belgium), famous names (for professionals) and niche emerging brands. There are also pieces designed by Laura herself. Knitwear is her specialty, 60

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in addition to leather garments and even gadgets, all bearing her signature symbol - a little doll. It is omnipresent around the store - on signs, upholstery, business cards and shopping bags. “Research remains the fundamental part of the concept store. Aside from the catwalk shows, I go to fairs, showrooms, basements in Milan, Paris, London. It’s the only way I can offer an amazing shopping experience to my customers,” she reflects. Milaura’s stock list is constantly being updated. Its best-sellers include names like Martin Grant, Coperni, Atlantique Ascoli, Studio Nicholson, Sara Battaglia, Nico Giani, Circolo 1901, Officina del Poggio, Sofie D’Hoore and Jupe by Jackie. “I select versatile pieces, which are easy to integrate and mix and match with what is in the store and what is in the customer’s wardrobe,” she adds, noting that her years working as a manager paid off because they prepared her to deal with the intricacies of working on a more international scale. The results are plain to see. Though her new space has only been open for just over a month, Poretti says she is enthusiastic about the results: “Traffic

in the store has certainly increased and September sales have more than doubled compared to a year ago. Now that we have expanded, we are able to offer a vast array of product to a very diverse public.” The new Milaura, in fact, is also mulling a new strategy that targets a younger, more contemporary consumer. ”Our target range is already very wide, but over time I would like to turn Milaura into a reference shopping destination for teenagers.” The shop, which was inaugurated on September 17th, is expected to evolve even further. The new space includes company offices on the second level and a secret VIP room for special customers, who will be able to enjoy a totally private session at the store. In addition, there are also plans for pop-up stores, a space for photo-ops, and a more technologically enhanced shop. “There are thousands of projects to develop. One day mens’ fashion could happen… or international expansion could be on the horizon, as the Milaura style would work perfectly in many foreign capitals. We already have a list: Tokyo, Shanghai, Singapore, and New York,” she conludes.  ■


GREEN AREAS FOR RELAXATION

Bernardelli: New Concept for Multibrand’s Mantua Flagship “This investment emphasizes the real-world shopping experience in an increasingly virtual world,” says the group led by Bruna Casella and her husband Stefano Gozzoli

The Bernardelli Group flagship store in the northern Italian city of Mantua has reopened after a radical restructuring. The store at Corso Umberto I number 27 was revisited by architecture firm. Inspired by the concept of “home,” the Storage Associati architects designed a hospitable place, keeping the original floor of the building and choosing polished wood and brass for the walls. The result is sober elegance, consistent with a style that has characterized the Gozzoli family for almost 50 years, while the more avant-garde offerings are displayed in a more “forward” setting. The exterior also got a new look. The Corso Umberto I arcade where the store is located ends in a small green courtyard where some of the shop windows face. This area has been set up as

a relaxation corner. The lobby of the store faces the arcade’s main courtyard, where a street mural depicting flowers designed by Nicola Falappi of Studio40 and created by Giovanni Bressana gives new life to a crumbling facade. “This investment emphasizes the real-world shopping experience in an increasingly virtual world,” reads a statement. Bernardelli now has six stores in the area, a success story for well-known buyer Bruna Casella, who manages the stores together with husband Stefano Gozzoli, who are being joined by daughter Ginevra. Although the Gozzoli family is also active online, it aims to develop personal relationships. “Along with fabrics and pins, there is time for chatting, handshakes and smiles.” (e.f)

WITH LUISAVIAROMA THE WEDDING DRESS GOES ONLINE LuisaViaRoma.com launches Bridal, the new virtual lounge where you can buy not only the dream wedding dress, but also the perfect look for your bachelorette party. The selection includes pieces from the current seasons, as well as accessories and exclusive capsule collections designed by talented new designers such as Magda Butrym and Rowen Rose. Customers will also be able to preview and pre-order the looks of the Spring Summer 2020 collections by designers such as Valentino and Giambattista Valli. Added to this is a haute couture service through which future brides will have exclusive access to haute couture ateliers around the world.

IN ROME, LEAM WOMEN’S STORE IS ALL NEW

AN EVOLVING FORMAT

Clan Upstairs: a New Area Dedicated to Philosophy and Inclusive Events Multibrand boutique Clan Upstairs has developed a factory dedicated to ideas, communication and new languages: its owner Fabio Bisogno continues to diversify the store’s offer in via Pontaccio 15 in Milan. The hottest news is the creation of an exclusive area dedicated to the starendorsed label Philosophy by Lorenzo Serafini. All new Clan Upstairs projects in this format will be conceived as moments of sharing with the final consumer. Many of these inclusive activities will revolve around a dehors and a small cafe, hidden by a green wall that will host club evenings, organized once a month, and yoga experiences, a morning group masterclass.

Leam (the historic Roman store) has recently renovated its womenswear space in Via Appia Nuova. Its surface now has 1200 square meters, spread over three floors with a minimalist 500 square meter exhibition area characterized by geometric shapes mixed with industrial materials. The redesign work was carried out by architect Marco Costanzi. In 2020 there will be other novelties, such as a footwear space for men.

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BEAUTY BUSINESS BY ANNALISA BETTI REPORT 2019

THE BEAUTY BOOM: ITALY’S COSMETICS MARKET REACHES EUR422M DOLCE&GABBANA

T

+2.2% FACE BEAUTY PRODUCTS

+1.5 % EYE MAKEUP

he Italian market is currently being targeted by foreign beauty brands, while recent economic data show that Italian beauty brands are ripe acquisition targets for foreign investors. The Beauty Report 2019 by Cosmetica Italia shows that the makeup industry is on the rise, up 2.2%. In terms of revenue, the sector generated 422 million euro in 2018. A breakdown of the industry shows that foundations and colored creams represented 54% of total annual sales. Concealers, blush and bronzers come in second place, while powders represent a mere 10%. Consumption of eye make-up is also growing: +1.5%. Demand for this sub category is valued at 370 million euro. Over 42% of the market is represented by mascara, a product that grew slightly by 0.8%, as well as

liquid and pencil eye liners which inched up 1.9%, while eye shadows grew 2.1%, with values, respectively, equal to 140 and 74 million euro. The lip category also had a positive year in 2018, rising 2.4%, being valued at 314 million euro. Lipsticks and lip glosses together spearheaded the positive trend, rising 3.4% and together, closed 2018 at 203 million euros, representing almost 65% of total sales for the entire industry. Liquid eye-liners and eye-pencils declined slightly by 1.1%. Sales channels for makeup purchases also showed interesting results: consumers preferred large chains and other channels like Italian “profumerie” when buying face make-up (44.7% against 41.2% for chains, while only 33.7% of mascaras were bought in a profumeria), which saw the sale of lipsticks fall to 32.3%. A hefty 17% of lipsticks were sold in pharmacies.  ■

