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NOVEMBER 2019

‘Excitement For Welding’ State-of-the-art lab opens at Corcoran

Club teaches students about bicycle mechanics Lights on the Lake: Tips for families A tale of two Thanksgivings

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FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2019

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EDUCATOR OF THE MONTH

8

LIGHTS ON THE LAKE

10

Planning to attend the event? Check out these tips for families.

THANKSGIVING CRAFT

12

Show what you’re thankful for with a collaborative garland

BECAUSE I SAID SO

14

Balancing conflicting Thanksgiving plans can be tricky.

CLUB OF THE MONTH

18

Bicycle Mechanics Club brings old bicycles back to life.

FEATURE

20

State-of-the-art welding lab opens at Corcoran High School.

SALT AWARDS Nominees announced for annual event.

Lights on the Lake opens for vehicles NOV. 14 4

FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2019

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CONTENTS

6

NOVEMBER 2019

EDITOR’S NOTE

31

LEARN

32

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FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2019

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FROM  THE

EDITOR

November is here, which means Thanksgiving is right around the corner. On page 14, Neil Davis writes about a dilemma we’ve all faced at some point in our lives; having conflicting Turkey Day plans. Thanksgiving is also a chance to give thanks. One way you can do this is by creating a collaborative gratitude garland with your friends and family. Natalie Davis shows you how on page 12. November also marks the opening of Lights on the Lake. On page 10, we give some tips for families planning to head to Onondaga Lake Park, as the event celebrates its 30th year.  Also in this issue: A club at Manlius Pebble Hill School is bringing old bicycles back to life (page 18), and I pay a visit the new state-of-the-art welding lab at Corcoran High School (page 20).   As the year winds down, Family Times will undergo a few changes, beginning with the November issue. Educators of all kinds play a huge role in children’s lives, so each month we will feature a local educator (our first Q&A can be found on page 8). In our next issue, we will also debut a column that talks about ways that women can treat themselves, as well as a Question of the Month. More on those two things in December. As always, feel free to send me ideas at CourtneyK@familytimescny.com. We hope you enjoy your Thanksgiving!

NOVEMBER 2019 | ISSUE NO. 211

GENIUSES AT WORK PUBLISHER/OWNER Bill Brod EDITOR IN CHIEF Courtney Kless CourtneyK@familytimescny.com CONTENT DIRECTOR Steve Guglielmo PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Karley Harmon CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Tom Tartaro (ext. 134) SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Greg Minix GRAPHIC DESIGNER Karley Harmon CONTRIBUTORS Deborah Cavanagh, Neil Davis Jr., Tammy DiDomenico, Aaron Gifford, Eileen Gilligan, Molly Morgan, Tami Scott, Maggie Lamond Simone, Laura Livingston Snyder, Christy Perry Tuohey, Chris Xaver SALES MANAGER Tim Hudson (ext. 114) ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Lesli Mitchell (ext. 140) LMitchell@familytimescny.com Anne DeSantis (ext. 111) ADesantis@familytimescny.com ADDRESS

COURTNEY KLESS EDITOR IN CHIEF

1415 W. Genesee Street, Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 472-4669 fax (315) 422-1721 familytimescny.com

ON THE COVER

Priscilla Jones-Johnson, Robert Doughty, and Jesiah Love-Adair are members of the welding program at Corcoran High School. Learn about the school’s new lab on page 20.

INSIDE PHOTO

Read about Greg Roth, our Educator of the Month, on page 8. Advertising deadline for April is March 16. Calendar deadline for April is is Nov. March1.3. Advertising deadline for December is Nov. 7. Calendar deadline for December Design & Cover Photo by Karley Harmon

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FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2019


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Greg Roth Soule Road Elementary School BY JANELLE ROZZANO PHOTO PROVIDED BY GREG ROTH

Each month, Family Times will showcase a local educator. This month’s educator is Greg Roth, a sixth-grade teacher in the Liverpool Central School District. Tell me a little about your experience as an educator and your background. I received my teaching degree from East Stroudsburg University in Pennsylvania and then I taught a year of fifth grade in the Penns Valley School District. I moved to Liverpool and have been working at Soule Road Elementary for 19 years, 10 in fourth grade and 9 in sixth.

“Greg is an amazing teacher. The only thing bigger than his personality is his heart.” – Anthony Campagna,

sixth grade teacher at Soule Road Elementary School What do you hope to achieve as an educator? What are your goals for the students? Obviously, there is the curriculum, state standards and subject areas. So that’s number one. But along with that, I want them to be good people. One of the things that I emphasize is the “unwritten curriculum” and that is using your manners, being respectful and being responsible. All the qualities to be good, productive citizens. We have a wide range of abilities in various subject areas. I hope that each student can be challenged at their level and progress. What are some unique ways that you help your students learn? I try to be real with them. I make corny jokes and try to relate to them on a personal level. It’s important to learn personal things about them so I can try to make a connection with them. 8

I am that type of teacher that will jump up on tables. I will sneak up on kids and catch them being good. Just be goofy to catch and keep their attention. How do you help your students learn difficult concepts? In math, there are usually multiple ways to solve problems and I fully encourage that. When we share student work, we can talk about their different thought processes. For example, some students solve best by drawing pictures. I have them dialogue with each other so that they’re receptive to other ways of solving. When we share, we find the positives in each of their work and they learn that it’s okay to make mistakes. What do you love most about teaching? What I love most are the kids. My undergrad degree was in recreation and parks. I love playing games, activities and sports. When I got my teaching degree, I was still able to use that piece of me to adapt games into a learning environment. What advice would you give new teachers? Embrace the fact that you’re new and try different things. Be a sponge, soak up whatever you can from the people around you. Take advantage of the professional development that the district offers to better yourself and be a lifelong learner. Janelle Rozzano is a freelance writer living in Fairmount with her family.

Know an educator who deserves a mention? E-mail CourtneyK@familytimescny.com

EDUCATOR OF THE MONTH


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A Family Tradition Lights on the Lake celebrates 30 years

A

BY COURTNEY KLESS

lot has changed since Lights on the Lake began 30 years ago. For one, the show has grown to two miles. And today, all lights are now LED. The event returns to Onondaga Lake Park this month.

Debbie Dennis, senior recreation leader for the park, is entering her 13th season as the coordinator for Lights on the Lake. She says the popularity of the show is part of the reason why it has been able to continue for so long. “We do hear a lot of feedback from people that they came as children and now they’re able to bring their children here,” Dennis says. “People do it as a tradition and they like to carry it on from when they were younger and now do it with their children or with their grandchildren. We’re very consistent with our numbers.” According to information provided by Onondaga County Parks, 43,420 vehicles visited Lights on the Lake during the 2018-19 season, second only to 43,623 vehicles in 2017-18. This year’s show will feature several new pieces, including a 10th birthday display for Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. Also new this season, a 5K will be held on Nov. 17 to celebrate Lights on the Lake’s 30th year. The event will begin at 6:30 a.m. so runners are able to see the displays. “We’re just very excited and privileged to keep doing this in the community and to have the support that we have and working on it together,” Dennis says. “It’s just rewarding for me professionally and personally, and I think everyone here feels the same way.” Lights on the Lake opens Nov. 14 and continues through Jan. 5.

MICHAEL DAVIS PHOTO

For more stories about Lights on the Lake, pick up a copy of the program at the event.

TIPS FOR FAMILIES

1.

With Lights on the Lake right around the corner, you may be planning a trip with your family. Here are a few tips to help things go a little more smoothly:

AVOID THE LINES

Dennis says that weekends are typically the busiest times at Lights on the Lake. If you want to avoid a long wait time, your best bet is to come during the week or right when the show opens at 5:00 p.m. on weekends (the end of the show is also typically less busy).

IF YOU GO

Location: Onondaga Lake Park, 106 Lake Dr., Liverpool. Dates: Nov. 14 – Jan. 5 Hours: 5-10 p.m. 10

2. GET A DISCOUNT

Weekends are when Lights on the Lake is most expensive. Dennis recommends bringing your Wegmans Shoppers Club Card for $6 admission on Mondays and Tuesdays or you can take advantage of the walking preview on Nov. 12 (a $2 donation is encouraged). Advance sale tickets are also on sale (for a discount) at local Wegmans locations until opening night. All active and retired military members can get free admission during Salute the Troops Night on Nov. 14.

3. BRING YOUR PET

Don’t want to leave your furry friend at home? Check out the Dog Walk on Nov. 13. Donations will benefit HumaneCNY.

