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NOVEMBER 2017 FREE

Lights on the Lake PROGRAM INSIDE! Why learning has no limits

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Dream of a

Dance

Staging a holiday extravaganza

College, the next frontier A partnership that helps teachers teach


MEN’S HEALTH ISN’T JUST A GUY THING. So what if you can’t pull off a mustache, women already make 80% of all health care decisions for their family1. Who better to urge the guys in your life to screen for some of the hairiest threats to their health this Movember: prostate cancer, testicular cancer, heart disease and high blood pressure.

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FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2017

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ATYPICAL FAMILY

6

Why there’s no such thing as a learning ‘plateau.’

FAMILY FACES

10

Maria Murray’s nonprofit helps teachers get more kids reading.

FEATURE

14

The making of The Nutracker, a dance extravaganza.

BEEN THERE

20

A son starts making choices about college, with his parents in tow

BEST OF SYRACUSE FOR FAMILIES Forty-five winners of the 2017 readers’ choice poll.

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CONTENTS

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NOVEMBER 2017

EDITOR’S NOTE

16

LEARN

19

PARTY

24

FAMILY FUN CALENDAR

31

ADVERTISER INDEX

FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2017

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FROM  THE

THE PARENTING GUIDE OF CENTRAL NEW YORK

NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO. 187

GENIUSES AT WORK PUBLISHER/OWNER

EDITOR R

ight now, somewhere, somebody is thinking about The Nutcracker: how to get the Christmas tree to grow on cue, how to make sure Mother Ginger’s costume doesn’t snag, how to get dozens of dancers of all ages and abilities to act and perform their steps in time to Tchaikovsky’s score. The holiday ballet is an annual tradition in communities of all sizes across the United States—including Syracuse. In this issue, Tami Scott writes about how the Syracuse City Ballet’s production comes together, with, this year, 125 dancers in the cast (page 14).

Bill Brod EDITOR IN CHIEF Reid Sullivan editorial@familytimes.biz MANAGING EDITOR Bill DeLapp PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Michael Davis CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Tom Tartaro (ext. 134) CREATIVE SERVICES MANAGER Robin Turk GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Greg Minix Rachel Barry DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER Aaron Scattergood

Since Thanksgiving falls in November, it’s an appropriate time to express gratitude for the people and organizations that make CNY a great place for families. In this issue, we publish the winners of the 2017 Best of Syracuse for Families, starting on page 22. In 45 categories, from dog whisperer to library, readers chose their favorites.

CONTRIBUTORS Deborah Cavanagh, Tammy DiDomenico, Aaron Gifford, Eileen Gilligan, Linda Lowen, Maggie Lamond Simone, Laura Livingston Snyder, Chris Xaver

Also in this issue: stories about the learning “plateau” (page 6); the adventures of a son and his parents on the road to college (page 20); and a profile of a professor who helps teachers get students reading (page 10).

SALES MANAGER Tim Hudson (ext. 114)

We hope you enjoy what you find in Family Times this month. Thank you for reading!

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Elizabeth Fortune (ext. 116) EFortune@syracusenewtimes.com Paige Hart (ext. 111) PHart@syracusenewtimes.com Lesli Mitchell (ext. 140) LMitchell@syracusenewtimes.com Ryann Nolan (ext. 146) RNolan@syracusenewtimes.com

REID SULLIVAN EDITOR IN CHIEF

SALES AND MARKETING COORDINATOR Megan McCarthy (ext. 115) MMcarthy@syracusenewtimes.com GENERAL MANAGER/COMPTROLLER Deana Vigliotti (ext. 118)

ON THE COVER

Ava Ascenzo, age 11, will perform as Clara in Syracuse City Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker. (The other dancer cast as Clara is Sophie Green, 13, of Baldwinsville.)

INSIDE PHOTO

Ava is pictured with her mother, Maria. For the story of the making of The Nutcracker, see page 14. Advertising deadline April is March Calendar deadline deadline for for December April is March 3. 7 Advertising deadline for for December is Nov.16. 9. Calendar is Nov. Photos by Michael Davis Design by Greg Minix

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FAMILY TIMES NOVEMBER 2017

OFFICE MANAGER Christine Burrows ADDRESS

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Getting Off ‘The Plateau’ What motivates a kid’s growth? | BY DEBORAH CAVANAGH

T

he concept of academic plateauing has been discussed for decades. The theory is that at a certain point there is a flattening of the learning curve: Understanding higher level material stalls or cannot be achieved, and new skill acquisition becomes impossible.

If you search the term “plateau” at PsychologyDictionary.org, the entry states: “a time in learning whenever the learning curve flattens due to the rate of increase stopping temporarily, frequently due to tiredness, boredom, loss of willingness, or a modification in the level of ability necessary.”

I speak from experience. A particular learner in my house needs to see the reason for the skill or she has no desire to make it happen. My daughter, Amanda, has Down syndrome. She has challenges learning certain concepts. She also has never had the desire to achieve anything just because it is a goal on an assessment or because an instructor has it on a checklist.

If you have a child with special needs, you may have heard this concept used when discussing goals, placement within classrooms, or allocation of services. It is usually combined with a perceived level of ability.

I can remember discussing standardized assessments and testing with a particular district administrator. I attempted to explain the results were not an accurate representation of my daughter’s ability. Not because she may or may not know the answers to the questions. The struggle was that she did not understand the relevance or reason for the test itself. She found the process boring. She would give random answers or pick the first one given.

But when I read the definition, what catches my eye is “due to boredom or loss of willingness.”

The district administrator said to me, “Well, maybe that in itself shows her level of ability.”

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ATYPICAL FAMILY

“No, it shows that she doesn’t perform on command,” I replied. “Should we assess her intelligence based on that?” Math and number concepts have always been a struggle as well. Understanding the value of a number, something that seems obvious, was a hurdle we slammed into for years. Yes, years. Without it, being able to grasp “more” or “less” is impossible. We tried everything. Piles of marbles to show the difference in value. Stacking Legos to see height difference. Coloring graphs, counting on number lines. No matter what we tried, Amanda seemed not to understand that the number 20 was more than 15. That you needed to take away a certain amount to achieve a lower number, or add an amount to get to a higher number. It was torture and an exercise in futility. We seemed to be trapped on a big, long plateau. All we learned was that we hated math. In fifth grade Amanda was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. In seventh grade, continued on page 8


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continued from page 6 she transitioned from using injections to manage her insulin delivery to a pump system. This system came with a personal diabetes manager, or PDM, a handheld device that is programmable and delivers insulin based on input from the individual using it. This device gave Amanda the ability to manage her diabetes care independently, if she could learn how. One of the skills needed was entering the number for the carbohydrate value associated with what she was about to eat. The device has a scrolling number entry program. You need to either scroll up or down to get to the accurate number. In other words, you need to know where the number you are entering falls in the grand scheme of numbers. Is 60 past 50 or before it? How do you find it? Up or down? Is it more or less? One week. That is all it took. She was a pro. She was able to test her blood sugar, find and enter the carbohydrate number needed, and deliver herself a bolus of insulin without help. And then she was able to eat her breakfast, lunch or dinner.

able to navigate his way like an Apple Genius. All because there is a game he wants to play. But he still refuses to learn how to tie his shoes. Or how about the grandmother who won’t learn how to use a smartphone, but she will take the time to go to the local library and enroll in classes on how to use her device so she can see pictures of her grandchildren and do FaceTime.

“My daughter has never wanted to achieve something just because an instructor has it on a checklist.”

And then there is the mom who paid no attention in biology class and could have been deemed “at her science plateau” in high school. She learned all about extra chromosomes, airways, tracheostomies, gastrointestinal tracts, heart anomalies, celiac disease and type 1 diabetes—because she had to, so she could take care of her daughter, Amanda. The desire must be there. The reason for acquiring the skill must be motivating. There is always opportunity for learning and growth. If there is a plateau, it is just a resting point before the next surge forward in knowledge. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise. Deborah Cavanagh lives in Manlius with her husband and two children. She has written for local organizations supporting children and adults with special needs.

Think of the 4-year-old who picks up an iPad for the first time and, within hours, is

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Best Practices

Maria Murray’s nonprofit shows teachers what works | BY TAMMY DiDOMENICO

The Reading League is an organization whose purpose is to help teachers bring evidence-based practices into their classrooms, and Maria Murray is its founder. The league is a volunteer partnership made up of educators, researchers, school administrators, parents, support specialists, healthcare providers and others. Murray has been a literacy professor at SUNY Oswego since 2008. With the Reading League, which she started two years ago, she focuses on reading instruction and assessments that help students learn to read. Many local educators are now embracing the use of evidence-based practices in helping their students build literacy skills. The Reading League offers professional 10

development opportunities, instructional materials and support. “We know we are filling a hole that needs filling,” says Murray, who lives in Syracuse with her husband, Dan. She is the mother of a grown daughter, Kate, and a son, Mark, who is a junior at Centre College in Kentucky.

JIM RUSSELL/SUNY OSWEGO PHOTO

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f all the skills elementary students acquire, learning to read is probably the most important. Literacy unlocks all the other skills and information that teachers have to teach and students need to know.

“It is a proven fact that everyone can learn to read to some degree,” Murray says. “When we take a fifth-grader who is reading at a first-grade level and finally teach them to read, it’s not that they couldn’t have learned—they did.” Murray became interested in the effectiveness of literacy education as a graduate student at Syracuse University. She was fascinated by the research her adviser did in Central New York. Using grants from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, they spent a year working with struggling second- and third-grade non-readers, teaching them to read. Their research showed that, after the

FAMILY FACES

Maria Murray interventions, the students’ brain activation patterns began to measure similarly to those of non-impaired readers. “You would think that this would set people on fire and they would say, ‘Oh, now we know what to do.’ But it didn’t. It


just languished,” Murray recalls. “The sun came up, the sun when down. And nothing changed in schools.” Murray has since studied more strategies for teaching literacy, incorporating data from psychologists, as well as speech, language and reading specialists. “We know how reading works and how it really can be taught effectively,” she says. “There is consensus in the scientific community, but we are not using those methods consistently in schools.” But change is afoot. The workshops and professional development opportunities offered by the Reading League every other month are attracting educators from all over Central New York. Each event is hosted by a different school district. “Schools are now asking for us to come in,” Murray says. “And we make our events tailored to what the teachers need and have requested.” The Reading League aims to educate parents, too. “Parents are starting to realize that when they hear ‘Oh, don’t worry. Give them another year. It will be OK. Some kids are just delayed,’ that this advice isn’t right,” she says. “We’re trying to clear up those misconceptions.” Teachers did, indeed, previously have access to literacy-focused continuing education and professional development. New York state encouraged collaboration among school districts and educators in 1948, when it established statewide BOCES (or Boards of Cooperative Education Services). Murray says that the Reading League’s professional development events complement those offered by BOCES, giving teachers the tools they need to apply evidence-based practices to their own teaching styles. As someone who works with future teachers at SUNY Oswego, Murray knows that the formation of an educator doesn’t end upon graduation. She wants those already working in the profession to have access to the best information available, and the guidance to use it. “With reading, we now have evidence” of what works, Murray says. “We have brain-imaging studies. We have the science and the research showing that to teach kids to learn to read, it has to be a systematic program. “For example, start with the easiest sounds—short vowels and single consonants—and you slowly move up to more complex patterns. A lot of the programs out there just have everything thrown into a soup pot. Today you’re talking about plurals, tomorrow you’re talking about short ‘a’ and the book you’re reading has nothing to do with either of those things,” Murray says. “Sometimes it’s simple things like that that contribute to underperformance in learning to read.” Murray points out that even in some of the most affluent districts, where students have been read to since birth, and have access to steady streams of books, some 40 percent to 50 percent of the fourth- and eighth-grade students are not reading at grade level. “We could just tweak a few things and bring the children’s eyes and brains to the pages in a way that makes them go, ‘Oh, I get it. I now notice this and will use it when I see it again instead of guessing,’” she says.

www.fln.org 800.927.9083

Murray would like to see teachers stop encouraging what she calls “guess reading.” Looking at pictures to determine what words are is not a strategy that builds literacy skills; nor does placing too much emphasis on the first letter of a word.

Syracuse Metro Area

Murray says there is a strong link between literacy and behavior. Students who score low on their earliest phonemic awareness assessments (phonemes are the sounds that make up words) in

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continued from page 11 kindergarten are often the kids most frequently sent to the principal’s office by the time they are in fifth grade.

“We could just tweak a few things and bring the children’s eyes and brains to the pages in a way that makes them go, ‘Oh, I get it.’” —Maria Murray “Kids know that they are bright. They know everything there is to know about the things that interest them. But they become aware of how important reading is and they can’t understand why they are having trouble with this task that they need for everything,” Murray says. “They think, ‘All day long I have to do this thing that’s hard for me. I hate school. It’s not for me.’ That’s where we get behavior problems.” Murray is excited about a slew of new partnerships and projects that the Reading

Murray is inspired by collaborations among educators, fostered by the Reading League. More information can be found on the league’s website, TheReadingLeague. com, and through its YouTube channel. Whatever other endeavors the league pursues, the organization remains committed to solving the problems that have always fascinated Murray in her career as an educator. “I think there is no more honorable profession out there,” Murray says. “Every teacher wants to do the best for their children. I have seen teachers with tears in their eyes—just giddy with relief.

League has in the pipeline. A new director, Stephanie Bartling, is on board. There’s a planned partnership with the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading on a quarterly journal; the possibility of building a leadership team that would work with teachers directly in applying proven reading strategies; and the making of two videos (thanks in part to a $5,000 Jim &

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A

Dream of a

Dance

The making of The Nutcracker STORY BY TAMI SCOTT PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DAVIS

Ava Ascenzo will perform as Clara in The Nutcracker. (Sophie Green will also dance in the role.) 14

FEATURE


At auditions for the Syracuse City Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker (clockwise from top left): the company’s artistic staff observe some dancers; dancers go en pointe for “The Waltz of the Snowflakes”; dancers prepare to audition for the corps de ballet; and ballet mistress Rachael Cierniakoski demonstrates for dancers getting ready to audition.

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n one recent late-summer Saturday, the heat and humidity from outside the Syracuse City Ballet’s studio had seeped into the entrance and corridors already crammed with mothers, kids and strollers. The air was thick with nervous but hopeful energy.

It was audition day. More than 150 boys and girls showed up, eager to land a part in the eighth annual local production of The Nutcracker. That number was up from last year’s 90 dancers and the company’s biggest turnout to date. Total cast in this year’s production: 125. “It’s a big cast and they’re not easy decisions,” said artistic director and company founder Kathleen Rathbun. She and the other casting coordinators stayed hours after auditions were over, combing through their notes to ensure they cast the best individual for each role. Even after intense discussions, they sometimes have second thoughts. “We’re so tired, we’re not sure if it’s right so we have to go back, look at it again and tweak it. Then we’ll say, ‘This one’s gonna be sad.’ It’s kind of like the real world; everybody doesn’t get a trophy,” Rathbun said.

“It’s hard, and I think sometimes parents don’t understand we’re struggling with it, too,” she added. “I’d love everyone to go en pointe. I’d love everyone to have a lead (but) the integrity of the production has to stay professional.” At the center of The Nutcracker is Clara, a young girl who dreams her way through the fairy tale ballet. The dancer cast in the role must have stage presence, and be able to learn quickly, retain corrections and embody the character. Two girls were chosen as Clara this year: Ava Ascenzo, 11, of Liverpool and Sophie Green, 13, of Baldwinsville. When she first heard the news, Ava said she was shocked. “I was like, ‘(Did they get) the right person?’ I didn’t think I would be good enough to get it. My mom started screaming, she was so excited.”