NEW SPRING-SUMMER 2020 TRENDS

DIOR

MARC JACOBS

MAKE-UP: MORE IS MORE

B

old graphics for the eyes, using multicolor shading techniques, but also pure black eyeliner; highimpact lips, vinyl, matte or gothic even. Last but not least, gold, so much gold and XXL eyelashes. All of this, in short, sums up the make-up trend for spring 2020, at least according to what we saw on the catwalk. But what really won the industry over in terms of trends were the looks emerging from Marc Jacobs and designed by Pat McGrath. “We focused

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on an idealized interpretation of real life. There is a nod to the past and the future. The great thing is to take the looks that come from hence and modernize them. Moreover, in a sense, I would call it a modern approach to street style in the most complete way. A girl, a boy or a person will look the same, but everyone must also be different. Everything is about characters, being different and having fun,” Pat McGrath says. In fact, each model bore a unique appearance, appropriate to his or her personality ranging from a smokey eye to a bright detail, to that healthy glow that continues to win consumers over. In the same vein, Peter Philips, Creative and Image Director for Dior Make-up, created a natural but

sophisticated look for the Dior fashion show, which emphasized the complexion with a soft light and highlighted the look in a chic way, with a thin line of eyeliner. Dolce&Gabbana has instead presented a collection inspired by the “Sicilian Jungle” concept. The show was characterized by a timeless beauty look, able to capture the essence of femininity, underlining the icons of Mediterranean beauty, according to the label headed by Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana, where dramatic and sumptuous lines emphasise the eyes, a light and luminous base that infuses the face with a radiant and luminous effect. Finally, a palette of red and purple tones brighten the lips. ■


BY TERRY

SHISEIDO LANCÔME

NEW FOUNDATIONS

ROCK-SOLID FOUNDATION: HIGH TECH AND INCLUSIVITY

Technology is serving-up the best foundation formulas ever made. Two years ago Lancôme, with its Le Teint Particulier Custom Made Foundation, used a special machine that analyzed the epidermis to create a customized formula, choosing between 20,000 combinations. Today, a testament to that breakthrough is the performance + skincare combo, which is a potent mix of duration, pigment stability, texture and treatment effect. Aside from all of its advanced features, the line proposes an ample range of colors and tonalities. Among other innovations, Ultra Le Teint Velvet by Chanel has a “second skin” effect and a featherweight texture, for uniform and modular coverage; Shiseido Synchro Skin SelfRefreshing Collection is a blend of makeup and treatment, with a foundation in 30 shades, that remain unchanged and fresh for 24 hours; Luminous Silk Foundation by Giorgio Armani Beauty is moisturising, silky smooth and renders the skin flawlessly transparent. Finally, an easy, tone perfect option (regardless of gender) is Color X Skin, a line made by Italian company Purophi. It is a primer that boasts four foundation shades, in Adjust Tone or Tone- to lighten or darken the skin. It is all made with AIAB-certified vegan and bio formulas, with antioxidant and active ingredients that combat pollution. ■

BOBBI BROWN COSMETICS AND MUCH MORE

PRO POWER

Bobbi Brown Cosmetics, a brand that now belongs to the Estée Lauder Group, first hit Italian soil in 2000. At the time, it was not fully understood, probably due to a lack of adequate media coverage and the fact that the worldwide Web was in its early stages. Instagram and influencers were far from revolutionising the industry as we know it. Bobbi Brown, its founder, is no longer part of the company but eventually garnered widespread fame for her flair for creating camera-ready, natural looks. Several make-up artists-turned-brands followed in her footsteps: Pat McGrath, Charlotte Tilbury, Lisa Eldridge (Lancôme’s Global Creative Director), Anastasia Beverly Hills (founded by Anastasia Soare, brow addict), Huda Beauty (founded by Huda Kattan who is famous for her false eyelashes), Laura Mercier (brought to Italy by Shiseido in May), Lorac (founded by Carol Shaw) and Kat Von D, a Mexican tattoo artist who founded her eponymous brand, with ultra-performing vegan formulas, found exclusively at Sephora. Also sold at Sephora is Fenty Beauty, another indie reality, which was founded by make-up outsider Rihanna, who despite her lack of real training in the sector, has enjoyed considerable success. Fenty’s reach is, perhaps, due in large part to the fact that it caters to individuals

BOBBI BROWN

whose complexions have been long neglected by the industry. Victoria Beckham launched her beauty line this year: she claims that her products are non-toxic and cruelty-free. Expanding her brand, the former pop star and designer teamed up with former Estée Lauder executive Sarah Creal, who has also worked with Bobbi Brown. When it comes to eco-beauty, Jessica Alba is one of the first names that come to mind. Her Honest Beauty line boasts democratic prices, recognisable eco-packaging and non-toxic and effective formulas. In Italy Alba’s products are sold exclusively within cosmetic chain Douglas. L’Oréal Group launched IT Cosmetics , a line with a tech facet. The ‘IT’ stands for Innovative Technology. The brand, founded by news reporter Jamie Kern Lima, is on sale within Douglas and on QVC in Italy. ■

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

Big Data Fuels the Personalisation Process The cosmetic industry is constantly evolving with technology. Testament to all of this are product offerings and packaging types that are customised according to Big Data. Despite in-store consultations, and algorithms, the industry still falls short of meeting the needs of each customer. Numerous examples can be found in Korean and US retail markets, where interactive mirrored screens are ubiquitous and function with the support of experienced sales people. Technology can in fact identify solutions based on the individual’s skin type. The most visionforward beauty retailers are therefore updating their stores, experimenting with augmented reality and offering customized products and packaging, actively using Big Data and its ability to conjure detailed information about each customer. Beautystreams, the world authority on industry trends said that the challenge that companies face today is being able to speed-up their analysis of each customer’s needs and render the process more fluid. Recent developments in the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) have rendered certain features of personalisation that were once impossible, a reality for the wider cosmetics industry. From analysing a customer’s personal needs to realtime product manufacturing - the cosmetic applications of AI are endless and several retailers around the world have already begun to experiment with these technologies in their stores. Some core examples are the real-time tester apps and the new make-up simulators that accumulate data and immediately reprocess it into a market study, featuring an optimal level of customisation. ■

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BLUEITALY GROUP for

THE BLUEITALY GROUP EXPANDS WITH BRAND NEW BLUEPALACE A NEW AREA WHICH COMPLETES THE COMPANY’S PRODUCTION HUB IS NOW ACTIVE. INSPIRED BY AN INCREASINGLY DEEP AND INCISIVE OFFER, COMBINING TECHNOLOGY WITH SUSTAINABILITY CRITERIA COMPLIANCE

Blue as in blue economy, meaning meticulous attention to the environment, guaranteed by a closed-cycle production process. As of today, Blue also stands for Bluepalace, the recently inaugurated facility in addition to two existing ones, completing the Blueitaly group production hub, active in the sector of special finishes for textiles, leathers and plastic materials in general. Thanks to compliance with ethical and social values set forth in blue economy principles - which aim to use

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available substances, facilities and work forces by making smaller and targeted investments - sustainability has become an everyday practice. A path which the Pescara (Italy)based company, founded in 2013, is pursuing with increasing conviction. In this sense, for two seasons running it invested in the Bioproject project, a new range of zero-impact research products: a collection consisting of organic certified products, whose design is a culmination of the very finest of bio research at an in-

ternational level. This is the case, for example, for Gots-Global Organic Textile Standard certification, which distinguishes organic textile products obtained in compliance with stringent environmental and social criteria applied at all production levels, from the harvesting of natural fibres in the field to successive manufacturing steps, up to finished product labelling. Then there’s the Wastemark brand, for the recovery of technological waste and its innovative re-use.