Admission: $10 from Monday – Thursday and $20 from Friday – Sunday. All prices are per car and the ticket booths only accept cash. More information: lightsonthelake.com

LIGHTS ON THE LAKE


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2/1/192019 11:55 AM FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 11


Supplies Jute twine Felt or scrap fabric Decorative ribbon Scrapbook paper Scissors Single hole puncher

A Grateful Garland PHOTOS BY NATALIE DAVIS

VIS IE DA L A T A BY N

T

Show what your family is thankful for with this collaborative craft hanksgiving is the perfect time to practice gratitude. This collaborative gratitude garland gives every family member a chance to highlight something they are thankful for this year. The garland is assembled ahead of time using either scrap fabric or felt, which is cut into strips and tied to a piece of twine.

Decorative tags can be made out of scrapbook paper and placed in a jar near the garland. Friends and family can then create their own personal note to hang on it.

12

Create

s p e t S

1

Measure how long you want your garland to be (I used the entryway to my dining room).


2

Cut the felt or fabric into strips at your desired length (I cut my felt into 1 ½-inch-by-4 ½-inch strips).

3

Select a desired pattern for the colors and start tying the felt strips into simple knots around the jute twine. In the example, I tied a piece of decorative ribbon between each felt piece.

4 5 6 7

Continue tying until the garland is the desired length.

For the tags, cut the scrapbook paper pieces into small tags and punch a hole at one end to affix the ribbon.

Place the tags in a decorative jar, along with some markers or pens, near the garland.

Invite your friends and family members to add to your collaborative artwork by writing something they are grateful for on a tag and tie it to the garland.

Natalie Davis is an artist and educator teaching enrichment in the Syracuse City School District. She lives with her family in Jordan. FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2019

13


A Tale of Two Turkeys Balancing Thanksgiving plans can be tricky BY NEIL DAVIS JR.

Y

ou have my permission to skip Thanksgiving. Seriously, if I invite you over to my house and you don’t show up, no hard feelings. We will still be friends on Facebook. I might even continue to “like” every gratuitous picture that you post of your cat. The truth is, I’ve never hosted Thanksgiving, nor any event nearly so significant. I recall once co-hosting a Memorial Day barbecue, but Thanksgiving can be a bit more formal, ranking much higher on the holiday spectrum. Most guests show up having showered, some even wearing socks. I imagine that they generally set their expectations higher than hot dogs and beer. And I would know. See, I have always been the Turkey Day invitee. I don’t have a tablecloth, crystal glassware or a desire to wake at 6:00 a.m. to start basting or mashing anything. Instead, I just show up at someone’s house, possibly with a side dish (wine is a side dish, right?), I say “please” and “thank you,” keep my elbows off the table and make sure to eat my required ration of yams. It sounds easy, right? It is, until a second invitation is extended. Being welcomed into someone’s home on Thanksgiving is always something for which to be thankful. So, having two offers should be an absolute blessing. But the reality is that balancing multiple Thanksgiving Day invites can lead to a cornucopia of problems.

“You have to come!” your aunt pleads. “Tyler is flying in from continued on page 16

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BECAUSE I SAID SO

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continued from page 14 Denver, and you won’t believe what your cousin Lucy is doing with the giblets.” Before you even have a chance to ask about Lucy’s giblets, you feel the anxiety set in. You already promised your sister that you would be at her house by mid-morning, armed with your cornbread and a relish tray. But you forgot that your aunt had cornered you months earlier and made you commit to stopping by. Just like that, you are locked into two Thanksgivings, and you feel like a wishbone being yanked in two different directions. With the holiday season upon us, a scenario like this is bound to happen to everyone at some point. Social obligations mount as the calendar winds down. In between all the shopping, you must accommodate work parties, neighborhood gatherings, visiting relatives, school concerts and holiday potlucks. And all of that stress kicks off in grand fashion on the fourth Thursday in November, the date generally considered to be the ultimate family get-together. It began simply enough, early colonists convening with Native Americans to celebrate a bountiful harvest. But, over time, Thanksgiving has grown into our nation’s most revered secular holiday, a day for every generation to come together and share in a mutual appreciation of our most sacred gift. No, I am not talking about crescent rolls, the Dallas Cowboys or Black Friday doorbusters. I’m talking about family – the same family who will expect you to do anything you can to fit them into your schedule. Your sister’s turkey will be done at noon. Your brother-in-law has his scheduled for 2:00 p.m. But your uncle’s family refuses to leave the house until the parade ends, as though they are afraid that this is the year Santa won’t show up. Your niece needs to be online at the precise moment that a limited quantity of headphones goes on sale. And your grandmother insists on watching the National Dog Show because she has money on a schnauzer. The chaotic agenda can be enough to make you want to stay home. It would certainly make getting on the scale the next day a lot easier.

Don’t get me wrong – I love Thanksgiving. In fact, I love any reason to start drinking at noon on a Thursday (my workplace frowns upon this). Most importantly, I love the skilled chefs in my family. If not for their generosity, I might be eating leftover General Tso’s Chicken straight from the carton. So, when someone is willing to spend six hours in the kitchen while I binge-watch every Friends Thanksgiving episode back-to-back, I am eternally grateful. Still, attending two Thanksgivings can be hectic. The day already has a tendency to shine an unwanted spotlight on family dysfunction, so it is best to stick to a few rules that can help alleviate any headaches. For starters, remember to RSVP. My mother tries to nail down the itinerary with a group text sent weeks in advance to a dozen people. Half the responses come immediately with detailed scheduling conflicts. The other half are sent the day before Thanksgiving, long after decisions have been made about the turkey size and the number of place settings. If the host adds another leaf to the table upon your arrival, you are doing it wrong. Secondly, make a schedule and stick to it. When it is time to leave one house and head to the other, set down your pie, apologize politely and head to the car. Your hosts and the other guests might feign some sadness, but ultimately everyone will appreciate that you made time for them. Most importantly, know your food limits. Wear your stretchy pants and pace yourself. Consider surrendering that extra helping of potatoes to someone who is not about to drive across town to repeat the gluttony. Your stomach will thank you later. I will be holding myself to these rules again this year, allowing me to carve out time for a third Thanksgiving, in case anyone has an open chair. You won’t even have to feed me. I will just be visiting, sharing in the spirit of kinship. Because that is the real reason that I attend two Thanksgivings – the people. Everything else is just gravy. Neil Davis works at Bristol-Myers Squibb and lives in Liverpool with his daughter, Sadie, age 17.

16

BECAUSE I SAID SO


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Club Bicycle Mechanics Club OF THE

Month

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY MANLIUS PEBBLE HILL SCHOOL

A

lexandre Leclercq worked on his first bicycle, a BMX, when he was nine years old.

Now at Manlius Pebble Hill School (MPH), he continues to repair and build bicycles, serving as the advisor of the school’s Bicycle Mechanics Club. Leclercq, MPH’s Dean of Students, started the Bicycle Mechanics Club in 2015, but its roots go back further than that. In 2008, Leclercq formed a bicycle club at the Mundy Branch Library (he was a volunteer there at the time), and began teaching local students how to fix bicycles and bring old parts back to life. “I thought old American bikes were beautiful and worth repairing and a ton were being thrown out in the trash,” Leclercq says. “When I worked on the west side of Syracuse, I encouraged the kids to roam around neighborhoods on trash nights and pick up old bicycle frames, old wheels or whatever we could find and we’d fix them up.” That has carried over to MPH. Leclercq says the Bicycle Mechanics Club uses mostly recycled parts to repair and restore bicycles (some date from as far back as the 1950s). During their meetings, students learn how to take a bicycle apart and rebuild it, which includes skills such as painting a frame, refurbishing old parts and building wheels, among other things. The club also auctions off a bicycle at the school’s gala.

18

“It’s cool to own a bicycle that did not come from a store, that students have built themselves and customized and made it look like their own bike that reflects their personality,” Leclercq says. “I think that’s what we’re trying to do here. The bike that we sell at auction every year typically is bought by an MPH student or parent of an MPH student, and that student gets to have a bicycle that does not exist anywhere else in the world.” The Bicycle Mechanics Club typically hovers around five to 10 members, and includes a mix of students from the middle and upper schools (though during the 2018-19 school year, it also included students from the lower school). Leclercq says one of the main purposes of the club is to help train the next generation of engineers. But it’s about much more than that. “Bicycling is something that connects people, rich and poor, young and old,” Leclercq says. “Everybody has a shot at riding a bicycle, so it brings people together, and for this club, it’s perfect. We have upper school students working with middle school students, mentoring each other, teaching each other the skills they’ve learned and doing things they’ve never done before. It feels very powerful to take a mechanic completely apart and know that you can put it back together and make it better and make it more beautiful, and sometimes for an old bicycle, give it a second life.” — Courtney Kless

CLUB OF THE MONTH


In their words: Farouq, a junior, has been part of the Bicycle Mechanics Club since his freshman year. He says he joined the club because he likes mechanics. “In all honesty, I like the process of building a bike,” Farouq says. “Taking the parts out and then rebuilding it, it’s just very interesting for me.”

FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2019

19


ISTOCK PHOTO

Excitement For Welding Corcoran opens state-of-the-art lab BY COURTNEY KLESS

T

blame.

he buzz is growing for welding at Corcoran High School. Instructor Jose Ocasio said during the last week of September alone, five students interviewed for the school’s welding program. A new state-of-the-art lab may be to

“It’s this incredible thing that all of a sudden it’s just boom, this excitement for welding,” says Nick Lisi, the Business and Higher Education Liaison for the Syracuse City School District’s 27 Career and Technical Education programs. “Who would have ever thought? But it’s happening. It gives you chills because you think, ‘ok, well before there was this program, these students never even knew about it.’ Now they know about it, they’re excited about it. And there’s a pathway to jobs, there’s excitement from businesses for the students. It’s the perfect marriage.” Ocasio – a former instructor at Mohawk Valley Community College – says that as far as he knows, this is the only high school welding shop of its kind in the state. It came online this past May after about two years of construction. During the 2018-19 school year, members of the program were transported to the Johnson Center downtown to practice welding (that space has since been

20

FEATURE

repurposed to house the Promising Futures Leadership Academy). Some of those students were able to get their first look at the lab during a six-week bridge program over the summer.

Welding Industry Outlook Lisi says the lab was built, in part, because there is a need for welders in the Syracuse community and beyond. “Businesses are reaching out to us,” Lisi says. “They are not shy. They’re seeing our students as their next employees. We meet with businesses regularly and they’re all saying the same thing: they have employees that are retiring and they have no one that is there to fill, so here we are. And that really has been the motivating factor to get these programs going.” Ocasio says the need for welders is especially high in fabrication and manufacturing. Cal Manning – who has been a welding instructor at Haun Welding Supply for the past nine months – says that local companies are always looking for welders. “It’s going to be huge, getting these kids familiar with [the industry] and understanding it,” he says of the new lab. “I think it will really help the industry.”


PHOTO COURTESY OF SYRACUSE CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

“We have the machinery to actually do real life things. It gives [the students] a more tangible experience. When we talk about it in lecture, we go over safety and I show them the things that you can actually do, and then I come [in the lab] and actually do it with them, it gives them the whole experience. They can actually feel what they’re learning rather than just learning about it in a textbook.” – Jose Ocasio, welding instructor Sponsorship by Lincoln Electric Though the funding for the lab came entirely from the Syracuse City School District, all of the machinery and safety equipment are sponsored by Lincoln Electric (as Lisi explains, it’s similar to how a media lab would choose Mac computers). This sponsorship allows Corcoran to get some of the company’s newest gear and machinery, and gives them access to numerous other resources, including manuals and additional education for instructors. “For the most part, it’s hard to get manufacturers on the phone if you need something,” Ocasio says. “If you’re a sponsor with Lincoln, you can just call their rep, the rep comes in and tells you, ‘Ok, x, y, z is wrong with the machine, and this what you have to do to fix it.’” Each student in the Corcoran welding program is required to provide three things: jeans, shirts and steel-toed boots. The school supplies the other necessary equipment, giving each student a duffel bag that contains an auto darkening helmet (each is then re-purposed when a student graduates), bandanas, gloves and a jacket, all of which are supplied by Lincoln Electric. And Lisi says this is the same safety equipment a welder in the field would use. “In all of the CTE programs in Syracuse, [Director] Bob Leslie wants students to use the same equipment that’s used in the

profession,” Lisi says. “Students that are using Lincoln Electric machines could go to G.A. Braun, and they may see the exact same Lincoln Electric welder.”

State-of-the-art technology Corcoran underwent construction over the summer and the new welding lab caught the eye of some of the workers. “It’s like their dream shop,” Ocasio says. “They come in, they look at the machinery and they’re like ‘Oh wow!’” A converted technology room and office space, the welding lab features some of the newest machinery that Lincoln Electric offers. Each of the 16 booths contains a multi-process welder, which is unique from the ones previously used at the Johnson Center. “A lot of people have to shut off their welder, plug in a different welder or plug in all the leads and take the leads off,” Ocasio says. “These welders already have all of the processes built in, and they have software, so whenever you turn on the machine, you set which process you want and it will deactivate one plug and activate a different plug.” These welders can do 453 different types of welds and are bluetooth capable, enabling Ocasio to plug in his laptop and check a student’s progress that day, among other things. Each booth is also equipped with a state-of-the-art ventilation system. This continued on page 22

PHOTOS BY KARLEY HARMON

FAST FACTS Welding Program at Corcoran: The welding program is one of 27 Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs in the Syracuse City School District. There are CTE programs in every high school in the district.

Lisi says that 14 students are enrolled this year.

Ocasio says students in the welding program begin by learning about safety and the basics of several different welding processes. During their sophomore and junior year, they also talk about the different job options in the field and start the college process. Two students can then attend Lincoln School during their senior year.

With all CTE programs in the district, students from any school can apply to their chosen program during their eighth-grade year. They meet with administrators and teachers from that school to make sure the program is a good fit for them. FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2019

21


continued from page 21 allows Ocasio to talk to his students while they’re welding without shouting, something not normally possible because of the noise. “Over the summer, we might have had 12, 13, 14 students all welding at the same time,” Lisi says. “I mean it’s a shop, but you could still have a conversation…It’s pretty amazing.” Another unique feature of the Corcoran welding lab is the robotic arm welder, created to mimic those found in the auto industry. Students can also take advantage of the fully automated plasma table, which allows them to draw and transfer files to it, then cut out the parts.

“We have the machinery to actually do real life things,” Ocasio says. “It gives [the students] a more tangible experience. When we talk about it in lecture, we go over safety and I show them the things that you can actually do, and then I come [in the lab] and actually do it with them, it gives them the whole experience. They can actually feel what they’re learning rather than just learning about it in a textbook.”

For Ocasio and his students, the impact of the new lab has been immediate.

Courtney Kless is the Editor in Chief of Family Times. She lives in Jamesville with her husband.

Q&A with welding instructor Jose Ocasio: Tell me a little bit about how your interest in welding developed.

I come from a family of auto mechanics. A lot of them actually either did welding or worked in most of the factories around this general area. So from a young age, I was exposed to welding. Once I went to college, my criminal justice advisor kind of directed me toward welding, and once I actually started welding again, I found a love and kind of progressed into what it is now.

Why did you decide to become a teacher? That interest developed with another teacher that I had. I went to Mohawk Valley Community College as a Criminal Justice major and I took Spanish. I needed a language elective. I spoke with the Spanish instructor at the time, and he actually showed me that being a teacher can make a huge difference. At that point in time, I didn’t know if I wanted to continue in college, I was kind of hesitant about going back and I had some bad experiences at other colleges I went to. Just talking to him, it kind of drew me back into college and I realized that in order for me to make a difference, especially in the area, there’s only one way to go, and that’s to start with the young people around the area. Honestly, I think teachers are underrated because if you think about it, every single profession has to go through a teacher. And to be honest with you, the teacher has the most influence. The teacher can make, based off their style and what they teach, really productive people in society or they can make counterproductive people in society depending on the engagement. So when it comes to teaching, I think it was just that one teacher that kind of drew me in.

How did you first become involved in the program at Corcoran?

I became involved with the program here when it was first being developed. I was a welding instructor at MVCC, so we were working on a bridge program between MVCC and this general area. After the program I decided I wasn’t going to teach anymore and Bob Leslie decided that it wasn’t time for me to retire yet, I was a little too young. The job opened and I happened to see it online and I said ‘why not.’ I ended up applying for the job and was lucky enough to actually be interviewed and I got the job…[Bob Leslie] definitely was a huge influence in me applying for the job.

What has been your favorite part of teaching at the high school level? That we get to implement welding at a younger age. I taught at a college for about eight years, and teaching at a college, I had all levels. I had people that were just done with the military, I had people that were straight out of high school, so I had people from different levels. Here we start with ninth grade, so we start them young.

What do you see in the future for the welding program?

This interview was edited for length and clarity. 22

FEATURE

PHOTO BY KARLEY HARMON

For the future of the welding program, I see a lot of things, especially from my standpoint at this point in time. I’ve realized that a lot of businesses need welders, and we have gotten such great feedback from the community and from businesses as a whole, so at this point, the sky’s the limit. In the future, I see us becoming a Lincoln school or an American Welding Society facility or something that’s unique. The way that the program is going, I see a lot of things. The future in this case really is untold, there’s so much potential that this program can develop into and with the feedback that we’re having, I see it growing into something really big.


