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NOV. 7-13, 2018 ● ORLANDO WEEKLY

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FREE | NOV. 7-13, 2018

Florida Group Publisher Graham Jarrett Editor in Chief Jessica Bryce Young Editorial Staff Writers Monivette Cordeiro, Xander Peters Calendar Editor Thaddeus McCollum Music Editor Matthew Moyer Digital Content Editor Colin Wolf Contributors Peg Aloi, Rob Bartlett, Jen Cray, Jason Ferguson, Liv Jonse, Holly V. Kapherr, Faiyaz Kara, Seth Kubersky, Bao Le-Huu, Cameron Meier, Richard Reep, Joey Roulette, Moriah Russo, Leah Sandler, Steve Schneider, Madeleine Scott, Nicolette Shurba Editorial Interns Lora Korpar, Paola Peralta Advertising Director of Sales Jeff Kruse Senior Media Specialists Dan Winkler, Matt Whiting Multimedia Account Exec Scotty Spar Digital Marketing Consultant Colin Schotter Classified and Legal Rep Jerrica Schwartz Account Manager Danielle Lebron Major Accounts Specialist Leslie Egan Marketing and Events Senior Marketing and Events Manager Jessica Pawli Events and Promotions Manager Kevin Ruane Creative Services Art Director Melissa McHenry Production Manager Daniel Rodriguez Graphic Designer Justin “SKIP” Skipper

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Cover illustration by Melissa McHenry | Photo above by Rob Bartlett

Business Director of Operations Hollie Mahadeo Business Assistant Allysha Willison Circulation Circulation Manager Collin Modeste Euclid Media Group Chief Executive Officer Andrew Zelman Chief Operating Officers Chris Keating, Michael Wagner VP of Digital Services Stacy Volhein Digital Operations Coordinator Jaime Monzon Controller Kristy Dotson euclidmediagroup.com National Advertising: Voice Media Group 1-888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Orlando Weekly Inc. 16 W. Pine St. Orlando, Florida 32801 orlandoweekly.com Phone 407-377-0400 Fax 407-377-0420

NEWS + FEATURES

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7 Your Words + “This Modern World” Readers react to blog posts and stories from the Oct. 31 issue, plus Tom Tomorrow’s comic

8 ICYMI News you may have missed in the past week

FOOD + DRINK

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MUSIC 45 Here comes trouble

Folk singer Ray LaMontagne feels groovy about his new album and tour

33 Off-road Bem Bom makes the successful transformation from food truck to must-stop restaurant

45 Picks This Week

33 Tip Jar

47 Are friends electric

Great live music rattles Orlando every night of the week

Kokino closes, Hunger Street serves weekly omakase at the Heavy, plus more in our weekly food news roundup

11 Informed Dissent Fear of a brown planet

13 The Beer Issue Our annual guide to the state of suds and our own Orlando Beer Festival

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Synthwave queens Nina and Parallels redefine nostalgia

49 This Little Underground The goth commodification of Pale Waves; the stunning debut of should-be star Miya Folick; the perennial party of Yelle

37 Recently Reviewed Short takes on restaurants we’ve reviewed recently

Orlando Weekly is published every week by Euclid Media Group Orlando Distribution Orlando Weekly is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Copyright notice: The entire contents of Orlando Weekly are copyright 2018 by Euclid Media Group LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Publisher does not assume any liability for unsolicited manuscripts, materials, or other content. Any submission must include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. All editorial, advertising, and business correspondence should be mailed to the address listed above. Subscriptions: Additional copies or back issues may be purchased at the Orlando Weekly offices for $1. Six-month domestic subscriptions may be purchased for $75; one-year subscriptions for $125. Periodical Postage Pending at Orlando, FL POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ORLANDO WEEKLY 16 W. Pine St. Orlando, FL 32801.

ARTS + CULTURE

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29 Live Active Cultures Skeptic converted to believer: Acoustic theater Steinmetz Hall is slowly but surely taking shape at the Dr. Phillips Center

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FILM

CALENDAR 50 Selections 52 The Week 53 Down the Road

41 Cine-mitzvah The Jewish Film Festival is more necessary than ever

43 On Screens in Orlando

Back Pages

Movies playing this week: The Girl in the Spider’s Web, The Grinch and more

62 Savage Love 62 Gimme Shelter 63 Classifieds

43 Film listings Cinema-oriented events to go see this week

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Readers react to blog posts and stories from the Oct. 31 issue.

comparable to mass shooting and requires a very different solution. On Nov. 1, we reported that Republican Gov.

On Nov. 1, we reported on a billboard designed by the father of a Parkland victim that takes aim at Florida’s gun laws. The sign, installed outside a Boston parking garage, bears a photo of 17-year-old Joaquin Oliver, one of the 17 students and teachers shot to death earlier this year at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. “If I had attended high school in Massachusetts instead of Parkland, Florida, I would likely be alive today,” the billboard reads. “GUN LAWS SAVES LIVES.”

Rick Scott walked away when asked to

@Mary Ann Stoddart-Summers His parents are true icons to me. So brave and committed. I live one mile from Stoneman and this young man had such potential.

in this state, does he?

@Frank D’Aprile III If gun laws save lives, why do 50 people get shot in Chicago almost every weekend? @Michael Fallik This is literally the only response gun nuts have. Chicago! Chicago! Chicago! … Chicago gun violence is not random. It is gang violence. That makes it not

comment on President Donald Trump’s latest brainworm – the president’s intention to sign an executive order ending birthright citizenship to children born in the United States. A spokesperson for Scott’s campaign later claimed the governor didn’t hear the question. @Janet Ivey Of course he did. He certainly doesn’t care about Russian babies being born

@Rey Rodriguez Of course they don’t want to answer unscripted questions. @Charla Childers Tight squeeze between that rock and that hard place, isn’t it? You need the Nutbag-in-Chief to support you but if you show too much outward support, you could lose the handful of voters who might help you win in this tight, tight race.

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BY MONIVETTE CORDEIRO

Floridians (hopefully) elected a new governor, the Pulse memorial and museum gets tax dollars, Feds cause long lines at Orlando immigration court and other news you may have missed last week. »

Someone just became Florida’s new governor, though we don’t know who: Because Orlando Weekly goes to press Mondays and hits stands on Wednesdays, as we write this we have no idea whether Democratic nominee Andrew Gillum or Republican nominee Ron DeSantis won the governor’s race in Tuesday’s general election, or the outcome of any other political race for that matter. We’re keeping our fingers crossed that Floridians at least chose someone, and we’re not in the middle of a full-on state recount à la Bush v. Gore. And we hope all who could vote had the chance to do so and let their voices be heard.

»

OnePulse Foundation awarded up to $10 million for a permanent Pulse memorial: Orange County commissioners unanimously approved the use of $10 million in tourist tax revenues for the OnePulse Foundation, which is in charge of creating and building a museum and memorial at Pulse. Two years ago, a shooter killed 49 people and injured dozens at the gay nightclub. The funding will be used to acquire land and create designs for a proposed museum. “This will be a sacred space that will tell the story of Pulse and our 49 angels, while ensuring future generations learn from the detrimental impact of hate, bigotry, discrimination and intolerance,” Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs said in a statement. “We will never forget the 49 angels we lost or the impact this tragedy had on everyone in our region, especially our LGBTQ, Latinx and Hispanic communities. This museum sends a clear message that hate will not win and love will always prevail.”

»

Roughly 100 people gather at Orlando immigration court because ICE agents gave them fake hearing dates: About 100 people stood in a line that snaked around Orlando’s immigration court last week after local attorneys say U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials issued false court dates to immigrants. People standing in line had been told they were supposed to be at the courthouse off Maguire Boulevard on Oct. 31 for a hearing on their case, but for many, that hearing was never scheduled on the docket, says John Gihon, an immigration attorney with the firm Shorstein, Lasnetski, & Gihon. Gihon explains that ICE and other agencies within the U.S. Department of Homeland Security are scheduling “fake dates” in order to comply with a recent ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court regarding notices to appear, also known as NTAs. In a joint statement, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Justice say they are “working through minor logistical errors that resulted in a number of individuals appearing for immigration court hearings that were not docketed in accordance with regulatory requirements. These errors will be resolved and will not prevent these cases from being docketed properly in a timely fashion.”

»

Metro Orlando needs plan to address ongoing Puerto Rican exodus, new United Way report says: The metro Orlando area still needs a plan to address the ongoing Puerto Rican exodus to Central Florida, especially after Hurricane María, according to a new report from the United Way. The number of people leaving the U.S. territory is predicted to exceed 200,000 by the end of this year, according to a report from researchers at the University of Central Florida that was highlighted at a Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Metro Orlando event. The people who evacuated the island after the catastrophic storm are mostly women (79 percent) coming with extended families that include children and older relatives. An estimated 40 percent of those with jobs expected to earn less than $20,000 annually.

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ILLUSTRATION BY CLAY JONES

FEAR OF A BROWN PLANET The closing days of the 2018 midterm elections portend an ominous final two years of Trump’s term as president BY J EFFREY C. BI L L M A N

By the time you read this, the votes

will have been cast and, barring a recount, the victors declared. So I don’t know whether Democrats claimed the House, or whether Andrew Gillum is governorelect, or whether Bill Nelson retained his Senate seat. I don’t know whether Brian Kemp’s blatant attempts at voter suppression paid off in Georgia, or whether Beto O’Rourke pulled off a stunner in Texas, or whether the white nationalist Steve King hung on in Iowa. I don’t know what the Wednesday-morning spin is – that Democrats blew a golden opportunity, or that President Trump’s unpopularity led to a blue wave, or that a split decision will render Washington even more dysfunctional as the political universe turns its eyes to 2020. I can guess at the state of the world we’re waking up to, though – Dems take the House, Republicans keep the Senate, Gillum and Nelson win, Trump declares that he alone saved his party from annihilation – but so much lingers in the margin of error that it’s impossible to feel any sense of certainty on Monday as this column goes to press, especially with so much at stake.

I do know, however, that this election shouldn’t be this close: While the party in power typically loses seats in the midterms, it usually isn’t staring down a wipeout with 50-year-low unemployment. And I also know that, whatever happened Tuesday, Trump’s closing pitch should send a shiver down your spine. There’s no optimism, no Reaganesque sense that sunny days are here again. Instead, it’s fear – fear of a white power structure on the wane, fear of the more diverse rising generation, fear of a brown planet. In many respects, this has been Trump’s M.O. since he came down the Trump Tower elevator in 2015 to announce his campaign. His appeal to older, less-educated white men has always been rooted in white anxiety, from his birtherism to his campaign attacks on a Mexican judge and the parents of a fallen Muslim soldier to the travel ban, his remark about “shithole countries” in Africa, and his both-sidesing the violent Charlottesville white supremacist march. Throughout the last three years, what we’ve been calling the president’s dog whistles have begun to sound more and more like bullhorns.

To paraphrase Andrew Gillum, I don’t know whether Donald Trump is a racist, but I do know the racists think he’s a racist. And I also know that, through his words and deeds, he’s given racists succor. Whether that’s based in an ingrained animosity toward minorities or a narcissistic unwillingness to criticize those who praise him – or both – I don’t know, and I’m not sure it matters. What matters, to my mind, is the closing argument the president and his party have been making these last few weeks, and what that portends for the next two years. Over the weekend, Trump’s 2020 campaign released an undeniably racist ad designed to gin up his base – CNN refused to air it, though other stations did – fear-mongering about the so-called caravan of migrants making its way through Mexico. This comes on the heels of Trump tweeting out another racist – and false – ad claiming that Democrats allowed an unapologetic cop-killer into the country. (He entered under George W. Bush’s watch.) And it follows Trump sending some 7,000 troops to the border, where they’ll erect barbed wire and tent concentration camps, and the president threatening to instruct the military shoot anyone who throws a rock (an edict which the Nigerian army promptly used an excuse for killing protesters). Never mind that this caravan “invasion” nonsense is batshit conspiracy-mongering, or that the military deployment is a laughably obvious political stunt. The roughly 3,500 refugees, many women and children – poor, tired, hungry, fleeing conditions we imagine only in nightmares, traveling as a group because there’s safety in numbers – are weeks away from our border, hardly an imminent threat worthy of a military response. They are asylum seekers – a right guaranteed under U.S. and international law – desperate for a better life, not some clear and present danger to American sovereignty, as Trump and Fox News claim. This ad also follows a week of political violence, in which a Trump fanatic allegedly mailed bombs to those the president mocks during his rallies, a racist white man gunned down two black people in Kentucky, and an antiSemite, convinced by Fox News and other information cesspools that George Soros and the Jews were funding the migrants, shot up a Pittsburgh synagogue, killing 11. Whether Trump is responsible for this carnage is debatable. Whether he encouraged it is not. Words, especially from the biggest bully pulpit in the world, have consequences. And yet, even in the face of this violence and unrest, the president chose not to be conciliatory or to tone down his rhetoric. Instead, he stuck with the one that brought him – intentionally divisive, racially charged politics designed to rile up his core supporters. And if that inspires a few maniacs, so be it. Even more disconcerting is this: This is how the president acts with a booming economy and GOP control of government. Imagine how the next two years will look. What if there’s a recession in 2020, as some analysts predict? What if an energized Democratic House, armed with subpoena power, pulls back the veil on the administration’s wanton corruption? What if Robert Mueller seeks to force the president to testify before a grand jury on obstruction or collusion? What will he say then? The president’s default, when hit with the slightest speedbump, has been to revert to racial appeals. There are a lot more speedbumps on the way, along with a presidential election and a mass of Democratic candidates hammering away at the president’s fragile ego. Do you think any of this is going to get better?

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Every cloud has a silver lining

The upside of climate change? Florida farmers can now grow barley and hops year-round to brew a true Florida beer

A handful of hops grown in Florida PHOTO BY MATT ROBERTS

BY PAUL BRIN KMANN

Q

uick, imagine the aroma and taste of a beer made with ingredients grown only in Florida. If your first thoughts are sunscreen, swamp water or eau de T-shirt shop, we’ll forgive you. Seriously, though, the local craft brew industry is experimenting with local ingredients, and the outlook is promising. A Zellwood nursery is growing a regular crop of hops now, and Charles Barrett, a University of Florida researcher, recently grew a batch of barley at a UF farm east of Tallahassee. Using those ingredients, Hourglass Brewing in Longwood produced a 5-gallon batch of an unnamed but

very Florida beer for the recent Florida Brewers Conference in September, held in the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld. It is believed to be the first beer ever brewed with the major ingredients – barley and hops – grown in Florida. “We were worried it would be too low in alcohol, but it wound up being almost 9 percent,” says Matthew Gemmell, one of two head brewers at Hourglass. “And the flavors wound up really nice.” He says he was thinking along the lines of orange groves, cypress, sea breezes and crystalline spring water for inspiration, which truly are abundant Florida resources. Also at the tasting event was Greg

but they are aiming to do it some time in winter of 2019. Barrett is trying to make sure there’s a good grain crop for the next attempt, Gemmell says. Besides ongoing trends supporting local food sourcing and craft brewing, the drive to grow beer ingredients in Florida is, oddly enough, a result of climate change. Climate change has made it more possible to grow hops and barley in Florida for two reasons. First, there’s a bigger risk of drought in northern agriculture centers like Washington state’s Yakima Valley, which is where the vast majority of U.S. hops are grown. Second, warmer winters overall mean less risk of a freeze in Florida.

Piecora, owner of Wops Hops Brewing in Sanford. He says he liked the unnamed “very Florida beer.” “If you put ingredients in the hands of a good brewer, you can get the flavor you want,” Piecora says. “It wasn’t necessarily a Florida flavor, but it was the right flavor for those particular Florida ingredients.” Either way, Florida’s craft brewing industry is well on its way to developing a truly locavore sudsy mug. The only notfrom-Florida ingredient in Hourglass’s native brew was the yeast, but they plan to brew another batch using airborne or native yeast – a process known as spontaneous fermentation. Gemmell and his co-head brewer, Michael Delancett, didn’t have time to make that happen this year,

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The Roberts family has grown

A row of hops plants in Zellwood PHOTO BY RICHARD SMITH

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

As of June 30 this year, there

were 6,655 active breweries in the U.S., up from 5,562 the prior year. An estimated 2,500 to 3,000 breweries were in planning, based on active Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau licenses, according to the Boulder, Colorado-based Brewers Association. But the pace of growth has shown signs of slowing in the past couple years, particularly in overall sales volume. Nationally, sales growth slowed to 5 percent in 2017 after double-digit increases for several years, the association says. That suggests the national appetite for craft brew is closer to being satisfied. Then there’s Florida. The craft brew scene was slower to heat up here, particularly in the Orlando area. Central Florida started catching up to the national trend in the past three years. Craft brewing most recently found a home in Sanford, where you can sample craft brew at half a dozen spots within a few blocks downtown. At the same time, climate change has prompted serious worry among hops growers and grain farmers. A Western drought in 2015 challenged hops growers. Leading breweries signed a “climate declaration” to call attention to the specific risks and opportunities of climate change on the beer industry.

Previous attempts to grow hops in Florida yielded only about a quarter of a pound per plant. Roberts got about a pound per plant and was happy. Up north they get six to seven pounds per plant. “We have no idea how long we’re going to be able to use the same plant yet. If we get two crops per year, that will help a lot with the money equation, and in terms of competing with the northern growers,” he says. “Regionally, I think there is a chance to help fill in from the national scare on climate change and drought,” Roberts says. Ultimately the biggest selling point for local hops and barley, hopefully, will be taste. “The consumer would have a different experience with these hops than with hops grown in Yakima, for example, especially if they are used when fresh, which we call a wet hop brew,” Smith says. “Local hops, like grapes, are known for regional quality difference,” he adds. It’s a concept known in wine and brewing as terroir, a French word to describe all the environmental factors that affect a crop’s flavor and character. Smith plans to be at the 2018 Orlando Beer Festival with a keg of beer brewed with Florida hops, as well as seedling hops plants from Roberts’ farm.

ferns and foliage in Zellwood for years. Recently Matt Roberts decided to try out some of Smith’s research on a bigger scale and plant a hop crop. In July, about 100 people showed up for a “you pick” event for the first crop. “I want to keep it as local as possible, if we have enough breweries here in Central Florida to supply,” Roberts says. “So far it’s going really well. I also hear from several local homebrewers every day.” One hurdle to growing hops in Florida is the length of daylight during the summer, which is actually shorter in Florida than up north because of the angle of the earth as it tips toward the sun. To address that issue, Roberts and Smith decided to use bright halide lighting around the perimeter of the three-quarter-acre plot dedicated to the hops vines. With a few extra hours of light, the hops produced significantly more blooms. One of the crop’s biggest problems – powdery mildew – hasn’t shown up yet, he says. But he did have a problem with spider mites. “We used a mostly organic pesticide, neem oil, to disrupt the mites,” he says. The farm now has 600 hops plants, about half of which are the common Cascade variety. The other half is a mix of 11 varieties, and two of them didn’t perform well.

