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DECEMBER 2019

FREE

Girls Who Code Club teaches young women about technology Three CNY businesses reflect on their family roots Treat yourself to a facial this holiday season

Winners Announced p.24

LOC AL

Gift Guid p. 16 e


39 Reasons Why Central New York Moms Choose Crouse There are many reasons why Crouse delivers more babies than any other hospital in upstate New York, not the least of which are the amazingly skilled, compassionate and highly regarded OB providers who choose to deliver at Crouse Health. If you’re pregnant — or planning to be — don’t you want the very best for both you and your baby?

Crouse Obstetrical Care Providers Cathy J. Berry, MD & Associates Cathy Berry, MD PT Nguyen, MD Janet Ortolani, CNM Alia Rezek, CNM CNY Obstetrics & Gynecology PC Leonard Marotta, MD CNY Women’s Healthcare PC Stephen Brown, MD Maria Ciciarelli, MD Krystal Foree, MD Carol Lopes, MD Jaya Nemani, MD Sarah Schoch, MD Crouse Midwifery Group Mary Thompson, CNM Family Medicine Services Group Eugene Bailey, MD Loftus, Ryu, Bartol, MDs PC Reem Akkawi, MBChB Suzanne Bartol-Krueger, MD Kelli Corniello, DO Erin Hill, MD Jessica Landin, MD William Loftus, MD

Richard D. Semeran, MD PC Richard Semeran, MD University OB/GYN Associates, Inc. Nicholas Baranco, MD Maureen Burke, MD Robert Eden, MD John Folk, MD Leah Kaufman, MD Dimitrios Mastrogiannis, MD Renee Mestad, MD John Nosovitch, Jr., MD Robert Silverman, MD George Stanley, MD Caroline Stroup, MD Brian Thompson, MD Jodi Wallis, DO Charina Carissimi, CNM Kathleen Dermady, CNM Mary Hartman, CNM Women’s Wellness Place Nikole Bucsek, MD Carly Hornis, MD Sara Quinn, MD

For more information about the full spectrum of maternity and obstetrical services available at Crouse, visit crouse.org/babies.

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FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019


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Winter Solstice Concert

SYRACUSE COMMUNITY CHOIR

“We Are”

Sunday, December 15, 2019 at 4pm

St. Paul’s Downtown, 220 East Genesee 15-30 (or less if you need to) At the Door • Children Free Interpreted for the Deaf: Maggie Russel

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Sunday - Thursday 4:30-8:30pm

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FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

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TREAT YOURSELF

8

Are you in need of some pampering? Facials offer numerous benefits.

QUESTION OF THE MONTH

10

EDUCATOR OF THE MONTH

11

FEATURE

12

Central New York businesses reflect on their family roots

HOLIDAY GIFTS

16

Need holiday gift ideas? Check out our local gift guide.

CLUB OF THE MONTH

20

Girls Who Code Club teaches young women about technology

CRAFT

22

DIY snow globe ornaments are easy to make.

SALT AWARDS WINNERS

L 9 OCnA page 1 L P o SHO 4

FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

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CONTENTS

6

DECEMBER 2019

EDITOR’S NOTE

11

PARTY

19

SHOP LOCAL

26

FAMILY FUN CALENDAR

28

LEARN

31

PARENTS NIGHT OUT / AD INDEX


FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

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FROM  THE

THE PARENTING GUIDE OF CENTRAL NEW YORK

EDITOR

December has always been one of my favorite months of the year. I love grabbing a cup of hot chocolate and driving around to look at holiday lights, preferably with a little snow on the ground. For our first Question of the Month, we asked readers about their favorite holiday tradition. See some of their answers on page 10. December can also be one of the most stressful months of the year, so what better time to debut our new column, Treat Yourself? On page 8, I write about getting my first facial (spoiler: it was as relaxing as it sounds). If you have any ideas about where I should go next, please feel free to email me at courtneyk@familytimescny.com. Do you struggle to find holiday gift ideas? I know I do. Natalie Davis shows you how to make a snow globe ornament perfect for gifting on page 22. We also highlight some local products in our gift guide on page 16. Rounding out our spotlight on local companies, Christy Perry Tuohey talks to three Central New York businesses about their family roots (page 12). You can also read about our Club of the Month, the Girls Who Code Club at Cicero-North Syracuse High School (page 20), and our Educator of the Month, Play2Learn owner Kelly Owens Vincentini (page 11). We hope you enjoy the December issue.

DECEMBER 2019 | ISSUE NO. 212

GENIUSES AT WORK PUBLISHER/OWNER Bill Brod EDITOR IN CHIEF Courtney Kless CourtneyK@familytimescny.com CONTENT DIRECTOR Steve Guglielmo PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Karley Harmon CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Tom Tartaro (ext. 134) SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Greg Minix GRAPHIC DESIGNER Karley Harmon CONTRIBUTORS Deborah Cavanagh, Neil Davis Jr., Tammy DiDomenico, Aaron Gifford, Eileen Gilligan, Molly Morgan, Tami Scott, Maggie Lamond Simone, Janelle Rozzano, Laura Livingston Snyder, Christy Perry Tuohey, Chris Xaver SALES MANAGER Tim Hudson (ext. 114) ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Lesli Mitchell (ext. 140) LMitchell@familytimescny.com

Happy holidays!

Anne DeSantis (ext. 111) ADesantis@familytimescny.com

COURTNEY KLESS EDITOR IN CHIEF

ADDRESS

1415 W. Genesee Street, Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 472-4669 fax (315) 422-1721 familytimescny.com

ON THE COVER

Gianna Germain, Madison King and Sandy Lin are members of the Girls Who Code Club at Cicero-North Syracuse High School. Read more about the club on page 20.

INSIDE PHOTO Sandy Lin works with a fourth grader. Advertising deadline forisApril 16. deadline Calendarfor deadline is March 3. Advertising deadline for January Dec is9.March Calendar JanuaryforisApril Dec 6. Design and Cover by Karley Harmon

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FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019


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FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

7


Treat Yourself Facials offer numerous benefits BY COURTNEY KLESS

I

t’s no secret the holiday season is one of the most stressful times of the year. While you’re checking gifts off your list, why not treat yourself to a spa visit?

Located off Route 92 in Fayetteville, La Fleur de Beauté opened in October 1993. Sandra Rabe, part-owner and esthetician, says their most popular services are full body massages, manicures, pedicures, microdermabrasions, waxing and the European facial. I opted for the facial. The benefits are numerous. I was initially drawn to the relaxation aspect, but Rabe says getting a facial every four to six weeks can help clean, hydrate and exfoliate your skin, and is much like going to the dentist to get your teeth cleaned. “The dermis is made up of multiple layers and the top layer does exfoliate, so you do need to exfoliate some of the layers to get your moisturizer and your products to penetrate your skin,” she says. “To help maintain your skin, facials keep you very healthy because you’re turning the cells over.” “Your skin is your largest organ,” she adds, “So it’s important that you take care of it.” I’ll be the first to admit that I’m the kind of person who thinks a face mask from Target is luxurious, so this was a new experience for me. Going into my appointment, I had images dancing through my head of face masks and cucumbers over my eyes, but my experience was nothing like that. It was better. Rabe says the La Fleur de Beauté facial was designed around experiences the owners had at other spas. The esthetician began by massaging my hands and feet with moisturizer and placing them into heated mitts, instantly putting my body and mind at ease. That was followed by a skin cleansing (with a brush) and analysis, where the esthetician identified my skin type and asked me questions about my skincare routine (I learned that I have been using the wrong kind of facial cleanser). The products used during the rest of the facial were based on my skin type. Next, the esthetician gave me a facial massage under steam – Rabe says this helps stimulate the skin. After a few minutes relaxing in the steam that was followed by extractions and a neck, shoulder and face massage. The final step was a custom mask. I had two different kinds: The lower half of my face had a clay mask designed to draw out impurities, while the upper half had a nutrient mask which reduces redness. There was acoustic music and nature sounds playing in the background throughout, making it impossible not to relax.