PROFILE

Welding Lab Brings Happiness BY COURTNEY KLESS

I

t was a busy summer for Priscilla Jones-Johnson.

In addition to balancing two part-time jobs, the Corcoran High School senior participated in a six-week welding program at her school. But there was always something she looked forward to: spending time in Corcoran’s new state-of-the-art welding lab. “What kept me stable was coming here every morning,” Priscilla says. “This is how I get started. This excites me. I honestly don’t believe I could go to my other jobs and feel happy, because out of all my jobs, this is where I feel happy.” The summer bridge program ran from Monday through Thursday, and included training by welding instructor Jose Ocasio and a visit to Feldmeier Equipment, a local company. The Syracuse City School District partnered with CNY Works to give all participating students a financial stipend.

“At this point, if I really put my mind to it, I can go anywhere…I’m pretty sure a lot of people in high school can’t say that right now.” – Priscilla Jones-Johnson, Corcoran senior Priscilla – who also holds the school record in the weight throw as part of the track and field team – first joined the welding program during her junior year. She said that she knew the instructor at the time and was able to get to know the program through him.

When she began to practice welding in the Johnson Center, a passion was born. “I love welding,” she says. “Just being inside a booth and as you work in there, actually being able to do things that most people can’t imagine doing, that just excites me and motivates me to do better for myself. Right now, my life is welding, that’s how I feel. Everything I’m trying to do is going towards my goal.” That goal, for now, is to become certified in different types of welding, but Priscilla hopes to own her own business one day. “[The welding program] has prepared me a lot,” she says. “At this point, if I really put my mind to it, I can go anywhere…I’m pretty sure a lot of people in high school can’t say that right now.” Priscilla is taking full advantage of Corcoran’s new welding lab. Over the summer, she helped build a metal bench, and spent the beginning of the school year working on a cougar head that will be a mascot for the school. Priscilla said that these projects, and others, have taught her important skills that extend beyond her welding booth. “Welding is not about actually going out there and welding,” she says. “It’s more teamwork. When you come inside a welding shop, it’s not just you, it’s everybody. In order for everything to work out, we all have to work together.” Ocasio has been at Corcoran since May, and says he has been impressed by Priscilla’s work ethic. “Look for the perfect student and she’s pretty much there,” Ocasio says. “She takes it upon herself to help others, so she’s really generous. She is definitely progressive. She takes the lead. If she has a good idea, she’s not afraid to actually voice it and try new things.”

Priscilla Jones-Johnson, a senior, is part of the welding program at Corcoran High School. PHOTO BY COURTNEY KLESS

PHOTO BY KARLEY HARMON

FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2019

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Awards Nominations The nominations have been announced for the 2019 Syracuse Area Live Theatre (SALT) Awards. The event is celebrating its 15th year, and award winners will be named on Nov. 17 at Redhouse Arts Center, 400 S. Salina St., Syracuse. A cocktail reception will be held at 5:30 p.m., followed by the awards ceremony at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are available for purchase online at cnytix.com until Nov. 16 ($25), as well as at the door the day of the ceremony ($28). The presenting sponsor for this year’s event is Empower Federal Credit Union.

PROFESSIONAL THEATER COMPANIES

Play of the Year Native Gardens (Syracuse Stage) Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) The Roommate (Kitchen Theatre) The Royale (Kitchen Theatre) Tribes (Kitchen Theatre)

Susanne Marley, The Humans (Syracuse Stage) Joey Parsons, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Lisa Tharps, The Royale (Kitchen Theatre) Costume Design of a Play Sarafina Bush, The Royale (Kitchen Theatre) Charlotte Palmer-Lane, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Carrie Robbins, Possessing Harriet (Syracuse Stage) Christina Selian, The Humans (Syracuse Stage) David Zyla, Noises Off (Syracuse Stage)

Leading Actor in a Play James Caverly, Tribes (Kitchen Theatre) Erick Gonzáles, Native Gardens (Syracuse Stage) Jamal James, The Royale (Kitchen Theatre) Tallon Larham, Marie and the Nutcracker Prince (Breadcrumbs Productions) Daniel Morgan Shelley, Possessing Harriet (Syracuse Stage)

Lighting Design of a Play David L. Arsenault, Grounded (Kitchen Theatre) Drew Florida, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Stephen Quandt, Possessing Harriet (Syracuse Stage) Seth Reiser, The Royale (Kitchen Theatre) Annie Wiegand, Tribes (Kitchen Theatre)

Leading Actress in a Play Susannah Berryman, The Roommate (Kitchen Theatre) Beth Dixon, The Piano Teacher (Kitchen Theatre) Nicole King, Possessing Harriet (Syracuse Stage) Kate MacCluggage, Grounded (Kitchen Theatre) Monica Rae Summers Gonzalez, Native Gardens (Syracuse Stage)

Set Design of a Play Donald Eastman, Possessing Harriet (Syracuse Stage) Sandra Goldmark, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) John Iacovelli, Noises Off (Syracuse Stage) Shoko Kambara, Native Gardens (Syracuse Stage) Cristina Todesco, Tribes (Kitchen Theatre)

Director of a Play Melissa Crespo, Native Gardens (Syracuse Stage) Maya Dwyer, Marie and the Nutcracker Prince (Breadcrumbs Productions) Jason O’Connell, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) M. Bevin O’Gara, Tribes (Kitchen Theatre) Pirronne Yousefzadeh, The Royale (Kitchen Theatre)

Sound Design of a Play Danny Erdberg, The Humans (Syracuse Stage) Arshan Gailus, Tribes (Kitchen Theatre) Jacqueline R. Herter, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Chris Lane, The Royale (Kitchen Theatre) Fabian Obispo, Possessing Harriet (Syracuse Stage)

Supporting Actor in a Play Jeff Gonzales, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Michael Keyloun, Noises Off (Syracuse Stage) Sean Meehan, The Royale (Kitchen Theatre) Dazmann Still, The Royale (Kitchen Theatre) Stephan Wolfert, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Supporting Actress in a Play Kate Hamill, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Juliet Kimble, Tribes (Kitchen Theatre) 24

SALT AWARDS

Musical of the Year Beehive (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Elf (Syracuse Stage) Girlfriend (Kitchen Theatre) Grand Hotel (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Leading Actor in a Musical Noel Carey, Murder for Two (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Christopher Carl, South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Patrick Cummings, Grand Hotel (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival)


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FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2019

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Chris Stevens, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Woody White, Girlfriend (Kitchen Theatre)

Michael Schweikardt, Grand Hotel (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival)

Leading Actress in a Musical Sarah Ellis, South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Heather Makalani, Grease (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Michele Ragusa, Grand Hotel (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Sally Shaw, The Snow Queen (Cherry Arts) Hanley Smith, The Last Five Years (Syracuse Stage)

Sound Design of a Musical Eric Backus, Murder for Two (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Ed Chapman, Grand Hotel (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Ed Chapman, South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Kevin Heard, Grease (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Jacqueline R. Herter, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Jacqueline R. Herter, The Last Five Years (Syracuse Stage)

Director of a Musical Donna Drake, Elf (Syracuse Stage) M. Bevin O’Gara, Girlfriend (Kitchen Theatre) Brett Smock, Beehive (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Brett Smock, Grand Hotel (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Scott Weinstein, Murder for Two (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Scott Weinstein, South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival)

Best Ensemble in a Musical Beehive (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Elf (Syracuse Stage) Grand Hotel (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Grease (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival)

Supporting Actor in a Musical Noah S. Bridgestock, Grease (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Reed Campbell, South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Michael Deni. South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Jayson Elliott, Elf (Syracuse Stage) David Lowenstein, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Dino Nicandros, Grand Hotel (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival)

Play of the Year Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center) Born Yesterday (Cortland Repertory Theatre) I’m Not Rappaport (Redhouse Arts Center) Sleuth (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center)

Supporting Actress in a Musical Melody Butiu, South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Mia Gerachis, Grease (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Celia Madeoy, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Crystal Sha’nae, Beehive (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Samantha Sturm, Grand Hotel (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Best Musical Director Corinne Aquilina, Beehive (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Corinne Aquilina, South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Brian Cimmet, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Brian Cimmet, Grand Hotel (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Jeff Cox, Murder for Two (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Best Choreographer William Carlos Angulo, South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Phil Colgan, Grease (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Brian J. Marcum, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Lee Martino, The Last Five Years (Syracuse Stage) Brett Smock, Grand Hotel (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Costume Design of a Musical Jessica Ford, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Tiffany Howard, Grand Hotel (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Tiffany Howard, Grease (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Tiffany Howard, Murder for Two (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Tiffany Howard, South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Lighting Design of a Musical Adam Honoré, Grand Hotel (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Driscoll Otto, The Last Five Years (Syracuse Stage) Dan Ozminkowski, Murder for Two (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Dan Ozminkowski, South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Martin E. Vreeland, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Set Design of a Musical Nate Bertone, Grease (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) John Iacovelli, The Last Five Years (Syracuse Stage) Jeffrey D. Kmiec, South Pacific (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) Czerton Lim, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Czerton Lim, Murder for Two (Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival) 26