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“Warmer temperatures and extreme weather events are harming the production of hops,” the declaration said. “Rising demand and lower yields have driven the price of hops up by more than 250 percent over the past decade. Clean water resources, another key ingredient, are also becoming scarcer in the West as a result of climate-related droughts and reduced snowpack.” Due to those concerns, as well as the desire to advertise local origins on everything from meat to beer to vegetables, hops growing has started to diversify and move into different states that hadn’t seen significant hops crops for decades. Many local farmers are not yet aware of the demand for grain and hops coming from local microbreweries, says Richard Smith, a former researcher with University of Florida who recently started his own company, Florida Hops LLC. He’s been studying which kinds of hops grow best in the state’s sandy soil, sweltering summers and mild winters. Grains to make alcohol are more challenging, he says, because they generally don’t do well in tropical conditions. Currently in Florida some grain is grown, but it is mostly used for animal feed. “Farmers could make two or three times as much money growing barley for sale to local brewers, rather than animal feed, if they started growing it,” Smith says. “Many of them have all the equipment they need.”

Beer made with locally grown hops PHOTO COURTESY OF BOWIGEN BEER CO.

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Anything you can brew she can brew better Women brewers are making waves – and tasty beverages – in Central Florida’s craft-beer scene

BY XANDER P ETERS

I

s the craft beer industry – which, today, accounts for 23 percent of the more than $111 billion U.S. beer market, according to the Brewers Association – a boys’ club? No surprise: The short answer to that question is yes. In fact, a study by Auburn University found that women make up just 29 percent of brewery employees nationwide. Meanwhile, further up the suds-making hierarchy, only 4 percent of women work as head brewers in an industry that, in its original form, was spearheaded by women. In ancient Egypt, women were almost solely in charge of beer production and sales. And somewhat more recently, when what would later become the United States was initially colonized, women worked as the primary brewers. In other words, this wasn’t a so-called man’s world until roughly 150 years ago. Taking back the inherently feminine tradition, however, are local women brewers like Jeanna Malines, head brewer and co-owner of Black Cauldron Brewing in Parramore. Malines says she and her husband took up home brewing when they first met in 2010. Like most beginner brewers, their first operation took shape in their garage. But as it turned out, Malines was in the right spot at the right time, when Central

Florida’s brew scene began to rapidly expand around 2014. “Five years ago, there were just a handful of breweries, maybe three,” Malines says. “Now, there’s almost 30.” The same, however, can’t be said of local women in brewing. “By and large, we’re definitely a minority,” says Sarah Nich, a brewer at Wop’s Hops Brewing in Sanford. “If you go to some cities that already have more established brewing communities, you’re going to find more women there. … But Florida’s already probably around 15 years behind the rest of the beer scene in the U.S.” Nich notes, though, that since she began brewing early last year, she’s noticed a growing amount of women coming forward to learn the trade, becoming assistant brewers. By her estimation, the female brewer population in Orlando has tripled in almost two years. The formation of Florida chapters by national organizations, such as the Pink Boots Society, the nation’s largest women in beer group, have played a part in the slowgrowing demographic shift. According to the Pink Boots website, their mission is “to assist, inspire and encourage women beer industry professionals to advance their careers through education.” The Pink Boots Society isn’t alone. On

Jeanna Malines of Broken Cauldron

women in,” Nich says. “It’s been the consumer that’s given us more of an issue. I blame that on macro beer mass marketing. It’s always been marketed towards men, and the population really isn’t in the right mindset to accept women as the people making their beer.” She qualifies that: “Currently. But the industry can never hurt from having more diversity, whether that’s gender or race or any kind of orientation.” The righteous sexiness of breaking down gender barriers aside, Malines says the brewing industry isn’t as fun-filled as some folks might assume. “Yeah, it looks glamorous,” Malines says, laughing. “But really you’re just a janitor. You’re a janitor covered in beer, rarely drinking.” For those interested in learning the art of turning hops and grains into a drinkable buzz, Malines recommends joining a home brew club, as she did. “The best thing to do, honestly, if there’s any women out there that want to get into the brewing industry, is to just start talking to other women that are in it, find out who’s looking for help. It varies from brewery to brewery to brewery, but a lot of times breweries are looking for an extra pair of hands on a brew day,” Malines says. After all, that’s how the ancient Egyptian women learned – elbow to elbow.

the local level, female-oriented beer social clubs around town include groups like Girls Pint Out, an “all-female organization that promotes solidarity between beer drinkers of the fairer sex,” according to the group’s website. Erika Chavez, the Pink Boots Society’s Florida chapter leader, calls the group a “celebration of women” in the beer-brewing industry. “We try to give as much education as possible to the women in this industry, to empower them, and to give them the best chance they can to be successful,” Chavez says. “We try to meet as much as possible, and during those meetings we always want to have an education component.” Chavez adds: “So it’s about having women talk about what they’re doing, and how we can share as much knowledge with each other about what we’re doing in our respective breweries, to make sure everybody is having new conversations.” Part of the difference in the numbers of women and men working in brewing could be traced back to socialization. According to a survey by the Brewers Association, women consume just 25 percent of all craft beer in the country. That could mean fewer women develop a palate for heavier traditional brews, like stouts, sours or barleywines, which Malines prefers. “I’ve never had an issue with members of the brewing community welcoming

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Roll out the barrel Theme park watering holes boast E-Ticket brews you won’t find in any ordinary bar

PHOTO BY ROB BARTLETT

BY SETH KUBERSKY

E

veryone knows that Walt Disney famously eschewed alcohol sales when opening his original theme park in Anaheim, for fear that Disneyland would become a fairground full of drunken delinquents. But did you know that Walt Disney World might have been built in St. Louis instead of Central Florida, if brewing baron August Busch Jr. hadn’t called Walt crazy for refusing to serve beer? Walt was no teetotaler, but he could always sneak off to his private apartment above Main Street’s firehouse for a Scotch Mist, and he certainly never had to stand in a three-hour queue for Flight of Passage while sober. Fortunately, today’s tourists can pound a pint of bright-green Hawke’s Grog Ale (brewed by Terrapin Beer Co., and tastier than it looks) while they wait for Animal Kingdom’s Pandora rides, or enjoy any number of other exclusive imbibing experiences inside each of Orlando’s major attractions. Unless you’re an annual passholder, the cover charges may make you choke, but these theme park watering holes boast E-Ticket brews you won’t find in any ordinary bar.

WALT DISNEY WORLD

UNIVERSAL ORLANDO

SEAWORLD

Epcot’s World Showcase has long been ground zero for theme park drinking (our MO is to start with a Black & Tan at the Rose & Crown Pub and stumble ’round counter-clockwise), while Animal Kingdom – in addition to the aforementioned Avatar ales – pours Old Elephant Foot IPA and African lagers at Nomad Lounge. Mickey has loosened the Magic Kingdom’s antialcohol edict, at least inside table-service restaurants, but you still can’t stroll the park sipping suds; Adventureland’s Jungle Navigation Co. Skipper Canteen, which serves the resort-exclusive Kungaloosh Spiced Excursion Ale, is your best bet for beer sans reservations. And a year from now, we’ll all be drinking fermented Bantha milk inside Batuu, but until then BaseLine Tap House (located just outside the upcoming Star Wars land’s entrance) is the hottest hangout at Disney’s Hollywood Studios; select your own four-sample flight of Californian craft beers, pair it with a hot Bavarian pretzel, and watch for the Jedi fanboys to start lining up. If park admission isn’t in your budget, park for free at Disney Springs’ Lime garage and settle in at the Polite Pig, which is pouring Cask & Larder Ales and Porters brewed by Larry Foor inside the Ravenous Pig.

Harry Potter’s Butterbeer might not give you a buzz, but the Hogwarts Express train ride that connects his two Wizarding World areas inside Universal Studios Florida and Islands of Adventure is the most beerfriendly theme park attraction we know of. Not only will they sell you a brew in the queue, but they’ll let you drink it during the ride; we recommend grabbing a Wizard’s Brew chocolate stout from Diagon Alley’s Hopping Pot before hopping in line. USF’s Simpsons-inspired Springfield is home to Moe’s Tavern and Duff Brewery, where the seasonal Dufftoberfest märzenbier is currently on tap. Volcano Bay’s signature Volcano Blossom fruity pilsner is brewed locally by Orange Blossom Brewery. Outside the parks, the fermentation tanks in CityWalk’s NBC Sports Grill & Brew are fake, but Florida Beer Co.’s 862 IPA is only available here; ask what’s in the bar’s Beer Engine hand-pumped firkin. And serious beer enthusiasts should sign up for Jake’s Beer Dinners at the Royal Pacific Resort, multi-course paired meals highlighting craft breweries from Abita to Walking Tree. The next events are Dec. 7 and Dec. 31.

SeaWorld was known as a suds-seeker’s paradise during the Anheuser-Busch ownership era, back when the Budweiser Clydesdales were as much mascots of the park as Shamu. The attraction’s brand suffered badly in the wake of Blackfish, but has rebounded recently, buoyed in no small part by beer-based promotions. It began with the return of free beer (featuring the parkexclusive Mako Red Lager) at Mama’s Pretzel Kitchen over the summer. The recently opened Waterway Grill, located alongside the brand-new Infinity Falls raft ride, pours Motorworks Brewing’s Midnight Espresso Porter, plus a dozen more rotating craft beers; annual passholders should ask about the refillable stein program. Finally, this summer’s first-ever SeaWorld Craft Beer Festival, offering samples of more than 100 drafts from local breweries like Crooked Can and Orlando Brewing, has been a success; it wraps up this weekend on Sunday, Nov. 11.

Beer Issue • orlandoweekly.com

skubersky@orlandoweekly.com

NOV. 7-13, 2018 ● ORLANDO WEEKLY

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We still love beer Orlando Beer Festival captures the magic of beer season

BY T HADDEUS MCCOL LU M

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t’s been said that in the fall, a person’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of hops. Or if it hasn’t, someone should have said it by now. The slightly cooler temperatures and less oppressive angle of sunlight, along with all of the vestigial indicators of the harvest season (lookin’ at you, decorative gourds) create the perfect milieu in which to appreciate civilization’s yardstick: beer. The Orlando Beer Festival, produced by yours truly, is the perfect opportunity to take advantage of that cosmic alignment. With multiple varieties of beer from more than 50 different breweries, your refined beer-tasting palate won’t be able to keep up. The slate this year includes local favorites like Ellipsis, Cask & Larder, Hourglass and Crooked Can, along with several breweries from across the state and country. It’s a pretty representative sampling of what the craft beer industry looks like in the U.S. in 2018. In fact, the only import represented at the festival is Guinness, and aren’t

ORLANDO BEER FESTIVAL they just a classic? While you’re welcome to string your own pretzel necklace to bring in with you, we’ve delegated the curation of the food truck pod to A Lo Cubano Kitchen, and they’ve assembled a group of trucks that covers everything from cheesesteaks (Lee’s Famous Cheesesteaks & Wings) to poke bowls (PokeKai) to doughnuts (Donut Central) to, well, even bigger pretzels (Amish Pretzel Shop). Plus, in an effort to relieve the line crush of previous years, the food truck area will be open to General Admission ticketholders beforehand, letting you get there early and grab lunch before the gates open for beer sampling at 2 p.m. VIP ticketholders, who get to access the beer tent area at 12:30 p.m., can browse the food trucks whenever they please. And even though we think our beer selection is second to none as far as area beer festivals go, we’ve worked hard to provide a myriad of other things to do to keep

12:30-5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10 Festival Park, 2911 E. Robinson St. orlandobeerfestival.com $40-$80

up early for those, as there’s limited seating. Of course, if you plan on taking advantage of everything we have to offer, you’ll want to spring for the VIP ticket. In addition to all of the beer samples and activities, you get exclusive access to a covered VIP area with – wonder of wonders – tables and chairs for you to rest at. You’ll also get access to VIP-only restrooms – you know why – and the Banyan Reserve cocktail zone, the only place at the festival to get a craft cocktail. Plus, you get to go home with a swag bag with a commemorative T-shirt and etched glass to add a little definition to the fuzzy memories you’ll Lyft home with. Seriously, guys, use a Lyft or an Uber. There’s no shame in being here for both a good time and a long time.

your mind and body engaged (so you don’t have to leave early to go have a beer nap). The music stage this year features local favorites like Kaleigh Baker’s Someday Honey, along with Joseph and Jessy Lynn Martens’ JUNOsmile performing covers of their favorite songs – because everyone knows music is better at a beer festival when you can sing along to it. The adult playzone features a big-screen broadcast of the day’s college football games, along with interactive inflatables and giant-size bar games. And Team Vision Dojo is setting up a full-size wrestling ring for a high-flying throwdown. Those who prefer grapes to grain can hang out at the Maxine’s on Shine Wine Tasting Experience. Or you can take advantage of Publix Aprons Cooking School’s beer pairing demonstrations. Sign

Beer Issue • orlandoweekly.com

tmccollum@orlandoweekly.com ●

NOV. 7-13, 2018 ● ORLANDO WEEKLY

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OBF GUIDE 2018

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BY SETH KUBERSKY STEINMETZ HALL UNDER CONSTRUCTION | PHOTO BY BRYAN SODERLIND, COURTESY OF DR. PHILLIPS CENTER

In Disney theme park parlance,

“Phase 2” refers to a major element of an ambitious overall project that is postponed from the original opening, but promised to appear at a later date. More often than not, such second acts are either significantly scaled back (see Sunset Boulevard at Hollywood Studios, which was supposed to include Dick Tracy and Roger Rabbit rides) or scrapped entirely, like Beastly Kingdom, Animal Kingdom’s lost land. So when the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts first announced that Steinmetz Hall, the acoustical venue promised alongside the wired-for-sound Walt Disney Theater, would be pushed back until 2020, I was fearful that the performing arts center’s lopsided facade would never be fully fleshed out. Well, now that I’ve walked the construction site and seen firsthand the massive undertaking that’s underway, I can say I’ve been converted from skeptic to believer. Last Friday morning, I was part of a small group of media led on a hard-hat construction tour of the concrete and scaffolding that will someday be one of the most acoustically perfect spaces on the planet. Brett Gelbert, an onsite owner’s representative for the Projects Group, brought us into the heart of the active worksite and face-to-face with the massive steel skeleton that will soon support the room’s signature sound shell. This 700,000-pound structure will slide back and forth on railroad tracks, accompanied by proscenium towers that glide on hovercraft, to transform the “multiform” theater for orchestra or opera. Next, we looked down from a dizzying height into the basement – dubbed “the bathtub” by the construction team for the way it accumulates rainwater while the roof is still under construction – where massive

Skeptic converted to believer: Acoustic theater Steinmetz Hall is slowly but surely taking shape at the Dr. Phillips Center motors will allow the floor to flip and pivot from flat dance floor into tiers of elevated seating, with the chairs stowing invisibly underneath. Finally, we climbed below the future stage to peek at the hidden secret that will make the room perfectly silent even if an amplified Broadway singer is belting next door: The entire structure sits on top of 437 rubber and steel isolation pads “that will tension the building to take out any tuning effect and keep out all outside vibrations,” according to Gelbert, making it “a building within a building.” Our construction tour came at the climax of a morning of media previews for the Dr. Phillips Center’s 2018-2019 season and beyond, which began with a preview of this year’s holiday lineup, headlined by Irving Berlin’s White Christmas and Jane Lynch’s A Swinging Little Christmas. (Lynch will appear live; Berlin, being dead, will not.) CEO Kathy Ramsberger shared some positive statistics on the Center’s financial performance – $200 million in local economic impact and a net profit of over $700,000 for the 2017/2018 season – along with a candid acknowledgment that their initial education offerings overlapped with other local programs. And in a few weeks, Dr. Phillips will begin an innovative clinic study conducted by Florida Hospital that seeks to quantify the benefits of acting classes for Level 4 Alzheimer’s patients.

All that is great, but what you’re really wondering is, “When and how can I get Hamilton tickets?” Subscription sales ended over a year ago, and while no singleseat sales date has been announced for the megahit’s Orlando visit from Jan. 22 to Feb. 10, 2019, we’ve been promised one week’s notice before the box office opens. In the meantime: Set up your drphillipscenter. org account with payment info in advance; make a list of your available dates; and be prepared to join the virtual waiting room 15 to 30 minutes before sales start. Don’t try purchasing in person or over the phone; don’t bother logging in at 3 a.m. (everyone queued before sales begin will have the same odds of random selection); and don’t buy tickets currently listed by resellers – they’re nothing but expensive IOUs. There won’t be any discounts or group sales, and purchases will be limited to four per person, but the daily $10 Ham4Ham lottery should be available via luckyseat.com and the official Hamilton app. While there’s still a massive amount of work to be done in the 18-odd months before Steinmetz Hall’s projected 2020 debut, witnessing the 250-plus crew members who are working daily to build it bolstered my faith in Gelbert’s assurances that progress is on schedule. However, it’s another project Ramsberger mentioned that really piques my interest: Rather than build the planned hotel and commercial building on Dr. Phillips’ front lawn, they are working with landscape architects OJB to completely revisit their concept for the nine-acre plot with the intent of “giving it back to the community.” It would be a perfect opportunity to build the accessible public performance space that Orlando’s emerging artists so desperately need. skubersky@orlandoweekly.com orlandoweekly.com

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tip jar

[ food + drink ]

OFF-ROAD

PHOTOS BY ROB BARTLETT

Bem Bom makes the successful transformation from food truck to must-stop restaurant BY FAIYAZ KARA

F

ollowing in the tire tracks of Joe then grilled over hot coals, is colonial fusion and David Creech (Hunger Street at its best and its succulence is unmatched. Tacos), Thomas Ward (Pig Floyd’s), But if you’re expecting a piri piri sauce akin and Fernando and John Collazo (Bad As’s to the one served at global chicken chain Sandwich), Francisco “Chico” Mendonça Nando’s, know that Bem Bom’s is a lot more not only went brick-and-mortar with his vinegary. On one occasion, the piri piri sauce never mobile food operation, but his Audubon Park restaurant – Bem Bom on Corrine – materialized, and we really had no problem is generating the same sort of buzz that with that. We gladly greased up our digits made destinations out of the others. It’s a tearing into the chicken and picking at sure sign of our city’s gastronomic health – the truffle-y fries, so much so that the barcode label still adhered not the opposite, as some to a wedge of lemon wrongly claim – when almost went unnoticed. food truck operators BEM BOM ON CORRINE Bem Bom’s servers, it get into the restaurant 3101 Corrine Drive seems, are still findgame. It’s merely a con407-960-5101 ing their bearings version of kinetic energy bembomfood.com – some appear wellto potential energy and, $$$ informed and in the case of Bem Bom seasoned; others (Portuguese for “very good”), the potential is contained within pay no notice when drink glasses sit empty, or feel napkins are a gratuthe sweltering confines of its kitchen. There, Portuguese and Mexican dishes, itous privilege. It’s all good, though much like the ones Mendonça fashioned – getting our hands dirty chomping at Winter Park’s Cocina 214 many years into a lamb burger ($13.95) ground to ago, are fired up – dishes like the famous order, with feta and a pepper relish, or frango de churrasco (or barbecued chicken) carnitas tacos ($10.95) with fiery salsa done in the piri piri ($11.95) style. The de arbol, brought an enjoyably messy intichicken, marinated in a sauce made from macy to the meal. But it’s in the daily specials where the African bird’s-eye chili pepper (piri piri)

Mendonça, who grew up in the Azores, really showcases the fare of his native Portugal. There’s the dense and porky grilled chouriço ($15), a filling sausage served with three sauces: piri piri with a swirl of mustard, a sweet pineapple salsa, and a smoky salsa pasilla with a burn that arrives later than sooner. Eating it with shreds of rustic pão da avó (literally “grandmother’s bread”) under an umbrella on the inviting patio amid the sounds of sputtering Vespas and foreign tongues lent a very European flair to our meal, and that’s hard to come by in this town. More specials we relished al fresco? A refined center-cut salted cod ($28) topped with caramelized onions and peppers drizzled in Portuguese olive oil and served with punched potatoes was simply magnificent. Carne asada ($28) with chimichurri was just as superb – you’d be hard-pressed to find a more tender grilled skirt steak in this town. It comes with rice and beans, though our server insisted we order the “Bomb” ($6) – fries mixed with Thai basil, Thai chilies, truffle oil and shaved ParmigianoReggiano. Enjoy it all with a glass or two of Ánnosa ($7), a Mexican-style lager brewed specially for Bem Bom by neighbors Redlight Redlight. In the coming weeks, new items will be introduced to the menu: Portuguese pork butt sandwiches; grilled sardines with cabbage curtido; and pastel de bacalhau, or cod baked in puff pastry tarts, to name just a few. After enduring 33 months of struggles and budget overruns just to get their restaurant open, Mendonça and co-owner A.J. Campofiore have shown a resolute commitment to seeing their vision through, no matter the cost. It’s clear Bem Bom’s eats will be of the authentic – not diluted – kind and that’s, well, bem bom.