Bluepalace: focus on the showroom and prototyping The new Bluepalace facility extends over a thousand square metres and completes the existing production hub, with a total surface area of 2,600 sqm. It is destined to welcome customers to a showroom capable of showcasing up to 3 thousand items on display. Bluepalace is also home to research and product offices, the graphics and administrative departments, along with a workshop equipped with 20 special machines, exclusively dedicated to prototype production. This new facility comes in addition to Bluelinea, the heart and soul of production,

with 30 machines, the warehouse and logistics area, and Bluelaser, where pre-production line activities take place. Here, numerical control machinery is used for laser cutting, bonding and lamination. Thanks to this important investment, which further relaunches the organisation’s strategies, focused on an ongoing dialogue between research, design and manuality, today Blueitaly counts on a production facility which makes over a million items per year, with 40 employees and a supply chain supported by over 100 contingent workers. The company’s main assets are a state-of-the-art production facility, thanks to con-

tinuous investments and research in order to acquire the most advanced technologies, and invaluable human resources, specialised to the highest degree in the development and control of various production processes. The result is a remarkable ability to fulfil all requests of customer companies, both in terms of textile design development and innovative treatments, such as thermovolume, logohook, hot and cold laser, hand and machine embroidery, needle punching, ultrasound, 3D printing, taping, hot-welding, laminating, waxing, special laundry finishes, serigraphs, digital and sublimation printing.

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www.trebarrabi.it

trebarrabi_back_to_basic

` Trebarrabi back to basic


GCDS

MIND OVER MATTER

THE NOBLEST FORM OF SIMPLICITY IS ELEGANCE, INVOLVING EVERY SINGLE ACT AND THOUGHT OF THE INDIVIDUAL. THIS THOUGHT IS REFLECTED IN COLLECTIONS WHERE THE BEAUTY OF LINES, WEARABILITY, PERFECT EXECUTION AND SHEER REFINEMENT OF MATERIALS BECOME A STYLE HANDBOOK, WITH INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO EXPRESS GRACE AND ELEGANCE IN DRESS, CONVERSATION AND INTERACTIONS WITH OTHERS, FOR EVERY OCCASION. BY ALBERTO CORRADO

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CATWALK SHOWS SPRING-SUMMER 2020

MOSCHINO

GIVENCHY

SAINT LAURENT

VIVETTA

DOLCE&GABBANA

BAD

ERMANNO SCERVINO

DAMIR DOMA

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ROMANCE

SERGIO ROSSI

ETRO

BLUMARINE


UNITED COLORS OF BENETTON

STELLA MCCARTNEY

ANDREAS KRONTHALER BY VIVIENNE WESTWOOD GUCCI

MARNI

NOW OR NEVER

TOM FORD

WOMSH

LACOSTE

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CATWALK SHOWS SPRING-SUMMER 2020

ELISABETTA FRANCHI

HERMÈS

ALBERTA FERRETTI

ICEBERG

OFF-WHITE

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COOL

CONTEST

BORSALINO

FILA

MARCO DE VINCENZO


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CATWALK SHOWS SPRING-SUMMER 2020

JUNGLE BIRDS

RICHARD QUINN

DRIES VAN NOTEN BULGARI

TOD’S

BALENCIAGA

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VERSACE

DIOR

VALENTINO


BURBERRY

ANDREW GN

FRANKIE MORELLO

ANTEPRIMA

MIU MIU

GAME

LOEWE

FENDI

HUNTING

GEDEBE

MISSONI

PETER PILOTTO

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CATWALK SHOWS SPRING-SUMMER 2020

ROYAL PASSION

CÉDRIC CHARLIER

LOUIS VUITTON

STUART WEITZMAN

PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

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SIMONE ROCHA

GIORGIO ARMANI

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN


MAX MARA

CHANEL

JIL SANDER

LOUIS VUITTON

BOTTEGA VENETA

FULL PSYCHO GABRIELE COLANGELO

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

CELINE

ORCIANI

VICTORIA BECKHAM

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CATWALK SHOWS SPRING-SUMMER 2020

AKRIS

BOSS

BALMAIN

JW ANDERSON

PRADA

VIGOROUS

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DANIELE CALCATERRA

LASHINGS

CHLOÉ

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

THE BRIDGE

EMPORIO ARMANI

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PROGETTO MILANO SHOWROOM

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CLEAN BANDITS DISSONANCE AND CONSEQUENT HARMONIES ENSUE WHERE THE PATINA OF TIME ENCOUNTERS A FLEETING PROMISE OF THE WARM SEASON. THE COLLECTIONS EXPRESS THIS CONVERGENCE THROUGH GEOMETRIC SYMMETRIES OF BOTANICAL INSPIRATION, MINGLED WITH A STRONG URBAN ENERGY. BY ALBERTO CORRADO

LORO PIANA

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WOMENSWEAR SPRING - SUMMER 2020

CIRCOLO 1901

LUISA SPAGNOLI

STREET STYLE PARIS

ROOF TOP VIEW s

The composed and simple elegance of a woman who loves to dress freely, without preconceptions, using items with couture roots, yet skilfully designed for today's reality. BARBOUR

BAGUTTA

MILA SCHÖN

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LARDINI

FABIANA FILIPPI


FLAPPER EMILIO PUCCI CRUCIANI

GENTRYPORTOFINO MALIPARMI

STREET STYLE LONDON

DOUBLE AGENT s

In an elegant exercise of cut-and-paste, with fantastical and dream-like patterns juxtaposed in a creative play of collage, garments that are unique but always different. ANTONIO CROCE

F.R.S FOR RESTLESS SLEEPERS

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WOMENSWEAR SPRING - SUMMER 2020

TREBARRABI BRUNELLO CUCINELLI

STREET STYLE PARIS

BLINDING SHINE s

ALPHA STUDIO

ARTHUR ARBESSER

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Transcending casual, in items created from formal and classical, sartorial and urban fusions, expressed in the original language of materials and superlative comfort.

