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Strategic Plan FY’ 2017 - 2019

FA M I LY S E R V I C E A S S O C I AT I O N www.fsasj.org


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

2017-2019

Senior Leadership Team Cindy Herdman Ivins

George Booskos

President/CEO

Controller

Dawn Belamarich

Krisanna Ghadiri

Vice President of Family & Community Development

Vice President of Behavioral Health

Torrina Bennett-Michael

Marion McLaurin

Chief Development Officer

Chief Administrative Officer

Board of Trustees Evelynn Caterson, Esq., Chairperson, FSO, FSE

Robert Fatzinger

Deb Renaud

Kathy Mullins, Chairperson, FSA

Dianna Fauntleroy, Esq.

Cheryl Schwartz

Vanessa Reale-Jones, Chairperson, FSD

Richard Harlan

Jerry Shockey

Carrie Becker

Dr. Robert Hill

Lawrence Stroud

Marilyn Dolcy

Brian K. Jackson

Rev. Louis Strugala

John Donnelly, Esq.

Dr. Richard Lolla

Theresa Watts, Esq. Andrea Worrall

Strategic Planning Steering Committee Kathy Mullins, Chairperson Brian K. Jackson, Board Member Dr. Richard Lolla, Board Member Cheryl Schwartz, Board Member Cindy Herdman Ivins, President/CEO Dawn Belamarich, Vice President Family & Community Services Torrina Bennett-Michael, Chief Development Officer Krisanna Ghadiri, Vice President of Behavioral Health Marion McLaurin, Chief Administrative Officer Marie Zieger, Facilitator Support Center, Partners in Philanthropy


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

2017-2019

Family Service Association Strategic Plan FY’ 2017-2019 Table of Contents Introductory Letters…………………………………………………………1

Executive Summary……………………………………………………….2-4

Strategic Plan Overview…………………………………………………….5

Agency History……………………………………………………………...6

Programs & Services………………………………………………………6-8

Mission/Vision/Values………………………………………………………9

The Process……………………………………………………………..10-11

Strategic Priorities……………………………………………................12-34


Introductory Letters The Board Chair We have been very focused at Family Service Association, determining how we can further fulfill our community’s needs. Early in the year, we embarked upon a strategic planning process that included input from internal and external stakeholders to develop a comprehensive plan to address the needs of the community we serve. I am proud to present and endorse this strategic plan, developed after a year of exhaustive planning and research. I thank the Strategic Planning Steering Committee for their dedication and perseverance. Their task was monumental, and their achievement surpassed all expectations. Indeed, this plan will guide us through the next three years, enabling us to provide our consumers with the tools they will need to be successful in their lives and in their communities. I look forward to the opportunities that lie ahead as we continue to fulfill our commitment to individuals and families who need our services. Sincerely,

Lynn Caterson Board Chairperson, FSO

The Strategic Planning Chair It is with great pride and anticipation that I present the 2017 – 2019 Strategic Plan for Family Service Association of South Jersey. This three-year plan introduces our new mission and vision statements for the Agency along with the integrated strategic goals that will support their implementation. The Plan was developed with broad involvement and guidance from the Board of Trustees and FSA Staff, whose participation was vital in assuring the document accurately reflects our current position and lays the foundation for a successful future. The Strategic Planning Steering Committee members have done amazing work in providing the Agency with a proactive blueprint to guide us through 2019. Our goals are ambitious, measurable and most importantly achievable, strategically aligning projects to the mission and vision of the Agency. Insightful and robust, this Strategic Plan will guide our Agency to welcome the future with a continuous process of excellence and dedication to those we serve. Yours truly,

Kathy Mullins Board Chairperson, FSA Strategic Planning Committee Chairperson

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Executive Summary I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Board of Trustees and Staff of Family Service Association who working collectively developed this strategic plan with assistance from The Support Center, Partners in Philanthropy. It provides Family Service Association with a three-year roadmap for organizational development, focused on the framework of fostering an individual’s positive well-being, and the Agency providing a continuum of services that are holistic in nature. The Board of Trustees and Staff will review progress quarterly and will update the plan annually as needed. This plan was developed with broad involvement, collaboration, and guidance from the Board of Trustees and Staff. The Strategic Planning Steering Committee included three board members and the senior leadership team. The Committee met monthly to reflect on the mission, vision, core operating values and assumptions underlying the organization’s approach to its work. These meetings set the stage for a work session including the full Board during which the organization’s strategic direction was defined. The Staff helped coordinate the planning process and provided important support and analysis to complete this plan. The following will summarize our newly adopted mission statement, it will offer insight to the work of Family Service Association and lastly, illustrate key strategic priorities identified in the environmental scan.

Mission: Improving the quality of life for individuals and families in our community. Family Service Association is a private, community based multi-service United Way partner that provides a wide range of services to more than 8,500 children, youth, families and seniors each year. Family Service Association was founded in 1909 in order to provide relief services to families living in the local community. This foundational goal lives on today in more than twenty programs that offer hope, healing and resiliency to the lives of those we touch. Family Service Association is divided into four non-profit entities, each of which is designed to enhance the services and programs of the organization. Family Service Association is a non-profit (501(c) 3) agency that provides direct care services to children, youth, individual adults, families and senior citizens. Family Service Enterprise (FSE) explores entrepreneurial opportunities that advance its mission. Family Service Development (FSD) raises funds and public awareness, and coordinates volunteer services for the entire association; and Family Service Operation (FSO) manages the assets of the Association and provides management services to the three other corporations. 2


