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UPSTATE CORD BLOOD BANK HELPS

SAVE LIVES

Environmental Club aims to raise awareness Speach Family Candy Shoppe celebrates 100 years

CREATE A LOVE BUG


39 Reasons Why Central New York Moms Choose Crouse There are many reasons why Crouse delivers more babies than any other hospital in upstate New York, not the least of which are the amazingly skilled, compassionate and highly regarded OB providers who choose to deliver at Crouse Health. If you’re pregnant — or planning to be — don’t you want the very best for both you and your baby?

Crouse Obstetrical Care Providers Cathy J. Berry, MD & Associates Cathy Berry, MD PT Nguyen, MD Janet Ortolani, CNM Alia Rezek, CNM CNY Obstetrics & Gynecology PC Leonard Marotta, MD CNY Women’s Healthcare PC Stephen Brown, MD Maria Ciciarelli, MD Krystal Foree, MD Carol Lopes, MD Jaya Nemani, MD Sarah Schoch, MD Crouse Midwifery Group Mary Thompson, CNM Family Medicine Services Group Eugene Bailey, MD Loftus, Ryu, Bartol, MDs PC Reem Akkawi, MBChB Suzanne Bartol-Krueger, MD Kelli Corniello, DO Erin Hill, MD Jessica Landin, MD William Loftus, MD

Richard D. Semeran, MD PC Richard Semeran, MD University OB/GYN Associates, Inc. Nicholas Baranco, MD Maureen Burke, MD Robert Eden, MD John Folk, MD Leah Kaufman, MD Dimitrios Mastrogiannis, MD Renee Mestad, MD John Nosovitch, Jr., MD Robert Silverman, MD George Stanley, MD Caroline Stroup, MD Brian Thompson, MD Jodi Wallis, DO Charina Carissimi, CNM Kathleen Dermady, CNM Mary Hartman, CNM Women’s Wellness Place Nikole Bucsek, MD Carly Hornis, MD Sara Quinn, MD

For more information about the full spectrum of maternity and obstetrical services available at Crouse, visit crouse.org/babies.

CROUSE

Kienzle Family Maternity Center 2

FAMILY TIMES FEBRUARY 2020


THE SYR ACUSE AUTO DE ALERS ASSOCIATION PRESENTS THE 112TH AUTO EXPO.

Syracuse Auto Expo: The Best & the Brightest! February 6-9, 2020

Oncenter Convention Center & War Memorial See the latest cars, trucks, SUVs, crossovers, motorcycles, street rods and more! Test drive the newest Toyotas at the Toyota Drive Center! Register for a drive in the Pre-function Lobby at Oncenter. Vehicles available will be the all new Camry, RAV4 Hybrid, Highlander & Tundra!

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9

First Responders, Veterans, Military Personnel & EMTs FREE admission with proper ID (Parking not included.)

Customer Appreciation Day. Enjoy the night out, meet up with your friends and family at the Expo!

The Lounge at the Expo! Local wineries & distilleries tastings (4 pm-7 pm). The Twin Magicians & the Face Paint Lady for the kids!

Family Fun Day! The Twin Magicians & The Face Paint Lady too!

For more information visit autoexposyracuse.com.

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Sponsored by the Syracuse Auto Dealers Association

Syracuse Auto Dealers Association Auto Show 4-c Ad “Syracuse Auto Expo: The Best & the Brightest!” Syracuse Family Times Magazine

(7.75 x 4.9 inches)

Due January 9/Prints January 31

Prepared by Anne Sabach 607/842-6843 asabach@frontiernet.net

FAMILY TIMES FEBRUARY 2020

3


QUESTION OF THE MONTH

8

EDUCATOR OF THE MONTH

9

TREAT YOURSELF

10

Need somewhere to eat for Valentine’s Day? Ichiban offers dinner and a show.

LOCAL FACES

12

Speach Family Candy Shoppe celebrates 100 years in Central New York.

CLUB OF THE MONTH

18

Environmental Club aims to raise awareness

FEATURE

22

Umbilical cord blood can save lives, and there is a public bank right here in Syracuse.

CREATE Make a love bug from recycled cardboard tubes.

5

26

CONTENTS

6

FEBRUARY 2020

EDITOR’S NOTE

CAMP ACTIVITY PLANNER

20-21 LEARN 28 4

FAMILY TIMES FEBRUARY 2020

FAMILY FUN CALENDAR


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5


THE

THE PARENTING GUIDE OF CENTRAL NEW YORK

FROM

EDITOR Happy February!

Nothing says Valentine’s Day quite like chocolate. One local business, Speach Family Candy Shoppe, is celebrating a milestone this year. Read about the store’s history, and how it plans to mark 100 years, on page 12. This month’s Treat Yourself has a Valentine’s Day theme. My husband and I enjoyed dinner and a show at Ichiban Japanese Steakhouse, and a local jeweler offers advice for those thinking about purchasing a gem (page 10). Natalie Davis also shows you how to turn recycled carboard tubes into a love bug on page 26. Did you know February 14 is also National Donor Day? The stem cells in umbilical cord blood are being used to treat more than 80 diseases, and there is a public bank right here in Syracuse. Learn more on page 22. In 2020, we plan to create more multimedia content, beginning with this issue. Visit our website to watch the Upstate Cord Blood Bank staff answer some commonly asked questions about cord blood donation. Looking for something to do during winter break? Check out our Question of the Month (page 8) and calendar listings (page 28) for some ideas. Rounding out the February issue is the Club of the Month, Auburn Junior High School’s Environmental Club (page 18), and the Educator of the Month, kindergarten teacher Taylor Whitmore (page 9). If you know a group or educator that deserves a mention, email me at courtneyk@familytimecny. com or fill out the form on our website.

FEBRUARY 2020 | ISSUE NO. 214

GENIUSES AT WORK PUBLISHER/OWNER Bill Brod EDITOR IN CHIEF Courtney Kless CourtneyK@familytimescny.com CONTENT DIRECTOR Steve Guglielmo PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Karley Harmon CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Tom Tartaro (ext. 134) SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Greg Minix GRAPHIC DESIGNER Karley Harmon CONTRIBUTORS Deborah Cavanagh, Neil Davis Jr., Tammy DiDomenico, Aaron Gifford, Eileen Gilligan, Molly Morgan, Tami Scott, Janelle Rozzano, Maggie Lamond Simone, Laura Livingston Snyder, Christy Perry Tuohey, Chris Xaver SALES MANAGER Tim Hudson (ext. 114) ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Lesli Mitchell (ext. 140) LMitchell@familytimescny.com Anne DeSantis (ext. 111) ADesantis@familytimescny.com ADDRESS

COURTNEY KLESS EDITOR IN CHIEF

ON THE COVER

Sarah Minix, the wife of graphic designer Greg Minix, holds an enlarged stem cell. Read about how the stem cells in umbilical cord blood are being used to treat more than 80 diseases on page 22. Advertising deadline is March 16.deadline Calendarfor deadline April Advertising deadline for Marchfor is April Feb 12. Calendar March for is Feb 5. is March 3. Design by Karley Harmon Cover Photo and Design by Greg Minix

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FAMILY TIMES FEBRUARY 2020

1415 W. Genesee Street, Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 472-4669 fax (315) 422-1721 familytimescny.com


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QUESTION OF THE MONTH ?

?