Ava has performed in The Nutcracker since she was 7, when she danced as one of the 16 mice. This year, as one of the leads, the sixth-grader from St. Rose of Lima School said she expects to get help and tips from the older kids and past Claras. Ava also appreciates that she’ll be sharing the part. “I think me and the other Clara can, like, work together and learn off each other’s mistakes or compliments. There’s a lot we can help each other with.” For Sophie, the news put her on Cloud 9. “It’s my favorite ballet ever,” she said, “and this is the first year I’ll actually have time for it, so I’m really excited.” She anticipates a hectic but rewarding schedule: “I feel like the whole experience is going to further my dance education and help me grow as an artist.” Alongside Clara’s character is her brother, Fritz, who will be played by Andres Vallardes. Vallardes recently moved to Central New York from California and is a student at Jamesville-DeWitt Middle School. In the Syracuse City Ballet version of The Nutcracker, Fritz protects his sister and goes through the Land of Sweets with her. continued on page 17 Family Times NOVEMBER 2017 15


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Dancers auditioning for the corps de ballet in Syracuse City Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker. Rehearsals begin two months before the curtains rise, with hours spent in the studio, every weekend, from Friday evening through Sunday afternoon until the first performance Dec. 2. “It’s definitely a big commitment for the kids and adults alike,” said ballet mistress and company manager Rachael Cierniakoski. “We know we have a limited time to fit everything in, so we require a lot of focus and dedication from everyone, including ourselves.” West Genesee High School senior and corps de ballet member Hannah Walsh will perform in the show for the last time this year. She admits she made some tough sacrifices over the five years she’s been involved. “There’d be Friday-night football games that I’d want to go to, but couldn’t because of rehearsal and stuff like that,” she said. The chance to perform on stage is her reward. What has made a substantial difference to practices this year is Ballet and Dance of Upstate NY’s new studio. Also founded by Rathbun, Ballet and Dance is the official school of the Syracuse City Ballet. In past years, rehearsals took place in the basement of a local church that had low ceilings and poles. It was challenging for the dancers, particularly the corps de

ballet, to learn the intricate choreography of certain scenes in the makeshift space. “When we got on the (Mulroy Civic Center’s Crouse-Hinds Concert Theater) stage, the stage was so much bigger than the studio, that we had to basically restage everything and that would take time and money to do,” Rathbun said. The building at 932 Spencer St. in Syracuse is 5,100 square feet, and Rathbun is thrilled that the space will allow the staff to tape out the exact size of the Crouse-Hinds stage in the studio. That same room has a dividing wall to create two smaller studios, high ceilings and no poles. Also new for the company is its very own “growing” tree to serve as one of the few hard props in the ballet. In the first act, when Clara goes to sleep and begins to dream, the Christmas tree sprouts up to a gigantic height. The majority of the second act is a dream, which is foreshadowed in the first act. When recounting past ballets, Rathbun laughed at some of the mishaps the cast and crew have had to overcome. “One year during the party scene, which has a lot of young dancers in it. the music just stopped. They did the whole dance

without any music,” she said. The sound technician fixed the problem, and when the music started again, the dancers just continued without a pause. “It’s live theater so you never know!” Other challenges have occurred with Mother Ginger, who appears during the second act. The character, typically played by a man dressed like an old lady, is built to be larger-than-life with casters, a stage crew to roll her out and 12 little gingerbread cookie dancers all hidden underneath her dress. One difficulty they had was getting it onstage without the audience glimpsing the inner—or under— workings. “Sometimes the casters would roll on the dress and the Mother Ginger would get stuck,” Rathbun said. “We can’t move her! We can’t lift her! What are we going to do? Either they would rip (the costume) or leave her there and get her out the best they could.” Since then, the costume has been redesigned a couple of times. “I think we’ve fixed the problem,” she said. Many problems have been solved by volunteers and parents who each year come to the aid of the staff. Cierniakoski, who continued on page 18 Family Times NOVEMBER 2017 17


continued from page 17

At a rehearsal for “The Waltz of the Snowflakes,” artistic director Kathleen Rathbun (above) gives members of the corps de ballet notes.

The Syracuse City Ballet is launching a one-time sensory-friendly performance this year. It is working with a company downstate that’s helped transform even Broadway shows for people with autism or sensory issues. A sensory-friendly show involves knowing when to dim the lights or soften the music, said Rathbun. Most importantly, it will be a judgment-free zone. “No one’s going to get mad if you talk or yell or get out of your seat,” she said. joined the Syracuse City Ballet in 2013, raved about the dedication of the local dance community. “When I came here, it kind of blew my mind how everybody is so willing to pitch in all the time, to go above and beyond. They don’t mind giving up their weekends,” she said. “The parents don’t mind helping with costumes. The kids love when they can help each other in rehearsals. It’s just an atmosphere of giving and loving that makes it a lot of fun. It really does get you ready for Christmas and excited for the season.” From acting as chaperones, to helping with the concessions, to coordinating the kids’ whereabouts, The Nutcracker takes a village. Stephanie Alberts, mother of two dancers in the show, has been helping with various aspects of The Nutcracker for three years. “Being able to watch my children have complete and utter, sheer joy doing something they love so much, and the joy that it brings to our family and friends, it’s a beautiful experience,” 18

FEATURE

The ballet company will also continue to provide its outreach program to Syracuse city schools. Members of the artistic staff visit the students to share the story of The Nutcracker, listen to some of its music, and even teach them a little bit of the choreography. The company then performs two abbreviated shows midweek for schoolchildren from Syracuse and surrounding areas. Evening and matinee performances will be held Saturday, Dec. 2, and Sunday, Dec. 3. “The arts instill so much into our youth and many times it’s the first thing to be cut,” Rathbun said. “But it’s not a luxury, it’s a necessity.” Her students, she said, don’t have a problem with discipline, dedication, perseverance or creativity. “They don’t all become dancers, obviously, but many become lawyers and doctors and they like the challenge and they’re up for it,” she says. “It’s kind of neat to see that part for me: hard work and dedication and then the payoff.” Freelance writer Tami Scott lives in Liverpool with her husband, Tim, and their three children, Juliana, Santiago and Jonathan.


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iSTOCK PHOTO

Seasons of College Admissions A teen explores his options, parents in tow | BY TAMMY DiDOMENICO

I

t’s 5:12 p.m. on a random-summer weekday evening and I am struggling to keep up with my 17-year-old son and his friend as we are whisked around the north end of a college campus in northern New York. We were late arriving, as usual. It’s raining, and the guide wants to get us back to the admissions building before the staff leaves for the evening.

exercise in restraint. I myself began my college experience in an associate’s degree program at a state school about 40 minutes from where I grew up. When a local editor offered me a weekly column before I graduated, I postponed transferring to a fouryear college in order to focus on work. It took me another decade to get my bachelor’s degree.

By now, as this is our 10th campus visit, I’m well aware of how colleges market to students these days: Hype up the abundance of food choices, technology and the sports facilities; head to the library only if asked. To appease the parents, mention the access to tutors and tout the post-graduation job placement rates. I’ve got it down.

As my son got further into high school, I encouraged him to learn from my mistakes. “Choose your college carefully and make sure it’s a place you will want to identify with for the rest of your life,” I told him.

The boys are polite to the guide as he goes through all the requisites. But I know that look on my son’s face: He’s checked out. His responses are monosyllabic. His shoulders are starting to slump. And he’s avoiding my comments about how much I would have LOVED to go here! (Comments meant to encourage our plucky tour guide, whose face falls slightly when my son asks no questions.) He’s already decided that this college is a no-can-do. The only thing he wants to hear now is the list of restaurants we will encounter on the ride back home.

But maybe that’s not the best message to give a teenager when he is just coming to terms with the fact that life as he knows it will soon change in almost every way. So I’ve been doing my best to course-correct and not project my own hopes onto his prospects. I’ve learned not to sneer when a college he’s interested in has “Tech” as part of the name. I’ve stopped saying, “College students don’t read actual books these days?” when we visit the dorm rooms. I mourn the lack of college radio stations in complete silence.

This is it: My older son is a senior in high school, and the planning of post-high school endeavors has been well under way. To be honest, this is not what I pictured just a few years ago. The mothers I knew with older children seemed to make it sound so exciting. I listened to the tales of “Jimmy’s college search” and “Mary’s senior night” with awe.

And I know other parents who have been having even less fun with all this senior-year hoopla. One mom I see often has not been home for something like the past 40 weekends. Her son is a talented baseball player as well as a strong student, and she is usually on the road with him, chasing that elusive sports scholarship. Another mother spent six months looking at colleges specializing in one major, only to have her son switch gears and choose another major—requiring them to start the whole process over again.

Those parents were enjoying the fruits of their parenting labors—sons and daughters who were ready for their next step into adulthood. They all seemed to be having fun exploring college campuses and pondering scholarship offers. For many of us, the reality can be something else.

The parents of a girl my son goes to school with took the opposite approach. Since the daughter wanted to attend a school clear across the country, they bought her a ticket, wished her luck, and let that young woman survey her options on her own. That’s certainly one way to handle it.

For me, my son’s college search was, and still is, a constant 20

BEEN THERE

I felt that my husband and I were lucky in one respect: Our


son knew what he was interested in studying. The first step in his college search was to review the websites of colleges that had the right program and make some preliminary choices. This took several months. For him, making that move toward seriously considering what he wanted to do, and where he wanted to do it, was daunting. My husband and I did our best to let him navigate things himself. But patience is not something I have in abundance.

g n i k c e Ch

Once that list of college prospects got made, he could start deciding which schools would make sense based on location and cost. After some coaching from the school guidance office, we were off. We started with a few local favorites: Syracuse University (Dad’s alma mater and Mom’s former employer) and Cornell (my son’s dream school). For my son, the newness of the process was invigorating. He sat in on a class. He made a point to meet the deans at the schools. He met a cute girl from New England who was traveling with her dad on an East Coast college tour. He seriously considered what living away from home would entail. After quick trips to other New York cities to see more campuses, a clear favorite emerged. Afterward, other schools he visited were judged against it and none measured up, thus wasting a few perfectly good Saturdays. Spring break of junior year was also spent on the hunt, and we visited three campuses in the Boston area in three days. One, which I thought would be perfect, he hated. One I thought would be a good choice, but my husband deemed it “too liberal” after seeing a poster promoting a series of upcoming speakers. But the last school, located right in the heart of Boston, my son’s favorite city, was different. The energy on this campus was palpable, and it perked my usually reserved son right up. The students and staff were friendly and understanding, and seemed genuinely interested in why he was there and what he wanted to do. The lab facilities—which my son was very interested in—were impressive, and comfortably integrated into the heart of the campus, unlike at other schools. And the atmosphere of purpose on campus was infectious; these were young people who seemed motivated and eager to embrace every moment. I thought to myself, yes, this could be where my smart teenager will find inspiration. It was the only college where he took the plunge and actually bought a piece of clothing. (I’m told this is a pretty big commitment.) Notably absent from my son’s list were any state schools. So, my husband and I put two on ours. As “The Summer Before Senior Year” became burdened with balancing three work schedules, and my younger son’s activities, and both boys’ year-round sports commitments, fitting in those last two visits became far more of a chore than it should have been. Once the school year began, we still had one visit left.

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Now, the focus has moved to college applications and essays. Before long, yet another phase will be bearing down on us: the financial aid filing deadline nightmare. Stay tuned!

Award-winning writer Tammy DiDomenico lives in DeWitt with her husband and two sons.

for help call

315-471-1359

Family Times NOVEMBER 2017 21


BEST APPLE PICKING Beak & Skiff Apple Orchard

2708 Lords Hill Road, LaFayette. (315) 696-8683, beakandskiff. com.

for Families PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DAVIS

BEST GYMNASTICS PROGRAM YMCA of Greater Syracuse syracuse.ymca.org.

BEST OUTDOOR TRAILS Green Lakes State Park

7900 Green Lakes Road, Fayetteville. (315) 637-6111, parks.ny.gov/parks/172.

BEST PLACE TO SKI Labrador Mountain 6935 NY-91, Truxton. (607) 842-6204, skicny.com.

BEST PLACE TO BIKE Onondaga Lake Park 106 Lake Drive, Liverpool. (315) 453-6712, onondagacountyparks.com.

BEST ORGANIZED WALK/RUN Paige’s Butterfly Run 2911 Fargo Road, Baldwinsville. (315) 303-2578, pbrun.org.

BEST DATE NIGHT LOCATION Movie Tavern 180 Township Blvd., Camillus. 22

(315) 758-1678, movietavern. com/locations/syracuse.

BEST LOCAL AMUSEMENT OR WATER PARK Enchanted Forest Water Safari

3183 State Route 28, Old Forge. (315) 369-6145, watersafari.com.

BEST GO-KARTS RPM Raceway

Destiny USA, 9090 Destiny USA Drive, Syracuse. (315) 423-7223, rpmraceway.com.

Parkway, Liverpool. (315) 4536712, onondagacountyparks. com/parks/onondaga-lake-park/ wegmans-playground.

BEST AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM YMCA of Greater Syracuse syracuse.ymca.org.

BEST BOWLING ALLEY Flamingo Bowl 7239 Oswego Road, Liverpool. (315) 457-7470, flamingobowlcny. com.

BEST HEALTH STORE Natur-Tyme

BEST MUSEUM The Milton J. 3160 Erie Blvd E., Syracuse. Rubenstein Museum BEST PRE-SCHOOL (315) 488-6300, natur-tyme.com. of Science & PROGRAM BEST Technology Learn As You Grow 500 S. Franklin St., Syracuse. PEDIATRICIAN Early Education (315) 425-9068, most.org. Pediatric Associates Centers learnasyougrowccc.com. pediatricassociatesny.com. BEST MOVIE THEATER BEST CNY BEST DENTIST Movie Tavern PLAYGROUND Dr. Michael Fallon, 180 Township Blvd., Camillus. (315) 758-1678, movietavern. Wegmans Fallon and Fallon com/locations/syracuse. 5109 W. Genesee St., Camillus. Playground (315) 469-6871, facebook.com/ Onondaga Lake Park, BEST MOVIE Fallondentistry. 6763-6777 Onondaga Lake DRIVE-IN Best Park, Best Place to Bike, Best CNY Playground, Best Dog Park Midway Drive-In 2475 State Route 48, Fulton. (315) 343-0211, midwaydrivein.com.

BEST ICE SKATING Clinton Square Ice Rink 2 S. Clinton St., Syracuse. (315) 423-0129, syrgov.net/ parks/clintonsquarerink.html.

BEST PUMPKIN PATCH Tim’s Pumpkin Patch 2901 Rose Hill Road, Marietta. (315) 673-9209, timspumpkinpatch.com.

BEST OF SYRACUSE

Onondaga Lake Park: Debbie Dennis, Charlie Bisnett


BEST BIRTHDAY CAKE Wegmans Bakery wegmans.com.

BEST HOT DOG Heid’s of Liverpool 305 Oswego St. Liverpool. (315) 451-0786, heidsofliverpool.com.

BEST DOUGHNUTS Just Donuts 219 County Route 57, Phoenix. (315) 695-1387, justdonutsnobagels.com.

BEST DANCE PROGRAM Ballet & Dance of Upstate NY 932 Spencer St., Syracuse. (315) 487-4879, balletanddanceofupstateny.com.

Best Radio Personality Amy Robbins and Ted Long, WNTQ-FM 93.1 (93Q)

BEST RADIO BEST FAMILY PERSONALITY RESTAURANT Ted and Amy, Tully’s Good Times WNTQ-FM 93.1 (93Q) tullysgoodtimes.com. 93q.com/tedandamy.

BEST RADIO STATION WNTQ-FM 93.1 (93Q)

BEST BREAKFAST SPOT Stella’s Diner

93q.com.

110 Wolf St., Syracuse. (315) 4250353, stellasdinersyracuse.com.

BEST TV PERSONALITY Wayne Mahar CNY Central.

BEST FROZEN TREATS Gannon’s Isle Ice Cream

cnycentral.com/station/people/ wayne-mahar.

BEST BAKERY Harrison Bakery 1306 W. Genesee St., Syracuse. (315) 422-1468, harrisonbakerysyracuse.com.

gannonsicecream.com.

BEST PIZZA Toss ‘N’ Fire Wood Fired Pizza

315 N. Main St., North Syracuse. tossnfirepizza.com.

BEST CAR DEALERSHIP Driver’s Village 5885 Circle Drive E., Cicero. (877) 514-1748, driversvillage.com.

BEST CAR WASH Delta Sonic deltasoniccarwash.com.

BEST AUTO REPAIR SHOP John’s Auto Care

2045 Milton Ave., Syracuse. (315) 468-6880, johnsautocareandtire. com.

BEST USED BOOKSTORE Books End 2443 James St., Syracuse. (315) 437-2312, thebooksend.com.

BEST PARK Onondaga Lake Park

BEST LIBRARY Onondaga Free Library

4840 W. Seneca Turnpike., Syracuse. (315) 492-1727, oflibrary.org.

BEST NOT-FORPROFIT Helping Hounds Dog Rescue

6606 Kinne Road., DeWitt. (315) 446-5970, helpinghoundsdogrescue.org.

BEST PET DAYCARE/ BOARDING Carm’s Dog House carmsdoghouse.com.

BEST VETERINARIAN Liverpool Village Animal Hospital

6770 Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. (315) 451-5455, liverpoolvillagevets.com.

BEST ANIMAL/PET RESCUE Helping Hounds Dog Rescue 6606 Kinne Road., DeWitt. (315) 446-5970, helpinghoundsdogrescue.org.

BEST DOG PARK Wegmans Good Dog Park at Onondaga Lake Park 49 Cold Springs Trail, Liverpool. onondagacountyparks.com/ parks/onondaga-lake-park/ wegmans-good-dog-park.