BY FAIYAZ KARA OPENINGS Sushi Pop will open its Winter Park restaurant at 115 E. Lyman Ave. at the end of this month or in early December. Chef-owner Chau Trinh says Sushi Pop will be open seven days a week, but the restaurant will transform into Chauhaus – a pop-up of sorts serving pho, rice bowls and noodle bowls – Wednesdays through Sundays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Then, from 3-5 p.m., Chauhaus will offer various small plates ranging from spring and summer rolls to chicken wings and poke before dinner service as Sushi Pop … Cookie Dough Bliss will open its first Orlando location in Altamonte Springs next to the Crepevine in the Village Shoppes in the coming weeks … Grato Italian Grill & Pizzeria has opened on Lake Mary Boulevard near Rinehart Road.

CLOSINGS Kokino Restaurant on Turkey Lake Road in Dr. Phillips has closed.

NEWS Hunger Street Tacos will stage weekly Mexican omakases starting Friday, Nov. 9, at the Heavy in Winter Park. There will be two seatings – one at 5:30 and one at 8:30 p.m. – for 12 people each.

EVENTS Yellow Dog Eats celebrates their 20th anniversary – a big achievement in the restaurant world – at their Gotha location on Saturday, Nov. 10. The dog- and kid-friendly celebration goes from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; $20 buys you a plate with two proteins, two sides and two glasses of beer or wine … The 4th annual Orlando Beer Festival takes place Saturday, Nov. 10, from 2-5 p.m. at Orlando Festival Park. More than 200 craft brews will be poured. Cost is $40; $75 VIP … The 19th annual Taste of Orlando also happens Nov. 10, kicking off at 11 a.m. at Waterford Lakes Town Center. Cost is $15 … And also on Nov. 10, chef Hari Pulapaka will hold a “Classic Indian” cooking class at Cress Restaurant in DeLand at 10 a.m. Cost is $90 … Digress Wine and the Ravenous Pig collaborate on a four-course Beaujolais wine dinner Sunday, Nov. 11, at the Pig. A tablier de sapeur (look it up) will be served. Seats are $100 … Speaking of Beaujolais, Beaujolais Nouveau Day is Thursday, Nov. 15, and both Bites & Bubbles and the Swirlery will stage celebrations. Got restaurant dish? Send tips to dining@orlandoweekly.com

fkara@orlandoweekly.com

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NEW LUXURY COMMUNITY

OFFERS RESORT-STYLE LIVING AT HOME Solstice Apartment Homes takes rental living to the next level with gorgeous apartments and one-of-a-kind amenities.

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C

entral Floridians are no strangers to vacation — we’re smack in the middle of one of the largest tourism spots on the globe. Every year hundreds of thousands of people flock to our state to get away from it all, but when you live here year round it’s easy to forget how spectacular Orlando can be. Resorts near the theme parks are tourist-friendly, but Orlando residents deserve resort amenities, too — and now you can have them right at home with Solstice Apartment Homes. This luxury community offers one-of-a-kind statement apartments in the heart of Orlando’s must-see theme park attractions, with easy access to downtown or wherever else your day takes you.

daily basis for all of your latte art needs. borhood is continuing to grow. Multiple outlet stores have made their home in the shopping plaza across the street, Experience Wellness The luxury community also has a real with a Target, Cheesecake Factory, dedication to wellness — you won’t and movie theater hot on the heels need a pricey gym membership when of other retail and dining establishyou’re already living in a home with ments. The neighborhood is becoming top-tier equipment, multiple pools, and more family-friendly with an elemenoutdoor options for a complete workout. tary school in the works, and with an The state-of-the-art gym is filled with I-4 on ramp scheduled for completion brand new Precor machines, a dedicat- mere seconds away from Solstice, ed strength training area and a sepa- you’ll have access to downtown Orrate room complete with a Peloton bike lando, theme parks, and anywhere and equipment for yoga. Swimmers else your daily adventures take you. will feel right at home at Solstice, too: Experience the Ultimate an indoor resistance pool will get your Whether you’re a busy executive who heart pumping, and hot and cold plunge wants a luxury experience under your

Experience the Lifestyle

Solstice Apartment Homes has amenities that you’d be hard pressed to find in any other apartment community in Orlando (or even some of the higher end resorts that tourists flock to every summer).The brand-new construction boasts top-notch finishes, nine-foot ceilings, and some of the largest square footage you’ll find in the area. The use of space in the apartments is phenomenal: the design somehow marries cozy with spacious for an airy feel of a large luxury home, without the overwhelming feeling that sometimes comes with large rooms. Your personal space will have a five-star hotel edge. You’ll also notice how quiet it is — aside from added privacy, the sturdy construction stops those little noises (like creaks, pipes and traffic) that can disrupt your day and affect your sleep. You’ll sleep so well in Solstice Apartment Homes that you’ll never want to sleep anywhere else. Solstice also prides itself on its outstanding customer service. They’ve thought of everything with this community, from pet-friendly amenities (like an on-site dog park and a pet spa) to dedicated lockers for secure, 24-hour package delivery. Spunky yet chic interior design, like green couches harmonizing with gold architectural details, adorn the 24-hour resident lobby. The included kitchen fosters a sense of community as you chat with fellow residents waiting for your cup to brew. Free coffee every morning eliminates the need for that Starbucks run, and within the next few months a barista will be available on a

pools help you recover from your workout and relax at the end of the day. A gorgeous outdoor Infinity pool is perfect for swimming laps or lounging with friends on a sunny day, and Crossfitstyle equipment resembles an outdoor fitness playground for adults. On top of the community’s commitment to physical fun, there are plenty of options for recreation too. A 24-hour game room comes complete with foosball, billiards, and ping pong, and if you’re looking to improve your golf game you can access the building’s digital simulator to work on your swing.

Experience the Neighborhood

Solstice Apartment Homes is located in the heart of Orlando, and the neigh-

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own roof, a theme park employee looking to up your living experience with a few roommates, or a family who wants a great environment for their kids in the heart of Orlando, Solstice Apartment Homes has options for you. If you want to experience the ultimate in Central Florida living, you can find out more on solsticeorlando.com.


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recently reviewed EDITED BY JESSICA BRYCE YOUNG

$$$$ $$$$ $$$$ $$$$

$10 OR LESS

The price range generally reflects the average cost of one dinner entree. Bakeries, ice cream shops, etc. reflect $15-$25 relative cost for one person. Search hundreds more $25 OR MORE reviews at orlandoweekly.com

$10-$15

THE H CUISINE

Turkish steakhouse has a flair for tableside theatrics à la Salt Bae, but there’s no denying the quality cuts and showstopping preparations, be it a 28-day dryaged, bone-in ribeye or luscious “chateau filet” for two finished in a butter-pooled hot plate. Steak tartare blended with bone marrow starts things off in a properly beefy manner, though a salad of goat cheese, walnuts and pomegranate-studded vinaigrette is just as gratifying. Strozzapreti finished inside a flaming Parmesan wheel fuses gusto with gimmick. Don’t overlook the intriguing Turkish desserts. Open daily. 7512 Dr. Phillips Blvd., 407-930-3020; $$$$

LE COQ AU VIN

Venerated restaurant has lost much of its luster over the years, though its menu of classic French cuisine (with dishes that miss the mark more often than not) are still as pricey as ever. Two dishes that are worth a look: the namesake coq au vin and canard done two ways – as a crispy leg confit and a sliced duck breast scented with lavender and honey. Closed Mondays. 4800 S. Orange Ave., 407-851-6980; $$$$

TASTE OF CHENGDU

Sichuan specialties keep things appropriately fiery at this comfy West Colonial Drive restaurant, but it’s the skill of chef-owner Xiong “Tiger” Tang, former executive chef of Zen at the Omni Orlando Resort, that has Chinese food enthusiasts abuzz. What to order? Really, anything – but the pan-fried pompano concealed under a heap of triple chili pepper, peanuts and a five-spice sauce, or the spicy whole lobster hacked and reassembled with its carapace adorned in an alluring mix of chilies, peppercorns, garlic and cilantro are both great places to start. Closed Mondays. 2030 W. Colonial Drive, 407-839-1983; $$$

BIG TIME STREET FOOD

Big Time Street Food shares an interior door with Burton’s, one of Thornton Park’s most popular watering holes, but whether you’re buzzed or not, this food is good. Not just good; it’s loud, brash and ultraextra. The Holy Fried Chicken Sandwich is a sinner’s version of Chick-fil-A’s spicy chicken-on-a-bun, and the Chorizo Montoya burger is edible chef porn: a grilled chorizo patty on top of a regular burger, plus cheese, cubed avocado and fried onions. It’s excessive. It’s cravable. It’s the Cardi B of hangover snacks. 805 E. Washington St., 407-801-5464; $$ CONTINUED ON PAGE 39

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JINYA RAMEN BAR

Decor is minimalist and food comes out fast and piping hot at this Los Angeles-based chain ramen-ya. The signature Jinya Tonkotsu Black ramen, a flavorful pork broth accented by a slick of unctuous fat, is stuffed with nori sheets, tender seared pork belly, a whole seasoned egg, kikurage seaweed and fried garlic – and toothsome noodles, of course. Tokyo curry rice and crispycreamy octopus fritters are also best bets, if you’re going broth-free. 8 N. Summerlin Ave., 407-704-1825; $$

THE NOBLE SMOKESMAN

The Noble Smokesman does a bustling lunch business, and that’s good since they only serve the one meal. We didn’t love the sandwich or the mac & cheese we tried on our first visit, but the three smoked-meat tacos on our second visit knocked our socks off; the Birdhouse (barbecue chicken with smoked tomatillo salsa, pickled onions, cilantro cream and a generous sprinkling of queso fresco) was our favorite. The inch-high mini cakes are also not to be missed. 6925 Lake Ellenor Drive, 407-630-6223; $

SAPORITO ORGANIC BAKERY & KITCHEN

While the restaurant hews to the Slow Food ideology in the kitchen – slower is better, everything from scratch – nothing about the front-of-house service at Saporito was too leisurely. The breads, pizzas and desserts make it clear that there are some master bakers here, and finding a true bacon-egg-and-cheese carbonara is ecstasy-inducing. But what really makes Saporito Organic Bakery & Kitchen special is the owners’ relationships with their customers; this place feels like home. 2759 Old Winter Garden Road, Ocoee, 407-554-2100; $$

CAFÉ LINGER

The impressive culinary credentials of the cooks and owners at this College Park café show up in dishes that are technically proficient. Oh, and they’re very, very good – whether it’s the smoked salmon and avocado tartare, or the grilled octopus over fondant potatoes slicked in a sauce velouté, or delicately crisp branzino laid over arugula and rosemary potatoes anointed with a refined beurre blanc. Yes, Café Linger is bent on redefining coffee culture on Edgewater Drive. 2912 Edgewater Drive, 407-9300473; $$

SHIRAZ HOUSE OF GRILL

Sleek, modern eatery keeps the college crowd gratified with traditional Iranian kebabs and stews, be it a fine presentation of saffron- and citrusmarinated chicken tenderloin kebab, or a smoky dip of eggplant, onion, garlic and whey. Feast like a sultan on the naaderi soltani, a platter graced with a skewer of ultraplush filet mignon and ground beef koobideh. Weekends are highlighted by the presence of braised lamb shank. 688 N. Alafaya Trail, 407-930-6422; $$ n

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[ screens ] CENTRAL FLORIDA JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL Saturday-Monday, Nov. 10-12 Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland and Orlando Science Center, 777 E. Princeton St. enzian.org $12

spirit and talent does shine through. Even better, juicy interviews with Jerry Lewis, Kim Novak and countless other celebs – including Donald Rumsfeld (yes, really) – add some much-needed hipness to a film about the man who practically invented the stuff. Despite its entertainment value, the film is an odd choice for the festival, as it spends only about five minutes discussing his Judaism. Still, Davis’ explanation for his conversion is memorable: “After I had the accident [in which Davis lost his eye], I needed something desperate to hold onto and found myself being more and more convinced that Judaism was it for me. I know that there is sort of a kinship between the plight of the Negro and the plight of the Jew.” The Last Suit (3 ½ stars) is appropriately last, wrapping up the festival at 7 p.m. on Monday. It’s the tale of the final, strange odyssey of Abraham Bursztein, an 88-yearold Holocaust survivor. Directed by Pablo Solarz, the drama is a powerful reminder of the value of long-term friendships and the kindness of strangers. And though a couple of those relationships stretch believability, the film succeeds on both a metaphorical and literal level thanks to clever writing and Miguel Ángel Solá, who gives the festival’s best performance. “Sometimes we old people don’t accept our age, but we don’t want to be a burden for anyone either,” Abraham says before embarking on a journey from Argentina to Poland. “So we’re going to face the time we have left to live with gratitude and joy.” Experiencing that gratitude vicariously through Abraham is a wonderful way to wrap up this year’s festival. Despite these good reviews, you might still be tempted to stay home and eventually seek out the films on a streaming service. But unless Netflix has opened a Jewish deli, you’ll miss the festival’s knishes (baked dough with cheese and spinach), latkes (potato pancakes), holishkes (cabbage rolls with meat), Hebrew National hot dogs and tzimmes (stew of beef, carrots and sweet potatoes). So get your and your mishpocha’s tuchuses to the festival. Don’t make me noodge you again!

ally struggles to balance comedy and drama, this Israeli Academy Award nominee slowly and unexpectedly builds momentum. By the end, expect a punch in the emotional gut. Taking a 180-degree turn in genre and a step up in quality, the festival continues at 2 p.m. on Sunday with Winter Hunt (4 stars). The best of this year’s five features, this German thriller focuses on a young woman who Winter Hunt unexpectedly turns up on the doorstep of a 91-year-old man and his daughter. Yet we soon discover the visit is not random and is instead designed to deliver a shockingly personal act of vengeance. Jewish Film Festival more necessary than ever Grappling with themes of morality, prejudice and self-righteousness, Astrid Schult’s BY C AMERON MEIE R film, at just 75 minutes, is tight as a drum. panish author and philosopher crowd-pleaser thanks to its feel-good glow, But this seemingly small, stagey flick still Miguel de Unamuno wrote, “Racism there’s no halvah-coating the fact that it falls finds time to ask big questions concerning is cured by traveling.” It’s also cured flat both journalistically and cinematically. the nature of the hunter and the hunted. by movies, and if the anti-Semitic lunatic (It’s tough to work up much emotion over And it’s powered by three memorable perwho gunned down 11 Jewish worshippers an anti-climactic, reality-TV-type doc about formances that, despite the extraordinary in Pittsburgh two weeks ago had been reg- wealthy American ballplayers claiming dis- story, are infinitely relatable and humanularly exposed to the type of art at this tant Jewish heritage in order to qualify as istic. Speaking of humanity, wait until you see I year’s Central Florida Jewish Film Festival, “Israeli.”) But if the temptation to see and be seen Have a Message for You (5 stars), the short, perhaps his rampage never would have on opening night is too strong to resist, partially animated documentary accompaoccurred. That might be a bridge too far, but it the good news is the dramatic short that nying Winter Hunt. As does the feature, this doesn’t negate the fact that the Enzian accompanies the feature is stellar. Wig 13-minute, French-language mini-masterTheater’s festival of Jewish film, food and Shop (4 stars), starring Emily Mortimer as piece confronts the legacy of the Holocaust, culture is more necessary than ever. Still, an orthodox Jewish-American woman on but it does so with astonishing unpredictgood intentions are not enough – quality is a uniquely emotional shopping trip, will ability. Director Matan Rochlitz has created equally important. And the movies of the inform, entertain and confound you – all in a masterclass in short-doc moviemaking. Taking another sharp genre pivot, the just 16 minutes. 20th annual event have plenty of that. The festival continues at 11 a.m. on Sunday festival continues on Monday at 4:15 p.m. In observance of the Sabbath, the festival – which is co-presented by the Roth Family at the Enzian with Shoelaces (3 stars), a with Sammy Davis Jr.: I’ve Gotta Be Me (3 Jewish Community Center – kicks off at 8 Hebrew-language look at a unique familial stars), a documentary about the incompap.m. on Saturday, Nov. 10, at the Orlando bond. Having barely seen his special-needs rably talented entertainer. Though it packs Science Center with a documentary about son (Nevo Kimchi) since his birth 36 years in a lot of its subject’s accomplishments, it’s Israel’s unlikely success at the 2017 World ago, a father (Doval’e Glickman) is forced more concerned with showcasing Davis’ Baseball Classic. Heading Home: The Tale of to re-examine their relationship while also indomitable spirit and bravery. It’s occasionTeam Israel (1 ½ stars out of 5) is the only confronting his own past and his attitude ally both jumbled and bland, and places an festival film not at the Enzian, and the only toward people with disabilities. Though it odd emphasis on Davis’ surprising embrace weak offering. Though it will likely be a takes a while to find its footing and occasion- of President Richard Nixon, but Sammy’s

CINE-MITZVAH

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FILM LISTINGS ON SCREENS IN ORLANDO

Batman: Mask of the Phantasm Feature-length animated film from the team behind Batman: The Animated Series. Monday, 2 & 7 pm; multiple locations; $13.31; fathomevents.com. Can You Ever Forgive Me? Melissa McCarthy stars as Lee Israel, the best-selling celebrity biographer who ruined her career by resorting to forgery and theft. Through Thursday; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $11; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. Central Florida Jewish Film Festival: Heading Home: The Tale of Team Israel Documentary about Israel’s team in the World Baseball Classic, which incorporated many JewishAmerican players with tenuous relationships to Judaism. Saturday, 8 pm; Orlando Science Center, 777 E. Princeton St.; $12; 407-514-2000; enzian.org. Central Florida Jewish Film Festival: Sammy Davis, Jr.: I’ve Gotta Be Me Documentary about the legendary Rat Pack singer and entertainer. Monday, 4:15 pm; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $12; 407-6290054; enzian.org. Central Florida Jewish Film Festival: Shoelaces Gently comic story of a complicated relationship between an aging father and his special-needs adult son. Sunday, 11 am; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $12; 407-629-0054; enzian.org.