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

2017-2019

Direction and Results The strategic direction and goals included in this plan are Family Service Association’s response to its understanding of what its consumers value most about the organization, and current opportunities and challenges for offering a high quality system of support in our community. The three-year period of this strategic plan will be a time of assessing and strengthening approaches to our scope of work. Concurrently, Family Service Association will take a leadership role in working with a broader array of community resources, and will actively engage more volunteers and potential donors and friends to the Agency. With a fresh perspective on its mission, understanding what the Agency does well, and the environment in which it operates, the following strategic directions will be pursued: 1. Family Service Association will review and deepen its existing direct supports and services over time to ensure they work effectively and meet community needs. 2. Family Service Association will further assess consumer and community needs to identify gaps and/or needed shifts in service delivery. This assessment will serve as the basis for expanding or adding new services. 3. Family Service Association will take a leadership role in working with a range of service providers, including primary care providers, to become an Agency that is holistic in nature. 4. Family Service Association will expand the organization’s visibility in the community and marketing of its brand to promote our wide array of programming. 5. Family Service Association will continue its transformation as an Agency that is trauma informed. 6. Family Service Association will seek opportunities to increase unrestricted revenue.

Organization of the Strategic Plan Strategic Priorities The following strategic priorities for Family Service Association are the organization’s response to the important issues identified in the environmental scan. These strategic priorities provide a framework for fulfilling future initiatives.

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Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

Programs & Services

Technology

Community Awareness

Strategic Partnerships

Human Resources

Governance

2017-2019

Facility

Financial

Goals/Outcomes/Objectives Each strategic priority has a set of observable and measurable goals, outcomes, and objectives to be completed within the three-year strategic planning period.

Key Strategic Actions Key strategic actions provide structure and guidance to move the organization from point A to point B. As noted above, this document is intended to be a management tool for Family Service Association with two purposes. First, it is a record of the strategic planning process and the decisions reached by the Board of Trustees and Staff. Second, it is a reference guide for strategic planning to inform and instruct current and future endeavors. Again, I applaud the wonderful work done by our Board and Team and wholeheartedly look forward to the future of our Agency. In service,

Cindy Herdman Ivins President/CEO

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Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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Strategic Plan Overview Mission Improving the quality of life for individuals and families in our community. Vision To assist individuals and families by providing premier services that will support them in their path to healing, wellness and recovery. Core Values Accessibility  Flexibility  Innovation  Partnerships  Communication  Diversity  Ethics Strategic Priorities Programs & Services Community Awareness Strategic Partnerships Technology Human Resources Facility Governance Financial

Programs & Services Community Awareness Increase the all encompassing Ensure consistent community awareness and holistic nature of our Agency of FSA’s brand and services and its services Technology Human Resources Increase capacity, security, access Attract, retain and develop a diverse and efficiency of the technology Team that fulfills the Agency Mission infrastructure Governance Improve overall board effectiveness & aligned board direction/function

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Strategic Partnerships Increase, deepen and enhance strategic partnerships in all aspects of the Agency’s work Facility Integration of trauma informed practices managed utilizing best facility & fiscal practices Financial Ensure a diversified financially stable resource base


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

2017-2019

Agency History Family Service Association was incorporated in 1909 as The Organized Charities of Atlantic City. At that time, the primary function of the agency was to provide tangible relief for individuals and families in need. In 1919, the name of the agency was changed to The Atlantic County Welfare Board. It was felt that this name was more appropriate for an agency whose objective was the rehabilitation of families who were or might become dependent, and the removal of preventable cases of misery and destitution. With the development of public welfare programs, the need for tangible relief decreased and the emphasis began to shift toward counseling. The agency changed its name again in 1937 to The Social Service Bureau of Atlantic City. In 1938, the agency became a charter member of the Community Chest of Atlantic City, assuring a sounder basis for operating after many years of financial uncertainty. In 1953, the agency experienced its last name change, this time to Family Service Association.

Programs and Services Behavioral Health Family Service Association’s Behavioral Health programming focuses on every individual’s healing and recovery journey, partnering with them to achieve their definition of health and well-being. The Outpatient program provides behavioral health counseling and psychiatry services for individuals, groups, couples and families. The goal of these services is to promote the physical, emotional, spiritual, social, and economic well-being of persons residing in southern New Jersey. Groups currently offered include trauma support groups for adults, adolescents, and young children, and an anger management group for adults. Additional groups are continually being formed based on the needs of the community. First Day provides psychiatric adult partial care services where over 90 individuals diagnosed with a severe and persistent mental illness participate in a variety of therapeutic and life skills groups designed to support their wellness and recovery. Children’s Partial Care: Rainbow Place and Safe Harbor provide structured and intensive group treatment to enable youth who are at risk of psychiatric hospitalization to remain in their homes. Rainbow Place, for children aged 6-12 and Safe Harbor, for adolescents aged 13-17 use evidence based curriculums to encourage youth experiencing emotional and behavioral challenges to make positive changes that will promote their healing and recovery.