BEST ANIMAL WHISPERER Jake Grenier, Dog Trainer at PetCo petco.com.

106 Lake Drive, Liverpool. (315) 453-6712, onondagacountyparks.com. Family Times NOVEMBER 2017 23


Please note: Mistakes happen. To confirm event details, call the sponsoring organization’s phone number or visit the website.

Wednesday, Nov. 1 First Steps. 9:30 a.m.; also Nov. 8, 15, 22 & 29.

Children who are good walkers, up to age 3, can with a caregiver take part in a program with music, movement, crafts and more. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. Free. (315) 637-6374. fflib.org.

Baby Storytime. 10:30 a.m.; also Nov. 8, 15,

22 & 29. Babies and caregivers can share rhymes, songs, stories and signs in this language-building program. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. Free. (315) 637-6374. fflib.org.

Read, Sing, Play Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m.; also Nov. 8, 15, 22 & 29. Children from birth to age 5 years, accompanied by an adult, can enjoy a fun storytime. Central Library, KidSpace, 447 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-1900. Storytime. 10:30 a.m.; also Nov. 8, 15 & 29.

Children ages 2-4 (and siblings), accompanied by caregivers, can hear stories, sing songs and make crafts. Hazard Branch Library, 1620 W. Genesee St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-5326.

Homeschool Creative Writing Club. 1:30-3

p.m. Students in grades 7-12 can join other homeschooler teens who are interested in writing fiction or poetry. Bring a notebook or laptop. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Homeschool STEAM Club. 1:30-3 p.m.

Homeschoolers ages 5-10 can learn about science, technology, engineering, art and math with handson activities and experiments. Parents and siblings

24

CALENDAR

are welcome. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Technology Camp. 4:30 p.m.; also Nov. 8, 15 &

29. Young people ages 8-18 can learn a variety of tech skills, from basic robotics to computer coding in sessions with plenty of hands-on activities. Mundy Branch Library, 1204 S. Geddes St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3797.

Teen Geeks. 6-8 p.m.; also Nov. 15. Teens can

hang out, eat snacks, and play a game or do another activity at each week’s session. Board games are played in the first session, and video games in the second. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Teen Writer’s Guild. 4-5 p.m.; also Nov. 9 &

15. Join fellow teens to write in any of a variety of genres, receive feedback and get support. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. Free. (315) 637-6374. ffl.org.

Craft Club. 5:15 p.m.; also Nov. 9 & 16. Children age 5 and up can use their imaginations and discover new crafting techniques. Beauchamp Branch Library, 2111 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3395.

Friday, Nov. 3

6:30-9 p.m. Songwriters of all ages and skill levels can bring work, and get and give constructive suggestions. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Words and Music Songwriter Woodshed.

Drop in Family Storytime. 10:15-10:45 a.m.; also Nov. 17. Children age 5 and under, with caregivers, can share songs, stories and games. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

The Lion King. 7:30 p.m.; through Nov. 12.

Free to Be. 10:30-11:15 a.m. Children from

Musical by Elton John and Tim Rice. Landmark Theatre, 362 S. Salina St., Syracuse. $25-$121. ticketmaster.com.

Thursday, Nov. 2 Trail Tales. 1 p.m.; also Nov. 16 & 30. A

naturalist reads nature-themed stories and then leads a hike whose theme matches the stories; for children ages 3-5, accompanied by an adult. Beaver Lake Nature Center parking lot, 8477 E. Mud Lake Road, Baldwinsville. $4/parking. 638-2519.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream. 4 p.m.;

through Nov. 4. The JCB Drama club presents Shakespeare’s comedy about four young lovers who find themselves lost and confused in a magical forest. John C. Birdlebough High School, 552 Main St., Phoenix. $8/adults; $5/senior citizens & students. (315) 695-1631. Pre-order: lspereno@ phoenixcsd.org.

infants to age 6 can take part in this early childhood music and acting class with live guitar music, creating unique lyrics. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. Free. (315) 637-6374. fflib.org.

Sharing Nature. 1 p.m.; also Nov. 10 & 17. Preschoolers, accompanied by an adult, can discover nature with walks, games and crafts. Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 E. Mud Lake Road, Baldwinsville. $7/person. Parking: $4/vehicle. Preregistration required: (315) 638-2519. Popcorn Fridays. 3:30-4:30 p.m.; also Nov. 17. Young people ages 12-18 can eat popcorn, watch anime and play games in the teen space. Central Library, 447 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-1900. Wii and Game Fun. 3:30 p.m.; also Nov. 17.

Kids age 5 and up can test their skills on the Nintendo Wii and play board games while they


MICHAEL DAVIS PHOTO

wait. Beauchamp Branch Library, 2111 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3395.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream. 7:30 p.m.; through Nov. 4. See Nov. 2 listing.

Saturday, Nov. 4 Jingle Bell Run. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. A festive 5K run

raises awareness and funds for the Arthritis Foundation. Long Branch Park, 3813 Long Branch Road, Liverpool. $15-$40. (585) 264-1480.

Squishing of the Squash. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. When

Halloween’s over, zoo animals get a chance to play with and squish some pumpkins. Rosamond Gifford Zoo at Burnet Park, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Admission: $8/adults; $5/senior citizens; $4/children; free/age 2 and younger. (315) 4358511. rosamondgiffordzoo.org.

NYS Model Train Fair. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; also Nov. 5. One of the Northeast’s premier model train shows, with dozens of vendors and numerous operating layouts. Sponsored by the National Railway Historical Society’s Central New York chapter. State Fairgrounds, Geddes. $10/age 16 & older; free/age 15 and under. (315) 451-6551. modeltrainfair.com. Paws and Books. 10:30-11:30 a.m.; also Nov.

18. Children ages 5-12 can read a story to Cooper, a trained, lovable dog certified as a Canine Good Citizen. Hazard Branch Library, 1620 W. Genesee St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-5326.

Paws to Read. 10:30-11:30 a.m.; also Nov. 11,

18 & 25. Kids can read to a friendly dog from Paws Inc. of CNY. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Lights on the Lake, Nov. 15 - Jan. 7 Toddlers’ Tango. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Toddlers and preschoolers can join the fun in this music and movement class. Salina Free Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. Registration required: (315) 454-4524.

Highland Forest Open House. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Meet the staff, buy season ski passes, and find out about outdoor clubs. Horse-drawn wagon rides for $3. Highland Forest Park, Skyline Lodge, County Road 128, Fabius. Free admission. (315) 683-5550.

Tails to Tell. 11 a.m.; also Nov. 18. Children ages 5-12 can read to a dog volunteer trained by Paws of CNY. Mundy Branch Library, 1204 S. Geddes St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3797.

Rice Creek Story Hour. 11 a.m. Elementary-aged children, especially, will enjoy tales of animals’ wild ways and how humans relate to the natural world; all ages are welcome. Rice Creek

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Holiday MEGA SALE Shopping Town Mall

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SHOP incredible deals on 75,000 amazing children’s items (newborn-pre-teen) including: Clothing • Toys • Baby Gear • Sports Equipment Furniture • Books • Games • Shoes & More

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Field Station, SUNY Oswego, Thompson Road, 1 mile south of Route 104, Oswego. Free. (315) 312-6677.

St. Daniel Harvest Festival. Noon-9 p.m.

Activities include kids’ games and crafts; bake sale; casino games; raffles; and a performance by Elvis impersonator Tom Gilbo (5-6 p.m.). St. Daniel School gymnasium, 3004 Court St., Syracuse. Free admission. (315) 454-4946.

Aladdin. 12:30 p.m. The Magic Circle Children’s

Theatre presents an interactive, comic version of the tale, in which children in the audience help Aladdin find the magic lamp and win the princess’ heart. Children are invited to dress as their favorite fairy tale character. Spaghetti Warehouse, 689 N. Clinton St., Syracuse. $6. Reservations recommended: (315) 449-3823.

Ukulele for Beginners. 1-2 p.m. Pat Doherty teaches a class for newcomers to the ukulele. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org. Technology Camp. 2 p.m.; also Nov. 11, 18 &

25. Young people ages 8-18 can learn a variety of tech skills, from basic robotics to computer coding in sessions with plenty of hands-on activities. Mundy Branch Library, 1204 S. Geddes St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3797.

Sciencenter Showtime. 2 p.m.; Saturdays.

In upcoming sessions of this weekly interactive series, topics will include: boat safety, birds, seeds, and the engineering of a rollercoaster. Sciencenter, 601 First St., Ithaca. Admission: $8/ages 2-64; $7/ seniors, age 65-plus; free/under 2. (607) 272-0600. sciencenter.org.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream. 7:30 p.m. See Nov. 2 listing.

Sunday, Nov. 5 DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ENDS NYS Model Train Fair. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. See Nov.

4 listing.

Montessori School Open House. 2-4 p.m.

Learn about the private preschool and elementary school for children ages 3-12. Montessori School of Syracuse, 155 Waldorf Parkway, Syracuse. (315) 449-9033. mssyr.org.

Mickey & Minnie’s Doorway to Magic. 1 &

4 p.m. In this Disney Live show, more than two dozen characters emerge from a magical doorway to perform spectacular scenes. Crouse-Hinds Theater, Oncenter, 411 Montgomery St., Syracuse. $15-$105. (315) 435-2121. disneylive.com.

Day of the Dead Party. 2-3 p.m. Everyone from age 8 to 18 can celebrate Dia de los Muertos by eating traditional foods, making crafts and learning more about this Mexican holiday. Community Library of DeWitt & Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, DeWitt. Free. Registration required: (315) 446-3578. CLDandJ.org.

Monday, Nov. 6 Moms Club of Syracuse East. 10 a.m.-noon.;

Gaming for Adults with Special Needs.

1:30-3 p.m. Adults with special needs can build communication and social skills while playing Wii and board games. Caregivers must remain in the room. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Monday Funday. 5 p.m. Children ages 5-10 can

make a craft. Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 Genesee St., Camillus. Free. (315) 672-3661. maxwellmemoriallibrary.org.

Multiple Moms Mingle. 6:30 p.m. Monthly meeting of mothers and expectant mothers of multiples. Tully’s, 2943 Erie Blvd. E., Syracuse. Reserve if you wish to attend: multiplemomsmingle.com.

Tuesday, Nov. 7 ELECTION DAY Kids Vote. 9 a.m.-7:30 p.m. Children ages 5-12 can make their own voter registration cards and cast votes in the categories of snacks, books, movies and library programs. Hazard Branch Library, 1620 W. Genesee St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-5326. Rock Your Vote. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Kids ages 11-17 can use mock ballots to “vote” in Syracuse elections. Mundy Branch Library, 1204 S. Geddes St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3797.

Stories and More. 10 a.m.; also Nov. 14, 21 &

28. Children from babies to age 5 years can get a chance to move around, sing, hear stories and more. Mundy Branch Library, 1204 S. Geddes St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3797.

Signing Storytime. 10:30 a.m.; also Nov. 21.

Children ages 3-6 can learn several signs that correspond to the stories that day. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. Free. (315) 637-6374. fflib.org.

Read, Sing and Play Storytime. 10:30 a.m.;

also Nov. 14, 21 & 28. Children ages 18 months to 5 years and their families can participate in stories, rhymes, fingerplays and songs. Petit Branch Library, 105 Victoria Place, Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3636.

Drop In Crafts. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Kids can make

fun, seasonal crafts in the Children’s Room with provided materials. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Tails to Tell. 3:30 p.m.; also Nov. 14, 21 & 28.

Children ages 5-12 can read to a dog volunteer trained by Paws of CNY. Mundy Branch Library, 1204 S. Geddes St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3797.

Coding Essentials. 4-5:15 p.m.; also Nov. 14, 21

& 28. People age 12 and up can learn about HTML and CSS. Attendees must understand how to navigate the internet. Central Library, MakerSpace, 447 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-1900.

Hazard Teen Poetry Society. 5 p.m.; also Nov. 14. High school senior Chris Costello teaches the fundamentals of poetry, and how to gather ideas and produce new work; for ages 1319. Hazard Branch Library, 1620 W. Genesee St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-5326.

also Nov. 20. Meet other mothers while the kids play. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. Free. (315) 637-6374. ffl.org.

Wednesday, Nov. 8

Rhyme Time. 10:30 a.m.; also Nov. 20. Children

Storytime. 10 a.m.; also Nov. 15, 22 & 29. Early

from infants to 2 years will learn songs and nursery rhymes, followed by free play with educational toys. Hazard Branch Library, 1620 W. Genesee St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-5326.

26

CALENDAR

readers can practice literacy skills with music, rhymes, movement and stories; for ages from infants through 5 years. Beauchamp Branch Library, 2111 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3395.

Teen Anime Night. 6-8 p.m. Teens can come

and talk about anime. Cosplay is okay, but library staff must approve. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Teen Anime Night at NOPL. 6-8 p.m. Young people can watch anime, partipate in drawing contests, and take part in other activities. NOPL North Syracuse, 100 Trolley Barn Lane, North Syracuse. Free. (315) 458-6184.

Thursday, Nov. 9 Smartplay. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Children age 6 and

under can explore a free-play environment that promotes discovery, creativity and the development of early literacy skills. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. Free. (315) 637-6374. fflib.org.

Preschool Book Club. 1:30 p.m. Children ages 3-5 can bring a parent or guardian to read a book together and then talk about things happening in the book. Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 Genesee St., Camillus. Free. (315) 672-3661. maxwell memoriallibrary.org. Teen Trading Card Game Day. 2:30-4:30 p.m. Young people ages 12-18 can join TCG Player, a local company, for an afternoon of games and prizes. Central Library, Community Room, 447 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-1900. Teen Writing and Drawing Group. 3:30-5 p.m. Teens can share art or writing, get feedback, and talk about their projects. Petit Branch Library, 105 Victoria Place, Syracuse. Free. Registration required: (315) 435-3636.

Friday, Nov. 10 Time for Tots Playgroup. 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Education playgroup for children ages 18 months-5 years and their caregiver. Stories, songs, arts and crafts, and more. Cross of Christ Lutheran Church, 8131 Soule Road, Liverpool. $3/family. Registration recommended: (315) 622-2843. NYCrossofChrist.org/Tots.

Home School Nature Series. 10 a.m.-noon.

Homeschooled students ages 5-12 will discover how birds find their way to wintering locations and back home again. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah. $8/student. (315) 365-3588. ny.audubon.org/montezuma.

Family Dance Party. 2-3 p.m.; also Nov. 17. Active toddlers and preschoolers, and their grownups, can dance to music, using props and playing rhythm instruments. NOPL Cicero, 8686 Knowledge Lane, Cicero. Free. (315) 699-2032.

Saturday, Nov. 11

CNY Bridges Build ’Em & Bust ’Em. 8 a.m.1 p.m. Teams of up to three students in grades 4-12 can build bridges out of balsa wood and see them broken to test the bridges’ strength. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST), 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. Admission: $12/adults; $10/ages 2-15. (315) 425-9068. Read, Make, Play. 10:30 a.m.; also Nov. 18 & 25. Children ages 3-5 can listen to stories, make crafts and play. Mundy Branch Library, 1204 S. Geddes St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3797.


The Secret of the Puppets Book. 11 a.m. In this performance,

Lewis, a puppet who loves stories, discovers the fun and adventure of reading. Open Hand Theater, Suite No. 3, Shoppingtown Mall, 3649 Erie Blvd. E., DeWitt. $5. (315) 476-0466. openhandtheater.org.

ents can learn yoga and literacy skills in a session that features puppets, stories, songs and breathing exercises. Participants must wear socks; mats provided. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. Free. Registration required: (315) 637-6374. ffl.org.

Rice Creek Rambles. 11 a.m.;

Creation Station. 2:30 p.m. Kids

also 18 & 25. Explore trails, woods and wetlands with a naturalist on a family-friendly hike. Those under 17 must be accompanied by an adult. Rice Creek Field Station, SUNY Oswego, Thompson Road, 1 mile south of Route 104, Oswego. Free. Call day of to check trail conditions: (315) 312-6677.

Aladdin. 12:30 p.m. See Nov. 4 listing.

Science Saturday. 2-4 p.m. Kids

age 6 and up can learn a new way to use an iPad, using the Osmo app for word and math games, coding, drawing and more. Petit Branch Library, 105 Victoria Place, Syracuse. Free. Registration required: (315) 435-3636.

Sensory Friendly Time. 5:30-

7:30 p.m. Staff turn down the noise, turn off flashing lights, and shut off air compressors so people with sensory processing challenges can enjoy the museum. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST). 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. Museum admission: $12/adults; $10/seniors and ages 2-11. (315) 425-9068.