WHAT DOES YOUR FAMILY LIKE TO DO DURING FEBRUARY BREAK? “Winter hiking, visiting local children’s museums and spending time with family.” – Connie

“Vacation somewhere warm.” – Natalie Baldwinsville

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“Years ago, when they were young, we searched for the newspaper medallion. Now, the studio runs a children’s portrait special, and I make some maple syrup.” – Edwin

“Walk outdoors (weather permitting), play in the snow, ice skate, go out to eat.” – Will

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QUESTION OF THE MONTH


Taylor Whitmore

Kindergarten teacher at St. Patrick’s School BY JANELLE ROZZANO PHOTO PROVIDED BY TAYLOR WHITMORE

Smitty’s Curiosities

Tell me about your background and how you joined St. Patrick’s School in Oneida? While in college, I was a preschool teacher at a local daycare for two years until I graduated. I went on to be a substitute teacher for six months. One of the teachers I became close with, as I subbed in her classroom many times, messaged me and told me there was an opening at St. Patrick’s School. She recommended I fill out an application. I was hired the Friday before Labor Day and only had two days to prepare and get everything ready in the classroom for orientation. It was a very stressful start, but I had the help of coworkers and families from the school to help make the transition easy. I have been teaching kindergarten for four years at St. Patrick’s School and I love it!

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What is a skill that you think is important to instill in kindergarten students? One skill I think is important for students starting out in kindergarten is to be a problem-solver. Many times, an issue can arise in a classroom. I have the children try to come up with a way to fix the problem or solve the issue on their own. For example, many times a student’s pencil will break when they are in the middle of writing. They will raise their hand and say, “My pencil broke,” and I will say, “OK, what should you do?” The children will have to come up with a plan on how to fix their pencil. Being able to solve problems will help students in the long run, and is a skill they will need for the rest of their life.

Does your child have

delayed

vision skills?

How do you keep learning fun for such a young age? We do a lot of singing in kindergarten. The kids love it, especially if they have funny dance moves to go along with it. In my classroom, our morning is full of small groups or center time. We have ELA centers and then math centers after a snack. This is the students’ favorite part of the day. The centers are short, which is great for their short attention span, and they are moving around the room to each center. One of their favorite centers right now is playing bingo (letters, sounds, colors, sight words). Playing is also very important, as the children are still learning social skills. Any free chance we have, even if it is only five minutes, I will let them play. For the full interview, visit familytimescny.com. Janelle Rozzano is a freelance writer living in Fairmount with her family.

Know an educator who deserves a mention? E-mail CourtneyK@familytimescny.com

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FAMILY TIMES FEBRUARY 2020

9


Treat Yourself

Ichiban offers dinner and a show BY COURTNEY KLESS

How to choose a gem

Are you looking for somewhere to eat for Valentine’s Day? Do you just need a night out? If so, consider Ichiban Japanese Steakhouse in Liverpool. My husband and I headed there for dinner and a show.

Brad Ozinsky has been the owner/operator of Bradley’s Jewelers in Liverpool for the past 42 years.

Located on Old Liverpool Road, the restaurant first opened its doors in 1975. You can sit at a non-cooking table or a hibachi table, where guests can watch as their food is prepared. I recommend the latter to get the full experience, especially if you’ve never visited a hibachi restaurant before – it was our first trip.

Diamonds are by far and away the most popular gem. There’s nothing that’s even a close second. It used to be rubies, sapphires and emeralds, which are all in the category of precious gems because they’re the most expensive. But rubies, sapphires and emeralds are mixed in now with a whole lot of other stones. Tanzanite is popular, morganite is popular, pink sapphire is popular. There are a ton of different stones out there.

Manager Bridget Hodgson says the chicken teriyaki is among the restaurant’s most popular dishes, but they also offer numerous vegetarian and gluten-free options. “We can accommodate whatever you’re looking for,” she says. “[Guests] can have their dinner cooked in back any way they want it. We can cater a menu item based on their allergies or just likes and dislikes...We just want to be a part of everyone’s special moment.” Since I am a pseudo-vegetarian, I opted for the teriyaki tofu. The meal started with miso soup and a salad topped with Ichiban’s homemade ginger dressing – or in my case, a double salad. Next, the chef cooked fried rice and fried noodles (depending on what guests ordered), followed by the main course. Though both of our meals were prepared in the kitchen, we thoroughly enjoyed watching the show, especially the occasional burst of fire and shrimp toss over the shoulder. It made dinner much more exciting. Hodgson says Valentine’s Day is one of Ichiban’s most popular days, so keep that in mind if you’re planning to visit then. We may be back soon.

If You Go Ichiban Japanese Steakhouse Location 302 Old Liverpool Rd., Liverpool.

Hours Monday – Thursday from 4:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.; Friday from 4:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.; Saturday from 12:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.; Sunday from 12:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. More information IchibanJapaneseSteakhouse.com (315) 457-0000

Have an idea for a future Treat Yourself? E-mail CourtneyK@familytimescny.com

10

TREAT YOURSELF

What are some of the most popular gems?

What advice would you give to customers? What are some things should they look for? They’re going to get lots of different prices for similar stones, so they need to shop around and compare. And no two diamonds are identical. So even though two stones could both weigh 1.03 carats and have the same grade, they can still look different depending on how they’re cut and what the original rough diamond that came out of the earth was actually like. Just keep in mind, it’s not apples to apples. It’s not like you go to Best Buy and price an HP computer and it’s model number xyz, then you go on Amazon and find the exact computer in model xyz. There, you’re comparing apples to apples. But diamonds are different…You need to ask a lot of questions and you need to trust the person that you’re dealing with. That’s important. What is the top mistake you see customers make? Worrying too much about the grade of the stone. In other words, they’re looking at a particular stone that has this color and clarity, and yet they could find, very likely, another stone that has a different color and clarity that could be substantially less, but looks the same. A lot of people get hung up on the grade, and say, ‘Oh, well I have this quality diamond,’ and the other person says, ‘Well, I have a lower quality diamond, but boy they sure look exactly the same in the ring on my fiancé’s finger.’ I actually heard that from a world-renowned diamond cutter who I asked a technical question about diamond cutting, and all he said to me was, ‘What does it look like? Is it beautiful? That’s all that matters.’ People just get too worried about the grading of stones. You should be more concerned with what does it look like to you. This interview was edited for length and clarity.

Courtney Kless is the Editor in Chief of Family Times. She lives in Jamesville with her husband.


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11


ISTOCK PHOTO

A Sweet Celebration Speach Family Candy Shoppe marks 100 years in CNY BY TAMMY DiDOMENICO PHOTOS BY KARLEY HARMON

T

ucked away on Lodi Street in Syracuse, one could be forgiven for not making Speach Family Candy Shoppe a frequent shopping destination. But a quick peak into the fourth-generation family business is all it takes to understand why it has lasted for 100 years. Fresh, handmade chocolates tempt visitors in the glass cases, while troughs of penny (style) candy line the back wall. The Speach family has been successful by balancing quality and innovation with just the right amount of nostalgia.