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Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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Family and Community Strengthening Services Family Service Association’s Family Strengthening and Community Building programs strive to empower individuals and families to successfully meet life's challenges and thrive as secure, stable families. The Family Life Center is a unique, family friendly, multi-service center designed to meet the needs of parents and children who are at risk of abuse and neglect issues. The Family Life Center provides parenting education and support to individuals who are involved with Division of Children Protection & Permanency (DCP&P) and may have had substantiated cases of abuse or are at risk of abuse and neglect. Group activities are designed to foster positive parent/child interaction. Parents are encouraged to bring their children. Family Success Centers in Egg Harbor Township (Spruce) and Galloway (New Day) are community-based neighborhood gathering places where any resident can go for support, information and services. The FSC’s provide families and individuals with wraparound services and supports that ultimately lead them on a path towards self sufficiency. The Network provides opportunities designed to strengthen family relationships, improve child and family well-being and increase self-sufficiency at home, in the workplace and in the communities of Western Atlantic County. Family Service Association leads this collaboration of the Atlantic Cape Family Support Organization, CASA of Cape Atlantic, and Literacy Volunteer Association in Cape Atlantic. The Kinship Legal Guardianship program promotes safety and permanency by assisting grandparents and other relations in obtaining legal guardianship for their relative children. KLG provides services to families in the seven southern counties of New Jersey: Atlantic, Burlington, Cape May, Camden, Cumberland, Salem, and Gloucester. The Kinship Wraparound program aids caregivers, such as grandparents, other blood relatives, and family friends who have taken on the responsibility of taking care of children until age 18 or (21 if the child is disabled), in maneuvering through various government networks to find formal and informal supports and services, including providing referrals for child care, support groups, medical coverage, legal services and housing assistance. Egg Harbor Township School Based Youth Services Program: Family Service Association partners with the Egg Harbor Township School District to operate the Teen Center in the Egg Harbor Township High School. The Teen Center provides positive youth development activities with the overarching goal of assisting youth in successfully navigating their adolescent years, acquiring the skills needed to obtain employment or continue their education, and graduate healthy and drug-free. 7


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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The goal of Family Service Association’s Home Electronic Device System (HEDS) Case Management program is the diversion of youth from detention or correctional placements by enhancing problem solving capability through brief counseling and case management activities. The HEDS program provides intensive in-home counseling and case management services to pre and post adjudicated youth who have been assigned by the Juvenile Justice System to HEDS. The Parents as Teachers (PAT) model is an evidenced-based home visitation program (EBHV) that provides in-home health and parenting education, and supportive services to at-risk families, especially those overburdened by stressors that may contribute to child neglect and abuse. Anti-Poverty Services Family Service Association’s anti-poverty work is focused on assisting individuals who are at the end of their welfare eligibility. FSA provides assistance in building their lives through the provision of intensive case management, financial literacy and employment skills. Family Service Association administers the Supportive Aid to Individuals and Families (SAIF) in Atlantic, Cape May, Cumberland, and Salem counties. SAIF works in close partnership with the county welfare authorities to assist individuals who are facing the end of their welfare eligibility. Other Programming Training: As a part of our array of services, Family Service Association is also instrumental in providing training and development services to other organizations and provider agencies in the state. Board and Care: For more than twenty (20) years, Family Service Association has been the sole provider of Board and Care Operator’s Training for the State of New Jersey. This mandatory training series is designed to educate and instruct owners and operators in topics relative to operating residential care facilities and rooming houses within the State. The goal is to ensure persons managing this population are compliant with the Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) standards and regulations. Cultural Competence: FSA provides Cultural Competence Training to Division of Mental Health and Addictions funded agencies in the twelve (12) central/southern counties within the State of New Jersey. This initiative is designed to educate and train individual practitioners and provider agencies in curriculum that addresses how to better serve mental health clients within therapeutic modalities.

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Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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The Process Family Service Association’s Strategic Planning process is focused on providing a framework for Agency growth and development. The process was conducted in three phases:

Assessment

Implementation

Integration

The Assessment phase was comprised of the collection and synthesis of key data, to identify issues that pose challenges and/or offer opportunities for the future direction of the Agency. Key learning tasks included: • An environmental scan to assess and analyze new developments and trends critical to behavioral health, social service, and the future of the Agency. • A Board retreat with the purpose of identifying needs, areas of improvement, and the development of strategies to meet those needs. • The Support Center, Partners in Philanthropy facilitated the planning process utilizing the Core Capacity Assessment Tool (CCAT). The CCAT is an online 146-question survey that measures a nonprofit organization's effectiveness in relation to four core capacities—leadership, adaptability, management, and technical capacities—as well as organizational culture. • Sessions with program managers provided additional ideas and feedback that would add value and perspective to recommended strategies. • A Special Board Meeting to discuss Strategic Priorities. During the Implementation phase, a new mission, vision, and value statement were constructed that best represented the Agency in which we envisioned. Setting goals and developing objectives that would support meeting the Agency’s future were reviewed to ensure alignment with community needs. Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Time bounded (SMART) objectives were created to provide evidence that goals are being achieved. 10


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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Having developed a navigation dashboard to guide Agency efforts, the Integration phase will focus on meeting goals by transforming strategies tied to objectives into tangible actions, and by monitoring the effectiveness of the actions to ensure compliance.

