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ONE YEAR

After PULSE


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Publisher Graham Jarrett Editor Jessica Bryce Young Editorial Staff Writer Monivette Cordeiro Calendar Editor Thaddeus McCollum Music Editor Matthew Moyer Digital Content Editor Colin Wolf Contributors Peg Aloi, Rob Bartlett, Jen Cray, Jason Ferguson, Hannah Glogower, Alma Hill, Scott Horn, Liv Jonse, Holly V. Kapherr, Faiyaz Kara, Seth Kubersky, Bao Le-Huu, Cameron Meier, Richard Reep, Joey Roulette, Leah Sandler, Steve Schneider, Madelenie Scott, Nicolette Shurba, Abby Stassen Editorial Interns Kristin James, Virginia Vasquez, Jacob Galvin

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Advertising Director of Sales Jeff Kruse Major Accounts Specialist Leslie Egan Senior Multimedia Account Executives Debbie Garcia, Lori Green, Dan Winkler Multimedia Account Executives Scott Navarro, Scott Spar Classified and Legal Rep Jerrica Schwartz Advertising Coordinator Danielle Lebron

NEWS + FEATURES 7 Orlando united In the hours and days just after the senseless violence at Pulse, this is how we felt

Marketing and Events Events Director Zackary Rowe Events and Promotions Manager Brad Van De Bogert Marketing and Events Coordinator Rachel Hoyle

9 Still here A year after the worst day of their lives, survivors of the mass shooting at the gay nightclub Pulse learn to live with a new normal

17 In Memoriam: The Orlando 49 In every issue since the Pulse Nightclub shootings, Orlando Weekly profiled a person killed on June 12, 2016. Here are all of their stories.

Creative Services Art Director Chris Tobar Rodriguez Production Lead Designer Melissa McHenry Graphic Designer Daniel Rodriguez Graphic Designer Ian Jones

31 Aiming for change Has the post-Pulse momentum for gun reform stalled in Central Florida?

Business Operations Manager Hollie Mahadeo Business Assistant Allysha Willison

35 A different table After Pulse, queer and trans African-American and Latinx leaders in Orlando carve spaces of their own

Circulation Circulation Manager Collin Modeste

37 Prism of Pulse A spectrum of local voices on how they remember June 12 and what Orlando showed the world on its darkest day

Euclid Media Group Chief Executive Officer Andrew Zelman Chief Operating Officers Chris Keating, Michael Wagner Human Resources Director Lisa Beilstein Digital Operations Coordinator Jaime Monzon euclidmediagroup.com

43 We see you From high art to humble displays, visual representations and reactions to the Pulse tragedy are everywhere in Orlando

National Advertising: Voice Media Group 1-888-278-9866, voicemediagroup.com

45 Love is love is love In the months after the Pulse attack, Orlando’s theater community responded with activism and art

Orlando Weekly Inc. 16 W. Pine St. Orlando, Florida 32801 orlandoweekly.com

47 Live aid Orlando’s music scene was on the forefront of citywide rallies for Pulse

Phone 407-377-0400 Fax 407-377-0420 Orlando Weekly is published every week by Euclid Media Group Orlando Distribution Orlando Weekly is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Copyright notice: The entire contents of Orlando Weekly are copyright 2017 by Euclid Media Group LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Publisher does not assume any liability for unsolicited manuscripts, materials, or other content. Any submission must include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. All editorial, advertising, and business correspondence should be mailed to the address listed above. Subscriptions: Additional copies or back issues may be purchased at the Orlando Weekly offices for $1. Six-month domestic subscriptions may be purchased for $75; one-year subscriptions for $125. Periodical Postage Pending at Orlando, FL POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ORLANDO WEEKLY 16 W. Pine St. Orlando, FL 32801.

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CALENDAR 48 Selections 50 The Week 51 Down the Road Back Pages

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ONE YEAR AFTER PULSE

“Terrified.” “Angry.” “Exhausted.” “Gutted.” In the hours and days just after the senseless violence at Pulse, this is how we felt.

THE COVER OF OUR JUNE 15, 2016, ISSUE WAS ONE OF SIX DESIGNS WRAPPED AROUND THE PULSE SITE. VISITORS FROM AROUND THE WORLD MADE THE PILGRIMAGE THERE AND LEFT MESSAGES OF LOVE AND HOPE.

Insomnia had editor Jessica Bryce Young awake at 3:30 a.m. Sunday, June 12; when she gave up on sleep and started scrolling through Twitter on her phone, she saw a tweet from a British paper about a shooting in Orlando, Florida. As the numbness of shock set in, she sat up and reached for her laptop. By 9 a.m., reporter Monivette Cordeiro was on her way to Pulse. Art director Chris Rodriguez was out with his camera, documenting lines at blood banks and the scene at the GLBT Center. Digital editor Colin Wolf was blogging and coordinating social media sharing of the stories and photos being posted by the whole staff as we communicated via text, dividing up assignments and just beginning to tell a story that will be a part of Orlando forever. On Monday, June 13, Orlando Weekly’s editorial staff ripped up the issue that had been set to go to the press that day and started over. From that day forward, all of us have written over and over about Pulse. From the morning of June 12 until today, everything has been told through the lens of this grief, in one way or another. This past year has felt like an extension of that one hot day in June. We are glad we’ve been able to help family members and friends tell their loved ones’ stories. But as the early days stretched into weeks and months, our emotions changed. Now we were one of Those Cities, being cynically used as a partisan football in campaign speeches. We got used to hearing our name in the mouths of celebrities. We vacillated between gratitude to the Glenn Closes, Anderson Coopers, and Lin-Manuel Mirandas of the world and weary anger at the politicians using our dead to score political points. As we commemorate the Pulse tragedy and pay tribute to the lives that were lost or irrevocably changed, it’s important that we also recognize the simple moments of human kindness: hundreds of people gathered outside of blood donation centers, strangers embracing each other at candlelight vigils, countless benefits to raise money for victims and their families. These seemingly small expressions of love are what get us through tough times. And in a world where it seems like we’re constantly subjected to grotesque displays of inhumanity, it’s those moments of decency in the face of hatred that we need more of. Be brave. Be kind. Be strong. — Monivette Cordeiro, Thaddeus McCollum, Matthew Moyer, Chris Rodriguez, Colin Wolf and Jessica Bryce Young

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ONE YEAR AFTER PULSE Orlando Torres PHOTO BY JOEY ROULETTE

Still here A year after the worst day of their lives, survivors of the mass shooting at the gay nightclub Pulse learn to live with a new normal BY MO N I V E TTE CO R D E I R O

he glittering disco ball sends rainbow shimmers through gyrating bodies on the packed dance floor before settling on the face of Orlando Torres. Lounging on a white leather couch in a corner of the gay club Southern Nights, he takes a swig from a plastic cup under his penciled mustache. The 53-year-old promoter who goes by “Pimp Daddy Orlando” isn’t wearing his usual crimson zoot suit and matching godfather hat, but people still recognize him and come to the corner for a kiss on the cheek. Past glamorous drag queens and a man in a tutu twirling with his arms outstretched to pounding house music, Torres walks into a darker karaoke room where a couple is singing a passionate, off-key rendition of “Don’t Stop Believin.’” “Look,” Torres says as he points toward the back of the room. “There’s the bathrooms and there’s another exit. Nothing is going to happen – probably.” He pauses for a quick glance at the crowd. “But … you never know. You just

never know.” This is a sliver of the new normal for Torres after last summer’s bloodbath. A year ago on June 12, he was about three miles away from here on Orange Avenue at the gay nightclub Pulse on Latin Night when a deranged young man stormed in with a semi-automatic Sig Sauer MCX .223-caliber rifle and a handgun. At 2:02 a.m., the gunman fired a barrage of bullets into a crowd of hundreds of people who ran screaming for their lives. Torres and others scrambled to hide in the bathrooms, only to be trapped there by the shooter. He terrorized them for hours as he talked to hostage negotiators and eventually pledged his allegiance to the terrorist organization ISIS over the phone. After three agonizing hours, Orlando police used an armored vehicle to punch holes in the wall and began rescuing victims. The gunman started a deadly shootout with police that ended with his death. As dawn broke over Orlando that Sunday, not much was clear about why this had happened, but one thing was certain – 49 people were gone, taken by a gunman in the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

And some souls would never be the same again. Torres was one of more than 68 survivors who escaped the massacre that night. One day at a time, he and other survivors have found the courage to reassemble the shattered pieces of their lives after an experience that irredeemably marked them, and work to create something new. In the months since, some survivors have left the hospital, gone to counseling, learned to use a wheelchair and gained some of their independence back. Others, like Torres, don’t have bullet wounds but struggle with the scars of mental trauma. Most of all, they want people to know they’re still here. Torres had a close connection with Pulse’s Latin Night because he helped start it years ago to give his LGBTQ Latinx community a safe space to be themselves and dance to their own music. But God left him here for a reason, he says. “I felt like I was given a chance to stay here,” he says. “I feel like I’m on a mission to be the voice of the 49 and voice of the other survivors who don’t want to be on camera, don’t want to talk … I think I owe that to God and to the victims and the survivors.” orlandoweekly.com

Torres, a native New Yorker, moved down to Florida in 1988 and lived a straight life until 2001, when he hooked up with his first boyfriend in drag at Southern Nights. He rose quickly as a promoter in the gay club scene. He launched several successful Latin nights at clubs around town before the one at Pulse took off. On June 12, when the bullets started flying, he hid quietly in a single stall on a toilet with a friend, pressing his foot hard against the door so the gunman couldn’t push the door in. Then they heard his steps in the bathroom. Someone said, “His gun is jammed,” and the shooter yelled, “I got it fixed and there’s plenty of ammo.” They didn’t know what his agenda was until he got on the phone with hostage negotiators and told them he was wearing a bomb vest and had other shooters with him. Torres remembers he started shooting again, and at one point touched him with the gun while he played dead. Hours passed until the other side of the bathroom wall sounded like a war zone as police tried to breach the wall. “They were punching out holes in the wall and they busted the piping so water was gushing down my face. I felt like I was going to drown,” he says. During the fatal gunfight between the shooter and police, Torres put his phone next to his face in case a ricochet came his way. First responders pulled him out of a small hole in the bathroom wall, scraping his back, and put him on a pickup truck to Florida Hospital. He left later that day in scrubs, chunks of concrete still in his hair and his arm in a sling, for a plate of scrambled eggs with cheese and hash browns at Waffle House. After calling his friends to say he was OK, Torres went to mourn at vigils and churches. Now wasn’t the time to hide – his community needed him. Since then, he’s been a constant presence in the club scene and Pulse events, always trying to make sure others feel comfortable, even though he battles with PTSD. “It’s not easy to build the trust after what happened,” he says. “I’m meeting friends that are bringing their friends who have been afraid to come out since Pulse.” Some people are surprised he still goes out to promote local gay clubs, but Torres wants people to know it’s all right to keep dancing and living life after the terror of that night. “We’re not going to let the terrorists win,” he says. “We’re not going to show fear. We survived together, so we need to still stick together and support each other.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

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he simple act of pulling her thick black hair into a ponytail is an accomplishment for Ilka Marie Reyes. Every milestone, small as it may be, is a blessing for the 30-year-old after she was shot nine times at Pulse last June. Reyes didn’t usually go to Pulse – she preferred Parliament House – but on that night, she drove by herself from Kissimmee to surprise her best friends Simon Carrillo Fernández, Oscar Aracena Montero, Rodolfo Ayala Ayala and Jean Carlos Nieves Rodriguez, who were celebrating a friend’s birthday. She went to the bar for a water when she heard the loud blasts of gunshots that seemed like music at first. Someone told her to get down. Reyes was pushed to the floor. Lying on the ground, she realized her pinky was missing. A bullet had ripped it off her right hand. As she played dead, she saw a shadow standing next to her from the corner of her eye, then POP-POPPOP-POP-POP-POP-POP-POP. Eight more bullets ruptured through her back. When she woke up again, she was in pain, surrounded by friends and family in a hospital bed. Her face was so swollen, she could barely open her eyes. But Reyes does have a clear memory of seeing her mother’s worried face. “Before everything happened, my mom was going through a lot of depression,” she says. “She was going through something hard. So I quit my job – I quit everything I was doing just to take care of her. So seeing my mom the first time, like she was there for me, I couldn’t ask for anything else. Because of her and God, I’m here.” She couldn’t move or walk. It was a blow for Reyes, who had always loved to play sports, especially volleyball and softball. As she recovered in the hospital for about a month, the same question always came up in her mind – why me? “I didn’t think I deserved to go through that,” she says. “I’m the person that I never do anything wrong and never did anything bad to other people. I’m always caring and

always taking care of other people. I was angry. I was mad. And I thought about so many things, like ‘Why didn’t I do this? Why didn’t I do that?’ But at the end of the day, there’s nothing you can do, you know? Just gotta leave everything in God’s hands.” Quietly, Reyes wondered why her four friends never came to see her. After all, they were more like her brothers. They had taken her on her first cruise. A couple of weeks before Pulse, they had all gone out together to dance. They were probably in the hospital, too, she thought. After she left Orlando Regional Medical Center to recover at home with her parents, she pushed herself to go to a survivors’ event at Osceola Heritage Park. There, she saw angels with her four friends’ names and realized they were dead. “That night was one of the most terrible nights for me,” she says, eyes shining. “I still don’t accept that they’re gone. We were just having fun, you know?” Reyes says she hasn’t been able to bring herself to visit their graves. “I still think and feel they’re here,” she says. “They live with me. I feel like the day I choose to go there, that’s when I’m finally finalizing that they’re gone, that they’re not here. I’m not ready for that.” When Reyes got home, she had no income and her parents weren’t working because they were taking care of her, but the bills continued to pile up. They struggled financially for months until the money from the OneOrlando Fund came in October. Reyes was still bedridden, going from appointment to appointment for physical therapy and counseling. Her parents and friends would have to help her shower and dress because her legs were weak and it was painful to move or lift her left arm and shoulder. “Trying to walk again was one of the hardest things,” she says. “I started stretching and forced my legs to move. I had to learn how to get dressed by myself. I would crawl or I would have to sit down and grab one of my legs to do it. I had to learn how to eat, brush my teeth and sign and do all the things with my right hand because I’m a leftie.” She now goes to therapy twice a week but feels her arm is getting stronger. “I know I’m going to get there,” Reyes says. “I can take a bath by myself now, I can do my hair a little bit and a ponytail. I’m really an independent woman, so it’s a big challenge for me.” Almost a year later, Reyes says she still has nights where she wakes up screaming and sweating. She can’t listen to fireworks or weird noises. When she’s driving and stops her car, she gets flashbacks and becomes paranoid that someone is after her. And she always has to keep the exit of

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a building within her view. With a bright smile on her face, though, Reyes says she works to stay positive. “I feel like after what I’ve been through, I’m stronger than ever,” she says. “I’m sure of things that I want to do.” Reyes wants to thank the community who’s sent love and support to survivors and victims’ families, especially the children who sent her drawings while she was in the hospital. And she wants people to

know she and other survivors are still here, still going to therapy appointments, still having surgeries, still fighting for it. “Sometimes I think they forgot more about us and they focus more on the people that passed away,” she says. “But I still suffer. I miss my friends. At the same time, I’m grateful. I’m blessed that I’m here with my family. … It’s something that I live with every day. It doesn’t matter how long it’s been. For me, it’s still like yesterday.”

Ilka Marie Reyes PHOTO BY TASHA SPEAR

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uan José Cufiño Rodriguez promised to fly a thousand miles to say the things he left unsaid when gunfire tore him apart from his lover. The 31-year-old from Bogotá, Colombia, was on a trip through the United States last year when he met Jean Carlos Nieves Rodriguez, 27, and his three friends in Miami. The pair immediately clicked. He traveled to Nebraska and Denver and then came back down to Orlando to spend time with Jean Carlos, his mother and his group of friends. “They were really good friends, you know, just those type of people that leave their mark on your life and you know they’re going to be a friend for life,” he says in Spanish. “Jean Carlos was an exceptional person – a good friend, a good son and just a good human being.” They’d only been together for three months, but the two men were deeply in love. He was supposed to leave back home to Colombia in June, but he thought maybe if he could fix his affairs in his home country, he could come back to marry Jean Carlos. Two days before he was set to fly out, Cufiño Rodriguez joined Jean Carlos and his friend to celebrate a friend’s birthday at Pulse. In a picture taken early that night, Cufiño Rodriguez is smiling slightly, his big, brown eyes full of promise while Jean Carlos stands behind him, cheesing hard. It was the last time they saw each other. Hours later, Cufiño Rodriguez was shot four times. He remembers screaming at the gunman, “Why are you doing this?” before everything went black. He woke up three months later from an induced coma. Doctors told him he was paralyzed from the waist down. Jean Carlos and his friends were killed in the massacre. “I was so disoriented when I woke up,” he says. “I remember asking, ‘What happened to me?’ I couldn’t speak very well

because I had a tracheotomy. I had suffered pneumonia while I was in the coma, so I was fully intubated. Because of the shooting, my lungs had filled with blood and they had also done 26 to 27 surgeries on my body. I was very weak.” He was the last Pulse survivor to be released from ORMC in September. Cufiño Rodriguez spent two more months in a rehabilitation center before finally being released in a wheelchair. Now what will happen to my life, he thought. The process to recovery has been long and difficult. Because he was here on a visa, Cufiño Rodriguez doesn’t have access to health insurance that can pay for expensive medical needs and services. He was getting help for quite some time, but now he does his own form of physical therapy at home with his mother and boyfriend Mario. “In Colombia, I was a sports professor, so I know a little bit about the body,” he says. “I taught physical education at the primary,

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Juan José Cufiño Rodriguez PHOTO BY TASHA SPEAR

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secondary and university level. So as you can imagine, the engine of my work was my body and now it’s limited.” For Cufiño Rodriguez, it’s also hard to heal in a place where he can’t understand the language and doesn’t have the support of other family and friends. He misses practicing gymnastics, swimming and martial arts. His daily schedule is monotonous – he wakes up, he eats breakfast, lunch and dinner, and then he goes to sleep. He still has to wear a colostomy bag and ask others for help dressing. Transportation is also tricky because it’s hard to get a wheelchair in a car and the LYNX bus system can take hours. Still, he finds comfort in his 10-year-old son, who came to stay with him. The young boy tells him jokes and shows him how to play video games on his phone. “My son and my mom have made me stronger,” he says. “A lot of times I have even thought about taking my life because I think, ‘What am I good for? Why continue if I’m physically limited?’ But they’ve given

me a reason to live.” In a few days, Cufiño Rodriguez will be returning to Colombia for good, though now a changed person. Like Reyes and Torres, he’s always watching exits and planning escape strategies. When he feels more recuperated, he says he plans to advocate for better gun reform policies. “This is something that should never happen again,” he says. “The government should be able to better regulate guns in this country. Just surviving that was an achievement, but the next thing is I hope this story will not be repeated again.” Cufiño Rodriguez has also made a promise to himself to go to Puerto Rico to visit Jean Carlos’ grave. Because he was in a coma, he could not attend the funeral. “I want to see where Jean Carlos is and talk to him,” he whispers. “I just want to say goodbye and thank him for being such a beautiful person with me.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 14


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utside the window of Angel Santiago’s highrise apartment, the Lake Eola bandshell looks like a rainbow splash against the glistening waters. It’s hard to believe that almost a year ago, more than 50,000 people crowded into downtown Orlando’s traditional gathering spot to just grieve next to each other. Santiago remembers lying in his hospital bed at Florida Hospital watching the candlelight halo that encircled Lake Eola on the television. He wanted to be there so badly – but he couldn’t walk after being shot once in his left foot and once in his right knee at Pulse. “I was so jealous,” he says. “My friends were out there. It was really touching to see that outpouring of support from not only the LGBTQ community but everyone in Orlando.” It’s still surreal for the 33-year-old Philadelphia native to think about how much his life has changed since that night. He grew up in a religious Puerto Rican family, and as a child was ridiculed at his school, church and sometimes by his family for being “flamboyant.” Santiago says he finally came out to his family when he was about 25 years old. “For my entire life, I’ve been the type of person that if it’s a difficult topic or subject I tend to ignore it,” he says. “Growing up gay and not accepting that I was gay even though I knew and hiding it from everyone that I knew, that was my way of dealing with these negative emotions – not process it, not deal with it and ignore it. But eventually you have to face it head on.” He had debts, but he was making good money as a mortgage foreclosure prevention counselor in Philly – until he was laid off. In 2015, he asked his brother if he could live with him in Sanford for a year to get on his feet and then maybe move to California with his best friend. But things didn’t seem to be improving. At his temporary job as a salesman at CarMax, he made slightly more than minimum wage. His car was repossessed because he couldn’t afford it. “I didn’t know what I was doing,” he says. “I didn’t even have the means to leave.

The only thing I could afford was my part of the rent and barely enough for food at that point, so yeah, it was a really difficult time.” Pulse was a place to escape all those feelings. On June 12, Santiago was there dancing with his friends when the bullets started flying. He and a friend ran to one of the bathrooms to hide in a stall, and Santiago folded himself under a sink for protection. He smelled the gunpowder and then bullet after bullet started coming through the stall wall. Two shots hit his body, shattering his heel and leaving him unable to walk. When it seemed quieter outside, he crawled past the dead out of the bathroom and into the sight of police officers who dragged him to an ambulance. After about a month in rehabilitation, Santiago was sent back home to the Sanford townhouse in a wheelchair, his left leg now containing seven screws and a metal plate. While he had been in the hospital, his sister-in-law had given birth to a baby, so the only person with an income was Santiago’s brother, leading to some financial struggles. Going back to his room on the second floor felt strange – like looking at his life through a window. “I felt completely separated from everything that belonged to me before,” he says. “I was disconnected from them because I’m like, ‘All these things have absolutely no value because I was this close to being dead. My bed, my television, my PlayStation – things that I would love before – were all just material.” Santiago fell into a bit of a depression because he was physically unable to move around the house – he would have to drag his body up and down the stairs. The road to his independence became much clearer when he slowly started walking again with crutches and then eventually driving. Doctors had told him he wouldn’t be able to walk again until December, but he started putting weight on his foot until the muscle in his leg felt less like jelly. By August, he was able to move at a slow pace without the crutches. Since Pulse, he’s become an activist for equal rights for LGBTQ people – something he couldn’t have imagined doing as a child terrified to acknowledge he was gay. Inked on Santiago’s forearm is a rainbow heart tattoo with the words “Love Is Love.” He’s also become a strong voice in support of gun reform and recently went to Washington, D.C., to speak with Congressional leaders. Sometimes it’s frustrating because of the power the gun lobby has over lawmakers, but Santiago feels it’s still important for legislators to hear the voices of gun violence

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Angel Santiago PHOTO BY JOEY ROULETTE

survivors. “I’m a believer in the Second Amendment, but what I don’t necessarily agree with is some person who probably should not have had the ability to legally purchase a weapon being able to come into a club and start shooting everyone,” he says. “This person was on the FBI’s watch list three times and still allowed to purchase a gun? It doesn’t quite make any sense to me.” Santiago is also going back to school to become a nurse. He’s enrolled in classes at Valencia College and was offered a full scholarship to Florida Hospital’s nursing program. He was also able to help his brother go back to school for radiology. Even though the most horrible day of his life happened in Orlando, he’s found a community of here, especially among other LGBTQ Latinx folks. The healing process is not that simple, though. Earlier this year, Santiago says he

fell into a bout of depression because of all the changes that have happened in his life since last June. It’s also disheartening to continue to see acts of violence around the world, like the Manchester bombing, he says. “Everything has been very overwhelming,” he says. “I’m still me, but I don’t feel like I’m still me. My counselor allowed me to realize that it’s OK to feel bad as long as you don’t allow yourself to fall into this dark place where you can’t come out.” He feels better now but wants to remind people that even if they see survivors smiling on social media, that doesn’t necessarily mean the trauma is gone. “Remember to be kind,” he says. “Just because it’s a year later doesn’t mean that we’re OK. A lot of us are still dealing with it, and some of us are still even dealing with therapies and surgeries. It’s still very real. It’s not over.”