Michael Speach Jr. has been president and head chocolatier since 2007. One hallmark of his tenure has been bringing a modern business savvy to the day-to-day retail operations, while honoring the rich history that his parents, grandparents and great-grandparents built. “It’s a balance,” Speach says. “You can be very niche-based, but that can be limiting. Part of the appeal, for me, is figuring out how we can better serve our customers. For example, chocolate covered potato chips were extremely popular in the ‘90s. They are still a very big product for us. But we have also become very good at looking at where we can introduce a new product or service without sacrificing the quality that people expect.” Speach approaches his role with enthusiasm, but admits that wasn’t always the case. When his parents, Michael and Susan 12

LOCAL FACES

Speach, ran the store, Michael Jr. was rarely there. “In my teens, I did next to nothing,” he says with a laugh. “As a child, I saw that holidays were very busy and stressful for my parents. I wasn’t attracted to that.” Speach studied at Onondaga Community College and Ithaca College, earning a degree in theatrical design, then worked for several years in New York City. But the stress and politics involved in the theatrical world grew dismaying. During the summer of 2007, Speach came home to visit and to evaluate his future in the entertainment business. It was a turning point. “My mom was busy getting things ready for the State Fair and she asked me to help out by making some fudge,” he says. “Within two or three days, I had made, like, 700 pounds of fudge. More than we could possibly sell.” The rhythm and serenity of the process tugged at some heartstrings. “I woke up again,” Speach says. “I was really drawn to the creativity of the candy making, and the history of the business.” The timing couldn’t have been better. Susan Speach was juggling her work running the business with a full-time job. She and her husband were coming to terms with the fact that they could no longer carry on. They sat down with Speach and his two sisters continued on page 14


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Dawning a new century

S

peach Family Candy Shoppe has always been an active community member. But in 2020, the family-owned business will mark its 100th anniversary with a unique form of community engagement.

On New Year’s Day, the shop launched its 10 Decades of Giving event. For the first 10 months of 2020, Speach will partner with a different non-profit community organization. A unique candy treat has been devised in honor of each organization, and a portion of the profits from that product will donated to that cause. President Michael Speach Jr. says that the non-profits were selected through an online customer poll. Customers can order the products from the Speach Family Candy Shoppe website (speachfamilycandy.com). The site also has a link to each non-profit’s website so customers can learn more about their role in the community. Speach loves the idea of being a community partner, and sees the 10 Decades of Giving event as a sort of culmination of his family’s commitment to the community that has supported it for a century now. The partner organizations include larger, well-known organizations such as The Rescue Mission and Hospice of CNY, as well as smaller organizations like Misfits Animal Rescue & Sanctuary and Front Row Players Inc. “It was a lot of fun putting this together,” Speach says. “It gave me a lot of satisfaction to reach out to these organizations and use my creativity for something positive. This will not only enable us to make a financial contribution to each of these non-profits, but people will be able to learn more about what these organizations do. We are very excited about it.” Another initiative launching this year is 100 Products for 100 Years. “Basically, we’re bringing back some of our most popular products that we’ve made over the past 100 years,” Speach says. “It’s another way of honoring our parents, grandparents and great-grandparents.” Three of the items have been released on the store’s website – a 2019 Advent Calendar, a Holiday Hostess Box of high-end chocolate creams and a selection of limited-edition hot cocoa mixes. Speach says he wants to keep most of the upcoming products a surprise for customers, but he promises a mix of old favorites, updated classics and new items. Check the store website often for more products and surprises. — Tammy DiDomenico 14

LOCAL FACES

continued from page 12 and reviewed their options: sell everything and close shop, or … “I decided I would handle the day-to-day running of the business,” Speach says. “I told them I would give it three years.”

A Fresh Vision Now into his 12th year as president, Speach says that he has learned so much from what his predecessors did right and what they could have done better. “I’ve learned to be more well-rounded when it comes to the business side of things,” he says. “I’ve just decided to embrace it, to incorporate it all into the daily tasks.” He also uses technology as a means of promoting the business beyond the local market, and for making organization easier. “We don’t really use technology in any part of the candy production,” Speach says. “The dipping, chopping and melting are still basically made by hand. But technology has been helpful in tracking trends in our sales, things like that. Our POS (point of sale) system is a big piece of our growth.” Automation has infiltrated many food-based businesses, but Speach says he plans to continue giving his customers what they expect: a high-quality, hand-made product. “Everything is made by hand, and it’s actually better for us because we can control the quantity,” he adds. “We don’t overproduce to the point where we have a warehouse full of stuff.” Another mark of a good leader is knowing when to ask for help. In 2012, Speach’s sister, Connie, came on board as an assistant manager. Speach also started hiring outside help – not something his predecessors ever did. During the holidays – Christmas, Valentine’s Day, Easter and Mother’s Day – the staff can grow to about a dozen. “That has been a big change,” Speach says. “During that first year, I was doing most everything, but I think I’ve gotten a better sense of how to delegate and what to hold on to.” Connie Speach, unlike her brother, logged plenty of hours in the candy shop when her parents were running it. “All through high school, I would help my mom as much as possible,” she said. “When I graduated, I helped out more.” Connie juggled her work at the store while building management experience at other retailers. She also took note of her mother’s strong work ethic and the determination required to keep a small business successful. Bringing those skills to the family business once Michael became president made perfect sense. The Speach siblings share an easy camaraderie on the sales floor and have thus far navigated the occasional difference of opinion. “We argue about certain things, but that’s what families do,” Connie says. “I wouldn’t have it any other way.”


Once Old Is New Again Speach keeps a small wooden plaque hanging behind the counter. It holds a preserved receipt from the 1930s when his great-grandfather, Michael Spicciati (the family’s original Italian name), ran the business. “There were four products listed, all done very, very well,” Speach says. “Now, we offer about 600 different products.” Some of the shop’s current products – such as the chocolate covered marshmallows, brickles and truffles – hail back to their origins. The brickles evolved from recipes used by Speach’s mother, Susan, and the truffles follow the process created by Susan when she was the head chocolatier. “My mother was truly the creative part of the business for over 20 years and continues to be what inspires me every day when I walk through these doors,” Speach says. “The brickles are a very unique product and they are very popular,” he adds. “We’ve changed the recipes just a little to incorporate more natural ingredients. We still offer about 300 different kinds of truffles, rotating them in depending on the holidays.” In recent years, the store has established a partnership with 1-800-Flowers, assembling fresh fruit and chocolate arrangements for delivery. Each arrangement is made from fresh fruit selected daily from local distributors. continued on page 16 ICHAEL

ED BY M

PROVID PHOTO

SPEACH

i

Valentine’s Day Of course, Valentine’s Day is one of the Speach Family Candy Shoppe’s biggest holidays. Michael Speach says truffles are always popular, and Connie adds that the classics are always popular with sweethearts – a heart-shaped box of mixed chocolates or a box of fresh, hand-dipped strawberries.