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Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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Strategic Priorities PROGRAMS & SERVICES Goals: Ensure cutting edge/competitive advantaged and community relevant programs and services Increase the all encompassing and holistic nature of our Agency and its services To provide the community with integrative, self-selective care that will sustain throughout one’s lifetime OUTCOMES 2019 A minimum of 75% of clients report improved well-being and positive impact on their lives 80% of those participating in FSA programs have increased their economic selfsufficiency Year 1 (FY’17) Objective (desired measurable results): By June 30, 2017, all of FSA’s consumers have increased the number of services utilized for a positive tangible impact. Key Strategic Actions: 

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Develop and implement an agency-wide intake and access process; common front door for the community to use to ensure that they are connected with the appropriate FSA program Eliminate program silos by ensuring all FSA Team members have an awareness of other FSA programs and services Align FY’17 budget with strategic planning priorities Continually scan the environment; develop and incorporate means of community assessment to ensure programs and services are developed to address needs Increase program manager and Agency capacity to use data in evaluation of program and services Explore provision of substance abuse services: reacquire license or partner with another agency Once agency intake and access is streamlined, develop strategic partnerships with local medical providers to begin to integrate our behavioral health/substance abuse services with them, moving toward a vision of treating the whole person 12


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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Create specific outreach and programming for veterans, military families and senior citizens Implement Trauma Informed Care (TIC) and diversity initiatives that ensure all FSA Team members are mindful in their daily interactions with client and fellow Team members

Year 2 (FY’18) Objective: By June 30, 2018, FSA will have thoughtfully evaluated the effectiveness of all programs and services against our strategic plan and our focused priorities. Key Strategic Actions 

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Intake is centralized. Agency Point of Entry is integrative, meaning that no matter which program a client enters FSA from; they are assessed and connected with other appropriate programs Institute feedback loops from consumers/clients that inform agency practices including consumer satisfaction surveys and data measures; utilize information gathered to inform agency practices and programming a. Identify two programs/services FSA can provide based upon feedback b. Develop dashboard tools for each program that include operational/impact outcomes, LOS and fiscal viability as well as connection to Mission/Vision/Values Identify two forms of clinical service which can be provided via use of telehealth and/or electronic devices, including apps a. Complete a cost/analysis of FSA creating vs. utilizing a telehealth system Compare two electronic record systems (cost/utilization) to Carelogic for determination to maintain or purchase alternate Electronic Health Record (EHR) Move towards establishment of integrated care agreement with area Primary Care Provider Team thinks differently about their role, less compartmentalized Exploration of Innovation Engineering process to creatively develop programs and services Expand clinical services for children to create a full continuum of services that addresses the diversity of issues

Year 3 (FY’19) Objective: By June 30, 2019, we will positively impact the life of every FSA client through an integrated treatment approach.

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Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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Key Strategic Actions      

All clients/consumers are familiar with FSA integrated approach Feedback loops are routinely utilized in program impact and evaluation a. Continuation of Year 2 process Implementation of telehealth and/or other electronic means of provision of services Integrated care agreement with pediatricians in addition to Primary Care Providers FSA is a Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic with integrated clinical service with specialties for children, seniors and veterans/military families FSA continues to aggressively seek funding for new programs and services that meet community needs and are consonant with Mission/Vision/Values

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COMMUNITY AWARENESS Goal: Ensure consistent community awareness of FSA’s brand and services. OUTCOMES 2019 FSA’s volunteer base is increased by 25% FSA’s client base is increased by 25% FSA’s donor base is increased by 50% FSA has 3 to 5 formal partnerships FSA is one of the top three sites that people visit for services Annual formal and informal participation in a minimum number of 2-4 priority networks that can significantly increase the community’s awareness of FSA Year 1 (FY’17) Objective (desired measurable results): By June 30, 2017, FSA will introduce its new brand to the community and heighten awareness of agency programs and services. Key Strategic Actions 

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Create a Marketing/Development Plan that will: a. Measure our current partnerships and donor base, grow annually by 25% b. Measure effectiveness of current events, meeting budget needs for unrestricted revenue c. Engage Board on potential marketing/partnership/donor prospects Have created a number of strategic marketing vehicles that increases FSA’s exposure to the community Ensure effective, consistent branding across all agency programs a. Creation and implementation of new website Evaluation of social media efforts with the goal of expanding and strengthening communications Explore partnerships with media, marketing and/or advertising agencies Develop budget for marketing/brand awareness Participate on community committees/groups that will further FSA mission - ―Have a presence‖ Create a ―speaker’s bureau‖ of agency Team members to present on topics of importance to community groups (i.e., schools, churches, etc.) 15


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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Year 2 (FY’18) Objective: By June 30, 2018, FSA will be viewed as the community resource for behavioral health and community social services resulting in greater utilization of services, increase in donors (unrestricted funds) and volunteers. Key Strategic Actions   

Continuation of Year 2 strategies Continued implementation of Development/Marketing Plan Purposeful partnerships with Stockton University, Atlantic Cape Community College, South Jersey Industries, and other businesses to be their primary behavioral healthcare resource Implementation of media partner strategy with the goal of increasing community awareness of FSA programs as evidenced by more donors, friends of the agency and volunteers

Year 3 (FY’19) Objective: By June 30, 2019, FSA is the community resource for behavioral health and community social services resulting in greater utilization of services, increase in donors (unrestricted funds) and volunteers. Key Strategic Actions     

Continued implementation of Development/Marketing Plan Increase unrestricted revenue as a result of donor cultivation Institutionalization of individual donor giving from annual gifts to the establishment of major gift and planned giving opportunities Ongoing partnership with local media outlets to ensure coverage of FSA sponsored events/Team/services FSA is revered as the subject matter expert by local and regional media

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Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS Goal: Increase, deepen and enhance strategic partnerships in all aspects of the Agency’s work. OUTCOMES 2019 Have a minimum of 3-5 strategic formal partnerships that significantly move forward FSA’s impact on substance abuse, integrative care and economic self-sufficiency Participation in all networks that support FSA’s work in these areas Year 1 (FY’17) Objective (desired measurable results): By June 30, 2017, FSA has identified 1-3 top priority partnerships to explore, develop and strengthen. Key Strategic Actions  

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Facilitate connections with community agencies to increase referral services Collaborate with higher education institutions to provide pathways/opportunities for advancement to our consumer base (Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for training, GED classes, etc.) Meet with three sources/agencies that have incorporated integrative care, and/or three Primary Care Providers (PCP) interested in integrating with a Behavioral Health Provider Explore merger with local substance abuse provider Increase FSA relationship with local businesses including MBCA and Chamber of Commerce with the goal of strengthening ties a. for Development (including marketing and branding) b. the Family Economic Opportunity Center Strengthen FSA ties with federal, state, county and local politicians with the goal of enhanced support for FSA operations Convene Atlantic County Anti-Poverty Network Convene Atlantic County Suicide Prevention committee

Year 2 (FY’18) Objectives: By June 30, 2018, FSA has identified another 1-3 top priority partnerships to explore, develop and strengthen.