If You Go

Rabe also recommends a peel for those who are new to facials (there are several options available as add-ons at La Fleur de Beauté). I had an enzyme peel during the steaming process. The entire thing took less than an hour and I left feeling relaxed.

La Fleur de Beauté A Day Spa

Location 6900 Highbridge Rd., Fayetteville. Hours Tues. – Thurs. 10:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. Fri. 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. More information lafleurdayspa.com

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TREAT YOURSELF

I’ll be honest: my skin was a little irritated for a few days, but about a week post-facial, it looked the best it has in years. Who knows, I may have found a new skin care routine.

Courtney Kless is the Editor in Chief of Family Times. She lives in Jamesville with her husband.

Have an idea for a future Treat Yourself? E-mail CourtneyK@familytimescny.com


FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

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QUESTION OF THE MONTH ?

?

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE HOLIDAY TRADITION? “Every Christmas Eve my brother and I open our gifts to each other. It is the one gift we are allowed to open and is so exciting to get to open one early!” – Kathryn

“Getting together with all of the family and grazing of course!” – Stacey Livonia

Baldwinsville

“Cutting down the tree and decorating together.” – Kelly

“Christmas Eve at my parents’ house. We exchange “counter gifts” around their kitchen counter. These are little gifts that we happen to find throughout the year that are perfect for someone. It’s always fun to see what people find to give!” – Jane Baldwinsville

“Family time and actually talking around the dinner table.” – Jenn

Syracuse

“Listening to Christmas music.” – Mary Syracuse

Baldwinsville

REMINDER: VISIT OUR SOCIAL MEDIA PAGES TO ANSWER @FAMILYTIMESCNY

@CNYFAMILYTIMES

@FAMILYTIMES

THE JANUARY QUESTION OF THE MONTH!

Happy Holidays! $35 European Facial from all of us at

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CELEBRATING 26 YEARS!

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LYNDON CORNERS, FAYETTEVILLE | 315.449.4036 | LAFLEURDAYSPA.COM 10

QUESTION OF THE MONTH

(REG. $185) With coupon. No cash value. Not valid on prior purchases. Expires 1/1/20


Kelly Owens Vincentini Play2Learn, Baldwinsville

BY JANELLE ROZZANO | PHOTO PROVIDED BY KELLY OWENS VINCENTINI

Tell me about yourself and your background. I taught at Stonehedge Elementary School in the West Genesee School District for eight years. I spent four years at home on a child rearing leave before I resigned from Stonehedge to stay home with my first little one. When I was on leave with my first daughter, we looked around the community for some kind of early childhood program that we could enjoy together. I wanted something that would promote socialization and for her to be enriched. I wanted lots of gross and fine motor movement, along with play, while still being there with her. I knew what I wanted but there wasn’t anything like it, so I created Play2Learn. What makes Play2Learn different than other centers? I created Play2Learn to teach early childhood family classes to enrich children in the early childhood years and promote socialization. We support families and answer their questions about how they can play with their little ones at home, and help them through difficult transitions. I started with tot time which is for ages 2 ½ to 4. It’s like a precursor to preschool, all through play with their caregiver. The interest from the community was over the top, and there was interest in classes for babies up to ten months old. I reached out to an occupational therapist I used to work with, and asked if she wanted to create a baby sensory motor class. So now we have three different classes, starting with the baby sensory motor class, going to mini movers and ending with tot time, all with the parent or caregiver. We also have art studio for toddlers and preschoolers, and open gym.

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What are you most proud of about Play2Learn? I really wanted my three kids (two girls and a baby boy) to see mommy as a teacher and for them to also benefit from Play2Learn, and they have 100%. As a family, I am proud of that. I am also proud of the sense of community that we’ve created. Families come for two-week sessions and they meet other families with children of the same age that are going through the same things. They become friends and plan play dates. Families have been coming from all over to experience this, and I’m proud of how we’ve expanded to service more families. Janelle Rozzano is a freelance writer living in Fairmount with her family.

Know an educator who deserves a mention? E-mail CourtneyK@familytimescny.com

For information and your tour,

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EDUCATOR OF THE MONTH

CAZENOVIA

FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

11


A Family Affair

Three CNY businesses reflect on their family roots BY CHRISTY PERRY TUOHEY

A

radio repair shop that opened in 1923, a grist mill built before the Civil War and a factory that produced china at the turn of the 20th Century. United Radio, New Hope Mills and China Towne Furniture have been family owned and are still operating, in one form or another, in 2019

The second, third and fourth generations of the Rubenstein, Weed and Yennock families have worked side-by-side with grandparents, parents, aunts, uncles, cousins or siblings for most of their employed lives. And each says it takes a special family dynamic to make it all work.

“You need to be able to agree with each other when it’s necessary” – Phil Rubenstein, United Radio

You may be surprised to learn that the one and only Sony authorized audio and video product repair center in the United States is located right here in Central New York. If a radio breaks in a Chrysler vehicle anywhere in the world, it comes to East Syracuse to be fixed. Broken Nintendo unit? It gets shipped to one of two authorized repair centers, one of which is United Radio located on Enterprise Parkway. Today’s United Radio traces back to a little shop in 1920s downtown Syracuse. There, Jacob Rubenstein, a self-taught engineer, assembled and repaired radios in the medium’s earliest days. “Back then, you had to see a radio repair guy four, five, six times a year,” explained Phil Rubenstein, Jacob’s grandson and current owner, along with his sister Mara. “When radio first came out, you bought a box of parts, basically, and had to assemble it yourself. So my grandfather would assemble radios for people and he would contract with department stores to put the radios together.” As time went on and the television was introduced, United Radio got into the TV repair business as well. But not right away. “My grandfather wanted to make sure that [TVs] were going to stay, that they weren’t just a fad,” Rubenstein said with a laugh. In 1963, Grandfather Rubenstein moved the business to Erie Boulevard, which at that time, in Phil’s telling, was in the middle of nowhere. “It was muck farms at the time and everybody questioned my grandfather, ‘Why are you going out there?,’” he said. “But you can see what happened to Erie Boulevard, so I guess that’s my way of saying my grandfather had incredible vision.” In the late 1960s, Jacob and his wife Dorothy moved to Florida to retire and handed the business over to two sons, one of whom was Phil’s father, Arnold. The company was then transitioning

into repairing communications equipment used by police and fire departments. Phil remembers working for the family business when he was seven or eight years old. He helped mark up claim checks for customers, and got paid a quarter an hour. As he got older, he worked the front counter and switchboard. He became the shop’s Atari technician when those home video game consoles became popular in the early 1970s. He also remembers summers home from college, when he would work in the garage installing police radios. After college, he left the family business for a few years and moved to Rochester, where he was a recording engineer for the Eastman School of Music. By 1991, he was back in Syracuse working at United Radio with his cousin as owner. In 2001, he and his sister bought his cousin’s half of the business and they continue to run the company today, advised by his retired father Arnold, with whom he shares an office. Today’s United Radio has three operating divisions: communications, consumer and automotive electronics. They continue to service communications systems for municipalities, hotels and hospitals. Of being part of a family business legacy and balancing the professional and the personal, Phil says, “You need to be able to agree with each other when it’s necessary and disagree with each other when it’s necessary. And for it not to affect the relationship.” And, he added, “You have to be able to admit when you’re wrong.” Not only is the company family owned, but United Radio also hires and employs family members who work together. “We have some families with three generations working here all at once. It’s not [just] the Rubensteins.” continued on page 14