Sunday, Nov. 12 March of Dimes Run/March for Babies. 8 a.m. (5K run registration);

10 a.m. (three-mile walk registration). At 9 a.m., run 5K or at 11 a.m. walk three miles and raise money for local programs that support healthy pregnancies. SRC Arena, Onondaga Community College, 4585 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Donations and pledges. (315) 463-0700.

Monday, Nov. 13 The Bubble Man. 2-3 p.m. Doug Rougeux creates intricate and beautiful bubbles. NOPL Brewerton, 5440 Bennett St., Brewerton. (315) 676-7484. Lights on the Lake Stroll.

5-9 p.m. Special two-mile walking preview of annual wonderland of illuminated holiday scenes at Onondaga Lake Park, Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool, before it opens to vehicles only. Visitors may stroll some or all of the trail. Holiday characters will be on the trail. Parking at Griffin Visitor Center, Salt Museum or Willow Bay lots. $2/donation for adults. (315) 453-6712.

Tuesday, Nov. 14 Yoga Storytime. 10:30 a.m.; also

also Nov. 28. Kids ages 3-6 and par-

ages 5-12 can make three different Thanksgiving crafts: paper pumpkins, thankful pies and turkeys. All supplies provided. Hazard Branch Library, 1620 W. Genesee St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-5326.

Teen MOPS. 4-6 p.m.; also Nov. 28. Young mothers, ages 13-21, with children under 6 enjoy a faith-based program with fun, food and activities while their children are cared for by the childcare program. Liverpool First United Methodist Church, 604 Oswego St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 569-2542.

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Weekday Mornings 5:30 -10AM

Lights on the Lake Dog Walk.

5-9 p.m. Dogs are welcome for this special walking preview of the annual illuminated holiday wonderland, including holiday characters. Walkers can cover as much of the two-mile stretch as they wish. Refreshments for humans and dogs available for sale. Onondaga Lake Park, Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. Parking at Griffin Visitor Center, Salt Museum or Willow Bay lots. $2/donation. (315) 453-6712.

Family Literacy Hour. 6:15-7:15 p.m.; also Nov. 28. Families with children from infants to 5 years old can get into stories, music, rhymes and movement. Beauchamp Branch Library, 2111 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3395.

Wednesday, Nov. 15 Cooking Fall Muffins. 4 p.m. Kids

ages 5-12 can learn while making a delicious treat. Mundy Branch Library, 1204 S. Geddes St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3797.

Opening Night Lights on the Lake. 5-10 p.m., daily; through Jan.

7. Drive through the annual light extravaganza featuring two miles of life-size displays, themed sections and a grand finale. Onondaga Lake Park, Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. $10/car, Monday-Thursday; $15/car, Friday-Sunday. (315) 453-6712.

Pokemon. 6:30 p.m. Participants of all skill levels are encouraged to come and play Pokemon. Participants should bring their own decks. For kids in grade 3 and up. Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. Registration required: (315) 492-1727. Cirque du Soleil: Varekai. 7:30

p.m.; through Nov. 19. In a set depicting a magical forest, a cast of 50 performers demonstrates a variety of circus arts, from street performance to aerial acts. War Memorial, Oncenter, 800 S. State St., Syracuse. $25-$170. ticketmaster.com.

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Family Times NOVEMBER 2017 27


Thursday, Nov. 16 Terrific Thursdays. 11 a.m.-noon. In a program for homeschooling students and families, children can learn how to get ideas for stories with children’s book author Lauri Fortino. Community Library of DeWitt & Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, DeWitt. Free. Registration required: (315) 446-3578. CLDandJ.org. Thanksgiving Meal. 12:15 p.m.

Community members can help serve a festive meal especially for those with special needs. The Road, 4845 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. (315) 218-6066. wholelygrounds attheroad.org.

Celebrate Eric Carle. 2-3 p.m.

Children ages 3-7 can celebrate author Eric Carle with a storytime and a craft; each attendee will receive a free book. Salina Free Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. Registration required: (315) 454-4524.

Teen Book Club. 3:30-4:30 p.m. In this month’s session, young people ages 12-18 can talk about M.E. Girard’s Girl Mans Up, about Pen, a 16-year-old girl who looks like a boy. Central Library, Community Room, 447 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-1900. Game Design Coding Club. 6:30 p.m. Children in grade 5 and up can learn to program their own computer games using Scratch. Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. Registration required: (315) 492-1727.

Friday, Nov. 17 Toddler Dance Party. 10:30 a.m. Toddlers and preschoolers, ages 18 months to 5 years, accompanied by caregivers, can enjoy musical instruments, bubbles and tunes. Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville. Free. CLDandJ.org. (315) 446-3578. Mixing and Mastering. 3:30-4:30 p.m. People age 12 and up can learn the basics of post-production techniques with SubCat Studios. Central Library, MakerSpace, 447 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-1900. Registration required: onlib.org/ events/calendar.

Star Party. 7-9 p.m. Using a telescope, look for the Leonid Meteor Shower, and get a look at Uranus and Neptune. Bring a lawn chair or blanket to lie back and watch for meteors. Dress warmly. (Backup date: Nov. 18.) Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. $9. (315) 673-1350. Register: baltimorewoods.org.

Saturday, Nov. 18 Junior Café Scientifique. 9:30-11 a.m. The Technology Alliance of Central New York presents a talk by Maryame El Moutamid about orbital

28

dynamics and celestial mechanics. The talk is geared toward middle school students, who must be accompanied by an adult. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST), 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. Free. Register by email: jrcafe@tacny.org.

tasty treats to eat and make crafts to take home. Mundy Branch Library, 1204 S. Geddes St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3797.

Thursday, Nov. 23

Polar Express Pajama Party.

listing.

Pioneer Cabin Campfire Cooking. 2-4 p.m. Learn tradi-

Graphic Novel and Comic Book Club. 2 p.m. Young people

ages 13-19 can discuss Matt Dembicki’s book Trickster: Native American Tales (available Hoopla), work on their own graphic novels, and eat pizza. Hazard Branch Library, 1620 W. Genesee St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-5326.

Family Dance. 6:30 p.m. Children

and adults of all ages and abilities are welcome to join in fun and simple dances. United Church of Fayetteville, 310 E. Genesee St., Fayetteville. $2/adults; $1/teens & kids. syracuse countrydancers.org.

Sunday, Nov. 19 See Ongoing Events

Monday, Nov. 20 First Day Erie Canal Museum Gingerbread Gallery. 10 a.m.-5

p.m.; through Jan. 7. (Closed Nov. 23.) See structures made from pretzels, candy and—of course—gingerbread in this magical village, with a special theme of the Erie Canal and its vessels. Erie Canal Museum, 318 Erie Blvd. E., Syracuse. $7/adults; $5/ seniors; $2/age 12 & under. (315) 471-0593.

Homeschooling 101 for Parents. 7-8:30 p.m. Homeschooling

parents meet and talk about a different topic each month. This month: online options. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Tuesday, Nov. 21 See Ongoing Events

Turkey Trot 5K. 9 a.m. 5K leaves

from the White Water Pub, 110 S. Willow St., Liverpool, and follows the East Shore Trail, Onondaga Lake Park, Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. $25. (315) 373-1282.

Friday, Nov. 24 IMAX Polar Express Opening Day. Noon & 3 p.m.; through Jan. 1. See the animated movie about a boy on the edge of not believing in Santa Claus—until he takes a wild train ride to the North Pole. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST), 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. $10/adults; $8/ages 2-11 and seniors age 65 and up. (315) 425-9068.

Opening Day Dickens’ Christmas in Skaneateles. Noon-4

p.m.; also Saturdays & Sundays through Dec. 24. More than 50 Victorian characters, including the author of A Christmas Carol himself, fill the village of Skaneateles, on Genesee, Jordan and Fennell streets. Free. (315) 685-0552. skaneateles. com.

Clinton Square Tree Lighting Ceremony. 6:30 p.m. The annual

lighting of the 50-foot-plus Norway spruce takes place following an evening of music and an appearance by Santa Claus and Mrs. Claus. After the ceremony, head to an open house at City Hall (233 E. Washington St.), meet the mayor and have photos taken with the Clauses. Downtown Syracuse. Free. (315) 473-4330. syracuse.ny.us.

Saturday, Nov. 25 Button Maker. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children ages 5-12 can create a design on paper and see how it’s made into a pinback button. Hazard Branch Library, 1620 W. Genesee St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-5326.

Lego Build. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Kids ages 5-12 can play with Legos or complete the Thanksgiving challenge. Hazard Branch Library, 1620 W. Genesee St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-5326.

Family Train Day. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Trains run on a large indoor model railroad and in loops on the floor; also a children’s play area. Presented by the Central New York LargeScale Railway Society. The Commons, Driver’s Village, 5885 E. Circle Drive, Cicero. Free. cnylsrs.net.

Thanksgiving Party. 4 p.m. Chil-

Holiday Crafts for Kids. 10 a.m.

Wednesday, Nov. 22

dren from babies to age 12 can bake

CALENDAR

Aladdin. 12:30 p.m. See Nov. 4 listing.

Aladdin. 12:30 p.m. See Nov. 4

tional campfire recipes and cooking techniques, and make something to eat right on the fire; recommended for age 8 and up. Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. $15. (315) 673-1350. Register: baltimorewoods.org.

own crafts and ornaments using materials found in nature. Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 E. Mud Lake Road, Baldwinsville. $6/person. Parking: $4/vehicle. Preregistration required: (315) 638-2519.

Children of all ages can create their

5-6 p.m. Children can take part in interactive activities and visit with Santa Claus. Then they can see The Polar Express in the six-story IMAX theater (7 p.m.). Museum of Science and Technology (MOST), 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. $5/person for party, in addition to movie tickets: $10/adults; $8/ages 2-11 and seniors age 65 and up(315) 425-9068. most.org.

Nature at Night Walk. 6-7:30

p.m. Naturalist George Steele reads from his book Wait Till It Gets Dark, then he leads a walk that helps participants explore what animals do at night. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah. $7/ adult; $5/child; $20/family. (315) 3653588. ny.audubon.org/montezuma.

Sunday, Nov. 26 See Ongoing Events

Monday, Nov. 27 See Ongoing Events

Tuesday, Nov. 28 Teen Mystery Afternoon. 3:30-

4:30 p.m. Young people ages 12-18 can try to figure out why Selena stole a library book and how justice can be served. Central Library, Community Room, 447 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-1900. Registration required: onlib.org/events/calendar.

Wednesday, Nov. 29 The Wizard of Oz. 7 p.m. (preview); through Jan. 7. An acrobatic take on the beloved story includes characters and songs from the Oscar-winning movie score. Syracuse Stage, 820 E. Genesee St., Syracuse. $20-$58. (315) 443-3275.

Thursday, Nov. 30 DIY Snowman Ornament. 6-7 p.m. Kids ages 8-12 can learn to make a snowman ornament with a light-up nose. Salina Free Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. Registration required: (315) 4544524. Yoga Storytime. 6:30 p.m.

Participants can take part in a yoga storytime, make a craft and enjoy a snack. Petit Branch Library, 105 Victoria Place, Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-3636.


Writing and Comic Drawing Club. 7 p.m. Young people in grade

6 and up can play fun games to help develop characters and plot twists, get writing tips, and more. Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. Registration requested: (315) 492-1727.

Friday, Dec. 1 See Ongoing Events

Saturday, Dec. 2 Aladdin. 12:30 p.m. See Nov. 4 listing.

Syracuse City Ballet Nutcracker. 1 & 6 p.m.; also Dec. 3. Syracuse City Ballet artists and children perform the tale of a young girl who ventures into an enchanted world after saving a dashing prince. Mulroy Civic Center, 411 Montgomery St., Syracuse. $10-$75 (plus fees). (315) 435-2121. syracusecityballet.com.

Sunday, Dec. 3 Syracuse City Ballet Nutcracker. 2 p.m. See Dec. 2 listing. ONGOING EVENTS Lights on the Lake. 5-10 p.m.,

daily; through Jan. 7. Drive through

the annual light extravaganza featuring two miles of life-size displays, themed sections and a grand finale. Onondaga Lake Park, Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. $6/car, Mondays & Tuesdays with Wegmans Shoppers Club card. $10/car, Monday-Thursday; $15/car, Friday-Sunday. (315) 453-6712.

Erie Canal Museum Gingerbread Gallery. Daily, 10 a.m.-5

p.m.; Nov. 20-Jan. 7. (Closed Nov. 23, Dec. 25 & Jan. 1.) Dec. 24 & 31: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. See a fantastical village of houses, boats and more, built with gingerbread, candy, crackers and other edible items. Erie Canal Museum, 318 Erie Blvd. E., Syracuse. $7/ adults; $5/seniors; $2/age 12 & under. (315) 471-0593.

Peanut Butter Jelly Time.

dusk. Throughout the year, visitors can grab their walking shoes and explore 4.5 miles of well-groomed, flat trails. Trails feature a 900-foot boardwalk, osprey nesting platform, and wetland and grassland restoration areas. The area is a stop for many migratory waterfowl and songbirds; other wildlife include muskrats and beavers. Great Swamp Conservancy, 3.5 miles off I-90, Exit 34, 8375 N. Main St., Canastota. Free. (315) 697-2950.

Storytimes. Mondays, 10:30

Baltimore Woods Nature Center. Hiking trails and parking are free

Fairmount Community Library Storytimes. Little Movers

and open every day from dawn to dusk. Interpretive Center open Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; closed Sundays. 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. (315) 673-1350.

Thursdays, 5 p.m. Members of the community can join in making more than a hundred bagged lunches to hand out to the hungry and homeless in downtown Syracuse. The Road, 4845 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. (315) 218-6066. whole lygroundsattheroad.org.

Wegmans Playground. Boundless Playground for children (and parents) of all ages and abilities includes accessible swings, slides, bridge and more, including special section just for the tiniest tykes. Onondaga Lake Park, Route 370, Liverpool. Free. (315) 451-PARK.

Weekend Walks With a Naturalist. Saturdays and Sundays, 2 p.m.

Barnes & Noble Storytimes.

Nature discovery hike with different topics each weekend. Beaver Lake Nature Center, Route 370, Baldwinsville. Admission: $4/vehicle. (315) 638-2519.

Great Swamp Conservancy Nature Trails. Daily, dawn to

Thursdays, 10 a.m. Join a storytime for toddlers and preschoolers that’s features a book, songs and coloring. Barnes & Noble, 3454 Erie Blvd. E., DeWitt. Free. (315) 449-2948.

Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville (formerly DeWitt Community Library)

a.m., Sept. 18-Dec. 18: Babies & Books. Tuesdays, 10:30 a.m., Sept. 19-Dec. 19: Story Play (birth to age 5). Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m., Sept. 20-Dec. 20: Toddler Time (18-36 months). Thursdays, 10:30 a.m., Sept. 21-Dec. 21: Preschool Storytimes (ages 3-5). Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville. Free. Registration required: CLDandJ.org. (315) 446-3578.

(good walkers ages 1-3): Mondays & Wednesdays, 10:15 a.m. Small Steps (unstructured play for ages 0-2 years): Tuesdays, 10:15 a.m. Creative Kids (stories and crafts for preschoolers): Mondays, 11:15 a.m., Thursdays, 10:15 a.m. Fairmount Community Library, 406 Chapel Dr., Syracuse. Free. (315) 487-8933.

Maxwell Library Storytimes.

Storytimes and book groups for all ages. Call for dates and times. Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 Genesee St., Camillus. Free. (315) 672-3661.

Northeast Community Center Library Storytimes. Preschool

storytimes with rhymes and occasional games; youngsters learn group listening and participation skills. Call for times. Northeast Community Center Library, 716 Hawley Ave., Syracuse. Free. (315) 472-6343, Ext. 208.

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Family Times NOVEMBER 2017 29


Dickens’ Christmas in Skaneateles, Nov. 24 and weekends through Dec. 24 NOPL Brewerton Storytimes. Age 2 and up: Mondays, 10:30-11:30 a.m. NOPL Brewerton, 5440 Bennett St., Brewerton. (315) 676-7484. NOPL Cicero Library Storytimes. Toddler

Story Hour: Tuesdays & Wednesdays, 10-11 a.m. Preschool Story Hour: Tuesdays & Wednesdays, 11 a.m.-noon. NOPL Cicero, 8686 Knowledge Lane, Cicero. Free. (315) 699-2032.

NOPL North Syracuse Library Storytimes. Birth-age 3: Wednesdays, 10-11 a.m. Ages

4-7: Thursdays, 11 a.m.-noon. Daycare Storytime: Fridays, 10-10:30 a.m. NOPL North Syracuse, 100 Trolley Barn Lane, North Syracuse. Free. Registration required: (315) 458-6184.