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Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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By June 30, 2018, FSA has 1- 3 strategic partners that are committed organizational champions. By June 30, 2018, FSA has 1-3 strategic partnerships that result in Integrated Care affiliations; impact on local issues of concern (poverty, economic development, suicide prevention). Key Strategic Actions        

Substance abuse is folded into Integrated Care as a focus Continuation of prior effective Strategic Actions Establishment of integrated care agreement with area Primary Care Provider FSA strengthens ties with Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine resulting in FSA becoming a practicum site for psychiatrists FSA becomes an Administrative Services Organization (ASO) providing human resources, IT, facility and accounting support for other non-profits Focused cultivation of the priority strategic partners for development of committed organizational champions Evaluate the impact the partnerships are having against our desired results and make adjustments as needed Increased Board and Staff Leadership time in community building and cultivating relationships

Year 3 (FY’19) Objectives: By June 30, 2019, FSA has identified another 1-3 top priority partnerships to explore, develop and strengthen. By June 30, 2019, FSA has an additional 1- 3 strategic partners that are committed organizational champions. By June 30, 2019, FSA has additional 1-3 strategic partnerships that result in Integrated Care affiliations; impact on local issues of concern (poverty, economic development, suicide prevention). Key Strategic Actions    

FSA has 3-5 integrated care agreements with area primary care providers and pediatricians Continuation of prior effective Strategic Actions Maintain, sustain, and grow the strategic partnerships established in Years 1 and 2 Evaluate the impact the partnerships are having against our desired results and make adjustments as needed 18


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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Increased Board and Staff Leadership time in the community building and cultivating relationships

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Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

TECHNOLOGY Goal: Increase capacity, security, access and efficiency of the technology infrastructure. OUTCOMES 2019 25% of behavioral health clients will utilize telehealth secure platforms for psychiatry and clinical services. FSA will have the technology to efficiently produce:  

dashboard and outcome data forecasting and budgeting information

All Team managers are using technology to report on consumer impact regularly. All FSA departments have demonstrated an increase in their efficiency of service delivery and reporting. FSA will increase efficiency and capacity in providing integrative services, community awareness and raising of resources. Year 1 (FY’ 17) Objective (desired measurable results): By June 30, 2017, FSA will have a comprehensive Technology Plan and timeline to accomplish the desired outcomes. Key Strategic Actions 

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Evaluate use of technology and agency’s capacity for overall effective operations including new initiatives resulting in a Technology Plan a. Evaluate capacity to provide and utilize telehealth technologies b. Ensure all computers have capacity to handle agency/program operations c. Evaluate capacity to utilize electronic therapeutic methods of treatment such as texting, apps (ex. myStrength app) to improve outcomes and participation d. Evaluate current technology software array including security, usage of Care Logic, migration to Microsoft 360 e. Evaluate security protocols for HIPAA/Protected Health Information Protocols including need for secure emails Improve ability to retrieve outcome data and reports from Care Logic Develop the institutional capacity through an internal support structure for all software (Care Logic, E3, Donor Perfect and Traverse) Develop a policy and procedural manual for IT operations Implement redesigned website and intranet 20

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Evaluation of security solutions and services that help secure Agency systems and networks Evaluation of current software/systems to ensure they are meeting current and anticipated agency needs

Year 2 (FY’ 18) Objective: By June 30, 2018, all FSA departments have increased their efficiency of service delivery and impact reporting. Key Strategic Actions          

Implementation of telehealth services – specifically psychiatry consultations Explore provision of clinical services through telehealth and/or web-based strategies IT has completed workshops and trainings on how to support telehealth; including compliance, software needs, security, trouble-shooting Design and implement computer systems that communicate with outside partners Evaluate needs around compliance, software needs, security, and trouble-shooting in an inter-communication modality with strategic partners Continue evaluation of current software/systems to ensure they are meeting current and anticipated agency needs Easy, accessible reports needed for statistics, funders, partners, marketing, are created and electronically transferrable Evaluate usage and effectiveness of website and intranet as evidenced by Google Analytics and other feedback; make necessary adjustments Implementation of the Technology Plan for the purposeful incorporation of technology in all aspects of our operations Continuation of prior effective Strategic Actions

Year 3 (FY’ 19) Objectives: By June 30, 2019, all FSA departments have increased their efficiency of service delivery and impact reporting. By June 30, 2019, FSA will have incorporated 1-2 new technologies to provide high quality services and operations. Key Strategic Actions   

Continuation of prior effective Strategic Actions Recommit to Care Logic or implement a new EHR Provide IT support to FSA and strategic partners regarding telehealth, integration of program services, internal intranet, social media and development activities 21


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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Evaluate the necessity for desktops verses other means of computer hardware Purposeful incorporation of the Technology Plan in all aspects of our operations