TONET CARELLA

BEATRICE B

STREET BY OBLIQUE


JERSEY LOMELLINA for

TRENDSETTING GREEN JERSEY LOMELLINA CONTINUES TO OPERATE IN FAVOUR OF THE ENVIRONMENT WITH THE RENEW FAMILY, A RANGE OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE FASHION FABRICS MADE OF ECONYL速, A 100% REGENERATED NYLON YARN DERIVED FROM WASTE. THE VERY LATEST INCLUDE RENEW FOLK, RENEW WAVE AND RENEW TECHNO Sustainability is not a fad. Nor is it a marketing gimmick. For Jersey Lomellina, a prominent specialist of circular knitted fabrics, it is a concrete and verifiable process for the protection of the sea and environment which first started a few years ago with the launch of the Renew collections made of Econyl速. A 100% regenerated nylon yarn from industrial plastic components, recovered through a complex physical-chemical process, are all turned into latest generation, functional and glamorous fabrics, suitable for beachwear, activewear and outdoorwear. Because tackling the complex issue of the environment is an emergency: institutional sources like Fao and Unep

speak of 8 million tons of waste ending up in the sea every year and 640 thousand tons of fishing nets abandoned in the oceans. The time is ripe for Renew, responsible fabrics available in three new cool variants: Renew Folk, Renew Wave and Renew Techno. The first bielastic, soft and anti UV Econyl速 polyamide fabric is characterised by a functional and elegant, flat, shiny, ribbed structure, designed for sunny and vibrant beachwear but also suitable for a total look, used alone or matched with smooth-textured fabrics like Renew Shine, recommended in particular for drapery construction. The other new entry, Wave, also contains Econyl速 and presents a textured, full-bodied

www.jerseylomellina.com

and vaguely three-dimensional surface which creates intriguing light and shadow effects, for youthful fashionista beachwear. In addition to these polyamide-based fabrics, Renew Techno is the first polyester version of the dynasty, made of Ecoantex yarn obtained from the processing of post-industrial and post-consumer waste, such as plastic bottles and film, perfect for the active world. Along with the aforementioned versions, the Renew range also includes Cult (champion against pilling and abrasions), Fine (the ultra-soft second skin), Prime (compact sporty, for perfect muscular compression), Style (breathable and fast-drying) and Style Peach (with a velvety hand).


WOMENSWEAR SPRING - SUMMER 2020

CHIARA BONI LA PETITE ROBE ACT N 1

SHE'S SO

THE ATTICO CRISTINA EFFE

STREET STYLE MILANO

MET SET s

HERNO

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Daywear is interpreted with extravagant flair, blending hedonism and femininity and uncovering a part of the body, making it clear that women dress themselves with the same dedication as when they undress. CIVIDINI


ph. Suffo Moncloa

LORENA ANTONIAZZI

BLAZE ph. Suffo Moncloa

STREET STYLE LONDON

PERFECT TWEAK s

PESERICO

MADAME BERWICH

A wardrobe with a dual soul, where the concepts of size and colour are re-elaborated by means of intense colour studies, for garments characterised by lightness and functionality.

TAGLIATORE 0205

POMANDERE

MALO

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XACUS

MARELLA ROSATI

KOCCA

PLAN C

TELA

STREET STYLE PARIS

GARDEN STATE s

Images and suggestions of the summer pass through a pleasantly surreal filter, inspiring imaginative dresses, prints and silhouettes. MELAMPO

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SOLOTRE


ASPESI

SSHEENA

STREET STYLE LONDON

LUSH RADIANCE s

MARC CAIN

FORTE FORTE

The sheer freshness of a marine vibe is palpable in collections featuring a sophisticated and seductive mix. Drop shoulders and a vintage feel for proposals that are perfect for all occasions in a woman's life.

WOOLRICH

FISICO

VIA MASINI 80

LIU JO

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Our road to Zero

Beyond being green, we are proud to be transparent. See our MRSL DETOX

www.lampo.eu


One Planet

GOODMATCH

THE COLLECTIONS ON DISPLAY AT THE WHITE TRADE SHOW ALL HAVE THE THREAD OF SUSTAINABILITY IN COMMON. WITNESS THEIR FRESH YET NOSTALGIC STATEMENTS FOR A BETTER FUTURE. BY ALBERTO CORRADO

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SPRING-SUMMER 2020 @ WHITE

COMING OF AGE

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NEXT SUMMER WILL ENCOURAGE GLIMPSES INTO THE PAST, REIVENTING ITALY’S MOST ANCIENT CRAFT WITH SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS

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1 Essentiel Antwerp: Chequered jacket with large lapels, iconic t-shirt, flounced skirt with feather applications, cross body mini-bag with maxi zip. 2 Exquisite J: Shopping bag and straw hat with garment dyed scarf. 3 Violanti: Lightweight fabric trench coat for the leading waterproof and sportswear company. 4 Ermanno Gallamini: Jacket cape with exclusive fabric applications, exuding absolute prestige. 5 Eremo: Snail shell bag made of vegetable tanned leather. 6 Knit Knit: Top made of refined yarn in lime green tonalities. 7 Alpha Studio Maxi striped trouser suit. 8 RRD: Hooded parka, with hidden button fastening visible on collar.

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SPRING-SUMMER 2020 @ WHITE

ALTERNATIVE CLASS

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1 Munè: Vintage masculine workwear style feminine shirt with a clear cut, well-defined volume, a creation by the Japanese designer Munenori Uemuro. 2 Marella art 365: Sweater made of doubled cotton fabric, with embroidered crystal logo. 3 Goose Tech Down jacket with inner padding, designed by Martina Campanella. 4 Iorane: Linen and Sangallo lace cropped top. 5 Tpn e Tpn X Lotto: Minidress shirt with flower print and wide band around the waist. 6 Paltò: Double-breasted denim jacket with large full-view pockets. 7 Alexander Smith: Round-toed leather and technical fabric sneakers, leather inner and rubber sole. 8 Estabanot: Yellow colour raw-cut picnic basket, made of high quality bovine hide.

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SPRING-SUMMER 2020 @ WHITE

AMAZING GRACE

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A KNOWING FEMININITY THAT CONCEALS ITS ELEGANCE IN AN ODE TO THE PERSONALITY OF A WOMAN.

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1 Cunnigton & Sanderson: The independent English brand proposes a sartorial chequered dress with contrast fabric sleeves and flounce enriched with bow applications. 2 Falorni Italia Le Borse: Bucket bag with hand woven finishing. 3 Edward Achour Paris: Jacket with silk ribbons and frayed edges over silk shirt. 4 Lu Ren Cashmere: Cashmere top featuring argyle print. 5 Fabio Rusconi: Snakeskin print leather clogs with geometric heel and inner leather. 6 Frida Zazou: robe-manteau in light fabric and belt around the waist. 7 Ferruccio Vecchi Studio: Parisian model camisole made of woven straw with 12 centimetre brim and gros grain ribbon. 8 Paloma Barcelò: Sandals with woven rope wedge.