SALT AWARDS

REGIONAL

THEATER COMPANIES

Leading Actor in a Play Greg Bostwick, Sleuth (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Bill Coughlin, Born Yesterday (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Fred Grandy, I’m Not Rappaport (Redhouse Arts Center) Woody Minshew, Born Yesterday (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Nicholas Wilder, Sleuth (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Leading Actress in a Play Ashley Bufkin, Little Women (Hangar Theatre) Magdalyn Donnelly, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center) Catherine Gaffney, The Lady with All the Answers (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Briana Gantsweg, Born Yesterday (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Marguerite Mitchell, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center) Director of a Play Vincent J. Cardinal, I’m Not Rappaport (Redhouse Arts Center) Trey Compton, Sleuth (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Steve Hayes, Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center) Mark Reynolds, Born Yesterday (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Temar Underwood, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center) Supporting Actor in a Play Basil Allen, Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center) Michael Antico, Born Yesterday (Cortland Repertory Theatre) John Bixler, Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center) Derek Powell, Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center) Patrick White, Born Yesterday (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Supporting Actress in a Play Laura Austin, Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center) Sandrinne Edström, Little Women (Hangar Theatre) Lilli Komurek, Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center) Marcia Mele, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center) Karis Wiggins, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center) Costume Design of a Play Katie Dennis, Sleuth (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Orli Nativ, Born Yesterday (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Raven Ong, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center) Mark Reynolds, The Lady with All the Answers (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Donnie Williams, Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center) Lighting Design of a Play Eric Behnke, The Lady with All the Answers (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Margaret Peebles, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center) Mary Lana Rice, Born Yesterday (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Matthew Webb, Sleuth (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Marie Yokoyama, Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center)


FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2019

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Set Design of a Play Tim Brown, I’m Not Rappaport (Redhouse Arts Center) Shane Cinal, Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center) Shane Cinal, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center) Ola Kraszpulska, Sleuth (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Jeremy Hollis, Born Yesterday (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Sound Design of a Play Seth Asa Sengel, Born Yesterday (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Seth Asa Sengel, The Lady with All the Answers (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Seth Asa Sengel, Sleuth (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Anthony Vadala, Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center) Anthony Vadala, I’m Not Rappaport (Redhouse Arts Center) Anthony Vadala, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center)

Donnie Williams, Once Upon a Mattress (Redhouse Arts Center) Lighting Design of a Musical Matt Richards, Kinky Boots (Hangar Theatre) Matt Webb, Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Marie Yokoyama, The All Night Strut (Redhouse Arts Center) Marie Yokoyama, A Charlie Brown Christmas (Redhouse Arts Center) Marie Yokoyama, Once Upon a Mattress (Redhouse Arts Center) Set Design of a Musical Shelley Barish, Legally Blonde (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Adam Crinson, The Rat Pack Lounge (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Terry Martin, The All Night Strut (Redhouse Arts Center) Nicholas James Schwartz, Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Steve TenEyck, Kinky Boots (Hangar Theatre)

Musical of the Year Kinky Boots (Hangar Theatre) Legally Blonde (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Once Upon a Mattress (Redhouse Arts Center) Weird! The Musical (Peaceful Schools Productions)

Sound Design of a Musical Cory Kosman, Legally Blonde (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Cory Kosman, Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Seth Asa Sengel, The Rat Pack Lounge (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Anthony Vadala, The All Night Strut (Redhouse Arts Center) Anthony Vadala, A Charlie Brown Christmas (Redhouse Arts Center)

Leading Actor in a Musical Darius Harper, Kinky Boots (Hangar Theatre) Woody Minshew, Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Colin Purcell, Once Upon a Mattress (Redhouse Arts Center) Brian Sears, Kinky Boots (Hangar Theatre) Jason Timothy, Once Upon a Mattress (Redhouse Arts Center)

Best Ensemble in a Musical The All Night Strut (Redhouse Arts Center) A Charlie Brown Christmas (Redhouse Arts Center) Kinky Boots (Hangar Theatre) Legally Blonde (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) The Rat Pack Lounge (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Weird! The Musical (Peaceful Schools Productions)

Leading Actress in a Musical Lara Hayhurst, Legally Blonde (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Carleena Manzi, A Charlie Brown Christmas (Redhouse Arts Center) Rebecca Mason-Wygal, Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Erica Steinhagen, Into the Woods (Hangar Theatre) Caroline Strang, Once Upon a Mattress (Redhouse Arts Center) Director of a Musical Trey Compton, Legally Blonde (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Shawn Forster, Weird! The Musical (Peaceful School Productions) Gerry McIntyre, Kinky Boots (Hangar Theatre) Kerby Thompson, Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Temar Underwood, Once Upon a Mattress (Redhouse Arts Center) Supporting Actor in a Musical Steven Bidwell, Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Jack Boice, Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Joseph Buck, A Charlie Brown Christmas (Redhouse Arts Center) LaRon Grant, The All Night Strut (Redhouse Arts Center) Clayton Howe, Kinky Boots (Hangar Theatre) Nic Maclane, Once Upon a Mattress (Redhouse Arts Center) Supporting Actress in a Musical Jane Blass, Into the Woods (Hangar Theatre) Mariko Iwasa, A Charlie Brown Christmas (Redhouse Arts Center) Riley Mahan, Weird! The Musical (Peaceful Schools Productions) Aline Mayagoitia, Kinky Boots (Hangar Theatre) Cathleen O’Brien Brown, The All Night Strut (Redhouse Arts Center) Amanda Walker, Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Best Musical Director Barry Blumenthal, The All Night Strut (Redhouse Arts Center) Roy George, Weird! The Musical (Peaceful Schools Productions) Andrew Russo, Once Upon a Mattress (Redhouse Arts Center) Shoshanna Seid-Green, Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Christopher Zemliauskas, Kinky Boots (Hangar Theatre) Best Choreographer Stephfond Brunson, A Charlie Brown Christmas (Redhouse Arts Center) Matthew Couvillon, Legally Blonde (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Stephan deGhelder, The All Night Strut (Redhouse Arts Center) Bryan Knowlton, Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Gerry McIntyre, Kinky Boots (Hangar Theatre) Costume Design of a Musical Dustin Cross, Kinky Boots (Hangar Theatre) Jennifer Dasher, Legally Blonde (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Katharine Tarkulich, Mamma Mia! (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Donnie Williams, The All Night Strut (Redhouse Arts Center) 28

SALT AWARDS

COMMUNITY THEATER COMPANIES Play of the Year The Boys in the Band (Rarely Done Productions) The Diviners (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Dracula (Oswego Players) Drunk with Hope (Rarely Done Productions) Rumors (CNY Playhouse) Leading Actor in a Play Basil Allen, Richard III (Syracuse Shakespeare-in-the-Park) Derek Emerson, The Diviners (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Dan Rowlands, Dracula (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Jack Sherman, Rumors (CNY Playhouse) Ben Sills, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (CNY Playhouse) Leading Actress in a Play Valerie Abel, Other Desert Cities (Rome Community Theater) Binaifer Dabu, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (CNY Playhouse) Blair Dawson, Rumors (CNY Playhouse) Dorothy Lennon, Drunk with Hope (Rarely Done Productions) Heather J. Roach, Les Liaisons Dangereuses (CNY Playhouse) Rebekah Tadros, The Tempest (Syracuse Shakespeare-in-the-Park) Director of a Play Anne Childress, The Tempest (Syracuse Shakespeare-in-the-Park) Stephen Cross, Fragile White Guy (Building Company Theater) Tina Lee, Drunk with Hope (Rarely Done Productions) Krystal Osborne, The Diviners (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Troy Pepper, Dracula (Oswego Players) Korrie Taylor, Dracula (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) William Edward White, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (CNY Playhouse) Supporting Actor in a Play Strange David Fuller, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (CNY Playhouse) Strange David Fuller, The Mousetrap (CNY Playhouse) Michael Richard King, Dracula (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Michael King, Nevermore (CNY Playhouse) Michael Stephan, The Boys in the Band (Rarely Done Productions) William Edward White, The Diviners (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Supporting Actress in a Play Alicia Cobb Goodson, Les Liaisons Dangereuses (CNY Playhouse) Jessie Dobrzynski, Blithe Spirit (CNY Playhouse) Anne Fitzgerald, Blithe Spirit (CNY Playhouse) Brandilyn Kelly, Our Lady of 121st Street (CNY Playhouse) Chelsea Lembo, Rumors (CNY Playhouse) Alyssa Otoski-Keim, The Mousetrap (CNY Playhouse)