The Girl in the Spider’s Web BY ST EVE SCHN EID ER

THIS WEEK: The Girl in the Spider’s Web In the immortal words of Drunk Uncle, “Girl with a dragon tattoo? Not in my house!” That was the general reaction to the 2011 English-language film version of Dragon, which couldn’t help but feel superfluous after three Europeanmade adaptations of Stieg Larsson’s written oeuvre. For some reason, Hollywood is trying again – but with an entirely new cast and creative team. Not only that, but they’re skipping ahead to the fourth novel in the series, which was written by another author many years after Larsson had, rather inconveniently, stopped breathing. (Imagine if, in 2005, the Broccolis had announced they were rebooting James Bond, but were starting with Colonel Sun.) All in all, it’s a big gamble to take on material the public may no longer care about. Then again, in 2011, we were saying that about Obama running for a second term. You live, you learn. (R)

hew a bit closer to the source material than that Jim Carrey farrago. (Excuse me, assumed farrago. Still haven’t bothered with it!) Illumination Entertainment may not have exactly set the world on fire with their previous take on The Lorax, but visually at least, what we’ve seen so far of their Grinch looks pretty darn cute. (After The Secret Life of Pets, we can safely say these guys just have a way with dogs named Max.) Plus, Benedict Cumberbatch is still in that “can do no wrong” stage of his career. Gotta quibble with the choice of narrator, though: Pharrell Williams does not a Boris Karloff make. Okay, neither does anybody currently living, but you know what I mean. (PG)

Overlord Boy, I do not envy J.J. Abrams for having thought this would be the right time to resurrect the genre of Nazi pulp horror. Somehow, the likes of Ilsa, She-Wolf of the SS just don’t seem so quaint and amusing when real life, latter-day stormtroopers are The Grinch Thank God those live-action Dr. mowing down Jewish nonagenarians in their Seuss movies seem to have gone the way tracks. Yet this weekend will nonetheless see of the dodo. Because in the space of just the release of Overlord, in which Abrams’ three years, they gave us a Cat in the Hat Bad Robot Productions attempts to make who couldn’t rhyme and a Whoville filled popcorn entertainment out of the idea that with little materialists. Okay, I’m going on Hitler’s minions were creating zombies to reports when it comes to the latter, because do their bidding in the final days of the Big I boycotted the 2000 How the Grinch Stole One. I mean, I’m not saying they wouldn’t Christmas for reasons that should have been have tried, just that mining that conceit for immediately apparent to anyone who grew grindhouse thrills seems about as timely up on the book and animated TV special. right now as … um, a girl with a dragon I’m holding out hope, though, for this latest tattoo? (Also, the dragon is wearing an animated attempt, which looks like it might armband.) (R)

Central Florida Jewish Film Festival: The Last Suit A Holocaust survivor living in Argentina travels to Poland to reunite with the Christian friend who saved his life during World War II. Monday, 7 pm; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $12; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. Central Florida Jewish Film Festival: Winter Hunt A young woman on a mission of vigilante justice goes to extremes to seek reprisal against a suspected ex-Nazi. Sunday, 2 pm; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $12; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. Cirque du Soleil: Kurios – Cabinet of Curiosities Step into the curio cabinet of an ambitious inventor who defies the laws of time, space and dimension in order to reinvent everything around him. Tuesday, 7 pm; multiple locations; $15.98; fathomevents.com. Cult Classics: Waiting for Guffman Ensemble comedy about a small-town theater production that gets hijacked by a wannabe Broadway star. Tuesday, 9:30 pm; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $8; 407-6290054; enzian.org. Die Hard A special 30th anniversary screening of what is clearly not a Christmas movie. Sunday, 2 & 7 pm; multiple locations; $13.31; fathomevents.com. Hymn: Sarah Brightman in Concert The best-selling soprano peforms at the Festspielhaus in the Bavarian Alps. Thursday, 7:30 pm; multiple locations; $13.31; fathomevents.com. Mel Brooks Double Feature Free screening of Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein. Friday, 7 pm; The Nook on Robinson, 2432 E. Robinson St.; free; facebook.com/ thenookonrobinson. Popcorn Flicks in the Park: Enchanted Fairytale comedy about a princess from another world who lands in modern Manhattan and falls in love with a divorce lawyer. Thursday, 7 pm; Central Park, Winter Park, North Park Avenue and West Morse Boulevard, Winter Park; free; enzian.org. Restoring Tomorrow Inspirational film about a church renovation. Tuesday, 7 pm; multiple locations; $13.31; fathomevents.com. Saturday Matinee Classics: Lawrence of Arabia David Lean’s biopic about World War I British lieutenant T.E. Lawrence is the very definition of an epic. Saturday, 11 am; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $8. orlandoweekly.com

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[ concert preview ]

GREAT LIVE MUSIC RATTLES ORLANDO EVERY NIGHT

RAY LAMONTAGNE with the Secret Sisters 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 9 Walt Disney Theater, Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts 445 S. Magnolia Ave. 844-513-2014 drphillipscenter.org $39.50-$245

RAY LAMONTAGNE | PHOTO BY REID LONG

HERE COMES TROUBLE Folk singer Ray LaMontagne feels groovy about new album and tour BY DAVE GIL DE RUBIO

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retension, flash and lack of substance seem to be the calling card for so much of what passes for musical talent nowadays. If this is what you might come to expect from Ray LaMontagne, you’re advised to look elsewhere. Ever since he burst on the scene with his 2004 debut, Trouble, the soft-spoken singer-songwriter has carved out an admirable career over a span of seven albums that includes the recently released Part of the Light. Possessing a raspy tenor, LaMontagne has crafted a sound that evokes the spirit of the Band and 1970s-era Van Morrison. Over time, he’s applied more of a psychedelic nuance to his material, while working with a number of sympathetic producers including Ethan Johns, Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys and Jim James of My Morning Jacket. Having first taken the production helm for his fourth studio outing, 2010’s God Willin’ & the Creek Don’t Rise, LaMontagne has done the

same for this most recent collection of songs. And like he did for God Willin’, the New Hampshire native chose to record Part of the Light at the Big Room at Apple Hill, the studio he built for himself at his 130-acre farm in Ashfield, Massachusetts. The decision was a no-brainer for him. “I just wanted to really do it here. I have a studio here at the farm and it’s just a beautiful place to be. I just thought I’d do it here this time. I’d bring people here out to my place,” he says. “It’s pretty nice to be able to wake up in the morning, make a cup of coffee and walk into the studio. It’s very cozy and it’s always nice to be able to sleep in your own bed.” LaMontagne’s recording approach is less about technical wizardry and more about working with friends whose work he enjoys and respects. It’s a big part of what went into this recording process that took place over the span of a couple of 10-day sessions last year. “[This experience] was really just about

Nathan Gray Gray of Boy Sets Fire and Jack O’Shae of Bayside present a night of intimate solo

getting my friends together – people that I can communicate with very easily and whose music and talents I admire,” he says. “Dave Givan wound up playing drums on [LaMontagne’s 2016 album] Ouroboros and I really love the way he plays. So I wanted to get him out here. Seth Kauffman has played on Supernova, Ouroboros and now, this record. So he’s been on three records. I had just done a tour with Carl Broemel of My Morning Jacket for Ouroboros and I wanted to try and get him up here – and Bo Koster from My Morning Jacket as well.” LaMontagne’s backstory is quite the unusual one; the oft-told tale is that he quit his job at a shoe factory in Lewiston, Maine, after waking up to his alarm clock radio playing Stephen Stills’ “Treetop Flyer.” While the details remain hazy to him, LaMontagne does remember buying his first guitar around that time: “I got a Fender acoustic guitar from a pawnshop in Lewiston. It nearly killed me because it was so hard to play.” As the epitome of an artist who would rather let his music speak for him, LaMontagne is getting to do just that as he tours this fall, despite the idea that going on stage runs counter to the privacy he cherishes. “I’m a very private person, so going out there is, in some ways, the hardest thing for me,” he admits. “But there are people who want to hear this music and I’m very grateful for that. I’m very grateful that they’ve stuck with me and buy the albums. And the live audience continues to grow, which amazes me.” That said, LaMontagne is excited about this current string of dates, especially given the visual aesthetics that he’s eager to share with his fans as he shares what people should expect to experience when they come out to see him play live. “We’re obviously touring a new record, so we’re going to be playing a lot of new songs. It will be a beautiful show. The set and lighting design is just gorgeous,” he says excitedly. “It’s really nice. No LED’s – it’s gorgeous. It’s worth it just for that. I would tell people to come, sit back, watch the show and enjoy it. It’s going to be as beautiful to look at as well as listen to.”

sets, stripped of their sturm und drang. 9 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, at Will’s Pub, $10

Timothy Eerie Austin-via-Orlando psych-rock mover Eerie plays a homecoming show as part of a tour of the South with Sonic Graffiti and Bubble Boys getting similarly dazed. 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, at Stonewall, $7

Zoya Zafar Local singer Zafar returns after a quiet couple of months, putting on this free local bill also featuring Julee Bruise, Dearest and Be Gentle Young Traveler. 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 9, at Stardust Video & Coffee, free

Banda MS Iconic Mexican ranchera hitmakers bring their Tour Con Todas Las Fuerzas to the Amway Center. 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at the Amway Center, $40.50-$140.50

Simple Minds 1980s new wave hitmakers with heavy post-punk chops wind down their tour in Orlando with a heady mix of new music and old classics. 7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11, at Hard Rock Live, $43-$48

Steven Head Acoqui, Moon Jelly and White Sands sonic technician debuts new material at this month’s installment of experimental showcase the In-Between Series. 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 12, at the Rogers Kiene Building, donations suggested

Whitechapel Knoxville deathcore bruisers hit Orlando as part of a tour celebrating the 10th anniversary of their This Is Exile album.

music@orlandoweekly.com orlandoweekly.com

6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, at the Abbey, $22 ●

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[ concert preview ]

NINA | PHOTO BY JOAKIM REIMER

ARE FRIENDS ELECTRIC Synthwave queens Nina and Parallels redefine nostalgia BY MATTHEW MOYER

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ynthwave, more than almost any synth-pop background, I was always really other subgenre in recent memory – inspired by it.” The sounds of Nina and Parallels are redyes, that includes you, rockabilly – is immutably rooted in a specific sense of aes- olent of the best of ’80s pop radio instead of thetic place and time. A neon color palette, the end credits of an ’80s thriller, feeling like a widescreen analog sound, a fashion sense lost tracks from a mixtape that also included steeped in Miami Vice, Members Only and Kate Bush’s “Running Up That Hill” (whom London Fog … synthwave is awash in the Dodson counts as an early epiphany), Yaz, futuristic leanings of 1980s popular culture. Tina Turner’s “We Don’t Need Another Hero,” and Stevie There is still room for Nicks’ “Stand Back” innovation, though, NINA AND PARALLELS – a very futureas U.K. solo project with Moondragon, ACP Pro, forward way of lookNina and TorontoWatch Out for Snakes ing back. based trio Parallels 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10 Boldt cops to the are proving on their Soundbar, 37 W. Pine St. nostalgia inherco-headlining North soundbarorl.com ent in synthwave. “I American tour. $15 feel connected with Both eschew the prevailing synthwave trends toward masks ’80s music and aesthetics … brings beautiand shadowy non-image and place their ful memories; that sweet nostalgia you feel voices front and center in contrast to the when listening to a record from Depeche unspoken rules of the synthwave boys’ Mode or Duran Duran.” “It’s so vibrant and colorful, which I love,” club. And though the soundscapes, say, of Perturbator and Gost are impressive on adds Dodson. “Neon escapism at its best.” This won’t be either performer’s first their own, the addition of vocals takes these two projects’ music into alternately more Florida show – Nina opened for Erasure (!) in 2011 and Parallels have played the state yearning and anthemic realms. “I personally like listening to music with a handful of times – but the popular tastes vocals,” says Nina Boldt. “And following in 2018 have caught up with their sounds, the story and different sections of a song, and it really feels like now is their time. taking you on a journey.” To Holly Dodson, For the night, Boldt promises “songs taking frontperson of Parallels, vocals are a crucial you back in time.” To which Dodson adds, piece of her band’s musical formula: “Lyrics without missing a beat, “We’d love to see and vocal melodies are probably my favorite you dancing.” piece of the puzzle. Coming from more of a mmoyer@orlandoweekly.com orlandoweekly.com

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BY B AO L E - H U U MIYA FOLICK | PHOTO BY JEN CRAY

This week, a perennial partystarter, a pretender and a serious new contender.

PALE WAVES AND MIYA FOLICK, THE SOCIAL, NOV. 3

Being from a city with some of the heaviest, most seminal heritage in alternative music history, you’d think Pale Waves would know better. But the Siouxsie Sioux rips of this young Manchester band are surely earning them some mad shade from all the true goths, especially since their look is as far as their alt-rock commitment goes. If you squint real hard, maybe you can see occasional faint echoes of the dreamy chimes of 1980s alternative guitar pop. Maybe. But no amount of pale face and black makeup can conceal that this is highgloss pop-rock with a very commercial sensibility. If ever there were an express lane to Poseurtown, this would be it. Although lightweight, Pale Waves’ music isn’t bad, necessarily – particularly live, where they were solid. It’s just that this book’s not half as interesting as its cover. An artist to watch very seriously, though, is fresh should-be star Miya Folick. Although the California artist is just emerging with a brand-new debut album (Premonitions) released the week before her Orlando debut, she’s already showing big artistic strides. In this first full-length work, her early indie-folk musings have broadened into forward-thinking indie-pop with nerve and verve. Rather than schizophrenic and overreaching, it’s a diverse album that shows an artist of extraordinary versatility but moored in vision and confidence. The

Miya Folick is proving herself to be a complex figure, one that’s carrying the spirits of Kate Bush and Sinéad O’Connor to bring integrity and salvation to modern pop

brilliance with which Folick handles this major pivot shows an immense nascent talent that packs potential like a powder keg. And it’s produced one of the year’s best, most poised, most striking albums. Even if she still needs a little live refinement to match the finesse of her new record, this performance showed plenty of the stunning concentration of natural aptitude and possibility that resides in her. A new voice who can balance smart pop aspiration with a cliff-diving finale of guitar crashes and yelling catharsis is someone to pay attention to. Folick is already proving herself to be a complex figure, one that’s carrying the deep spirits of Annie Lennox, Kate Bush and Sinéad O’Connor on into the bold now alongside Mitski and Angel Olsen to bring integrity and salvation to modern pop.

YELLE, THE SOCIAL, OCT. 30

I’m sick AF of saying it but these are dire times indeed. Still, even in this doomsday prophecy come to life, it’s been especially dark of late, and the forecast doesn’t look

good. So a dose of eternally bouncy French pop to stave off onset terminal cynicism? Tout de suite! Sweet insouciance, take me away from this burning apocalypse for just one night. Yelle became a new-millennium indie sensation on the wings of some of the most guileless dance-pop out there. That they’re a little arty and delightfully kooky is nice gravy, but what’s always made them so unerringly fun is that they fly with no fear of cheese so long as it’s in the service of a good time. And live, that manifests in a fantastic, color-splashed dance party with nice aesthetic. Onstage, the French troupe feature lots of good live percussion by two kinetic and assertive players. But this is an act clearly fronted by the namesake singer, and she juices the crowd with her open charm and irresistible dance moves. With a full glitter catsuit and a nonstop Euro-pop workout of spring steps and jaguar slinks, Yelle does razzle-dazzle with zero irony and maximum pep. Even if she executes it all with more stage crispness and refinement than when they first emerged, Yelle still pumps with the innocent, bright-eyed pulse of a teenage girl jamming out in her bedroom. That’s the thing with Yelle. Being less slaves to sex and edge than their pop contemporaries has made them one of the most reliably fun of the pack. No airs, no politics of cool, let’s just play. It’s an attitude that’s made them a pure neon romp of unmitigated joy, something the world could use a big enema of. Now back to your regularly scheduled dumpster fire. baolehuu@orlandoweekly.com orlandoweekly.com

NOV. 7-13, 2018 ● ORLANDO WEEKLY

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Wednesday, Nov. 7

Kyle Kinane COMEDY

We go to press on this issue too early to know what the results of the midterm elections will be, but if previous elections are any indication, we’re gonna need a laugh. Luckily, Kyle Kinane, easily one of the best – and scandal-free so far, knock on wood – “alternative” comedians, takes the stage at the Abbey for a palatecleansing. Kinane’s tendency to switch from topic to topic in a way that always feels more conversational than performative is sure to come out in the wake of the election. Local openers Heather Shaw and Marcus Crespo warm up the mic for this special oneoff show co-produced by local promoters Norsekorea. – Thaddeus McCollum 8 p.m. | The Abbey, 100 S. Eola Drive | abbeyorlando.com | $18-$25

Thursday, Nov. 8

A$AP Ferg MUSIC

with Ella Mai | 7 p.m. | CFE Arena, 12777 N. Gemini Blvd. | 407-823-3070 | cfearena.com | $25

PHOTO BY JASON GOODRICH

Rapper, certified fashion icon and jewelry ambassador A$AP Ferg is coming to the University of Central Florida for Homecoming Concert Knight this week. The Harlem artist, known for wildly successful singles like “Plain Jane” and “Shabba,” will be performing along with English singer Ella Mai. The show is free for UCF Knights but all others will have to pay up! – Monivette Cordeiro

Friday-Sunday, Nov. 9-11

Free Play Florida EVENTS

Free Play Florida has grown from a niche convention for pinball enthusiasts to one of the premier gaming conventions in the state, with classic arcade and console games added to the mix. Along with the massive arcade set up every year, attendees can check out panels from celebrities and game designers or attend the Saturday night afterparty with performances from Keith Apicary, Moondragon and Nestrogen. But the hidden gem of the convention is the “Pre-War Playground,” a pop-up museum consisting of early-20th century pinball cabinets, often operated purely by the plunger and requiring you to take score on your own. Most of the cabinets on display are playable, which is a pretty impressive feat considering some of them are more than a century old. – TM

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4 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday-Sunday | Caribe Royale Resort, 8101 World Center Drive | freeplayflorida.com | $25-$75 ●

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Friday, Nov. 9

Festival of Trees HOLIDAY

The Orlando Museum of Art’s Christmas wonderland is entering its 32nd year this holiday season; and as the presenting group, the Council of 101, assures us, “It’s the most wonderful time of the year.” The event features designer Christmas trees, holiday vignettes, a gingerbread village, handmade wreaths and more. Throughout the nine days that the Tannenbaum fest lasts, there will be additional special activities for people of all ages, such as breakfast with Santa and an ugly holiday sweater date night. The event kicks off with a gala and tree lighting. – Lora Korpar 10 a.m. | through Nov. 18 | Orlando Museum of Art, 2416 N. Mills Ave. | 407-896-4231 | omart.org | $15-$200