FAMILY TIMES FEBRUARY 2020

15


continued from page 15 The shop has been at its current location, 2400 Lodi Street, since 1994. The family has owned the building for decades. The store first opened on North Townsend Street, then operated out of several locations in Syracuse, Liverpool and (very briefly) in Cortland. Speach says that, although the building is old and costly to maintain, it is set up to suit the needs of the business quite well.

and the 100th anniversary,” she says. “We have looked forward to this for a very long time. I know our dad, grandparents and great-grandparents would be extremely proud knowing that we made it this far from what they started and built over these last 100 years.” Award-winning writer Tammy DiDomenico lives in DeWitt with her husband and two sons. PHOTO PROVIDED BY MICHAEL SPEACH

“This isn’t just a business; it’s my life. It’s blood, sweat and tears. It’s the good times and the bad. It’s family, friends and lasting relationships.” – Michael Speach Jr., president of Speach Family Candy Shoppe

As much as Speach is thriving in his role, he encounters some of the same occupational hazards that caused his parents to walk away. “I have yet to really find a sort of work/family balance,” he admits. Even with the expanded staff, Speach says he probably does about 90% of the direct customer service himself. As for the future, Speach says he’s open to the possibilities. Perhaps a change of location? An expansion? “The store has opened so many doors for me,” Speach says. “We will see…anything can happen.” Whatever comes next, Connie says she looks forward to helping continue the family legacy. “Michael has big plans for the store

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h It? t i W Do o T t Go HEAVY HITTER TIP OF THE MONTH:

On Valentine’s Day, Honor Your Loved One! As personal-injury attorneys, we know quite well that bad things can happen in life. That’s why we think it’s important to celebrate the good things in life – like honoring your significant other and celebrating the life and love you share. It’s a good thing to do every day – but especially so on Valentine’s Day! Here are our tips for how to make that happen: • • • • •

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17


Club OF THE

Month

Environmental Club Auburn Junior High School

From left to right: Sierra Ryan, Olivia Shaw, Penelope Furgeson, Millie Wu, Jasmine Gray, Connor Lansbury, Jasmine Parilla, Francesca Pisciotti, Madisyn Edersheim, Molly Matheson, Dejah Evans Murphy, Elisabeth Lentini. On the floor: Caitlyn Rao. PHOTOS BY KARLEY HARMON

D

uring the 2018-19 school year, a group of students from Auburn Junior High School collected more than 35,000 bottle caps for a local project. Those bottle caps were later turned into benches and placed at the district’s five elementary schools.

“They are bringing out their unfiltered creativity,” Feheley says. “I love that they’re so ambitious and are ready to change the entire world this year, but we’ve had to talk about realistically how do we do it, when do we do it, more of the planning aspect.”

This year, those students wanted to do more, and the Environmental Club was founded.

Feheley says one of the club’s main goals is to raise awareness about environmental issues and “change people’s thinking.” On America Recycles Day in November, members held a raffle, giving any student or staff member that recycled plastic bottles or old batteries or brought in a reusable water bottle a chance to win a prize. Two students also turned recycled plastics into a tree, featuring facts about how our actions during the holidays – such as hanging up lights – affect the environment.

“In college, I took a class entirely about plastics. Ever since, I’ve been hyper-aware of what their impact is,” says Julie Feheley, the club’s adviser and a Technology teacher at the school. “In my class, one day a year, I would teach them what plastics are, the fancy names for them and what plastics they’re seeing around. Then, I would talk about the impact they were having. Some of the students mentioned we should start a club to bring awareness to it and do certain environmental things, so I did.” The Environmental Club – which meets every Tuesday after school – typically includes 15-20 members. They’ve had a busy first year. This fall, students raked the courtyard outside the school. The club also recently collected old T-shirts for a fundraiser – the shirts will be turned into re-usable bags. In the future, the Environmental Club hopes to do a clean-up project in Auburn.

18

“One person does make a difference, and changing the little things you do can have a bigger impact than people think,” Feheley says. “I feel like there are a lot of kids right now that are really passionate about the environment and are realizing what damage has been done. Sometimes, I feel like it’s thought that the kids don’t care and they’re just doing what they’re doing, but I’ve noticed the passion behind it. They want to make a difference and they want to do good things.”

CLUB OF THE MONTH

— Courtney Kless


In their words:

What has been your favorite part of being in the Environmental Club? PHOTO PROVIDED BY AUBURN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

“Probably when we cleaned up our courtyard.” – Caitlyn Rao “At the beginning of this year, we all went out into the courtyard and we cleaned it up. At the end of this year, we’re going to make a little duck enclosure because we have ducks that come back every year.” – Cianna Bailey

“We all group together to think of ideas to help. Our first job was working out in our courtyard to fix it up, but now we’re starting to talk about Australia and how we can help them, how we can recycle, so just the little activities we do to try to help.” – Molly Matheson Mixed age classes Individualized curriculum

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The Power to Save a Life

Cord blood is being used to treat more than 80 diseases | STORY AND PHOTOS BY COURTNEY KLESS

A

cord blood transplant saved Mildred Bethea’s life.

She survived battles with breast cancer and a type of acute leukemia, the second of which Bethea says “catapulted me to death’s door,” before being diagnosed with Myelodysplastic Syndrome. After Bethea went into remission for a third time, her doctor recommended a bone marrow transplant. Though she was unable to find an adult donor match, she did find one at a public cord blood bank.

“At that point, it became an issue of what they would have to do to me in order to give me the transplant because I had been through all this other chemotherapy,” Bethea says. “I was a difficult case.” Despite the risks, she was successfully transplanted with that cord blood donation. That was in 2007. Today, Bethea – who lives in Wilmington, North Carolina – is an advocate for cord blood donation, leading an organization called Driving for Change. “I’m trying to help mothers be aware that when [the umbilical cord] went into the garbage, it still had life in it,” she says, “And that is what I’m living off of.”

? 22

What Is Cord Blood?

Typically discarded after birth, the blood in the umbilical cord and placenta contains stem cells. Those cells can then be used to treat more than 80 diseases, including leukemia, lymphoma and other blood disorders. Unlike adult stem cells from bone marrow, there does not need to be a perfect match between the donor and the recipient, increasing the chances of finding a match. Cord blood is also being used in research for treatment of diseases ranging from cerebral palsy to autism. The first cord blood transplant was performed in 1988. Since then, more than 25,000 patients have benefitted, according to the National Marrow Donor Program’s website (www.bethematch. org).

Upstate Cord Blood Bank

The Upstate Cord Blood Bank is one of two public cord blood banks in New York state – the other is located in Long Island City – and 30 around the country, according to the Upstate Cord Blood Bank’s website. After former Senator John DeFrancisco obtained $15 million to construct the facility, the Upstate Cord

On Our Website: The Upstate Cord Blood Bank staff answer some commonly asked questions about cord blood donation.

FEATURE


“ That has been our biggest achievement; I think we actually have changed the culture here at

the Upstate Family Birth Center. We gave every nurse a tour of our facility and then they understood what we were doing. We want to try to put that awareness out into the community so that they understand. Each cord blood donation could save a life, why throw it out? “ – Ann Marie Straight, Business Manager

Blood Bank began processing and storing cord blood in February of 2017. For the Upstate Cord Blood Bank staff, one of the biggest challenges so far has been changing the culture around cord blood donation. Business Manager Ann Marie Straight says since cord blood donation has not been an option for the region, most people (mothers, providers, nurses etc.) don’t think about it. “That has been our biggest achievement; I think we actually have changed the culture here at the Upstate Family Birth Center,” she says. “We gave every nurse a tour of our facility and then they understood what we were doing. We want to try to put that awareness out into the community so that they understand. Each cord blood donation could save a life, why throw it out?” The Upstate Cord Blood Bank currently receives cord blood from two hospitals in the area – Upstate Community Hospital, where the facility is located, and Crouse Hospital – and is working to add St. Joseph’s Hospital. They also hope to eventually expand to private banking, which families would pay for.

“It makes sense, business-wise, to reach out into both of those worlds and provide that service to the community,” Straight says. “A mom who wants to donate to a family bank, it would be nice if they could just do it right here versus sending it out to Arizona or Kentucky. There are places all over. Having it right here [in Syracuse], you know where it is.”