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY UNITED RADIO

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Feature


FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

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continued from page 12

“It gave us a lot of very fond memories” – Doug Weed, New Hope Mills

Doug Weed grew up to the sounds of the splash and churn of his family’s grist mill water wheel. He and his extended family have all worked at one time or another in or around New Hope Mills in Cayuga County. His first memories of being part of the family business include cleaning up around the mill, shoveling grain and bagging flour. Weed’s grandfather bought the mill and sawmill in 1947. His father took over the business eventually, and, in 2004, moved the operation to a 40,000 square foot facility in Auburn. Doug says the old mill, built in 1823, was not designed to accommodate the company’s expanding production. “It was not made for massive output for today’s needs for the marketplace,” he said. Doug bought New Hope Mills from his dad in 2012. Today, the company produces pastry and bread flour, along with pancake, waffle and baking mixes. New Hope Mills operates two cafés, one in Auburn and one in Cortland. He and one of his sisters are now the remaining family members at the helm. “My sister lives an hour and a half away, and she comes up one day a week,” Doug explained. “She shares an office with me. It’s

one of those things where we both have a passion to carry on the family tradition and family legacy, and we care a lot about our brand and about what we do.” Working so closely with family might be a challenge for some. As Doug puts it, no business is without its struggles and no family is without its disagreements. “There’s times where you may not see eye-to-eye, but you all come back to the dinner table and you eat dinner together and you find a way to make it work and to continue on,” he said. Weed continues to hire his nieces and nephews, the fourth generation, to work at the facility when school is out for the summer. His brothers are working with their father in newer businesses he started, but everyone stays in touch and knows what’s going on with each other’s work, he said.

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY NEW HOPE MILLS

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Feature

Despite the new and different endeavors, though, Weed says it all connects back to the old mill. “It gave us a lot of very fond memories, from working in the flour mill to working in the sawmill,” he said.


“I think it can be very rewarding” – Jay Yennock, China Towne Furniture

Jay Yennock’s father, John, was a homebuilder, lumber yard owner, cabinet maker and entrepreneur. When the Iroquois China Factory in Solvay closed its doors in 1970, the elder Yennock saw an opportunity. He bought the building and moved his cabinetry business into the basement. On the main floor he opened a sort of off-price department store. “It was T.J. Maxx before T.J. Maxx,” Jay said of the store’s manufacturer’s overstock inventory. “He kept all the dishes and positioned them in front of the store and called it China Towne.”

iSTOCK PHOTO

So if you’ve ever wondered how China Towne Furniture got its name, now you know. The Yennocks, having purchased the surplus china from Iroquois, sold dishes along with everything from wallpaper to greeting cards to furniture. “Just about anything he could buy to sell,” Jay said of his father. As the china was sold off, there was more room for diverse products at China Towne; at one point they even sold cars. In the mid-1970s, the company opened additional stores in Syracuse and North Syracuse, including the Furniture Barn on North State Street in Syracuse. Yennock began working in the Solvay store as a kid, sweeping floors. As he grew older, he sold furniture, was a ‘gofer’ and eventually got involved in advertising. His mother, Rita, was the store’s bookkeeper. Jay took over the store’s ownership in 1984 and began to focus solely on selling furniture and mattresses. “Our business is completely different from where it was,” he says of today’s China Towne. Although his daughter joined him in running the business for about a decade, Jay is now the one family member involved in the company. You may have seen him – and his daughter – in local TV commercials or heard his voice in radio spots, touting “The one big store in Solvay...China Towne.” Of being part of a family business, Jay said “I think it can be very rewarding.”

Christy Perry Tuohey is an author, journalist and freelance writer living in Syracuse.

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY CHINA TOWNE FURNITURE

FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

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Holiday Gift Guide Play the Game Read the Story PHOTOS BY KARLEY HARMON

Jason Engle has seen a resurgence in the popularity of board games. In addition to what Engle – the manager at Play the Game Read the Story – calls the largest board game selection in the area, the store offers comic books, graphic novels and collectibles. You can visit them at two locations: Destiny USA and North Clinton Street.

$$$

Dragon’s Breath (ages 5+) $19.99 Team 3 (all ages) $19.99 each Villainous (young teens +) $34.99

Locations 9808 Destiny USA Dr., Syracuse 689 N. Clinton St., Syracuse Hours Destiny USA Monday – Saturday from 10 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. Sunday from 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. North Clinton Street Monday – Saturday from 10 a.m. – 9 p.m. Sunday from noon – 6 p.m. More information playthegamereadthestory.com 16

SHOP LOCAL


These local stores offer something for every member of the family Syracuse Salt Company PHOTOS BY KARLEY HARMON

The idea for Syracuse Salt Company started four years ago, after Libby Croom brought back infused salts from her honeymoon. Today, she runs the business with her father, David Iannicello, and the pair use a process similar to that from the 1700s and 1800s to make their salt, pumping salty water out of the well at their production space in Syracuse and evaporating the water. Syracuse Salt Company offers flake salt, infused salts, salt lamps, soaps and candles.

$$$

Himalayan salt slab & cookbook $65 Gourmet salt flight $19 Himalayan salt nightlight $16

Location Iannicello says the company currently has 30 retail partners. Visit their website for more information. More information syracusesaltco.com

FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

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Holiday Gift Guide Wildflowers Armory PHOTOS BY COURTNEY KLESS

Wildflowers Armory has a new home for the holidays, moving from its space on West Jefferson Street to the McCarthy Building. What started out as a pop-up is now a long-term space where artisans from around the state can sell their work (and they rotate every three months). Founder and co-owner Michael John Heagerty says Wildflowers Armory will offer live music and tastings during the holidays, as well as extended and Monday hours.

$$$

Hand-painted sign Black Rabbit Studio $65

Welcome wall hanging Fringe & Stitches $30 Art nouveau replica pendant Bright and Dusty $32

Location 217 S. Salina St., Syracuse Hours Tuesday – Saturday from 10 a.m.– 8 p.m. Sunday from noon – 6 p.m. More information wildflowersarmory.com

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SHOP LOCAL


HOLIDAY SHOPPING? KEEP IT LOCAL!

Help us

When you SHOP LOCAL, you’re supporting families and small business owners in your community and keeping economic growth close to home.

Help them this holiday season

WE ARE IN URGENT NEED Help us check off our

Holiday Wish List Blankets, towels, sheets, pillow cases Soft and hard dog and cat food SERVING SYRACUSE SINCE 1949!

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Dog and cat toys hard and soft. Dog and cat treats Brooms Laundry soap Cat litter boxes(small)

As always

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1306 WEST GENESEE ST

(315) 422-1468

Give the gift that keeps on giving!

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SURPRISE THEM WITH A GIFT THAT LASTS ALL YEAR LONG!