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SPRING-SUMMER 2020 @ SUPER & THEONEMILANO

BY CARLA MERCURIO AND ANGELA TOVAZZI

A BOHEMIAN SARTORIAL TOUCH AT MILAN RTW SHOWS

Milan’s Spring Summer 2020 fashion week was brimming with uptown brands and new talent. Trade shows Super and TheOneMilano were no exception and collections catered to a modern woman, who is not willing to sacrifice her freedom. Whether she is in the city or at the beach, there is always time to experiment with colors and silhouettes. This was reflected in overall trends that were built around two main themes: bohemian-folk and sharp sartorial looks. Quality elements like natural textiles and artisan craftsmanship took centre stage

EMPATHIA @ THEONE

A brand for men and women that fuses oriental culture with a modern urban vibe. An unconventional collection with savvy silhouettes and volume.

GIORGIANDREAZZA @ THEONE

CABAN ROMANTIC @ SUPER

The artisanally created coats of the brand combine leather webbing with delicate layers of tulle or lace.

A student at Naba Milano, the designer who hails from Bassano del Grappa (Veneto) founded a brand dedicated to gender fluid styles and the subculture of the 1990s.

CORA BELLOTTO @ THEONE

Linen, silk, as well as nettle and hemp fabrics were woven into the Milanese designer’s Spring-Summer proposals that incorporates an ethical spirit with a strong aesthetic.

DELFINA @ SUPER

A beachwear brand designed by Delfina Marsaglia and made exclusively in small artisanal workshops.

VIVETTA @ SUPER

A footwear debut After establishing herself in the ready-to-wear arena, the designer, famous for her whimsical, fairytale styles, is expanding her reach with a line of contemporary shoes, produced by Be71, a company situated on Italy’s Brenta riverside and distributed by Massimo Bonini Showroom.

CIRCOLO 1901 @ SUPER

“Proud People in Easy Jackets” is the slogan of the Puglia-based company.

SHAFT JEANS @ SUPER

A Made in Italy denim company that has a laid back vintage vibe and incorporates researched materials into its designs, as well as traditional accents like crochet.

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MICHELE CHIOCCIOLINI @ THEONE

Geometric shapes, fringe effects, straw and raffia are just a few of the elements that characterise this brand envisaged by an architect turned designer, who works with his sister in a Florentine atelier.

DOTZ @ THEONE

An eco-friendly shoe brand from Portugal that incorporates precious raw materials with ethical production practices.


school courses start in 7th november

2019

info@deniminstitutemilano.com


La Fiera Internazionale per la Moda : Tessuti, Merceria, Accessori 10 - 13 Febbraio 2020 the fairyland for fashion Paris le Bourget, Francia www.texworld-paris.com


PHILIPP PLEIN

KILL THEM WITH

KINDNESS

NEW TRENDS ALIGN WITH SUMMER, HONING IN ON INCREASINGLY CUSTOMISED DRESSES CREATED TO RESPECT AND ENHANCE THE BODY, WITH SPECIAL CONSIDERATION FOR THE ENVIRONMENT. AN ODE TO COURTEOUSNESS WHICH IS BACK IN FASHION, WITH THE REDISCOVERY OF A PLAYFUL MOOD, INSPIRING WOMEN TO UNDERTAKE A PLAYFUL JOURNEY, TO DISCOVER THE BEST VERSION OF THEMSELVES. BY ALBERTO CORRADO

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UPSTATE VIBES 1 YUNA YANG 2 VERONICA BEARD 3 TOMO KOIZUMI

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CELTIC MISTS 1 CAROLINE HU 2 TEMPERLEY 3 HOUSE OF HOLLAND

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BITTER RICE 1 MARINA RINALDI 2 PACIOTTI 3 GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI 4 BARRIE 5 ALANUI 6 WOOLRICH 7 SARA BATTAGLIA

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RETAIL IN ASIA CONFERENCE 2019

KNOWING UNDERSTANDING AND TAKING OVER ASIA ORGANISERS

PANELISTS

12th November Milan AN EVENT FOR RETAILERS THAT ARE CONSIDERING DEVELOPING THEIR PRESENCE IN ASIA

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Antonio Civita Panino Giusto Italy

Nick Bradstreet Savills Hong Kong

Francesco Poggesi Visconti Italy

Jason Ahn Creative Lab Korea

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A HINT OF GLAMOUR

Summer is a creative laboratory for expressing daring experimentations and meandering through blocks of colour. Substance and thought entwine, bringing to life bags and shoes characterized by a contemporary and original allure. BY ALBERTO CORRADO

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MIA BAG U. S. POLO CLERGERIE DE MARQUET

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ACCESSORIES SPRING - SUMMER 2020

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STAR

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1910 BORBONESE VALEXTRA L’AUTRECHOSE PAOLA BONACINA

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ACCESSORIES SPRING - SUMMER 2020

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BOARDING

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PASS

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ZANELLATO FURLA CALICANTO QUEENBEE

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AGL ATTILIO GIUSTI LEOMBRUN RENÉ CAOVILLA TOSCA BLU FIORENTINI+BAKER

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SPRING-SUMMER 2020 @ HOMI

BY ELISABETTA FABBRI

WHEN ACCESSORIES MAKE THE DIFFERENCE

4CROSSES

Paris-based Sophie Vallois Gouard’s timeless pieces are available in 24K gold and semi-precious stones.

There was no shortage of hot trends at Homi Fashion & Jewels, the showcase launched in September by the organisers of Italy’s lifestyle fair Homi. The goal was to highlight the viability of an increasingly dynamic sector which now deserves to be more than just a “satellite” of Milan’s fair. Concept stores, jewelry boutiques, perfumeries and interior design shops are perfect retail spaces for the show’s multi-faceted accessories. Sustainable collections, as well as mens jewels, are major trends JIMMY CHRISTAL NEW YORK

COSMO PETRONE

Cat frames encrusted with Swarovski crystals are thought to illuminate the face.

The shoulder strap bag can be customized with a jewel-clasp that can be removed and/or worn by itself. Sandals are coming soon.

BOKS & BAUM

DAFDESIGN

The French jewellery brand makes couture accessories handmade with the crochet technique.

Country-retro bags created by Fernando Pezzuto are an expression of Apulian craftsmanship.

CAREBAG

Good deeds for nature The CareBag, crafted in natural and sustainable raw materials, can be purchased with a kit that allows them to be assembled and personalised. Invented by Perugina Care, CareBag employs people in need and plants a tree for each bag sold.

PRISCA BROWN

Eco-friendly cork bags A textile and urban design graduate, Priscia Brown launched her line of cork accessories and bags in Lugano, where she develops the collection in a studio she co-manages with a graphic designer and an illustrator.

NELSON

The male jewellery specialist presents macro chain link bracelets handmade in silver and bronze.

LA TILDE The Piedmont-based Garello sisters are

passionate about vintage and up-cycle the dials of old landline telephones.