ONE YEAR AFTER PULSE

einon Carter still doesn’t know exactly

what happened that night. Filtering through the haze of his memory, here’s what he remembers: He was at Pulse that night with his friend Antonio Davon Brown. Brown, 29, was a U.S. Army Reserve captain with kind brown eyes and a big smile. They were recent friends but had clicked hard, hanging out every day, like new brothers on an adventure. Brown asked him to go to the gay night-

club, Carter said to himself. When the smell of gunpowder reached his nostrils, Carter took Brown and bolted into the mass of people trying to escape. He lost consciousness after being shot and woke up unable to walk. In the harrowing hours, he blacked out repeatedly from blood loss. Carter dragged himself to a spot he thought was safe. But the gunman wasn’t done yet. He came back a second time to shoot anyone on the floor, dead or alive. “I had to lay there and calm myself down,” Carter says. “My heart was racing. It was either you finna die anyway because he’s coming back to shoot or you’re gonna die fast because your adrenaline is rushing and your blood pumps out fast. I kept telling myself, ‘Calm down. Just calm down.’” Carter was hit a second time. He was next to Brown when the cops came in to remove their bodies. A cop screamed, “Is there anyone who needs to go to the hospital?” Someone responded, “This young man here.” Those are the last words Carter heard before he blacked out for a final time. A month later, he woke up in pain, wondering what happened. He had been in a coma for over a month and weighed about 90 pounds. His sister Shawnna Benbow later told him doctors had declared him dead and put him in a room with other bodies. They allowed her a final moment with him, so she grabbed his hand and told him he had siblings and nieces that needed him. “I guess I replied to her and she ran out to get the doctors,” he says. “They were trying to show her I was dead, that it was just a reaction, so they asked me to move my left Keinon Carter leg, which I couldn’t do because that’s the leg I was shot in. So, then PHOTO BY JOEY ROULETTE they asked me to put a thumb up and I did that, so they said, ‘Get him club on June 12. Carter, 32, wasn’t really in off the table.’ She saved my life.” When he gathered enough strength, he the mood but decided to go anyway, for his friend. The club was buzzing with mixes peeked at his body under the sheets and of salsa, bachata, reggaeton and hip-hop. saw a gash across his stomach and a colosWhile Brown used the bathroom, Carter tomy bag. During his coma, he had about 15 surgeries – the first bullet tore through waited for him outside in front of a mirror. In those seconds alone, he looked at his his leg and the second one shot through his reflection – a 6-foot-4-inch man, hand- abdomen, small intestines and kidney to some, with sinewy muscles and a blond break his pelvis. Eventually he learned that Brown had frohawk – and just danced to the music. Then he heard loud pops, one after not survived. “I just want some answers. I want to another after another. Firecrackers, he thought. Someone is playing games in the see video,” he says. “I want to know my orlandoweekly.com

situation, how I went down and what really happened to me, my friend and everybody else. Sometimes, I’m mad at myself for not even trying a little harder. If it was really one person shooting, ain’t no way in hell we couldn’t have done something to take that man out. I could be mad at him, but he’s not living, so it’s like crying over spilled milk.” Carter was one of the last survivors to leave ORMC on Aug. 12. He did physical therapy for a while but stopped after the appointments and the bills became overwhelming. The OneOrlando Fund helped give him financial security and buy a new home in West Orlando, where his boyfriend, Aaron Torres, helps take care of him. His left leg is slowly getting better, though he can’t stand on it yet. He’s taken his current physical state in stride, calling himself the “wheelchair bandit,” but sometimes curling up his frame into the chair takes a toll. Before Pulse, he was the primary breadwinner for the family, working with his hands at a bakery or a construction site. The many medications have made him lose his sense of taste and altered smells, meaning he can’t enjoy the spicy hot fries at the gas station like he used to. “The hardest part has been gaining independence back,” he says. “Your partner wants to help you and do everything for you, meanwhile you’re sitting here fighting, ‘No, let me do this.’ I want to be able to stand up and hug my family. Stand up and hug my babe. Get up and run.” Carter also struggles with the idea of feeling united with the community for various reasons. The majority of victims who died that night were Latinx, but many were African-American, and most media outlets and support organizations failed to acknowledge that fact. It’s part of what motivated Carter to use some of the money he received to open up his own organization in West Orlando directed toward black LGBTQ youth that would include a shelter, an HIV testing center and a place to be themselves. “I just want to have my foot in the community,” he says. “I never imagined myself to be involved in something like that, but I want to be someone people can look up to.” Sitting with his hands to his face, Carter sheds some tears. He wants the victims’ families to know that he’s always thinking of them and their pain. “Sorry, I get emotional,” he says. “I’m still here. God saved me out of everybody. And I appreciate it – I’m not saying I’m like a bad person – but, there probably was some hearts out there purer than mine.” His face looks determined. “I’m trying to find the door to my purpose now,” he says. “I’m trying to change my life for the better.” feedback@orlandoweekly.com JUNE 7-13, 2017

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IN MEMORIAM: THE ORLANDO 49 Antonio “Tony” Davon Brown, 30 years old

U.S. Army Reserve Capt. Antonio “Tony” Davon Brown was known among his fellow troops for his smile and unwavering spirit. Brown, originally from Port St. John, lived in Orlando and wanted to go to the gay nightclub Pulse on June 12 to have some fun, says his friend Keinon Carter. During the mass shooting that night, Brown and 48 other people died from their injuries. “He was a newfound friend,” Carter says. “We hung out every day. We were kind of like new brothers. I just miss him.” Brown served an 11-month tour in Kuwait during the Iraq War in 2010 and had been promoted to captain in 2012. He was a highly decorated soldier whose awards included a Meritorious Service Medal, two Army Achievement Medals, and the National Defense Service Medal. Before his death, he was working at Lowe’s as a human resources manager. In a statement, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter said the attack in Orlando was a cowardly assault on the freedoms that Brown had devoted his life to protect. “Capt. Antonio Davon Brown served his country for nearly a decade, stepping forward to do the noblest thing a young person can do, which is to protect others,” he said. “His service both at home and overseas gave his fellow Americans the security to dream their dreams and live full lives.” Brown graduated from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in 2008 with a major in criminal justice and was a member of the school’s ROTC program. He also earned a master’s in business administration from the University of Mary in North Dakota. At Brown’s funeral, James Hickey told mourners that his older brother was a genuine person who had a joy for living, Florida Today reports. “He had a kind heart, and a loving soul, and he never met a stranger,” Hickey said. “To honor my brother, love somebody. Because that’s what he did.” – Monivette Cordeiro

Stanley Almodovar III, 23 years old

Stanley Almodovar was always happy and loved to have a good time, according to his stepbrother Alex Rodriguez. “He was the type of person that if he came into a room and everyone was frowning, he would put a smile on everyone’s face,” Rodriguez says. After his death, the city of Clermont officially declared June 28 Stanley Almodovar III Day in his memory. More than anything, Rodriguez says he wants people to remember his brother as the amazing person that he was and how positive he always seemed to be. “I would like for people to remember his smile,” Rodriguez says. “He was always enjoying life and living every day as if it were his last.” Amanda Alvear, 25 years old

Amanda Alvear loved hugs. After the Pulse shooting robbed her family and friends of her future embraces, her brother Brian started a “Hugs, Not Hate” campaign, giving hugs to hundreds of random strangers around Central Florida. The night of the shooting, Alvear was at Pulse with her two best friends. On her Snapchat account, Alvear posted video snippets of the three dancing, drinking and having a good time at Latin Night. Her last video shows her confused as round after round of bullets is heard in the background. “In every lifetime you are only afforded the opportunity to meet a handful of truly amazing people,” Alvear’s friend Craig Johnson wrote on Facebook. “There is no doubt that Amanda Alvear in my lifetime has been one of these people. … She was epic in every sense of the word.” Oscar Aracena Montero, 26 years old

One of Oscar Aracena Montero’s last dreams was to bring his mother from the Dominican Republican to Florida. He had left her in Santo Domingo as a child almost 10 years ago to move to Tampa with his father. Listín Diario reports his mother, Altagracia

In every issue since the Pulse Nightclub shootings, Orlando Weekly profiled a person killed on June 12, 2016. Here are all of their stories. BY MONIVETTE CORDEIRO, DEANNA FERRANTE, AND MARTINA SMITH Montero Díaz, was a month away from reuniting with her son when Aracena Montero perished at Pulse. “Oscar played piano, he sang and he loved God since he was a child,” his uncle said at a vigil after his death. “In my prayers for him, I remember a verse from the Bible that says, ‘For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.’”

Martin Benitez Torres, 33 years old

Just hours before the shooting at Pulse nightclub, Martin Benitez Torres was posting videos to his Facebook page, laughing with his family as they cooked a meal on Saturday morning. His last post was a picture with family members, jokingly referring to them as the Kardashian sisters. Originally from San Juan, Puerto Rico, Torres was in Orlando visiting his family. He was studying to be a pharmacy tech at a Tampa satellite campus of the Puerto Rican university Sistema Universitario Ana G. Méndez. Torres, his friends wrote, was always able to appreciate the beauty around him. In his Facebook cover photo, he highlighted this quality with a quote in Spanish: “If God takes away my eyesight, it’s because I’ve been allowed to see everything that’s beautiful in the world.”

Rodolfo Ayala Ayala, 33 years old

Rodolfo Ayala Ayala was quiet and polite until you got to know him, says his friend Aileen Carrillo. The Puerto Rican native (often seen wearing a bow tie) was always positive, to the extent that he had a hard time listening to his friends complaining. “He was extremely happy,” Carrillo says. “He didn’t give importance to negative things.” In his spare time, Carrillo says, Ayala liked to bake cheesecakes for his loved ones at his new Kissimmee home and dance to bachata. But Ayala also worked a serious job as a platelet supervisor in Orlando’s OneBlood laboratory, where he was passionate about saving lives. After his death, his co-workers at OneBlood mourned “Rody” as they dealt with long lines of people waiting to donate blood for the surviving victims of Pulse.

Darryl Roman Burt Jr., 29 years old

Alejandro Barrios Martínez, 21 years old

Alejandro Barrios Martínez was full of dreams when he immigrated to the U.S. He left his mother and grandmother in Cuba to come to Orlando in 2014. Barrios Martínez had recently gotten a new job and decided to celebrate at Pulse on June 12. When the shooting started, Barrios Martínez sent texts to his partner, Aday Suarez Molina, as he waited trapped in the bathroom. “I’m fine, but I don’t know if I’ll get out alive,” he wrote in Spanish. “I’m writing to tell you I love you.” Barrios Martínez did not survive. “I promise you I will always, always love you, as you did until the final minute of your life,” Suarez Molina wrote on Facebook after his death. His mother, Orquídea Martínez, was issued a humanitarian visa to see her son one last time. orlandoweekly.com

Beneath his dapper bow ties and professionalism, Darryl “DJ” Burt was someone who could make you laugh until your stomach hurt, says his cousin Takesha Burt. “DJ has been my best friend for the past 29 years,” she says. “He was so smart and even though I was a year older, I really looked up to him.” Burt was a financial aid officer at Keiser University in Jacksonville. He had recently become a member of the Jacksonville Jaycees. “He was definitely one who wasn’t afraid to take the lead,” says Shawn DeVries, the president of the Jacksonville Jaycees. “He really wanted to help others.” In June, Burt graduated from DeVry University with a master’s degree in human resources management. On June 12, he was out with friends celebrating at Pulse. On Facebook, Burt’s mother posted baby pictures of her son. “We refuse to let the hatred of others steal the joy of our child,” she wrote. Jonathan Camuy Vega, 24 years old

Carlos Camuy says God planted a seed of love in his son’s heart the day he was born. It was only after he died that they were able to see all the fruits of that love at his funeral. Hundreds came to pay their last respects in CONTINUED ON PAGE 19

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both Kissimmee and Puerto Rico to the young man who worked as a producer in Orlando for Telemundo’s La Voz Kids, a singing competition for children. A graduate of the University of Puerto Rico en Arecibo, Camuy Vega moved to Florida in 2015. His mother, Lourdes Vega, says he would text or call every day, and several times he made surprise visits back to Puerto Rico. Camuy Vega’s partner says he called his mother his “eternal girlfriend” because she was the only woman who would never break his heart. Camuy Vega died trying to protect his friend Yilmary Rodriguez Solivan from the shooting at Pulse. They, along with 47 others, both died in the massacre.

the situation in his country worsened, says his sister Aileen Carrillo. Almost 10 years later, Carrillo Fernández had become a U.S. citizen and was studying to become an accountant. “He was really spectacular in so many different ways,” his sister says. “He was the baby, but sometimes it felt like he was the older sibling. He looked out for all of us.” She also remembers him as someone who made her double over with his jokes. The last time she physically saw him months before his death, he made her laugh so much she called it “laughter therapy.” “It was never in my plans to lose you so quickly,” she wrote to her brother on Facebook in Spanish. “How could I forget someone who gave me so much to remember?” Juan Chávez Martínez, 25 years old

Ángel Luis Candelario Padró, 28 years old

Ángel Candelario Padró was preparing to start a new chapter in his life. Originally from Guánica, Puerto Rico, Candelario Padró was to start a new job as an ophthalmic technician at Florida Retina Institute in Orlando on June 20. He had also recently found love. On June 12, Candelario Padró was at Pulse with his boyfriend when he was killed. The FRI says its physicians and employees were shocked to hear about Candelario Padró’s death. “We were all looking forward to Angel becoming a part of our team,” FRI said in a statement. “We cannot express how deeply grieved we are at this horrible turn of events.” Before moving to Orlando, Candelario Padró worked for nearly two years at the Illinois College of Optometry. “Our staff, faculty, and students are saddened by this tragedy and senseless loss of life,” ICO said in a statement. “We will celebrate all that Angel was, and draw solace from his life and the imprint he made on our community.” At his funeral on the island, Candelario Padró was buried in a white lab coat with his stethoscope. Simón Adrian Carrillo Fernández, 31 years old

Simón Carrillo Fernández came looking for the American Dream and found it in Kissimmee. Originally from Venezuela, Carrillo Fernández moved to Florida in 2006 as

By day, Juan Chávez Martínez worked diligently as a housekeeping supervisor at the Reunion Resort in Kissimmee. But in his spare time, the Davenport resident dreamed of being a hairstylist, a makeup artist or a decorator, according to his friends. Originally from Huichapan, Mexico, Chávez Martínez left his home almost a decade ago to help his parents out of poverty by sending them money. His sister-in-law Angelia Garza Chávez says he worked in construction for about a year with his brother in Bartow before moving closer to Central Florida’s tourism district. Chávez Martínez was dancing at Pulse with his friends Selvin Dubon and Joel Rayón Paniagua on June 12. When the shooting started, Dubon was able to escape, but Chávez Martínez and Rayón Paniagua perished. Leroy Valentín Fernández, 25 years old

Leroy Valentín Fernández was a diva, but not a Mariah Carey or a Madonna. Fernández lived by Beyoncé’s definition of the word: “Diva is the female version of a hustler.” By day, the Puerto Rican native worked as a leasing agent through Bridge Property Management, and on the side, he went to people’s houses to do their hair and makeup,

says his best friend and co-worker, Pedro Feliciano. Once the lights went down, the entertainer side of Fernández emerged, and it was named Indara Valkayre. Wearing lush wigs, tight bodysuits and high boots, Fernández emulated his idol Queen B in drag, re-creating her dance routines on stage perfectly.

His siblings, Ryan, Amanda and Ashley Connell, called him a “superhero.” On what would have been his 22nd birthday, Blanco wrote on Facebook that she never thought the person who made her believe in love would vanish.

Feliciano says Fernández recently told him that he was the happiest he’d ever been because of his months-long relationship with Xavier Emmanuel Serrano Rosado, who was 10 years his senior. Their last night together was at Pulse; both men died in the shooting on June 12.

Tevin Eugene Crosby, 25 years old

As the New Year was about to begin, Tevin Eugene Crosby was so excited he posted a Facebook status saying, “2016 will be the best year ever.” Crosby had recently moved to Michigan to start a marketing business. He tried to keep his team passionate with inspirational quotes, bowling nights and leadership awards. His sister Shenetra Harris, the oldest of three children, still remembers Crosby coming home from school upset that he’d gotten a B. He always loved to excel, whether it was on the honor roll or later in life by going after new business ventures. “My brother was full of light, full of energy,” she says. “He just always went for everything he wanted in life.” Harris says her brother had traveled back on June 9 as a surprise to spend time with his family, then went to Orlando to visit friends. On June 12, he and Richard Aiken went out for a night of fun at Pulse. During the shooting, Aiken and Crosby were trapped in the bathrooms. Aiken made it out alive, but Crosby and 48 other people were killed in the club.

Luis Daniel Conde, 39 years old

Luis Daniel Conde worked to make people in his community feel beautiful. Originally from San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico, Conde ran Alta Peluquería D’Magazine Salon with his partner, Juan Pablo Rivera Velazquez, in Kissimmee. They transformed people with makeup, hairstyles and fashion tips into who they wanted to be, says Wanda Ferrer, a friend and client of the salon. “They were tremendous people,” she says. “They always had a smile for their customers.” Ferrer says Conde and his partner loved to go to Pulse on weekends. It’s where they were during the early-morning hours of June 12. His friends Albert and Iris Rivas Diaz wrote on Facebook that they would always remember his pure and sincere smile. “You are someone who will stay tattooed in our hearts and will never be erased until the day we meet again,” the couple said.

Franky DeJesús Velázquez, 50 years old

Cory James Connell, 21 years old

Cory Connell wanted to save lives as a firefighter. He never fully realized his dream, but on June 12, he proved himself a hero. The graduate of Edgewater High School in Orlando worked at the College Park Publix while he studied at Valencia College. On June 12, he was out celebrating with his girlfriend, Paula Blanco, and members of her all-female football team at Pulse. When the mass shooting started, ABC News reports Blanco was shot in the arm and told her boyfriend to run. Instead, he pushed her out of the way and saved her life while sacrificing his own. After his death, Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs named him an honorary firefighter. orlandoweekly.com

His first name was listed as Franky, but the people who loved him and searched for him on June 12 knew him as Jimmy. Jimmy DeJesús Velázquez lived in Orlando but was originally from Puerto Rico. During his time on the island, he had an illustrious dancing career traveling the world with Gíbaro de Puerto Rico, a troupe dedicated to the folk music made popular by the island’s peasant farmers, known as jíbaros. In pictures the troupe posted online, DeJesús Velázquez is all smiles, dressed in straw hats and colorful scarves. He moved to Florida almost a decade ago and worked as a visual merchandiser. As families and friends waited to hear news of their loved ones on June 12, DeJesús CONTINUED ON PAGE 21

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Velázquez’s friend Sara López called him her “brother” and said he was with his best friends that night for a good time at Pulse. When they first heard the shots, they thought it was music until they started seeing people fall down. The three friends held on to each other as they tried to hide, but DeJesús Velázquez was lost in the panic. Deonka Deidra Drayton, 32 years old

Her friends knew her as “Zeus.” Deonka Deidra Drayton was a larger-than-life personality known for her dreadlocks, snapback hats, jokes and the love she gave to those she cared for, says her friend Lexington Martinez. Drayton was working at Pulse during the early morning of June 12 when the shooting started. Her former partner, Emmy Addison, says Drayton loved all children, including Diyari, a small boy that they were raising together. “We loved her so very much,” Addison says. “It has been truly heartbreaking to see him want for his other mother so badly and not being able to explain to him in a way for him to understand that she is in heaven.” Her mother, Andrea Drayton, says her daughter was a loving person who was close to God. “I would always say she was 3-D,” she says. “Everything she did was in full force. Whether she was playing basketball or any sport, it felt like she was jumping out at you. We loved every bit of it.”

June 12, but only one emerged. Garcia says he was in a different part of the club when the gunman started shooting, and he was able to escape. The day after her murder, her brother Cesar wrote on Facebook, “It is not fair that such a horrific act of hate would take the life of a beautiful soul.” Peter O. Gonzalez Cruz, 22 years old

Peter “Ommy” Gonzalez Cruz was known for a contagious joyful energy and an infectious smile. Among his family and friends, Gonzalez Cruz was known as the life of any party. He worked at UPS in Orlando and his customers remembered him as always smiling. On June 12, Gonzalez Cruz went out with his best friend Gilberto Silva Menéndez and other friends to Pulse. Gonzalez Cruz, Silva Menéndez and many of their other friends died in the shooting that night. “In a way that night we said bye to each other with all the hugs and kisses you gave me and you told me you loved me too many times,” wrote Adrian Lopez, who escaped Pulse that night, on Facebook. “One day we will meet each other again.” On Facebook, his mother Bernardette Cruz said that her son’s smile “reflected true love.” “A piece of my life was torn away,” she wrote in Spanish. “I want to keep sleeping to remember all the best moments we had together as a family and the best thing, your smile.” Juan Ramon Guerrero, 22 years old

Mercedez Marisol Flores, 26 years old

In her photos, Mercedez Marisol Flores looks quiet and introspective. By day, she worked at Target and attended Valencia College. But at night, her friends remembered her as a music lover who blasted any genre on the radio and wanted to become a party planner. Josean Garcia remembers meeting Flores and their mutual friend Amanda Alvear in middle school. At Ridge Community High School in Davenport, Florida, their group was known as “the Hyenas” because they were always laughing loudly in the lunchroom. After they graduated in 2008, they started going to Pulse together, he says. It was a place where they all felt safe, even if Alvear and Flores were not gay themselves. Three of the Hyenas went into Pulse on

The first time Brandon Wolf met his friend Drew Leinonen’s boyfriend, Juan Ramon Guerrero, he was a little skeptical. Guerrero was quiet compared to the affable Leinonen, 32. Wolf had been friends with Leinonen for years and had met many dates and boyfriends. “I don’t know about this,” he thought. To his great pleasure, he was completely wrong about Guerrero. “It took a minute for him to warm up to our friend group, but within months, he could make you laugh no matter what,” he says. “The day could be wrecked, but he would walk in the room and you were smiling in seconds. He just had that infectious personality. From the moment he met Drew, you could feel the love.” Wolf was at Pulse on June 12 with Guerrero, Leinonen and other friends. Guerrero and

Leinonen perished along with 47 others in the early morning hours. Guerrero’s Dominican family told Time magazine he would have married Leinonen if they hadn’t died.

meet. Their eight children helped them run their taco truck, including Miguel Ángel, who made tortillas and ran the cash register. After decades of work, the Honoratos now own several businesses, all of which Miguel Ángel helped manage.

Paul Terrell Henry, 41 years old

To his friends, Paul Terrell Henry was a bright light. He was a regular at the Parliament House, where he loved to dance. But it was at the pool table where you’d be most like to find him. “He taught me,” says Angel Laroyale Lewis, a friend of Henry’s. “I wasn’t as good as him, but he would teach me a couple of things.” The morning of June 12, Lewis says, she was at Pulse with Henry. She says they were supposed to leave the club earlier, but decided to stay late. It’s something she still struggles with. “I want people to remember that he had a heart full of gold,” Jaymie Glaspie, another friend, says. “He was a pure person, just loving. He would do anything for you if it was in his power.”

His wife, Minerva Honorato, told Aquí y Ahora she met her husband when they were in high school. Together they had three children, and Miguel Ángel was a doting father who helped plan birthday parties. The last time she saw her husband he told her he was going to the store. Hours later, police officers informed her Miguel Ángel had been invited by some friends to Pulse and died during the mass shooting on June 12. Jason Benjamin Josaphat, 19 years old

Jason Benjamin Josaphat had the entire world ahead of him. Born in Fort Lauderdale to Haitian parents, Josaphat attended school in Orlando before moving out of state. He graduated in 2014 from Skyline High School in Arizona and more recently from Southern Technical Institute as a business office specialist. His obituary said he was known for his “memorable gleaming smile.” On June 12, Josaphat died at Pulse. His mother, Myrlande Bébé, said on Facebook that her son died to save Tiara Parker from the shooter while they were trapped in the bathroom. “Nice cars or nice house, or diamond or anything people would say can’t ever, ever bring Jason back,” she wrote. “But at the end of the day he is a hero. He is hero by saving that beautiful young woman.”

Frank Hernández Escalante, 27 years old

Tattooed on his left bicep in black ink, Frank Hernández Escalante kept a saying close to his heart: “Love has no gender.” He was proud of his identity, often posting pictures with rainbow colors or his “GAY O.K.” shirt. Two years ago, he left Texas for Orlando. He was making a life in the City Beautiful with his longtime boyfriend, Brett Rigas, and their two dogs. Months before they were about to celebrate their three-year anniversary, the couple went to Pulse for a night of dancing and fun. When the shooting began, the two men lost each other in the dark. Rigas escaped the club with his life on June 12, but Hernández Escalante did not.

Eddie Jamoldroy Justice, 30 years old

Miguel Ángel Honorato, 30 years old

After years of hard work, Miguel Ángel Honorato and his family were enjoying the fruits of their American dream. They traveled from Guerrero, Mexico, across the U.S. border and settled in Apopka. They didn’t know English or have jobs, so the family decided to sell tacos in front of theme parks to make ends orlandoweekly.com

His friends knew him as Brycen Banks. That’s the nickname Eddie Jamoldroy Justice created for himself. It makes sense when you learn he was an accountant, and as his friend Guardini Bellefleur described him, a little bougie. He drove a Mercedes, owned a business and lived in a high-rise in downtown Orlando, “in a sky house, like the Jeffersons,” his mother, Wilhelmina Justice, told the Associated Press. In early 2016, he met Alejandro Ortega and they fell deeply in love. Justice also loved Latin Night at Pulse. When the gunman attacked, Justice was there with a group, including his best friend and survivor of the shooting, Demetrice Naulings. CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

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Naulings told CBS News that during the shooting, Justice told him, “Take care of me. Please don’t leave me.” He was separated from his friends in the rush to escape the club and was trapped in one of the club’s bathrooms. During that time, he texted his mother, “Mommy I love you.” In his final text, he called the gunman in the bathroom with them “a terror.” Javier Jorge-Reyes, 40 years old

Javier JorgeReyes was known for his friendliness, sass and smile. He spread this bright energy every day at his sales jobs at Guess and Gucci. But his flair really appeared outside of work. “He loved hanging with friends and doing drag,” his friend Taylor Lianne Chandler says. “When I say doing drag, that is an understatement. He was great at it and breathtaking.” She remembers walking with Jorge-Reyes through the streets of downtown Orlando during the city’s Come Out With Pride celebration in 2015. They laughed and carried on through the whole parade, Jorge-Reyes dressed as Alice from Alice in Wonderland. The next night, the friends went to Parliament House and entered the costume contest, taking funny videos that Chandler says are now some of her most treasured possessions. Anthony Luis Laureano Disla, 25 years old

Anthony Laureano Disla was the type of performer who could charm you in a suit or in a dress. The native of Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico, was a talented dancer who liked to wear suspenders and fedoras when he danced to mambo, salsa and ballroom. But when he performed in drag as Alanis Laurell, he preferred blonde wigs and shiny ensembles as he lip-synced to Olga Tañon and Jennifer Lopez. Laureano Disla studied at Universidad Del Sagrado Corazon on the island before coming to Orlando about three years ago to focus on his career as a dancer and choreographer. He wasn’t performing at Pulse on June 12, but he was there that night to party with his friends when the shooting started. His mother, Olga Disla, says her son was a true artist.

“He would call me every day to make sure I was OK,” she says in Spanish. “My son was a marvelous boy who always fought for his dreams.” Christopher “Drew” Leinonen, 32 years old

Paula Lupton says she would describe her friend Christopher “Drew” Leinonen as a renaissance man. As a Seminole High School student, he started a Gay-Straight Alliance student chapter, which earned him the Anne Frank Humanitarian Award. The University of Central Florida graduate worked as a licensed mental health counselor by day and in his free time explored cinema, photography, history, politics, vegetarianism and the intricacies of playing Dance Dance Revolution. He died at Pulse on June 12. On July 27, his mother, Christine Leinonen, captured a nation as she spoke at the Democratic National Convention. In between advocating for common-sense gun policies, she told thousands of delegates that her son was a “big Hillary supporter,” whose belief that “love trumps hate” was etched in his DNA: His paternal grandparents met and fell in love at a Japanese internment camp during World War II. “Christopher was my only child,” she says. “As I used to tell him, you can’t do better than perfect.” Brenda Marquez McCool, 49 years old

Brenda McCool spent her last moments as a hero. The Brooklyn mother of 11 children was dancing with her son Isaiah Henderson at Pulse when the shooting started. Her sister-in-law Ada Pressley told the New York Daily News McCool saw the gunman point his weapon toward them and shielded her son with her body. Before that day, McCool was already a hero. The single mother who beat cancer twice was known as a fighter, according to actor Wilson Cruz, whose mother was McCool’s stepsister. “For Brenda, [Pulse] was the place where she could spend time with her son where he was his most authentic self, and it was beautiful,” he says. “Brenda protected her son by jumping in front of the gun. … Maybe she thought she was indestructible but more likely it was instinct, a lioness protecting her cub.”

Jean Carlos Méndez Pérez, 35 years old

Akyra Monet Murray, 18 years old

Jean Carlos Méndez Pérez found love through a scent. He was working at Perfumania in the Orlando Premium Outlets when Luis Daniel Wilson-León walked in. It was love at first sight, remembers Wilson-León’s cousin, Laly Santiago-León. Wanda Ferrer, a close friend of the couple, describes them as polar opposites who couldn’t live without each other. WilsonLeón was an outgoing person and loved to eat mofongo, pinchos and alcapurrias, while Méndez Pérez was a reserved person and liked going to the gym and spending hours in the bathroom primping his face, for which no cream was too expensive. They lived together in Kissimmee. Both from Puerto Rico, they understood what it was like to have family members who loved them, but could not accept their devotion to each other, Ferrer says. “Their love was greater than anything,” she says. “They fought like everybody else, but they were going to last a lifetime. Dani would say, ‘He makes me mad, but I love him the way he is.’”