Purchase your gift online at syracusezooevents.org/members or call (315) 435-8511 x8503

NTER E C N E I SC ERSHIP B M E M

Go to sciencenter.org/membership

SHOP LOCAL

19


Club OF THE

Girls Who Code Cicero-North Syracuse High School

PHOTOS BY COURTNEY KLESS

Month

From left to right: Lauren Postell, Erin Barney, Sandy Lin, Gianna Germain, Madison King, Brooke TenBrink, Lee Ferenc, Mackenzie Simon, Matt Harbinger

T

wo students developed their own Amazon Alexa. Another pair created a number converter. A third group is building and coding robots.

All are members of the Girls Who Code Club at Cicero-North Syracuse High School. “I have a lot of driven young women who are learning a lot about technology and themselves, and are flourishing because of it,” says Matt Harbinger, the club’s advisor. “The pitch that I usually give is not, ‘You should take this because you’re going to be a computer scientist one day, therefore you should be in this club,’ because we would have two people. Instead, I ask, ‘What do you want to go to college for, what do you want to do as a career, because you’re going to be using technology, you’re going to be using computers, and so it’s time to get in on the ground floor.’” Following a push for more young women in the technology field, C-NS received a $20,000 grant from New York state to begin a Girls Who Code Club during the 2015-16 school year. It was the first such club in Upstate New York. Harbinger says C-NS was chosen, in part, because of its past success in this area. “I teach computer science, and a lot of my female students sign up for the National Center for Women in IT (NCWIT) award, and they talk about their aspirations in computing,”

Harbinger says. “I have a lot of really smart, motivated, talented students, and they’ve won the state award a lot. And because of their successes, our school was recognized as a good place to start the club.” The Girls Who Code Club has approximately 20 members, and includes a mix of tenth, eleventh and twelfth grade students. Harbinger says the club is project-driven, and during their weekly meetings, members create apps, work on robots or learn how to code, among other things. They also go on college visits and take trips. In the past, members have visited companies such as Samsung, Mashable and Google, and even met the founder of Girls Who Code at the organization’s headquarters in New York City. But perhaps more importantly, Harbinger says the club is helping provide an opportunity for all genders in the technology field. “The numbers for women in college and in the workforce are definitely increasing,” Harbinger says. “I would venture to say they’re not anywhere what they should be yet in terms of percentages, but I definitely think there’s an upward trend for women in general being in technology. I think having good role models is a definite factor. I think the normalization of women in tech is a factor. You see it everywhere. Girls Who Code is a big deal.” — Courtney Kless

20

CLUB OF THE MONTH


In their words:

What has been your favorite part of the Girls Who Code Club? “Just having the ability to learn what I want. You have a nice focal point for help, but you’re still open to whatever you need.” – Gianna Germain, junior “Right now I think [building and coding robots] is my favorite part…I’m actually better at the hardware area, so I’m really excited to not only just be on the computer, but to make the computer, which is one of my favorite parts.” – Lee Ferenc, senior

“Probably [building and coding robots] because now I know the material. Before, we basically just problem-solved for a while, trying to figure out how we would use the Lego Mindstorms to do anything. We wanted to make a Candyland, basically, but we couldn’t find a way that would ethically work to program it… In [Raspberry Pi], we can do random, but we’re steering away from that and really just having fun with racing.” – Mackenzie Simon, senior FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

21


A Holiday Keepsake Check out these DIY snow globe ornaments

CRAFT AND PHOTOS BY NATALIE DAVIS

S

truggling with family gift ideas? You can create a holiday keepsake ornament with just a few supplies and some sweet, smiling kiddos.

Supplies Camera or smart phone Color printer

4� clear snap-on plastic ball ornaments

Holiday bows and bells

Steps

2. 22

1.

Hot glue gun

Scissors

Have your kids stand in front of a plain background and strike a wintry pose. Take three to four pictures to ensure you have a favorite.

Print out their poses on a color printer using thick cardstock or photo paper.

CRAFT

Cardstock or photo paper


3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Trim the background out of the photos, leaving a small tab at the bottom to apply your glue.

Add a drop of hot glue to the tab you created for your cut-out people to attach them to the inside of the ornament.

Add enough glitter to cover the bottom Âź of your ornament.

Add a couple dots of hot glue or super glue to seal your ornament closed and prevent a glitter-tastrophe from happening.

Thread a string or ribbon through the top of your ornament for tree hanging and add a holiday bow and bell for embellishment, then your ornament is ready to go.

Natalie Davis is an artist and educator teaching enrichment in the Syracuse City School District. She lives with her family in Jordan.

FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

23


Awards Winners

The winners have been announced for the 2019 Syracuse Area Live Theatre (SALT) Awards. The ceremony was held on Nov. 17 at the Redhouse Arts Center. PROFESSIONAL THEATER COMPANIES

Play of the Year Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Leading Actor in a Play Daniel Morgan Shelley, Possessing Harriet (Syracuse Stage) Leading Actress in a Play Nicole King, Possessing Harriet (Syracuse Stage) Director of a Play Jason O’Connell, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Supporting Actor in a Play Stephan Wolfert, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Supporting Actress in a Play Joey Parsons, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Costume Design of a Play Charlotte Palmer-Lane, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Lighting Design of a Play Drew Florida, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Set Design of a Play Shoko Kambara, Native Gardens (Syracuse Stage) Sound Design of a Play Jacqueline R. Herter, Pride and Prejudice (Syracuse Stage) Musical of the Year Elf (Syracuse Stage) Leading Actor in a Musical Chris Stevens, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Leading Actress in a Musical Hanley Smith, The Last Five Years (Syracuse Stage) Director of a Musical Donna Drake, Elf (Syracuse Stage) 24

SALT AWARDS

Supporting Actor in a Musical David Lowenstein, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Supporting Actress in a Musical Celia Madeoy, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Best Musical Director Brian Cimmet, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Best Choreographer Lee Martino, The Last Five Years (Syracuse Stage) Costume Design of a Musical Jessica Ford, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Lighting Design of a Musical Martin E. Vreeland, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Set Design of a Musical Czerton Lim, Elf (Syracuse Stage) Sound Design of a Musical Jacqueline R. Herter, The Last Five Years (Syracuse Stage) Best Ensemble in a Musical Elf (Syracuse Stage)

REGIONAL

THEATER COMPANIES

Play of the Year Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center)

Leading Actor in a Play Fred Grandy, I’m Not Rappaport (Redhouse Arts Center) Leading Actress in a Play Marguerite Mitchell, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center) Director of a Play Steve Hayes, Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center)


Supporting Actor in a Play Basil Allen, Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center)

Supporting Actor in a Play Strange David Fuller, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (CNY Playhouse)

Supporting Actress in a Play Marcia Mele, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center)

Supporting Actress in a Play Anne Fitzgerald, Blithe Spirit (CNY Playhouse)

Costume Design of a Play Donnie Williams, Almost, Maine (Redhouse Arts Center)

Costume Design of a Play Diane Bates, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (CNY Playhouse)

Lighting Design of a Play Margaret Peebles, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center)

Lighting Design of a Play Sarah Anson, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (CNY Playhouse)

Set Design of a Play Shane Cinal, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center)

Set Design of a Play Navroz Dabu, A Midsummer’s Night Dream (CNY Playhouse)

Sound Design of a Play Anthony Vadala, Steel Magnolias (Redhouse Arts Center)

Sound Design of a Play Sean Connolly, Dracula (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild)

Musical of the Year Legally Blonde (Cortland Repertory Theatre)

Musical of the Year The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild)