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Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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HUMAN RESOURCES Goal: FSA works to attract, retain and develop a diverse Team that fulfills the Agency Mission. OUTCOMES 2019 Staff retention is increased by 25%. Annual Team survey reflects that individuals are valued and supported in their work as well as self-satisfaction with positive impact on Mission as it relates to their position. At least 50% of available promotion opportunities are filled with FSA Team members. Annual assessment of revenue to determine possibilities of increasing compensation and benefits. Year 1 Objectives (desired measurable results): By June 30, 2017, FSA Team members will experience an improved orientation process that will enhance their understanding of the Agency and their roles (inclusive of interns, service-learning students and volunteers). By June 30, 2017, FSA explores how to be a Trauma Informed Care agency whose operations are mindful of the impact of trauma and relevance of cultural competency in both Team and clients. By June 30, 2017, FSA has a succession plan for key agency leadership roles. By June 30, 2017, FSA will evaluate current benefit offerings and make recommendations for additional services. Key Strategic Actions    

Review and strengthen Agency Employee Handbook and Personnel Policies Ensure the Agency Employee Handbook and Personnel Policies reflect agency culture and Mission, Vision, and Values Ensure compliance with all State and Federal laws and regulations. Ensure Agency Orientation processes induct new Team members into agency culture (Team members include new hires, interns, service-learning students, and volunteers) a. New Hire Orientation process occurs quarterly and includes overview of FSA Mission/Vision/Values; Program and Services information; mandatory trainings and Trauma Informed Care exposure 23


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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b. Program Orientation occurs within initial two weeks of joining the program and includes at a minimum: program operational policy and procedures; program outcomes (both contractual and impact); position expectations; Care Logic, E3, My Learning Pointe and other relevant training Streamline Agency hiring process of new Team members Implement Trauma Informed Care and Cultural Competence initiatives that ensure all FSA Team members are mindful in their daily interactions with client and fellow Team members Evaluate operations including break areas to ensure they meet Trauma Informed Care criteria Evaluate provision of supervision to enhance individual Team member’s job performance and professional development Evaluate provision of training to ensure Team members are fully prepared to fulfill their job responsibilities Leadership Skills Training for program managers and supervisors designed to strengthen their abilities to effectively manage their programs and Teams Improve and educate managers on effective interviewing techniques Improve and educate managers on effective performance evaluation techniques Evaluate utilization of My Learning Pointe for efficacy in providing training Evaluate usefulness of All Team Day to ensure it’s an effective method of training all Team members on mandatory required trainings and agency culture Explore other methods of effectively preparing Team members to perform their job expectations and responsibilities Explore ways to infuse agency culture and reduction of silos in daily operations Review the cost for fringe benefits and determine if best dollars are being spent Explore ways to create unrestricted revenue to increase compensation Establish an emergency succession plan for all key leadership positions

Year 2 Objectives: By June 30, 2018, FSA Team members will experience orientation and performance measurement processes that enhance their understanding of the agency and their roles (inclusive of interns, service-learning students and volunteers). By June 30, 2018, FSA is a Trauma Informed Care agency whose operations are mindful of the impact of trauma and relevance of cultural competency in both Team and clients. By June 30, 2018, FSA has developed a succession process to identify future agency leaders. Key Strategic Actions 

Continuation of prior effective Strategic Actions 24


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

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2017-2019

Review and strengthen Agency Performance Evaluation processes to enhance Team member professional development and job performance Improve and update agency job descriptions Improve and update agency performance evaluations including a self-evaluation process Cross train Team members where possible Create a structured leadership development program for the purpose of identifying future leaders and strengthening current leaders Strengthen current program managers and supervisors leadership skills and capacity Identify and develop individual Team member’s leadership skills and capacity Create employee engagement by submitting employee articles and ideas to publications and conferences in our field Redesign fringe benefits based on the results of Year 1 research Investigate new ideas around Team member’s wellness

Year 3 Objectives: By June 30, 2019, FSA’s Human Resources processes involve employee wellness and practices that produce and/or promote productivity and excellence in performance. By June 30, 2019, FSA’s employees are committed to meeting program and agency expectations through excellence in job performance. By June 30, 2019, FSA is a Trauma Informed Care agency whose operations are mindful of the impact of trauma and relevance of cultural competency in both Team and clients. By June 30, 2019, FSA’s succession process identifies future agency leaders. Key Strategic Actions  

Continuation of prior effective Strategic Actions Continuous environmental scan for best human resources practices to ensure FSA is a competitive employer

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Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

2017-2019

FACILITY Goal: FSA’s facilities will accommodate employees and clients within a trauma informed system and will be managed utilizing best facility management and fiscal practices. OUTCOMES 2019 Enhance facility operations with a reduced number of service calls for repairs Use a Facility Maintenance Plan to manage our facilities and fleet in conjunction with a Capital Improvements Plan that addresses preventative and maintenance issues Utilize forecasting of utility and facility costs in budget preparation Utilize a Security Plan and an Emergency Preparedness Plan to ensure the Health and Safety of Team members and clients at all FSA properties Year 1 (FY ’17) Objective (desired measurable results): By June 30, 2017, FSA will determine if the Agency is employing optimal usage of facilities and evaluate effective and/or efficient measures to resolve any losses or deficiencies. By June 30, 2017, FSA will explore customary designs to create, improve and/or enhance the facilities in becoming a more trauma informed environment. By June 30, 2017, FSA will explore developing a maintenance policy and procedure plan to address daily operating issues within the facilities. By June 30, 2017, FSA will evaluate the Agency’s capacity to support telehealth; where building facility is impacted and the agency will also begin to investigate the building needs to become integrative. Key Strategic Actions 