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HOMO Inspired by his ”physical and spiritual” travels, Francesco Massari works with raw natural materials for his bijoux creations.


PORTRAITS

GABRIELE MAGGIO

A LUXURY VETERAN SWITCHING GEARS AT STELLA MCCARTNEY Gabriele Maggio, an Italian manager with a vast amount of experience in the luxury goods sector, has taken the helm of the ethical luxury label as it begins a new chapter with the LVMH Group. Maggio, formerly general manager of Moschino, is convinced that to succeed in today’s market a brand needs to be less self-referential and instead have an eagle’s eye on what is happening in the rest of the luxury world BY ALESSANDRA BIGOTTA

B

ritish designer Stella McCartney recently altered the trajectory of her brand when she bought back 50% of her company from the Kering Group, breaking off a relationship that had lasted 17 years. Earlier this year it was announced that LVMH took a minority stake in the brand and that the designer would take the role of special sustainability adviser to LVMH Chairman and CEO Bernard Arnault. Stella has always been at the forefront of research and development in sustainable fashion, an ever-more important buzzword but, above all, a rooted choice for her. Analyst Melania Grippo of Exane BNP Paribas values her brand at around 280 to 300 million euro. Recently Stella McCartney parted ways with Frederick Lukoff, who was responsible for building the brand’s sustainable image, and who served as president and CEO of the brand for over a decade. While Lukoff has taken the helm at the Amsterdam-based Scotch & Soda retail brand, ex-Moschino CEO Gabriele Maggio is being appointed as Stella McCartney’s new CEO. The Tuscan manager started his career as export area manager of Armani Collezioni, in the 2000s, around the same time as McCartney debuted with her label. Maggio later moved on and held various positions at Gucci and Bottega Veneta, where he was CEO for Greater China and South

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East Asia. He was most recently general manager of Moschino, Aeffe Group's core brand, with revenues of almost 72 million euro in the first quarter of 2019, up 11% over the same period last year. Whilst working alongside Massimo Ferretti, owner of Aeffe, and designer Jeremy Scott, Maggio made use of his deep knowledge of China to drive the brand’s business in the country, while pushing its omnichannel growth. “Today luxury has no choice but to come down from its ‘ivory tower’. Creatives have to listen to the market with a sense of humility. The creative process needs to start from social and cultural evolutions. No one is in absolute need of a bag or a coat. We need to ignite desire through storytelling, the season-less nature of a product, through digital media and the ability to anticipate trends,” he stated during the CEO Roundtable, organized by this magazine last November. At Stella McCartney, Gabriele Maggio may have his work cut out for him. The brand, which is sustainable but not “new,” will have to impact younger generations and, above all, become the gold standard for LVMH’s ambitious projects from now until 2025 - from traceability to animal welfare, from renewable energy to reducing the group’s carbon footprint, which has already fallen 16% between 2013 and 2018. ■

• Gabriele Maggio is a luxury sector veteran. Between 2002 and 2003, he served as export area manager with Armani Collezioni. • At the end of 2003, he joined Gucci, where he remained for almost six years, as worldwide men's ready-to-wear merchandise director. • Between September 2009 and May 2016 he served as Bottega Veneta's CEO for Greater China and South East Asia and corporate strategic alliances director. • From 2016 to 2019, he worked at the Aeffe Group, where he was general manager of the Moschino brand. • On 21 October 2019, Gabriele Maggio will become the CEO of Stella McCartney.


CAREERS BY ANDREA BIGOZZI

Moschino Taps Stefano Secchi as its New GM In the wake of Gabriele Maggio’s move to Stella McCartney, where he will take over as chief executive, Moschino, the brand known for its jovial, exaggerated designs, has tapped 42-year-old Stefano Secchi. The manager was previously in charge of sales for Etro. The executive started his career in 2005 withGiorgio Armani, where he held a variety of positions, culminating in his appointment as strategic marketing manager in 2011. In 2015, he was tapped as global wholesale director for Versace, a position he held for three years. “We are satisfied with the entry of Stefano Secchi in Moschino and we salute an expertise that will drive our next phase of growth, in line with the strong, distinctive identity of the brand. We are confident that he will seize new commercial development opportunities and will successfully face the challenges of an increasingly globalised market”, says Massimo Ferretti, executive president of Aeffe and president of Moschino’s board of directors. Secchi says he is “enthusiastic” about the opportunity and eager to make his contribution to the next phase of international expansion of Moschino.

Serge Carreira To Promote France’s Emerging Designers

Giuseppe Zanotti Appoints Eugenio Manghi

The Fédération de la haute couture et de la mode (Fhcm) confirms its commitment to fresh design talent. The French body has entrusted Serge Carreira, who was the head of Mary Katrantzou’s eponymous brand until last June, with the responsibility of organising initiatives dedicated to upcoming designers. As director of the Emerging Brands Initiative, Carreira will be supported by Christelle Cagi-Nicolau, who headed up France’s fashion association and who has worked for Le Bon Marché, Kenzo, Lancel and Delpozo. CagiNicolau will focus on collection development.

Giuseppe Zanotti has chosen Eugenio Manghi as the new company’s new CEO. The manager takes the place of Nicola Brandolese, who left to take on a role at Yoox Net-a-Porter-Ynap Group. Manghi, 51, has over 20 years of experience in the fashion world. He recently served as CEO for Elisabetta Franchi and has previously held the same position for Marella, part of the Max Mara group. “I am happy to be part of Giuseppe Zanotti’s team, an entrepreneur who, with vision, has succeeded in establishing himself in the luxury footwear market. I am convinced that the brand holds all the cards to grow and face the challenges of today’s world,” Manghi says.

SIMONA CLEMENZA JOINS ASPESI Aspesi has appointed Simona Clemenza as its new managing director. The manager, who recently served as Krizia’s ceo, also held roles with Kenzo and Karl Lagerfeld. Clemenza takes the place of Fabio Gnocchi, who left in June. “After a long search, we are very happy to welcome someone with the calibre and profile Simona has,” says Francesco Chiappetta, chairman of Aspesi’s board, who also represents Armònia, the fund behind the brand’s acquisition from founder Alberto Aspesi in 2017. “We are sure she will be be in line with our expectations of visibility and growth that the brand deserves,” added Chiappetta. The Aspesi brand operates 10 mono brand stores including a Milan flagship inaugurated last January and a wholesale network of around 600 retailers worldwide.

KERING NAMES KALPANA BAGAMANE DENZEL CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER Diversity and inclusion are a top priority for major players in the fashion industry. This is demonstrated by the human resource choices recently adopted by large luxury groups like Prada, Gucci, Chanel and Burberry, which have all introduced the role of chief diversity officer into their top management ranks. Kalpana Bagamane Denzel, Kering’s new chief diversity, inclusion and talent officer will work in collaboration with Kering’s galaxy of brands, with the main task of prioritising initiatives that encourage diversity.