Leading Actor in a Musical Jason Timothy, Once Upon a Mattress (Redhouse Arts Center) Leading Actress in a Musical Carleena Manzi, A Charlie Brown Christmas (Redhouse Arts Center) Director of a Musical Trey Compton, Legally Blonde (Cortland Repertory Theatre) Supporting Actor in a Musical LaRon Grant, The All Night Strut (Redhouse Arts Center) Supporting Actress in a Musical Mariko Iwasa, A Charlie Brown Christmas (Redhouse Arts Center) Best Musical Director Barry Blumenthal, The All Night Strut (Redhouse Arts Center) Best Choreographer Stephfond Brunson, A Charlie Brown Christmas (Redhouse Arts Center) Costume Design of a Musical Jennifer Dasher, Legally Blonde (Cortland Repertory Theatre)

Leading Actor in a Musical Dan Williams, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Leading Actress in a Musical Erin Sills, Anyone Can Whistle (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts) Director of a Musical Colin Keating, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Supporting Actor in a Musical Ryan Sparkes, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Supporting Actress in a Musical Ceara Windhausen, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Best Musical Director Dan Williams, Damn Yankees! (Syracuse Summer Theatre at the Oncenter)

Lighting Design of a Musical Marie Yokoyama, A Charlie Brown Christmas (Redhouse Arts Center)

Best Choreographer Jodi Bova-Mele, Damn Yankees! (Syracuse Summer Theatre at the Oncenter)

Set Design of a Musical Terry Martin, The All Night Strut (Redhouse Arts Center)

Costume Design of a Musical Jodi Wilson & Karyn Palinkas, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild)

Sound Design of a Musical Anthony Vadala, A Charlie Brown Christmas (Redhouse Arts Center)

Lighting Design of a Musical Liam Fitzpatrick, Kiss of the Spider Woman (CNY Playhouse)

Best Ensemble in a Musical A Charlie Brown Christmas (Redhouse Arts Center)

Set Design of a Musical Dustin M. Czarny & Christopher James Lupia, The Producers (Center Players)

COMMUNITY

THEATER COMPANIES

Play of the Year The Diviners (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild)

Leading Actor in a Play Ben Sills, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (CNY Playhouse) Leading Actress in a Play Binaifer Dabu, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (CNY Playhouse) Director of a Play Korrie Taylor, Dracula (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild)

Sound Design of a Musical Sean Connolly, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Best Ensemble in a Musical The Producers (CNY Playhouse) Lifetime Achievement Award Jim MacKillop Hall of Fame Award Jeanette Reyner

FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

25


HAPPY

December

Please note: Mistakes happen. To confirm event details, call the sponsoring organization’s phone number or visit the website.

TUESDAY, NOV. 26 Syracuse City Ballet Nutcracker. Noon (sensory-friendly performance); also Nov. 30 & Dec. 1. Syracuse City Ballet artists and children perform the tale of a young girl who ventures into an enchanted world after saving a dashing prince. The Oncenter Crouse Hinds Theater, 411 Montgomery St., Syracuse. $20-$75 (plus fees). (315) 435-2121. syracusecityballet.com.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 27 SEE ONGOING EVENTS

THURSDAY, NOV. 28

FRIDAY, NOV. 29

SATURDAY, NOV. 30

Opening Day Dickens’ Christmas in Skaneateles. Noon-4 p.m.; also Saturdays &

Be the Scientist. Noon-4 p.m. Explore the

Sundays through Dec. 22. More than 50 Victorian characters, including the author of A Christmas Carol himself, fill the village of Skaneateles, on Genesee, Jordan and Fennell streets. Free. (315) 685-0552. skaneateles.com.

26

CALENDAR

DIY Holiday Gifts. 1-3 p.m. Children ages

Syracuse City Ballet Nutcracker. 2 p.m. & 6 Polar Express Pajama Party. 5-8 p.m.; also

Nov. 30 (sensory-friendly), Dec. 6, 7, 13 &14. Children can take part in interactive activities and visit with Santa Claus. Then, they can see The Polar Express in the six-story IMAX theater (6:15 p.m.). Museum of Science and Technology (MOST), 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. $15/person (non-members). (315) 425-9068. most.org.

night, and the music of Merry Mischief following the tree lighting in Clinton Square. Erie Canal Museum, 318 Erie Blvd. E., Syracuse. $7/adults; $5/seniors; $2/age 12 & under. (315) 471-0593. eriecanalmuseum.org.

run leave from the Griffin Visitor Center and follow the East Shore Trail. Onondaga Lake Park, Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. $10-$35. (315) 451-7275.

activities of an animator with hands-on activities. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST). 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. Museum admission: $12/adults; $10/seniors and ages 2-11. (315) 425-9068. 4-13 can make holiday gifts for friends and family members. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Erie Canal Museum Gingerbread Gallery Grand Opening. 5-9 p.m. Cookies and cocoa all

Liverpool Turkey Trot. 9 a.m. 5K and 5 mile

2019

Clinton Square Tree Lighting Ceremony.

6:30 p.m. The annual lighting takes place following an evening of music and an appearance by Santa Claus and Mrs. Claus. After the ceremony, head to an open house at City Hall (233 E. Washington St.), meet the mayor and have photos taken with the Clauses. Downtown Syracuse. Free. (315) 473-4330.

p.m. See Nov. 26 listing.

Polar Express Pajama Party. 5-8 p.m. (senso-

ry-friendly). See Nov. 29 listing.

SUNDAY, DEC. 1 STEM Storytime. 10:30-11:30 a.m.; also Dec.

8, 15, 22 & 29. Children ages 2-6 can take part in a session that encourages the scientific spirit through stories, music, and play. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST), 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. $5/child (non-members). (315) 425-9068.

Beauty and the Beast. 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.; through Jan. 5. Watch as the Beast tries to break the curse. Syracuse Stage, 820 E. Genesee St., Syracuse. $30-$60 (plus fees). (315) 443-3275. syracusestage.org.


Syracuse City Ballet Nutcracker. 10 a.m. & 3 p.m. See Nov. 26 listing.

MONDAY, DEC. 2 Gaming for Adults with Special Needs.

sing-along. NOPL Brewerton, 5440 Bennett St., Brewerton. Free. Registration required: (315) 676-7484, nopl.org.

Park, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Cost includes zoo admission: $19.95/general; free/age 2 & younger. Reservations required: (315) 435-8511, Ext. 113. rosamondgiffordzoo.org.

THURSDAY, DEC. 5

Holiday Pancake Breakfast. 9 a.m.-noon.; also

1:30-3 p.m. Adults with special needs can play Wii games and board games; caregivers must remain in the room. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Trail Tales. 1 p.m.; also Dec. 19. Children ages

TUESDAY, DEC. 3

Festival of Trees. Noon-5 p.m.; through Dec.

3-5, accompanied by a caregiver, can hear some stories and go on a trail walk. Beaver Lake Nature Center, Route 370, Baldwinsville. $4/parking. (315) 638-2519.

FRIDAY, DEC. 6

CNY Young Naturalists. 4:30-5:30 p.m. Held

on the first Tuesday of each month, children ages 5-12 can learn about local wildlife. Central Library, KidSpace (Level 2), 447 S. Salina St., Syracuse. (315) 435-1900.

STEAM Challenge: Christmas Trees. 6:30-

7:30 p.m. Children ages 7-12 can use toothpicks and candy to build a Christmas tree. NOPL North Syracuse, 100 Trolley Barn Lane, North Syracuse. Free. (315) 458-6184. nopl.org.

18. Join fellow teens to write in any of a variety of genres, receive feedback and get support. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. Free. (315) 637-6374. ffl.org.

Merry Mischief. 6:30-7:30 p.m.; also Dec. 12. Santa and Mrs. Claus visit the library and lead a

FREE!