Friday, Nov. 9

Smoking Popes MUSIC

Never the most flashy of the alt-rock vanguard of the 1990s, Chicago’s Smoking Popes still scored big with undergroundgone-overground hits “Need You Around” and “Rubella” from major-label debut Born to Quit in 1994. Even more lucratively than that, the album caught the ears of one Stephen Patrick Morrissey, who for several years used them as his go-to American touring opener. It’s no mystery why their music resonated with pop aesthete Morrissey: Smoking Popes deal in concise, melancholic, serrated pop(ish) punk with a knack for memorable choruses full of dramatic longing. In 2018, the original lineup has reunited for the first time in two decades and recorded new album Into the Agony, as well as authorizing some crucial reissues. A night made for singalongs. – Matthew Moyer with the Pink Spiders, Amuse | 8 p.m. | The Abbey, 100 S. Eola Drive | 407-704-6261 | abbeyorlando.com | $15-$18

Saturday-Sunday, Nov. 10-11

Maker Faire EVENTS

Come one, come all, to Orlando’s greatest show (and tell) of the year, the Maker Faire: a community-organized, family-friendly extravaganza that includes everything from do-it-yourself science, art, rockets and robots to crafts, music and more. What is a maker, you may ask? Well, in this case, a maker is a parent, a student, a weekend warrior – however that may personally fall – so long as they have a love for innovation, creativity and inspiring the world around them. In the past, Maker Faire has shown off such contraptions as an E.T.-themed virtual reality game, a human-powered structure, and a life-sized snow-cone machine. So come out and see the polite chaos for yourself – and just how far others have pushed the human imagination. – Xander Peters 10 a.m.-5 p.m. | Central Florida Fairgrounds, 4603 W. Colonial Drive | makerfaireorlando.com | $10-$25

Sunday, Nov. 11

11Eleven Fest MUSIC

A sequel of sorts to last year’s Ten10 Fest, 11Eleven promises, much like Spinal Tap’s amps that go up to 11, a louder and more bombastic version of the original: live music and a selection of artist cocktails and ales matching up to many of the day’s performers. The lineup is an intoxicating mix of local and touring bands including Diet Cig, Pathos Pathos, Starbenders, Bothering Dennis, Wolf-Face, Transkam, Hungover and Universal Funk Orchestra. Adding to this brew (we can go on with these puns forever) are a phalanx of comedians including Heather Shaw, Jeff Jones and Simon Nash. And as for the custom drinks on offer at the fest? Diet Cig’s set will be best paired with the Blood Zombie Blueberry Vanilla Sour Ale; consider sipping the Mule-Face while checking out Wolf-Face. – Matthew Moyer 1 p.m. | Broken Strings Brewery, 1012 W. Church St. | 11elevenfest.com | $25-$333

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THEWEEK

Submit your events to listings@orlandoweekly.com at least 12 days before print to have them included

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7-TUESDAY, NOV. 13 COMPILED BY THADDEUS MCCOLLUM

MUSIC WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7 Bobby Koelble Band 8 pm; Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park; $10; 407-636-9951. The Daniel Heitz Band 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540. Eat to the Beat: Boyz II Men Epcot, 200 Epcot Center Drive, Lake Buena Vista; included in admission; 407-824-4321. MK & Camelphat 9 pm; Celine Orlando, 22 S. Magnolia Ave.; $25-$35. Nathan Gray (Boy Sets Fire), Jack O’Shae (Bayside) 9 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $10-$12. Real Friends, Boston Manor, Grayscale, Eat Your Heart Out 6 pm; Soundbar, 37 W. Pine St.; $23.

THURSDAY, NOV. 8 Lauv Thursday at House of Blues

Aqueous, the Heavy Pets 7 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $15-$17; 407-246-1419. ASAP Ferg & Ella Mai 7-10 pm; CFE Arena, 12777 N. Gemini Blvd.; $25; 407-823-3070.

Winter Park, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; $20$45; 407-646-2182; bachfestivalflorida.org.

The Bloody Jug Band, 20 Watt Tombstone, The Maness Brothers, SFG, Johnny Debt 7 pm; The Veranda Live, 707 E. Washington St.; free; 407-405-1144.

Kaleigh Baker 10 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free.

Collide Contemporary Music Series: UCF New Music Ensemble 8 pm; University of Central Florida Rehearsal Hall, 4000 Central Florida Blvd.; Free; 407-823-1500. Eat to the Beat: The Hooters Epcot, 200 Epcot Center Drive, Lake Buena Vista; included in admission; 407-824-4321. EDC Pre-Party: D3V, Paper Mushrooms, Hallucinate, DJay 10 pm; Peek Downtown, 50 E. Central Blvd. Suite B; $7. Home Bass Orlando Sun on the Beach, 5770 W. Irlo Bronson Memorial Highway, Kissimmee; $15-$60; 407-719-3610. Insights & Sounds: Joe and Mike, the Haydn Brothers 7:30 pm; music from Joseph Haydn and his lesser-known younger brother, Johann Michael, two rock stars of the Classical era. Bach Festival Society of 52

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Lauv, Charlotte Lawrence 7 pm; House of Blues, Disney Springs, Lake Buena Vista; $20; 407-934-2583. Leisure Chief 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540.

Timothy Eerie, Sonic Graffiti, Bubble Boys 8 pm; Stonewall Bar Orlando, 741 W. Church St.; $5; 407-373-0888. Tropidelic, Bumpin Uglies 8 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $12-$15.

FRIDAY, NOV. 9 The Afterparty: Suzy Solar, Denzo 10 pm; Peek Downtown, 50 E. Central Blvd. Suite B; $10.

Modestep, Fox Stevenson 9 pm; The Beacham, 46 N. Orange Ave.; $5-$20; 407-648-8363.

Carnie Cool Down: DJ Sandy, FoxForce005, DJ Skinner and more 9 pm; Stonewall Bar Orlando, 741 W. Church St.; $5; 407-373-0888.

Prince: Soft Exposed and Chilling 5:45 pm; The Imperial at Washburn Imports, 1800 N. Orange Ave.; free; 407-222-413.

Chilled Monkey Brains, Control This!, the Hoverounds, IPOL, Effit 6:30 pm; Iron Cow, 2438 E. Robinson St.; $7.

Real Friends, Boston Manor, Grayscale, Eat Your Heart Out 6 pm; Soundbar, 37 W. Pine St.; $23.

Eat to the Beat: The Hooters Epcot, 200 Epcot Center Drive, Lake Buena Vista; included in admission; 407-824-4321.

Rick Springfield, Greg Kihn, Tommy Tutone 7 pm; Hard Rock Live, 6050 Universal Blvd.; $42.50-$82.50; 407-351-5483.

Electric Daisy Carnival Tinker Field, 287 S. Tampa Ave.; $109-$329; 407-649-7297.

Thursday Night Hang: Dave Sheffield Trio 8 pm; Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-636-9951.

Eric Bachmann (Crooked Fingers, Archers of Loaf) 8 pm; private residence, TBA; $25.


Mel Brooks Double Feature Prince: Soft Exposed and Chilling Frankie Messina, local arts advocate and new host of WPRK’s “State of the Scene” broadcast, is a huge Prince fan. His collection of rare records, tapes and memorabilia is definitely bigger than yours. Tonight, he brings his encyclopedic knowledge of the Artist to bear for a special night focused on the softer side of Minneapolis’ favorite son. Expect a little less “Let’s Go Crazy” and a little more “Mr. Goodnight.” Sure to be an educational experience for those who only recently discovered their fandom. 6 p.m. Thursday; The Imperial at Washburn Imports, 1800 N. Orange Ave.; free; apartmente.com.

EDC Pre-Party: D3V Get ready for the biggest EDM festival of the year, Electric Daisy Carnival, with this pre-party at Peek Downtown. Trap artist D3V headlines the night, accompanied by Paper Mushrooms, Hallucinate and DJay, and the as-yet-unannounced winner of a DJ mix contest. It all ends mere hours before the gates open for EDC. Sleep is for the old, right? 10 p.m. Thursday; Peek Downtown, 50 E. Central Blvd.; $7; gorseevents.eventbrite.com.

Orlando International Fashion Week EDGE The signature event for Orlando International Fashion Week returns to Tier Nightclub this week. Catch a runway show from several talented designers, then mingle with models and industry pros during the after party. Spring for VIP if you want preferred seating and early entry. 6 p.m. Friday; Tier Nightclub, 20 E. Central Blvd.; $25-$35; orlandointernationalfashionweek.com.

Mel Brooks Double Feature With all of the mixing and mingling and electric daisying in town this week, it’s refreshing to see a night out that doesn’t require you to move very much. The Nook hosts a movie night showcasing both of Mel Brooks’ 1974 features, Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein. One of those movies has aged a lot better than the other one, but we’ll let you figure out which one. 7 p.m. Friday; The Nook on Robinson, 2432 E. Robinson St.; free; facebook.com/ thenookonrobinson.

Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness Feb. 7, 2019, at House of Blues Tech N9ne, Nov. 15 at the Plaza Live Big Gigantic, Nov. 16 at the Plaza Live Hobo Johnson & the Lovemakers, Nov. 19 at House of Blues Ghost, Nov. 23 at the Dr. Phillips Center Elton John, Nov. 27 at Amway Center Atmosphere, Nov. 27 at the Beacham Moe., Nov. 29 at the Plaza Live Anuel AA, Nov. 30 at Amway Center Marc Broussard, Dec. 1 at the Social Glenn Beck, Dec. 1 at the Plaza Live Cannibal Corpse, Dec. 5 at the Abbey

The Brian Setzer Orchestra, Dec. 7 at Hard Rock Live Thievery Corporation, Dec. 7 at House of Blues Migos, Dec. 7 at CFE Arena The Garden, Dec. 8 at Soundbar Barry Manilow, Dec. 8 at Amway Center Halestorm, Dec. 14 at Amway Center Trans-Siberian Orchestra, Dec. 15 at Amway Center 6lack, Dec. 17 at Hard Rock Live A John Waters Christmas, Dec. 17 at the Plaza Live Gost, Dec. 22 at Will’s Pub

Shinedown, Dec. 2829 at House of Blues Noname, Jan. 19, 2019, at the Beacham Cher, Jan. 21, 2019, at Amway Center

Sarah Brightman, Feb. 21, 2019, at the Dr. Phillips Center LP, Feb. 23, 2019, at the Social The Beach Boys, March 2, 2019, at the

Hamilton, Jan. 22Feb. 10, 2019, at the Dr. Phillips Center El Ten Eleven, Jan. 24, 2019, at the Social Kane Brown, Jan. 26, 2019, at Amway Center Neko Case, Feb. 2, 2019, at the Beacham

Dr. Phillips Center Kurt Vile & the Violators, March 12, 2019, at the Beacham STRFKR, March 14, 2019, at the Social John Mellencamp, March 24, 2019, at the Dr. Phillips Center

Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness, Feb. 7, 2019, at House of Blues Andrea Bocelli, Feb. 13, 2019, at Amway Center

Why Don’t We, April 1, 2019, at CFE Arena Leon Bridges, April 20, 2019, at House of Blues

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FRIDAY-SATURDAY, NOV. 9-10

Electric Daisy Carnival MUSIC

Bust out the glitter, the body-paint and the iridescent spandex because the Electric Daisy Carnival is returning to Orlando for its eighth consecutive year. A multimedia explosion of music, art and energy, the full-immersion experience of EDC packs in dedicated ravers, party monsters and casual fans equally. The nonstop two-day affair includes three stages with more than 50 artists and DJs, full-sized carnival rides, and ample space to hula-hoop, headbang, dance and snap selfies to your heart’s content. Featured performers this year include Bassnectar, Alison Wonderland, Martin Garrix, Kaskade and Suzy Solar. Remember to stay hydrated, kids. – Paola Peralta

1 p.m. | Tinker Field, 287 S. Tampa Ave. | orlando.electricdaisycarnival.com | $109-$329

Home Bass Orlando Sun on the Beach, 5770 W. Irlo Bronson Memorial Highway, Kissimmee; $15-$60; 407-719-3610. Miss Jacqueline Jones 8 pm; Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park; $15; 407-636-9951. Orlando International Fashion Week EDGE 6-9 pm; Tier Nightclub, 20 E. Central Blvd.; $25-$35; 407-317-9129. Prof, Mac Irv, Dwynell Roland 8 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $12-$15. Ray LaMontagne, the Secret Sisters 8 pm; Walt Disney Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $39.50-$245; 844-513-2014. Silent Planet, Stray From the Path, Kublai Khan, Greyhaven 6 pm; The Abbey, 100 S. Eola Drive; $15; 407-704-6261.

Wisin 7 pm; House of Blues, Disney Springs, Lake Buena Vista; $42.25; 407-934-2583. Woodwind Ensembles Concert 7 pm; University of Central Florida Rehearsal Hall, 4000 Central Florida Blvd.; Free; 407-823-1500.

SATURDAY, NOV. 10 Alterity Chamber Orchestra: You Are Free 7:30 pm; chamber concert. Timucua White House, 2000 S. Summerlin Ave.; $20; 727-515-5900; timucua.com. Banda MS 8 pm; Amway Center, 400 W. Church St.; $40.50-$425; 800-745-3000. The Company 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; $0; 407-649-8540. Eat to the Beat: Big Bad Voodoo Daddy Epcot, 200 Epcot Center Drive, Lake Buena Vista; included in admission; 407-824-4321.

Smoking Popes, the Pink Spiders, Amuse, Stages and Stereos 7 pm; Soundbar, 37 W. Pine St.; $15-$18.

Electric Daisy Carnival Tinker Field, 287 S. Tampa Ave.; $109-$329; 407-649-7297.

Unearth, Fit for an Autopsy, the Agony Scene, Traitors 6 pm; The Haven, 6700 Aloma Ave., Winter Park; $18-$20; 407-673-2712.

Haken & Leprous, Bent Knee 6:30 pm; The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave.; $22.50-$35; 407-228-1220.

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Home Bass Orlando Sun on the Beach, 5770 W. Irlo Bronson Memorial Highway, Kissimmee; $15-$60; 407-719-3610. Lanco, Travis Denning 7 pm; House of Blues, Disney Springs, Lake Buena Vista; $25-$101.25; 407-934-2583. Mae 6 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $22-$25; 407-246-1419. The Met Live in HD: Marnie 12:55 pm; gripping reimagining of Winston Graham’s novel, set in the 1950s, about a beautiful, mysterious young woman who assumes multiple identities. Multiple locations; $25.56; fathomevents.com. Nina, Parallels, Moondragon, ACP Pro, Watch Out for Snakes 8 pm; Soundbar, 37 W. Pine St.; $15. Rocket 88, the Tremolords, Sacred Owls 9 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $8. Smokin’ Torpedoes 8 pm; Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park; $15; 407-636-9951. Sock Hop and Swing 10 pm; The Nook on Robinson, 2432 E. Robinson St.; free. Tiny Waves: K-Pop Rave 9 pm; The Geek Easy, 114 S. Semoran Blvd., Winter Park; $5; 407-332-9636. Vince Gill 8 pm; Walt Disney Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $39.50-$99.50; 844-513-2014.

SUNDAY, NOV. 11 11Eleven Fest: Diet Cig, Starbenders, Ian Sweet, Transkam and more 1 pm; Broken Cauldron Taproom & Brewery, 1012 W. Church St.; $20-$111. Ancient Sun 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540. Caffiends, No Fraud, Hamiltons, Nunhex, Devalued, Tight Genes, 430 Steps, Moat Cobra, Brunch Sluts 6 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $10-$12. The Dobre Brothers Noon; The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave.; $25-$750; 407-228-1220. Eat to the Beat: Big Bad Voodoo Daddy Epcot, 200 Epcot Center Drive, Lake Buena Vista; included in admission; 407-824-4321. Home Bass Orlando Sun on the Beach, 5770 W. Irlo Bronson Memorial Highway, Kissimmee; $15-$60; 407-719-3610. Laurent Boukobza, Beethoven Piano Sonatas 7:30 pm; Timucua White House, 2000 S. Summerlin Ave.; $10-$20 suggested donation; 727-515-5900.

THEWEEK My Children My Bride, Secrets, Capture 8 pm; Soundbar, 37 W. Pine St.; $17. Scott Silbert 3 pm; Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park; contact for price; 407-636-9951. Simple Minds 7 pm; Hard Rock Live, 6050 Universal Blvd.; $35-$65; 407-351-5483.

MONDAY, NOV. 12 Eat to the Beat: Big Bad Voodoo Daddy Epcot, 200 Epcot Center Drive, Lake Buena Vista; included in admission; 407-824-4321. The In-Between Series: Steven Head, Dream Rhythm 7 pm; Rogers Kiene Building, 39 S. Magnolia Ave.; $5 suggested donation. Reggae Mondae: Florida Man 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540. (Sandy) Alex G, Half Waif 7 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $16-$20; 407-246-1419. Sparta 7:30 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $16-$19.

TUESDAY, NOV. 13 The Groove Orient 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540. Tuesday Night Sessions: Chris Cortez 8 pm; Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-636-9951. Whitechapel, Chelsea Grin, Oceano, Slaughter to Prevail 6 pm; The Abbey, 100 S. Eola Drive; $22; 407-704-6261.