The Donation Process

Straight says that, as of December 31, 2019 more than 820 families have donated to the Upstate Cord Blood Bank. Meghan Shea-Frederick is one of those donors. While she was pregnant and working as a nurse in the labor and delivery unit at Upstate Community Hospital, Shea-Frederick heard about cord blood donation and its benefits. “One of the main reasons I ended up donating is because I actually knew about it,” Shea-Frederick says, adding that her dad had leukemia as a child, which also played a role in her decision. continued on page 24

Fast Facts Typically discarded, blood remains in the umbilical cord and placenta after a baby is born

Donating cord blood is not controversial; there are no embryonic stem cells involved

That blood contains stem cells, and it can be used to treat more than 80 diseases

Though cord blood can be used for adult transplants, it is most commonly used in children

Unlike other types of cells, stem cells are able to self-replicate

The top use of cord blood is transplants for blood cancers

The unit must meet standards set by the Food and Drug Administration and New York State of Health, and contain a certain number of stem cells FAMILY TIMES FEBRUARY 2020

23


By The Numbers

2

Public cord blood banks in New York

30

Cord blood banks in the United States

5

continued from page 23

Ounces of blood in the umbilical cord and placenta

Central New York families that have donated cord blood since the Upstate Cord Blood Bank opened in February 2017

PHOTO PROVIDED BY UPSTATE CORD BLOOD BANK

When a mother chooses to donate, she must fill out a consent form and a health history questionnaire, and let her provider know about her plans. Because it is a public bank, there is no cost for the donor. After the provider has clamped and cut the cord, the blood – approximately five ounces or a half-cup – is collected. Mothers are still able donate if they have a C-section or opt for delayed cord clamping, as long as their provider follows the guidelines set by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The entire collection process takes about five minutes. “You don’t feel a poke; you don’t feel anything,” Shea-Frederick says. “You’re not even really aware that they’re collecting it.” When it arrives at the Upstate Cord Blood Bank, the cord blood is assigned a unique identifier, processed, and placed in a container about the size of a cassette tape. It is also tested for contamination and cell count. If the cord blood doesn’t meet the standards for transplant, it can be used for research. Otherwise, it is stored in a tank filled with liquid nitrogen until needed. Each tank is able to store 3,600 units of cord blood, and the number of donations the facility receives per day varies.

820

3,600

Shea-Frederick says she wouldn’t hesitate to donate again. “It was easy,” she says. “I just filled out a couple health questionnaires, and in the end, the unit can be useful, if not for me, for someone else in the future to help cure diseases. It’s a small thing we can do now that I would do over again.” For more information about the Upstate Cord Blood Bank, visit upstatecordbloodbank.com.

Courtney Kless is the Editor in Chief of Family Times. She lives in Jamesville with her husband.

Units of cord blood that each tank can store

No cost for families to donate cord blood to a public bank PHOTO PROVIDED BY UPSTATE CORD BLOOD BANK

24

FEATURE


An evening of food, fun, entertainment, silent & live auctions and raffles to support the children of Holy Family School! Adults $50 per person ___________________________

Your ticket price includes: Delicious food by Limp Lizard BBQ • Wine, Beer & Non-alcoholic beverages • Live entertainment by The Mere Mortals band Proceeds help support Holy Family School. This year the event will be for adults only.

March 7, 2020 • 6:00 – 10:00pm 

        Â?Â?Â?Â?Â? ­ FAMILY TIMES FEBRUARY 2020

25


A Recycled Creation Use cardboard tubes to make this Valentine’s Day craft CRAFT AND PHOTOS BY NATALIE DAVIS

T

his Valentine’s Day, love bugs are a great project for the little ones in your life. Plus, you get to recycle! Kids can practice their tracing and cutting skills as they make the heart wings for their love bugs. For the real young ones, parents can provide pre-cut hearts, available right now in the seasonal craft section of your favorite retail store.

Supplies ◊ Toilet paper tubes or paper towel cardboard tubes. You can experiment with different heights. ◊ Acrylic paint in pink, red, purple or any color you choose. ◊ Paint brushes

26

CREATE

◊ Googly eyes ◊ Pom poms ◊ Sharpie

◊ Glue or hot glue

4

◊ Pipe cleaners

◊ Masking tape

◊ Scissors

Supplies

◊ Foam craft sheets in pink, red, purple or any color you choose.

2 5

3


Steps 1

Find some cardboard craft tubes. You can recycle your cardboard toilet paper roll or paper towel roll tubes, which we did here, or order them on Amazon.

2

Paint the cardboard tubes any color you would like and let dry. This will be the base/body of the bug. Here, I chose to use Valentine’s-themed colors.

3

Trace and cut out heart shapes for the wings. I drew and cut out a heart that I then used as my template for the other wings. If you are not as confident with your drawing skills, you can always find a heart image online, then print and use that as your template.

us on Instagram so we can see Tip: Tag what you create! @familytimescny

4

Glue your heart wings to your cardboard roll and let dry.

5

Glue your googly eyes on, and affix pipe cleaners for the legs and antennae. If the glue is giving you trouble with this step, you can use masking tape (I happened to have some red masking tape on hand). Have fun making silly faces with a sharpie and curl your antennae. Add some more paint or sharpie to the body of your love bugs to give them some personality. Once the glue is dry...

your love bug is ready!

Natalie Davis is an artist and educator teaching enrichment in the Syracuse City School District. She lives with her family in Jordan.

FAMILY TIMES FEBRUARY 2020

27


Please note: Mistakes happen. To confirm event details, call the sponsoring organization’s phone number or visit the website.

SATURDAY, FEB. 1 Take Your Child to the Library Day. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Make a bookmark and explore what the library has to offer. Spin art (2-3 p.m.); registration requested. Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. (315) 492-1727. oflibrary.org.

Kids Cooking Class. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. The

class includes a cooking lesson and lunch. Spots are limited. CNY RISE Center, 275 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. $20/adult and child; $5/additional child. cnyriseladies@gmail.com.

Pups ‘n Pages. 11 a.m.-noon.; also Feb. 15 & 29.

SciExcite, a nonprofit organization run by local high school students. Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville. Free. Registration required: CLDandJ.org. (315) 446-3578.

SUNDAY, FEB. 2 STEM Storytime. 10:30-11:30 a.m.; also Feb. 9,

16 & 23. Children ages 2-6 can take part in a session that encourages the scientific spirit through stories, music, and play. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST), 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. $5/child (non-members). (315) 425-9068.

Sunday Funday. 2-4 p.m.; weekly, through April 5. All ages of visitors can explore the galleries, see art making, hear stories, and play games. Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. $8/ general admission; free/under 12. (315) 474-6064. everson.org.

All ages can read to or just hang out with one of the volunteer dogs. NOPL Cicero, 8686 Knowledge Lane, Cicero. Free. (315) 699-2032. nopl.org.

MONDAY, FEB. 3

Rice Creek Rambles. 11 a.m.; also Feb. 8, 22

Adults with special needs can play Wii games and board games; caregivers must remain in the room. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

& 29. People of all ages (kids under 17 must be accompanied by an adult) can go on an informative, family-friendly walk. Rice Creek Field Station, 193 Thompson Road, 1 mile south of SUNY Oswego’s main campus, Oswego. Call to check trail conditions the morning of the hike: (315) 312-6677. oswego.edu/ricecreek.