Onondaga Free Library Storytimes. Mother Goose Time (age 2 and under): Tuesdays, 11 a.m. Family Storytimes (age 2 and older): Wednesdays, 10 a.m., and Thursdays, 11 a.m. Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. (315) 492-1727.

Petit Branch Library Storytimes. Tuesdays,

10:30 a.m. Toddler and preschooler storytime for children ages 18 months-5 years and caregivers. Includes stories, rhymes, finger plays and songs. Petit Branch Library, 105 Victoria Place, Syracuse. (315) 435-3636.

Regional Market Farmers’ Market. Saturdays, 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Shop seasonal produce, meat, fish, poultry, eggs, specialty foods and more on display throughout covered sheds; heated shops of Regional Market Commons feature gift and unique items including jewelry, paintings and home decor. Also, flea market, Sundays, 7 a.m.-3 p.m. 2100 Park St., Syracuse. (315) 422-8647. ATTRACTIONS Corning Museum of Glass. 1 Corning Glass Center, Corning. Daily 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $18/adults; free/age 17 and under. (800) 732-6845. Ongoing: You Design It, We Make It: Glassblowers choose from among designs submitted by young visitors and create that work on the spot.

30

CALENDAR

Erie Canal Museum. 318 Erie Blvd. E., Syra-

cuse. Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; closed holidays. Free. (315) 471-0593. Interactive exhibit: Work the Weighlock. The Stonecutters: Exhibit reveals the fascinating world of the stonecutters and quarrymen who built the 83 locks and 18 aqueducts along the 363-mile Erie Canal.

Everson Museum of Art. 401 Harrison St.

Tuesday-Friday, Sunday, noon- 5p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $8. (315) 474-6064. World-class museum includes Children’s Interactive Gallery designed to acquaint beginning art viewers with basic art principles, with areas dedicated to portraiture, hands-on activities, and a classroom.

Museum of Science and Technology (MOST). 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square,

Syracuse. Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Open until 8 p.m. on Thursdays. Museum admission: $12/adults; $10/seniors and ages 2-11. IMAX admission only: $10/adults; $8/senior citizens and ages 2-11; (473-IMAX). (315) 425-9068. most.org. Planetarium (only available with museum admission): $2. 425-9068. Hands-on science center features the Bristol Omnitheater, Science Playhouse, Earth Science Discovery Cave, Technotown, and Flight and Space Exhibit. Silverman Planetarium shows “Zoo in the Sky,” for kids under age 8, Saturdays, Sundays and school holidays, 11:15 a.m.; “Seasonal Sky” Saturdays, Sundays and school holidays, 3:15 p.m. Throughout October: Make, a space where children of all ages can build and create.

Onondaga Historical Association Museum.

321 Montgomery St., Syracuse. Wednesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Donation. (315) 428-1864. Syracuse’s only comprehensive local history museum, with exhibits on architecture, local industries, transportation and more.

Calendar listings are free!

Email information about your family-friendly event to: editorial@familytimes.biz. Listings are due by Nov. 7 for the December issue.

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Sciencenter. 601 First St., Ithaca. Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Admission: $8/general admission, ages 2-64; $7/seniors; free/under 2. (607) 272-0600. sciencenter.org. Inspires people of all ages to discover the excitement of science through exhibits and programs. Explore the Sciencenter’s interactive exhibits. Through Sept. 17: Grossology: The (Impolite) Science of the Human Body. Mini-Golf course open through Nov. 30, weather permitting. Admission: $7/age 4 and older; free/ages 0-3 with paid adult.


MICHAEL DAVIS PHOTO

93Q........................................................................................................................ 27 Canterbury Stables............................................................................................ 12 Child Health Care Associates........................................................................... 9 CNY Arts............................................................................................................. 12 CNY Tix...............................................................................................................29 Coco’s Big Shoe Clowns.................................................................................. 19 Dave & Buster’s.................................................................................................. 19 Eastview Mall....................................................................................................... 13 Edge FCU................................................................................................................ 9 Everson Museum.................................................................................................. 9 Excellus................................................................................................................... 5 EYE Studio.............................................................................................................. 9 Faith Heritage School........................................................................................ 16 Family Life Network.......................................................................................... 11 Flamingo Bowl.................................................................................................. 7,19 Jewish Community Center..............................................................................29 John Ball for Madison County Sheriff...........................................................25 Joe Ball’s Home Improvement........................................................................27

Jordan Elbridge Country Kids.........................................................................27 Mike Carter’s Cartoon Island......................................................................... 19 Montessori Discovery School of Syracuse.................................................. 16 Montessori School of Syracuse...................................................................... 16 Montessori School of the Finger Lakes........................................................ 16 Music for Life....................................................................................................... 19 Naughty Nits......................................................................................................... 7 Pathfinder Bank.................................................................................................. 13 Pediatric Associates, LLP.................................................................................27 Polka Tot Children’s Consignment Sale.......................................................25 Prevention Network......................................................................................... 21 SewSyracuse........................................................................................................ 19 Solvay Bank.......................................................................................................... 21 St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center............................................................... 2 St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church.............................................................. 8 St. Vincent De Paul Day Care......................................................................... 16 Upstate Medical University........................................................ Back Cover Weiss, Savedoff & Ciccone................................................................................ 7

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Special Days at Lights on the Lake

Local companies within the community have stepped forward to help support Lights on the Lake. Here’s a look into the special days at Lights on the Lake. MONDAY Presented by

“Happy Holidays on behalf of SECNY Federal Credit Union! Every Monday during Lights on the Lake will be SECNY Federal Credit Union night! Don’t forget to show your SECNY debit or credit card at the ticket window to receive $4 off your admission cost! Not a SECNY Federal Credit Union member yet? Stop in to your local SECNY branch or visit secny.org to start saving now!” SAVE $4 PER CAR BY SHOWING YOUR WEGMANS’ SHOPPERS CLUB CARD

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FRIDAY Be on the lookout for Hyro…The Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital mascot – Hyro will be hiding in different areas of the show each week. Check out the Lights on the Lake Facebook page for clues. @LightsOTL

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SATURDAY WonderWorks wants to wish everyone a happy and joyful holiday season! Each and every Saturday, WonderWorks will be handing out a fabulous wonder book of savings. Save on admission, birthday parties and get a free game of laser tag! Wonderworks celebrates its 5th year in Syracuse and thanks everyone for making each year special.

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SYRACUSE NEW TIMES | LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017

ake ps! L the r Troo n ou ts o

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Welcome to Lights on the Lake Dear Friends: We are pleased to present Onondaga County’s 28th annual Lights on the Lake holiday show. Each year it has grown and we are always working to offer something new. New displays added to this year’s show include a penguin scene, a star arch, a rocking horse and a massive candle poinsettia display. Once again, all of our displays are powered by energy efficient LED lighting.

Presented by:

Our continued partnership with Galaxy Communications has enabled us to grow the show each year. And we are also appreciative of our major sponsors. • Wegmans; • Syracuse Area Honda Dealers; and • Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital We’re open every night, including New Year’s Eve, so be sure a visit to Lights on the Lake is on your list this holiday season. Sincerely, Joanne M. Mahoney

Onondaga County Executive

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SYRACUSE NEW TIMES | LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017


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Family Fun For All

SOME LIGHTS ON THE LAKE VISITORS CREATE THEIR OWN SPECIAL MEMORIES AT THE EVENT | BY MIKE JAQUAYS

F

or nearly three decades, Lights on the Lake at Onondaga Lake Park has created special memories for literally millions of visitors, memories they can now relive each time they return.

Gass admitted that fateful proposal trip was their first through Lights on the Lake. They returned again last year, and now plan on making it an annual outing — one that will always have special meaning for both of them.

Back in 2015, Corey Gass of Bernhard’s Bay was contemplating just the right way to propose to his fiancée, Jessica Benton. He saw on the Lights on the Lake website that they offered banners with custom-inscribed messages that could be placed beside the road.

“It’s a tradition we want to keep and go every year. We brought our 1-year-old son last year. We plan on having a date night ritual every year when we visit,” he promised.

That sparked the idea to ask Benton to be his wife in a fabulously festive way — through a special message of love strategically placed right there amid the festivities. As the couple toured the displays that December evening, Gass waited hopefully, and maybe a bit nervously, for Benton’s reaction. “I wasn’t sure where the banner was going to be located so the whole time we were driving in the car I was looking for it,” he recalled. “Near the end we came around a corner and I see it. She was looking at it trying to read it and once she saw ‘Jessica Lee will you marry me?’ she was confused. She figured it must have been for someone else. She then turned to me and I had the ring out and asked her to marry me. She said ‘Yes!’” The couple haven’t tied the knot yet but expect maybe next year to celebrate their nuptials.

Manlius native J.J. Pelligra recalled he has been coming to Lights on the Lake with his family every year since he was a youngster, some 20 years now. It was always his sister Stephanie Pelligra who enjoyed their trips the most, and always insisted that they return for their yearly visit. Pelligra had noticed all of the banners there during their tours, and knew he had a great idea for a memorable gift for his sister in 2015: a banner specifically for her with a holiday message on it. Pelligra said arranging the logistics of their visit together while the banner was up, while still keeping it a surprise, was a challenge, but well worth it. “She absolutely freaked out,” Pelligra said. “She was in shock and speechless. Afterward, she said it was the best gift she’s ever got. We pulled over — against the rules, I know — to let her take a continued on page 11

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cheer! Holiday

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continued from page 8 quick picture by it. I captured the moment she saw it from the car with my camera as well. Lots of laughter followed.” Pelligra now lives in New York City, and Stephanie is in Chicago. But that won’t stop them from visiting Lights on the Lake again this season, he said. The event blossomed from the first-ever Holiday in Lights celebration in 1990-1991, featuring a humble, half-mile display set up by private promoter Glen Donnelly and DIRT Enterprises. Entering from the Salt Museum, guests viewed solely white lights, in non-moving displays that were only a little larger than what might be seen at homes around the neighborhood. Admission to that inaugural event was $5 per car. The following season saw the first official Lights on the Lake, as local businessmen John and Pat Brandano took the Holiday in Lights concept and improved on it in cooperation with Onondaga County Parks. A partnership of Parks, the Friends of Historic Onondaga Lake, and Brandano Displays expanded the concept to feature multicolored and much larger attractions throughout the length of a now two-mile trail. The electricity was provided by existing sources coupled with generators. The entrance was moved to Willow Bay to alleviate any possible traffic problems in the village of Liverpool, and a temporary AM radio station was installed, although that didn’t work as well as hoped at the time.

2 mil es

of me mo

ries!

plays, seeing more than 300 of them adorned with some 600,000 lights. Following the Stroll and Dog Walk, Lights on the Lake opened up in 2016 with a salute to veterans, with all vets and active duty military personnel admitted free. Lights on the Lake spokesperson and Galaxy Events general manager Carrie Wojtaszek said her group joined a partnership with Onondaga County back in 2010, working closely with the county to bring the event to even bigger and better heights. There are many wonderful opportunities for local businesses to be involved, she said, as well as individuals who might also want to have a part in the festivities. She especially enjoys working on the personalized banners, offering the chance to create a memorable message for an unsuspecting loved one. “It is fun for us to be sneaky and plan those out,” Wojtaszek admitted. She recalled Lights on the Lake as a family tradition of her own. Back when she was younger, Wojtaszek went to tour the scene with her own parents; now she takes her own young children.

“People move away, but make sure to come back to Lights on the Lake when they come home.”

Now in its 28th year, Lights on the Lake has welcomed 4,161,000 guests since the beginning, including 95,000 who have come out for the walking events. Founding sponsor Wegmans has been supporting the event since 1991. The one-night Lights on the Lake Stroll for walkers to get an up-close look at the decorations began in 2005, followed by the annual Dog Walk in 2009. Both are fundraisers for local organizations: The Stroll this year on Nov. 13 benefits Hillside Work-Scholarship Connection, and the Dog Walk on Nov. 14 is for the Humane Association of CNY. The 2011-2012 Lights season saw a record 41,587 vehicles drive through, although the most vehicles on a single night was when 1,880 visited on Dec. 22, 2001. The most motorcycles at one time was on Nov. 25, 2006, when 19 wheeled through together. The most people seen in a single vehicle was in the 2000-2001 season, as 19 packed into a pickup truck. Last year, 40,576 vehicles toured their brightly decorated dis-

Dog Walk is Nov. 14th

Even better, once the leaves have fallen from the trees, Wojtaszek can actually see the Lights on the Lake location from her Liverpool home and watch the traffic of jolly visitors driving in.

It’s not all laughs for her own children, she intimated. “They cry when it’s done,” Wojtaszek said. But she is sure to reassure them that there will always be a next year for the longtime Central New York holiday happening. Lights on the Lake has become one of those true local holiday destinations for area residents, out-of-town visitors, and returning former neighbors alike, as those old friends make sure to include a trip to the park during their seasonal visits with Central New York family. “It’s one of those stops you have to do when you come back for a visit around the holidays,” Wojtaszek said. “People move away, but make sure to come back to Lights on the Lake when they come home.” “Lights on the Lake is a Syracuse staple, right up there with Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, Syracuse University basketball and football, Wegmans, and Heid’s and Hofmann hotdogs,” agreed Pelligra. “It is a must-see at Christmas time.” For full details, visit lightsonthelake.com. LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017 | SYRACUSE NEW TIMES

11


Hillside Work-Scholarship Connection executive director Wayne O’Connor stands in front of a mural of graduates at their Syracuse facility. Mike Jaquays Photo

Making a Difference

Lights on the Lake Stroll joins forces with Hillside Connection to help students with external risks | BY MIKE JAQUAYS

S

tudents with Hillside Work-Scholarship Connection want Lights on the Lake visitors to help them graduate.

When the annual Lights on the Lake Stroll event returns Nov. 13 to kick off the season at the bright holiday tradition at Onondaga Lake Park, walkers will have the chance to see those colorfully lighted decorations up close. They will also be helping some students in Central New York to graduate high school, and build better lives for themselves. Thanks to the generosity of corporate sponsor Wegmans, the stroll through the park is a fundraiser for Syracuse-based not-forprofit Hillside Work-Scholarship Connection. Executive director Wayne O’Connor said there are more than 1,300 students from five high schools and eight middle schools in the Syracuse school system enrolled in the Hillside programs. Every one of them is experiencing some external risk factor in his or her life that puts graduation in jeopardy. Around 90 percent of the students come from some level of poverty, and there are broken homes and unplanned pregnancies also putting pressure on the students to distract them from their goal of completing school.

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SYRACUSE NEW TIMES | LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017

That’s where Hillside Work-Scholarship Connection comes in. “We pick them up in seventh and eighth grade and stay right with them until they graduate,” O’Connor said. “These are wonderful kids, young people who often times without some extra support can become a statistic. They want the same thing that every child wants: to be able to graduate from high school and have a future. It‘s hard enough being 14, 15, and 16 in the best of conditions.” Students arrive after school, with transportation provided by Hillside to and from their location to make sure it is accessible for all. There, the young people meet with tutors, including instructors from Syracuse University, Le Moyne College, and retired teachers. There is a gymnasium in the building, but O’Connor said the students always make sure their work is complete before visiting that part of the facility. O’Connor himself greets every single student as they arrive. But help in their studies isn’t all that Hillside offers the young people. They also assist them with college visits and Regents preparations when that time comes, O’Connor said. Hillside also helps with finding and keeping a job, with Wegmans — its major corporate sponsor, who secured Hillside the


“We celebrate our differences because we know that’s our strength.” Lights on the Lake fundraiser — employing more than 100 of its students in part-time positions. Rides to and from work are also provided where there is no public transportation available. Hillside recently acquired the church buildings across the street, and has made that into a more informal, college-like atmosphere. O’Connor said it could be the stained-glass windows that remain, or simply the knowledge that the building used to be the home of a church congregation, but whenever students are in there they speak with a hush. O’Connor said 93 percent of Hillside’s students come from families of color. There are 72 percent African-American, 13 percent Latino, and 7 percent Caucasian. And their cultural differences are saluted at Hillside, including events such as the recent Hispanic Heritage Month celebration that ran from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. There is a world map at the entrance with pins locating the origin countries of every student, as well as a colorful collection of flags from around the world also boldly boasting each student’s own roots. One student even got rather emotional when she saw the flag from her family’s homeland. She commented to O’Connor that seeing that flag proved to her that someone truly cared about her. “We celebrate our differences,” he said, “because we know that’s our strength.” O’Connor said Hillside has students coming in from all areas of Syracuse, but they never have any turf problems. There has been only one fight in seven years. The students work well together, because they are all motivated by a similar goal: doing their best to improve their lives and make a positive future for themselves. That is likely a dream they might not have otherwise. Discipline is often simply a case of reminding a student of his or her own goal in being a part of the program, O’Connor said. Sometimes one of the students might become unfocused — as all young people can do — and perform in ways that get away from his or her own life’s plan. O’Connor said he can walk up to that student and simply ask if his or her actions are now moving them toward their goal of a better life for themselves. And when he or she thinks about it, the student will realize the error and move back to the original goal.