THEATER The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee Musical about an eclectic group of six kids. FridaySaturday, 7:30 pm, Sunday, 2:30 pm; Gateway Center for the Arts, 880 N. Highway 17-92, DeBary; $17; 386-668-5553; gatewaycenterforthearts.org. 9 to 5: the Musical A live theatrical production based on the 1980 movie. Thursday-Friday, 8 pm, Saturday, 2 pm; Florida Institute of Technology Gleason Center, 150 W. University Blvd., Melbourne; $10; 321-507-0249; fit.edu. Assassins Musical by Stephen Sondheim. Fridays-Saturday, 8 pm, Sunday, 3 pm, Monday, 8 pm; Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park, 419A W. Fairbanks Ave., Winter Park; $12-$20; 407-920-4034; breakthroughtheatre.com. orlandoweekly.com

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THEWEEK BOOM An epic and intimate dramatic comedy about a one-night stand that takes on added significance when a catastrophic event threatens to strike the planet. Wednesday, 8 pm, Friday-Sunday, 8 pm; Theater on the Edge, 5542 Hansel Ave.; $16-$32; 407309-0106; theaterontheedge.org. The Bridges of Madison County Musical based on the novel about a lonely housewife who has an affair with a traveling photographer. ThursdaySaturday, 8 pm, Sunday, 2 pm, Monday, 8 pm; Theater West End, 115 W. First St., Sanford; $22-$50; 407-548-6285; theaterwestend.com. Broadway Lights: A Student Showcase Featuring Adam Pascal Broadway star Adam Pascal headlines a student musical theater showcase. Saturday, 8 pm; Lake Mary High School, 655 Longwood Lake Mary Road, Lake Mary; $25$95; 407-320-9550; wekivariverplayers.org. Foul Play An evening of comedic one-act plays. Friday-Saturday, 8 pm, Sunday, 6 pm; Art’s Sake Studio, 680 Clay St., Winter Park; $12; 407-399-9252; facebook.com/playdeluna. The Jungle Book Retelling of the classic man-cub raised by wolves in the Indian jungle. Sunday, 4:30 pm; Margeson Theater, Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 812 E. Rollins St.; $15$20; 407-447-1700; orlandoshakes.org. Laura Hodos Songs from the Golden Age of the Silver Screen performed by vocalist Laura Hodos. Wednesday-Thursday, 7:30 pm; Winter Park Playhouse, 711-C Orange Ave., Winter Park; $23$28; 407-645-0145; winterparkplayhouse.org. Mission STEAMpossible Educational, familyfriendly puppet show. Saturday, 2 pm; Seminole State College Planetarium, 100 Weldon Blvd., Sanford; $6; 407.708.2360; seminolestate.edu. The Mystery of Irma Vep Vampire attacks, werewolf sightings, and the resurrection of an Egyptian princess make for an exciting start to married life for Lady Enid, Lord Edgar’s second wife. Audiences will die laughing at this melodramatic farce set in mystical Gothic England. Wednesday, 2 & 7:30 pm, ThursdaySaturday, 7:30 pm, Sunday, 2 pm, Tuesday, 7:30 pm; Orlando Shakes, 812 E. Rollins St.; $30-$53; 407-447-1700; orlandoshakes.org. Of Mice and Men Stage adaptation of John Steinbeck’s novel about two Depression-era drifters. Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 pm, Sunday, 2 pm; Theatre UCF, 4000 Central Florida Blvd.; $20; 407-823-1500; theatre.ucf.edu. Rapture, Blister, Burn Two women reunite and are envious of the accomplishments the other has made in their lives. Thursday-Saturday, 8 pm, 58

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Sunday, 3 pm; Mad Cow Theatre, 54 W. Church St.; $15; 407-297-8788; madcowtheatre.com. Spring Awakening A theatrical production of the modernist play. Friday, 7 pm, Saturday 1 & 7 pm, Sunday 1 pm; Theatre South Orlando, 11184S. Apopka-Vineland Road; $12; 407489-4458; theatresouthplayhouse.org.

COMEDY Benji Brown Friday, 8 pm; Bob Carr Theater, 401 W. Livingston St.; $19.50; 407-246-4262; drphillipscenter.org. Earthquake Friday, 6:30 & 9:45 pm, Saturday, 5:30 & 9:15 pm, Sunday, 5:30 pm; Orlando Improv, 9101 International Drive; $25; 407480-5233; theimprovorlando.com. Friday Night at the Black Box: Ron Feingold Friday, 8 pm; Clermont Performing Arts Center Black Box Theater, 3700 S. Highway 27, Clermont; $15; 352-394-4800; clermontperformingarts.com. Kyle Kinane Wednesday, 8 pm; The Abbey, 100 S. Eola Drive; $18-$25; 407-704-6261; abbeyorlando.com. Nitro Comedy Tour: Catfish Cooley & Ginger Billy Tuesday, 7 pm; Orlando Improv, 9101 International Drive; $25; 407480-5233; theimprovorlando.com. Samuel J. Comroe Monday, 7 pm; Orlando Improv, 9101 International Drive; $20; 407480-5233; theimprovorlando.com. The Show’s Upstairs Intimate biweekly comedy showcase. Tuesday, 9 pm; Magnolia, 13 S. Magnolia Ave.; free.

DANCE Bolshoi Ballet: La Sylphide On his wedding day, the young Scotsman James is awakened with a kiss from an ethereal winged creature, a Sylph. Sunday, 12:55 pm; multiple locations; $19.17; fathomevents.com. Dancing for Diabetes Benefit dance concert featuring award-winning and nationally recognized performers from across Central Florida. Saturday, 7-10 pm; Bob Carr Theater, 401 W. Livingston St.; $15$25; 407-914-2744; drphillipscenter.org. So You Think You Can Dance Live The top 10 finalists from the most recent season show off their skills live. Friday, 8 pm; Hard Rock Live, 6050 Universal Blvd.; $45.50-$100; 407-351-5483; hardrock.com/orlando. Todrick Hall Performance by the popular web entertainer. Friday, 9 pm; Southern Nights, 375 S. Bumby Ave.; contact for price; 407412-5039; southernnightsorl.com.


ART OPENINGS/EVENTS

ANTI Pop-Up: The Revival Art and fashion pop-up celebrating the return of clothing label ANTI. Saturday 7 pm; Loud Gallery, 1907 N. Orange Ave.; $10-$12; loudgallery.com. Art in the 21st Century: Johannesburg Screening of the Art21 documentary about the art scene in the South African city. Tuesday 6 pm; Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-646-2526; cfam.rollins.edu. Beautiful Bounty Group art show themed around gratitude, generosity and plentitude. Friday Nov. 9, 7 pm; Dandelion Communitea Cafe, 618 N. Thornton Ave.; free; 407-3621864; dandelioncommunitea.com. Greg Branham: The Unexpected A pop-up exhibition highlighting recent mixed media works by Greg Branham. Friday Nov. 9, 6:30 pm and -16; The Art Gallery at Mills Park, 1650 N. Mills Ave.; free; 855336-3653; thegalleryatmillspark.com. Mike Meyer Hand Lettering Workshop Four-day workshop with sign painter Mike Meyer. All materials included. Nov. 8-11, 10 am; The Orange Studio, 1121 N. Mills Ave.; $795; betterletters.co. Real Virtual Painting in Virtual Reality Learn how to use Tilt Brush, a VR painting application that uses traditional painting skills in virtual 3D space. Thursday Nov. 8, 6-7 pm; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd.; Free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. MUSEUM GUIDE

Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens Soul of Graffiti: Jan Kalab, through Dec. 2; 633 Osceola Ave, Winter Park; $10; 407-647-6294; polasek.org. Art & History Museums – Maitland Indigo Waves, through March 31, 2019; Central Florida Yellow Ribbon Project, through Nov. 30; Soldier’s Home: Veterans’ Art in Central Florida, through Jan. 7, 2019; J. André Smith and the Art of Camouflage, through Jan. 6, 2019. 231 W. Packwood Ave, Maitland; $6; 407-539-2181; artandhistory.org. Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art Nineteenth-Century American Landscapes, through Jan. 27, 2019; The Art Machine, through Jan. 27, 2019; Earth Into Art: The Flowering of American Art Pottery; American Arts & Crafts; Art Nouveau From Europe and America, through Sept. 27, 2020; NineteenthCentury American Landscapes, through Jan. 27, 2019. 445 N. Park Ave., Winter Park; $6; 407-645-5311; morsemuseum.org. Cornell Fine Arts Museum Forging Modern American Identities: Recent Acquisitions, through Dec. 12; Jamilah Sabur:

THEWEEK Ibine Ela Acu / Water Sun Moon, through Dec. 12; Fake News? Some Artistic Responses, through Dec. 12; Dangerous Women: Selections from the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, through Dec. 12. Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-646-2526; cfam.rollins.edu. Mennello Museum of American Art Shifting Gaze: A Reconstruction of The Black & Hispanic Body in Contemporary Art, through Jan. 13, 2019. 900 E. Princeton St.; $5; 407246-4278; mennellomuseum.org. Orlando Museum of Art Nick Cave: Feat., through Dec. 30; Purvis Young and His Angels, through March 3, 2019; A Trek From North to South, ongoing; J. Hyde Crawford and Anthony Tortora Collection, ongoing; People and Places, ongoing. 2416 N. Mills Ave.; $15; 407-896-4231; omart.org.

EVENTS Central Florida Fall Egg Fest Group cookout for fans of the Big Green Egg grilling system. Bring your best recipe, or just taste everyone else’s. Saturday, 9 am; Wekiva Island, 1014 Miami Springs Road, Longwood; $25; centralfloridafalleggfest.com. Central Florida Job Fair More than 80 companies offering thousands of career openings in various industries and resources on hand to assist your job search. Wednesday, noon4 pm; Central Florida Fair, 4603 W. Colonial Drive; free; 407-834-4022; cfec.org. Central Florida Orchid Society Monthly meetings with speakers, auctions, raffles, refreshments and plants for sale. Monday, 6:30 pm; Harry P. Leu Gardens, 1920 N. Forest Ave.; free; 407-252-6984; cflorchidsociety.org. College Park Tour of Homes Guided tour of mid-century modern architecture in College Park. Sunday, 1-5 pm; St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, 2499 N. Westmoreland Drive; $25; mycpna.org. Free Play Florida A three-day celebration of electronic gaming of all kinds with more than 250 arcade machines, pinball games and consoles all set to free play. Friday, 4-11 pm, Saturday, 10 am-10 pm, Sunday, 10 am-4 pm; Caribe Royale Resort Suites Hotel, 8101 World Center Drive; $7.50$70; 888-258-7501; wp.freeplayflorida.com. Furball 2018 Enjoy great food, world-class entertainment and adorable company all while supporting pets in the community. Saturday, 6-10 pm; Four Seasons Resort, 10100 Dream Tree Blvd., Lake Buena Vista; $250-$500; 407248-1744; petallianceorlando.org. orlandoweekly.com

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Maker Faire Orlando Immerse yourself in maker culture with endless exhibits, a performance stage, big art and spectacle, and hands-on making and learning SaturdaySunday, 10 am-5 pm; Central Florida Fairgrounds, 4603 W. Colonial Drive; $10-$25; 407-634-6257; makerfaireorlando.com. Mills 50 Historic Homes Tour The tour includes classic bungalows and traditional home styles from the 1920s through the 1950s. Saturday, 2-7 pm; Colonialtown Neighborhood Center, 1517 Lake Highland Drive; $35-$40; orlandoweeklytickets.com. Nerd Nite Orlando An evening of entertaining presentations on a variety of topics. Thursday, 7 pm; Stardust Video and Coffee, 1842 E. Winter Park Road; free; 407-623-3393; orlando.nerdnite.com. Night of Dreams: Art from the Heart Live entertainment, refreshments and an art auction benefitting children and adults with cerebral palsy and motor disabilities. Thursday, 6-10 pm; Full Sail Live, 141 University Park Drive, Winter Park; $125; 407-671-4687; cecodreams.org. Orlando Beer Festival More room, more breweries and more beer. Saturday, 12:30-5 pm; Orlando Festival Park, East Robinson Street and North Primrose Drive; $35-$65; orlandobeerfestival.com. Orlando Punk Rock Flea Market Flea market for punk, goth, metal, hardcore and other counterculturerelated goods. Sunday, noon; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; free; willspub.org. PechaKucha Orlando Special presentations from a variety of artists and community leaders. Friday, 8 pm; Walt Disney Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $39.50-$179; 844-513-2014; drphillipscenter.org.

THEWEEK Nook on Robinson, 2432 E. Robinson St.; free; facebook.com/thenookonrobinson. Orlando Poetry Slam: Zeke Russell Competitive poetry slam with a featured reader. Thursday Nov. 8, 8 pm; The Milk Bar, 2424 E. Robinson St.; free; 407-896-4954. Writing Workshop: World-Building in a Binder Author Kerry Evelyn teaches how to organize research and world elements into a single binder. Wednesday, 7 pm; Alafaya Library, 12000 E. Colonial Drive; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info.

SPORTS Orlando Magic vs. Detroit Pistons NBA basketball. Wednesday, 7 pm; Amway Center, 400 W. Church St.; $14.25-$536.50; 800-745-3000; amwaycenter.com. Orlando Magic vs. Washington Wizards NBA basketball. Friday, 7 pm; Amway Center, 400 W. Church St.; $14.25-$536.50; 800-745-3000; amwaycenter.com. UCF Knights vs. Navy Midshipmen College football. Saturday; Spectrum Stadium, University of Central Florida; $60-$200; 407-823-1000; ucf.edu.

HOLIDAY Disney Springs Christmas Tree Trail Holiday display of Christmas trees, along with Santa’s Chalet and other activities. Opens Thursday, 11 am, through Dec. 24; Disney Springs Town Center, 1676 E. Buena Vista Drive, Lake Buena Vista; free; disneysprings.com.

Script Orlando: Benoit Glazer, Bruce Hensal Monthly series of public talks on Orlando topics. Wednesday, 6-7 pm; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd.; Free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info.

Holiday Open House Live music, local artists and crafters and plenty of hot mulled wine and wine specials. Friday-Sunday, 10 am; Lakeridge Winery and Vineyards, 19239 N. U.S. Highway 27, Clermont; $5; 800-768-9463.

Taste of Dr. Phillips Sample bites from area restaurants, along with live entertainment, drinks and more. Sunday, 1-4 pm; Dellagio Town Center, 7940 Via Dellagio Way; $75; drphillipsrotary.com.

Holiday Open House The gallery features carefully curated gifts and décor in themes. Nov. 9, 6-9 pm; Jeanine Taylor Folk Art, 211 E. First St., Sanford; free; 407-323-2774; jtfolkart.com.

LEARNING

Festival of Trees Watch the museum transform into a glittering wonderland filled with sparkling trees, vignettes and stunning decor for visitors of all ages. 10 am-4 pm; Orlando Museum of Art, 2416 N. Mills Ave.; $15; 407-896-4231, ext. 254; omart.org.

You Are There: Roaring Through the 1920s Living history presentation from Charlie Grinker. Thursday, 2 pm; Clermont Performing Arts Center Black Box Theater, 3700 S. Highway 27, Clermont; $10.75; 352-3944800; clermontperformingarts.com.

LITERARY Get Lit: Closed Mic Poetry reading with six selected poets. Wednesday, 8:30 pm; The

Festival of Trees at the Lake Mary Museum Share your family Christmas stories and enjoy festive holiday decorations. Tuesdays, Fridays, 10 am-3 pm; Lake Mary Museum, 158 N. Country Club Road, Lake Mary; free; 407-585-1481; lakemarymuseum.com. n orlandoweekly.com

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B Y D A N S AVA G E

I’ve been spending a lot of time lately thinking about myself and my sexuality and my romantic self. I can log on and easily find someone to fuck. I’m a bear-built top guy. There are ladies in my life who choose to share their beds with me. I can find subs to tie up and torture. (I’m kinky and bi.) What I can’t find is a long-term partner. The problem is that after I fuck/sleep with/torture someone, my brain stops seeing them as sexual and moves them into the friend category. I have friends that I used to fuck regularly, that now it’s a chore to get it up for. Sure, the sex still feels good, but it’s not passionate. And when it’s all said and done, they’re still in the “friend” category in my brain. Some of them have suggested being more, but I’ve recoiled. There’s nothing wrong with them, but they’re friends, not potential partners. I’m 32, and my siblings are married and having kids, and the people I grew up with are married and having kids. And here I am not able to find a long-term significant other. Am I broken? Should I just accept that, at least for me, sexual partners and domestic/romantic partners will always be separate categories? Always Alone What if you’re not like most everyone else? What if this is just how your sexuality works? What if you’re wired – emotionally, romantically, sexually – for intense but brief sexual connections that blossom into wonderful friendships? And what if you’ve been tricked into thinking you’re broken because the kind of successful long-term relationships your siblings and friends have are celebrated and the kind of successful short-term relationships you have are stigmatized? If your siblings and friends want to have the kinds of relationships they’re having – and it’s possible some do not – they will feel no inner conflict about their choices while simultaneously being showered with praise for their choices. But what are they really doing? They’re doing what they want, they’re doing what makes them happy, they’re doing what works for them romantically, emotionally and sexually. And what are you doing? Maybe you’re doing what you want, AA, maybe you’re doing what could make you happy. So why doesn’t it make you happy? Maybe because you’ve been made to feel broken by a culture that holds up one relationship model – the partnered and preferably monogamous pair – and insists that this model is the only healthy and whole option, and that anyone who goes a different way, fucks a different way or relates a different way is broken. Now, it’s possible you are broken, of course, but anyone could be broken. You could be broken, I could be broken, your married siblings and friends could be broken. But here’s a suggestion for something I 62

want you to try, something that might make you feel better because it could very well be true: Try to accept that, for you, sexual partners and domestic/romantic partners might always be separate, and that doesn’t mean you’re broken. If that self-acceptance makes you feel whole, AA, then you have your answer. I might make a different suggestion if your brief-but-intense sexual encounters left a lot of hurt feelings in their wake. But that’s not the case. You hook up with someone a few times, you share an intense sexual experience, and you feel a brief romantic connection to them. And when those sexual and romantic feelings subside, you’re not left with a string of bitter exes and enemies, but with a large and growing circle of good friends. Which leads me to believe that even if you aren’t doing what everyone else is doing, AA, you’re clearly doing something right. P.S. Another option if you do want to get married someday: a companionate marriage to one of your most intimate friends – someone like you, AA, who also sees potential life partners and potential sex partners as two distinct categories with no overlap – and all the Grindr hookups and BDSM sessions you like with one-offs who become good friends. I knew my little brother had an odd fascination with rubber that would likely become sexual. He would steal rubber gloves and hide them in his room, and there was a huge meltdown when our mother found a gas mask in his room when he was 12. My brother is in his 30s now and has a closet full of rubber “gear” that he dresses in pretty much exclusively. (When he’s not at work, he’s in rubber.) All of his friends are rubber fetishists. When he travels, it’s only to fetish events where he can wear his rubber clothing publicly. He will date only other rubber fetishists, which seems to have severely limited his romantic prospects, and he posts photos of himself in rubber to his social media accounts. I read your column and I understand that kinks aren’t chosen and they can be incorporated into a person’s sex life in a healthy way. But my brother’s interest in rubber seems obsessive. Your thoughts? Rubbered Up Baby Brother’s Erotic Rut If your brother were obsessed with surfing or snowboarding and built his life around chasing waves or powder – and would date only people who shared his passion – you wouldn’t have written me. Same goes if he were obsessed with pro sports, as so many straight men are, or Broadway shows, as so many gay men are. The only “problem” here is that your brother’s obsession makes his dick hard – and to be clear, RUBBER, the problem is yours, not his. An erotic obsession or passion is just as legitimate as a

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“ W H AT A I N ’ T B R O K E ”

nonerotic one. And even if I thought your brother had a problem – and I do not – nothing I wrote here would result in him liking his rubber clothes, rubber buddies or rubber fetish events any less.