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Costume Design of a Play Diane Bates, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (CNY Playhouse) Heather Jensen, Dracula (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Stephanie Long, Rumors (CNY Playhouse) Barbara Toman, Richard III (Syracuse Shakespeare-in-the-Park) Barbara Toman, The Tempest (Syracuse Shakespeare-in-the-Park) Lighting Design of a Play Sarah Anson, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (CNY Playhouse) Sarah Anson, Nevermore (CNY Playhouse) Thomas Fazzio, Dracula (Oswego Players) Liam Fitzpatrick, Our Lady of 121st Street (CNY Playhouse) Andrew Hughes, The Diviners (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) William Edward White, The Mousetrap (CNY Playhouse) Set Design of a Play Stephen Cross, Fragile White Guy (Building Company Theater) Navroz Dabu, A Midsummer’s Night Dream (CNY Playhouse) Chris Lupia & Liam Fitzpatrick, Our Lady of 121st Street (CNY Playhouse) Christopher Lupia, Nevermore (CNY Playhouse) William Edward White, The Mousetrap (CNY Playhouse) Sound Design of a Play Mark Bengtson, The Tragedy of Macbeth (Center Players) Sean Connolly, Dracula (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Christopher Lupia & Rob Searle, Nevermore (CNY Playhouse) Robert G. Searle, The Mousetrap (CNY Playhouse) Ryan Benson Smith, Dracula (Oswego Players) Musical of the Year The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Band Geeks (At Rise Productions) Damn Yankees! (Syracuse Summer Theatre at the Oncenter) Kafka’s Metamorphosis: The Musical (Auburn Public Theater) The Producers (CNY Playhouse) Leading Actor in a Musical Liam Fitzpatrick, Kiss of the Spider Woman (CNY Playhouse) Joe Gauzza, Damn Yankees! (Syracuse Summer Theatre at the Oncenter) Cole LaVenture, The Producers (CNY Playhouse) Josh Mele, The Producers (CNY Playhouse) Dan Williams, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Leading Actress in a Musical Haley Georgia, The Music Man (Center Players) Hali Greenhouse, Mamma Mia! (CNY Playhouse) Erin Sills, Anyone Can Whistle (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts) Erin Sills, Kiss of the Spider Woman (CNY Playhouse) Morgan Smith, Kafka’s Metamorphosis: The Musical (Auburn Public Theater) Gina Wentworth, Annie Get Your Gun (Oswego Players) Ceara Windhausen, Anyone Can Whistle (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts) Director of a Musical Matt Chiorini, Kafka’s Metamorphosis: The Musical (Auburn Public Theater) Olivia De Angelis, Band Geeks (At Rise Productions) Garrett Heater, Damn Yankees! (Syracuse Summer Theatre at the Oncenter) Colin Keating, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Abel Searor, Kiss of the Spider Woman (CNY Playhouse) Supporting Actor in a Musical Christopher James Lupia, The Producers (CNY Playhouse) Danny Monroe, A New Brain (Rarely Done Productions) Jeffrey Salamone, Guys and Dolls (The Town of Manlius Recreation Department) Ryan Sparkes, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Brandon Tyrrell, The Music Man (Center Players) Supporting Actress in a Musical Jessie Essig, Once Upon a Mattress (CNY Community Arts Center) 30

SALT AWARDS

Michele Lindor, A New Brain (Rarely Done Productions) Mary Musial, Damn Yankees! (Syracuse Summer Theatre at the Oncenter) Sara Weiler, Damn Yankees! (Syracuse Summer Theatre at the Oncenter) Natasia White, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Ceara Windhausen, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Best Musical Director Nancy O’Connor, Band Geeks (At Rise Productions) Abel Searor, Kiss of the Spider Woman (CNY Playhouse) Abel Searor, A New Brain (Rarely Done Productions) Abel Searor, The Producers (CNY Playhouse) Dan Williams, Damn Yankees! (Syracuse Summer Theatre at the Oncenter) Dan Williams, Dogfight (Center Players) Best Choreographer Jodi Bova-Mele, Damn Yankees! (Syracuse Summer Theatre at the Oncenter) Marisa Guzmán-Colegrove, Guys and Dolls (The Town of Manlius Recreation Department) Hannah Komar, Band Geeks (At Rise Productions) Lauren Puente, The Producers (CNY Playhouse) Shannon Tompkins, Kiss of the Spider Woman (CNY Playhouse) Costume Design of a Musical Dylan Andrew, Diane Bates, Harlow Kisselstein, Liz Stainstreet, Barbara Toman & Calico Yaworski, The Producers (CNY Playhouse) Stacey Goldyn-Moller, The Music Man (Center Players) Garrett Heater & Jeanette Reyner, Damn Yankees! (Syracuse Summer Theatre at the Oncenter) Abel Searor & Donnie Williams, Kiss of the Spider Woman (CNY Playhouse) Jodi Wilson & Karyn Palinkas, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Lighting Design of a Musical Dusten Blake, A New Brain (Rarely Done Productions) Liam Fitzpatrick, Kiss of the Spider Woman (CNY Playhouse) Liam Fitzpatrick, Mamma Mia! (CNY Playhouse) Liam Fitzpatrick, The Producers (CNY Playhouse) Garrett Heater, Damn Yankees! (Syracuse Summer Theatre at the Oncenter) Set Design of a Musical Dana Jane Comfort, Dogfight (Center Players) Dustin M. Czarny & Christopher James Lupia, The Producers (Center Players) Maria & Olivia De Angelis, Band Geeks (At Rise Productions) Amanda Dunlap, Guys and Dolls (The Town of Manlius Recreation Department) Christopher James Lupia, Mamma Mia! (CNY Playhouse) Sound Design of a Musical Matthew Barnes, Dogfight (Center Players) Sean Connolly, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Robert G. Searle, Kiss of the Spider Woman (CNY Playhouse) Robert G. Searle, The Producers (CNY Playhouse) Anthony Vadala, Damn Yankees! (Syracuse Summer Theatre at the Oncenter) Best Ensemble in a Musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Damn Yankees! (Syracuse Summer Theatre at the Oncenter) The Music Man (Center Players) A New Brain (Rarely Done Productions) The Producers (CNY Playhouse) Lifetime Achievement Award Jim MacKillop Hall of Fame Award Jeanette Reyner


Discover the power of family music making STILL TIME TO REGISTER Age 1 to Adult Give the Gift of Dance Visit The Dance Shoppe

Home of 5 Broadway Performers

thedancestudiocny@gmail.com 315-922-3232 TheDanceStudioCNY.com

Camillus & Manlius

WE DO BIRTHDAY PARTIES!

WE ARE LOOKING FOR PARTICIPANTS

Do you have difficulty hearing? For example, in group settings, restaurants, talking with friends, etc. Over the counter (OTC) hearing aids were recently approved by congress. We are looking for people 40 years old and older who have trouble hearing to participate in a research study designed to determine how the average consumer obtains and self-fits OTCs.

MILY TIMES HORIZONTAL

participate email Jasleen at hearlabsu@gmail.com. 5” WIDE To XYou 4.9” HIGH will be paid $12.00/ hr. for your participation. This study is being conducted by the Hearing Science Lab at Syracuse University.

Contact us for a free trial class! Offering early childhood music and movement classes for families all over Central New York

www.bluebirdmusictogether.com (315) 427-6985

OPEN HOUSE NOVEMBER 17 2-4 PM

www.mssyr.org 315.449.9033

A world-class Montessori education for children ages 3-12.

LEARN

31


November !

HAPPY

Please note: Mistakes happen. To confirm event details, call the sponsoring organization’s phone number or visit the website.

FRIDAY, NOV. 1 Art Gone Wild! Art Exhibition. 10 a.m.-4:30

p.m. through Nov. 22. View artwork created by the zoo’s animals. Rosamond Gifford Zoo at Burnet Park, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Free with zoo admission: $9/adults; $5/senior citizens; $5/ children; free/age 2 and younger. (315) 435-8511. rosamondgiffordzoo.org.

SATURDAY, NOV. 2 NYS Model Train Fair. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; also Nov. 3. One of the Northeast’s premier model train shows, with dozens of vendors and numerous operating layouts. Sponsored by the National Railway Historical Society’s Central New York chapter. State Fairgrounds, Syracuse. $10/age 16 & older; free/age 15 and under. modeltrainfair.com.