Send information about your family-friendly event to: CourtneyK@ familytimescny.com. Listings are due by DEC 6 for the Januray issue.

Discover

New York Shootout

Fee t ato r Sp e c $10

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Come see the new 2020 snowmobiles! Sauer’s Track behind The Ole Barn N EW Y ORK S HOOTOUT . COM

Annual American Indian Holiday Craft Fair. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Check out hand-made jewelry, artwork and more. Turning Stone Resort Casino, 5218 Patrick Rd., Verona. Free. (315) 829-8338. twalker@oneida-nation.org.

PAWS to Read. 10:30-11:30 a.m.; also Dec. 14,

21& 28. Kids can read to a friendly dog from PAWS Inc. of CNY. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

SATURDAY, DEC. 7

Toddlers’ Tango. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Toddlers and preschool-aged children, accompanied by an adult, can take part in this music and movement class. Salina Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. Registration required: (315) 454-4524. salinalibrary.org.

Musical Holiday Storytime and Santa Pictures. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Children can hear

holiday stories, make crafts, and get photos taken with Santa. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. Free. (315) 637-6374. fflib.org.

YOU ARE NOT ALONE. New Hope Family Services is here to help.

• Free Pregnancy Testing • Free Ultrasound • Options Counseling • Free Baby Clothes & Supplies • Adoption Planning • Post-Abortion Counseling

3519 James Street, Syracuse NY 13206 315-437-8300 NewHopeFamilyServices.com

Inlet, NY

Saturday, December 14, 2019

crafters, as well as food and music. Nottingham High School, 3100 E. Genesee St., Syracuse. Admission: $2-$5/adult; free/age 16 & younger or 65 & older. (315) 472-5478. peacecouncil.net/plowshares.

Nov. 29 listing.

or 11 a.m.-noon; also Dec. 8, 14, 15, 21, 22. Enjoy a delicious breakfast while the kids share Christmas wishes with the jolly old elf, decorate cookies with Mrs. Claus and create a holiday craft. Rosamond Gifford Zoo at Burnet

Teen Writer’s Guild. 4-5 p.m.; also Dec. 11 &

Plowshares Craftsfair and Winter Peace Festival. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; also Dec. 8. Dozens of

Polar Express Pajama Party. 5-8 p.m. See

Breakfast with Santa at the Zoo. 9-10 a.m.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 4

Calendar listings are

15. (Open during museum hours: Friday noon-5 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, noon-5 p.m.; Wednesday, noon-5 p.m.; Thursday, noon-8 p.m.) See beautifully decorated trees, wreaths and other displays, donated by local individuals and organizations. Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. $8/person. (315) 474-6064. everson.org.

Dec. 14. Eat a tasty meal including pancakes, sausage and a beverage, and get a chance to see Santa. Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 E. Mud Lake Road, Baldwinsville. $3-$5/person. Admission: $4/vehicle. (315) 638-2519.

1854 Farmhouse Stay

Elegant Countryside Getaway in Cazenovia, New York InletNY.com

Saturday, February 29, 2020

Fire n e z Fro ghts i L & Inle

Rustic & Romantic

t’s

Cardboard Sled Race, Bonfires, Kites, Fireworks & more!

Fern Park & Arrowhead Park, Inlet

FrozenFireandLights.com

• Private Suite with Full Kitchen • Farmhouse Breakfast Basket Included  • Fresh Morning Eggs and Pure Maple Syrup  Plan a Romantic Weekend or Girls Getaway or Small Group Retreat

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! Complimentary Gift Package

(315) 569-7244

www.redfoxrunbb.com FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

27


Rice Creek Rambles. 11 a.m.; also Dec. 14.

Explore trails, woods and wetlands with a naturalist on a family-friendly hike. Those under 17 must be accompanied by an adult. Rice Creek Field Station, SUNY Oswego, Thompson Road, 1 mile south of Route 104, Oswego. Free. Call day of to check trail conditions: (315) 312-6677. oswego.edu/rice-creek/.

Dasher’s Magical Gift. 11 a.m.

In a lively narrated ballet for children, performed by students from Dance Centre North, a crisis arises in the days before Christmas when Santa’s fastest reindeer, Dasher, loses his ability to fly. Presented by CNY Arts. Crouse Hinds Theatre, 411 Montgomery St., Syracuse. $10-$19. (315) 299-5598.

Santa Saturday. 1-4 p.m.; also Dec. 14 Enjoy the

Festival of Trees, meet Santa, engage in art making, and have a drink and cookies. Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. $10/adults; $5children. (315) 474-6064. everson.org/FOT19.

Plowshares Craftsfair and Winter Peace Festival. 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. See Dec. 7 listing.

THURSDAY, DEC. 12

MONDAY, DEC. 9

can wear pajamas, hear a story and make a craft. Salina Free Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. Registration required: (315) 454-4524. salinalibrary.org.

American Girl. 6 p.m. Children ages 7-12 can

learn more about the lives of the American Girls. The event will feature crafts, games, stories and more. Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. Registration required: (315) 492-1727.

TUESDAY, DEC. 10 Homeschoolers ages 5-11 can learn with hands-on activities. Parents and siblings welcome. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

Characters from a variety of Disney films – including Moana, Buzz Lightyear, Anna and Elsa – appear in the “Celebrate Memories” show. War Memorial Arena, Oncenter, 515 Montgomery St., Syracuse. $15-$85 (plus fees). (315) 435-2121. ticketmaster.com. through Dec. 22. Come see the Charles Dickens tale with a Syracuse twist. Redhouse Arts Center, 400 S. Salina St., Syracuse. $37 (including service fee). (315) 362-2785. theredhouse.org.

FRIDAY, DEC. 13 Books and Cooks. Noon-2 p.m. Sponsored

Nov. 29 listing.

Caroling in the Woods. 7-8:30 p.m. Pick up

SUNDAY, DEC. 8

Disney on Ice. 7 p.m.; through Dec. 15.

A Syracuse Christmas Carol. 7 p.m. (preview);

Homeschool STEAM Club. 1:30-3 p.m.

Polar Express Pajama Party. 5-8 p.m. See a song sheet and take part in a Baltimore Woods tradition; bring treats to share with fellow carolers. Lanterns provided. Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. Free. (315) 673-1350. Registration requested: baltimorewoods.org.

Pajama Storytime. 6-7 p.m. Children ages 3-6

Holiday Story Time. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Children

can enjoy stories about Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanzaa. NOPL North Syracuse, 100 Trolley Barn Lane, North Syracuse. Free. (315) 458-6184.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 11 SEE ONGOING EVENTS

Breakfast with Santa at the Zoo. 9-10 a.m. or 11 a.m.-noon. See Dec. 7 listing.

by Headstart, children ages 3-5 and their families can discover books and recipes. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. Registration required: lpl.org. (315) 457-0310.

Cinnamon Ornaments. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Kids of all ages can create and decorate a cinnamon ornament. Salina Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. Registration required: (315) 454-4524. salinalibrary.org.

Polar Express Pajama Party. 5-8 p.m. See Nov. 29 listing.

Disney on Ice. 7 p.m. See Dec. 12 listing.

REGISTERING Age 1 to Adult The Dance Shoppe for all your dancing needs! thedancestudiocny@gmail.com Call or text 315-922-3232 TheDanceStudioCNY.com

Camillus & Manlius WE DO BIRTHDAY PARTIES!

Invest in what matters. Academic excellence from a Biblical mindset Purposeful learning with dual-credit college courses, Varsity Athletics and Performing Arts  A safe,, loving environment where teachers can teach, and students can learn.  