Meet Talos! I’m a 28-year-old straight man married to a 26-year-old straight woman. My wife and I were watching a video about sex and the female orgasm, and they were talking about how, unlike men, women don’t have a refractory period after orgasm. We were confused because we are almost the complete opposite. I have never experienced drowsiness, lessened sensitivity or quickened loss of erection after orgasm. My wife, on the other hand, doesn’t even like me kissing her bits after orgasm. She says they feel tender and sore afterward, and this feeling can last for hours. Is this normal? Newlywed’s Orgasms Rarely Multiply What you describe isn’t the norm, NORM, but it’s your norm. Most men temporarily lose interest in sex immediately after climaxing. It’s called the refractory period, and it can last anywhere from 15 minutes (for teenagers) to 24 hours (for old-timers). It’s a hormone thing: After a guy comes, his pituitary gland pumps prolactin into his bloodstream – and prolactin blocks dopamine, the hormone that makes a dude horny and keeps him horny. But some men release very little prolactin and consequently have short refractory periods; a handful of men have no refractory period at all and are capable of multiple orgasms. You don’t mention the ability to come again and again, but you do sound exceptional in that you don’t lose your erection after you come. Your wife also sounds exceptional, NORM, since most orgasmic women are capable of having multiple orgasms – but most women ≠ all women. (I’ve always loved what groundbreaking sex researcher Mary Jane Sherfey wrote in 1966: “The more orgasms she has, the more she can have – for all intents and purposes, the human female is sexually insatiable.”) But again, NORM, there’s nothing wrong with either of you. It’s just that your norm isn’t the norm – and that’s only a problem if you choose to regard it as one. On the Lovecast, strap it on with Tristan Taormino!: savagelovecast.com. mail@savagelove.net ITMFA.org

This 3-year-old cutie (A404116) arrived at Orange County Animal Services on Sept. 24 because his owners were no longer able to care for him. Our staff is shocked that this handsome, easy-going dog has not yet been adopted. Talos would love to find a home in time for holidays! He’s sure to bring cheer to any household. For more information on Talos and other available pets, please visit ocnetpets.com. For the month of November, the shelter is reducing cat and dog adoption fees to just $10 for those who donate a children’s toy worth $10 or more. The collected toys will go to children in need. Adoption fees cover spay/neuter, microchip and vaccines. Orange County Animal Services is located at 2769 Conroy Road in Orlando, near the Mall at Millenia. The shelter is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information about adopting a shelter pet, please visit ocnetpets.com.


Marketplace ANTIQUE TELEPHONE COLLECTION FOR SALE –

More than 200 antique telephones collected worldwide for 30+ years. European & American. From Wall Phones to Candlesticks, to Desk Sets & more. Some wanted by the Smithsonian. Selling telephone ephemera as well. Unbelievable & rare collection - first time open to public!! Collection located in South Florida. Serious buyers only. Call Jeff 954-295-6676

FOOD TRUCKS & CONCESSIONS TRAILERS – One Fat Frog (407)480-3409

Cash for cars and trucks Running or not Any Condition 352-771-6191. WANTED - All motorhomes, fifth wheels and travel trailers. Cars, vans and trucks any condition. Cash paid on the spot. Call 954-595-0093.

Legal, Public Notices AUCTION EXTRA SPACE STORAGE – STORE 1631 5753 Hoffner Ave, Orlando, FL 32822 Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the locations and times indicated: On November 28, 2018 11:30 AM location: 5753 Hoffner Ave. Orlando FL 32822 (407)212-5890 Charitin CentenoHousehold goods, Emmanuel Aluko- Household goods, Pedro Ignacio Alvarez- Household goods, Edward Velez- king bedroom set, table with 4 chairs, Saisha Massey- house hold goods, Kellie Martin- Household items, Jose Samanez- House hold goods, Yesenia Carrasquillo- Household goods, Michael Jay- Household, Luis Angel Arias Montas- Furniture and personal items, Nicole Marshall- Household items. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facilities in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. AUCTION Extra Space Storage – Store 8841 9847 Curry Ford Road, Orlando,

FL 32825 Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 9847 Curry Ford Road, Orlando, FL 32825 (407) 495-9612, November 28th , 2018 @ 11:00AM: Eric Athearn – Furniture, Maria Perez – Household goods, Janine Jackson – Boxes Classroom Supplies, Maria Brellis – 2-bedroom apartment. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. AUCTION EXTRASPACE STORAGE – STORE 1335 1101 MARSHALL FARMS RD, OCOEE FL 34761 Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 1101 Marshall Farms Rd, Ocoee FL 34761, 11/23/2018 @ 10:30 am: Jeff Rego, Unit H467 Cases of tile flooring, Cases of wood flooring, Power tools, Jayrem Fernandez, Unit A043 Couch, Dresser, Janet Howell, Unit C189 Dresser, Totes, Bicycle, Devonte Bynoe, Unit 925 Clothes, Kenneth Coleman, Unit 0729 1999 Ford Mustang VIN 1FAFP46V0XF183686 Owner Adrienna Tameka Coleman. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. AUCTION EXTRASPACE STORAGE – STORE 8813 7500 W Colonial Dr, Orlando, Fl 32818 Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 7500 W Colonial Dr, Orlando FL 32818, 11/23//2018 @ 9:30 AM: Tamara Bavero, Unit 2153, furniture and boxes, Fenel Rene, Unit 1228, home goods, Tisha Brown, Unit 1102, Household goods, Ladarius Stephenson, Unit 2124, business inventory/shirts, Tyquan Douglas, Unit 2387, Clothes,Rims and tires, Gina Quinones, Unit 1203, New customer Requested a 10x10Boxes and furniture, Rose Ferguson, Unit 2384, House hold goods, Rishi Jolivain, Unit 2246, Household goods, Beatrice Moxey, Unit 2173, Furniture, Lora White, Unit 2286, storage bins, Rachele Mccoy, Unit 1250, household goods, Maryury Mella, Unit 2165A, refrigerator, boxes, Jennifer Shipley, Unit 1183, Household goods, Tapeka Taylor, Unit 1372, Household goods, JASON ARMSTRONG, Unit 1235,

CLOTHES, Tamara Tosen, Unit 1315, boxes, king bedroom set, 2 queen beds, deep freezer, dressers, tvs. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. AUCTION EXTRASPACE STORAGE @ 11261 Narcoossee Rd, Orlando, FL 32832 (407)280-7355, November 28th, 2018 @ 12:00PM: We will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below: Michael Harlos- Office items Linda Pietri-Clothes John Kinghousehold items Carlos Santoshousehold items Rami Mohamad -household items. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 540 Cypress Parkway, Kissimmee Florida 34759, 863-240-0879 on 11/20/18 @ 11:30AM. Carmen Ayala-household goods, Yariel Torres-full bed, boxes, household goods, Eurhonda Renee Maxey- household items, Danielle Loyd-household items, Lina Marie Resto -household items, Latasha Hill-household items & furniture. Adaryl Beasley-household items, furniture, couch, beds, Miriam Aralissis Echavarria- household items, Nadine Jasmine Josephhousehold items. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the locations indicated: 11071 University Blvd. Orlando, FL 32817 11/28/2018 10:00am: East Coast Wings-William Charlie Brown- Computer/Monitor, Boxes, Files, Personal papers, Shelves, Table, Kitchen Racks, Restaurant equipment, Dishes Thomas Litteer- Bed, Couch, Dresser, Tv, Bags, Boxes, Desk, Lamps, Workout equipment Beverly Rodriguez Bed, Table, bags, picture/ photographs, totes, toys, luggage, lamp, holiday decoration Diane Montgery -Chair, couch, table, printer, pictures /photgraphs, grill, tire, pillows Mariah Crenshaw-

chair, couch, tv, bags, boxes, totes, toys, futon Candido Lopez- chair, table, microwave, boxes, totes, tool box, c.d’s, ladders, bookcase, storage cabinet, holiday décor Pressure King Inc- Harold KingTable, Refrigerator, desk, hand tools, power tools, shelves, toolbox, ladder, motorized wheel chair, car parts, buffer/flooring machine, motorcycle parts. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN RE: THE ESTATE OF ROBERT WILLIAM NEWHAM PROBATE NO. 2018-CP-003393. NOTICE TO CREDITORS: The administration of the estate of ROBERT WILLIAM NEWHAM, deceased, whose date of death was October 7, 2018, is pending in the Circuit Court of Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 425 N. Orange Ave., Orlando, Florida 32801. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to

be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.. The date of first publication of this notice is 11/7/18. Signed on this 15th day of October, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ GARY E. DOANE, Esquire Florida Bar No: 228923, LAW OFFICES OF GARY DOANE, P.A., 230 East Monument Avenue, Suite D, Kissimmee, Florida 34741, (407) 648-2000, Lawofficesofgarydoane@gmail. com Personal Representative: /s/ Michael Darin Newham

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 4390 Pleasant Hill Rd, Kissimmee, FL 34746 (407) 944-1408 on 11/20/18 @ 10:30 am: Jonathan Edmunds, hhold items, Dorna Noble, furniture, Armando Blanco, hhold items, Jaidat Persaud, business equipment, Christopher Jacobs, hhold items, Patricia Hughes, hhold goods, Elionel Garcia, hhold goods, personal items, Heather Lee Smith, bedroom set, box rocking chair, Suhail Martinez, hhold goods, Giovanni Rosario, hhold goods, John Durran, hhold and personal items, power tools, Felix R Peralta, hhold goods, personal items, Angel Gabriel Molina Acevedo, hhold goods, personal items, Adaryl Beasley, hhold goods. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

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Legal, Public Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA DIVISION: 03/SHEA PINE HILLS SERVICE CENTER CASE NO.: DP17-318 In the Interest of: B. G. DOB: 04/11/2017, a minor child SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS, STATE OF FLORIDA TO: PAGE HENDRICKSON, mother. WHEREAS a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this court regarding the above-referenced child. You are hereby commanded to appear before Judge Timothy Shea, on Monday, January 14, 2019, at 9:30 a.m. at the Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, Florida 32806, for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and at the time specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MIGHT LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. Pursuant to Sections 39.802(4)(d) and 63.082(6)(g), Florida Statutes, you are hereby informed of the availability of private placement with an adoption entity, as defined in Section 63.032(3), Florida Statutes. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at Orlando, Orange County, Florida this 1st day of November, 2018. This summons has been issued at the request of: Jennifer McCarthy, Esquire, Florida Bar No.: 0086793, Children’s Legal Services, State of Florida, Department of Children and Families, 882 S. Kirkman Road, Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32811, 407-579-9480 - Telephone, Jennifer.mccarthy@ myflfamilies.com. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Deputy Clerk, (Court Seal) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA DIVISION: 03/SHEA PINE HILLS SERVICE CENTER CASE NO.: DP17-318 In the Interest of: B. G. DOB: 04/11/2017, a minor child SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS, STATE OF FLORIDA TO: DERRICK GOGUL, father. WHEREAS a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this court regarding the above-referenced child. You are hereby commanded to appear before Judge Timothy Shea, on Monday, January 14,

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2019, at 9:30 a.m. at the Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, Florida 32806, for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and at the time specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MIGHT LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. Pursuant to Sections 39.802(4)(d) and 63.082(6)(g), Florida Statutes, you are hereby informed of the availability of private placement with an adoption entity, as defined in Section 63.032(3), Florida Statutes. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at Orlando, Orange County, Florida this 1st day of November, 2018. This summons has been issued at the request of: Jennifer McCarthy, Esquire, Florida Bar No.: 0086793, Children’s Legal Services, State of Florida, Department of Children and Families, 882 S. Kirkman Road, Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32811, 407-579-9480 - Telephone, Jennifer.mccarthy@ myflfamilies.com. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Deputy Clerk, (Court Seal) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA, JUVENILE DIVISION: 03/SHEA, CASE NO.: DP17-754 IN THE INTEREST OF D.O . DOB: 011/09/2017, Minor Child. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS, STATE OF FLORIDA. To: TIANA DECOTIS, Address Unknown. WHEREAS a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this Court regarding the abovereferenced child. You are hereby commanded to appear before Judge Timothy Shea, on December 6, 2018 at 9:30 a.m. at the Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, Florida 32806, for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and at the time specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD (THESE CHILDREN). IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN) NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. “Pursuant to Sections 39.802(4)(d) and 63.082(6)(g), Florida Statutes, you are hereby informed of the availability of private placement with an adoption entity, as defined in Section 63.032(3), Florida Statutes.”

WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at Orlando, Orange County, Florida this 1st day of November, 2018. This summons has been issued at the request of: Nancy A. Robak, Attorney for the State of Florida, Department of Children and Families, 400 West Robinson Street, Ste. N211, Orlando, FL 32801, (407) 317-7643. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURTBy: /s/ Deputy Clerk, (Court Seal) LIVE AUCTION MULTIPLE FACILITIES – MULTIPLE UNITS Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: Facility 1: 610 Rinehart Rd, Lake Mary, FL 32746, 407-333-4355, November 19th, 2018 @ 11:30am 0600 Ian Smith-unknown goods, 1032 Glenn Alper- household goods, 1025 Kristi Mitchell- new customer, mattress set, 15 boxes sofa, tv, 0866 Julie Amiot- household goods, 0701B Marie Cole- 2 bedrooms,with couch and two tvs and dining table, two bedroom town house, no w/d no frig, 0597 Donna HazelwoodHousehold goods, 0023 Kimberly Hunter-tables, queen mattress set, china cabinet L shape couch and dresser nite stand, 0744 Thomas Cassandra-household goods, 0185 Jim Wulf-furniture household goods, 0745 Thomas Cassandra household, 0267 Vachira Wongmongkol household goods, 0574 Shelia Foose-household goods, 0686 LaShant Hawkins -household goods, 0229 Thomas Cassandra -household goods, 0450 Thomas Cassandra household goods and a car 2005 VW Touareg Vin #WVGBG77L85D009666, owner:Damon Bradley Herota. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: Facility 2: 2728 W 25 TH St, Sanford, FL 32771 407-708-3327 November 19 th 2018 @ 10:30 AM 1589 Sierra Locascio-Crib, kids bed, toys, rugs, table. 1584 Edwin McDonald -Household Items. 1265 Utavia Brown-Beds baby bed dresser chest night stand and clothes. 1468 Natalie Williams-Household goods. 1015 David Cherry-household items. 1567 Caleb Murray- Household Goods. 1536 Latoya Lester-2 bedroom apartment (washer, dryer). Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● NOV. 7-13, 2018 ● orlandoweekly.com

the personal property.

Dated: 11/2/18

Notice is hereby given that Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at location indicated: 1751 Fortune Rd Kissimmee, FL 34744, 407-414-5303 on 11/20/18 @ 9:30 am: Jennifer Kirby household appliances & furniture, Rafael Rodriguez tools, boxes, misc, Carlos Magno Malavet business items, Mary Mar Delgado Ayala personal belongings, misc items, Dennis Seeraj household goods, Hamza Balghit 2 love seats, queen bed, Brenda Nunez household goods, washer, dryer, Rahman S Prescott 2 bedroom home, Shirlon Cowan household items, Yexenia Roldan full size bed & its frames. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned,Pistil Events, LLC, of 2300 Edgewater Dr., Orlando, FL 32804,, pursuant to the requirements of the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, is hereby advertising the following fictitious name: Pistil Home and Garden It is the intent of the undersigned to register “Pistil Home and Garden” with the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations. Dated: 10/30/18

NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned, Dentists of Winter Springs, PA, of 5908 Red Bug Lake Road, Winter Springs, FL 32708, pursuant to the requirements of the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, is hereby advertising the following fictitious name: Dentists of Winter Springs It is the intent of the undersigned to register “Dentists of Winter Springs” with the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations. Dated: 11/1/18 NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned, Maxqen LLC, of 312 N Forest Avenue, Orlando, FL 32803, pursuant to the requirements of the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, is hereby advertising the following fictitious name: Engraver Gurus It is the intent of the undersigned to register “Engraver Gurus” with the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations. Dated: 11/1/18 NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca JeanneKapp Juarez, of 2901 Parkway Blvd, Kissimmee, FL 34747 in the county of Osceola, pursuant to the requirements of the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, is hereby advertising the following fictitious name: Transformation It is the intent of the undersigned to register “Transformation” with the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION FOR MONIES DUE ON STORAGE LOCKERS LOCATED AT UHAUL COMPANY FACILITIES. STORAGE LOCATIONS AND TIMES ARE LISTED BELOW. ALL GOODS SOLD ARE HOUSEHOLD CONTENTS, MISCELLANEOUS OR RECOVERED GOODS. ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD TO SATISFY OWNER’S LIEN FOR RENT AND FEES IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807, STARTS AT 8 am and RUNS CONTINUOUSLY. Uhaul Ctr Kirkman-600 S Kirkman Rd- Orlando 12/5/18 3037 Shabiki Dann 2101 Antonio Troutman 1015 Christina Hernandez 1119 Moses Scott 2116 Simplified Financial Service 3069 Jamison Malloy 3054 Lou Kirby 4012 Cindy Charles 4035 Debra Brooks 1069 Monica Grossinger 3043 Nichola Boyd 3071 Jessica Whitley 1062 Nyrere Nembhard 2018 Simplified Financial Service 4029 Andre Granger 3003 Frederick Dauley 3014 Edsel Tenorio 3109 Christin Taylor 6045 Ivon Joseph 3033 Ivy Jones 3083 Ursula Jones 2066 Malcolm Robertson 2086 Jonathan Smith 2120 Winston Fortune 2072 Wendy Pierre Uhaul Ctr Orange Ave-3500 S Orange Ave- Orlando 12/5/18 1622 Heather Longo 1807 Jordan Mercer 1421 Anna Daszewska 1627 Monica Sheals 1811 Ambery Hines 1059 Brandon Parrish 1062 Btian Margolis Uhaul Ctr Baldwin Park- 4001 E Colonial Drive- Orlando 12/5/18 B214 Patrick Smith B177 Juan Marti C141 Brackston Helms A115 Cintron Service Group B138 Bernie Wilkerson C168 Christyna Mcbrayer B216 Bernie Wilkerson D102 Brett Kolmetz B194 Bernie Wilkerson C144 Ben Chihombori B213 Bernie Wilkerson A104 Cintron Service Group B212 Bernie Wilkerson D206 Lena Reed B136 Carl Metzger Uhaul Ctr Goldenrod-508 N Goldenrod Rd- Orlando 12/5/18 324 Susan Brijall 1510 Pamela Bowers 625-26 Brahim Boubecker 1410 Samantha Velez 221 Adrain Robinson 744 Jessica Mojica 203 Veline Parfait 511 Diana Polo 614 Jonathan Soto 423 Nildo Martell AA2795U Candyce Holland 1506 Centro Intl Nueve Vida Grisel