People who met Akyra Monet Murray knew she was going somewhere. The honors student had recently graduated from West Catholic Preparatory High School third in her class. The Philadelphia teenager known by the nickname “Kira” was also a star athlete who scored 1,000 points while she played on the Lady Burrs basketball team. She had signed a letter of intent to play basketball at Mercyhurst College on a full scholarship. With all the promise in the world and a long list of accomplishments, Murray and her family came to celebrate in Orlando a week after her graduation. In the early morning hours of June 12, Murray was having a good time with her cousin Tiara Parker and their friend Patience Carter at Pulse. When the shooting began, Murray and Carter made it out of the club, but went back in to find Parker. Carter and Parker survived the shooting, but Murray did not, making her the youngest victim of the shooting. Jean Carlos Nieves Rodriguez, 27 years old

Kimberly “KJ” Morris, 37 years old

On stage, Kimberly “KJ” Morris used her infectious smile and suave dance moves to give life to “Daddy K,” her magnetic drag king personality. Juan AndersonBurgos, one of Morris’ friends and a drag colleague, described her drag as “bold.” “It’s hard to explain, but she was energetic, expressive, colorful, alive,” he says. “She earned and owned that stage. She was a beautiful spirit.” Morris moved to Orlando in April 2016 to take care of her aging mother and grandmother. She had recently found work as a bouncer at the gay nightclub Pulse; her mother said she still hadn’t unpacked some of her boxes. Two months after moving to Orlando, Morris died at Pulse. “She left behind a legacy here,” Her friend Allie Thorpe says. “Nobody has forgotten her. She’s very much alive in our hearts.”

In his final musings, Jean Carlos Nieves Rodriguez wrote on Facebook about love. “I want and I wish to feel how it feels that someone loves you,” he said before his death. Nieves Rodriguez may not have found his true love, but the love he showed others was moving. He bought a house so he and his mother could live in a nicer place, and sometimes paid his sister’s phone bill when she couldn’t. Nieves, a graduate from Orlando’s Oak Ridge High School, had worked at McDonald’s since he was 15 and recently became the manager of a check-cashing store. His mother, Dimarie Rodriguez, says, “I raised him by myself, as his mom and his dad. … I was there for him in his sadness and his happiness. We were always together.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 27

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IN MEMORIAM: THE ORLANDO 49 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24

Luis Omar Ocasio-Capo, 20 years old

Luis Omar Ocasio-Capo spent his final hours doing what he loved the most: dancing. Known to people by his second name, Omar, he danced to anything you put on, be it salsa, bachata, hip-hop or one of the many cultural dances he participated in as a child, says his sister, Belinnette Ocasio-Capo. “Omar was a such a happy person,” she says. “He was the peacemaker in the family.” From their childhood in Ponce, Puerto Rico, to their later youth in Cleveland, OcasioCapo and his siblings were always dancing at parades and festivals, his sister says. After graduating from high school in Tennessee, Ocasio-Capo moved to Kissimmee with his mother. He had registered for theater classes at Valencia College, which he was supposed to start the week of June 12. His sister says before Ocasio-Capo left with a friend to Pulse, he hugged his mother tight. His mother jokingly asked him, “Are you going to die today that you miss me so much?” “My mom asked him not to go, but he said he didn’t want to leave anyone hanging,” his sister says. “He gave her a big kiss and he told her, ‘Mamí, I’ll see you later.’ Then later never happened.” Geraldo A. Ortiz Jimenez, 25 years old

Just hours before heading out to the gay nightclub Pulse, Geraldo Ortiz Jimenez was hitting the gym. An avid gym rat, Ortiz wouldn’t even let up on his workout routine while he was on vacation. He was visiting Orlando to see a Selena Gomez concert at the Amway Center, something he posted about for months on Facebook. Originally from the Dominican Republic and currently a college student studying law in Puerto Rico, Ortiz made the trip specifically to see his favorite singer. A self-proclaimed “Selenator,” he often posted videos singing along to Gomez’s music on his social media

accounts. That weekend, while in Orlando, he posted a picture to his Instagram account as he posed with the singer’s wax figure while visiting Madame Tussauds.

songs. May the death of a poor man be a great celebration.”

“With the love of my life,” Ortiz wrote in Spanish, pretending to give the singer a kiss on the cheek.

Nia Garcia can’t help but laugh when she remembers the pranks she pulled with her cousin Enrique L. Rios Jr. The two grew up together, and one of their favorite activities was playing tricks on their family and friends. Garcia says he was definitely a clown, but also a good man raised in a devout Baptist family. Rios was on vacation in Orlando last June when he was shot and killed at Pulse. He lived in Brooklyn, New York, working as a coordinator at a home health care agency. Garcia says he loved to work with older people, supporting and caring for them. “He had this gift where he would see the good in people and knew how to encourage you with his words,” she says. “He really did have a way with words where he made you feel brand-new after hearing him.”

Eric Ivan Ortiz Rivera, 36 years old

Eric Ivan Ortiz Rivera was days away from celebrating his first wedding anniversary with his beloved husband, Ivan Domínguez. They married on June 26 – the same day the U.S. Supreme Court decided that same-sex couples across the country have the right to marry, with Justice Anthony M. Kennedy writing for the majority, “No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice and family. In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than once they were.” Ortiz Rivera and his husband could not be together to celebrate that union last year. On June 12, he was one of 49 people who died at Pulse. “My heart is torn to pieces,” his husband wrote on Facebook the day of Ortiz Rivera’s death. Joel Rayón Paniagua, 31 years old

Joel Rayón Paniagua was the hard-working breadwinner for his family back in Veracruz, Mexico. He left his country to work in gardening and construction so he could send money home. By June 2016, Rayón Paniagua had paid off the last of the debt he owed to the guide who helped him get to the U.S. and was starting to save for a better life. He would never get to see it – during the early morning hours of June 12, Rayón Paniagua was with friends at Pulse when he was killed. Rayón Paniagua’s friends described him as a friendly and fun person who loved to dance. At his funeral, bands played mariachi and norteño music for a final goodbye, including a song with the lyrics, “I don’t want a coffin worth millions. All I want is for them to sing

Enrique L. Rios Jr., 25 years old

Juan Pablo Rivera Velázquez, 37 years old

With a flick of his wrist to apply black winged eyeliner or the careful precision he used to slick on glittery lip gloss, Juan Pablo Rivera Velázquez could give people the makeover of a lifetime. The makeup artist and hairstylist nurtured a fan base at Alta Peluquería D’Magazine Salon, a business he ran with his 16-year partner, Luis Daniel Conde, in Kissimmee. Together they helped women in their community feel beautiful, says Wanda Ferrer, a friend and client of the couple. Six months after his death, Rivera Velázquez’s sister reopened her brother’s beauty salon and relaunched his makeup line, “Color Face Creation,” dubbing it “CFC by Juan P.” “I couldn’t just leave everything he worked for and suffered for,” Jessica Silva says. “His dream has become my dream.”

Yilmary Rodriguez Solivan, 24 years old

The last photo of Yilmary Rodriguez Solivan shows a young woman smiling so hard inside Pulse that her eyes crinkled at the corners. Known to most as Mary, Rodriguez Solivan was married to racecar driver Juan Borges and the mother of two young boys, including a 3-month-old son. “Mary was an amazing daughter and an extraordinary sister,” her sister Natalia Canlan wrote on a GoFundMe fundraiser for her sister’s husband and sons. “Her smile lit up the room and her laughter brought a smile to your heart!” Rodriguez Solivan was showing off her smile the night of June 12 at Pulse along with her brother-in-law William Sabad Borges and a friend, Jonathan Camuy Vega. During the shooting, Camuy Vega tried to protect Rodriguez Solivan from the bullets. Both ultimately perished in the attack. Christopher Joseph Sanfeliz, 24 years old

Christopher Joseph Sanfeliz shone bright, like a diamond, his childhood friend says. Nicole Irizarry remembers that Sanfeliz started calling the people he loved “diamonds” after they tried to stay up all night to watch a meteor shower on Cocoa Beach about two years ago. “I remember Chris said, ‘Oh my god, diamonds are falling out of the sky,’” she says. “From then on, he would tell his friends, ‘You’re my diamonds.’ There’s a wrenching feeling in my gut from just remembering it.” A Tampa native of Cuban descent, Sanfeliz worked as a personal banker at JPMorgan Chase. After Sanfeliz’s death, his older brother, Carlos Sanfeliz Jr., wrote on Facebook that his heart was “completely broken.” “My little brother, the most important person in my life, has passed away due to his injuries,” Carlos Sanfeliz Jr. wrote. “He was the light of my family and I know that he will continue to bless us and his light will be radiating down from a better place.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

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IN MEMORIAM: THE ORLANDO 49 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 27

Xavier Serrano Rosado, 35 years old

Sotomayor grew up into a charming, selfconfident man with brilliant green eyes who worked as the national brand manager for alandchuck.travel, an LGBT travel agency. There he became known as “Top Hat Eddie,” after he took to wearing a black top hat on guided travel tours so patrons could easily find him in a crowd. He was working on organizing the first gay cruise to Cuba. “In every person’s life, you encounter special people that forever change you,” writes Al Ferguson, owner of the travel agency. “Edward Sotomayor was one of those people.”

people to be the best they could be. He didn’t need a stage for that.” Hours before his death, Tomlinson had performed with his band at Blue Martini nightclub. Tomlinson later went to Pulse, where he perished in early hours of June 12. Simmons says he speaks every day with Tomlinson’s parents. “I find myself still having conversations with him every day,” he says. “He lived every moment and he enjoyed every minute of it.” Luis Sergio Vielma, 22 years old

Gilberto Ramon Silva Menéndez, 25 years old

Xavier Serrano Rosado had many passions in life, but his focus always stayed on one: his 5-year-old son, Kelvyn. Originally from Ponce, Puerto Rico, Serrano Rosado performed at local theme parks, including Disney World and Universal, before leaving to work at a shoe store to provide income and spend more time with his child, even though it meant not being a full-time dancer, says Kelvyn’s mother, Wilmariel Lozano. A video of one of his last performances as Eman Valentino at Parliament House shows Serrano Rosado lip-syncing and doing pirouettes under strobe lights, dressed in a bejeweled top hat and cape. “There was nothing that made him happier than dancing,” she says in Spanish. “But he left that to get a better job with better hours. His son was his life.” Serrano Rosado was in a happy relationship with Leroy Valentín Fernández. Their last night together was at Pulse; both men died in the shooting. Eddie Sotomayor Jr., 34 years old

Gilberto Silva Menéndez left this world to the sounds of drums and those who loved him dancing to plena music with rainbow flags. Silva Menéndez, also known as “Culi” and “Junito,” was one of 49 people killed at Pulse June 12. At his funeral, his family didn’t want mourners to wear black. They wanted people to celebrate in the way that reflected Silva Menéndez’s joyfulness by dressing in bright colors, holding balloons and dancing to Puerto Rican folk music. Silva Menéndez, 25, was originally from Manati, Puerto Rico, and moved to Orlando a few years ago. Before his death, he was studying health care management at the Ana G. Méndez University’s Orlando campus. His friends and family knew him as a happy person who loved music and life.

When his co-workers raised their wands for Luis Vielma outside the Hogwarts castle at Universal Orlando, they remembered the fallen Gryffindor for his bravery and kindness. Vielma was an attendant for the Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey ride. He graduated from Seminole High School in 2011 and from Seminole State College in 2014. Recently, he had enrolled at the college again to train as an emergency medical technician. In his free time, he volunteered at the All Souls Catholic church in Sanford and played soccer with the Deltona Adult Soccer League. After Vielma’s death, J.K. Rowling, the creator of the world he loved so much, sent a wreath of red flowers to his funeral and a handwritten card. “To Luis, who died for love,” the author wrote. “You will never be forgotten.” Luis Daniel Wilson-León, 37 years old

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About eight years ago, he found love when Jean Carlos Méndez Pérez sold him a bottle of perfume. The couple was at Pulse during the attack on June 12 and died together. Although they had a joint wake, Wilson-León’s body was taken to Puerto Rico, while Méndez Pérez was buried in Kissimmee. Jerald Arthur Wright, 31 years old

Shane Evan Tomlinson, 33 years old

Eddie Sotomayor was the glue that kept his family together, says his sister Kimberly Jackson Sotomayor. He was five years older than her and served as a natural protector, teacher, confidant and stylist, she says. He loved sweet things: Sour Patch Kids, his grandmother’s teriyaki chicken and Chick-fil-A lemonade. As children, they once convinced their mother to let them get on the coffee table and dance to Paula Abdul’s “Straight Up,” while wearing sunglasses and singing into toy microphones. “He was so bright and full of life; super sarcastic and witty but sweet on the inside,” she says.

all sorts of horrendous homophobic slurs,” said his childhood friend Daniel Gmys-Casiano. “He was the first person on this earth I came out to, and he always protected and loved his friends,” Gmys-Casiano says. “We were both members of the same church and we both [rebelled] against it, and against the spiritual tyrants that kept condemning us for giving what the world needs the most: love.”

The first thing people hear about Shane Evan Tomlinson is how beautiful his voice was. But the most beautiful part about Tomlinson was his giving heart, says his best friend, Quinten Simmons. The singer liked to help people in need, Simmons says. “He poured into people. He loved hard, whether it was through agreements or disagreements. He encouraged

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For Luis Daniel Wilson-León, Florida was the first place he could be himself. Growing up in a religious household in Ponce, Puerto Rico, he “endured countless days of bullying while growing up, by cruel people calling him

Jerry Wright’s mother says her son wasn’t a genius in school, a good athlete or someone who stood out in the crowd. María Jose Wright says what made Jerry a beautiful jewel of a human being was his ability to love and care for others. “He wasn’t the life of the party, but he was the person who would make sure you were having a good time at the party,” she says. “He was just a really sweet, loving spirit. He was the one everyone could count on to be there.” Wright grew up in Miami. As a child, his mother says, he struggled with severe dyslexia and a speech impediment, and had to wear a full body brace to straighten his spine. But none of that stopped him from trying to communicate with others. María Jose Wright says she thinks her son’s love of making people feel special pushed him into a career in hospitality. On June 10, her son called to tell her he’d been promoted at Disney. Two days later, he died at Pulse. His mother says over 800 people attended his funeral, and she learned how kind her son was not just to her, but to everyone he knew. María Jose Wright says after her son’s death, her daughter named her newborn son Jerald after her brother. The family misses him terribly, but they’re trying to honor his legacy by advocating for gun reform. “He gave a lot of love to a lot of people in the 31 years he was with us,” his mother says. ■


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ONE YEAR AFTER PULSE

AIMING FOR CHANGE Has the post-Pulse momentum for gun reform stalled in Central Florida? BY ADAM MANNO

Shopping at the Florida Gun Show PHOTO BY JOEY ROULETTE

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he inviting aroma of barbecue wafts past rounds of golden ammo at the exhibition hall of the Central Florida Fairgrounds. Fifty-four-year-old Pinellas County resident Chris Rhubottom and his son are standing in the middle of the bustling room while shoppers swarm the Orlando stop of Florida Gun Shows on May 20. Some are perusing federally licensed stands. Others carry rifles with price tags attached to them, ready to take part in the so-called “gun show loophole” that allows private citizens to sell their firearms at events like this one without a paper trail. “His name is C.J.,” Rhubottom says, gesturing toward the antsy 7-year-old next to him. “He has an AR-15. He shoots for entertainment.” The atmosphere is dominated by paranoia and anti-press sentiment, punctuated with anti-Hillary Clinton merchandise left over from a fiery election season. Mike Williams, a 36-year-old Pine Hills resident there to buy a sling for his AR-15, cites possible riots as reason for his purchases. “I got four boys at the house, so I gotta make sure they’re all right,” he says. Mentions of post-Pulse gun reform are met with variations of the “people kill people” narrative.

“The gun didn’t kill everybody. It was a tool,” Rhubottom says. Echoing alt-right activist Milo Yiannopoulos’ speech in downtown Orlando last June, in which he said the rainbow flag should be emblazoned “Fire Back,” Rhubottom says he believes that gay people should take up arms for self-defense in the future, rather than fight to take others’ gun rights away. Michael Wilcox, a 35-year-old salesman for Shoot Straight, the firearms dealer that owns this gun show, says that as a lifelong Orlando resident, the 49 deaths at Pulse last June hit him hard. Still, he argues that bans on highcapacity magazines wouldn’t do anything to stop criminals from getting their hands on products already out there. “Unfortunately, every now and then, in a business like this, some people are going to slip through the cracks,” Wilcox says. “And there’s nothing you can do about it.” State Rep. Carlos Guillermo-Smith (D-Orlando) disagrees. “We actually now have lawmakers proactively filing gun safety legislation,” he says. “Before they weren’t even doing that.” Guillermo-Smith is referring to House Bill 167, which he filed and co-sponsored with eight other Democrats as the

session opened this year on Jan. 5. The bill’s language would have made the possession of high-capacity magazines and assault weapons by everyday citizens a third-degree felony, punishable by a mandatory minimum of one year in prison, unless the weapon or ammunition was purchased prior to Oct. 1, 2017, and licensed for possession by the state by October 2018. It died in the Criminal Justice Subcommittee in early May. The bill’s Senate counterpart, SB 254, cosponsored by Linda Stewart (D-Orlando), died on the same day. According to Gallup, gun ownership across the country peaked in the mid-1990s at 51 percent, falling to 39 percent in 2016. However, the number of gun-owning households may have decreased, but the number of firearms in those households doubled in the past 20 years. Data from the FBI criminal background check system showed in November 2016 that gun sales had set new records for 18 straight months. Also in 2016, 55 percent of respondents said they believed that gun laws ought to be made stricter. After Pulse, the Tampa Bay Times reported on an Americans for Responsible Solutions poll showing that 58 percent of Florida voters are “more likely to vote for a candidate who supports comprehensive gun reform.” But gerrymandering and strong Republican support can make those numbers seem out of reach. Campaign promises of gun reform, which catapulted U.S. Rep. Stephanie Murphy (D-Florida) to victory over Republican incumbent John Mica, have either dissipated from public discourse or been forgotten amid the clamor of national news. Translating popular support into actual policy isn’t easy. Guillermo-Smith faults the gun lobby. “The [National Rifle Association] is very powerful in Tallahassee,” he says. “Republicans are in lockstep with their agenda because they contribute to their campaigns, but also because if they go against the gun lobby, they have a lot of money spent attacking them.” The 2017 Florida legislative session was the first since the Pulse shooting, and it ended in a big win for gun advocates: an expansion of the controversial “Stand Your Ground” law. Under new legislation that shifts the burden of proof, it’s now up to the prosecutor to prove the defendant was not standing his ground, rather than up to the defendant to prove that he was. After passing in both the state House and Senate, it is one gubernatorial pen stroke away from becoming law. “I would say that’s a pretty favorable session,” says state Sen. Greg Steube (R-Sarasota). “There’s no anti-gun bills that even got a hearing at the Senate or the House.” Other bills proposed by Steube, an ardent gun-rights proponent who enjoys a 100 percent rating from the NRA, failed to see the light of day. A bill allowing citizens with concealed weapons permits to sue gun-banning businesses in the event of a shooting failed. Other measures, like concealed campus carry and airport carry – both currently prohibited by state law – also failed to gain traction. Gun reform activists see those failures as small victories. “I call that progress,” says Maria Wright, who has made it her mission to change the gun laws she says are responsible for her son Jerry’s death at Pulse. “It shows the strength of constituents speaking out, sharing their voices and standing up to the gun lobby’s agenda.”

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Florida Gun Show PHOTO BY JOEY ROULETTE

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31

Steube blames the FBI for not fully exercising their duty to stop guns from reaching people on their terror watch list. But when it comes to banning assault rifles or highcapacity magazines, he doesn’t seem to think they cause that much harm. “How does an assault rifle fire any different than a 9mm handgun?” he asks. Jason Lindsey, executive director of the Pride Fund to End Gun Violence, thinks comments like that are mere posturing. “The gun lobby pushes these minute differences,” he says. “The lethality is the same. The efficiency is the same. Yet the gun lobby believes those types of weapons are needed to defend yourself.” An ideological fault line seems to be at the center of disagreements on gun legislation. Talking points on both sides present polar-opposite views on how to best keep people safe. One side thinks they add to the problem; the other sees them as a necessity for law-abiding citizens who may need to take matters into their own hands, especially where law enforcement can be slow to respond. Steube made clear he stands on the latter side when he told the Weekly there were no armed people at Pulse. (In fact, an off-duty police officer was at the scene when the shooting began, but quickly realized shooter Omar Mateen outgunned him.) Guillermo-Smith sees action brewing on the ground. “You’ve seen some stalling on the legislative front, but there’s no stalling on the grass-roots front,” he says. “There’s still a lot of energy and activity from everyday people to enact some commonsense gun safety legislation.” Two of those everyday advocates sit at a table surrounded by rainbow banners at the 32

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LGBT Center of Central Florida on Mills Avenue, where they meet with their group’s members once a month. David Moran and Sonia Parra are with the Orlando chapter of Gays Against Guns, one of the advocacy groups that sprung up after the Pulse tragedy. Parra says she lost seven friends the morning of June 12. Moran lost two. “My first thought at that time was not changing gun legislation,” Moran says. “I was thinking a lot more about loss. I think the catalyst for me was getting a call from my friend Ida, who said, ‘Do you wanna come to this protest?’ It got me out of bed.” That protest, a sit-in outside U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio’s Orlando office in July, got Moran arrested on charges of trespassing. It also got the ball rolling for Gays Against Guns. In the months since, the chapter has remained active, holding meetings and attending rallies throughout the city. Though they’ve seen progress, Moran and Parra say they still struggle to be taken seriously among Pulse advocacy circles. “They don’t talk about [gun reform],” Parra says of groups and campaigns like the onePULSE Foundation and QLatinx. “I guess because of unity with the police force and everything with ‘Orlando United,’ they seem to forget everything that happened.” “Is it taking away someone’s right to be able to legally purchase an assault weapon that can murder 49 people in a matter of a few minutes?” Moran wonders. “Is that really taking away people’s rights?” Maria Wright, whose son died at Pulse, believes that dialogue could foster compromise between both groups. “Our son was a wonderful person, a truly good and kind human being,” she says. “He deserved to live. The right to live can and should coexist with the right to bear arms.” feedback@orlandoweekly.com


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ONE YEAR AFTER PULSE

A DIFFERENT TABLE After Pulse, queer and trans African-American and Latinx leaders in Orlando carve spaces of their own BY MON IVETTE COR D EI R O

A sit-in at Sen. Marco Rubio’s office on July 11, 2016 PHOTO BY JOEY ROULETTE

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he first time Robin Harris and Charlotte “ChaCha” Davis met was in the Orange County jail. The two women were arrested along with eight other people singing “This Little Light of Mine” after they refused to leave a sit-in at U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio’s downtown Orlando office. It had been almost a month since the massacre at the gay nightclub Pulse, in which a gunman killed 49 people and injured countless others during Latin Night. Frustration was running high after Rubio, a Miami Republican who consistently supported homophobic policies like banning LGBTQ couples from adopting children, used the Pulse tragedy as the reason he was running for re-election. Florida’s junior senator also came under fire from activists for letting gun violence run amok while accepting money from lobbying groups like the National Rifle Association. But that’s not why Davis got arrested. The local club promoter and community organizer was there because in all of the stories and the vigils after Pulse, Orlando’s queer and transgender African-American community had been erased from the narrative, despite the fact that more than a fifth of the victims were black. “The community wasn’t being included,” she says. “My focus was on bringing people to the forefront who had not gotten to tell their stories.” As news of the worst mass shooting in modern American history got out on June 12, the national media was criticized for failing to acknowledge that the shooter had not only targeted a gay club, but also that he had attacked on

Latin Night, when most of the people partying and dancing would be Latinxs. Despite people recognizing that particular intersectionality, Davis says they couldn’t see that other intersecting social identities existed that night among the people who were murdered and push resources out to survivors who needed it. The Pulse massacre highlighted a divide that already existed within Orlando’s LGBTQ community. Separated by past decades of housing segregation, Interstate 4 and an inadequate public transit system, the queer African-American community living in West Orlando deals with higher levels of police brutality, racial discrimination and less access to health resources on top of tackling homophobia. “The issues I have about being a black woman here in Orlando outweigh me being a black lesbian here in Orlando,” Davis says. “And as a black woman living here, it has been awful. The police have been harassing my son since he was 14. It’s awful to raise kids here.” After being handcuffed with plastic zip-ties and held in a jail cell for hours, Harris felt like she had taken a stand for the people who died at Pulse that experienced many of the same things she’d experienced as a black lesbian. But after the election, Harris says the organizations that had started the sit-in shifted their focus away from Rubio and ultimately, the issues still plaguing Orlando’s queer black community. “I felt abandoned,” she says. “Post-Pulse, there was no space created for us to grieve and heal. I think what it boils down to is that everything we’re seeking, we have to

become it. What we’re looking for somebody else to do for us, we have to do it ourselves.” So, they did it. Instead of finding a seat at the table, Davis, Harris and other LGBTQ African-Americans in Orlando made their own table, so to speak, by making a home at Orlando OASIS Community Outreach, a grass-roots group started by Pastor Brei Taylor. Taylor, who also helped found an LGBT-affirming ministry in town, says she started the organization to empower LGBTQ people of color in Central Florida. Some of their first conversations were forums addressing the racism and discrimination within the queer community. Ultimately, Taylor and other community organizers want to establish a place with a variety of resources, including AIDS/HIV education and prevention. “We wanted create a safe space in our black community for people to decompress because we haven’t really had a welcoming space that wasn’t club-oriented or a church service,” she says. “We want genuine inclusion fostered by authentic representation.” Like Harris, Viviana Tronche felt some of the same isolation after Pulse. When the shootings happened, she was living in Poinciana, one of the many communities of Latinxs spread like patchwork across Central Florida. In the past, she had driven the hour it took to get to Pulse to listen to Spanish music among her lesbian and queer friends, losing herself in the memories of her hometown pier in Ponce, Puerto Rico. Like her, many of the victims were Puerto Rican and would drive the half-hour from Kissimmee just to be themselves and dance. Without that safe space, she says she felt alone and depressed in a place with few, if any, LGBTQ resources. “It was this utter emptiness, like my body felt like it had no organs, but at the same time, it felt heavy, like it was full of cement,” she says. “I would wake up feeling like I was just waiting for my turn.” Tronche eventually discovered QLatinx, a community organization that sprung up after the tragedy to focus on healing and empowering queer and trans Latinxs when many of the governmental agencies and institutional LGBTQ organizations couldn’t provide services in a language other than English. They meet on a weekly basis to talk about a variety of issues affecting LGBTQ Latinxs, like immigrants rights, mental health and coming out to their families. Christopher Cuevas, one of the founders of QLatinx, says the group started as a group of strangers who got together in someone’s living room right after Pulse. “We just sat there eating, crying, laughing and sharing these beautiful memories,” he says. “In that moment, I just needed to be in community with queer people of color that understood me.” Kent Marrero, who identifies as a genderqueer transgender person, recently started attending QLatinx as a space to heal after Pulse. Marrero, who uses the pronoun “they,” says there’s still a long way to go for racism and colorism to be addressed in the Latinx community and the larger LGBTQ community. They say sometimes it might seem like these communities are intentionally trying not to feel united with the rest of Orlando, but that’s not the case. “In order to be ‘Orlando United,’ we also need to make sure these communities are being listened to and that it’s not just business as usual,” Marrero says. “We need to make something better for the future, like create a city united in diversity, not in homogenization.”

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ONE YEAR AFTER PULSE

Pulse memorial crosses on display at the History Center PHOTO COURTESY OF ORANGE COUNTY MAYOR’S OFFICE

Prism of Pulse A spectrum of local voices on how they remember June 12 and what Orlando showed the world on its darkest day BY M O NI VET T E CO RD EI RO, D EANNA FERRANT E AND HO LLY V. KAPHERR

Before June 12, you could ask people in the city where they were from and they would usually respond with the name of another state, says Mayor Buddy Dyer. But since the mass shooting at Pulse, he hears people say, “I’m from Orlando.” The City Beautiful promised not to be defined by those terrifying hours of hate, and it has kept to that by responding with compassion, from the heroism of first responders to the long lines of residents at blood banks. Orlando was a beautiful place to live before Pulse, but on the city’s darkest day, it embodied love when choosing to blame someone would have been easier. And that, as Robert Frost would say, has made all the difference.