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Q&A

BY ANGELA TOVAZZI

DESIGNER

SIMONA MARZIALI

“I WANT TO GROW WITHOUT LOSING MY IDENTITY” Her MRZ brand debuted on the catwalk of Milano Moda Donna, along the likes of Prada and Armani. It was a dream come true for the designer, who unfurled an ethnic-urban collection, where knitwear played a leading role Was becoming a designer a natural choice? For me, the family business was an extension of the home, a playground full of fascinating machines, threads, colored fabrics and scraps of yarns. It was really impossible not to follow in my family’s footsteps. Growing up in this environment was probably what influenced my choice to become a designer, even though my professional growth took place outside the family context. You founded MRZ after working for companies like Gilmar and Diesel for 12 years. How did you decided to embark on a solo career? Working in the creative office of large companies where, right from the start, I had many responsibilities, turned out to be great training for me. I realized that creativity is necessary but it’s not the only thing you need to succeed. You also have to have the right attitude and prepare yourself for the inevitable difficulties in a competitive world like fashion. Building on this awareness, I was able to take on a new challenge, which was: launching my brand. What experience made a change in your career? Definitely the day I won Who Is On Next? 2018 Award. For me it was really the recognition of my work, commitment and passion. It was also a unique opportunity to gain visibility in front of the press and industry professionals. After that, it was really full-steam ahead. I started working on a slew of collaborations with big fashion companies. I had a real desire to succeed, and despite the challenges I faced, I finally managed to debut on the Milan catwalk. Who do you have to thank the most? First of all my family for supporting me along

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this path and all those who in recent years have believed in me. I’d also like to thank Italy’s fashion chamber Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana for making my dream come true and helping me propel my collection into the same arena as giants like Prada, Gucci and Max Mara. So much hard work and commitment goes into just a few minutes. Emotions were running high. I won’t ever forget it. What celebrities would you like to dress? Two in particular: British actress Lucy Boynton and the Swedish actress and film producer Alicia Vikander. Both are modern and they both embody the feminine character and attitude of today. What sort of woman is your inspiration? The woman I design for is basically my selfportrait. I am very curious and always on a quest for something new, which is why I am always attentive to every creative outlet: music, art, cinema... I love color, details and quality and use all these languages to ​​ better define my aesthetic project. You are very attentive to sustainability: how are you implementing these ideals into your collections? Fortunately, ethical creativity is a radical new reality. For my part, when I choose yarns and fabrics I always pay attention to quality. I prefer noble and natural fibers because it is important that a garment is beautiful, but it is also important that it is comfortable and feels good on and healthy for the skin. What is your dream for your brand? For it to grow slowly, but in a stable way, without losing its identity and the quality that distinguishes it.  ■

Il magazine di news, business e trend

Direttore Responsabile e Amministratore Delegato Marc Sondermann (m.sondermann@fashionmagazine.it) Caposervizio Alessandra Bigotta (a.bigotta@fashionmagazine.it) Redazione Andrea Bigozzi (a.bigozzi@fashionmagazine.it) Elisabetta Fabbri (e.fabbri@fashionmagazine.it) Carla Mercurio (c.mercurio@fashionmagazine.it) Angela Tovazzi (a.tovazzi@fashionmagazine.it) Realizzazione grafica Nadia Blasevich (n.blasevich@fashionmagazine.it) Carlo Maraschi (c.maraschi@fashionmagazine.it) English Language Editor Sofia Celeste Fashion Editor Alberto Corrado (a.corrado@fashionmagazine.it) Collaboratori Mariella Barnaba, Annalisa Betti, Cristiana Bonzi, Jennifer Clark, Venera Elisa Fichera Pubblicità e promozione Barbara Sertorini (b.sertorini@fashionmagazine.it) Laura Pianazza (l.pianazza@fashionmagazine.it) Senior Digital Advisor Stefania Navaretti (s.navaretti@fashionmagazine.it) Special Projects Matteo Ferrante Veneziani (m.veneziani@fashionmagazine.it) Assistente di direzione Valentina Capra (v.capra@fashionmagazine.it) Amministrazione Cristina Damiano (c.damiano@fashionmagazine.it) Edizioni Ecomarket Spa Redazione, Amministrazione, Pubblicità: piazza Pio XI 1, 20123 Milano telefono: 02 80620-1 telefax: 02 80620-444 (redazione) - 02 80620-333 (pubblicità e abbonamenti) Edizioni Ecomarket Spa Fashion - Il magazine di news, business e trend Registrazione presso il Tribunale di Milano n. 389 del 6-11-1970 Iscrizione n. 1418 al ROC Registro Operatori della Comunicazione È vietata la riproduzione anche parziale Articoli, disegni e fotografie, anche se non pubblicati, non verranno restituiti © Fashion 2019 Edizioni Ecomarket - Milano Abbonamento annuale 199,00 e (quindicinale) - c/c postale n. 16879207 È possibile richiedere gratuitamente la rettifica o la cancellazione scrivendo a: Edizioni Ecomarket Spa - servizio abbonamenti - piazza Pio XI 1 - 20123 Milano Numeri Arretrati: 16,00 e cad L’editore garantisce che i dati forniti dai sottoscrittori degli abbonamenti vengono utilizzati esclusivamente per l’invio della pubblicazione come quelli relativi agli invii in omaggio non vengono ceduti a terzi per alcun motivo. Garanzia di riservatezza per gli abbonati in ottemperanza al D. Lgs. n.196/2003 (tutela dati personali) Stampa: Vela Web Srl - Via Copernico 8 - 20082 Binasco (Mi) MDM Milano Distribuzione Media Srl Fashion fa parte del Gruppo DFV Verlagsgruppe Deutscher Fachverlag www.dfv.de Le altre testate moda del gruppo sono: TextilWirtschaft, Frankfurt; TextilJurnal, Praha; Sportswear International, Frankfurt; ÖTZ Österreichische Textil Zeitung, Wien; DivatMarketing, Budapest; Images Business of Fashion, New Delhi.


S E E K I S E D G Y, S T R O N G A N D U N P O L I S H E D . O N C E A G A I N , I T ‘ S A B O U T C O N T E M P O R A RY S TAT E M E N T D E S I G N S , N E W C L A S S I C S , DENIM AND SPORTSWEAR. SEEK IS THE FU N E VEN T FO R T H E FA S H I ON C OMMUNITY T H AT K N O W S W H E R E I T ‘ S G O I N G , PROMOTES SALES AND UNITES THE P R E S E N T A N D F U T U R E G E N E R AT I O N S O F DECISION-MAKERS. SEEK IS UNCONVENT I O N A L A N D D E F I N I T E LY N O T B O R I N G .