Rivera Baez 705 Anthony Brimhall 433 Anthony Gonzalez Uhaul Ctr Alafaya-11815 E Colonial Drive- Orlando 12/5/18 1606 Jessica Ramos 1261 Mary Baldwin 1425 Duncan Dykes 1427 David Mcmahan. NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE NEW GENERATION TOWING AND RECOVERY, LLC. gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on the following dates, 10:00 am at 10850 COSMONAUT BLVD ORLANDO, FL 32824 pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. NEW GENERATION TOWING AND RECOVERY, LLC. reserves the right to accept or reject any and/ or all bids. NOVEMBER 22, 2018 1HGCG56451A020547 2001 HONDA 1HGEJ6620WL010826 1998 HONDA 2HGFA1F50BH303277 2011 HONDA KNDJB7234Y5679753 2000 KIA NOVEMBER 23, 2018 4A3AJ56G4VE030175 1997 MITSUBISHI JHMEG8546PS029060 1993 HONDA NOVEMBER 24, 2018 2HGES16542H524129 2002 HONDA LHJTLBBN3FB000239 2015 BASH NOVEMBER 25, 2018 1G2NE52E0XM804139 1999 PONTIAC JM1FE17N340140181 2004 MAZDA NOVEMBER 27, 2018 JM1BL1V82C1700105 2012 MAZDA. NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE To satisfy the owner’s storage lien, PS Orange Co. Inc. will sell at public lien sale on November 23, 2018, the personal property in the below-listed units, which may include but are not limited to: household and personal items, office and other equipment. The public sale of these items will begin at 09:30 AM and continue until all units are sold. PUBLIC STORAGE # 25893, 3725 W Lake Mary Blvd, Lake Mary, FL 32746, (407) 495-1274 Time: 09:30 AM: 1008 - Sharp, Sharica; 1171 - Harris, Derrilyn; 2078 Moran Pelaez, Gregory; 3030 - Sharp, Sharica; 3053 - Vazquez, Kiana; 3068 - Mekarski, Joleen; 4011 - Reed, Christopher; 4012 Reed, Christopher; 4036 - Pierce, Deborah; 5010 - Funk, Aaron; 5106 - Brescia, Bryan; 6119 - davila cepeda, Christian; 7119 - Black, Alexis; 9010 - Schlawiedt, BrittAny; 9018 - Matino, Daniel; 9021 - Todd, Jacob PUBLIC STORAGE # 25842, 51 Spring Vista Dr, Debary, FL 32713, (386) 202 2956 Time: 09:45 AM: 00289 - Orosz, Jessica; 00302 - Postell, Queona; 00311 Resto, Maribel; 00422 - Peoples,


Shannon; 00425 - Richard, Jeremy; 00507 - Joseph, Wade; 00521 Freshour, William; 00557 - Lee, Lydia; 00576 - Corkery, AMBER; 00582 - Strefling, Terry 00610 - Frankiewicz, Rachel; 00736 perez, william; 00754 - Cespedes, Jessica 00768 - Torrente, Marco 00905 - Russell, Stanford; 00917 Russell, Corey PUBLIC STORAGE # 25438, 2905 South Orlando Drive, Sanford, FL 32773, (407) 545-6715 Time: 10:00 AM: A026 - Rush, Towana A037 - Ortiz, Dylan; B007 - Wilson, LaQuinta; C008 - Lamar, Marquita; C009 - MClaurin, Irma; C046 Pastore, Louis; D030 - Spatcher, Natasha; D052 - Sands, Jaedia; D080 - Bennett, India; D087 - Hurricane Pavers Mateljan, Andrew; E006 - Gonzalez, Antonette; E047 - Hinton, Helen; E051 - Millsap, Marion; F025 - Stevenson, Karen; F036 - Ingram, Delvin G002 Cruce, Dianne; G003 - Reddick, Betty; G020 - Powell, Sadie; H019 - Marimon, Katrina; I006 - Rembert, Aretha; J109 - Gibson, Amanda; J205 - Debose, Tina J214 - Bell, Alicea J219 - Debose, Tina J519 Cole, Denicia; J605 - Cooper, Betty; J608 - Jones, Ann; J708 - McBeth, Terenna J901 - Walker, Angela P065 - Neighbor, Tina P087 Neighbor, Tina PUBLIC STORAGE # 24326, 570 N US Highway 17 92, Longwood, FL 32750, (407) 505-7649 Time: 10:15 AM: A114 - Morton, Erica; A123 - Brown, Jerleen; B236 Kimble, Ronald B255 - Salgado, Shamira; C351 - Colf, Amanda; E058 - Woods, Charles; E064 Burns, Martha; E077 - Miranda, Ernesto; F608 - Christensen, Kristy; F619 - Severance, Brett; F644 Allie, Nancy; H808 - Sears, Ron; H828 - Johnson, Gregory PUBLIC STORAGE # 23118, 141 W State Road 434, Winter Springs, FL 32708, (407) 5120425 Time: 10:30 AM: B045 McCoy, Vincent; H228 - Caldwell, Christian H245 - Griffith, Cara J324 - McGarry, Sandra; J390 Long, Andria K434 - Lewis, Nicole L496 - Hinton, Cory; R544 - Fink, Stephen; S579 - Mickelson, Mark PUBLIC STORAGE # 07030, 360 State Road 434 East, Longwood, FL 32750, (407) 392-1525 Time: 10:45 AM: 1802 - Houser, Brian; 3409 - Ainsworth, Denise; 3511 - Cella, Jaclyne; 3605 - Ciocca, Christopher; 3616 - Creative Chiropractic CareLLC Rodriguez, Cori P010 - Rodgers, Brian PUBLIC STORAGE # 24328, 7190 S US Highway 17/92, Fern Park, FL 32730, (407) 258-3060 Time: 11:00 AM: B219 - Pembleton, Lutisha; B220 - Hutley, Derek; B233 - Mcmurray, Taylor Ann D421 - Jacques, Brenda; E509 - Davis, Maribel; E524 - Guthrie, Robert; E527 - Benedetto, Robert; E536 - Howell, Susan; F602 - Moreno, ulariam F626 - Neighbor, Tina G701 - Bell, Cheryl; G718 - Wolfe, Tence G745 - Figueroa, Christian G746 - Willing, Tyranika H803 - Smith [S Brown], Randall; H813 - Newsome, DeShonda; H816 Heard, Otis J903 - Mugele, Clinton

J920 - Simpson, Jessica; J934 - Grey, Dashaun J939 - Singleton, William; J940 - Hull, Christopher; K021 - Franklin, Jonathan; K023 - Arias, Roger PUBLIC STORAGE # 25455, 8226 S US Highway 17/92, Fern Park, FL 32730, (407) 258-3062 Time: 11:15 AM: A108 - Mcduffie, Janet A162 - Habersham, Tommy B224 - Kersting, Kate B227 - Mcall, Vaughn D406 - Tanyhill, Holly E524 - Young, Jameelah E549 Pittman, Thomas PUBLIC STORAGE # 08729, 5215 Red Bug Lake Road, Winter Springs, FL 32708, (407) 4952108 Time: 11:30 AM: 0329 - King, Ashlee; 4040 - Marlette, Justin PUBLIC STORAGE # 28076, 1131 State Road 436, Casselberry, FL 32707, (407) 505-6401 Time: 11:45 AM: B010 - Campbell, Stephanie; B044 - Martinez, Adrian; B051 Steward, Anthony; C004 - Yancey, Carl; C066 - Brown, Barbara; C103 - Galan, Madeline; D018 - Pierce, Jason; E038 - Glunt, Cindy; F049 - Adderley, Tyreese F061 - Perez, Sulay; G046 - Spinella, Mikanzis; G053 - Pinkney, Joyce; G065 Daverat, Georges G073 - Berger, Alexander; K015 - Britto, Gabrielle . Public sale terms, rules, and regulations will be made available prior to the sale. All sales are subject to cancellation. We reserve the right to refuse any bid. Payment must be in cash or credit card-no checks. Buyers must secure the units with their own personal locks. To claim tax-exempt status, original RESALE certificates for each space purchased is required. By PS Orangeco, Inc., 701 Western Avenue, Glendale, CA 91201. (818) 244- 8080. NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the locations indicated:on November 28th, 2018 12:30 PM location: 13125 S. John Young Parkway Orlando FL 32837 (407)516-7005 Garvey Johnson- piano, cabinets, Renier Maiguel- household items, Melissa Rodriguez- funiture, Marie Balken- home items, Janna C Ceasar- home items, Richard Sanchez- home items, Eliel Diaz- home items, Edwin Limaylla- electronic parts, Monica Gonzalez- home items, Martin Lugo -tools,car parts. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facilities in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that Mindful Storage will sell at public auction, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below

belonging to those individuals listed below at the following times and locations: November 20th, 2018 11:00 am at the Mindful Storage facility located at: 900 Cypress Pkwy. Kissimmee, FL. 34759 (321) 732-6032 The personal goods stored therein by the following: #1022- Households, #2034- Households, #I216 -Households, #H212 -Business Goods, #1026- Households, #F208 -Households, #A109Households, #1171 - Households, #1149Households, #1065 -Furniture, #1028 -Furniture, #1027 -Households, #D229 - Boxes, #D227Clothes, #C104 - Households, #D211 - Households. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Mindful Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that on Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction at the storage facilities listed below, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the following locations: November 29th, 2018 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored therein by the following: 9:30a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 5603 Metrowest Blvd. Orlando, FL 32811 (407) 445-0867 #02226- Demond Jefferson- Shoes and clothes #02211- Martha Hussey- Boxes bages 02041 Clarissa Gaytonhousehold items, personal etc #2017- Christine Lormil- 1 twin bed set kids, kitchen boxes #5153- Victoria Freemon- Household goods #01007- jermaine Maxwell- household furniture and items #09115Lois Hill-boxes and bins #02222Doretta Lee-clothes, household items, boxes 05010- Loyd Saffier Household goods 03019- Florence Mckoy- house hold goods #02166- Vanidia Perez- mattresses, couch, love set, boxes #02080-Mavis Williams-household personal items #09127-Eveline JoachimTubs, bins, boxes 09128-Monica Murray- Books #09120- Kentria Porter-queen bed, boxes #06017Jhirfondren Kentrell Williams-Boxes #09112-Ivory Anderson-mattresses, beds, bins clothes, etc #07006NAVAISHA ELLISON- House Hold Goods 09131-Dennis Galvagnihousehold furniture and goods #3024-Oswaldo Caibett- Queen Bed Set. Sectional. Dining Table and 4 Chairs #09132-Dennis Galvagni- bags, boxes, etc. 10:30a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 5592 L. B. McLeod Rd. Orlando, Fl. 32811 (407) 445-2709 #035 Kevin Smythe – Household Goods #351 Handy Jones – Household Goods #150 Priscilla Alsene – Personal

Items 890 Marcus Bargnare Furniture, appliances 267 Inga Bostwick – Household Goods 760 Yolanda Golding sectional, queen bed, boxes #765 Kenisha Milbourne household goods 124 Jasmine Taylor Household Goods 656- Katina Young2011 Porsche Panamera VIN# WP0AA2A79BL012870 Owner: Katina Maria Young Lien Holder: Santander Consumer USA. 11:00a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 4601 S. Orange Blossom Trail Orlando, FL. 32839 (407)630- 9395 #0F043- Darlene Johnson- Boxes, totes, suit cases, and clothes0E037- Jason Wright- 2 cars and tools- #0I043- Lorimet DesrochesDresser, chair, microwave, bags, bicycle, clothes, and totes- #0C057Carmen Saldana- 20 boxes#0F021- KeNyra Dye- personal items- #0B002- Kerwin Victoria Edwards- personal items, bags, boxes, totes, and tv- 0C028- Tramaine Polite- electronics, furniture, and clothes- #0H023 Sarai Lozafa Mercado- Washer, dyer, and boxes#0H035- Dexter Hall-boxes, coolers and others- 0I008- Georgine Gedeon- clothes and boxes. 11:30a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 3820 S. Orange Ave Orlando, FL 32806 (321)270-3440 #1103 Sharon Moore household goods and furniture, 3067 Tamera Stanfield electric wheelchair and bags, 3133 Tonya Denise Blackmon Bed, boxes, clothes ,#3075 Scott Donald Robinson single bed room apt. 12:00p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 3501 S. Orange Blossom Trail Orlando, FL. 32839 (407)839- 5518 #4097- Daniel Romero exercise equipment, 4049-Angel Bricenooffice furniture, desks 1002-Melissa Toussaint- household goods, #2015- Shalonda Leeks- household items, #2069 Cheletta Hart- clothes, box, #3135-Delroy Woolery- mattress, home goods 1039A- Tonita Dixon- boxes, clothes #2116- Samika Plummer- HHG, tvs. 12:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 1420 N Orange Blossom Trail Orlando, FL 32804 (407)312-8736 #778 Rosetta Adkins household goods, 840 Tania Young Bed, Boxes 751 Isaac Vallejo personal items, #833 Cheletta Hart lawn equipment, #421 Carlos Lacen household goods, 848 Sophia Bele household items, #182 Runnels Jerell household items. 1:00p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 1001 Lee Rd. Orlando, FL 32810 (407)489-3742 #1062 Caroline Reed Household goods 1077 Linnda Durre Desk, Boxes, household goods 2162 Natasha Marie Phillips 2 bedroom apt, beds, expensive sofa set, boxes and totes, tv 1016 Courtney Tookes HHG #3175 Jack Kenmore tools, smaller furniture #3134 Kevin Kennedy boxes of clothing 4078 Amber Brown Household Goods #2113 Ridgeo’Rane Bonnick household items #4036 Danielle Genty

Household goods. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that on Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction at the storage facilities listed below, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the following locations: November 30th, 2018 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored therein by the following: 9:30a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 2631 E Semoran Blvd. Apopka, FL 32703 (407) 408-7437 #2273- Guylyn Laney- Household items #1110 -Stephen Bowman- Household items #1704- Windel Germain -Household items #1112- Virginia Hernandez -Household 1726-Miguel Angel Garcia Narvaez -Furniture #2029-John Kuhn-Household items #2009- Jonathan Santiago- Household items 1709- Greg Cozart- Household items 1010- Craig Fugitt- Furniture and boxes 2116-Virginia Hernandez- Household items #1412 Brian Morgan -Household items #2334-Jasmine Mullins- Household items 1603- David Taylor -Household items 1715-James Thomas -Clothes, desk. 10:30a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 831 N Park Ave. Apopka, FL 32712 (407) 450-0345 #1304-Scott Winternheimer -chair, boxes, totes, wood head & foot board ,seasonal items. 2027- Jacqueline Teccichair, couch, boxes, totes, toys, tool box, records. #2308- Jack Woodford-dresser, table, TV, totes, toys, speaker. 1621 Bridgette Small-chair, table, microwave, bags, clothes, pictures, totoes. 1905- Chrystal Perez- TV, boxes, totes, vacuum. # P03-Lakisha Yeldell- 2006 Blue Volkswagen Jetta VIN#3VWPF71K76M713230 Owner: Lakisha Yeldell Lien Holder: TMX Finance Of Florida, INC. #2315- Nakeya Drinkard- couch, table, bags, boxes, clothes, shoes, totes, dishes, toaster, sewing machine, foot bath. #1007-C-Aracely Melendez bags, pictures, shoes, totes, 2070 Enrique Presas- bags, clothes, shoes, hand tools, shevles, rake, car seat. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

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Legal, Public Notices

NOTICE OF SALE Vehicles will be sold as is, no warranty. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid. Terms of bids are cash only. Buyer must have funds on hand at time of sale: 2005 Jeep VIN# 1J4GS48K85C512188 1999 Honda VIN# 1HGCG1651XA000905 2002 Mazda VIN# JM1BJ225121628978 2009 Volkswagen VIN# 3VWRM71K09M145213 2005 Toyota VIN# 5TDBA22C85S053221 2008 Nissan VIN# 3N1AB61E28L623973 1997 Chevy VIN# 1G1JF52T6V7230687 To be sold at auction at 8:00 a.m. on November 21, 2018 at 7301 Gardner Street, Winter Park, FL. 32792 Constellation Towing & Recovery LLC

Employment

Brand Manager needed by Marco Store, LLC to direct mrktg & progs. Evaluate mrktg strategy. Benchmark the mrkt. Evaluate budget, expenditures, rsrch & dvlpmt of the product. Dvlp & dsgn products based on the brands guidelines. Use strategic planning to ensure the sale & profitabilty of product. Manage wholesale key accts. Anlyz contracts from vendors, suppliers & courier co’s. Consult w/buying personnel to gain advice regard’g the type of products & services expected to be in demand. Must have 2 yrs exp as Brand Mgr & exp w/Brazilian & Chinese mrkts. Mail resume to R. Harary, 7524 Currency Dr, Orlando, FL 32809 Clinical Safety Research Physicians, Longwood, FL: Apply medical expertise in immune oncology thr/o entire life cycle of neurosciences & oncology project. Manage clinical research functions, define clinical research strategy, & facilitate discussions between clinicians, regulators, key opinion leaders, senior management, & executive board. Send res to DSP, LLC, 160 Vista Oak Dr., Longwood, FL 32779. Lead Agile Coach sought by Walt Disney Attractions Technology LLC in Orlando & Lake Buena Vista, FL to develop agile roadmaps and system requirements. 7 yrs of SW devel, sys analysis, program, or rel. exp. Walt Disney Attractions Technology LLC., Attn: R.Giron, Job ID#468603-18, PO BOX 6992, Burbank, CA 91510-6992.

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THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY, REGION 4 ANNOUNCES THE FIFTH FIVE-YEAR REVIEW FOR THE CITY INDUSTRIES, INC. SUPERFUND SITE, WINTER PARK, ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA –

Purpose/Objective: The EPA is conducting a Five-Year Review of the remedy for the City Industries, Inc. Superfund site (the Site) in Winter Park, Florida. The purpose of the Five-Year Review is to make sure the selected cleanup actions effectively protect human health and the environment. Site Background: The 1-acre Site is located in Winter Park, Florida. From 1971 to 1983, the City Chemical Company (also known as City Industries) operated a waste storage, disposal and recycling facility on the Site. Poor waste handling practices and dumping contaminated site soil and groundwater. Contaminants include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including chlorinated and non-chlorinated solvents, paint and varnish wastes, acid/alkaline plating wastes, waste ink and 1,4-dioxane. Because of these findings, the EPA listed the Site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup Actions: Removal actions by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) and EPA in 1983 and 1984 addressed contaminated soil. The EPA selected the site’s groundwater remedy in a 1990 Record of Decision (ROD). It included institutional controls, groundwater monitoring of the surficial and Floridan aquifers, pumping and treating contaminated groundwater by air stripping, and discharging treated groundwater to a nearby canal. The EPA updated this remedy in 1994 by issuing an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) to eliminate the secondary treatment of discharged effluent and set cleanup standards for two chemicals not addressed in the ROD. Five-Year Review Schedule: The National Contingency Plan requires review of remedial actions that result in any hazardous substances, pollutants or contaminants remaining at the Site above levels that allow for unlimited use and unrestricted exposure every five years to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. The fifth of the Five-Year Reviews for the Site will be completed by August 2019. The EPA Invites Community Participation in the Five-Year Review Process: The EPA is conducting this Five-Year Review to evaluate the effectiveness of the Site’s remedy and to ensure that the remedy remains protective of human health and the environment.

As part of the Five-Year Review process, EPA staff is available to answer any questions about the Site. Community members who have questions about the Site or the Five-Year Review process, or who would like to participate in a community interview, are asked to contact: Peter Thorpe, EPA Remedial Project Manager, Phone: (404) 562-9688, Email: Thorpe. Peter@epa.gov, Kerisa Coleman, EPA Community Involvement Coordinator, Phone: 404-5628831| (877) 718-3752 (toll-free), Email: Coleman.Kerisa@epa.gov, Mailing Address: U.S. EPA Region 4, 61 Forsyth Street, S.W., 11th Floor, Atlanta, GA 30303-8960. A copy of the final Five-Year Review Report will be made available upon completion at the Site’s local document repository at the Winter Park Public Library located at 460 East New England Avenue, Winter Park, Florida. Additional information is also available at the Site’s local document repository and online at https://www.epa.gov/ superfund/city-industries-inc.

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Orlando Weekly November 7, 2018  
Orlando Weekly November 7, 2018