Allysia Williams aka Sierrah Foxx, performer In the year following the Pulse massacre, thousands of people have come to pay their respects and leave tributes at the club. But

Allysia Williams, who lives blocks away from the site, can’t go past Pulse because of the memories. That night, as she stood at the edge of her driveway, she saw cop cars flying down Kaley Street toward Pulse and two terrified boys running toward her, shouting that someone was shooting inside the club. Williams, who performs as a drag queen under the name Sierrah Foxx, couldn’t believe someone would gun down people at the place where she often performed. Williams let the two boys inside her home to take refuge. They were texting another friend still inside the club who was pretending to be dead. When the friend stopped texting, the two boys started to cry and Williams told them all they could do was pray. They prayed in her living room until 5 a.m., when the blast from police at Pulse shook the picture frames off her walls. Williams says it breaks her heart to think that her brothers and sisters who were dancing at the club that night were just trying to celebrate being gay and free. “I’m 45 and I’ve been through my ups and downs,” she says. “I remember saying to God, ‘Why couldn’t it have been someone

like me instead of these people that were so young and so innocent? Why did they have to go?’”

Dr. Michael Cheatham, Orlando Regional Medical Center

PHOTO BY ROB BARTLETT

Patty Sheehan, Orlando City Commissioner Orlando’s first openly gay City Commissioner, Patty Sheehan, says Orlando showed the world on June 12 how to stand orlandoweekly.com

up to hatred with community support and love. That morning, she remembers being on the street with Terry DeCarlo, director of the GLBT Community Center of Central Florida, as the world found out how many lives had been taken at Pulse. As she and DeCarlo held each other and cried, a local minister offered to pray with them. Photographer Joe Burbank captured the moment. “I will never forget that feeling, at that moment, and being so grateful to be surrounded by friends like Terry who have done service work in the LGBTQ community for so many years,” she says.

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of another shooter at the hospital. After working for hours to save people, Cheatham remembers one of the hardest moments that day was when he and another doctor had to read a list of survivors to hundreds of desperate family members clamoring for any information about their loved ones. The cries of anguish still stick in his mind. The next morning, Cheatham and hospital staff went right back to work to continue taking care of Pulse survivors and other trauma patients. “They left whatever they were doing and got out of bed at 3 a.m. to come to the hospital to work even though they weren’t on duty,” he says. “It’s what we do as a trauma center because of the commitment we have to the community.”

Katie Wright and Mallory O’Neill, Papa John’s Pizza on Mills Avenue Katie Wright was on vacation when she woke up Sunday to the news that a mass shooting had happened in her hometown. Wright, director of operations for the Orlando region of Papa John’s Pizza, called the Papa John’s on Mills Avenue and asked employees to help in the only way they knew how – by taking pizzas down to the GLBT Community Center of Central Florida. Mallory O’Neill remembers an “eerie feeling” in the air as she drove the pizzas down to the hundreds of people gathered at the Center who were crying and hugging each other. She and other workers delivered more than 200 donated pizzas around Orlando that day, even taking orders from customers in New York and Boston. “It wasn’t just a delivery for me,” she says. “It was our team helping in the way we could.”

Ruthie the Comfort Dog lends solace in Orlando PHOTO BY @RUTHIECOMFORTDOG

food. “When you’re the medical examiner’s office, you can’t do much after the fact – the only thing we can do is reunite victims with families as soon a possible,” he says. “It does sound like a cliché, but in the darkest hour, we really can see greatness in people.”

Rich Martin, director of K9 deployments at Lutheran Church Charities

Dr. Joshua Stephany, Orange County Chief Medical Examiner Bodies don’t bother medical examiner Dr. Joshua Stephany. But going in to identify the victims of the Pulse shooting, he felt like time had stopped at the crime scene. “Picture any nightclub in the country at that hour,” he says. “People buying drinks, buying food, they’re paying bills, people are dancing and joking, and the music is still pulsating. And then take away the people. It was surreal.” Many were touched when Stephany and his office decided to keep the bodies of the victims and their killer in separate rooms, out of respect for their families. It was a small, comforting gesture from the office, but it inspired people to send the office thank-you letters and even 38

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ing in modern American history. She plans to turn the club site into a national memorial and museum that honors the victims, their families and survivors. “I think it’s fair to say that the rest of the world has been able to see Orlando as it always has been – accepting, strong and loving,” she says.

PHOTO BY ROB BARTLETT

Barbara Poma, owner of Pulse Nightclub For Barbara Poma, Pulse was a way to celebrate the legacy of her brother John, who died of complications from HIV/AIDS in 1991. Terrible and profound events happened on June 12, but what still stands out in Poma’s mind is the sense of community felt in the city after the worst mass shoot●

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The golden retrievers (like Ruthie, above) that flew to Orlando after Pulse had already been to the site of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting and the Boston bombing, says Rich Martin, director of the comfort dog program at Lutheran Church Charities in Illinois. They visited hospitals, vigils, media stations, dispatch centers and dozens of other locations around the City Beautiful for two weeks to provide a calming moment for hundreds who grieved in the days after the massacre. “Many times they will lead us to the person that most needs it,” he says. “They know who needs love.”

Elizabeth Moreno, manager of the OneBlood donor center on Michigan Street When Elizabeth Moreno got into work at the OneBlood donor center on Michigan Street at 9 a.m. the morning of June 12, the building was already at full capacity. People distraught over the massacre at Pulse stood

for hours in long lines under the summer sun to help in one of the only ways they knew how. At one point, more than 600 people were waiting at the center to donate blood. Moreno and her team finally stopped working at 4 a.m. the next morning after the last donor left. By then, they’d been collecting blood for 21 hours. “The compassion and outpouring of love and support for the community helped keep us going,” she says.

Joshua Granada and Carlos Tavarez, firefighter paramedics with Orlando Fire Department Joshua Granada and Carlos Tavarez were dropping off a patient with stomach pain at ORMC around 2 a.m. when they heard gunshots in the distance. Far away from their home station in Parramore, they drove their ambulance down the street toward the police lights and sirens clustered around Pulse. Granada and Tavarez stopped close to Station 5 on Orange Avenue and saw firefighters dragging a man into the station. The two men immediately grabbed the man and sped off toward ORMC with their first patient. Trip after trip, the firefighter paramedics used their small ambulance to transport one-third of the 44 patients for the half-mile ride to the hospital throughout that morning. “I just remember telling one guy, ‘You’re not going to die today,’” Granada says. “Technically you’re not supCONTINUED ON PAGE 41


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ONE YEAR AFTER PULSE

UCF students at a vigil in the Student Union a week after the shootings PHOTO BY MONIVETTE CORDEIRO

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posed to say that, but that’s what that person needed to hear.” Tavarez credits the muscle memory they developed during training for the amount of victims they were able to help. “It took me a few days to fully realize what that was and what part we had in it,” Tavarez says. “Some days you’re angry, and sometimes you’re OK. We were just trying to the do the greatest amount of good for the greatest number of people.”

impossible for a child,” Perkins says. “But the simple, handwritten messages of hope, love, peace and support left by children just really spoke to me.”

Michael Perkins, executive director of the Orange County Regional History Center A woman’s rosary beads from the Vatican. A couch from IKEA covered in writing. A small treasure chest filled with 49 sparkly pink and red hearts. These are just a few of the tribute items that Michael Perkins and his staff at the Orange County Regional History collected and preserved from memorials around the city after the Pulse massacre. For weeks, his staff was out in the hot sun, cleaning candle wax and other debris from the things mourners left behind. “It’s hard enough for us as adults to understand how somebody could do this,

Mayor Buddy Dyer and Heather Fagan, City of Orlando Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer remembers his deputy chief of staff Heather Fagan’s face was a stark white when she came to

tell him the actual number of people that had died at Pulse. In those confusing first hours after the shooting at Pulse had ended, it would have been easy for residents to respond with fear and anger, not only toward the shooter but also the Muslim community. “We were going to have to support each other and this community was going to have to come together,” Fagan says. Together, Dyer and Fagan crafted a message that they hoped would inspire Orlandoans during the darkest moment to choose love and compassion over hate. “Were we going to be known as the site of the worst mass shooting in history?” Dyer says. “Right out of the box, we said we wanted to be defined as something different than that.” The final message was an iconic line from Orlando’s longest-serving mayor: “We will not be defined by the act of a cowardly hater. We will be defined by how we respond and how we treat each other.”

Chef Kevin Fonzo, owner of K Restaurant Chef Kevin Fonzo found out about the massacre at Pulse just after closing for the night at K Restaurant, his award-winning College Park eatery. After the initial orlandoweekly.com

shock, Fonzo recognized a familiar face among the victims – Cory Connell, 21, was a graduate of Edgewater High School who worked at the College Park Publix where Fonzo shopped daily. He decided to throw a fundraiser at his restaurant for Connell’s family to help pay for the funeral and other expenses. “[The evening] showed how, when challenged through devastation and loss, we can come together as one, regardless of race, religion or sexual preference,” he says.

Nina Reynolds, UCF graduate Nina Reynolds didn’t come out as transgender until her third year at the University of Central Florida, but says other students and her professors were kind and understanding. But there were still odd looks on the bus, misgendering and an endless battle with the state’s medical system. She says Pulse woke up many people in Orlando’s LGBTQ community to the hatred still present. “There’s a perception that just because gay people can marry and have a fire-ass parade every year that the fight is over. I feel it’s barely begun.” feedback@orlandoweekly.com JUNE 7-13, 2017

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ONE YEAR AFTER PULSE

Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz performs ‘Pietà’ PHOTO BY BERNARD WILCHUSKY/UCF

WE SEE YOU From high art to humble displays, visual representations and reactions to the Pulse tragedy are everywhere in Orlando BY L EAH SA N DLER

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n June 12, 2016, a shooter entered Pulse, a gay nightclub on South Orange Avenue, on Latin night, violently and abruptly ending 49 lives in the deadliest mass shooting in United States history. The shockwaves of this tragic event reverberated through Orlando’s LGBTQ and Latinx communities, through the nation and the world. A significant cultural trauma causes changes in the relationships between symbols and meanings, altering the visual culture of a society. The Pulse tragedy has dramatically altered the visual landscapes of Orlando, one of the most obvious and visually striking of these changes being the proliferation of rainbows across the city, in a show of support for the LGBTQ community, and in many ways a recognition and rejection of the culture of intolerance which caused such a tragedy to occur. Countless local businesses have prominently displayed rainbows in storefronts, small gestures adding up to a very visible show of support for the LGBTQ community. In October of 2016, the Lake Eola bandstand was painted in bright rainbow colors to honor the victims of the shooting. Forty-nine rainbow-hued seats were installed as a memorial at the Orlando City Soccer Club’s stadium in January of this year. Artists have also responded with shows of grief, support and recognition of loss. Many of these responses have been quiet and respectful gestures, community-driven and cathartic, opening spaces for grief and introspection as well

community and families who we love and want to remember and want to keep their spirit alive.” The 49 Portraits project, on view through June 14 at the Terrace Gallery at City Hall, brings together portraits by different artists of the 49 victims of the shooting, organized by Armstrong State University art professor Mia Merlin. Merlin says, “One thing many artists do is step towards pain, instead of turn away from it. From the artists making these portraits, I heard over and over how very difficult it was to do, and yet they wanted to do it. Their desire to do it came from a wisdom that in the midst of sorrow and loss is where we understand the value of our life, and that our creative response to heartbreak is where we weave straw into gold. They realize that in knowing our pain we know our shared humanity.” In the exhibition What Has Changed? (a partnership between the Orlando Public Library and Sam Flax of Orlando), local artists were asked to create works probing at this far-reaching question. Orlando artist Lesley Silvia, who made work for the exhibition, says, “My contribution borrowed symbolism found in vanitas, playing alongside commonly found animal imagery, to remind Orlando citizens that while the City Beautiful can for the most part be a safe haven for those in the LGBTQ community, Florida itself still has a long way to go as far as legislation is concerned with equal rights.” This exhibition opens June 15 at the Orlando Public Library. A driving force behind each of these contributions to Orlando’s visual culture is a desire to build community and acknowledge the specificities of grief borne from the tragedy. The meanings of certain symbols, such as the rainbow, have changed for our city, and a public awareness of the personal tragedies and political struggles within the LGBTQ and Latinx communities has come to define Orlando’s culture within the past year. feedback@orlandoweekly.com

as for a strengthening of community bonds. In Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz’s durational performance Pietà, the artist opened her arms to people of color and members of the LGBTQ community in response to the overwhelming deluge of tragedy experienced by these groups – not just the Pulse shootings but other identity-based hate crimes and instances of police brutality. RaimundiOrtiz also hosted a calavera decorating workshop at the Orlando Museum of Art with organizers of QLatinx, a grass-roots organization dedicated to the advancement and empowerment of Orlando’s LGBTQ+ Latinx community. The calaveras created during the workshop became part of a larger installation by Raimundi-Ortiz, a site-specific Dia de los Muertos ofrenda (offering) for Pulse, displayed at Chicago’s National Museum of Mexican Art as a part of their yearly Dia De Los Muertos exhibition. Cesáreo Moreno, visual arts director and chief curator of the museum, discussed the social relevance of the Day of the Dead exhibition in a phone interview with Orlando Weekly. “Every year we, unfortunately, include some sort of ofrenda or site-specific installation that pays homage to recent tragedies that have occurred in the U.S. and the world. In the past we’ve had ofrendas to events such as the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary, hurricanes, and deaths of people crossing the border from Mexico into the United States,” he says. “Dia De Los Muertos is a beautiful celebration of life. It is a way in which we can, in a healthy way, deal with grief, with tremendous loss, of people in our orlandoweekly.com

Dia de los Muertos ofrenda for Pulse PHOTO BY MICHAEL TROPEA

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ONE YEAR AFTER PULSE

LOVE IS LOVE IS LOVE In the hours and days after the attack, Orlando’s theater community responded with activism and art

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BY S E TH KUBERSKY

he Pulse Nightclub tragedy touched every walk of life, but theatrical artists were uniquely impacted, thanks largely to the intersectionality between Orlando’s themepark performers and gay population. “Our theater, entertainment and art community is very close with our LGBTQ community,” says producer-director Margaret Nolan, who presented last October’s After Orlando, an international project responding to the shooting. “We’re usually about one degree of separation or less.” As a consequence, in the hours and days after the attack, Orlando’s theater community “promptly came to the front lines in solidarity with the attack on our LGBTQ and Hispanic friends,” says Beth Marshall, producer of Play-in-a-Day 2016, which raised funds for the onePulse Foundation. Marshall, along with dozens of other volunteers, also participated in Orlando Shakespeare Theater’s “angel wings” project, which created costumes that worked as human shields. Volunteers donned the billowing wings to protect mourners at victims’ funerals from abusive antigay protesters. The angel wings gained national attention, but they were only the most visible of Orlando’s many artistic efforts to address Pulse’s aftermath. “Initially, I think we were all just in ‘fight or flight’,” says Blue Star, owner of the Venue, which became a hub for volunteer response efforts. “The reaction was, what do we do? We know how to create art, and art is going to help us heal.” The attack “spurred the theater community into taking action by creating theatrical expression of the loss, as well as to shine a light on related issues of gun violence, inequality and political actions,” according to Nolan, and resulted in “art that is mournful and reminiscent, and makes you dive deep to a place sometimes you don’t want to go,” as Blue says. Pulse’s impact was especially evident in the tone of Orlando’s 2017 Fringe Festival, as writer-director David Lee (whose award-winning anthology, O-Town: Voices From Orlando, will be performed June 11 at Orlando Shakes) points out. “The work at the Fringe this year has been more introspective and celebratory of life,” says Lee, while “putting out on the table what we need to work on, personally and socially.” Blue observes that “it’s definitely been a heavier Fringe, but a healing Fringe too,” adding that she sees “a lot of broken people trying to heal themselves through art.”

Producer Beth Marshall PHOTO BY ROB BARTLETT

Beneath the surface, the trauma of Pulse had a silver lining in that it stimulated solidarity within the arts community, with numerous troupes cooperating on fundraisers. One year later, Nolan says, “The synergy is spawning creative collaborations to further the discourse on the impact the tragedy had on our collective consciousness.” Lee concurs that the event has “made the collaborative spirit tighter,” saying that the theater community’s usual “interpersonal drama has completely dissipated, because everyone wanted to work together. … We all realize a little bit more how precious life is.” “Pulse will be with us forever,” Marshall says, and so will “art that aids in healing, education and societal change.” Orlando’s theater community “is a microcosm of Orlando in general,” says Lee, and “a lot of the theater community are also activists and responders,” so it’s only natural that a year after the event, artists are still immersed in its echo. “We are a unified community that is standing strong, as strong as we said we would on the day of the attacks,” asserts Blue. “It’s a promise that we have made as a community, and that we have kept as a community.”

OST Angel Wings PHOTO BY MONIVETTE CORDEIRO

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ONE YEAR AFTER PULSE

LIVE AID

Southern Fried Sunday to the Geek Easy. The “Beautiful Together” event at the Dr. Phillips Center unified more than 50 local arts groups. Big national names – from a wide spectrum including pop (Imagine Dragons and Nate Ruess at Hard Rock Live), metal (Sleep at the Beacham), Orlando’s music scene was on the forefront of citywide rallies for Pulse country (the “Country Strong” benefit concert at CFE BY BAO LE-HUU Arena), Broadway (“From Broadway With Love” at Dr. Phillips Center) and freestyle (Johnny O. and Cynthia at the Abbey) – came to raise money. “There is a sense of tranquility that music can give,” says Orlando rapper Lauren “TKO” Rohan. “And that’s what was happening through a series of events around the city; people were coming together to let the music heal. We came together to not only raise money, but to also raise awareness. We came together as musicians to let the city know that we will not be broken.” The night immediately following Pulse, OW photographer Jen Cray was on the beat at the So So Glos concert at Will’s Pub. “Though the venue was mostly empty and those that were there were quiet and shellshocked, I’ve never experienced such an immense feeling of communal mourning and healing through the live music experience,” she says. “Shows in the weeks that followed had the same warmth and love – lots of hugs, lots of conversation. A whole lot of feelings of not just sadness but of strength. It was beautiful – this healing through art.” The songs followed. Homegrown benefit compilations emerged, like Heartbeats, featuring local artists, and Forever Beautiful, a locally organized 49-song (one for each victim) comp with input from big names like Bad Religion, Anti-Flag and Taking Back Sunday. The day of the tragedy, Orlando breakout band You Blew It put out an EP of unreleased songs, named it Pulse and donated all proceeds to local LGBT beacon the Center. Backed by more than 50 others, Orlando musician Shadow Pearson penned “City Song – Finger on the Pulse.” More tribute songs were made by national stars, including Sleep at the Beacham Jennifer Lopez and Lin-Manuel Miranda (“Love Make the World Go Round”), Sharon PHOTO BY SIERRA REESE Van Etten (“Not Myself”), Melissa Etheridge (“Pulse”) and a glitteringly loaded all-star he Orlando music scene was already aghast at munity began to repair the tears in its fabric. It would be a cast for “Hands.” Though the music goes on, the wounds remain deep the murder of pop starlet Christina Grimmie long time before Orlando got its minds around this tragedy, at the Plaza Live by a deranged obsessive on if ever, so we rode on instinct. After we flooded the lines at and raw in Orlando nightclubs a year later. The weekend June 10, 2016. Then, the very next night, Pulse blood banks the next morning, the music scene expressed of Pulse plumbed the depths of our despair, but also of our itself in the ways it knows best: through song, shows and humanity and resolve. The reflex was a wave of solidarity, happened. And everything changed. enlightenment and pride like we’ve never seen, like we’ve “It was no longer enough to simply be a safe place to host community. Naturally, the clubs rallied. The Parliament House coor- perhaps never even realized we were capable of before. events for people to come and enjoy themselves,” says local “It’s sad that it had to take a tragedy on this scale to do promoter Kyle Raker (Norsekorea, Will’s Pub). “The envi- dinated with Pulse ownership to aid their staff, and the ronment here in Orlando seemed to become one where that Abbey took on hosting the Pulse Latin Nights. But the so, but I definitely think it has opened people’s eyes to the struggles of queer and Latinx folks,” says Wet Nurse drumripples went far beyond that. sense of security also needed to become visible.” On the live circuit, bands touring through in the imme- mer Vanessa Brewster. “When something like this happens The blow was staggering, crippling, enormous. Next to it, everything seemed so inconsequential. We didn’t know diate aftermath donated show proceeds to official Pulse in your own backyard, you can’t ignore it anymore and what to do, but we knew it couldn’t be nothing. So, amid funds, acts like Pity Sex and Petal. Then music benefits pretend that hatred and bigotry don’t exist.” probably the biggest trauma in the city’s history, the com- spread across the city, across all scenes, everywhere from feedback@orlandoweekly.com

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Thursday, 8

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COMEDY

MUSIC

Deadly Sins Brewing is already an oasis for craft beer fans in the middle of Winter Park’s are-we-really-calling-it-the-SoFa District. And their event schedule, featuring everything from a running club to food truck nights, have made it a burgeoning public living room in an area of town that’s been lacking an informal community hub. This week, Deadly Sins invites some regional comedians to try out the space and test the waters for a regular stand-up showcase. Sins & Grins draws comics from the Orlando and Daytona areas – like Javaris Temple, Casey Crawford, Jasmine Jewel and Sareth Ney – and gives them a microphone and the chance to do their best to make craft beer shoot out of the noses of laughing patrons. Napkins provided. – Thaddeus McCollum

Their moniker is as lurid as a particularly sketchy power electronics ensemble, but fear not, the members of Child Abuse (which includes two no-doubt doting dads), take pains to clarify that their band name is more of a descriptor than an intent: “brutal children’s music,” which somehow makes total sense. For indeed, Child Abuse is a bass-electronics-drums explosion of loud, attention-starved tantrums right in line with, say, a Christmas without the right presents on offer. Bassist-vocalist Tim Dahl will be familiar to sharp-eyed and scum-oriented local concertgoers, being a member of Lydia Lunch’s torture brigade when she supported the Genitorturers here last summer. Child Abuse’s music will be likewise familiar to devotees of the singular Skin Graft aesthetic: grimy chaos, art pranks and blown-out noise masking (accidental or not) adventurous compositions. There are some callbacks to the new “no-wave” scene that Skin Graft fostered in the late ’90s, but there’re also more than a few nods to early Butthole Surfers, hesher metal and maybe even a lick or two of free jazz. Maybe. The trio headlines a bill with local fellow travelers Obliterati and Norway’s Golden Oriole. Skronk ’em if you got ’em. – MM

Sins & Grins

Child Abuse

8-10 p.m. | Deadly Sins Brewing, 750 Jackson Ave., Winter Park | 407-900-8726 | deadlysinsbrewing.com | free

with Obliterati, Golden Oriole | 9 p.m. | Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave. | willspub.org | $7

Friday, 9

T.I.

MUSIC

Friday, 9

Tears for Fears MUSIC

OUR PICKS FOR THE BEST EVENTS THIS WEEK

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Putting aside the headscratcher of a double bill with Hall & Oates – are enterprising bookies taking odds on which duo will implode first on this tour or what? – any chance to hear the titanic songcraft of Tears for Fears in its natural environment (the arena) is very welcome. The duo of Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith started in 1981 and hit it big only one year later with their debut album The Hurting; but it was Songs From the Big Chair where the group made their unquestioned contributions to the heartbreak pop canon. Whether it was “Shout” or “Everybody Wants to Rule the World,” the band casually unveiled hit after hit. They may have splintered after 1989’s The Seeds of Love with, well, no love lost between the two members, but their songs weren’t intended for the same “Best of the ’80s” dustbin as many of their contemporaries. Soon after the band reunited in the early ’00s, their “Mad World” became a moody centerpiece to the film Donnie Darko, and a deluxe reissue of Big Chair only added to their swooning yet world-beating synth-pop mystique. Prom’s coming late this year, but is it ever here. – Matthew Moyer with Hall & Oates | 7 p.m. | Amway Center, 400 W. Church St. | 407-440-7900 | amwaycenter.com | $32-$126

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● JUNE 7-13, 2017

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Way back in 2006, rapper T.I. was checking into the Delano Hotel in Miami when he and his friend heard the sounds of someone in pain. They looked up at the balcony above them and saw a man suffering from injuries sustained in a botched suicide attempt. T.I. called the authorities and an ambulance came to take the injured man away. It wasn’t until a little while later that he learned that the suicide victim was Creed frontman Scott Stapp, who had thrown himself off the balcony during a drug-fueled mental breakdown. “He immediately took care of the situation and saved my life,” said Stapp of T.I.’s intervention. Four years later, T.I. assisted authorities in Atlanta in talking a man off the ledge of a building by shooting a personalized video message and sending it to the man. This week, T.I. brings his Hustle Gang tour to Venue 578, reminding us who popularized the word “trap” with nearly two decades of hits, from “Rubber Band Man” to last year’s surprisingly conscious Us or Else: Letter to the System. Get saved. – TM 8 p.m. | Venue 578, 578 N. Orange Ave. | 407-872-0066 | venue578.com | $40-$60


Saturday, 10

Sunday, 11

RAINN Benefit

Chefs Collab EVENTS

The Ravenous Pig hosts a one-night Italian-themed collaboration dinner event with its chef Nick Sierputowski and Bruno Zacchini of Pizza Bruno. Sierputowski has been serving up flavorful dishes for nine years, since the Ravenous Pig’s opening. Zacchini is a Swine family alum, and is also beloved for his Big Bruno's Bites cart and his work at Third Wave in New Smyrna Beach before opening the brick and mortar Pizza Bruno roughly a year ago, where his pies have gained fame amongst those who weren’t already followers. The two chefs are set to provide a Mediterranean trip for the palate: raw melon and prosciutto-cured fish, squid-ink tagliatelle, porchetta and tiramisu cannoli. – Virginia Vasquez 6:30-9:30 p.m. | The Ravenous Pig, 565 W. Fairbanks Ave., Winter Park | 407-628-2333 | theravenouspig.com | $65

Monday, 12

Orlando Love

MUSIC

PHOTO BY KARINA CURTO

PHOTO BY MONIVETTE CORDEIRO

EVENTS

As a replacement for the cancelled PWR BTTM date at Backbooth, local bookers Norsekorea kept the date and rebooked the show as a fundraiser for the nonprofit RAINN – the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. The new lineup is equal parts challenging and exciting, featuring a trio of local female-identified projects. You’ve got deranged punk malcontents Wet Nurse, along with the hazy indie-jangle of Chelsea Ybarra’s Sugarplum and spiky pop-punk trio Cool Grandma. New d-beat project Disgender will not, sadly, be able to play the show. One hundred percent of door proceeds go to RAINN. Support the alignment of outsider aesthetics with results-oriented activism. – MM

This week marks the passing of one year since the Pulse tragedy, and Orlando pays tribute to the fallen. Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs and other community leaders and elected officials will be hosting a remembrance ceremony at Lake Eola to honor all of those that we lost on that night. Grammy award-winning recording artist Olga Tañón and Sisaundra Lewis, a former contestant on The Voice, use the strength of their singing voices to remind us of the strength of the Orlando community. The memorial reading of the 49 names might be the hardest part to hear, but the unity of our city speaks volumes in itself. – Kristin James

with Wet Nurse, Sugarplum, Cool Grandma | Backbooth, 37 W. Pine St. | 407-999-2570 | backbooth.com | $5

7 p.m. | Walt Disney Amphitheatre, Lake Eola Park, 195 N. Rosalind Ave. | cityoforlando.net | free

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THEWEEK

submit your events to listings@orlandoweekly.com at least 12 days before print to have them included

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7-TUESDAY, JUNE 13 COMPILED BY THADDEUS MCCOLLUM

MUSIC WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7 Child Abuse, Golden Oriole, Obliterati 9 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $7. Eugene Snowden’s Ten Pints of Truth 10 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free. Forget Myself 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540. Lorna Shore, Bodysnatcher, The Extortionist 6:30 pm; Backbooth, 37 W. Pine St.; $13; 407-999-2570. Reggae Night with Hor!zen and DJ Red I 10 pm; The Caboose, 1827 N. Orange Ave.; free; 407-898-7733. (Sandy) Alex G, Japanese Breakfast, Cende 7 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $14-$17; 407-246-1419.