Gaming for Adults with Special Needs. 1:30-3 p.m.

DIY Valentines. 1-3 p.m. Use provided mate-

TUESDAY, FEB. 4

Mad Scientists. 2-3 p.m. Children in K-5 can take part in science activities presented by members of

Tuesday Crafternoons. 3:30-7 p.m.; also Feb. 11, 18 & 25. Children ages 3-10 can drop in to make a craft. Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 Genesee St., Camillus. Free. (315) 672-3661. maxwellmemoriallibrary.org.

rials to create a Valentine for family and friends. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

28

CALENDAR

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5 Teen Game Day. 2:30-4:30 p.m. Children ages 11 and up can join pros from TCGplayer to play YuGiOh!, Pokémon and more. Refreshments will be provided. Betts Branch Library, 4862 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Free. (315) 435-1940. Banff Film Festival. 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m. The event will feature a series of short stories. North Syracuse Junior High School, 5353 West Taft Rd., North Syracuse. $18/presale; $20/door. (315) 699-1391. facebook.com/SyracuseBanff.

THURSDAY, FEB. 6 Trail Tales. 1 p.m.; also Feb. 27. Children ages

3-5, accompanied by a caregiver, can hear some stories and go on a trail walk. Beaver Lake Nature Center, Route 370, Baldwinsville. $5/parking. (315) 638-2519.

Syracuse Auto Expo. 4-9 p.m.; through Feb. 9.

Hundreds of vehicles in two buildings. On Feb. 9, Family Fun Day includes a magical act (noon-4 p.m.), face painting (12:30-4 p.m.), and $20 for family four pack admission. Oncenter, 800 S. State St., Syracuse. $9/adults; $7/senior citizens; $3/ages 6-12; free/age 5 & under. autoexposyracuse.com.

Moonlight Skiing and Snowshoeing. Until 9 p.m.; through Feb. 9. Venture onto Beaver Lake’s 10 miles of trails (if the snow cover is adequate) lit by the moon. Hot chocolate and other refreshments available at the visitor center. Bring a flashlight and a friend for safety. Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 E. Mud Lake Road, Baldwinsville. Admission: $5/vehicle. (315) 638-2519. Drop-In Craft. Through Feb. 14. Children of all ages can create a love bug. Onondaga Free Library,


iSTOCK PHOTO

4840 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. (315) 492-1727. oflibrary.org.

FRIDAY, FEB. 7

PAW Patrol Live. 10 a.m. & 2 p.m.; also Feb.

9. Watch the live production of the popular Nickelodeon series. Landmark Theatre, 362 S. Salina St., Syracuse. $25-$65 (plus fees). (800) 7453000. ticketmaster.com.

Winter Fair. 2-10 p.m.; through Feb. 9. Food, rides, entertainment and more. Expo Center, State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse. $5/adults (plus fees); $3/ ages 13-17 & seniors (plus fees); free/age 10 & under. nyswinterfair.com.

Cupid’s Chase. 10 a.m. (registration); 11 a.m.

Friday Crafternoon. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Create

Feb. 7 listing.

Valentine-themed crafts. Salina Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. (315) 454-4524. salinalibrary.org.

(run). Take part in 5K run and 3K walk to benefit Community Options, an organization that supports people with disabilities. Walkers, runners, joggers, people in wheelchairs, and baby strollers are welcome. Onondaga Lake Park, Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. $35-$40 (315) 431-9859.

Winter Fair. 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; through Feb. 9. See Preschool Information Fair. 10:30 a.m.-

Syracuse Auto Expo. 4-9 p.m.; through Feb. 9. See Feb. 6 listing.

noon. Representatives from local preschools will provide information about their programs to families. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. Free. (315) 637-6374.

Guided Moonlight Snowshoe Hike. 7 p.m.;

Syracuse Auto Expo. Noon-9 p.m.; through

also Feb. 8. Explore the woodlands and frozen marshes on snowshoes with a guide; space limited. Program is only offered when conditions are acceptable. Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 E. Mud Lake Road, Baldwinsville. $5/snowshoe rental; $5/ vehicle. Registration required day of hike: (315) 638-2519.

SATURDAY, FEB. 8 A Taste of Chocolate. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Sample chocolate treats, including cookies, muffins and candies. Columbian Presbyterian Church, Routes 20 & 11, LaFayette. $.50/sample. (315) 677-3293. columbianpresbyterianchurch.com.

Feb. 9. See Feb. 6 listing.

My Special Guy and I. 5:30-9 p.m. The event,

which is a fundraiser for the Eastwood Bears yearround cheer team, will feature dancing, dinner and more. Eastwood American Legion, 102 Nichols Ave, Syracuse. Pre-sale (until 2/2): $35/couple; $10/ additional child; At the door: $50/couple; $20/additional child. (315) 481-3395.

SUNDAY, FEB. 9 PAW Patrol Live. 10 a.m. & 2 p.m.; See Feb. 8 listing.

Winter Fair. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; through Feb. 9. See

Feb. 7 listing.

Syracuse Auto Expo. Noon-5 p.m.; through Feb. 9. See Feb. 6 listing.

MONDAY, FEB. 10 Homeschool Family Fun. 1-2:30 p.m.

Homeschooling parents and kids can take part in a casual hangout with games and crafts. Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 Genesee St., Camillus. Free. (315) 672-3661. maxwellmemoriallibrary.org.

Comfort Measures. 6-7:30 p.m. Discuss tips

for a comfortable birth. Wear comfortable clothes and bring a yoga mat. Presented by CNY Doula Connection. CNY Healing Arts, 195 Intrepid Lane, Syracuse. Free. Registration is recommended. (315) 707-8097.

TUESDAY, FEB. 11 Drop-In Valentines. 11 a.m.1 p.m. Children of all ages can create a Valentine’s Day card. Manlius Public Library, 1 Arkie Albanese Ave., Manlius. Free. (315) 682-6400. manliuslibrary.org. Teen Tuesday. 4-5 p.m. Young people in grades

6-12 can take part in a different program each week. During this week’s session, create a tissue paper vase. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. Free. Registration required: (315) 637-6374. fflib.org.

FAMILY TIMES FEBRUARY 2020

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Visit our website to see how to make last year’s Valentine’s Day craft, melted crayon hearts. Photo by Michael Davis.

Drop-In Winter Craft. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Make a snowflake craft, a paper plate snowman and more. NOPL North Syracuse, 100 Trolley Barn Lane, North Syracuse. Free. (315) 458-6184. nopl.org.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12 Teen Tabletop Games. 6-8 p.m. Teens can

play board games and eat snacks. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

THURSDAY, FEB. 13 Valentine’s Day Party. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Children ages 2-10 can play games, work on crafts and more. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. Registration required: (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

FRIDAY, FEB. 14

SATURDAY, FEB. 15 Winter Hibernation Festival.

10 a.m.-3 p.m. Check out winter exhibits, cross-country skiing, live animals, and more. Great Swamp Conservancy, 8375 N. Main St., Canastota. $4 adults; $2/child 12 and under; $8 max for families. greatswampconservancy.org.

Sensory Slime Lab. Noon-3 p.m. Attendees

of all ages can play with slime and make some of their own to take home. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST), 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. $5/child. (315) 425-9068.