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“That’s the end of the lecture,” O’Connor said. SU students recently visited to work in the kitchen, making apple dishes with their Hillside counterparts. O’Connor said not only did those younger students learn valuable cooking and nutrition tips, but they also had the chance to chat with the older students about what college is like and how they should prepare for it. Last year, Hillside saw 99 percent of its senior students graduate, and O’Connor stressed that he and his staff are still working with the those who haven’t yet. In the last five years they have always seen a solid 98 percent graduation rate, he added. Other statistics are more somber, however. O’Connor said every single participant knows of someone who has been shot. Six of them have been shot themselves. They even lost one student to gun violence last year. Hillside has a program for senior students who have become totally disconnected with school for one reason or another, so much that the only way to keep them from failing is to have all continued on page 15

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SYRACUSE NEW TIMES | LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017


continued from page 13 of their work sent to Hillside. Last year 36 out of 37 of those students graduated. Without that program, however, O’Connor said he knows that number would have been zero out of 37.

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“They have already dropped out,” he explained. Of course, the students involved with the Hillside Work-Scholarship Connection also get to enjoy Lights on the Lake, and can sometimes be seen there promoting the program. For some of those young people, this could be the only chance they have to see the light show. “We take our students almost every year,” said Hillside’s specialist Renita Adams, who is the liaison between Hillside and Onondaga Community College. “It’s nice to be able to bring students who might not be able to get that experience themselves.”

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“Last year our kids made up a song, and they sang it while out there collecting donations,” O’Connor said, noting such lyrics as “Please do not hesitate/ We need help to graduate” performed for the Lights on the Lake visitors. “I think it’s really terrific that they do this for us. It has really become a tradition here in Syracuse for all kids and kids at heart, and I am an unbelievable fan of Wegmans for making this happen for us.” O’Connor said for him there is no better place to be than Hillside as the students start arriving in the afternoon. “We will have 140 to 150 kids pouring out of those vans,” he said. “I’m pretty sure there is nowhere else in the city where you will find teens so dedicated to doing their schoolwork. It is definitely heartwarming.” For more information on Hillside Work-Scholarship Connection, visit hillside.com.

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Under the Sea

A menagerie of sea creatures celebrate the season in this whimsical story set under the sea. Presented by

Santa’s Workshop The elves are busy working in this section to make the holiday a happy one for all. Presented by

Holiday Traditions

Presented by

Some of the classic themes associated with the holiday season.

Salt Museum & Pier

Major Display Sections

1st

Lake

1st S

t

Dr

370

ol Rd

erpo Old Liv

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SYRACUSE NEW TIMES | LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017

Willow St

Rte

St

Rte Vin

eS

t

Rte

57

37


“Follow the Yellow Brick Road” After the rainbow: The Wizard flying off in his hot air balloon joins Dorothy, Toto, Scarecrow, Cowardly Lion, Tinman, Glinda the Good Witch and 28 foot tall Emerald City complete with wicked witch circling above. Presented by

®

Wide World of Sports

Presented by

Santa and his friends enjoy a variety of sport activities like hockey, baseball, football and more.

It’s a Wrap Se

Presented by ne

ca

Ri ve r

70

Land of Oz

Lights on the Lake Exit

Onondaga Lake Park

d (2n

Turn left to Baldwinsville, Syracuse. Thruway exit 39 and Interstate 690.

Willow Bay

Turn right to Liverpool and Thruway exit 38.

Fairytale Magic Grand Finale

St)

Liverpool

Fantasy Forest Woodland creatures frolic in this magical blue and white forest. Presented by

I-90 Exit 38

Victorian Village

Travel back in time with old time shops, carolers and other traditional scenes. Presented by

Fantasy Castle Display 78’ x 38’ high; Cinderella on the way to the ball; Prince Charming comes to life. Presented by

LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017 | SYRACUSE NEW TIMES

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Galaxy Communications’ yuletide playlist music enhances the Lights on the Lake drive BY BILL DELAPP

W

hen WZUN-FM 102.1 (Sunny 102)’s morning-drive guru Big Mike Fiss is asked how many Christmas songs are on the annual yuletide playlist, first he delivers a pregnant pause worthy of Jack Benny. Then he deadpans, “I think we have six now,” before bursting into laughter. Actually, it’s more like 300 tracks, according to Sunny program director Gary Dunes, who also shares dawn-patrol microphone duties with Fiss and Cindy Humble. And those songs come in mighty handy when the popular Galaxy station begins its nightly broadcasts of Christmas melodies as the perfect sonic complement to the Lights on the Lake experience. The Sunny morning gang recently convened to chat about Lights on the Lake, Christmas music and even happy-hour chicken wings. Big Mike: About 10 years ago we were the first radio station in the country to start Christmas music, the day after Halloween, and we got more publicity about it, and we had fun. But as time went on, we realized that most of our listeners were more comfortable with hearing Christmas music starting around Thanksgiving. However, we do start Christmas music when Lights on the Lake begins on Nov. 13, because we are the soundtrack for the evening, between 5 and 10 p.m., with limited commercials. Gary Dunes: (The former) WSEN-FM 92.1 actually had (the Lights music) the first couple years, but then Galaxy came over (during a March 2016 merger with the station) and made everything better. It’s a bigger company and everything they do is 10 times better. For the Lights on the Lake evenings we broaden the playlist and try to get as much variety of Christmas music as we can. Big Mike: The variety is amazing. Barenaked Ladies has a great Christmas CD, for example, and we play songs like “Christmas Wrapping” by The Waitresses to mix it up. There are songs by Hall and Oates, Mariah Carey, the Carpenters. And we also play songs from people you don’t hear anymore: Perry Como, Ray Conniff, Gene Autry, Andy Williams, Percy Faith, Johnny Mathis.

Gary Dunes: Regarding the rest of the day’s music, we listened to social media, Facebook, Twitter, where people said that they liked the regular Sunny classic format, so we took all of that into consideration. So starting at Thanksgiving we play a couple of Christmas songs every hour, the standard biggest-hits songs, the stuff you can’t get away from. Everyone wants to hear Bobby Helms’ “Jingle Bell Rock,” Bing Crosby’s “White Christmas,” all the traditional songs. Then on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day we play all the Christmas songs. Big Mike: We also play classic music by local musicians including Todd Hobin, Joe Whiting, the Dean Brothers and Maria DeSantis. Gary Dunes: And for years you used to do the annual Christmas shows and the Big Mike’s Christmastime in Syracuse CDs with local musicians. 18

SYRACUSE NEW TIMES | LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017

Gary Dunes with his Del-Tunes offer a rockin’ rendition of “Run, Rudolph, Run.” Bill DeLapp Photo Big Mike: The holiday music becomes a format that is so unique and so short-lived. It may be on about six weeks, and it comes and goes, so embrace it. I personally love this music. I could listen to it year-round. For the Christmastime in Syracuse CDs, we would constantly be in the studio to record tracks. The Dean Brothers recorded one Christmas song on Memorial Day weekend when it was sunny outside and 75 degrees. This year will also mark my 36th annual Christmas radio special. We used to do live full broadcasts with local musicians. For continued on page 20


it’s your turn at the plate it’s your turn at the plate

It takes a lot to turn food into healthy meals for hungry families. You see, from storage to transportation to refrigeration, it takes your cash donations to make it all work. So, take your turn at the plate today. Please give at foodbankcny.org/donate

It takes a lot to turn food into healthy meals for hungry families. You see, from storage to transportation to refrigeration, it takes your cash donations to make it all work. So, take your turn at the plate today. Please give at foodbankcny.org/donate

LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017 | SYRACUSE NEW TIMES

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Christmas Traditions Start Here Freshly Harvested Trees or Cut Your Own Wreaths of All Sizes Balsam Barn Gift Shop Tasting Room Serving Cider, Beer and Wine Wagon Rides Food & Family Fun

Route 13 in Cazenovia, 3.5 miles south of Route 20 315-662-3355 www.critzfarms.com

family times The Parenting

Guide of Central New York

GOT FAMILY? Every month, Family Times provides articles that inform and inspire parents with children of all ages, from infants to teens. Find it at schools and other locations across CNY, including all Wegmans.

1415 W. Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 13204 (315)472-4669 www.familytimes.biz

Open daily November 24 - December 17 M-F, 10 to 6 • S & S, 9 to 6

20

SYRACUSE NEW TIMES | LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017

continued from page 18 the last two years we’ve been doing the “Big Mike and Cindy’s 12 Days of Christmas,” which features live musicians coming in to the show every day. We’ve had Just Joe, Joe Whiting, Todd Hobin and Jessica Novak in the past coming in to perform, and they are so accommodating. Gary Dunes: We also have the luxury because of our classic-hits format, so we can actually play Christmas music. You can’t play it on a heavy metal station. Big Mike: One of the songs we added to the Sunny playlist was by Gary Dunes and the Del-Tunes. They do a great live version of “Run, Rudolph, Run.” Gary Dunes: We recorded it live at the Marriott Hotel’s Flirtations Lounge in 1993. Big Mike: Back then it was packed, it was the happening place to be. I was actually working there on Friday nights (during happy hours as an emcee, when small plates of chicken wings were available for $1). I got the wings for free. I saved a buck. They never paid me; they said you could eat as many wings as you want. Gary Dunes: Then after a while, they said, “You know what? We’d rather pay you. No more free wings.” (Laughs)

It wouldn’t be Christmas without a Bing Crosby song.


THE LIGHTS ON THE LAKE OFFICIAL PROGRAM IS PUBLISHED BY

PUBLISHER/OWNER William C. Brod (ext. 138) EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Bill DeLapp (ext. 126) PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Michael Davis (ext. 127) ASSOCIATE EDITOR Reid Sullivan

Call today to learn about a worry free winter.

DIGITAL EDITOR David Armelino (ext. 144) FREQUENT CONTRIBUTORS Cheryl Costa, Renee K. Gadoua, Luke Parsnow, James MacKillop, Mike Jaquays, Margaret McCormick, Carl Mellor, Matt Michael, Jessica Novak, Walt Shepperd

on

SALES MANAGER Tim Hudson (ext. 114) SENIOR SALES ASSOCIATE Lesli Mitchell (ext. 140) DISPLAY ADVERTISING CONSULTANT Elizabeth Fortune (ext. 116) Ryann Nolan (ext. 146) SALES AND MARKETING COORDINATOR Megan McCarthy (ext. 115) CLASSIFIED SALES/LEGAL NOTICES Paige Hart (ext. 111)

830 James St.

150 Old Liverpool Rd.

(315) 422-2173

(315) 453-7911

Syracuse, NY

Liverpool, NY

INDEPENDENT LIVING • ENRICHED LIVING • MEMORY CARE www.thehearth.net

CREATIVE SERVICES MANAGER Robin Turk (ext. 152) GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Greg Minix Rachel Barry Renate Wood GENERAL MANAGER/COMPTROLLER Deana Vigliotti (ext. 118) OFFICE MANAGER Christine Burrows CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Tom Tartaro (ext. 134)

www.syracusenewtimes.com The Syracuse New Times is published every Wednesday by All Times Publishing, LLC. The entire contents of the Syracuse New Times are copyright 2015 by All Times Publishing, LLC and may not be reproduced in any manner, either whole or in part, without specific written permission from the publisher. All rights reserved. Syracuse New Times (ISSN 0893844X) is published every Wednesday at 1415 W. Genesee St., Syracuse, New York. Periodicals postage paid at Syracuse, NY. POSTMASTER Send change of address to Syracuse New Times, 1415 W Genesee Street, Syracuse NY 13204-2156. Our circulation has been independently audited and verified by the Circulation Verification Council, St. Louis, MO. Manuscripts should be sent to the Editor at the address below. Free calendar listings should be posted online at syracusenewtimes.com/calendar. Material cannot be returned unless accompanied by a stamped envelope. The publisher reserves the right to refuse or edit any material submitted editorial or advertising. CONTACT INFORMATION Office: (315) 422-7011 publisher@syracusenewtimes.com sales@syracusenewtimes.com editorial@syracusenewtimes.com

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OWN A HOME FOR LESS THAN YOU ARE CURRENTLY PAYING IN RENT! IT'S POSSIBLE! FIND OUT HOW AT COMMONFUNDMTG.COM 315-422-2325 717 ERIE BOULEVARD WEST SYRACUSE, NY 13204 NMLS 53923 LICENSED MORTGAGE BANKER N.Y.S. DEPT OF FINANCIAL SERVICES EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017 | SYRACUSE NEW TIMES

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ONONDAGA COUNTY PARKS

WINTER PROGRAM GUIDE “Winter is a great season in Onondaga County and the Parks Winter Guide provides plenty of activities for everyone to enjoy. Hike, ski, take a sleigh ride and more! Start planning your winter fun and for more information visit onondagacountyparks.com.” — Onondaga County Executive, Joanie Mahoney

CROSS COUNTRY SKIING

Highland Forest

30+ MILES OF TRAILS Skiers of all abilities will now find over 15 miles of groomed, woodland trails. Folks who prefer to blaze their own trail will enjoy over 10 miles of ungroomed snow that makes for the perfect backcountry run. The Northview and Pines Junction Trails are all accessible to novice users, while the other trails range from “more difficult” to “most difficult” on terrain with elevations up to 400 feet. Trail Use: Daily $10; $5 (15 & under) Season Pass: $30 adult; $20 (15 & under) Cross-Country Ski Rentals: $15 adult, $10 child (15 & under): Individual Item Rental (boots, poles or skis) $7 per item

Beaver Lake

7.5 MILES OF TRAILS Skiers of all levels will enjoy the nature center’s wooded trails. All are rated easy, except the moderate Three Meadows Trail. Ski under the full moon; see calendar for moonlight skiing dates. Trail Use: $5 per vehicle SKI 100 MILES AT BEAVER LAKE Here’s an incentive to get out and enjoy Beaver Lake’s trails this winter! Each time you go cross-country skiing, record

your mileage in your log book and stamp the date at the front desk to verify your progress. When you have skied 100 miles, present your log book and be rewarded with a long-sleeve T-shirt proclaiming, “I Skied 100 miles at Beaver Lake Nature Center.” The registration fee is $10 and there is no time limit in reaching the 100 mile goal.

Oneida Shores

McKinley Ridge Trail or Lake Access Free admission

Onondaga Lake Park

Shoreline Trails, Long Branch Loop and the West Shore Trail • Free admission

SNOWSHOEING

Highland Forest & Beaver Lake

Highland Forest offers all levels of snowshoers a chance to enjoy the forest on 6 trails of varying lengths: .5 miles to 8.7 miles. At Beaver Lake enjoy 2 separate trails, the Northern Exposure (1.4 miles) & the Southern Exposure (2.2 miles.) While the Southern has more hilly spots, the Northern offers a flatter trail and both go through open fields and wooded areas. Highland Forest Rentals: Daily $10; $5 (15 & under) Beaver Lake Rentals: $5 per hour

SLEDDING

Long Branch Park Sledding Hill

100 feet. Easy hill, perfect for young families. Daily, 10am-5pm (315) 453-6712 - call for conditions

Highland Forest Skyline Hill

650 ft. Fast fun going down but be ready for a big climb back up. Daily, 8:30am4:30pm (315) 683-5550 - call for conditions Please note: Sledding hills are not supervised.

SNOWMOBILING

Onondaga County Parks, in cooperation with the New York State Snowmobile Association and Onondaga County Snowmobile Association, administer the local NYS Snowmobile Grant-in-Aid Program. The following opportunities for riding and gaining access to the rural trails of America’s Snowiest City are available:

Oneida Shores Park

Beach Section Only Great access to 25 mile Oneida Lake, famous for ice fishing for perch, panfish and walleye pike. Open daily. Ample parking in boat launch area. Free.

www.OnondagaCountyParks.com 22

SYRACUSE NEW TIMES | LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017

Jordan Level

The five miles of Erie Canal towpath from Jordan to Memphis are maintained by local clubs. Parking is available at highway intersections. Please respect the cross-country skiers, hikers and other visitors who share access to these areas.

HIKING, WALKING & RUNNING

Highland Forest & Beaver Lake

Natural trails are not plowed, however, if the snow gets too deep, why not try out a pair of snowshoes on designated snowshoe trails.

Onondaga Lake Park

The 2 mile long East Shore Trail is plowed throughout the winter.