PAWS to Read. 10:30-11:30 a.m.; also Nov. 9, 16,

23 & 30. Kids can read to a friendly dog from PAWS Inc. of CNY. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Toddlers’ Tango. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Toddlers and preschool-aged children, accompanied by an adult, can take part in this music and movement class. Salina Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. Registration required: (315) 454-4524.

Rice Creek Story Hour. 11 a.m.; also Nov. 30. Elementary-aged children, especially, will enjoy tales of animals’ wild ways and how humans relate to the natural world; all ages are welcome. Rice Creek Field Station, SUNY Oswego, Thompson Road, 1 mile south of Route 104, Oswego. Free. (315) 312-6677. oswego.edu/rice-creek.

Willow Weaving Workshops. 1-4 p.m.;

also Nov. 9, 16, 23 & 30. Bonnie Gale, a nationally-known willow basket maker, will lead a series of ornament-making workshops. Open to ages 13 and over. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. Registration is required: (607) 336-9031 or bonwillow@fontiernet.net.

SUNDAY, NOV. 3 Squishing of the Squash. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. When Halloween’s over, zoo animals get a chance to play with and squish some pumpkins. Rosamond

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CALENDAR

Gifford Zoo at Burnet Park, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Admission: $9/adults; $5/senior citizens; $5/children; free/age 2 and younger. (315) 435-8511. rosamondgiffordzoo.org.

3-5, accompanied by a caregiver, can hear some stories and go on a trail walk. Beaver Lake Nature Center, Route 370, Baldwinsville. $4/parking. (315) 638-2519.

NYS Model Train Fair. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. See Nov. 2 listing.

STEM Storytime. 10:30-11:30 a.m.; also Nov. 10,

17 & 24. Children ages 2-6 can take part in a session that encourages the scientific spirit through stories, music, and play. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST), 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. $5/child (non-members). (315) 425-9068

MONDAY, NOV. 4 Gaming for Adults with Special Needs.

1:30-3 p.m. Adults with special needs can play Wii games and board games; caregivers must remain in the room. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

TUESDAY, NOV. 5 ELECTION DAY International Game Day.

2-3 p.m. Children ages 5-12 can celebrate by playing dozens of games. Hazard Branch Library, 1620 W. Genesee St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-5326.

Tuesday Crafternoons. 3:30-7 p.m.; also Nov.

12, 19 & 26. Children from age 3-10 and caregivers can drop in to make a craft. Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 Genesee St., Camillus. Free. (315) 6723661. www.maxwellmemoriallibrary.org.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6 Teen Writer’s Guild. 4-5 p.m.; also Nov.

13 & 20. Students in grades 6-12 can take part in a creative workshop, writing in a variety of genres. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. (315) 637-6374. ffl.org.

Dungeons & Dragons Night. 5:30-7:30 p.m.; also Nov. 13 & 20. Teens and adults can play Dungeons and Dragons. All levels are welcome. Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 Genesee St., Camillus. Free. Registration is required. (315) 672-3661.

THURSDAY, NOV. 7 Trail Tales. 1 p.m.; also Nov. 21. Children ages

FRIDAY, NOV. 8 Toddler Dance Party. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Children age 18 months to 5 years, accompanied by caregivers, can dance, play musical instruments and enjoy bubbles. Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville. Free. CLDandJ.org. (315) 446-3578.

SATURDAY, NOV. 9 CNY Bridges Build ’Em & Bust ’Em. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Teams of up to three students in grades 4-12 can build bridges out of balsa wood and see them broken to test the bridges’ strength. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST), 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. Free for student teams taking part in the competition. Registration is required: (315) 425-9068.

CNY Veterans Parade & Expo. 9 a.m. View artifacts in the World War I mobile museum or visit the expo in the Center of Progress Building. New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd, Syracuse. CNYVeteransParade.org. Rice Creek Rambles. 11 a.m.; also Nov. 16 & 23. Explore trails, woods and wetlands with a naturalist on a family-friendly hike. Those under 17 must be accompanied by an adult. Rice Creek Field Station, SUNY Oswego, Thompson Road, 1 mile south of Route 104, Oswego. Free. Call day of to check trail conditions: (315) 312-6677. oswego.edu/rice-creek/.

SUNDAY, NOV. 10 SEE ONGOING EVENTS

MONDAY, NOV. 11 VETERANS DAY Kids Cook. 2-3 p.m. Children ages

7-12 can make food to take home. Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. Registration required: (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Frozen Party. 3-4 p.m. Celebrate the upcoming

release of Frozen 2 with a sing-along and crafts. Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville. Free. Registration required: (315) 446-3578. CLDandJ.org.


Newborn Sleep Strategies. 6-7:30

p.m. Discuss strategies for supporting newborn sleep. Presented by CNY Doula Connection. CNY Healing Arts, 195 Intrepid Lane, Syracuse. Free. Registration is recommended. (315) 707-8097.

ZZ Z

TUESDAY, NOV. 12 Homeschool STEAM Club. 1:30-3 p.m.

Homeschoolers ages 5-11 can learn with hands-on activities. Parents and siblings welcome. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Teen MOPS. 5-7 p.m. Young mothers, ages 13-21, with children under 6 enjoy a faith-based program with fun, food and activities while their children are cared for by the childcare program. Liverpool First United Methodist Church, 604 Oswego St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 569-2542.

Lights on the Lake Stroll. 5-9 p.m. Special

two-mile walking preview of annual wonderland of illuminated holiday scenes at Onondaga Lake Park, Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool, before it opens to vehicles only. Visitors may stroll some or all of the trail. Holiday characters will be on the trail. Parking at Wegmans Landing, Salt Museum or Willow Bay lots. $2 suggested donation for adults. (315) 453-6712.

Lights on the Lake Dog Walk. 5-9 p.m. Dogs

are welcome for this special walking preview of the annual illuminated holiday wonderland, including holiday characters. Walkers can cover as much of the two-mile stretch as they wish. Refreshments for humans and dogs available for sale. Onondaga Lake Park, Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. Parking at Wegmans Landing, Salt Museum or Willow Bay lots. $2 suggested donation. (315) 453-6712.

SUNDAY, NOV. 17 Lights on the Lake 5K. 6:30 a.m. Runners will

have a chance to view the displays. Onondaga Lake Park, Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. $30 (plus fees). runsignup.com.

MONDAY, NOV. 18 Homeschool Family Fun. 1-2:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, NOV. 14 Opening Night Lights on the Lake. 5-10

p.m., daily; through Jan. 5. Drive through the annual light extravaganza featuring two miles of life-size displays, themed sections, new attractions, and a grand finale. Onondaga Lake Park, Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. $10/car, Monday-Thursday; $20/car, Friday-Sunday. (315) 453-6712.

FRIDAY, NOV. 15

Jingle Bell Run. 9:30 a.m. A festive, 5K run raises

awareness and funds for the Arthritis Foundation. Long Branch Park, Long Branch Road, Liverpool. Donations. (518) 732-6219 or rdoemel@arthritis.org.

ages 11-18 can learn how to make an origami dragon. Betts Branch Library, 4862 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-1940.

7:30 p.m. Participants of all ages can learn about reptiles. Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. Registration requested: (315) 492-1727. oflibrary.org. Parents can learn about library resources and other free materials they can use to supplement their teaching. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

SATURDAY, NOV. 16

Origami Dragons. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Participants

Dan the Snakeman. 6:30-

Homeschooling 101 for Parents. 7-8:30 p.m.

SEE ONGOING EVENTS

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13

Homeschooling parents and kids can take part in a casual hangout with games and crafts. Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 Genesee St., Camillus. Free. (315) 672-3661. www.maxwellmemoriallibrary.org.

TUESDAY, NOV. 19 Movie Matinee. 1:30-3:30 p.m.; also Nov. 22.

Watch a screening of Toy Story 4. Free popcorn and beverages will be provided. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Parents’ Night Out SATURDAY, NOV. 2 Syracuse Stallions Basketball. 7 p.m. Watch as the city’s ABA team takes

on the St. Louis Spirits in its season opener. Institute of Technology at Syracuse Central, 258 E. Adams St., Syracuse. $5-$10 (plus fees). syracusestallions.com.

FRIDAY, NOV. 8 Wreath Making. 6 p.m.; also Nov. 13, 15, 16, 18 & 19.

Create your own holiday wreath. All materials are included in the fee. Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 E. Mud Lake Rd., Baldwinsville. $17/person; Parking: $4/vehicle. Preregistration required: (315) 638-2519.