THURSDAY, JUNE 8 Advanced Listening: Second Subject, Aftermarket, Sean Shakespeare, Skip, E-Turn, Acey Watuso, Swamburger, Divinci 9 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $10; 407-246-1419. Colorvision, Stranger Stranger, Rocko English, James Pippin, the Sugar Fathers 8 pm; Uncle Lou’s Entertainment Hall, 1016 N. Mills Ave.; contact for price; 407-270-9104. Create: Mija, Whipped Cream 10 pm; Venue 578, 578 N. Orange Ave.; $15-$20; 407-872-0066. Froggy Fresh 7 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $15-$45. Kaleigh Baker 10 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free. The Mellow Relics 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540.

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● JUNE 7-13, 2017

Sean Holcomb 9 pm; Copper Rocket Pub, 106 Lake Ave., Maitland; free; 407-636-3171.

Eight Stories High 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540.

Skillet, the Reality of Yourself 6:30 pm; House of Blues, Disney Springs, Lake Buena Vista; $25-$57; 407-934-2583.

Floorplay: Frankie Alex & Trini D. 10 pm; Backbooth, 37 W. Pine St.; free; 407-999-2570.

Thursday Jazz Jams 8 pm; Austin’s Coffee, 929 W. Fairbanks Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-975-3364.

FRIDAY, JUNE 9 Acropolis, Eprom, Sayer, Tadeo, Vampa, Mash 9 pm; The Abbey, 100 S. Eola Drive; $15-$30; 407-704-6261.

Ho99o9 (Secret Show), Injury Reserve, Jason 9 pm; Address to be disclosed, TBA; unknown. Los Padres, Chozen, Spreadsheets 9 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $10. A Lotta Night Music 8 pm; The Mezz, 100 S. Eola Drive; $20; 407-423-9999.

Blizzard of Ozzy 8 pm; House of Blues, Disney Springs, Lake Buena Vista; $8; 407-934-2583.

Mr. Hymn, Transcendental Telecom, RV 8 pm; Sandwich Bar, 2432 E. Robinson St.; $3; 407-421-1670.

Blueanimal 9 pm; Copper Rocket Pub, 106 Lake Ave., Maitland; free; 407-636-3171.

Pacific Dub, Katastro 7 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $15; 407-246-1419.

The Prescription, 430 Steps, RushmoreFL, Eat the Elderly 7 pm; Backbooth, 37 W. Pine St.; $5; 407-999-2570.

Daryl Hall & John Oates, Tears for Fears 7 pm; Amway Center, 400 W. Church St.; $32-$216; 800-745-3000.

Purple Reign 7 10 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free.

Raleigh Estes and Friends 8 pm; Muldoon’s Saloon, 7439 Aloma Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-657-9980.

Divorce Ring, Burnt Hair, Ootheca, J. Carter 9 pm; Stardust Video and Coffee, 1842 E. Winter Park Road; $5 suggested donation; 407-623-3393.

The Mentors, The Robinsons, Killing Tradition 8 pm; West End Trading Company, 202 S. Sanford Ave., Sanford; $12-$15; 407-322-7475.

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[MUSIC] Mija Thursday at Venue 578

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Tip “T.I.” Harris 8 pm; Venue 578, 578 N. Orange Ave.; $35; 407-872-0066. CONTINUED ON PAGE 53


Purple Reign

Hourglass Comedy Showcase Adam Avitable hosts this comedy showcase at Longwood’s finest brewpub every first Wednesday of the month. Catch some laughs from some of the area’s best comics while trying a variety of house-made brews. 9-11 p.m. Wednesday; The Hourglass Brewery, 255 S. Ronald Reagan Blvd., Longwood; free; hourglassbrewing.com

BASE: Twisted Fairytales Fans of the cable competition show Skin Wars get to see some of the area’s best body painters and models show off their skills at this semi-regular night at DRIP. Expect to see plenty of dark faeries and elves traipsing around as more than a dozen artists interpret the theme. 8 p.m. Thursday; DRIP, 8747 International Drive; $10-$15; baseorlando.com

Purple Reign DJ BMF has been hosting allPrince parties in honor of His Dearly Departed Purple Majesty’s birthday (June 7; write your congressman to make it a national holiday) for the past seven years. BMF’s catalog goes super-deep, so even if you’re a diehard fan, you’re bound to hear something from the famously prolific artist that you’ve never heard before. 10 p.m. Friday; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free; willspub.org

The Purple Rain Skate Party And if that doesn’t slake your thirst for TAFKATAFKAP, you can also go old-school and strap some skates to your feet for this roller-disco Prince party. The soundtrack also features Princerelated artists like Sheila E. (they’d better play “Oliver’s House”), Morris Day & the Time, Vanity 6 and more. And just like every good Prince party, we expect to see more than a few skinned knees. 11 p.m. Saturday; Semoran Skateway, 2670 Casselcreek Blvd., Casselberry; $10 ($2 skate rental); semoranskateway.com

Puddles Pity Party

THE LOCAL ALTERNATIVE FOR

July 15 at the Plaza Live Yngwie Malmsteen, June 14 at House of Blues Black Marble, June 16 at Will’s Pub Tig Notaro, June 17 at the Plaza Live Jim Jefferies, June 17 at Hard Rock Live Frank Iero & the Patience, June 22 at the Social The Districts, June 23 at the Social What So Not, June 24 at Gilt Nightclub Micah Schnabel, June 24 at Lil Indies

Rooney, July 12 at the Social Ted Nugent, July 14 at the Plaza Live Phantogram, Tycho, July 15 at Hard Rock Live Puddles Pity Party, July 15 at the Plaza Live Chevelle, July 19 at House of Blues Taking Back Sunday, July 20 at House of Blues The Rocket Summer, July 25 at the Social SALES, July 25 at Will’s Pub

Duke Dumont, June 29 at the Beacham

Dragonforce, July 27 at the Beacham

Migos, July 3 at Gilt Nightclub

Cindy Wilson (The B-52’s), July 27 at Will’s Pub

Metallica, July 5 at Camping World Stadium

Shawn Mendes, July 28 at Amway Center

STRFKR, July 10 at the Beacham

Prince Royce, July 29 at Amway Center

Born of Osiris, July 11 at the Social

All Time Low, Aug. 6-7 at House of Blues

Blondie, Garbage, Aug. 9 at Hard Rock Live Laetitia Sadier Source Ensemble, Aug. 12 at Will’s Pub Lil Yachty, Aug. 15 at Hard Rock Live J. Cole, Aug. 16 at Amway Center The Goddamn Gallows, Aug. 23 at Will’s Pub Goo Goo Dolls, Aug. 30 at Hard Rock Live Ed Sheeran, Aug. 31 at Amway Center

Misterwives, Sept. 24 at the Beacham Pitbull, Sept. 29 at Amway Center Cafe Tacvba, Sept. 29 at House of Blues Thundercat, Oct. 10 at the Beacham

Bruno Mars, Oct. 14 at Amway Center

The Afghan Whigs, Sept. 6 at the Social

Bad Suns, Nov. 3 at the Beacham

Adam Ant, Sept. 9 at the Beacham

Imagine Dragons, Nov. 10 at Amway Center

Epica, Lacuna Coil, Sept. 24 at the Plaza Live

SPORTS

Descendents, Oct. 20 at House of Blues Halsey, Oct. 22 at Amway Center

The Melvins, Sept. 18 at the Social

FESTIVALS

Needtobreathe, Oct. 13 at House of Blues

Apocalyptica, Sept. 6 at House of Blues

The Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Sept. 10 at the Social

EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT

EVENTS

CONCERTS

Grizzly Bear, Nov. 15 at House of Blues Gabriel Iglesias, Dec. 2 at Amway Center Katy Perry, Dec. 17 at Amway Center

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CONTACT: BOXOFFICE@ORLANDOLIVEEVENTS.COM 6405 S US HWY US 17-92, FERN PARK, FL 32730 | 407.951.8751

JUNE 7-13, 2017

ORLANDO WEEKLY

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ORLANDO WEEKLY ● JUNE 7-13, 2017

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SATURDAY, 10

Saturday Matinee Classics: Black Orpheus FILM

The legend of Orpheus and Eurydice, whose love was stronger than death but not stronger than human curiosity, has been retold by writers as varied as Ovid, Rilke, Tennessee Williams and Thomas Pynchon, but this Brazilian film version holds its own in the reboot pantheon. Here the young lovers pass not through Hades itself, but through the slums of Rio during Carnaval, pursued by a killer dressed as Death. It’s best known for introducing bossa nova to a wider audience with its soundtrack featuring Luis Bonfá and a pre-“Girl From Ipanema” Antônio Carlos Jobim. But the true revelation of the film is the radiant Marpessa Dawn as Eurydice, beautiful and melancholic, most full of life as it’s being stolen from her. – Jessica Bryce Young noon | Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland | 407-629-0054 | enzian.org | $8

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 50

Vybe Night 6 pm; Backbooth, 37 W. Pine St.; $10; 407-999-2570.

SATURDAY, JUNE 10 Avillo 7 pm; Bombshell’s Tavern, 5405 Edgewater Drive; contact for price; 407-730-3999.

Mai Tatro, Sticky Steve & the Convicts, A Thousand Times Better, My Maiden Name 7 pm; Copper Rocket Pub, 106 Lake Ave., Maitland; free; 407-636-3171. The Murder Junkies, Moonmen From Mars, Room Full of Strangers, Bubble Boys, Gamma Waves 8 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $10-$12.

Cheryl Anderson 8-11 pm; Aloma Bowl, 2530 Aloma Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-671-8675.

Music in the Library: A Carpenters Tribute 11 am-noon; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323.

Crystal Dagger 8-11 pm; Wop’s Hops, 419 S. Sanford Ave., Sanford; free; 407-878-7819.

RAINN Benefit: Wet Nurse, Cool Grandma, Sugarplum 8 pm; Backbooth, 37 W. Pine St.; contact for price; 407-999-2570.

Justin Campbell, Michael Rosa 10 pm; Vinyl Arts Bar, 75 E. Colonial Drive; $10. CONTINUED ON PAGE 55

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PULSE EVENTS IF LEGAL TROUBLES FIND YOU,

CALL US... FREE CONSULTATION and you could receive

FREE REPRESENTATION To find out more call

LAW OFFICE OF

407-620-3352 WBURKELAW.COM

CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEY

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WHITNEY BURKE J.D.

Drag Queen Storytime In the spirit of the City of Orlando and One Alliance’s “Acts of Love & Kindness” movement, Impulse Group presents Orlando’s first Drag Queen Storytime. Monday, 5:30-6:30 pm; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. Love Rocks Paint river rocks with messages and symbols of love and kindness in honor of Orlando United Day. Monday, 3:30-4:30 pm; Winter Garden Library, 805 E. Plant St., Winter Garden; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info.

Orlando United: Love Letters to Strangers Hand-write encouraging notes to be placed around the city or sent to someone in need of a boost for Orlando United Day. Monday, 5-7 pm; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. 

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Unveiling of the Sea-to-Sea Flag An observance of the unveiling of the rainbow Sea-toSea Flag, also known as “The Sacred Cloth.” The flag has become a globally recognized symbol of the LGBTQ movement. Monday, 10 am; Orange County Administration Building, 201 S. Rosalind Ave.; free; ocfl.net. One City - One Pulse To mark the anniversary of the Pulse tragedy, artists from the LGBT, Latinx and Orlando community have submitted work to inspire hope and healing in our city. Opens Thursday, June 15, 6-9 pm, through July 15; CityArts Factory, 29 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-648-7060.

Pulse Remembrance With Music & Poetry Local band Sugar City perform their song “World of Love,” inspired by the Pulse tragedy and recorded at the Melrose Center. Local poets read poems they composed in memory of Pulse. Sunday, 2-3:30 pm; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info.

Letters to Strangers Write letters of encouragement and affirmation to strangers. All supplies will be provided. Friday, June 16, 2-3 pm; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info.

The Dru Project Pulse Anniversary Fundraiser Benefit party with door prizes, swag bags, drinking and dancing. Sunday, 6-9 pm; The Abbey, 100 S. Eola Drive; donations; 407-704-6261; thedruproject.org.

What Has Changed? An art show addressing what has changed since the Pulse tragedy. Featuring performances from the Orlando Gay Chorus and Latin guitar/percussionists Antone Affronti and Adalberto Bravo. Opens Thursday, June 15, 6-8 pm; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info.

One Orlando Collection and Digital Gallery The expanded One Orlando Collection and digital gallery featuring images of individual items collected at the Pulse memorial site in their current state of preservation. Curated pieces will include community artwork and international support received following the tragedy. Opens Monday, 10 am-7 pm, through June ORLANDO WEEKLY ● JUNE 7-13, 2017

Pulse Nightclub Moments of Hope and Healing The community is invited to conclude the evening with prayer, live music, inspirational dance and reflection. Monday,10 pm-midnight; Pulse, 1912 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-3888; ocfl.net.

Pulse Nightclub Public Community Gathering A ceremony featuring community speakers, reflective prayers, a reading of the 49 Orlando Love Remembrance event for the Pulse names, a display of 49 wreaths and music by massacre with performances from the Orlando Violectric. The Orlando Angel Force, HangGay Chorus, Blue Star, the Orlando Firefighters a-Heart, Stars of Hope and comfort dogs will Pipes and Drums and many more. Monday, 5-10 be present. Monday, 11 am-1 pm; Pulse, 1912 S. pm; Lake Eola Park, 195 N. Rosalind Ave; free. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-3888; ocfl.net.

Paint for Pulse Patrons are invited to paint their own piece of art to symbolize what the last year has meant to them and their community. Supplies will be provided. The finished artwork will be displayed at the Alafaya Branch. Tuesday, 7-8 pm; Alafaya Library, 12000 E. Colonial Drive; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info.

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17; Orange County Regional History Center, 65 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407-836-8500; ocfl.net.

Script Orlando: Pulse One Year Later Presentation by renowned muralists Michael Pilato and Yuri Karabash, sharing images from their multi-canvas mural depicting victims, survivors and responders. Thursday, June 15, 6:30 pm; The Dorothy Lumley Melrose Center, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; ocls.info.


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 53

Second Saturday 7 pm; West End Trading Company, 202 S. Sanford Ave., Sanford; $5 advance/day of show; 321-202-0011. Tears of a Tyrant, Those Who Wander, Eugene Snowden & Friends 9 pm-midnight; Orlando Brewing, 1301 Atlanta Ave.; free; 321-278-0452. W&W 10 pm; Gilt Nightclub, 740 Bennett Road; $15-$40; 407-504-7699. Yacht Rock Revue 7:30 pm; House of Blues, Disney Springs, Lake Buena Vista; $8.75; 407-934-2583.

SUNDAY, JUNE 11 Ancient Sun 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540. Central Florida Sounds of Freedom: We. Are. Americans. 3:30 pm; Orlando Repertory Theatre, 1001 E. Princeton St.; $10; 407-896-7365. Gwadcip$ 9 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free. Khris Audio 8 pm; Copper Rocket Pub, 106 Lake Ave., Maitland; free; 407-636-3171.

MONDAY, JUNE 12 The In-Between Series: Unit Colossus 7 pm; The Gallery at Avalon Island, 39 S. Magnolia Ave.; free. Jazz Meets Motown 8-11 pm; The Abbey, 100 S. Eola Drive; $10; 407-747-7223. Meiuuswe 10 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free. Open Mic Hip-Hop 9:30 pm; Austin’s Coffee, 929 W. Fairbanks Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-975-3364. Reggae Mondae: Florida Man 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540. Torque: René LaVice 10 pm; Native Social Bar, 27 W. Church St.; contact for price; 407-403-2938.

TUESDAY, JUNE 13 The Birthday Massacre, Army of the Universe, Sumo Cyco 6 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $25-$75; 407-246-1419. The Groove Orient 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540. Strawberry Girls, Comrades, Belle Noire, SAROS 8 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $12.

THEWEEK FILM Chris Brown: Welcome to My Life Marketing ploy disguised as a documentary, designed to garner sympathy for a convicted felon who savagely assaulted Rihanna in 2009. Thursday, 7:30 pm; multiple locations; $15.98; fathomevents.com. Cult Classics: What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? Bette Davis and Joan Crawford star in this 1962 film about Hollywood sisters forced to live with each other’s egos. Tuesday, 9:30 pm; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $8; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. FilmSlam: OrlandoUnited FilmSlam features the work of LGBTQ and Latinx directors. Filmmakers will also share different points of view regarding the aftermath of the Pulse tragedy and explore how the city remained united. Sunday, 1-3 pm; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $8; 407-222-7174; enzian.org. The Godfather A special 45th anniversary screening of Francis Ford Coppola’s epic film about a family of immigrants pursuing the American dream. Wednesday, 2 & 7 pm; multiple locations; $13.31; fathomevents.com. I Am Not Your Negro Free screening of the acclaimed documentary about writer and activist James Baldwin. Saturday. 4 pm; Winter Park Community Center, 721 New England Ave., Winter Park; free. Milk Money Movies: The Secret Life of Pets The quiet life of a terrier named Max is upended when his owner takes in a stray dog named Duke. Tuesday, 10 am; Garden Theatre, 160 W. Plant St., Winter Garden; $2; 407-877-4736; gardentheatre.org. Movies at the Mennello: Beautiful Losers Documentary about the lives and careers of a group of DIY artists and designers in the late ’80s and early ’90s. Wednesday, 6 pm; Mennello Museum of American Art, 900 E. Princeton St.; $5; 407-246-4278; mennellomuseum.com. Paris Can Wait Through Thursday; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $11; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. Popcorn Flicks in the Park: Close Encounters of the Third Kind Science fiction film about a man who receives psychic messages from extraterrestrials. Thursday, 8 pm; Central Park, Winter Park, North Park Avenue and West Morse Boulevard, Winter Park; free; enzian.org.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 56

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THEWEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 55

Real Boy An intimate film about a family in transition. Wednesday, 11:30 am-1:30 pm; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. The Rich Weirdoes Present: The Rocky Horror Picture Show Screening of the cult classic with a shadow cast, props and callbacks. Friday-Saturday, 11:15 pm; AMC CityWalk, 6000 Universal Blvd.; $11; richweirdoes.com. Saturday Matinee Classics: Black Orpheus This impressionistic retelling of the Greek legend of Orpheus and Eurydice introduced bossa nova to the world with its soundtrack by young Brazilian composers Luiz Bonfá and Antonio Carlos Jobim. Saturday, noon; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $8; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. Some Like It Hot Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon and Marilyn Monroe star in a comedy about two jazz musicians who dress in drag to find work. Sunday, 2 & 7 pm; Multiple locations, Various local venues; $13.31; fathomevents.com.

Van Cliburn International Piano Competition A seventeen day piano competition featuring the world’s best pianists culminates on the big screen. Saturday, 1 pm; multiple locations; $10-$16; fathomevents.com.

THEATER Animal Crackers A nostalgic Marx brothers musical comedy. Friday-Saturday, 7:30 pm, Sunday, 2:30 pm, Saturday, 2:30 pm, Monday, 7:30 pm; Mad Cow Theatre, 54 W. Church St.; $23-$47; 407-297-8788; madcowtheatre.com. Elaine Pechacek: Live Out Loud Musical theater cabaret featuring the solo and collaborative works of composer Elaine Pechacek. Saturday, 7:30 pm; Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park; $10; 407-636-9951; bluebambooartcenter.com. Finding Neverland The award-winning musical about the inspiration behind J.M. Barrie’s classic story, Peter Pan. WednesdayFriday, 8 pm, Saturday, 2 & 8 pm, Sunday, 1 & 6:30 pm; Walt Disney Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $33.75-$153.75; 844-513-2014; drphillipscenter.org. The Lion in Winter King Henry’s three sons, each eager to take his throne, plot against Henry’s manipulative wife Eleanor of Aquitaine. Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 pm,

Sunday, 2 pm; University of Central Florida, Theatre UCF, 4000 Central Florida Blvd.; $20; 407-823-1500; theatre.cah.ucf.edu. Murder for Two Everyone is a suspect in this hilarious murder mystery with a twist. WednesdayThursday, 2 pm, Friday, 7:30 pm, Saturday, 2 & 7:30 pm, Sunday, 2 pm; Winter Park Playhouse, 711-C Orange Ave., Winter Park; $30-$40; 407-645-0145; winterparkplayhouse.org. National Theatre Live: Peter Pan The acclaimed London stage production of J.M. Barrie’s classic tale captured live at the National Theatre. Sunday, 11 am; multiple locations; $10-$16; 407-354-5998; fathomevents.com. Next to Normal A rock musical about a suburban family struggling with the effects of mental illness. Contains adult language and themes. Friday, 7:30 pm, Saturday, 7:30 pm, Sunday, 2 pm, Monday, 7:30 pm; Valencia College East Campus, 701 N. Econlockhatchee Trail; $15; 407-582-2900. Playwrights’ Round Table Workshop All writers are welcome to bring any piece they’re working on, from a ten minute short to a full length work. Sunday, 1 pm; Sleuths Mystery Dinner Theater, 8267 International Drive; free; 407-363-1985; theprt.com. Superior Donuts Arthur Przybyszewski owns a decrepit donut shop in the Uptown neigh-

borhood of Chicago. Franco Wicks, a black teenager who is his only employee, wants to change the shop for the better. By Tracy Letts. Thursday, 7 pm, Friday-Saturday, 8 pm, Sunday, 2 pm; Theater on the Edge, 5542 Hansel Ave.; $16-$24; theaterontheedge.org.

COMEDY Clash of the Comics Stand-up comedy competition. Wednesday, 7 pm; Orlando Improv, 9101 International Drive; $8; 407480-5233; theimprovorlando.com. Dan Cummins Thursday, 7 pm, Friday, 6:30 & 9:45 pm, Saturday, 6 & 9:30 pm, Sunday, 6 pm; Orlando Improv, 9101 International Drive; $17$20; 407-480-5233; theimprovorlando.com. Drunken Monkey Open Mic Comedy open mic. Fridays, 8 pm; Drunken Monkey Coffee Bar, 444 N. Bumby Ave.; free; 407-8934994; drunkenmonkeycoffee.com. Erik Myers, Kirk Bonacci Saturday, 7:30 pm; Bonkerz - Downtown Orlando, 129 W. Church St.; $10. Frankie Paul, Shannon Hall Saturday, 7 pm; Bonkerz - Otters on the River, 4380 Carraway Place, Sanford; $10; bonkerzcomedyproductions.com.

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Hourglass Comedy Showcase Hosted by Adam Avitable. Wednesday, 9-11 pm; The Hourglass Brewery, 255 S. Ronald Reagan Blvd., Longwood; free; 407-262-0056. Jack’s Open Mic Comedy Night Open mic comedy night hosted by Myke Herlihy. Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9 pm; Jack’s Pub & Grub, 5494 Central Florida Parkway; free; 407-787-3886. Juanita Lolita, Zenneth Nevers Friday, 7:30 pm, Saturday, 7:30 pm; Bonkerz - Boardwalk Bowl, 10749 E. Colonial Drive; $10; 407-6292665; eastorlando.bonkerzcomedy.com. Open Mic Comedy Wednesdays, 8 pm; Parliament House, 410 N. Orange Blossom Trail; free; 407-425-7571; parliamenthouse.com. Open Mic Comedy With Craig Norberg Sundays, 8 pm; Austin’s Coffee, 929 W. Fairbanks Ave., Winter Park; free; 407975-3364; austinscoffee.com. Other Bar Open Mic with Ken Miller Comedy open mic with rotating hosts. Mondays, 8 pm; The Other Bar, 18 Wall St.; free; 407-843-8595. Sins and Grins Comedy showcase hosted by Alex Gasparini. Thursday, 8 pm; Deadly Sins Brewing, 750 Jackson Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-900-8726; deadlysinsbrewing.com.

DANCE Element Earth Contemporary dance performance from Emotions Dance themed around the four elements of fire, earth, water and air. FridaySaturday, 8 pm; Mandell Theater, Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 812 E. Rollins St.; $18$20; 407-788-1659; emotionsdance.org. Femmes & Follies: Comic Book Burlesque Comic book-themed burlesque show. Friday, 10 pm; The Venue, 511 Virginia Drive; $15-$20; 407-412-6895; thevenueorlando.com. It’s Showtime at the Apollo A talented company of young dancers perform to the music of popular artists who got their break at the Apollo. Sunday, 3 & 6:30 pm; Alexis & Jim Pugh Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $35; drphillipscenter.org.

ART OPENINGS/EVENTS

David Lynch Tribute Art Show Group show paying tribute to the works and style of David Lynch, American filmmaker. Opens Saturday, 9 pm, through July 9; The Falcon, 819 E. Washington St.; free; 407-423-3060.

My Favorite Art Show More than 25 local artists share their favorite works with the Central Florida community. Opens Wednesday, 7-10 pm, through July 2; Dandelion Communitea Cafe, 618 N. Thornton Ave.; free; 407-362-1864; dandelioncommunitea.com. Opening Night Reception: Janet Onofrey Meet plein air artist Janet Onofrey as Valencia College opens Silent Spaces, a two-month exhibit of her work, which documents the changing landscape of South Florida. Thursday, 5-7 pm; Valencia College East Campus, 701 N. Econlockhatchee Trail; free; 407-582-2268.

ing this year’s winner, William Cordova. Through Aug. 20; Orlando Museum of Art, 2416 N. Mills Ave.; $15; 407-896-4321. TV New artwork by Luce Sky themed around television. Opens Thursday, 6:30 pm, through July 9; The Hammered Lamb, 1235 N. Orange Ave.; free; 407-704-3200. CLOSING THIS WEEK

The Art of Ibex Puppetry An exhibit of puppets created by Ibex. Through Saturday; The Gallery at Avalon Island, 39 S. Magnolia Ave.; free; avalongallery.org.

Resinate An exhibition featuring works made of resin by Sara Berlin and Amy Wieck. Saturday, 8-11 pm; Kaleidoscope Venue for the Arts, 1991 Corporate Square, Longwood; free; 321-947-5484.

Artsplosion: Imagery of Sound Group art show of music imagery with a creative twist. Through Monday; The Falcon, 819 E. Washington St.; free; 407-423-3060.