Once the snow flies, visit OnondagaCountyParks.com for ski & snowshoe condition updates!


ONONDAGA COUNTY PARKS

WINTER PROGRAM GUIDE

Welcome to the “ADIRONDACKS OF CENTRAL NEW YORK”… Highland Forest! Highland Forest’s Skyline Lodge is the perfect spot to hang out and warm up in front of the fireplace after a day on the trails. The lodge is perched 1700 feet above Fabius and showcases the sweeping views of southern Onondaga County. The walls inside the Adirondack/Mission style lodge feature local history, while artwork and antiques add ambiance. Cross country skis and snowshoes are available at the rental shop and popular public programs include sleigh rides, prime rib dinners and Valentine’s in the Forest. Starting mid-December, Orchard Vali, Skyline’s exclusive caterer, will offer a hearty menu including breakfast, soups, stews and desserts from 9am-4pm on weekends, holidays and school breaks through February.

When the Temperatures Drop, MAKE THE ZOO YOUR STOP! Winter is the perfect time to have the best day ever at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo! Many of the zoo’s outdoor residents are perfectly suited for the cold Central New York winter. Wander the Wildlife Trails and see snow leopards, Amur tigers, red pandas and gray wolves playing in the snow for an incredible experience. Prefer to stay indoors? The tropical warmth of Diversity of Birds, a free-flight aviary featuring dozens of colorful birds, offers respite from the cold. U.S.S. Antiquities offers views of a variety of fish, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates. The 1,600 gallon giant Pacific octopus exhibit is also home to several species of fish, sea stars and anemones. A variety of indoor habitats offer nose-to-nose encounters with playful primates, African lions, sloths and more. The entire zoo is open year-round and with 60% of exhibits indoors, the zoo is the perfect wintertime getaway for families and children, even in the coldest weather.

NATURE NATUREAT ATITS ITSBEST… BEST… Beaver BeaverLake LakeNature NatureCenter Center

With indoor and outdoor exhibits, the Curious Cub Gift Shop, tasty meals from the Jungle Café and special events, you’re sure to have an entertaining, educational and memorable visit at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo–the best day ever! For details on special winter prices, visit www.rosamondgiffordzoo.org.

Located Located in Baldwinsville, in Baldwinsville, Beaver Beaver Lake Lake is home is home to atonatural a natural winter winter wonderland wonderland featuring featuring 10 miles 10 miles of cross of cross country country andand snowshoe snowshoe trails trails with with a multi-use a multi-use trailtrail offering offering seasonal seasonal leisure leisure andand workout workout opportunities opportunities for for all. all. Dozens Dozens of programs of programs including including weekend weekend guided guided walks, walks, skiing/snowshoeing skiing/snowshoeing under under thethe fullfull moon moon andand school school break break activities activities for for thethe little little ones ones areare offered offered throughout throughout thethe season. season. Winter Winter is also is also a great a great time time to get to get started started with with thethe 100100 Bird Bird Challenge. Challenge. Look Look for for those those rarerare visitors visitors likelike thethe long-eared long-eared owlowl andand pine pine siskin. siskin. ThisThis program program encourages encourages both both beginner beginner andand veteran veteran birders birders to come to come andand watch watch for for birds birds at at Beaver Beaver Lake. Lake. First First register register at the at the front front desk desk andand purchase purchase a Birds a Birds of Beaver of Beaver Lake Lake checklist. checklist. Every Every time time youyou seesee (or (or identify identify by by song) song) a new a new species, species, write write down down thethe date date youyou observed observed in the in the booklet. booklet. When When youyou have have reached reached 100100 birdbird species, species, youyou willwill be be rewarded rewarded with with a T-shirt: a T-shirt: “I Saw-whet “I Saw-whet at at Beaver Beaver Lake, Lake, 100100 birds.” birds.” TheThe registration registration feefee is $10, is $10, which which includes includes thethe Birds Birds of of Beaver Beaver Lake Lake checklist checklist booklet. booklet.

Experience the CHARM OF YESTERYEAR An old-fashioned horse-drawn sleigh ride through a snow-filled forest has family fun written all over it. Available weekends December 16 - February, twenty-minute rides at Highland Forest are from 11 am to 3:30 pm. In addition, rides will be offered during select school break dates. See calendar for details. Weather & conditions permitting. The price is $6, $3 (5 & under). Group packages, which include a horse drawn ride and use of Skyline Lodge, are available for groups of up to 160 people.

www.OnondagaCountyParks.com LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017 | SYRACUSE NEW TIMES

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ONONDAGA COUNTY PARKS

WINTER PROGRAM GUIDE

WINTER Calendar of Activities November 8, 2017 - March 2018

NOVEMBER 8-17 Art Gone Wild! Exhibition • 10am-4:30pm Free with zoo admission Enjoy extraordinary artwork created by our animals as part of their enrichment activities. Pieces produced by elephant trunks, panda paws, penguin feet and octopus arms will be on display leading up to the reception and art auction on Friday, November 17. ROSAMOND GIFFORD ZOO (315) 435-8511 NOVEMBER WEEKENDS Weekend Guided Walks • 2pm Free with nature center admission November 11 & 12 - Wildlife Preparing for Winter November 18 & 19 - Turkey Tales November 25 & 26 - Life in the Leaf Litter BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 NOVEMBER 10, 17 Sharing Nature with your Child • 1pm $7 per session, pre-registration required Preschoolers will enjoy weekly explorations of Beaver Lake. Each week brings a new opportunity for discovery through nature walks, games, and crafts. Children should be accompanied by an adult. November 10 - Squirrel Fun November 17 - Autumn Birds BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 NOVEMBER 10 & 17 • 6pm NOVEMBER 15 & 21 • 10am or 6pm NOVEMBER 18 • 1pm or 6pm Wreath Making Workshops $17 per person, pre-registration required Invite holiday guests and Christmas cheer through your front door with your handmade evergreen wreath. Just smelling the fresh boughs will put you in the proper spirit! The price includes boughs, wire and a bow. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 NOVEMBER 13 Lights on the Lake Stroll • 5-9pm $2 adult suggested donation Enjoy this special walking preview of Lights on the Lake before it opens to vehicles only. Visitors can choose to park at either the Wegmans Landing (Griffin Visitor Center), Salt Museum or Willow Bay lots. Walkers can cover as much of the two mile stretch as they desire and should dress for the weather. Holiday characters will be on the trail and refreshments will be available for sale. ONONDAGA LAKE PARK (315) 453-6712 NOVEMBER 14 Lights on the Lake Dog Walk • 5-9pm $2 adult suggested donation Dogs (and their parents) are welcome to enjoy this special walking preview of Lights on the Lake before it opens to vehicles only. Visitors can choose to park at either the Wegmans Landing (Griffin Visitor Center), Salt Museum or Willow Bay lots. Walkers can cover as much of the two mile stretch as they desire and should dress for the weather. Holiday characters will be on the trail and refreshments for humans and dogs will be available for sale. ONONDAGA LAKE PARK (315) 453-6712

NOVEMBER 15 – JAN. 7, 2018 Wegmans Lights on the Lake • 5-10pm $10 per car Monday-Thursday; $15 per car Friday-Sunday ($6 on Monday & Tuesday with a Wegmans Shoppers Club Card) This 28th annual event is a two-mile long drive-through light extravaganza featuring life-size displays, themed sections, traditional favorites, new surprises and a memorable grand finale. Opening Night, November 15: Salute to Troops - Free admission for all Veterans, active & retired military, show military ID at ticket booth. Onondaga Lake Park (315) 453-6712 NOVEMBER 16, 30 Trail Tales • 1pm Free with Nature Center Admission Perfect for pre-school aged children (3-5 years old), accompanied by an adult. A naturalist will first read two stories to the children and then lead the group out on a hike themed to match the stories. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 NOVEMBER 17 Art Gone Wild! Reception, Art Sale & Auction • 6-8pm $8 per person in advance, $10 per person at the door, children 12 & under free Don’t miss this opportunity to purchase a piece of animal art! Dozens of pieces created by our zoo animals will be auctioned off to support of the Rosamond Gifford Zoo chapter of the American Association of Zoo Keepers. Light refreshments and cash bar available. Rosamond Gifford Zoo (315) 435-8511 NOVEMBER 22 & 24 Thanksgiving Break Zoo Camp • 9am-4pm $65 per child per day, pre-registration required Parents, do you need some extra time for holiday preparations the day before or day after Thanksgiving? Register your kids for an awesome one-day zoo camp! Campers, ages 6-11,will tour the zoo, see animals up close, play games, make crafts and enjoy a pizza party lunch. ROSAMOND GIFFORD ZOO (315) 435-8511 X357 NOVEMBER 23 Turkey Trot 5K • 9am $25 ONONDAGA LAKE PARK (315) 373-1282 NOVEMBER 25 Holiday Crafts for Kids • 10am $6 per child, pre-registration required Children will learn how to create their own holiday crafts and ornaments using materials found in nature. This program is designed for children of all ages, but space is limited. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 NOVEMBER 25 Ugly Sweater Run • 12pm $40 ONONDAGA LAKE PARK willowhwc@gmail.com

NOVEMBER 28 OR 29 Create a Kissing Ball • 6pm $20 per person, pre-registration required Spend an evening creating a beautiful balsam fir kissing ball, accented with red ribbon and bow. It is sure to be a wonderful addition to your holiday decorating. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 DECEMBER 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, 17 Breakfast with Santa • 9am OR 11am $18; 2 & under free, reservations required Celebrate the season at this popular holiday event! Our elves will serve breakfast while our young guests meet Santa. Bring a camera for a photo opp with Saint Nick! Children can make a holiday craft and write a letter to Santa. Ticket includes post-breakfast zoo-admission. ROSAMOND GIFFORD ZOO (315) 435-8511 x113 DECEMBER WEEKENDS Weekend Afternoon Walks • 2 pm Free with nature center admission December 2 & 3 - Winter Birds December 9 & 10 - Winter Birds December 16 & 17 - “Night Tree” (special story read and hike) December 23 & 24 - Meet the Pines Beaver Lake Nature Center (315) 638-2519 DECEMBER 3 “Freezin’ for a Reason” Polar Plunge 10am-12:30pm Party & Registration; 1pm Plunge Teams and individuals welcome to register. Sponsored by Special Olympics ONEIDA SHORES PARK www.PolarPlungeNY.org/CNY DECEMBER 7 Prime Rib Buffet • 6-8pm $17.95; $8.95 ages 5-11; Under 5 free Enjoy a delicious Prime Rib Buffet, live music and a spectacular view from Skyline Lodge. Menu includes: Soup, salad bar, oven roasted chicken, garlic mashed potatoes, pasta, meatballs and sausage and slow-roasted prime rib. Reservations recommended. HIGHLAND FOREST (315) 677-3303 DECEMBER 9 Holidays with the Animals • 10am-3pm Free with zoo admission Help us celebrate the season with the animals as they receive enrichment “gifts” to engage them and enhance their well-being. Zoo-goers can watch the animals open their presents and play with their toys as they demonstrate natural behaviors. ROSAMOND GIFFORD ZOO (315) 435-8511 DECEMBER 9 Breakfast with Santa • 9am-12noon $3-$5 depending on appetite Kick off the holiday season by joining the Friends of Beaver Lake for breakfast. Enjoy a tasty meal of pancakes, sausage and a beverage. There will also be a holiday bake sale. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519

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SYRACUSE NEW TIMES | LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017

DECEMBER 14 & 28 Trail Tales: Stories and walk with a Naturalist • 1pm Free with Nature Center admission Listening to stories and exploring nature are two activities that most children enjoy. A naturalist will read stories to children ages three to five, and lead them on a walk to experience what the season has to offer. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 DECEMBER 16 Last Chance Trail Run & Pancake Breakfast • 8:30-11am $10; $5 ages 6-11yrs; $20 family maximum 8 mile trail walk or run and an all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast. HIGHLAND FOREST (315) 449-9615 DECEMBER 16 – FEBRUARY 25 (WEEKENDS) DECEMBER 26 – JANUARY 1, 15 & FEBRUARY 19 Horsedrawn Sleigh (or Hay) Rides • 11am-3:30pm $6; $3 5 & under 20 minute ride into the woods at Highland Forest. HIGHLAND FOREST (315) 683-5550 DECEMBER 27-29 Holiday Zoo Camp • 9am-4pm $65 per child per day, pre-registration required Parents, do you need some extra time for yourself during the holiday break? Register your kids, ages 6-11, for an awesome one-day zoo camp! Campers will tour the zoo, see animals up close, play games, make crafts and enjoy a pizza party lunch. ROSAMOND GIFFORD ZOO (315) 435-8511 x357 DECEMBER 31 Noon Year’s Eve • 10:30am-12:30pm Free with zoo admission Ring in the “noon” year at the zoo with entertainment, games, crafts and more. It’s an authentic New Year’s Eve celebration that keeps bed time in mind, complete with ball drop and sparkling grape juice toast at noon. ROSAMOND GIFFORD ZOO (315) 435-8511 DECEMBER 31 New Year’s Eve Prime Rib Buffet Dinner • 6-8:30pm $35.95 per person, reservations required Enjoy a delicious dinner and live music at the picturesque Skyline Lodge then head out for horsedrawn sleigh ride through the winter woods. HIGHLAND FOREST (315) 677-3303 JANUARY WEEKENDS Weekend Guided Walks • 2pm Tracking Wildlife on Snowshoes Registration is required beginning at 8am on the day of the hike and space is limited. This program will be offered on snowshoes only when snow conditions are acceptable. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519


ONONDAGA COUNTY PARKS JANUARY 2 - 31 Winter at the Zoo Photo Contest • 10am-4:30pm Complimentary zoo admission offered to contest participants who show their camera (cell phones are not acceptable); limit one entrant per household. Welcome the arrival of the New Year by entering the zoo’s annual photo contest. Photographers of all abilities are invited to enter for a chance to win fantastic prizes. ROSAMOND GIFFORD ZOO (315) 435-8511 JANUARY 2 – FEBRUARY 28 Snow Leopard Days – Discount Admission 10am-4:30pm Youth (3-17) $2; Adult (18-61) $5; Senior (62+) $2.50 Bundle up this winter and visit the zoo! Wander the Wildlife Trails and see animals playing in the snow, keep warm in indoor exhibits like the tropical Diversity of Birds, explore The Curious Cub Gift Shop and swing by the Jungle Café for a tasty treat or hot cocoa. The zoo is the perfect wintertime getaway for families and children, even in the coldest weather. You’ll be sure to have an entertaining, educational and memorable visit—the best day ever! ROSAMOND GIFFORD ZOO (315) 435-8511 JANUARY 3 - FEBRUARY 14 (WEDNESDAYS) Weekday Snowshoe Jaunt • 1:30pm Free with Nature Center admission. Snowshoe rental $5. Enjoy an hour-long outing through Beaver Lake’s winter woods. Benefit from a naturalist’s insights, along with the light aerobic exercise. This program will be offered only when conditions are acceptable. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 JANUARY 4 Prime Rib Buffet • 6-8pm $17.95; $8.95 ages 5-11; Under 5 free Enjoy a delicious Prime Rib Buffet, live music and a spectacular view from Skyline Lodge. Menu includes: Soup, salad bar, oven roasted chicken, garlic mashed potatoes, pasta, meatballs and sausage and slow-roasted prime rib. Reservations recommended. HIGHLAND FOREST (315) 677-3303 JANUARY 6 – FEBRUARY 25 (WEEKENDS) Try Snowshoeing • 12:30pm Free with Nature Center admission This snowshoe clinic will include instructions and a short snowshoe hike. Visitors with little or no snowshoe experience will especially enjoy this one-hour introduction. Registration is required beginning at 8am the day of the hike and space is limited. Call on that day to register and check conditions. This program will be offered only when conditions are acceptable. If there is not enough snow for snowshoeing, the nature center will hold an indoor program on identifying winter, wildlife tracks at 1pm. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 JANUARY 11 & 25 Trail Tales: Stories and walk with a Naturalist • 1pm Free with Nature Center admission During this popular program a naturalist reads two stories to the children and the leads the group on a hike themed to match the stories. Perfect for children ages 3-5 accompanied by an adult. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 JANUARY 15 Martin Luther King Jr. Day Camp • 9am-4pm $65 per child, pre-registration required Kids, ages 6 to 11, can spend the MLK holiday at the zoo! Activities include zoo tours, games, animal demonstra-

tions, crafts, snacks and a pizza party lunch. A minimum number of participants is required to hold this camp. ROSAMOND GIFFORD ZOO (315) 435-8511 x357 JANUARY 25-28 Moonlight Skiing and Snowshoeing • Until 9pm Free with Nature Center admission The trails will remain open until 9pm on these evenings as long as there is adequate snow cover. This is the opportunity for skiers and snowshoers to take advantage of the natural moonlight along Beaver Lake’s ten miles of trails. Hot chocolate and other refreshments will available at the Visitor Center. This program will be offered only when conditions are acceptable. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 JANUARY 26 Guided Moonlight Snowshoe Hike • 7pm Free with Nature Center admission. Rent snowshoes for $5. A winter moon lights the way as your group explores the Nature Center’s woodlands and frozen marshes on snowshoes. Registration is required beginning at 8 am the day of the hike, and space is limited. This program will be offered only when conditions are acceptable. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 JANUARY 27 Snowshoe Hike and Bonfire • 6pm $5 per person, reservations required Snowshoe through the snowy forest and field. Watch for deer and rabbits. Listen for the hoot of a distant Barred owl. Join a guide for a snowshoe trek along the Southern Exposure trail. Upon returning sit by a warm bonfire and sip hot chocolate! A great event for the whole family! BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 FEBRUARY 1 Prime Rib Buffet • 6-8pm $17.95; $8.95 ages 5-11; Under 5 free Enjoy a delicious Prime Rib Buffet, and a spectacular view from Skyline Lodge. Menu includes: Soup, salad bar, oven roasted chicken, garlic mashed potatoes, pasta, meatballs and sausage and slow-roasted prime rib. Reservations recommended. HIGHLAND FOREST (315) 677-3303 FEBRUARY WEEKENDS Weekend Guided Walks • 2pm Tracking Wildlife on Snowshoes Registration is required beginning at 8am on the day of the hike and space is limited. This program will be offered on snowshoes only when snow conditions are acceptable. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 FEBRUARY 4 Super Couch Potato 5K • 11am ONONDAGA LAKE PARK www.syracusetrackclub.org FEBRUARY 8 Trail Tales: Stories and walk with a Naturalist • 1pm Free with Nature Center admission During this popular program a naturalist reads two stories to the children and the leads the group on a hike themed to match the stories. Perfect for children ages 3-5 accompanied by an adult. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519