Christian Education grades Pre-K through 12

28

LEARN

Discover the power of family music making Now enrolling for Winter classes!

Offering early childhood music and movement classes to children, and the adults who love them. Classes located all over CNY. To find the one nearest you, call or visit our website www.bluebirdmusictogether.com • (315) 427-6985


Star Party. 7-10 p.m. Look for the Geminid

meteor shower. Dress warmly. (Backup date: Dec. 14.) Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. $9. (315) 673-1350. Register: baltimorewoods.org.

A Syracuse Christmas Carol. 8 p.m. See Dec. 12 listing.

SATURDAY, DEC. 14 Breakfast with Santa at the Zoo. 9-10 a.m. or

Christmas tree. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST). 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. Museum admission: $12/adults; $10/seniors and ages 2-11. (315) 425-9068.

Santa Saturday. 1-4 p.m. See Dec. 7 listing.

TUESDAY, DEC. 17

Holiday Concert. 2 p.m. Enjoy refreshments

Teen MOPS. 5-7 p.m. Young mothers, ages 13-21,

and music from Merry Mischief. Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. (315) 492-1727.

A Syracuse Christmas Carol. 2 & 8 p.m. See Dec. 12 listing.

Polar Express Pajama Party. 5-8 p.m. See Nov. 29 listing.

SUNDAY, DEC. 15

Holiday Pancake Breakfast. 9 a.m.-noon. See

Breakfast with Santa at the Zoo. 9-10 a.m. or

Christmas Cookie Cafe. 9:30 a.m.-noon.

Create custom cookie trays from dozens of homemade varieties. Bring your own tray or buy a tray. Columbian Presbyterian Church, Routes 20 & 11, LaFayette. $10/pound. (315) 677-3293. columbianpresbyterianchurch.com.

Upcycled: Gifts for the Holidays. 11 a.m.-1

p.m. Create gifts or holiday decorations with recycled materials. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. Registration required: lpl.org. (315) 457-0310.

Disney on Ice. 11 a.m., 3 & 7 p.m. See Dec. 12 listing.

Circuit Tree Weekend. Noon-2 p.m. Learn about electricity and help light up the MOST

with children under 6 enjoy a faith-based program with fun, food and activities while their children are cared for by the childcare program. Liverpool First United Methodist Church, 604 Oswego St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 569-2542.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 18 SEE ONGOING EVENTS

11 a.m.-noon. See Dec. 7 listing. Dec. 7 listing.

homeschool veteran. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

11 a.m.-noon. See Dec. 7 listing.

Holidays with the Animals. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Watch animals receive enrichment “gifts” that they can open and play with while demonstrating natural behaviors. Rosamond Gifford Zoo at Burnet Park, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Admission: $9/adults; $5/senior citizens; $5/children; free/age 2 and younger. (315) 435-8511. rosamondgiffordzoo.org.

Disney on Ice. Noon & 4 p.m. See Dec. 12 listing. A Syracuse Christmas Carol. 2 p.m. See Dec. 12 listing.

MONDAY, DEC. 16

THURSDAY, DEC. 19 A Syracuse Christmas Carol. 7 p.m. See Dec. 12 listing.

FRIDAY, DEC. 20 Time for Tots Playgroup. 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Education playgroup for children ages 18 months-5 years and their caregiver. Stories, songs, arts and crafts, and more. Cross of Christ Lutheran Church, 8131 Soule Road, Liverpool. $3/family. Registration recommended: (315) 622-2843. NYCrossofChrist.org/Tots.

Homemade Bath Bombs. 3:30-4:30 p.m.

Homeschooling 101 for Parents. 7-8:30

p.m. This month’s event will feature a Q&A with a

FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

29


Participants can make their own bath bomb. Salina Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. Registration required: (315) 454-4524. salinalibrary.org.

THURSDAY, DEC. 26

Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker.

23 listing.

4 & 8 p.m. The international touring ballet company returns to Syracuse for its holiday performance. Crouse Hinds Theatre, 411 Montgomery St., Syracuse. $29-$175 (plus fees). (315) 435-2121. (800) 745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

A Syracuse Christmas Carol. 8 p.m. See Dec.

KWANZAA BEGINS Santa’s Drone Delivery. Noon-2 p.m. See Dec. Afternoon Tea on Boxing Day. 3-4 p.m. All

ages can enjoy tea and scones in this exploration of British traditions. Wear a fascinator or make one with provided materials. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. Registration required: lpl.org. (315) 457-0310.

12 listing.

SATURDAY, DEC. 21 WINTER BEGINS Breakfast with Santa at the Zoo. 9-10 a.m. or 11 a.m.-noon. See Dec. 7 listing.

Rice Creek Story Hour. 11 a.m. Elementary-

aged children, especially, will enjoy tales of animals’ wild ways and how humans relate to the natural world; all ages are welcome. Rice Creek Field Station, SUNY Oswego, Thompson Road, 1 mile south of Route 104, Oswego. Free. (315) 312-6677. oswego.edu/rice-creek/.

A Syracuse Christmas Carol. 2 & 8 p.m. See Dec. 12 listing.

Holiday Fun with Shrek the Halls. 2 p.m.

Attendees off all ages can decorate gingerbread cookies, drink hot cocoa and watch Shrek the Halls. Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. Registration required: (315) 492-1727.

Winter Solstice Hike. 7-8:30 p.m. Learn about ancient solstice traditions on a lantern-lit hike through the woods; snowshoes provided. For age 5 and up. Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. $9. (315) 673-1350. Register: baltimorewoods.org.

SUNDAY, DEC. 22 HANUKKAH BEGINS Breakfast with Santa at the Zoo. 9-10 a.m. or 11 a.m.-noon. See Dec. 7 listing.

A Syracuse Christmas Carol. 2 p.m. See Dec. 12 listing.

MONDAY, DEC. 23 Santa’s Drone Delivery. Noon-2 p.m.

Attendees can fly a drone with holiday packages. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST). 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. Museum admission: $12/adults; $10/seniors and ages 2-11. (315) 425-9068.

TUESDAY, DEC. 24 Santa’s Drone Delivery. Noon-2 p.m. See Dec. 23 listing.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 25

FRIDAY, DEC. 27 Santa’s Drone Delivery. Noon-2 p.m. See Dec. 23 listing.

Make Your Own Gingerbread House. 1-2:30 p.m. All materials will be provided. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. Registration required: (315) 457-0310. lpl.org.

SATURDAY, DEC. 28 Be the Scientist. Noon-4 p.m. Explore the

activities of a programmer with hands-on activities. Museum of Science and Technology (MOST). 500 S. Franklin St., Armory Square, Syracuse. Museum admission: $12/adults; $10/seniors and ages 2-11. (315) 425-9068.

Santa’s Drone Delivery. Noon-2 p.m. See Dec. 23 listing.

Daily, dawn to dusk. Throughout the year, visitors can grab their walking shoes and explore 4.5 miles of well-groomed, flat trails. Trails feature a 900-foot boardwalk, osprey nesting platform, and wetland and grassland restoration areas. The area is a stop for many migratory waterfowl and songbirds; other wildlife include muskrats and beavers. Great Swamp Conservancy, 3.5 miles off I-90, Exit 34, 8375 N. Main St., Canastota. Free. (315) 697-2950.