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& ARE PLEASED TO INVITE YOU TO THE

CEO ROUNDTABLE ON COMMERCE INNOVATION VIEW FROM THE TOP HOW DIGITAL STRENGTH IMPACTS ON CORPORATE VALUE CEO PANEL – ECOMMERCE IS KEY WHAT REALLY DRIVES GROWTH   ENTREPRENEUR SPOTLIGHT E-PRICING IS EVERYTHING   CEO PANEL – LEADING IN OMNICHANNEL TIMES REINVENTING THE DIGITAL CORPORATION   ANDREAS SCHMEIDLER AWARD FOR DIGITAL VIRALITY YOUNG CREATIVE LEADER OF TOMORROW   CEO PANEL – AUTHENTICITY WINS GETTING AHEAD OF THE SUSTAINABILITY GAME   SPECIAL AFTERNOON SESSION BEST ECOMMERCE PRACTICES IN A NUTSHELL

NOVEMBER 7, 2019, 9 AM - 4 PM PALAZZO PARIGI, CORSO DI PORTA NUOVA 1, MILAN


PEOPLE CARA KENNEDY CUOMO

“I STRIVE TO MAKE THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE" Cara Kennedy Cuomo is an activist in the field of eco-sustainability and social responsibility, two aspects strongly linked to her work. Recently named Ambassador to the “Measuring for a Sustainable Future" initiative by Chiara Boni La Petite Robe, the 24-year-old granddaughter of Robert Francis Kennedy and Mario Cuomo chats about her approach to fashion and how she incorporates ecoresponsible habits into daily life BY CARLA MERCURIO

What does sustainability mean to you personally? How do you associate it with fashion? To me, sustainability means making everyday choices and encouraging the reform of our social, economic, and political systems to be inclusive of every member of society while protecting our natural environments and keeping global average temperature increases to well below 1.5 degrees Celsius. To me, sustainability in the field of fashion means supporting brands and entrepreneurs looking to fundamentally change the way clothing is made, the fabrics that are used, and how clothing items are consumed and reused. That is what made me so enthusiastic to work with Chiara Boni on La Petite Robe, the first Italian women’s clothing brand to receive the Product Environmental Footprint European certification (PEF). What is your attitude towards fashion today? I look for fashion brands that pride themselves on their low water use or carbon footprint, or were made by a marginalised social group in fair working conditions, or are transparent about their social and environmental standards. Chiara Boni La Petite Robe is great on this front, teaming up with Eurojersey, an Italian textile company, that last April received the PEF Certification by the competent authority. The 8 PEF certified pieces of Chiara Boni La Petite Robe

are sustainably sourced. Additionally, I look for pieces I know I will be able to keep and reuse many times over. Overall, I look for clothing that inspires confidence. How do you live your day-by-day life, whilst respecting the environment and human rights? Making purchasing decisions based on the environmental sustainability of the items you are consuming and being vocal about this can help incentivise industries into using more eco-friendly practices. We can also influence a lot in our work. Personally, I am happy to have structured my work thus far in life around both environmental sustainability and socioeconomic issues, working first on the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in a network of think-tanks under the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network and then through SDG investing. As an Associate at 17 Asset Management, a company which invests in SDGs, while achieving market returns, is it possible to reconcile profitability with sustainability? Historically, economic growth has been inextricably tied to environmental degradation. The path forward is to now reject that paradigm, and forge new systems that couple economic growth with environmental sustainability. At 17 Asset Management, we use the framework of SDGs to find areas

of market opportunity in which there is a legitimate need to be filled. Your mother, Kerry Kennedy, is a human rights activist and the president of the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights advocacy organization. How important was she for your education? She has a tremendous influence in my life. Even from a young age, I remember her telling us bedtime stories about human rights heroes, and wanting to grow up to be like Wangari Maathai or Archbishop Desmond Tutu or Kailash Satyarthi. You are a granddaughter of Bob Kennedy and of Mario Cuomo: what does being part of an important family like yours mean to you? Being a member of the Kennedy and Cuomo families has been an absolute blessing in my life, mainly because both have emphasised the power an individual has to advocate for and to create a more just and peaceful world. Being part of both of these families also means being part of an incredibly loving and supportive community. I was taught that thinking matters, and to be thoughtful; that my opinion matters, and to be assertive when I thought something was right or wrong, and openminded enough to learn from others. And to always be thinking about how to make the world a better place. ■

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RED CARPET

BY CARLA MERCURIO

MILAN TOASTS GRAPE HARVEST

HERE’S TO TEN MORE YEARS!

A view of Milan’s Quadrilateral luxury shopping area, on the evening of Vendemmia

Guglielmo Miani, Silvia Damiani and Giorgio Damiani

Arianna Alessi and Renzo Rosso

SPECIAL GUEST J.LO

Streets packed with traffic, and pedestrians crowding the streets. The 10th anniversary of Vendemmia, an event celebrating the 2019 grape harvest, attracted a multitude of people to Milan’s Quadrilateral luxury shopping area. This toast to the union between fashion and wine was organized by MonteNapoleone District, with 106 stores throwing their doors open, where owners and managers of Italy’s most important fashion brands welcomed several VIPs. It was an opportunity to taste wines from Italy’s top wineries, but also to admire clothes, shoes and accessories and even shop in the evening. Restaurants and five-star hotels in the city center got involved too, creating a network of tastings, initiatives and special offerings. Between sipping a glass of bubbly, a Merlot or Cabernet, Vendemmia was also a time to reflect on the evolution of retail thanks to a conference organised by La Martina at its Corso Venezia temporary store, a new format based on experientiality. “Retail 4.0” co-author Giuseppe Stigliano discussed trends in retail with brand CEO Enrico Roselli.

Natasha Stefanenko and Manuela Bortolameolli

Enrico Roselli and Giuseppe Stigliano

Davide Profeti, Mirna Zanotti and Daria Triolo

FERRAGAMO REOPENS ITS ROME BOUTIQUE

MALUMA SINGS IN DSQUARED2

STYLE, BUT ALSO SUSTAINABILITY

During the New York leg of his world tour, Maluma surprised the audience by pulling Jennifer Lopez on stage for a surprise appearance. To Maluma, who chose Dsquared2 for the tour, Dean and Dan Caten dedicated an after-show happening at the well-known club Up & Down in the Big Apple.

Ferragamo pulled off a star-studded re-opening of its men’s boutique in Rome, on Via Condotti 65, where a riveting kaleidoscopic digital work by the artist James Dawe transfixed the VIP guests. The store has reaffirmed the label’s commitment to sustainability: like many other flagships of the brand, it will receive LEED certification for energy and water efficiency, choice of materials, project site management, innovation and environmental quality.

Model Frida Aasen

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Maluma and Jennifer Lopez

Dean and Dan hug Maluma, together with Winnie Harlow and Vincent Cruz

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Superchef Joe Bastianich

Claudia Gerini and Micaela le Divelec Lemmi

Margareth Madè and Ferruccio Ferragamo

Valeria Golino and James Ferragamo

Francesco Scianna and Adriano Giannini

Filippo Nigro among the special guest


Profile for Fashionmagazine

FASHION N 10 2019  

FASHION N 10 2019