WINTER PROGRAM GUIDE FEBRUARY 9 Snow Leopard Soiree • 6:30-11pm $220 per person or $1,750 per table of eight, reservations required This year’s Friends of the Zoo annual winter fundraiser and gala features gourmet dining, live music, live and silent auctions, and animal greeters. Cocktail attire and animal prints are encouraged; black tie optional. Proceeds help benefit the zoo’s education programs, which connect more than 150,000 children and adults to the natural world. ROSAMOND GIFFORD ZOO (315) 435-8511 x132 FEBRUARY 9, 10, 11 & 14 Valentine’s in the Forest • 6pm $90 per couple, reservations required Enjoy a nostalgic, romantic evening in the forest with your sweetheart. Program includes Prime Rib buffet dinner, horse drawn sleigh ride, live entertainment, and flowers. Proceeds benefit the all volunteer Highland Forest Nordic Ski Patrol. HIGHLAND FOREST (315) 677-3303 FEBRUARY 10 Cupid’s Chase 5K Run & 3K Walk Registration 8am; Run 10am $20-$40 All proceeds will go towards supporting people with disabilities. Community Options, Inc. invites walkers, runners, joggers, and rollers (baby strollers and wheelchairs) to come out and participate. ONONDAGA LAKE PARK (315) 431-9859 FEBRUARY 11 Sweet Treats • 10am-3pm Free with zoo admission (discount admission in effect for this event) Watch the animals receive special Valentine treats and heart-shaped items throughout the day as part of the zoo’s enrichment program! ROSAMOND GIFFORD ZOO (315) 453-8511 FEBRUARY 18-25 Winter Break Activities • 10am-3pm Free with zoo admission (half-price admission in effect for this event) Beat the winter blues with a visit to the zoo! Enjoy animal demonstrations and meet the keeper sessions for a chance to learn what happens “behind the scenes.” ROSAMOND GIFFORD ZOO (315) 435-8511 FEBRUARY 19-23 Winter Wonders Week Free with nature center admission During School vacation there will be guided walks and critter talks daily for families and individuals. Walk down one of the nature center’s trails tracking winter wildlife. Learn about beaver, turtles, owls or other wildlife in the Visitor Center. 10am – Try Snowshoeing – Monday & Wednesday 10am – Snow Sculptures – Tuesday & Thursday 10am – Build a Snow Cave – Friday 1:30pm – Creature Feature – Monday-Friday 2pm – Guided Snowshoeing – Monday-Friday BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519

the whole week or individual days. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 FEBRUARY 22-25 Moonlight Skiing and Snowshoeing • Until 9pm Free with Nature Center admission The trails will remain open until 9pm on these evenings as long as there is adequate snow cover. This is the opportunity for skiers and snowshoers to take advantage of the natural moonlight along Beaver Lake’s ten miles of trails. Hot chocolate and other refreshments will available at the Visitor Center. This program will be offered only when conditions are acceptable. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 FEBRUARY 23 Guided Moonlight Snowshoe Hike • 7pm Free with Nature Center admission. A winter moon lights the way as your group explores the Nature Center’s woodlands and frozen marshes on snowshoes. Registration is required beginning at 8 am the day of the hike, and space is limited. This program will be offered only when conditions are acceptable. Rent snowshoes for $3. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 MARCH 1 Prime Rib Buffet • 6-8pm $17.95; $8.95 ages 5-11; Under 5 free Enjoy a delicious Prime Rib Buffet, live music and a spectacular view from Skyline Lodge. Menu includes: Soup, salad bar, oven roasted chicken, garlic mashed potatoes, pasta, meatballs and sausage and slow-roasted prime rib. Reservations recommended. HIGHLAND FOREST (315) 677-3303 MARCH WEEKENDS It’s Maple Syrup Time 10am-2pm, Saturdays; 1-4pm, Sundays Free with Nature Center admission This celebration of the maple syrup season marks the coming of spring. A visit to the demonstration sugarbush will introduce you to the heritage of sugaring and the production of maple syrup. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 MARCH 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 Pancake Breakfast • 9am-12noon $3-$5 depending on appetite Enjoy pancakes, sausage, coffee or juice and a visit to the sugarbush. BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER (315) 638-2519 MARCH 18 Irish Road Bowling • 10:30am $100 per four person team Teams compete by rolling a small cannonball along a 2-mile Shoreline Walking Trail course. Food, fun and prizes. Registration opens February 1. ONONDAGA LAKE PARK (315) 453-6712

FEBRUARY 19-23 Winter Camp • 9am-3pm $30 per day, pre-registration required Learn how to Snowshoe! Build a survival Snow Cave! Create incredible Snow Sculptures! Play fun Nature Games and make Nature Crafts. This Winter Camp is designed for 1st-4th graders and is led by two staff naturalists. This is great way to spend the winter break! Sign up for

www.OnondagaCountyParks.com LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017 | SYRACUSE NEW TIMES

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ONONDAGA COUNTY PARKS

WINTER PROGRAM GUIDE

THE PARTY (OR CORPORATE OUTING) STARTS HERE! Park party facilities are now accepting reservations for dates through 2019 for all types of family and business gatherings. Arrowhead Lodge at Oneida Shores BREWERTON

A wall-length stone fireplace with a surrounding view of tall pines and large upscale patio. Just 15 minutes from Syracuse, Arrowhead offers the ideal winter wonderland, or year-round setting, for your holiday party, wedding, retirement, graduation party or meeting. More info: www.OnondagaCountyParks.com or call (315) 676-7366.

Skyline Lodge at Highland Forest FABIUS

Perfect for holiday parties, weddings, rehearsal dinners, showers, banquets, proms, fund raising events, corporate retreats, birthday and retirement parties. The picturesque lodge features an expansive deck, stone fireplace, cathedral ceilings and an Adirondack/Mission design with wall-towall windows and a spectacular view. More info: www.OnondagaCountyParks.com or call (315) 677-3303.

Rosamond Gifford Zoo SYRACUSE

Central New York's top family attraction is home to one of the area's most distinct banquet facilities. Outdoor courtyard area and animal demos available.

Kphotos Photography

PLAN NOW FOR NEXT SUMMER! Reserve Now for 2018 Camping Trips

Summer comes but once a year‌

Now is the time to reserve your favorite Oneida Shores camping spot. Basic and electrical campsites for 2018 are available weekends beginning Friday, April 27 and daily beginning Friday, May 25 – Sunday, October 7 and include hot shower facilities and free boat launch access. Online reservations at www.OnondagaCountyParks. com/camping or call (315) 676-7366.

2018 Season Boat Launch passes for use at Oneida Shores and Onondaga Lake Park can now be ordered. The cost is $100 per trailer for the season. Season Beach passes can also be ordered now. For $50, county residents ($100 non-residents) get a full summer of fun in the sun at both Jamesville Beach and Oneida Shores.

Group Picnics are more fun at an Onondaga County Park

More info: www.cateringatthezoo.org or call (315) 726-2707.

Camp Brockway at Pratt's Falls POMPEY

Deep woods, rustic lodge offers full kitchen, fireplace, areas for volleyball and horseshoes nearby. Open mid May - mid October. More info: www.OnondagaCountyParks.com or call (315) 451-6249.

Twenty picturesque locations that include shelters and tents located throughout Onondaga County are available to reserve for your next outdoor function. Most areas can be reserved up to 11 months in advance except the Onondaga Lake Park and Long Branch Park shelters, which are available to reserve beginning January 1. Get details or reserve a site today at www. OnondagaCountyParks.com or call the Reservation Office at (315) 451-6249.

www.OnondagaCountyParks.com 26

SYRACUSE NEW TIMES | LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017


From Our Family To Yours...

• Original NY Style Hand-tossed Pizza • Specialty Pizza’s • OIP Famous Wings • And more! Visit one of our 6 locations in Syracuse or online at : www.myoip.com

Syracuse School of Dance First Class

FREE

Call 315-472-0235 for more information

Voted 2015 & 2016 Syracuse New Times

“Best of Syracuse”

Dance Program

Ballet • Jazz • Modern • Hip Hop Tap • Creative Movement

Interested in opening your own child care business?

Searching for child care?

For FREE assistance, contact...

Classes for all ages and levels of ability

Studio is located in the University/DeWitt Area www.syracuseschoolofdance.com

Are you male, single, gay or bisexual, and a moderate to heavy drinker? Are you between the ages of 21 and 50? If so, come participate in the Alcohol and Decision-Making Process Research Study conducted by Dr. Stephen A. Maisto in the Psychology Department at Syracuse University. Participation involves answering questions about your health behaviors, watching film clips, and completing motor tasks. For more information, please call our research lab at 315-443-5842 You will be compensated for your time (maximum 7 hours) and given $15 to cover transportation to/from Syracuse University

(315) 446-1220 www.childcaresolutionscny.org

STAYCATION

FUN WALKING

TOUR Tour the historic Franklin Square District. Learn about local history, Stop in several shops and sample delicious foods and drinks.

August: Osage County

Thurs/Fri Dec. 14 & 15, 2017 CNYCF Philanthropy Ballroom

in repertory with

Downtown Syracuse “A Christmas Carol” w/Xmas Carols

Fri/Sat/Sun Feb 9-18, 2018 Empire Theatre @ NYS Fair Tickets $10-$20

Tickets $20 to $25

Macbeth

Call or click for tickets to all shows today Book online: oswegofoodhistorytours.com

315-476-1835 https://ssitp.org LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017 | SYRACUSE NEW TIMES

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ONONDAGA COUNTY PARKS

WINTER PROGRAM GUIDE

Winter

Directory OS

BL

BEAVER LAKE NATURE CENTER

(315) 638-2519 7:30am-5:00pm November-January 7:30am-6:00pm February (Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas Day) $5 per vehicle 8477 E. Mud Lake Road, off Rte. 370W, 4 miles west of Baldwinsville CB

CARPENTER’S BROOK FISH HATCHERY

(315) 689-9367 9:00am-3:00 pm (Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day) Free 1672 Rte. 321, Elbridge HF

HIGHLAND FOREST

(315) 683-5550 8:30am-4:30pm (Closed Christmas Day) $3 per person; 21 & under free Rte. 80, 4 miles east of the Town of Fabius

OLP

ONONDAGA LAKE PARK

(315) 453-6712 6am-sunset, November-March Griffin Visitor Center: November-March: 8:30am-4:30pm, weekdays; 12-4pm, weekends (weather permitting) 6790 Onondaga Lake Park Trail, Liverpool Long Branch Reserved Area (315) 453-6712 The Sledding Hill at Long Branch Park is open daily, 10am-5pm. Conditions vary daily. Free 371 Long Branch Road, Liverpool OT

OTISCO LAKE PARK

BL HR OLP JL

NBT

CB

VMC

ZOO

JB PF OT

(315) 689-9367 Dawn-Dusk Free 2525 Otisco Valley Road, Marietta HF

HR

HOPKINS ROAD SOFTBALL PARK Closed for the season

PF

JB

PRATT’S FALLS PARK

JAMESVILLE BEACH PARK

Closed for the season

Closed for the season

ZOO

JL

ROSAMOND GIFFORD ZOO AT BURNET PARK

JORDAN LEVEL TRAIL

(part of the Erie Canalway Trail) (315) 689-9367 Laird and McDonald Road, Jordan or 5750 Devoe Road, Camillus

(315) 435-8511 10:00am-4:30pm daily (Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day) Mar-Dec: $9 adults; $5 seniors (62+) & youth (3-17); under 3 free Snow Leopard Days: Jan & Feb $5 adults; $2.50 seniors (62+); $2 youth (3-17); under 3 free 1 Conservation Place off Wilbur Ave., Syracuse

NBT

NBT BANK STADIUM

(315) 474-7833 Tex Simone Dr., Syracuse OS

ONEIDA SHORES PARK

Scan code to visit our website

(315) 676-7366 Sunrise-sunset, November-March (Closed Christmas Day) 9400 Bartell Rd., Brewerton www.OnondagaCountyParks.com 28

SYRACUSE NEW TIMES | LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017


Toss ‘n’ Fire Wood-Fired Pizza Neapolitan New York

Wishing our Central New York community a safe and happy holiday season. www.nationalgridus.com

Thank you so much to everyone who voted for us in the categories of

Best Food Truck and Best Pizza It means the world to us.

MOBIL

NOW BE TRUCKS FOR 20 OOKIN 18 SEA G S

COME VISIT US!

O N!

Open 6 days a week, closed Monday 315 N. Main St, North Syracuse More info at tossnfirepizza.com

It’s news that’s on the nice list.

S Y R A C U S E

MYHUMPDAY

Syracuse New Times. Interesting, entertaining, believable. Forwardlooking articles by local writers. News and information about what’s happening in our community. A comprehensive calendar of the region’s arts, music, entertainment and cultural events. Free every Wednesday at newsstands across six counties and online at syracusenewtimes. com.  Believe it.  Ho, ho, ho!  —Santa Claus

HABIT #MyHumpDayHabit

LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017 | SYRACUSE NEW TIMES

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Lights on the Lake COLORING CONTEST

You Could Win A Family Fun Basket! To Enter: • Visit bit.ly/LOTL17 • Print and have a child color the page • When the colored page is done, snap a pic of it and post it to the Lights on the Lake Facebook Page! @LightsOTL FOR FULL DETAILS VISIT: BIT.LY/LOTL17 30

SYRACUSE NEW TIMES | LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017


AFTER HOURS CARE

THE REGION’S FIRST DEDICATED PEDIATRIC URGENT CARE PHYSICIAN ON SITE AT ALL TIMES

Upstate Golisano After Hours Care is a walk-in urgent care for patients from birth through age 21. Pediatric and emergency medicine specialists care for patients who do not require a trip to the ER. We treat a wide range of conditions and illnesses in a setting that reflects the Upstate Golisano standard for excellence. Services include care for simple fractures, minor lacerations, IV rehydration, lab and x-ray.

HOURS: Monday - Friday, 4 - 10 PM Saturday and Sunday, Noon - 10 PM

HOLIDAY HOURS: Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day 4 - 10 PM

FREE PARKING

Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve Noon to 5 PM 4900 BROAD ROAD, SYRACUSE PHONE: 315-492-KIDS (5437) WWW.UPSTATE.EDU/AFTERHOURS LIGHTS ON THE LAKE 2017 | SYRACUSE NEW TIMES

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Browse our new Holiday Entertain catalog for everything from complete dinners to party trays! Order online at wegmans.com/parties, or stop by our store Catering Desk— we’re here to help. 135564ml_ROPSyrCatering8.25x10.75.indd 1

10/11/17 12:55 PM

Family Times November 2017  

Family Times November 2017