Evaluate the non-used portions of our facilities and determine the actual cost (loss) both monthly and annually. a. Determine the feasibility of renting out portions of the building i. Identify potential renters ii. Determine if their business supports our mission b. Explore redesigning current programs to make rental space available c. Clean and eliminate inventory no longer needed or used

Evaluate current utilization of all buildings 26


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

2017-2019

a. Maintain and/or improve internal temperature control, lighting, and energy efficiency b. Evaluate how well FSA manages its utility cost c. Evaluate service quality from vendors who provide maintenance and services to our buildings d. Evaluate how well the agency is using the Maintenance Ticket System i. Evaluate maintenance needs and considerations ii. Review turnaround times for repairs 

Review the several areas impacted by our facility and maintenance program in order to formulate a Facility Plan and a policy and procedural manual a. Create an agency companywide Emergency Preparedness Plan b. Create the process for managing the agency’s vehicle fleet c. Create the process for managing light building repairs d. Create the process for managing how we handle equipment and furniture e. Create the process for managing buildings and grounds f. Determine the physical layout and resources needed to do telehealth g. Procure service vendors that provide effective and quality services for heating, maintenance, cleaning, roofing, etc.

Explore and investigate how buildings and programs can be trauma informed sensitive a. Assess if current program locations are feasible for operations b. Post and implement mandatory signs and notifications for consumers c. Explore pictures and art that support Trauma Informed Care d. Investigate office design and set up that support Trauma Informed Care e. Determine if current building designs and practices violate Trauma Informed Care standards

Explore and implement needed facility adaptations for telehealth service provision.

Year 2 (FY ’18) Objectives: By June 30, 2018, FSA will increase the utilization of the non-used portions of the English Creek building. By June 30, 2018, FSA will move towards being a more trauma informed building by implementing infrastructure and systems that support Trauma Informed Care initiatives. By June 30, 2018, FSA will have implemented a maintenance policy and procedure plan to address daily operating issues within the facilities.

27


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

2017-2019

By June 30, 2018, FSA will evaluate the Agency’s capacity to support telehealth; where building facility is impacted and will also begin to investigate the building needs to become integrative. Key Strategic Actions  

Continuation of prior effective Strategic Actions Implement the plan to use and/or rent non-used space within our facility a. Secure rental agreements of potential tenant(s) b. Build out and/or prepare space that will be used by tenant(s) c. Relocate any offices and/or programs impacted by rentable space d. Determine how income from rented space will be used within operations

Implement recommendations for public areas regarding Mission, Vision, and Values adherence and Trauma Informed Care initiatives a. Develop a general Security Plan to protect Staff and clients b. Ensure Staffing and consumer areas are Trauma Informed Care sensitive c. Ensure the Agency’s Mission Statement is posted in public areas d. Implement pictures and art that are trauma informed sensitive e. Implement recommendations for designing offices that are trauma informed

Implement the Facility Plan and procedures developed in FY’17 and evaluate their effectiveness and make any needed adjustments.

Year 3 (FY ’19) Objectives: By June 30, 2019, FSA will be a trauma informed building by implementing infrastructure and systems that support Trauma Informed Care. By June 30, 2019, FSA will have a working Facility Plan and maintenance policy and procedure manual to address daily operating issues within the facilities. By June 30, 2019, FSA will operate a telehealth program in order to provide mental health counseling via the ―cloud.‖ Key Strategic Actions  

Continuation of prior effective Strategic Actions All public areas and private offices will be Trauma Informed Care sensitive a. Employees will be aware of trauma informed modalities b. Pictures and art will be trauma informed sensitive c. The agency’s Security Plan will be implemented d. Notifications and client rights will be posted

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Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

The Facility Plan and maintenance policy and procedural manual is written a. All employees are made aware of the plan b. The plan is posted on the agency’s intranet c. The Emergency Preparedness Plan is written for all buildings and programs

Telehealth is a viable program for providing mental health counseling via the ―cloud‖ a. The agency’s policy is written on telehealth b. The agency’s insurance program includes telehealth practices c. The agency’s lobbies or other areas are designed to give consumers an opportunity to enter the cloud with privacy d. Wi-Fi is easily accessible in all FSA buildings

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2017-2019


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

2017-2019

GOVERNANCE Goal: Improve overall board effectiveness & aligned board direction/ function with the Strategic Plan. OUTCOMES 2019 FSA has an engaged board that: 

Provides oversight of agency operations

Ensures fidelity to mission

Acts as an ambassador for the agency

Pro-actively monitors and directs the financial sustainability of the agency

To be measured by: biannual board self-assessment, a written annual board plan, three year strategic and fund development plan, written position descriptions, 100% board giving in an annual board fund and 90% attendance at each Board meeting. Year 1 (FY ‘17) Objectives (desired measurable results): By June 30, 2017, all FSA Board members will be able to clearly articulate their role and function as a Board member and have clarified their specific contribution. By June 30, 2017, all FSA Board members will be educated on the Agency’s current financial positions. By June 30, 2017, all Board members will have a clear place of engagement in the governance work and are participating in at least one committee. By June 30, 2017, there will be a succession plan for Board leadership. By June 30, 2017, FSA will have a succession plan for the President/CEO and key agency leadership roles. Key Strategic Actions:    