Baltimore Woods Nature Center. Hiking trails and parking are free and open every day from dawn to dusk. Interpretive Center open MondayFriday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; closed Sundays. 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. (315) 673-1350. Wegmans Playground. Boundless Playground

for children (and parents) of all ages and abilities includes accessible swings, slides, bridge and more, including special section just for the tiniest tykes. Onondaga Lake Park, Route 370, Liverpool. Free. (315) 451-PARK.

Peanut Butter Jelly Time. Thursdays, 5 p.m.

Members of the community can join in making more than a hundred bagged lunches to hand out to the hungry and homeless in downtown Syracuse. The Road, 4845 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. Free. (315) 218-6066. wholelygroundsattheroad.org.

own painting using provided materials. Petit Branch Library, 105 Victoria Pl., Syracuse. Free. Registration required: (315) 435-3636. onlib.org.

SUNDAY, DEC. 29 Santa’s Drone Delivery. Noon-2 p.m. See Dec. 23 listing.

MONDAY, DEC. 30 Pokémon Party. 2:30 p.m. Children ages 5-10 can participate in Pokémon-themed activities and crafts. Salina Free Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. Free. Registration required: (315) 454-4524. salinalibrary.org.

TUESDAY, DEC. 31 Noon Year’s Eve at the Zoo. 10 a.m.-12:30

p.m. Ring in the “noon” year with entertainment, games, crafts, and a sparkling-juice toast at noon. Rosamond Gifford Zoo at Burnet Park, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Admission: $9/adults (ages 19-61); $5/over age 62; $5/ages 3-18; free/age 2 and younger. (315) 435-8511.

Noon Year’s Eve Party. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Kids and parents can ring in the New Year with an event that features music, dancing, crafts, snacks, and a countdown at noon. Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St., Fayetteville. Free. (315) 637-6374. fflib.org.

New Year’s Eve STEAM. 1-2 p.m. Celebrate

the New Year with STEAM activities. Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Free. lpl.org. (315) 457-0310.

ONGOING EVENTS

SEE ONGOING EVENTS

Weekend Walks with a Naturalist. Saturdays

CALENDAR

Great Swamp Conservancy Nature Trails.

Painting with a Twist. 2 p.m. Create your

CHRISTMAS

30

different topics each weekend. Beaver Lake Nature Center, Route 370, Baldwinsville. Admission: $4/ vehicle. (315) 638-2519.

and Sundays, 2 p.m. Nature discovery hike with

Barnes & Noble Storytimes. Thursdays, 10

a.m. Join a storytime for toddlers and preschoolers that’s features a book, songs and coloring. Barnes & Noble, 3454 Erie Blvd. E., DeWitt. Free. (315) 449-2948.

Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville Storytimes. Call or visit the website for times. Community Library of DeWitt and Jamesville, 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville. Free. Registration recommended: CLDandJ.org. (315) 446-3578.

Fairmount Community Library Storytimes. Little Movers (good walkers ages 1-3): Mondays, 10:15 a.m. Music is Magic (ages 1-5): Mondays, 11:15 a.m. Stories at the Splashpad (ages infants to 5 years): Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime & Craft (ages 3-5): Thursdays, 10:15 a.m.; registration requested: fairmountlibrary.org. Fairmount Community Library, 406 Chapel Dr., Syracuse. Free. (315) 487-8933. fairmountlibrary.org.

Liverpool Public Library. Lapsit Story Time

(ages 2 and under): Tuesdays, 10:15-11 a.m. Sing Along Friends Story Time (ages 2-5): Thursdays, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Family Story Time (ages 5 and under): Fridays, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Studio B Dance Company, 318 First St., Liverpool. Free. (315) 457-0310.

Maxwell Library Storytimes. Storytimes

and book groups for all ages. Call for dates and times. Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 Genesee St., Camillus. Free. (315) 672-3661.

Northeast Community Center Library Storytimes. Preschool storytimes with rhymes

and occasional games; youngsters learn group listening and participation skills. Call for times. Northeast Community Center Library, 716 Hawley Ave., Syracuse. Free. (315) 472-6343, Ext. 208.


Parents’ Night Out

ADVERTISERS INDEX

FRIDAY, DEC. 6

93Q................................................................................................. 13 Art Mart..........................................................................................9 Bluebird Music Together........................................................... 28 Canterbury Stables......................................................................11 CNY Tix........................................................................................ 29 Crouse Hospital ...........................................................................2 The Dance Studio CNY............................................................. 28 Faith Heritage School................................................................. 28 Flamingo Bowl............................................................................. 5,11 HABA Toy Outlet....................................................................... 19 Harrison Bakery.......................................................................... 19 Hematology/Oncology Associates ........................................ 29 Ichiban Japanese Steakhouse......................................................3 Inlet................................................................................................. 27 La Fleur De Beaute..................................................................... 10 New Hope Family Services....................................................... 27 Pediatric Associates......................................................................3 The Redhouse................................................................................3 Red Fox Run B&B........................................................................ 27 Rosamond Gifford Zoo.............................................................. 19 Sciencenter................................................................................... 19 Syracuse Children’s Theatre.......................................................7 Syracuse Community Choir.......................................................3 Upstate Medical University...............................................Back Cover Wanderers Rest........................................................................... 19 Weiss, Savedoff & Ciccone....................................................... 31

First Fridays. 5:30-8 p.m. Check out the museum’s Festival of Trees event and shop for products from local vendors. Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. $8 for non-members. everson.org.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 11 Gingerbread Build + Sip. 5-7 p.m. Build your own gin-

gerbread house, and enjoy holiday music and beverages from the cash bar. Erie Canal Museum, 318 Erie Blvd. E., Syracuse. Pre-registration: $12 for non-members; At the door: $15 for non-members. (315) 471-0593.

SATURDAY, DEC. 21 It’s A Wonderful Life Radio Play. 7 p.m. This retelling of It’s A Wonderful Life includes music and sound effects. Auburn Public Theatre, 8 Exchange St., Auburn. $10. (315) 702-8309. auburnpublictheatre.org.

SATURDAY, DEC. 28 Syracuse Men’s Basketball. 7 p.m. Watch as the

Syracuse men take on Niagara University. Carrier Dome, Syracuse University, 900 Irving Ave., Syracuse. $16-$175 (plus fees). cuse.com.

Have an event or an idea for Parents’ Night Out? Email courtneyk@familytimescny.com with more information.

Wishing you a

happy

holiday season!

WEISS, SAVEDOFF & CICCONE Doctors of Optometry, PC

Excellence in professional vision care services/Quality ophthalmic materials

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Many people lose their flex plan money if they don’t spend it by December 31st. Visit us NOW! • Complete Family Vision Care • Quality Ophthalmic Materials • Excellence in Professional Vision Care Services

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WWW.EYE-CARE1.COM FAMILY TIMES DECEMBER 2019

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CARING FOR KIDS IS AT THE HEART OF WHAT WE DO BEST. STEVEN BLATT, MD, DIRECTOR OF THE UPSTATE PEDIATRIC AND ADOLESCENT CENTER, TEACHES TWO PATIENTS HOW TO GET A BETTER LISTEN.

Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital opened in 2009 to provide safe, innovative and family-centered care for children in Central New York. Today, we serve children and families across 17 counties—and beyond—with 100,000 patient visits each year. Upstate offers more than 50 services just for kids, and also is the region’s only Level 1 Trauma Center. Our commitment to quality care and an exceptional patient and family experience is evident in our culture and in the smiles of our patients. We are proud to care for the familes of Central New York for all special birthdays, and for many more to come.

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Family Times December 2019  

Family Times December 2019

Family Times December 2019  

Family Times December 2019

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