Sweet Treats. 10 a.m-3 p.m. Watch as the zoo’s animals receive Valentine’s Day treats. Rosamond Gifford Zoo at Burnet Park, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Admission February: $5/adults; $2.50/age 62 & up; $2/ages 3-18; free/age 2 and younger. (315) 435-8511.

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CALENDAR

MONDAY, FEB. 17

Valentine’s Day Story Hour & Crafting. 11 a.m. Elementary-age children can enjoy Valentinethemed tales and make a pinecone feeder. Rice Creek Field Station, 193 Thompson Road, 1 mile south of SUNY Oswego’s main campus, Oswego. (315) 312-6677. oswego.edu/ricecreek.

SUNDAY, FEB. 16

SEE ONGOING EVENTS

is a fundraiser for the Eastwood Bears year-round cheer team. Painting with a Twist, 3179 Erie Blvd E, Suite 131, Syracuse. $40. Paintingwithatwist.com/ studio/syracuse-dewitt/event/2274319.

Painting with a Twist. Noon-2 p.m. Children of all ages can create their own artwork. The event

Winter Wonders Week. 10 a.m.; daily through Feb. 21. Various special break-week activities, including a chance to try snowshoeing (Feb. 17 & 19 at 10 a.m.), build a snow cave (Feb. 21, 10 a.m.), learn about winter animals (daily, 1:30 p.m.); and more. All activities are weather dependent. Indoor activities will take place if there isn’t enough snow for outdoor ones. Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 E. Mud Lake Road, Baldwinsville. $5/vehicle. (315) 638-2519.

Create a Family Tree. 10 a.m.-noon. Explore

your family tree with the website Twile. Attendees are responsible for providing information about family members. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. Registration required: (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.


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TUESDAY, FEB. 18 Teen Spa Day. 2-3 p.m.

Attendees ages 8-16 can make spa products to take home. Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville. Free. Registration required: CLDandJ.org. (315) 446-3578.

No-Paint Winter Sky Pictures. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Children ages 5-12 can learn how to create a mini winter sky photo. Salina Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. Registration required: (315) 454-4524. salinalibrary.org. Beach Party Story Time. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Bring a beach towel and enjoy stories, crafts and more. NOPL North Syracuse, 100 Trolley Barn Lane, North Syracuse. Free. (315) 458-6184. nopl.org. Games of Strategy. 7-8 p.m. Attendees can play

chess, checkers and more. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19 SEE ONGOING EVENTS

THURSDAY, FEB. 20 Make Mardi Gras Masks. Noon-1 p.m.

Attendees of all ages can make their own mask. Manlius Public Library, 1 Arkie Albanese Ave., Manlius. Free. Registration required: (315) 682-6400. manliuslibrary.org.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid Party. 12:30-1:30

p.m. Children ages 5-10 can check out Diary of a Wimpy Kid-themed crafts and games. Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville. Free. Registration required: CLDandJ.org. (315) 446-3578.

Interactive Movie. 1-3 p.m. Elsa and Anna

return in a screening of Frozen 2. Costumes are encouraged. Also stop by from 10-11 a.m. to make a craft with the library’s ‘snow’ paint. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Balloon Show. 2-3 p.m. Jeff the Magic Man will perform. NOPL Brewerton, 5440 Bennett St., Brewerton. Free. Registration required: (315) 6767484. nopl.org.

Syracuse Winterfest 2011. Photo by Michael Davis

Beaded Wish Bracelets. 6 p.m. Teens can learn how create their own wish bracelet. Salina Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. Registration required: (315) 454-4524. salinalibrary.org.

FRIDAY, FEB. 21 Time for Tots Playgroup. 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Teddy Bear Tea Party.

4-5 p.m. Children ages 3 and up can enjoy storytime, hot chocolate and a craft with their favorite stuffed animal. Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville. Free. Registration required: CLDandJ.org. (315) 446-3578.

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CALENDAR

Homeschooling 101 for Parents. 7-8:30 p.m.

This month’s topic is teaching literature. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Science Week. Daily through Feb. 21. Families

can take part in STEM activities, including live animal presentations (Feb. 18), an egg drop (Feb. 19) and more. WonderWorks Syracuse, 9090 Destiny, Syracuse. $5/day. wonderworksonline.com.

Education playgroup for children ages 18 months-5 years and their caregiver. Stories, songs, arts and crafts, and more. Cross of Christ Lutheran Church, 8131 Soule Road, Liverpool. $3/family. Registration recommended: (315) 622-2843. NYCrossofChrist.org/Tots.

Toddler Dance Party. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Children ages 18 months-5 years can come play musical instruments, enjoy bubbles, and dance their sillies out. Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville. Free. (315) 446-3578. CLDandJ.org.


HIGHLIGHTS:

Thursday, Feb 13th Medallion Hunt begins Salsa at the Everson Friday, Feb. 14th Fireworks Saturday, Feb. 15th Culinary Cruise Martini Mix-off Cosmopolitan Mix-off Ice Carving Sunday, Feb. 16th Kids Fun with Checkers Chili Cook-off Beer Tasting Cornhole Tournament Ice Carving Saturday, Feb. 22nd Sandwich Stroll Margarita Mix-off Sangria Mix-off Ice Carving Everson Free Family Day Sunday, Feb. 23rd Yard Games Olympics Chowder Cook-off Bloody Mary Mix-off Wing Walk Hammond Jammin’ XVI Ice Carving Human DogSled Race Team Trivia Finals Fireworks FAMILY TIMES FEBRUARY 2020

33


Chocolympics. 2-3 p.m. Participants ages 7-12 can guess the number of Hershey kisses in a jar and more. NOPL North Syracuse, 100 Trolley Barn Lane, North Syracuse. Free. Registration required: (315) 458-6184. nopl.org. Curious George. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Children

ages 4-6 can enjoy Curious George-themed stories, crafts and games. Salina Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. Registration required: (315) 4544524. salinalibrary.org.

SATURDAY, FEB. 22 SEE ONGOING EVENTS

SUNDAY, FEB. 23 Open House and Train Show. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

The Syracuse Model Railroad Club’s annual event will feature a LEGO layout, Thomas and friends and more. Eastwood American Legion Hall, 102 Nichols Ave., Syracuse. Admission: $4/adult; $2/ages 12 and under; $10 family maximum. 315-706-7580. syracusemodelrr.org.

Puzzlemania. Noon-5 p.m. through Feb. 29

during library hours. Drop in and put together a puzzle. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

MONDAY, FEB. 24 SEE ONGOING EVENTS

TUESDAY, FEB. 25 SEE ONGOING EVENTS

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26 SEE ONGOING EVENTS

THURSDAY, FEB. 27 SEE ONGOING EVENTS

FRIDAY, FEB. 28 Books and Cooks. Noon-2 p.m. Sponsored by Headstart, children ages 3-5 and their families can discover books and recipes. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. Registration required: lpl.org. (315) 457-0310.

SATURDAY, FEB. 29 Frozen Fire & Lights. 10 a.m. The annual event features face painting, fireworks, a cardboard sled race and more. Fern Park and Arrowhead Park, Inlet. Free. frozenfireandlights.com.

Be the Scientist. Noon-4

p.m. Explore the activities of a chronologist with hands-on activities. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST). 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. Museum admission: $12/adults; $10/seniors and ages 2-11. (315) 425-9068.