The Road to Damascus Debut solo show from Jacoub Reyes featuring prints and drawings themed around religious iconography. Friday, 7 pm; Henao Contemporary Center, 5601 Edgewater Drive; contact for price; henaocenter.com.

Matthew Weinstein: The Living End Videos, paintings and drawings by Weinstein, who works extensively in 3-D animation. Through Sunday; Orlando Museum of Art, 2416 N. Mills Ave.; $15; 407-896-4321.

Florida Prize in Contemporary Art Exhibition featuring 10 of the most progressive and exciting artists working in the state, includ-

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SoReal A two-person exhibition featuring art from Dane Kolb and Long Dau, including mixed media drawings, paintings and sculpture. Through Saturday; Canvs, 101 S. Garland Ave.; free; 407-378-4150; canvs.org.

EVENTS AFO Haunted Dance Afterparty Official afterparty for Anime Festival Orlando. Saturday, 10 pm; Wyndham Orlando Resort, 8001 International Drive; $45-$100; animefestivalorlando.com.

Anime Festival Orlando Three-day convention for fans of anime. Friday-Sunday; Wyndham Orlando Resort, 8001 International Drive; $35$100; animefestivalorlando.com. BASE: Twisted Fairytales Fairytale-themed body painting showcase. Thursday, 8 pm; DRIP, 8747 International Drive; $11.54; 347-855-3747. Chefs Collab Four-course collaborative dinner from chef Bruno Zacchini of Pizza Bruno and Nick Sierputowski of the Ravenous Pig. Sunday, 6:30 pm; The Ravenous Pig, 565 W. Fairbanks Ave., Winter Park; $65; 407-628-2333; theravenouspig.com.

Colonialtown Bar Crawl Bar crawl to five different bars in the Mills 50/Ivanhoe Village neighborhoods. Saturday, 7 pm; The Guesthouse, 1321 N. Mills Ave.; $10. The Daily City Food Truck Bazaar - Orlando Food trucks from all over fill the south parking lot at Fashion Square. Second Sunday of every month, 6-9 pm; Orlando Fashion Square, 3201 E. Colonial Drive; various menu prices; 407-896-1131; thedailycity.com. Farmers & Artisans Market The highest quality locally crafted and locally grown products in historic Downtown Longwood. Saturdays, 9 am-1 pm; Historic Downtown Longwood, West SR

434 and South County Road 427, Longwood; free; 321-222-7224; longwoodfl.org. Friends and Family Beerfest Broken Cauldron celebrates its first year in business with a beerfest featuring more than 15 Florida breweries. Saturday, 5 pm; Broken Cauldron Taproom & Brewery, 1012 W. Church St.; $30-$35. Guitars and Cars On the second Sunday of every month, musicians get together for a swap meet at Renningers. Sunday, 8 am-5 pm; Renninger’s Antique Center, 20651 U.S. Highway 441, Mount Dora; $2; 352-383-8393. Orlando Etsy Craft Party A celebration of local artists, crafters, and vintage Items. Meet many of Orlando’s Etsy sellers and see their talented and beautiful work in-person. Saturday, 11 am-5 pm; Primrose Center, 2733 S. Ferncreek Ave.; free; 407-810-9983. The Purple Rain Skate Party Roller disco party with an all-Prince (and Princerelated) soundtrack. Saturday, 11 pm; Semoran Skateway, 2670 Cassel Creek Blvd., Casselberry; $10; 407-834-9095. SandwichEatUp Deli Fresh Threads and 903 Mills Market co-host a Sandwich Eat Up. Tuesday, 6-9 pm; 903 Mills Market, 903 S. Mills Ave.; cost of food; 321-303-5129; delifreshthreads.com. Second Thursday Art and Wine Walk Walk around Thornton Park to check out art and wine at various stops. Thursday, 6:30 pm; Thornton Park, Summerlin Avenue and Washington Street; $15; thorntonparkdistrict.com. Southwest StoryWalk Walk on the nature trail while reading the classic children’s story Henny Penny and collect fun souvenirs along the way. Saturday, 10:30 am-1:30 pm; Dr. Phillips Community Park, 8249 Buenavista Woods Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. Sustainable Seafood Dinner Multiple species of sustainable seafood in a delicious five-course affair. Thursday, 6:30 pm; Cress Restaurant, 103 W. Indiana Ave., DeLand; $70$95; 386-734-3740; cressrestaurant.com. A Taste of Europe in 12 Culinary Acts A 12-course meal showcasing the quintessential dishes of Europe, such as wiener schnitzel, chicken tikka masala, haggis and more. Wednesday, 6:30 pm; Cress Restaurant, 103 W. Indiana Ave., DeLand; SOLD OUT; 386-734-3740; cressrestaurant.com.

LEARNING Celebrate Your Heritage: African-American Family History Festival Celebrate history and heritage at the African-American Family History Festival. Library staff, EPOCH, the African-American Historical & Genealogical Society and Wells Built Museum share 58

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resources and services. Saturday, 11 am-2 pm; West Oaks Library, 1821 E. Silver Star Road; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. Cuisine Corner: No Cook Meals Learn how to make a quick, easy and nutritious no-cook meal. Space is limited. Registration required. Thursday, 6:307:30 pm; Washington Park Library, 5151 Raleigh St.; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. Culinary Tips & Florida Stories Pam Brandon, Katie Farmand and Heather McPherson serve up delectable bites that showcase Florida’s diverse culinary landscape as they share stories about their journeys throughout the state. Saturday, 1-2 pm; Jeanine Taylor Folk Art, 211 E. First St., Sanford; free; 407-323-2774; jtfolkart.com.

CIVICS Anti-Racism Rally Counter-protest to an anti-Muslim march led by white supremacists. Saturday, 10 am; Valencia College East Campus, 701 N. Econlockhatchee Trail; free; 407-299-5000. March Against Sharia A bunch of idiots march against “Sharia Law,” which is not a thing here. Saturday, 10 am; Valencia College East Campus, 701 N. Econlockhatchee Trail; free; 407-299-5000.

LITERARY Diverse Word Spoken word open mic. Tuesdays, 8 pm; Dandelion Communitea Cafe, 618 N. Thornton Ave.; free; 407-3621864; dandelioncommunitea.com. Flowers for the Living Slam Competitive poetry slam where poets must cover a poem by a living person. Thursday, 8 pm; The Milk Bar, 2424 E. Robinson St.; free; 407-896-4954. Intro to Flash Fiction Flash fiction workshop with writer J. Bradley. Sunday, 2 pm; Writer’s Atelier, 336 Grove Ave. Suite B, Winter Park; $40; writersatelier.com. Poetry Open Mic Open mic from the Writers of Central Florida or Thereabouts. Monday, 8 pm; Copper Rocket Pub, 106 Lake Ave., Maitland; free; 407-636-3171; letsmakeitathing.com. Tea & Conversation Monthly gathering where book lovers bring in recently read or favorite books and discuss them over tea. Monday, 1-3 pm; Writer’s Block Bookstore, 124 E. Welbourne Ave., Winter Park; free; 407335-4192; writersblockbookstore.com. Tertulia Cuatro Gatos: Spanish Book Club Spanish-language book club discussing literature, art, music and more.

THEWEEK All are welcome. Wednesday, 6:30-7:30 pm; South Creek Library, 1702 Deerfield Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. Wednesday Open Words Poetry and spoken word open mic. Wednesdays, 8:30 pm; Austin’s Coffee, 929 W. Fairbanks Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-975-3364; austinscoffee.com. Writers Group Join fellow writers for critique, discussion and camaraderie. All genres and experience levels welcome. Please attend one meeting before submitting a piece for critique. Sunday, 4-5 pm; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info.

FAMILY Free Family Days Make your own crafts, get a tour with a docent or check out the museum’s open house. Sunday, noon; Mennello Museum of American Art, 900 E. Princeton St.; free; 407-246-4278; mennellomuseum.com. Trolls Mini Camp Kids enjoy activities and classes in ballet, tap, theater dance, and arts & crafts with songs and activities from the Trolls movie. Appropriate for ages 3-7. Through June 16, 9 am-noon; Central Florida Ballet, 3306 Maggie Blvd., Suite B; $125; 407-849-9948; centralfloridaballet.com.

SPORTS Central Florida Mah Jongg Experienced American Mah Jongg players meet weekly using the National Mah Jongg 2015 card and rules. Wednesdays, 12:30-4 pm; MetroWest Country Club, 2100 S. Hiawassee Road; free; 561-704-9302. Falcon Run Club Biweekly runners club with discounted beer afterwards. Monday, 6:30 pm; The Falcon, 819 E. Washington St.; free; 407-423-3060. Global Running Day Run Unite with runners all over the country and take strides toward leading a healthier life. Runners and walkers of all paces welcome. Water, food and ice cold drinks provided. Wednesday, 6-7 pm; Track Shack, 1104 N. Mills Ave.; free; 407-896-1160; trackshack.com. Orlando City B vs. Rochester Soccer. Wednesday, 7:30 pm; Orlando City Stadium, 655 W. Church St.; $10; 855-675-2489; orlandocitysc.com. Ten10 Run Club A group run series on the Orlando Urban Trail beginning and ending at the Ten10 Brewery. Tuesday, 6:30 pm; Ten10 Brewing, 1010 Virginia Drive; free; 407-930-8993; ten10brewing.com. n orlandoweekly.com

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Osteoarthritis studies are enrolling now. Those who qualify may receive*: -Compensation which varies by study up to $1,000 -No-cost study-related care from doctors -No-cost study medication. Call today at 866-290-5847 Or visit www.OAresearchstudies. com. *In a clinical research study, the participants may receive investigational study product or may receive an inactive substance, or placebo, depending on the study design. Participants receive study-related care from a doctor/research team for the duration of the study. Reasonable payments will be made for participation and the length of the study may vary.

Do you have Rheumatoid Arthritis? –

Marketplace REWARD OF UP TO $17,000 If you have any information or details of the crime featured below, you may be eligible for a reward of up to $17,000. On September 25, 2016 at approximately 3:53 a.m., Orange County deputies responded to 4729 S. Orange Blossom Trail, Orlando, FL regarding a shooting. Two (2) victims were transported to ORMC and Christian Santiago was later pronounced deceased. He succumbed to a fatal gunshot wound. If you have any information on this homicide, please call Crimeline. You will remain anonymous. 800-423-TIPS - crimeline. org. No Caller ID No Recorders No Hassles Cash for cars and trucks Running or not Any Condition 352-771-6191. WANTED - All motorhomes, fifth wheels and travel trailers. Cars, vans and trucks any condition. Cash paid on the spot. Call 954-789-7530.

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ORLANDO WEEKLY ● JUNE 7-13, 2017 ● orlandoweekly.com

Rheumatoid Arthritis studies are enrolling now. Those who qualify may receive*: -Compensation which varies by study up to $625 -No-cost study-related care from doctors -No-cost study medication Call today at 1-866-291-3330 Or visit www.raresearchstudiestoday.com. *In a clinical research study, the participants may receive investigational study product or may receive an inactive substance, or placebo, depending on the study design. Participants receive study-related care from a doctor/research team for the duration of the study. Reasonable payments will be made for participation and the length of the study may vary.

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Legal, Public Notices NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned, Lucas Moskun, of 3037 Antique Oaks Circle, #153, Winter Park, FL 32792, pursuant to the requirements of the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, is hereby advertising the following fictitious name: Horse Traverse It is the intent of the undersigned to register “Horse Traverse” with the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations. Dated: 5/26/17 The following items are lost or abandoned property found in Orange County. Item, Mfr., Location Found Cell Phone (Samsung), Sykes Ct. Golf Clubs/bag/balls, Lake Underhill Rd I Phone, N. Alafaya Trl Jewelry, Pin Oak/Dr. Phillip Blvd Misc. Electronics, Red Willow Ave Motor Bike, Pointe Vista Television (LG), Pamela Ave Property not claimed will be disposed of per Florida State Statutes Chapter 705. For more information call 407 317-7570 M-F 8am to 5pm Notice is hereby given that Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at location indicated: 1751 Fortune Rd Kissimmee FL 34744, 407-414- 5303 on 06/20/17 @ 11:00 am. Maggy Jean Jacques 5042 shelfs & furniture, Courtney Crawford 5067 Bins, Kristopher Dunaway 5014 household goods & furniture, Damaris Vazquez 1086 tools, bicycle, boxes, Melisa Portalatin Amador 5047 machines for a pastry store, sinks, ovens, tools, tables, etc, Ayinde Sprewell Jr 1008 boxes, tables & misc, Joel Jimenez 2110 furniture, Alvin James 1017 household goods & furniture, Anthony Rivera 4052 household goods & furniture, Julio Garcia 5078 household goods, furniture, boxes, clothes, washer & dryer, Emely Minaya 3111 two beds, 1 washer & dryer, dining table, boxes, 2 TV’s, 1 table, Michael Lawrence 5013 household goods, Orlando Figueroa 4068 household goods. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF HELGA PHILLIPS, Deceased. File No. 2017-CP-001365-O NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Helga Phillips, deceased, whose date of death was March 25, 2017, is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is 5/31/17. Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Joseph M. Percopo, Attorney Florida Bar Number: 70239, MATEER & HARBERT, TWO LANDMARK CTR, 225 E ROBINSON ST STE 600, ORLANDO, FL 32801, Telephone: (407) 4259044, Fax: (407) 423-2016, E-Mail: JPercopo@mateerharbert.com, Secondary: LDana@mateerharbert.com. Personal Representative: /s/ /S/ Natalie Phillips 3007 Clemwood Street Orlando, Florida 32803.

NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned, Campus Crusade for Christ, Inc. of 100 Lake Hart Drive 3500, Orlando, FL 32832, pursuant to the requirements of the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, is hereby advertising the following fictitious name: SOON Movement It is the intent of the undersigned to register “SOON Movement” with the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations. Dated: 5/30/17


Legal, Public Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY STATE OF FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION: 03/SHEA CASE NO: DP14-549 IN THE INTEREST OF:S.M. DOB: 07/25/2005, J.M. DOB: 02/14/2007, K.M. DOB: 03/14/2009, T.M. DOB: 07/18/2012, M.C. DOB: 04/18/2015, Minor Children. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF TPR ADVISORY HEARING STATE OF FLORIDA TO:Vernell Joseph Address Unknown A Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this court regarding the above referenced child(ren), a copy of which is attached. You are to appear on July 5th, 2017, at 10:30 a.m. at the Thomas S. Kirk Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, FL 32806, before honorable Judge, Timothy Shea, for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and time specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE CHILD(REN). IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. Pursuant to Sections 39.802(4)(d) and 63.082(6)(g), Florida Statutes, you are hereby informed of the availability of private placement with an adoption entity, as defined in Section 63.032(3), Florida Statutes. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone 407-836-2303 within two working days of your receipt of this summons. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. Witness my hand and seal of this court at Orlando, Orange County Florida on this 12th day of May, 2017. CLERK OF COURT By: /s/ Deputy Clerk. Kelley Galvin, Esquire, Florida Bar No.: 103302, Senior Attorney for Children’s Legal Services, State of Florida, Department of Children an Families, 400 West Robinson Street, Suite N211, Orlando, FL 32801, (407) 317-7417 - Telephone (407) 317-7126 - Fax.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY STATE OF FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION: 03/SHEA CASE NO: DP14-549 IN THE INTEREST OF:S.M. DOB: 07/25/2005, J.M. DOB: 02/14/2007, K.M. DOB: 03/14/2009, T.M. DOB: 07/18/2012, M.C. DOB: 04/18/2015, Minor Children. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF TPR ADVISORY HEARING STATE OF FLORIDA TO:Cresent Fabious Address Unknown A Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this court regarding the above referenced child(ren), a copy of which is attached. You are to appear on July 5th, 2017, at 10:30 a.m. at the Thomas S. Kirk Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, FL 32806, before honorable Judge, Timothy Shea, for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and time specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE CHILD(REN). IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. Pursuant to Sections 39.802(4)(d) and 63.082(6)(g), Florida Statutes, you are hereby informed of the availability of private placement with an adoption entity, as defined in Section 63.032(3), Florida Statutes. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone 407-836-2303 within two working days of your receipt of this summons. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. Witness my hand and seal of this court at Orlando, Orange County Florida on this 12th day of May, 2017. CLERK OF COURT By: /s/ Deputy Clerk. Kelley Galvin, Esquire, Florida Bar No.: 103302, Senior Attorney for Children’s Legal Services, State of Florida, Department of Children an Families, 400 West Robinson Street, Suite N211, Orlando, FL 32801, (407) 317-7417 - Telephone (407) 317-7126 - Fax.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY STATE OF FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION: 03/SHEA CASE NO: DP14-549 IN THE INTEREST OF:S.M. DOB: 07/25/2005, J.M. DOB: 02/14/2007, K.M. DOB: 03/14/2009, T.M. DOB: 07/18/2012, M.C. DOB: 04/18/2015, Minor Children. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF TPR ADVISORY HEARING STATE OF FLORIDA TO:Ivon Jadimene Address Unknown A Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this court regarding the above referenced child(ren), a copy of which is attached. You are to appear on July 5th, 2017, at 10:30 a.m. at the Thomas S. Kirk Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, FL 32806, before honorable Judge, Timothy Shea, for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and time specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE CHILD(REN). IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. Pursuant to Sections 39.802(4)(d) and 63.082(6)(g), Florida Statutes, you are hereby informed of the availability of private placement with an adoption entity, as defined in Section 63.032(3), Florida Statutes. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone 407-836-2303 within two working days of your receipt of this summons. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. Witness my hand and seal of this court at Orlando, Orange County Florida on this 12th day of May, 2017. CLERK OF COURT By: /s/ Deputy Clerk. Kelley Galvin, Esquire, Florida Bar No.: 103302, Senior Attorney for Children’s Legal Services, State of Florida, Department of Children an Families, 400 West Robinson Street, Suite N211, Orlando, FL 32801, (407) 317-7417 - Telephone (407) 317-7126 - Fax.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA THE SCHOOL BOARD OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA, a corporate body organized and existing under the Constitution and Laws of the State of Florida, Petitioner, v. PERSHING AVENUE CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST), INC., a Florida not-for- profit corporation; DUKE ENERGY FLORIDA, LLC, d/b/a Duke Energy, f/k/a Florida Power Corporation; CORPORATION OF THE PRESIDING BISHOP OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS, a Utah corporation sole; SCOTT RANDOLPH, ORANGE COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES WITH ANY INTEREST IN PROPERTY, Respondents. CASE NO.: 2017-CA- 004102-O Parcel No.: P-117 Division 35 NOTICE OF ACTION IN EMINENT DOMAIN AND NOTICE OF HEARING FOR CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE OF PROCESS TO: All Respondents named in Exhibit A, attached; all parties claiming interests by, through, under, or against the named Respondents; and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in and to the property described in Exhibit B. A Petition in Eminent Domain has been filed to acquire property interests in Orange County, Florida. Each Respondent is required to serve written defenses to the Petition on Petitioner’s attorney, whose name and address are shown below, on or before June 26, 2017, and to file the original of the defenses with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Petitioner’s attorney or immediately thereafter, showing what right, title, interest, or lien Respondent has in or to the property described in the Petition, and to show cause why that property should not be taken for the uses and purposes set forth in the Petition. If any Respondent fails to do so, a default will be entered against that Respondent for the relief demanded in the Petition. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that an Order of Taking Hearing is currently set Thursday, July 6, 2017, at 3:30 pm, before the Honorable Heather L. Higbee, in Hearing Room 20-B, at the Orange County Courthouse, 425 North Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida. At that time, an Order of Taking will be entered. All Respondents in this action may file a request to be heard at that hearing. Each party to be heard at that hearing shall notify the Court of the specific issue(s) to be addressed at the Order of Taking Hearing, and shall identify any exhibits, motions needed, and the time requirements for the presentation of their case. Any Respondent failing to file a request for hearing shall waive any right to object to the Order of Taking. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 18th day of May, 2017. TIFFANY MOORE RUS-

SELL, CLERK OF THE COURT, By: /s/ Deputy Clerk. REQUESTS FOR ACCOMMODATIONS BY PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES: “If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator, Human Resources, Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue, Suite 510, Orlando, FL (407) 836-2303, at least (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than (7) days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.” DAVID A. SHONTZ, ESQ., dshontz@shutts. com, Florida Bar No. 0630519, SHUTTS & BOWEN LLP, 300 S. Orange Avenue, Suite 1000, Orlando, Florida 328016, Phone: 407-835- 6722, Fax: 407-8497273, Secondary E-Mail tmartin@ shutts.com; mfarmer@shutts. com, Attorneys for Petitioner, THE SCHOOL BOARD OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA. EXHIBIT A: OWNERS AND ENCUMBRANCES: NAME; RELATIONSHIP TO PROPERTY: 1. Pershing Avenue Christian Church, (Disciples of Christ), Inc., a Florida not-for-profit corporation, SERVE: Edgar Lopez, Esq., Harris Harris Bauerle Ziegler Lopez, 1201 East Robinson Street, Orlando, Florida 32801-2115; Fee Owner by virtue of Warranty Deed, recorded at Book 3709, Page 488, Official, Records of Orange County, Florida (Parcel ID 07-2330-0000- 00117). 2. Duke Energy Florida, LLC, d/b/a Duke Energy, f/k/a Florida Power Corporation, SERVE: C T Corporation System, Registered Agent, 1200 South Pine Island Road Plantation, Florida 33324; Easement interest recorded at Book 1913, Page 273, Official Records of Orange County, Florida (The West 8 feet of the North 350 feet of Parcel ID 07-2330-0000- 00117). 3. Corporation of The Presiding Bishop of The Church of Jesus Christ of LatterDay, Saints, a Utah corporation sole, SERVE: Corporation Service Company, Registered Agent 1201 Hays Street Tallahassee, Florida 32301; Easement interest in Parcel 07-23- 30-0000- 00117, contained in Quit Claim Deed recorded at Book 2670, Page 874; Easement reserved in Warranty Deed recorded at Book 1585, Page 988 and further recited in Warranty Deed recorded at Book 3709, Page 488, all in the Official Records of Orange County, Florida. 4. Scott Randolph, Orange County Tax Collector, 200 South Orange Avenue Orlando, Florida 32801; Real Property Taxes, if any Subject Parcel EXEMPT under Tax Account No. 07-23- 30-000000117. 5. Any and All Unknown Parties with Any Interest in Property, Address Unknown; Interest, if any, in any parcel included herein and made a part hereof. Exhibit B: LEGAL DESCRIPTION. Estate: Fee Simple, West 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section

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7, Township 23 South, Range 30 East, Orange County, Florida, subject to right-of- way for public road over the North 30 feet thereof. SUBJECT to a 25 foot easement across the South side of the above described property for ingress and egress to the Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4. ALSO DESCRIBED AS: Commence at the Northeast corner the Southwest 1/4 of Section 7, Township 23 South, Range 30 East, Orange County, Florida; thence run S 00°17’19” E, along the east line of said Southwest 1/4, a distance of 1995.75 feet; thence run S 89°42’41” W, along the south line of said Northeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4, a distance of 331.67 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence continue S 89°42’41” W, along said south line, a distance of 331.67 feet; thence run N 00°17’18” W, along the west line of said West 1/2, a distance of 634.85 feet to the south line of said North 30 feet; thence run N 89°40’36” E, along said south line, a distance of 331.67 feet; thence run S 00°17’19” E, along the east line of said west 1/2, a distance of 635.05 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION: 03 CASE NO: DP15-438 IN THE INTEREST OF MINOR CHILDREN: I.R.G DOB: 10/12/2007, E.C.C. DOB: 11/22/2011 SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS STATE OF FLORIDA TO: Tracy Cox, Address Unknown A Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this court regarding the above-referenced child. You are hereby commanded to appear before Judge Timothy Shea on July 5, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. at the Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, Florida 32806, for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and at the time specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MIGHT LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. YOU MAY BE HELD IN CONTEMPT OF COURT IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at Orlando, Orange County, Florida this 25th day of May, 2017. This summon has been issued at the request of: Nancy A. Robak, Florida Bar No.: 88796, Senior Attorney for Florida Department of Children and Family. nancy. robak@myflfamilies.com; CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY:/S/ DEPUTY CLERK (court seal).