Establish a process for recognition and engagement Establish a process for continued engagement of former Board members Establish criteria for new Board orientation and training Board members are trained in: a. Agency’s current financial portfolio and revenue streams 30


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

 

2017-2019

b. Program array c. Roles, responsibilities, and expectations of a governing Board Assess Board’s ability to best serve the agency. Define most effective governance structure given that assessment. Governance committee is established and directs: a. Board development and engagement b. Most effective committee structure c. Board succession planning d. Term limits e. Annual Board planning/Board Retreat f. Board member expectations including roles and responsibilities  Re-assess meeting frequency  Have established measureable participation criteria for all board members  Formal and informal mechanisms for board/Staff information exchange and communication established

Year 2 (FY ‘18) Objectives: By June 30, 2018, seamless addition of 3 new board members with a transition of 3-5 current board members. By June 30, 2018, staggered board term limits are established. By June 30, 2018, 100% financial support from Board members will be in place. By June 30, 2018, priority areas of governance are well represented through an effective work group/committee structure. Continuation of prior effective Strategic Actions Key Strategic Actions:      

Create an annual Board Plan to support FSA’s operating plan and budget Ensure sufficient Board representation to accomplish agency and funding goals Board/Staff roles and responsibilities are continually clarified and defined Board informed quarterly/biannually of program status Re-evaluate corporate structures and its ability to develop and inform the Strategic Plan Begin to engage Board members in a self-assessment process

Year 3 (FY ’19) Objectives: By June 30, 2019, Board members will ensure effective organizational planning is directed via the usage of dashboards. 31


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

By June 30, 2019, Board members will measure progress toward meeting the results defined by the Strategic Plan. By June 30, 2019, Board members will be able to assess their own performance through self-assessment. Key Strategic Actions:    

Utilization of dashboards for future organizational long-term planning Conduct full Board self-assessment utilizing a survey, interview, or other measurement tool Review Board Plan and make recommendations as needed Begin Strategic Planning work for FY’20-22

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2017-2019


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

2017-2019

FINANCIAL Goal: Ensure a diversified financially stable resource base. OUTCOMES 2019 FSA will have a fiscally healthy operation with diversified revenue streams. FSA will monitor and review financial policies and procedures, including but not limited to policies related to private inurement, retention of records, conflict of interest, etc. to ensure alignment with best practices. FSA will seek methodologies to improve current financial systems. FSA will increase unrestricted revenue through special events and private donors. FSA will establish a Fund Development Plan to detail fundraising goals. Year 1 (FY ‘17) Objectives (desired measurable results): By June 30, 2017, there will be an assessment of the financial viability of programs and develop a plan to cover the deficits. By June 30, 2017, there will be a collective understanding of our current funding base by all Board. By June 30, 2017, there will be a clear definition of what effective funding diversification means to FSA moving forward. By June 30, 2017, FSA will have a written aggressive diversified Fund Development Plan that aligns with programs and service needs. By June 30, 2017, FSA will expand individual giving from major donors. By June 30, 2017, FSA will increase revenue generated from special events. Key Strategic Actions:      

Oversee matters critical to the health of the organization Determine the viability of FSA’s business model Review the integrity of FSA’s internal systems and controls Maintain the accuracy of its financial statements Evaluate and help manage risk Create a Finance Committee that includes oversight of the investments 33


Family Service Association | Strategic Plan

2017-2019

Year 2 (FY’18) Objectives: By June 30, 2018, FSA will induct a Feasibility Study to determine if the program array meets sustainability and financial goals. By June 30, 2018, FSA will utilize a dashboard for program and agency budgeting. By June 30, 2018, FSA will increase grant and philanthropic donors by 20%. By June 30, 2018, FSA will expand and diversify investments based upon consultation from the Board Finance Committee. Key Strategic Actions:    

Utilize results from the Feasibility Study to determine future program sustainability Link the annual budget planning process to dashboards Engage in prospect research to seek and cultivate new private donors Monitor economic trends and study their impact on our investments and donor base

Year 3 (FY’19) Objectives: By June 30, 2019, at least one-third of FSA’s operating budget will be raised from private sector philanthropy. By June 30, 2019, FSA will assess economic forces that will affect financial liquidity and future economic growth. By June 30, 2019, FSA has become the charity of choice in our region evidenced by increased donations and an increased donor pool. Key Strategic Actions:  

Utilize donor data and profile donors with a high giving capacity to increase unrestricted revenue Steward FSA’s long-term resources, not just by carefully reviewing annual budgets and evaluating operations but also by encouraging foresight through several budget cycles Evaluate investments in light of future goals and planning for future capital needs

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FAMILY SERVICE ASSOCIATION LOCATIONS

CORPORATE OFFICE 3073 ENGLISH CREEK AVENUE, SUITE 3 EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP, NJ 08234 (609) 569-0239 FSA EAST 312 E. WHITE HORSE PIKE ABSECON HIGHLANDS, NJ 08205 (609) 652-1600 SPRUCE FAMILY SUCCESS CENTER 3050 SPRUCE AVENUE EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP, NJ 08234 (609) 569-0376 NEW DAY FAMILY SUCCESS CENTER 622-624 S. NEW YORK ROAD GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, NJ 08201 (609) 652-0230 SCHOOL BASED YOUTH SERVICES OFFICES EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL (609) 653-0100 EXT. 2683

Family Service Association Strategic Plan  

This is an internal view of FSA's strategic plan for the years of 2017 - 2019

Family Service Association Strategic Plan  

This is an internal view of FSA's strategic plan for the years of 2017 - 2019

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