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CALENDAR

ONGOING EVENTS CNY Scholastic Art Awards – Exceptional Teen Art! Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Saturday

and Sunday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; through Feb. 28. View award-winning art created by juniors and senior high school students. Whitney Applied Technology Center, Onondaga Community College, 4585 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. (315) 498-2221. sunyocc.edu/scholastic-arts-show.

Horsedrawn Sleigh Rides. Saturdays &

Sundays, 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; through Feb. 23. A 20-minute ride into the woods. Highland Forest Park, County Road 128, Fabius. $8/adults; $5/age 5 & under. (315) 683-5550.

Weekend Walks with a Naturalist.

Saturdays and Sundays, 2 p.m. Nature discovery hike with different topics each weekend. Beaver Lake Nature Center, Route 370, Baldwinsville. Admission: $5/vehicle. (315) 638-2519.

Great Swamp Conservancy Nature Trails. Daily, dawn to dusk. Throughout

the year, visitors can grab their walking shoes and explore 4.5 miles of well-groomed, flat trails. Trails feature a 900-foot boardwalk, osprey nesting platform, and wetland and grassland restoration areas. The area is a stop for many migratory waterfowl and songbirds; other wildlife include muskrats and beavers. Great Swamp Conservancy, 3.5 miles off I-90, Exit 34, 8375 N. Main St., Canastota. Free. (315) 697-2950.

Baltimore Woods Nature Center. Hiking trails and parking are free and open every day from dawn to dusk. Interpretive Center open MondayFriday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; closed Sundays. 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. (315) 673-1350. Wegmans Playground. Boundless Playground

for children (and parents) of all ages and abilities includes accessible swings, slides, bridge and more, including special section just for the tiniest tykes. Onondaga Lake Park, Route 370, Liverpool. Free. (315) 451-PARK.

Peanut Butter Jelly Time. Thursdays, 5 p.m.

Members of the community can join in making more than a hundred bagged lunches to hand out to the hungry and homeless in downtown Syracuse. The Road, 4845 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. (315) 218-6066. wholelygroundsattheroad.org.

Liverpool Public Library. Lapsit Story Time (ages 2 and under): Tuesdays, 10:15-11 a.m. Sing Along Friends Story Time (ages 2-5): Thursdays, 10:1511:15 a.m. Family Story Time (ages 5 and under): Fridays, 10:15-11:15 a.m.

Maxwell Library Storytimes. Storytimes

and book groups for all ages. Call for dates and times. Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 Genesee St., Camillus. Free. (315) 672-3661.

Northeast Community Center Library Storytimes. Preschool storytimes with rhymes

and occasional games; youngsters learn group listening and participation skills. Call for times. Northeast Community Center Library, 716 Hawley Ave., Syracuse. Free. (315) 472-6343, Ext. 208.

NOPL Brewerton Storytimes. Birth-24 months: Mondays, 9:30-10 a.m. Ages 2 and up: Mondays, 10:30-11:30 a.m. NOPL Brewerton, 5440 Bennett St., Brewerton. (315) 676-7484. nopl.org. NOPL Cicero Library Storytimes. Toddler

Story Hour: Tuesdays & Wednesdays, 10-11 a.m. Preschool Story Hour: Tuesdays & Wednesdays, 11 a.m.-noon. NOPL Cicero, 8686 Knowledge Lane, Cicero. Free. (315) 699-2032. nopl.org.

NOPL North Syracuse Library Storytimes.

Birth-age 3: Wednesdays, 10-11 a.m. Ages 3-5: Thursdays, 11 a.m.-noon. NOPL North Syracuse, 100 Trolley Barn Lane, North Syracuse. Free. (315) 458-6184. nopl.org.

Onondaga Free Library Storytimes. Baby

Storytime (age 2 and under): Tuesdays, 11 a.m. Family Storytimes (age 2 and older): Wednesdays & Thursdays, 11:15 a.m. Wiggleworms (toddlers and preschoolers): Wednesdays, 10:15 a.m. Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. Registration required: (315) 492-1727. oflibrary.org.

Petit Branch Library Storytimes. Tuesdays,

10:30 a.m. Toddler and preschooler storytime for children ages 18 months-5 years and caregivers. Includes stories, rhymes, finger plays and songs. Petit Branch Library, 105 Victoria Place, Syracuse. (315) 435-3636.

Regional Market Farmers’ Market. Saturdays, 7 a.m.-2 p.m. (year-round). Shop seasonal produce, meat, fish, poultry, eggs, specialty foods and more on display throughout covered sheds; heated shops of Regional Market Commons feature gift and unique items including jewelry, paintings and home decor. Also, flea market, Sundays, 7 a.m.-3 p.m. 2100 Park St., Syracuse. (315) 422-8647.

Barnes & Noble Storytimes. Thursdays, 10

a.m. Join a storytime for toddlers and preschoolers that features a book, songs and coloring. Barnes & Noble, 3454 Erie Blvd. E., DeWitt. Free. (315) 449-2948.

Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville Storytimes. Call or visit the website for times. Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville. Free. Registration recommended: CLDandJ.org. (315) 446-3578.

Fairmount Community Library Storytimes.

Little Movers (good walkers ages 1-3): Mondays, 10:15 a.m. Music is Magic (ages 1-5): Mondays, 11:15 a.m.; Preschool Storytime & Craft (ages 3-4): Thursdays, 10:15 a.m. Fairmount Community Library, 406 Chapel Dr., Syracuse. Free. (315) 487-8933. fairmountlibrary.org.

CALENDAR LISTINGS ARE FREE Send information about your family-friendly event to: Family Times calendar, 1415 W. Genesee St., Syracuse; fax to (315) 422-1721; or email to courtneyk@familytimescny.com. Include date and time of event, location with numbered street address and town, price, and phone number for publication. We give priority to low- or no-cost events aimed at parents, kids, or parents accompanied by kids. For consideration, listings are due by Feb. 5 for the March issue. For additional exposure, upload your event to the community guide at communityguide.familytimescny.com. Click on the FAQ tab for a video tutorial.


Parents’ Night Out SATURDAY, FEB. 1

Shaken Not Stirred. 7:30 p.m. Symphoria presents a

James Bond-themes performance. Crouse Hinds Theater, 421 Montgomery St., Syracuse. $20-$90 (plus fees). experiencesymphoria.

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NightLab. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Enjoy food and beverages and learn about the science of sound. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST), 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. Check website for cost: most.org.

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FRIDAY, FEB. 14 Romeo and Juliet. 8 p.m.; through Feb. 23. Catch a performance of William Shakespeare’s famous tragedy. Redhouse Arts Center. 400 S Salina St., Syracuse. $35 (plus fees). theredhouse.org.

Do you know a group of students who deserve to be featured as a

Class of the Month in

SATURDAY, FEB. 22 Syracuse Crunch Hockey. Watch as the city’s

AHL team takes on the Lehigh Valley Phantoms. War Memorial Arena, 800 S. State St., Syracuse. $16-$20. (315) 473-4444. Syracusecrunch.com.

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To nominate a class or group visit familytimescny.com and click the Class of the Month banner

Have an event or an idea for Parents’ Night Out? Email courtneyk@familytimescny.com with more information.

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The challenges from having obesity are complex. Upstate is committed to helping you make a change for your better health providing compassionate support and successful outcomes. If you are considering bariatric (weight loss) surgery, join us a free information session at

UPSTATE COMMUNITY HOSPITAL, 4900 BROAD ROAD, SYRACUSE Free parking is available in the hospital parking garage.

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