FRIDAY, NOV. 15 Nick Di Paolo. 7:30 p.m. Comedian Nick Di Paolo, who hosts a show on Sirius

XM and has appeared on shows such as Louie and The Sopranos, will perform one show in Cortland. Downtown Cortland Theatre, 24 Port Watson St., Cortland. $25-$30. (607) 756-2627. cortlandrep.org.

SATURDAY, NOV. 23 The Best of NY - A Food & Drink Showcase. Noon-8

p.m.; also Nov. 24. Attendees can sample food, watch cooking demonstrations and more. Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse. $10. bestfestnys.com.

SATURDAY, NOV. 30 Night Market. 3-10 p.m. Shop local products and listen to live entertainment. SKY Armory, 351 S. Clinton St., Syracuse. Admission: $5 (plus fees). nightmarketsyr.com.

Have an event or an idea for Parents’ Night Out? Email courtneyk@familytimescny.com with more information.

December 7th @ 11 a.m.

Crouse Hinds Theater, Syracuse Use code DASH19

$1 off per ticket when buying 4 or more!

Tickets at Dashersmagicalgift.org or Call 315-299-5598 FAMILY TIMES MONTH 2019

33


Thanksgiving Crafts. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Participants of all ages can choose from a headband turkey, wreath or thankful tree. NOPL North Syracuse, 100 Trolley Barn Lane, North Syracuse. Free. (315) 458-6184.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 27

ONGOING EVENTS

SEE ONGOING EVENTS

Weekend Walks with a Naturalist. Saturdays

THURSDAY, NOV. 28

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 20

Great Swamp Conservancy Nature Trails.

Daily, dawn to dusk. Throughout the year, visitors can grab their walking shoes and explore 4.5 miles of well-groomed, flat trails. Trails feature a 900-foot boardwalk, osprey nesting platform, and wetland and grassland restoration areas. The area is a stop for many migratory waterfowl and songbirds; other wildlife include muskrats and beavers. Great Swamp Conservancy, 3.5 miles off I-90, Exit 34, 8375 N. Main St., Canastota. Free. (315) 697-2950.

Safe Place to Game. 4-6 p.m. Participants ages

7-18 can learn how to play Pokemon, Magic: The Gathering and YuGiOh! Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 Genesee St., Camillus. Free. (315) 672-3661. www.maxwellmemoriallibrary.org.

THURSDAY, NOV. 21 SEE ONGOING EVENTS

FRIDAY, NOV. 22 Time for Tots Playgroup. 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Education playgroup for children ages 18 months-5 years and their caregiver. Stories, songs, arts and crafts, and more. Cross of Christ Lutheran Church, 8131 Soule Road, Liverpool. $3/family. Registration recommended: (315) 622-2843. NYCrossofChrist.org/Tots.

Kids Minecraft. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Kids in grades 3-5 can play on the library’s server. Salina Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. Registration required: (315) 454-4524. salinalibrary.org.

SATURDAY, NOV. 23 The Climb 2019. 10 a.m. Climb

the stairs in the State Tower Building to raise money for pediatric cancer. State Tower Building, 109 S. Warren St., Syracuse. Registration: $35-$40. (315) 416-2065.

Natural Holiday Crafts for Kids. 10 a.m.

Children of all ages can learn to make their own crafts using materials found in nature. Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 E. Mud Lake Road, Baldwinsville. $6/person. Admission: $4/vehicle. Registration required: (315) 638-2519.

SUNDAY, NOV. 24 Thanksgiving Crafts. 2-3 p.m. Children ages

Liverpool Turkey Trot. 9 a.m. 5K and 5 mile

run leave from the Griffin Visitor Center and follow the East Shore Trail. Onondaga Lake Park, Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. $10-$35. (315) 451-7275.

FRIDAY, NOV. 29 Opening Day Dickens’ Christmas in Skaneateles. Noon-4 p.m.; also Saturdays &

Sundays through Dec. 22. More than 50 Victorian characters, including the author of A Christmas Carol himself, fill the village of Skaneateles, on Genesee, Jordan and Fennell streets. Free. (315) 685-0552. skaneateles.com.

Polar Express Pajama Party. 5-6 p.m.; also

Nov. 30. Children can take part in interactive activities and visit with Santa Claus. Then they can see The Polar Express in the six-story IMAX theater (6:15 p.m.). Museum of Science and Technology (MOST), 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. Price TBA. (315) 425-9068. most.org.

Erie Canal Museum Gingerbread Gallery Grand Opening. 5-9 p.m. Cookies and cocoa all

night, and the music of Merry Mischief following the tree lighting in Clinton Square. Erie Canal Museum, 318 Erie Blvd. E., Syracuse. $7/adults; $5/seniors; $2/age 12 & under. (315) 471-0593. eriecanalmuseum.org.

Clinton Square Tree Lighting Ceremony.

6:30 p.m. The annual lighting takes place following an evening of music and an appearance by Santa Claus and Mrs. Claus. After the ceremony, head to an open house at City Hall (233 E. Washington St.), meet the mayor and have photos taken with the Clauses. Downtown Syracuse. Free. (315) 473-4330.

5-10 can make Thanksgiving crafts. Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville. Free. Registration required: CLDandJ.org. (315) 446-3578.

SATURDAY, NOV. 30

MONDAY, NOV. 25

activities of an animator with hands-on activities. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST). 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. Museum admission: $12/adults; $10/seniors and ages 2-11. (315) 425-9068.

SEE ONGOING EVENTS

TUESDAY, NOV. 26 Syracuse City Ballet Nutcracker. Noon (sensory-friendly performance); also Nov. 30 & Dec. 1. Syracuse City Ballet artists and children perform the tale of a young girl who ventures into an enchanted world after saving a dashing prince. The Oncenter Crouse Hinds Theater, 411 Montgomery St., Syracuse. $20-$75 (plus fees). (315) 435-2121. syracusecityballet.com.

34

CALENDAR

and Sundays, 2 p.m. Nature discovery hike with different topics each weekend. Beaver Lake Nature Center, Route 370, Baldwinsville. Admission: $4/ vehicle. (315) 638-2519.

Be the Scientist. Noon-4 p.m. Explore the

DIY Holiday Gifts. 1-3 p.m. Children ages

4-13 can make holiday gifts for friends and family members. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Syracuse City Ballet Nutcracker. 2 p.m. & 6 p.m. See Nov. 26 listing.

Polar Express Pajama Party. 5-6 p.m. (sensory-friendly). See Nov. 29 listing.

Baltimore Woods Nature Center. Hiking trails and parking are free and open every day from dawn to dusk. Interpretive Center open MondayFriday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; closed Sundays. 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. (315) 673-1350. Wegmans Playground. Boundless Playground

for children (and parents) of all ages and abilities includes accessible swings, slides, bridge and more, including special section just for the tiniest tykes. Onondaga Lake Park, Route 370, Liverpool. Free. (315) 451-PARK.

Peanut Butter Jelly Time. Thursdays, 5 p.m.

Members of the community can join in making more than a hundred bagged lunches to hand out to the hungry and homeless in downtown Syracuse. The Road, 4845 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. (315) 218-6066. wholelygroundsattheroad. org.

Barnes & Noble Storytimes. Thursdays, 10

a.m. Join a storytime for toddlers and preschoolers that’s features a book, songs and coloring. Barnes & Noble, 3454 Erie Blvd. E., DeWitt. Free. (315) 449-2948.

Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville Storytimes. Call or visit the website for times. Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville. Free. Registration recommended: CLDandJ.org. (315) 446-3578.

Fairmount Community Library Storytimes. Little

Movers (good walkers ages 1-3): Mondays, 10:15 a.m. Music is Magic (ages 1-5): Mondays, 11:15 a.m. Stories at the Splashpad (ages infants to 5 years): Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime & Craft (ages 3-5): Thursdays, 10:15 a.m.; registration requested: fairmountlibrary.org. Fairmount Community Library, 406 Chapel Dr., Syracuse. Free. (315) 487-8933. fairmountlibrary.org.

Liverpool Public Library. Lapsit Story Time

(ages 2 and under): Tuesdays, 10:15-11 a.m. Sing Along Friends Story Time (ages 2-5): Thursdays, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Family Story Time (ages 5 and under): Fridays, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Studio B Dance Company, 318 First St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310.

Maxwell Library Storytimes. Storytimes

and book groups for all ages. Call for dates and times. Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 Genesee St., Camillus. Free. (315) 672-3661.

Northeast Community Center Library Storytimes. Preschool storytimes with rhymes

and occasional games; youngsters learn group listening and participation skills. Call for times. Northeast Community Center Library, 716 Hawley Ave., Syracuse. Free. (315) 472-6343, Ext. 208.


FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2019

35


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