JUNE 7-13, 2017 ● ORLANDO WEEKLY

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Legal, Public Notices NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Personal property of the following tenants will be sold for cash to satisfy rental liens in accordance with Florida Statutes, Self Storage Facility Act, Sections 83-806 and 83-807. Contents may include kitchen, household items, bedding, toys, games, boxes, barrels, packed cartons, furniture, trucks, cars, etc. There is no title for vehicles sold at lien sale. Owners reserve the right to bid on units. Lien sale to be held online ending Wednesday, June 21, 2017 at times indicated below. Viewing and bidding will only be available online at www.storagetreasures. com beginning 5 days prior to the scheduled sale date and time! Also visit www.personalministorage. com/Orlando-FL- storage-units/ for more info. Personal Mini Storage Edgewater-6325 Edgewater Dr Orlando, FL 32810-at 11:30 pm: 0139 Christopher James, 0301 Pierre Andre Benoit, 0428 Tomika Lawanna Johnson, 0638 Kertrenia Katrese Burnam, 0711 Kimberly Ann Hudson, 0827 Paul Lutrell Ray, 0945 Keisha Sukhdeo, 1111 Saul Arocha, Heaven Academy, 1215 Brittany Chanlecia Williams, 1232 Kristan Gloria Mark, 1233 Shatonga Evelt Oliver, 1235 Bertha Lee Bacon, 1330 James C Parker, 1425 Deborah A XavierVelez, 1744 Richard Earl Gardner, 2317 Dave Bevan Howell, 1979 Boat HIN# VNB02821M79G Tag# FL0383DC & Boat Trailer, 2323 Dave Bevan Howell, 1978 Cruisers Boat HIN# CRS6577AM78B Tag# FL9476CG & Boat Trailer, 2326 Dave Bevan Howell, Vincent John Fechtel Jr, Gelfand Philip N, 1972 Vandesta Boat HIN# VMCD0061272 Tag# FL8056CJ & Boat Trailer, 2329 Dave Bevan Howell, 1988 Boat HIN# SERT6649J788 Tag# FL3200FY & Boat Trailer 2330 Dave Bevan Howell, 1972 Pro-Line Boat HIN# V2225053 Tag# FL0936PU & Boat Trailer Personal Mini Storage Forest City Rd-6550 Forest City Rd Orlando, FL 32810-at 12:00 pm: 1088 Heather Horne, 2022 Linda McKnight, 2035 Tambra Laveta Postell, 2061 Tambra Laveta Postell, 3074 James Laughlin, 3104 Mia Antoinette Nowells, 4010 Lillian McKinley, 4042 Amy Sue Truesdell, 4058 Susan White, 4106 Alex Maurice Griffin, 4113 Alma Gloria Wilson, 4119 Lakendra Lakol Warren, 5014 Annie L Griggs Meade, 5030 Natasha Stanley, 8031 David Francis Donahue, 8037 Ruth Jenkins, 8038 David Francis Donahue.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, BEDDING, TOYS, GAMES, PACKED CARTONS, FURNITURE, TOOLS, TRUCKS, CARS, ETC. THERE’S NO TITLE FOR VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE. OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS. LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ONLINE WEDNESDAY JUNE 28, 2017 AT THE TIMES INDICATED BELOW. VIEWING AND BIDDING WILL ONLY BE AVAILABLE ONLINE AT www.storagetreasures.com BEGINNING AT LEAST 5 DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED SALE DATE AND TIME. www. personalministorage.com PERSONAL MINI STORAGE FORSYTH - 2875 FORSYTH RD. WINTER PARK, FL 32792 - AT 10:00AM: FSI #A5-Shanta Nicole Moore PMS #116-Sean M Higgins; #258-Jason A Gaspard; #318-Jennifer Kay Dussing; #340-Julian Matthew Sharidon Davis; #474-Deborah Guzman MICHIGAN MINI STORAGE - 200 W. MICHIGAN ST ORLANDO, FL 32806 - AT 10:30AM: #8- Janice Johnstone; #15-Christopher Franklin; #203-Norberto Hernandez PERSONAL MINI STORAGE LAKE FAIRVIEW - 4252 N ORANGE BLOSSOM TR. ORLANDO FL 32804 - AT 11:00AM: #153-Thomas, Sherriel Janise; #305-Thompson, Denise Rosalee; #359-Young, Willette Atricia; #419-Williams, Tammy Antoinette; #635-Salatich, Blaise Peter; #726-Castro, Eddy; #854-WilliamsClark, Kerrin Andrea; #866-Berrios, David PERSONAL MINI STORAGE WEST - 4600 OLD WINTER GARDEN RD. ORLANDO FL 32811 AT 11:30AM: #35-Lamont Tyrone MasonSolution Custom Cleaning Inc; #43-Dominique Lamont Dozier; #95-Antoine Gregory Blyther; #98-Charles Maurice Carbon Jr.; #100-Miriam Diaz Cordova; #151-Jose Gilberto Almenas Ross; #152-Vince Delrenard Brown; #212-Willie Lee Hill; #272-Vince Delrenard Brown; #305-Mark Wesley Middlebrooks Jr.; #386-Yesenia Pagan; #492Troy Jones Jr.; #604-Boris Lavell Johnson; #626-Andre Decells Miller; #635-Ursula Blondale Baker; #638-Auterio Leonde Wilson; #647-Ursula Blondale Baker; #248A-Jarine Bennett; #382-Lashawn Paul.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that on Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction at the storage facilities listed below, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the following locations: June 29th, 2017 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored therein by the following: 9:30a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 1101 Marshall Farms Rd. Ocoee, Fl. 34761 (407) 877-0191 #B087-Dawn Swaim-Household goods #C189-Janet HowellHousehold items #B077-Deborah Wright-Furniture and appliance #E331-Deborah Wright-3 bedroom house #G425-Deborah WrightHousehold goods #A013-Deborah Wright- Household goods #E316Debra Clark-Household items #B120-Rebecca Groff-Household items #B083-Jason JakubowskiFurniture #C191-Bryan Mixson Jr.-Household goods #F401Kellie Bright-Couch, loveseat, full bed, boxes #F393-Joshua Smith-Couch washer dryer and boxes #G424-Letitia MitchellHousehold items #P615-Roberto Santana- 2015 SWTM Trailer, VIN-​ 1S907X12XFM982097​, OWNER: Jose Angel Hernandez Petit. 11:00a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 5603 Metrowest Blvd. Orlando, FL 32811 (407) 445-0867 #03004 Nelson Ramos, Jr restaurant eqpt; #02226 Demond Jefferson shoes,clothes; #08009 Esther Jones household goods; #02115 Tricia Slavin hsehold furniture, items, etc.; #01026 Shane Jordan one bedroom apt; #08012 Ernst Louis clothes, boxes; #05023 Alisha Laforest clothes, toys; #08032 Chiinelle (Chinelle) Fraites 2 living room,2 bedroom sets, boxes, dining room, 4 TV; #09119 Nicole Macarthur bins, TV, chest; #07031 Darci Amarante new mattresses, box springs, pillows. 12:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 5592 L. B. McLeod Rd. Orlando, Fl. 32811 (407) 445-2709: #361 Christina Anderson-HHG #448 Medical Alteratives of America Inc-Charts #610 Norvella WatsonHHG #044 Norvella Watson-HHG, Clothes #881 Ten 55 Productions Inc –HHG #132 Giovana Amarante–Furniture, Boxes #357 Joel Roger–HHG #711 Shirley Burns–Bike, Boxes #141 Eric Larson–Dresser bruronight stands queen matress 8-10 boxes #861 Luz Hernandez– HHG #125 Jeanette Hernandez-HHG #732 Cyrille Houndambi- HHG #682 Michael Davidson-HHG #762 Hugo Escorche-HHG 1:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at 3501 S. Orange Blossom Trail Orlando, FL. 32839 (407)839-5518 #4033- Igor Souvorkine- House hold goods, #1031- Roslyn ScottHouse hold items, beds, #4057Bernard Mcdonald- House hold goods, #1005- Annie Mae Wall – Clothes and books, #2078- Rodney Brown – House hold items,

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● JUNE 7-13, 2017 ● orlandoweekly.com

#4109- Shakina Jones- Kids toys towels, blankets and house hold items, #1093 – Dustari Fortilien – House hold items, # 4095 – Bevelyn Green- Jones – Tv, Clothes, boxes, #2046 – Patricia Harrison – House hold items, #1078 – Lamartrella Denine Lofton – Household items, #1003 – Ana Semidey – House hold goods, #2115 - Divida Daniels – Clothing, #1104 – Jeffrey Loureston Petush – Household items, #1103B- Derrick RountreeHousehold items, #2014- Anita Whitted- Household items, #2152Anita Whitted – Household items, #3137 – Kirk Shields – Household items, # 2124 – Yolanda Taneka Merritt – House hold items 3:00p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 1420 N Orange Blossom Trail Orlando, FL 32804 (407) 6503739 #762 Eugenio Ma Ruffat – Household goods; #416 Terrell Smith – DJ equipment, household goods; #343 Emilee McMaster – Household goods; #463 Michael Parker – Household goods; #856 Camille McKinnis – Household goods; #337 Misty Simmons – Bedroom/Household goods; #478 Raoul Vinton Williams Jr – Furniture, Boxes, Electronics, Home goods; #857 David Kelly Fulton Jr – Boxes, Clothes, Totes. 4:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 1001 Lee Rd. Orlando, FL 32810 (407) 539-0527 #1142-Clifford Hughley-bike, power tools, tool box, ladder, wood, movies, doors. #3068-Courtney Pierce-bed, chairs, couch, dining set, mattresses, table, bags, bike, boxes, totes. #2079-Lakesha Harris-beds, monitor, bike, boxes, clothes, shoes, totes, hose, fan. #4109-Erica Latasha Price-clothes, shoes, totes, toys. #3089-Ricky Corbin-2 bikes, boxes, clothes, shoes, telescope, dry erase board. #3150-Ronald Smith- chair, printer, totes, keyboards, speakers, tools. #4017-Lloyd Redden-bed, chair, microwave, books, boxes, pictures, tool box. #Curtisicia Renee Waller-boxes, clothes, shoes, totes, rug, xmas tree, perfume. #4055- Arthur Owens-armoire, chair, table, dvd, tv, boxes, clothes, totes, sofa bed. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

NOTICE OF SALE Vehicles will be sold as is, no warranty. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid. Terms of bids are cash only. Buyer must have funds on hand at time of sale. 1973 CHEVROLET VIN# 1L47H3D210526 To be sold at auction at 8:00AM on JUNE 19TH, 2017, at 2500 N. Forsyth rd, Orlando Fl 32807. Around The Clock Towing inc.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that on Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction at the storage facilities listed below, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the following locations: June 30th, 2017 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored therein by the following: 11:00a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 2631 E Semoran Blvd. Apopka, FL 32703 (407) 818-1681 #3032-Kimberly Caleb-Household goods #2337-Brandon JamersonHousehold goods #1304- Phyllis Reed-Boxes #2213B-Annetta Clemons-Household items 12:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 831 N Park Ave. Apopka, FL 32712 (407) 450-0345 #1812 Jose Acevedo- Household Items, #2806 Angel Vazquez- Household Items, #2203 Leisa Whitfield- Household Goods, #2427 Ciji Sanshayla Charlton- Household Items, #1020 Theresa Brockenbrough- Household Goods 2:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 610 Rinehart Rd. Lake Mary, FL 32746 (321) 420-1686 0672 Ayana Outerbridge household items, 0905 Kelly Kidwell Boat 23ft Sea Fox-HIN LYGHA254L900 PARTS ONLY + TRAILER PARTS ONLY, 0500 Ronald & Anny Schmid household goods, 0560 Donna GRUENENEIER HOUSEHOLD GOODS, 2002 Crystal Rodriguez Household Items, 0167, Michael Rosenblum Dinning table, 2 cabinets, bed, coffee table, 2 knick knacks, 0579 Alexandra Sanchez 2 bed apartmentDresserQueen MattressSofaDining, 0175 Luis Torres Clothes, Boxes, TV, 0568 Melissa Pereira household goods, 0318 Reginald Gallon household goods, 0148 tiffany Williams household goods, 0266 Ginger Swinehart unknown. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: ABA FOREIGN USED AUTO PARTS & AUTO SALES gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 06/12/2017, 09:00 am at 366 N COUNTY ROAD 13 ORLANDO, FL 32833-3325, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. ABA FOREIGN USED AUTO PARTS & AUTO SALES reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. 2006 Jeep Liberty, vin #1J8GK48K26W159297.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that on Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the following locations: June 28th, 2017 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored therein by the following: 9:30a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 13125 S. John Young Pkwy. Orlando, Fl. 32837 (407) 240-0958 #00720-Garvey Johnson- piano, cabinets, #00450-Dalila Rheafurniture, #00826-Diana BabilonaHousehold Items, #1115F- Arturo Vargas- Household Items, #00183Ricardo Garcia- Household Items, #00672- Flor Ponce- Household Items. 11:00a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 5753 Hoffner Avenue Orlando, FL 32822 (407) 212-5890 #1074-Chardleene MenendezHousehold goods, #1496- Onix Rosario- Household goods, #1313-Christopher MartinezHousehold goods. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that on Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction at the storage facilities listed below, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the following locations: June 28th, 2017 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored therein by the following: 12:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 11971 Lake Underhill Rd. Orlando, Fl. 32825 (407) 380-0046 #706-Beverly Rodriguez-Bins,To tes,Clothes,Wheelchair,Mattress #1327-Kendra Branker- household goods,furniture #308-Thomas Lewinski-furniture,household items,boxes,electronics #618Gardy Delva-bed,dresser,full mattress,clothes #552-Alexis Sanchez-furniture, household items, fridge,clothes Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.


Legal, Public Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OSCEOLA COUNTY, FLORIDA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, v. ROBERT RICHARDSON, JR., AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT LEE RICHARDSON, SR., DECEASED; et al., Defendants. CASE NO.: 2015-CA- 000446 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, Armando Ramirez, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Osceola County, Florida, will on the 27 day of June, 2017, at 11:00 a.m. ET, at the Osceola County Courthouse, 2 Courthouse Square, Suite 2600, Room 2602, Kissimmee, Florida 34741 in accordance with Chapter 45, F.S., offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Osceola County, Florida, to wit: Lot 50, Eagles Nest at The Oaks, a Subdivision as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 13, Page(s) 185 and 186, of the Public Records of Osceola County, Florida. Property Address: 2813 Eagle Claw Court, Kissimmee, FL 34746 pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style and case number of which is set forth above. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding or event, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator, Court Administration, Osceola County Courthouse, 2 Courthouse Square, Suite 6300, Kissimmee, FL 34741, (407) 742-2417, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. SUBMITTED on this 30TH day of May 2017. SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. /s/ Anthony R. Smith, Esq., FL Bar #157147, Kathryn I. Kasper, Esq., FL Bar #621188 Attorneys for Plaintiff. OF COUNSEL: Sirote & Permutt, P.C., 1115 East Gonzalez Street, Pensacola, FL 32503, Toll Free: (800) 826-1699, Facsimile: (850) 462-1599. NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicles will be auctioned at A Reliable Towing, 2500 Forsyth Rd F-7, Orlando FL 32807 on June 22, 2017 at 9:00 am: 00 NISSAN vin: 3N1CB51D8YL329763; 01 CHEVY vin: 1GCCT19W818134226; 01 TOYOTA vin: 4T1BF28B31U174515; 00 CHEVY vin: 2G1WX12K9Y9302567; 02 DODGE vin: 1B4HS58N22F138758; 05 TOYOTA vin: 2T1LR32E25C347792; 98 BMW vin: WBABK8325WEY88719; 98 TOYOTA vin: 4T1BG22K6WU372812; 85 FUNJET VESSEL vin: DDQJ2399F585.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA DIVISION: 03 CASE NO.: DP14-444 IN THE INTEREST OF: T.L., a male child, DOB: 08/11/2001 SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS STATE OF FLORIDA To: Jennifer Lopez, Address unknown. WHEREAS a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this court regarding the above-referenced child(ren), a copy of which is attached. You are hereby commanded to appear before Judge Timothy R. Shea on 5th day of July, 2017, at 9:00 a.m. at the Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, Florida 32806, for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and at the time specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS/THESE CHILD(REN). IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MIGHT LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD(REN) NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. Pursuant to Sections 39.802(4)(d) and 63.082(6)(g), Florida Statutes, you are hereby informed of the availability of private placement with an adoption entity, as defined in Section 63.032(3), Florida Statutes. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at Orlando, Orange County, Florida this 25th day of May, 2017. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (Court Seal) By: (Signed) Deputy Clerk. This summons has been issued at the request of: Stacy McDuffie, Esq., Florida Bar No.:56020, Children’s Legal Services, State of Florida, Department of Children and Families, 822 S. Kirkman Road, Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32811, (407) 563-2380 - Telephone, Stacy. mcduffie@myflfamilies.com.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA DIVISION: 03 CASE NO.: DP14-444 IN THE INTEREST OF: T.L., a male child, DOB: 08/11/2001 SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS STATE OF FLORIDA To: Michael Grubb, Address unknown. WHEREAS a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this court regarding the above-referenced child(ren), a copy of which is attached. You are hereby commanded to appear before Judge Timothy R. Shea on 5th day of July, 2017, at 9:00 a.m. at the Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, Florida 32806, for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and at the time specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS/THESE CHILD(REN). IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MIGHT LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD(REN) NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. Pursuant to Sections 39.802(4)(d) and 63.082(6)(g), Florida Statutes, you are hereby informed of the availability of private placement with an adoption entity, as defined in Section 63.032(3), Florida Statutes. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at Orlando, Orange County, Florida this 25th day of May, 2017. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (Court Seal) By: (Signed) Deputy Clerk. This summons has been issued at the request of: Stacy McDuffie, Esq., Florida Bar No.:56020, Children’s Legal Services, State of Florida, Department of Children and Families, 822 S. Kirkman Road, Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32811, (407) 563-2380 - Telephone, Stacy. mcduffie@myflfamilies.com.

NOTICE of Lien Sale Pursuant to the lien granted by the Florida Self-storage Facility Act Longwood, Storage Zone Self Storage and Business Centers will sell at public auction on June 22nd, 2017 personal property belonging to the following tenants to the highest bidder. The sale shall be held at Longwood Storage Zone, 120 Highline Drive, Longwood, FL, 32750, 407-831-837, commencing at approximately 10 AM. All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Sale rules and regulations are available at the time of Auction. Jonathan A Mijares Unit 904 - Car Parts, Tools ; Sharonda Taylor Unit 1018 - Household Goods.

NOTICE OF SALE Vehicles will be sold as is, no warranty. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid. Terms of bids are cash only. Buyer must have funds on hand at time of sale: 2009 Volkswagen VIN# WVWML73C29E553191 2012 Tao VIN# L9NTEACU3C100114 2001 Mitsubishi VIN# 4A3AA46G91E211616 1993 Chevy VIN# 1GBJC34K3PE153983 To be sold at auction at 8:00 a.m. on June 21, 2017, 7301 Gardner Street, Winter Park, FL. 32792 Constellation Towing & Recovery LLC

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION: 03 CASE NO:DP15-157 IN THE INTEREST OF MINOR CHILD: J.M. DOB: 07/16/2015 SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS STATE OF FLORIDA TO: Alexander Javier Mann, Address Unknown A Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this court regarding the above-referenced child. You are hereby commanded to appear before Judge Timothy Shea on July 31, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. at the Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, Florida 32806, for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and at the time specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MIGHT LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. YOU MAY BE HELD IN CONTEMPT OF COURT IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at Orlando, Orange County, Florida this 16th day of May, 2017. This summon has been issued at the request of: Nancy A. Robak, Florida Bar No.: 88796, Senior Attorney for Florida Department of Children and Family. nancy. robak@myflfamilies.com; CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY:/S/ DEPUTY CLERK (court seal).

NOTICE OF ACTION RE: The Florida Educator Certificate of: Hugh F Broomes, 4709 South Ferncreek Avenue, Orlando, FL 32806 Notice is hereby given to Hugh F Broomes, Respondent of an administrative complaint seeking disciplinary action against his Florida Educator Certificate. This notice shall constitute service of the administrative complaint, which shall be filed with Education Practices Commission. If Respondent wishes to respond to the administrative complaint, he must contact Professional Practices Services at 850/245-0438 by July 20, 2017. Respondent who fails to file a written request for a hearing by this date shall waive his rights, and the complaint will be considered by the Education Practices Commission for final action.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION: 07 CASE NO.: DP14-334 IN THE INTEREST OF: S.A. DOB: 09/17/2016, A MINOR CHILD. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS STATE OF FLORIDA TO: JEREMIAH BECKER, Address Unknown WHEREAS a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this court regarding the above-referenced child, a copy of which is attached, you are hereby commanded to appear before the Honorable Judge Daniel P. Dawson on July 10, 2017 at 11:30 a.m., at Thomas S. Kirk Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, Florida 32806 for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and at the time specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. WITNESS my hand and seal of this court at Orlando, Orange County, Florida this 22nd day of May, 2017. This summons has been issued at the request of: Jill Fowler, Esquire, FBN: 45276, Attorney for the State of Florida, Children’s Legal Services, 400 West Robinson Street, Suite N211, Orlando, Florida 32801, (407) 317-7643-Telephone, (407) 317-7126-Fax, jill. zivot@myflfamilies.com. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Rochelle Marrero, Deputy Clerk (Court Seal). If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, at 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone (407) 836-2303, not later than (7) days prior to the proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned, MFI Investments LTD., of 334 Central Avenue, Crescent City, FL 32112, pursuant to the requirements of the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, is hereby advertising the following fictitious name: El Dorado Apartments It is the intent of the undersigned to register “El Dorado Apartments” with the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations. Dated: 6/2/17

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION: 03 CASE NO: DP15-438 IN THE INTEREST OF MINOR CHILDREN: I.R.G DOB: 10/12/2007, E.C.C. DOB: 11/22/2011 SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS STATE OF FLORIDA TO: Darius Garrett, Address Unknown A Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this court regarding the above-referenced child. You are hereby commanded to appear before Judge Timothy Shea on July 5, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. at the Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, Florida 32806, for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and at the time specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MIGHT LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. YOU MAY BE HELD IN CONTEMPT OF COURT IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at Orlando, Orange County, Florida this 25th day of May, 2017. This summon has been issued at the request of: Nancy A. Robak, Florida Bar No.: 88796, Senior Attorney for Florida Department of Children and Family. nancy. robak@myflfamilies.com; CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY:/S/ DEPUTY CLERK (court seal). NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that Mindful Storage will sell at public auction, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the following locations: June 20th, 2017 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored therein by the following: 3:30 p.m. at the Mindful Storage facility located at: 900 Cypress Pkwy. Kissimmee, Fl. 34759 (321) 732-6032 732-6032 #B111-Alejandro Martinez-Malo/ House Hold Items, #1191-Terrence Stoute/House Hold Items, #C139-Denzi Wroy/Household & Business Items. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Mindful Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

JUNE 7-13, 2017 ● ORLANDO WEEKLY

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Legal, Public Notices NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. PERSONAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV’S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS & OTHER PERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF AT PUBLIC SALES ON JUNE 23RD 2017 AT LOCATIONS & TIMES INDICATED BELOW, TO SATISFY OWNERS LIEN FOR RENT & FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. ALL ITEMS OR SPACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH SPACE PURCHASED IS REQUIRED. 08714- 8149 Aircenter Court, Orlando, FL 32809-7414 AT9:30AM- 1011 - Mayo, Chrystal, 1115 - Passalacqua, Mirtha, 1161 - Difazio, Joseph, 1168 - Colon, Luis, 1175 - Heslin, Charlotte, 2031 - Perez, Maria, 2054 - Labbe, Naica, 2064 - Williams, Barnett, 2106 - Torres, Geomares, 2136 - heifetz, avee, 2183 - Ortiz, Luz, 2190 - Rabassi, Rick, 2214 - Okamoto, Michael, 2248 - Perez Correa, Luz, 2256 - Morris, Kristen, 3010 - Johnson, Donna Lea, 3050 - Howe, Thomas, 3058 - Watkins, Timothy, 4045 - Reece, Thomas, 6002 - Satterfield, Antonio, 6010 - Matthews, Ms, T, 6114 - Acree, Christina 08726- 4801 S Semoran Blvd, Orlando, FL, 32822-2316 AT09:45AM- 0112 - Melton, Donnie, 0118 - Hurlburt, Sebron, 0142 Duclos, Nadeige, 0150 - Larribeau, Annelle, 0151 - CLEVELAND, MELANIE, 0180 - Stevens Jr., James S., 0192 - Pittman, Robert, 0202 - Young, Olando, 0215 Biggs, Keith, 0216 - sanchez, felix, 0219 - Lasher, Parker, 0245 - Garces, Luis, 0253 - Acevedo, Luis, 0256 - Acosta, Laura, 0260 - Kinard, Alyson, 0296 - Jean, Shadee, 1021 - Campbell, Melanie, 2006 - Davis, Kismet, 3026 - Winkle, Tracy, 3074 - Kuhn, Donna, 5012- Christina Manous, 6019 - Turpin, Shannone, 6021 Areizaga, Anthony, 6023 - Taylor, Taronda, 6026 - Dan Casto Wallcovering, 7010 - Ruiz, Maria, 7011 - Ruiz, Jorge, 7056 - Dela Fuente, Nancy, 7064 - Garcia, Wilda, 7072 - Vargas, Fernando, 7087 Reese, Rosalyn, 7109 - Santiago Santiago, Gisselle, 7116 - Mendez, Stephanie, 7129 - Booth, Zachary, 7149 - Rodriguez, Diana, 8005 - Ross, Jimena, 8012 - Ruiz, Maria, 8029 - Butler, Victor, 8123 - Sanchez, Felix, 8138 - winkle, tracy, 8152 - Becker, Jonathan, 8185 - Rojas, Hector, 9003 - Tracz, Olinda 28084- 2275 S Semoran Blvd, Orlando, FL, 32822-2703 AT 10:00AM- A108 - Jeffries, Donald, A109 - Padilla, Jessica, A128 Davis, Clifford, A130 - Wilcox, Kimberly, A135 - Williams, Lynette,

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B116 - Lerggios, Roberto, B118 - Cobb, Brenda, B121 - Belcher, Grant, B135 - Cromie, Tim, B136 - donohoe, Thomas, B145 - Mole, Frances, B152 - Smith, Marisha, B167 - Jordan, Terrance, B170 - Parker, William, B181 - Martin, Charles, B201 - Flanagan, Christy, B203 - Tanner, Janis, B220 donohoe, Thomas, B224 - Conley, Christopher, C117 - guerra, luis, C132 - Louise, Nicole, C148 HILL, DOUGLAS, C153 - Ranson, Clark, C160 - Hibi, Saori, C162 Phillips, Renee, C195D - Martinez, Tricia, C195I - Cesareo, Samantha, C199G - Blackwell, Elizabeth, C208 - Shomefun, George, C209 - LAMERE, ALYSSA, C211E Walker, Nifisha, C212E - Weber, Jazmin, C230C - Wright, Danny 20179- 903 S. Semoran Blvd. Orlando FL, 32807 at 10:30AM: A001 - Brooks, Vertreca, B001 Lozado, Susana, B004 - Oquendo, Judith, B018 - ZAYAS, ANNA, B020 - Andino, Annette, B023 Faraldo, Jessica, B048 - Landron, Natalia, C004 - Clum, Vicki, C014 - Marmol, Steve, C015 - TEJADA, MARITZA, C022 - Munoz Centeno, Manuel, C028 - Calderon, Isializ, C046 - Holland, Columbus, C064 - Bishop, Scott, C079 - Taft, Andre, C081 - SHABAZZ, RAHMAAR, D002 - Romero, cristino, D013 - Wagner, Tonya, D014 Correa, Brenda, D026 - Cardenal, Elizabeth, D027 - Conway, Leon, D035 - Rink, Kathryn, D038 Orange County Democratic Exec. Cte., D042 - Ray, Lamar, D057 - Romero, Ramona, D083 - Black, Austin, D097 - Kolljeski, Jerry, D105 - Roman, Nikos, D108 Gonzalez, Hector, D120 - Newlan, Cynthia, D128 - Richardson, Jean- Louis, D161 - Perrone, Danna, D165 - Gonzalez-Jimenez, Zuelika, D183 - Kipp, Ronald, D191 - Moradel, Carol, D203 Benjamin, Danny, D208 - ZAYAS, DANA, D213 - Fariello, Jason, D227 - Spruell, Shelley, D228 Slayton, Victoria, D230 - Zapata, Osman, E009 - Breland, Sada, E024 - Strader, Travis, E034 - Sanchez Jr, Ricardo, E042 AGOSTO, LILLIAN, E045 - Arroyo, Pauline, E082 - Mcrae, Channing, E093 - Ramos, Luis, E094 - Hagy, Susan, E099 - Connolly, Madeline, E101 - Bonilla, Victor 25850- 2525 E Michigan St , Orlando , FL, 32806-5039 AT 11:30AM: 1027 - Melendez, Wanda, 2010 - Porter, Denise, 2026 - Crouch, Fred, 2037 - Elliot, Susan, 4011 - Smith, Benjamin, 4012 - King, Neshby, 4029 Rivera, Angel, 4033 - Zeek, Jason, 4037 - Atkinson, Jon, 5057 - Davis, Craig, 5337 - Barrow, James, 6219 - Bohanna, Gwen, 6306 - Hayman, Quinn, 6406- Sodexo C/O Janet Bennett, 6432 - Mitchell, Tiffany, 6449 - Nerette, Jean, Emmanuel, 6501 - Pinkney, Prince, 6502 BJanes, Beth, 6518 - Stewart, David, 6522 - Maxius, Viergeline, 6529 - Smart, Judy, 6615 Modeste, Julian, 6631 - Murphy, Steve, 6643 - Ryder, Laurie.

SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK - COUNTY OF QUEENS Index No. 13173/16 Date Summons Filed: November 15, 2016 EDISON POMALES, JR., Plaintiff, -against- BRENDA C. MARTINEZ, Defendant. Plaintiff designates Queens County as the place of trial. The basis of venue is CPLR Sec. 509. SUMMONS WITH NOTICE Plaintiff resides at 2751 Pitkin Avenue, Apartment 2R, Brooklyn, New York 11208. ACTION FOR DIVORCE To the above named Defendant: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within thirty (30) days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York); and in case of your failure to appear, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the notice set forth below. Dated: November 14, 2016. Signed, Ruth M. Baez, Esq., Attorney for Plaintiff, 45-14 104 Street, Suite 1R, Corona, New York 11368 (718) 592-3388. NOTICE: The nature of this action is to dissolve the marriage between the parties, on the grounds: DRL Section 170 subd. (7) - the relationship between the Plaintiff and Defendant has broken down irretrievably for a period of at least six months. The relief sought is a judgment of absolute divorce in favor of the Plaintiff dissolving the marriage between the parties in this action. The nature of any ancillary or additional relief demanded is: That the Family Court shall have concurrent jurisdiction with the Supreme Court with respect to any future issues of maintenance and support. That the parties do not require maintenance and no claim will be made by either party for maintenance. That the parties do not require payment of counsel and experts’ fees and expenses. That the Court grant such other and further relief as the Court may deem fit and proper. The parties have divided up the marital property, and no claim will be made by either party under equitable distribution. Notice of Automatic Orders: The parties are bound by certain automatic orders pursuant to DRL Sec. 236(B)(2) and DRL Sec. 255(1). NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to F.S. 713.585 At 9:00AM on June 24, 2017 Billis Auto Center 1710 N. Forsyth Rd. ORL, FL 32807, (407) 657-1808. Will sell the following vehicle(s) to Satisfy claim of lien. Seller reserves the right to bid and refuse any or all bids. Sold As-Is, No warranty. Seller guarantees no title. Terms cash. Satisfying the lien prior to sale may redeem said vehicle(s). You have a right to a hearing at any time prior to sale by filing a demand for hearing in the circuit court. Owner has the right to recover possession by posting bond per. F.S. 559.917. Any proceeds in excess of lien will be deposited with clerk of courts. 2008 TOYOTA VIN# JTKDE167880264794 Lien Amt: $3,485.09.

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● JUNE 7-13, 2017 ● orlandoweekly.com

NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. PERSONAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV’S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS & OTHER PERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF AT PUBLIC SALES ON JUNE 23, 2017 AT LOCATIONS & TIMES INDICATED BELOW, TO SATISFY OWNERS LIEN FOR RENT & FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. ALL ITEMS OR SPACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH SPACE PURCHASED IS REQUIRED 1051 BUENAVENTURA BLVD – KISSIMMEE, FL 34743 – AT 9:30AM: 01110 - Abu, Jossie, 01134 - Rodriguez, Ilsa, 01201 - Rubio, jaime, 02120 - Rivera, Jorge, 02141 - Justiniano, Kenyee, 02149 - Stees, Jenny, 02205 Olmo, Daniel, 02210 - Velasquez, Yvette, 02217 - Murray, Stacy, 02423 - Helisek, Matthew, 02435 - Ramos, Ruben, 02505 - Medina, Elizabeth, 02620 - Jean Louis, Andre, 03108 - Davila, Angel, 04110 - Caribean CeramicTile, 04113 - Narvaez, Edwin, 04117 Simon, Michael, 04119 - Cintron, Milton, 04133 - gonzalez, jeanne, 04145 - Torres, Josue, 04315 Brown, Robert, 04431 - Narvaez, Rois, 04525 - Raising knowledge academy, 04525 – Ariam Cotto, 05106 - Singh, Dave, 05118 Gonzalez, Ronald, 05137 - Velez, Jeremy, 05147 - Perez, Xenia, 05160 - Rentas, Brandon, 05243 Houston, Patricia, 05258 - Rachel, Vivian, 05337 - Cruz, Melba, 05348 - Tobon, Walter, 05364 - Bustos, Francisco, 05435 Andino, Edward, 21621 - Ramirez, Giovanni 1800 TEN POINT LN – ORLANDO, FL 32837 – AT 9:40 AM: 0121 - Torres, Carlos, 0163 - Willridge, Teroy, 0213 - Stokes, Nicholis, 0255 - Morales, Wilfredo, 0300 - Arribas, Marisol, 0304 EKTHUVAPRANEE, KARLA, 0306 - Klein, Michael, 1009 Morales, Nancy, 1021 - Reichley, James, 1042 - Amezquita, Kristian, 1045 - Montes, Dalys, 1067 Sayago, Manuel, 1068 - Irizarry, Noemi, 2017 - Philips, Carl, 2030 - Olivencia, Daisy, 2041 Dean, Mark, 2045 - Richmond, Marcus, 2070 - Davis, Antoinio, 3014 - Mendoza, Leyda, 3033 Bernabe, Marilyn, 5023 - Tenorio, Galo, 5030 - Restrepo, Tatiana, 5031 - Hernandez, Kimberly, 7012 - Gibbs, Martha, 7029 - Colon, Christian, 7044 - Martinez, Manuel, 7066 - Henderson, Timothy, 7085 - Rivera, Yvette, 7090 - Abreu, Rafael, 7113 - Felce, Alejandro, 7142 - Rodriguez, Jose, 7153 Duchac, Neil 2783 N. JOHN YOUNG PKWY – KISSIMMEE, FL 34741 – AT 10:50 AM: 1002 - ESTREMERA, MARIA, 1010 - THOMPSON, PHILLIP, 1024 - BREEDEN, RUBY, 1053 - SKENES, CARL, 1056 - CROUSE, KAHLA,

1064 - TORRES, RAYMOND, 1072 - BRADY, DAISY, 1110 ANDERSON, GEORGE, 11116 - GOODMAN, MICHELLE, 1113 - TOLEDO, ALEXIS, 11207 - VIGUIE, DEBRA, 11212 - GREGORY, PATRICIA, 11308 KEEFER, MYRA, 1157 - VELEZ JR, DAVID, 1201 - CULTRERA, CARLOS, 12014 - FERNANDEZ, STEPHANIE, 12025 - GRAY, THOMAS, 12063 - WILLOUGHBY, DERRICK, 12112 - WHITE, RACHAEL, 12202 - CARTAGENA, LUIS, 12306 - MARIN, DIEGO, 12312 - GREER, RICHARD, 12406 - WILSON, BRIAN, 12414 - MELTON HEINE, SHAUNDA, 12421 - CARDERO, JASMINE, 12503 - SANCHEZ, ARACELIS, 1260 - CORDOVI, DAVID, 12605 - JARVIS, REBECA, 12614 FILHO, JOAQUIM, 12615 - VALENTIN, SHEILA, 201 - BROWN, MICHAEL, 293 - KALLOO, ANNETTE, 306 - HACKER, ALTEREESE, 343 - DUQUE, JULIAN, 403 - TIRADO, ARMANDO, 472 - OCONNOR, SHEZWAE, 502 - RAMIREZ, EDGAR, 513 - MABSON, LAVERNE, 592 - MAILE, RUSELL, 611 - SMITH, GARY, 706 - JOHNSON, DARLENE, 712 - MORALES, CARMEN, 907 - SCHREIBER, MELISSA, 915 SEONATH, RAVINDRANAUTH, 966 - PERSAUD, KENNETH 1701 DYER BLVD, KISSIMMEE, FL 34741 – AT 10:00 AM: 0009 - BAEZ, SUSINDY, 0041 - SALDANHA, ROBERTA, 0043 WALKER, CAROL, 0045 - BIELE, FRANCISCO, 0046 - Santana, Denise, 0085 - Taczli, Philip, 0089 - THOMAS, VALERIE, 0090 - RODRIGUEZ SOTO, SANDRA, 0095 - Culley, Jazzmin, 0105 Carris, Justin, 0145 - PATE, PAUL, 0153 - Bowles, Robert, 0160 - WOODS, DRUVONDA, 0169 - Sanders, Janie, 0308 - Santos, Emiliano, 1016 - CARBONE, ERIKA, 1017 - BATCHLEOR, PAUL, 1024 – Estabrooks, Diane Lynne, 2006 - Mcelory, Karen Aneia, 2012 - Church, Matthew, 2051 - Mincer, Samantha, 2081 - Wynter, Nadia, 2086 - Sosa, Marisol, 2093 - MANANA MOJICA, KRIZIA, 2099 - RUIZ, AMANDA, 2110 - Paulino, Luis, 4014 - Almodovar, Fernando, 4017 - Joseph, Chantal, 4030 - Burgess, tiffeny, 4040 - Sanchez, Joseph, 6002 GEBREHEWET, AZMERA, 6042 - Rix, Jessica, 6066 - Williamson, Marc, 6072 - ORTIZ, MARIBEL, 6073 - Martinez, Joanelly, 6076 Kissimee Family Mission Inc, 6080 - Johnson, Brian, 6084 - Brooks, Noreen, 6085 - CRUZ, DAISY, 6126 - Rangel, Glaucia, 6128 MCEACHERN, KIMBERLY, 6146 - Upperman, Linda, 6156 - Raup, Emily, 6158 - WALKER, CAROL, 6176 - Gonzales, Yesenia, 6198 McQueen, Sherri, 6201 - Ruiz, Denise, 6209 - COLBERT, ROBERT, 6222 - YEAGER, TURINA, 7219A - Tazama, Gilner, 8013 - Diaz, Maribel, 8061 - Cortes, Bonny, 8072 - Rubio, Jaime, 8078 - Torres, Sophia, 8079 - ROBERTS, PARDEEP, 8080 - Sharrer, Renate 951 S. JOHN YOUNG PKWY – KISSIMMEE, FL 34741 – AT 10:10 AM: 1002 - RIVERA, CARLOS, 1011 - Nicholson, Thomas,

1013 - Pinckney, Alethia, 1022 - Cepeda, Tomara, 1027 - King, Ronald, 1123 - Francis, Letriece, 1204 - Maldonado, Diana, 1212 - Lawes, Avis, 1236 - Gordon, Rohan, 1308 - Riddell, Brett, 1316 - Walker, Jacquana, 1504 - Soto, Nereida, 1510 - Perez, Jennifer, 1511 - M & J Pool Services of Florida, 1511 – Jose Roman, 1522 - Torres, Jasmin, 1525 Denny, Kurt, 1540 - Rodriguez, Angel, 1611 - Karkosky, Robert, 1700 - Palma, Rossner, 1711 Wilson, William, 1714 - EUSTACE, JOHN, 1806 - Ferguson, Marlon, 2051 - Michelson, Michael, 2060 Santillanes, Ruth, 2071 - Bennett, Tartriequa, 2101 - Alvarado, Silvio, 2107 - Wilson, Shauna, 2166 Rose, David, 2174 - FISHER, PATRICK, 2184 - Jameson Hudson, Veronica, 2200 - Rogers, Malinda, 2227 - Cruz, Reina, 2318 - Amador, Victor, 2332 - Green, Nathalie 227 SIMPSON RD - KISSIMMEE, FL 34744 –AT 10:20 AM: 012 Hodge, Kocheta, 036 - Santiago, Pablito, 045 - Kingdom Restoration World, 070 - Barbee, Rachel, 104 Denson, Danielle, 224 - Rodriguez, Katherine, 233 - Mills, William, 246 - Serrano, Jorge, 263 - Carde, Rafael, 265 - Poueriet, Raziel, 268 - Briscoe, Nigel, 309 - Betances, Mayline, 324 - Inoa, Jenny, 340 Melendez Lozada, Geysha, 354 - Ferguson, Allen, 419 - Williams, Lilkeasha, 422 - Acevedo Jr., Ceferino, 434 - Martinez, Ingrid, 452 - Garcia, Edwin, 532 - Castro, Endel, 540 - Mclaurin, Kekan, 549 - White, Sonora, 557 - Persons, Justin, 580 - Jackson, Charles, 610 - Blanchard, Patrick, 620 Burgos, Orlando, 706 - Harrison, Ashley, 710 - Williams, Jimmy, 722 - Arraiga, Herminia, 826 - Coutou, Rupert, 832 - Sinclair, Daniel, 838 - Soto Ayala, Angel, 865 Uribe Carvajal, Juan, 882 - Higgs, Herbert, 890 - Schooler, Delia, RV3 - Thomas, Sumpter.

NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under The Florida Self Storage Facility Act Statutes (Section 83.801-83.809). The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on, Thursday, June 15th, 2017 at 10:00 AM, on lockerfox.com said property has been stored and which are located at: iStorage, 3400 Forsyth Rd, Winter Park FL 32792 Name, Unit #, Contents: Angelino Rodiquez, 158, Glass Table, Bedding, Lamps, Show Boxes Michael Wysong, 225, Wood, Tools, Paint, Shelving, Paintings Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase by cash only. All purchased items are sold as is, where is, and must be removed at the time of the sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Dated this 31st day of May and 7th day of June, 2017.


Legal, Public Notices NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. PERSONAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV’S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS & OTHER PERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF AT PUBLIC SALES ON JUNE 22, 2017 AT LOCATIONS & TIMES INDICATED BELOW, TO SATISFY OWNERS LIEN FOR RENT & FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. ALL ITEMS OR SPACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH SPACE PURCHASED IS REQUIRED. 28075- 4729 S Orange Blossom Trail, Orlando, FL, 32839—AT 9:30AM: 0107 - Fauntleroy, James, 0118 - Torez, Yaira, 0130 - Hunter, Paula, 0144 - Miranda, Kim, 0151 - Akande, Adewale, 0153 - Anderson, Tiffaney, 0158 - Charles, Kevin, 0202 - Laureano, Keymilis, 0206 - Buchana, Jo Ann, 0213 - Adams, Aneisha, 0226 - De Jesus Rodriguez, Felix, 0231 - Johnson, Jermaine, 0238 - Rios, Gladys, 0242 - Thompson I I, Keith, 0311 - Ousley, Baretta, 0312 - Shield Jr, Ken, 0315 - Brisbane, Harold, 0324 - Bridgewater, Maruko, 0336 - Baskins, Robert (Bob), 0349 - Fraser, Christopher, 0354 - Gardner-oliver, Gina, 0414 - White, Estella, 0435 - Williams, Edith, 0506 - Key, ANDRIA, 0507 - Nichols, Edwin, 0513 - Cameron, Noreen, 0514 - Brown, Telisha, 0604 - Maragh, Courtney, 0627 - Trice, Germaine, 0701 - Mack, Lillian, 0711 - Knight, Mary, 0733 Rayo, Marielena, 0806 - Longley, Chelsia, 0834 - Jordan, Glynn, 0843 - Vassale, Joseph, 0847 Strouse, Ashley, 0903 - Jackson, Santana, 0904 - Delancy, Marie Renee, 0905 - Pollard, Tatyanna, 0906 - Mayfield, Dwight, 09105 Martinez, Jellitza, 09107 - Martin Federal Credit Union, 09108 Dangleben, Paul, 09125 - Dais, Julius, 0926 - Sublet, Glender, 0932 - Scott, Tonjla, 0944 - Parks, Michelle, 0949 - Mitchell, Roger, 0983 - Kline, Jason, 0996 - Munoz, Abdias, 0997 - Jumpp, Janelle, 1008 - Yarber, Kelly, 1012 - West, Latrese, 1019 - Arguelles Tirado, Erline, 1050 - Saint Fort, Flavia, 1063 - Cadely, Dunel, 1064 Burke, Kaishma, 1068 - Milhomme, Manes, 1086 - Smith, Athena, 1108 - Langston, Geraldine, 1116 Mcneil, Queenesther, 1119 - Fryer, Marlin, 1122 - Scholz, Rebecca, 1149 - Mcdaniel, Keisha, 1161 Caldwell, Johnnie, 1167 - Briskey, Bradley, 1205 - Hadden, Jason, 1208 - Deas, Angel, 1217 - Rochelien, Rosette, 1236 - Duverceau, Yves, 1244 - Johnson, Shavon, 1249 - Bracey, Phillippa, 1253 - Felix, Ebony, 1274 - Alvarez, Marilyn 25454 - 235 E Oak Ridge Road,

Orlando, FL, 32809AT 10:30AMA105 - Brooks Jr., Albert, A117 MARTINEZ, JUAN, A125 - Henry, Sandra, A144 - Bryan, Pearl, A146 - Anderson, David, A150 - Spence, Carl, A157 - Sills, Kari, B205 Calderon, Jose, B245 - Bellamy, Shuantae, C303 - Robles, Minerva, C312 - Hernandez, Meliza, D409 - Rivera, Jennie, D418 Winn, Jaleesa, E506 - Regis, Felix, E518 - Dorcely, Ervens, E529 - Hylton, Candace, E533 - Lewis, April, F636 - Marcelin, Immaculee, G702 - Velazquez, Lionel, G711 - Diaz, Randy, H801 - Francois, Carole, H806 - Burnes Bowles, Kimberly, J013 - Guidry, Charles, J017 - Jackson, Steven, J019 Brown, James, J026 - Bazalar, Francisco, K109 - Hill, Tommie, K110 - Dorsey, Errick, K111 - Rigg, Taj, K114 - Munoz, Abdias, K120 - Smith, Labrina, L214 - Ortiz, Christian, L232 - Berdiel, Waykiria, M317 - AAtlantis Delivery Services, N401 - Coleman, Brittany, N403 - Pacheco, Miriam, O515 - Cruz, Juan, P005 - Rodgers, Ronn, P009 - Henderson, Michael, P046 - Laurent, Matheus, P053 - Perez, Juan Carlos 20711- 1801 W Oakridge Rd Orlando, FL 32809 AT- 11:30AM: B020 - Tejada, Jennifer, B041 Oliver, Barbara, B042 - Tejada, Jennifer, B054 - Rincon, Andres, C005 - Marc, Forecia, C031 Barner, Tonia, C048 - Breedlove, Obrian, D007 - Santos, Walter, D025 - Jean-Louis, Wilda, D039 - Calloway, Brennicka, D049 Jacques, Scardy, E012 - Phillips, Millie, E022 - Aldrich, Barbara, E032 - Lavache, Gina, F012 Gresham, Brittany, G012 - Garcia, Louis, G013 - Joseph, Marc, G027 - Chappell, Micahel, G043 - De Melo Faria, Sandro, H013 Ryan, John, H025 - Washington, Raniskia, H027 - Pierre, Mirtha, H028 - Rivera, Felisha, J002 Ulneus, Rosemaine, J003 - Brown, Angela, J027 - Svacha, Mathew, J032 - Brown, Tanzy, J038 - Anthony, Brandon, J040 - Radiano, Kimberly, J076 - Deverney, Vivian, J082 - Matos, Diana, J083 - Rodriguez, Bernadette, J090 - Roman Borrero, Javier, J101 - Castro, William, J118 - Danza, Michelle, J121 - Terameaux, Kimmy, J124 - Best, Ernest, J129 - Anty, Rebecca, J158 - Weidman, Tammi, J160 - Rivera, Sonia, J169 - Rivera, Eddie, J172 - Matos, Nubia, K001 - Hernandez Gonzalez, Geraldo Reinaldo, K011 - Peters, Gregory, K012 - Kleinberger, Gary, K019 Blanco, Gustavo, K020 - Carter, Kathryn, K036 - Ellis, Jadae, K048 - Serafin-Jimenez, Augurio, K053 - Wilson, Victor, K057 - Hodgson, Jayson, K064 - Tejada, Jennifer, K065 - Ortiz, Luz, K071 - Santiago, Lorna, K083 - Mortimer, Gilson, K087 - Catala, Monica, K099 Theodore, Edeline, K101 - Catala Nieves, Edwin, K109 - Danza, Michelle 24303- 1313 45th Street, Orlando, FL 32839-AT 12:30PM: A105 - Fairley, Arantes, A117 Williams, James, A118 - Anderson, Stacy, A123 - Similien, Diemerite, A136 - Love, Charmayne, A192Lesperance, Frantz, B205 - Simon,

Kyle, B209 - Wells, Marquita, B216 - Walton, Alexander, B217 Williams, Lorraine, B219 - Smith, Myeisha, B225 - Johnson, Lynda, B230 - Monroe, Cy, B244 - Singleton, Christopher, B254 - Coker, Leslie, C302 - Roman, Evangelina, C316 - Colin, Jean, C328 - Pierre, Emmanuael, C329 - Lawrence, Khanisha, C381 - Mundy, Phillip, C394 - King, Kanesha, D403 - Neely, Donna, D404 - Lalanne, Marie, D409 - Woodson, Lesine, D421 - Hair, Jennifer, D435 - Alberto, Francisca, E519 - Abrams, Troy, E520 - Williams, Kiya, E525 - Williams, Frederick, E528 - Jackson Jr, Charlie, E568 - Tillman, Tory, F608 - Claire Saint, Emmanuel, F630 - Simon, Karen Ingrid, F640 - Brown, Randy, G710 - Fraser, Christopher, G722 Richardson, Michael, H804 - Miller, Samson, H820 - Bryant, Hernisha, H838 - Marshall, Mae, J901 Honore, Nicole, J907 - Mercier, Martine, J915 - Perez, Madeline.

NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. PERSONAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV’S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS & OTHER PERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF AT PUBLIC SALES ON JUNE 22, 2017 AT LOCATIONS & TIMES INDICATED BELOW, TO SATISFY OWNERS LIEN FOR RENT & FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. ALL ITEMS OR SPACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH SPACE PURCHASED IS REQUIRED. 1080 E ALTAMONTE DR, ALTAMONTE SPRINGS FL AT 9:30 AM: B021 - Quiles, Ilene, B071 - Johnson, Amber, B116 - Lechtenberg, Samuel, B145 Awada, Steve, B161 - Richardson, Danielle, C015 - Bryson, Alisha, C053 - Holt, Jelena, C054 walters, jarvis, C067 - Hill, Jasmyn, C073 - Congress, Sebastian, C079 - Davis, Katrina, C082 Lorne, Monique, D018 - Sanchez, Jesus, D031 - Totaro, Timothy, D061 - Ruehlman, Joanna 310 W CENTRAL PARKWAY, ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL, 32714 AT 9:45 AM: 0008 Livanos, Anthony, 0318 - Fleming, Helen, 0351 - Smith, Earle, 0491 - Rivera, Jo, 1017 - Harvell, Tonya, 3010 - Rountree Jr., Roosevelt, 3028 - Lincoln, Roseen, 3055 Needham, Roger, 3064 - Acosta, Priscilla, 4013 - Caraballo, Iliana, 5015 - Garcia, Jose 2800 W STATE ROAD 434 , LONGWOOD , FL, 32779 AT 10:00 AM: 0005 - Graziano, Lisa, 0344 - Angevine, Michael, 0423 - MELENDEZ, PEDRO, 0675 Smith, Lamont, 0702 - Dennis, Billy, 0750 - Smiley, Marshell, 0816 - Scott, Kevin, 0930 - Chavez, Ricardo 521 S STATE ROAD 434, ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL, 32714 AT 10:15 AM: 3006 Consulate Health Care, 3030 - Colon, John, 4006 - Branch, Suzanne, 5025 - Bays, Shawn, 5046 - Vallejo, Caleb, 5051 -

Johnson, Dora, 5127 - Sumner, Kristine 455 S HUNT CLUB BLVD, APOPKA, FL, 32703 AT 10:30 AM: 1021 - Aviles, Lisa, 3001 - Henshilwood, David, 4006 Rivera, Jeffrey, 4062 - Jones, Michelle, 4079 - Lee, Connie, 5023 - Kinslow, Sally, 5052 - Creamer, Tara, 6217 - Shrock, David 2431 S ORANGE BLOSSOM TRAIL, APOPKA, FL, 32703 AT 10:45 AM: B035 - Clark, Shakeana, C016 - Chatigny, Betty, C021 - Brailsford, Janelle, D076 - Willcox, Jason, G002 - Hardy, Betty, NA03 - Miller, Carl, NA04 Colon, Alberto, U002 - Harkness, Shannon, U031 - Palmer, Elizabeth, U035 - Perez, David, V016 - Campbells, Jacqueline 108 W MAIN ST. APOPKA , FL, 32703 AT 11:00 AM: 0124 - Durham, Arika, 0217 - Daniels, Raekwon, 0311 - Hart, Jeannie, 0514 - Brown, Weldon, 0522 LANE, WENDY, 0603 - Helton, Lacye, 0613 - Lawrence, Siteria, 0621 - Lewis, Brittany, 1103 Owens, Candice, 1355 - Knight, Angie, 1412T - Soto, Martha, 1708 - Tyler, Corinthian, 1726 - Beckett, Rackel 8255 SILVER STAR ROAD ORLANDO, FL 32818 AT 11:15 AM: 1004 - Johnson, Tamara, 1110 - Chance, Lillie, 1407 Wright, Rebekah, 1408 - Beavers, Dashe, 1444 - Holmes, Quiana, 1606 - Zumaeta, Ada, 2026 Guirand, Jean, 2047 - vazquez, christian, 2136 - Tiwari, Narupa, 2259 - Lobban, Desmond, 2260 - Clark, Arielle, 2331 - donaldson, nicole 3150 N. HIAWASSEE RD ORLANDO, FL 32818 AT 11:30 AM: 1203 - Mcclendon, Dee, 1205 - Richberg, Solomon, 1206 - Risper, Beverly, 1407 - Bienaime Jr., Franklin, 1413 - Formor, Pamela, 1705 - Neish, Morise, 1814 - Lovett, Kenneth, 1815 Richards, Duane, 1830 - Mayan, Iekramullah, 1907A - Johnson, Jamie, 2104 - Wallace, Denise, 2200 - Little, Miranda, 2217 - Hall, Alisha, 2302 - Hastings, Nouchelle, 2524 - Simmons, Adriane, 2629 Neal, Trenitrice 6770 SILVER STAR ROAD ORLANDO, FL 32818 AT 11:45AM:, 0005 - Perfecting Praise Ministries, Inc., 0029 - Desaussure, Charlie, 0033 Auguste, Rubert, 0035 - Dawson, Yonique, 0057 - Talley, Pamela, 0078 - Jones, Lazeta, 0094 Hinton, Bethany, 0119 - Pruitt, Amina, 0128 - shackelford, christopher, 0173 - Griffin, Ivy, 0198 - Service, Damian, 0208 - Norfleet, Naporschia, 0236 - Brown, Latreveous, 0243 Johnson, Latoria, 0308 - Leeks, Rodriguez, 0310 - Harris, Takita, 0314 - farrow, Shaniqua, 0324 - Jules, Martine, 0332 - Elliott, Derrick, 0335 - Thomas, Veronica, 0338 - Wheeler, Chiquita, 0340 - Oliver, Yolanda, 0358 - Stuart, Chris, 0382 - Lampkin, Latoya, 0404 - Jackson, Shonte, 0412 - Hill, Alicia, 0471 - Williams, Tatisa, 0494 - Devitt, Michael, 0503 - Herring, Yvondia, 0505 - BALDWIN, SAMUEL, 0506 - Rodriguez, Esdras, 0510 rodriguez, Naomi, 0512 - West, Kevin, 0527 - Roberts, Patrick, 0546 - Mims, Destiny, 0598 Keating, Robert, 0618 - Rogers, Derrick, 0623 - Jones, Shenita, 0723 - Rojas, Jessica, 0857 Cutliff, Tiffany, 0861 - rodriguez, Naomi, 0870 - Oelhoffen, Kam, 0897 - Johnson, Tangela 0921 Hopkins, George.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will sell, to satisfy lien of the owner, at public sale by competitive bidding on June 20, 2017 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored there in by the following: 1:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 4390 Pleasant Hill Rd, Kissimmee, FL 34746 (407) 944-1408 Joshua Heredia unit 5009 furniture, Dorna Noble unit 5036 furniture, Caroline Anthony unit 473 hhold items, Luis Antonio Garcia unit 322 hhold goods, Shawn White unit 350 furniture, hhold items, Kimberlee K Lewis unit 265 School supplies, Eunice Patricia Fagan personal items, hhold goods, Anthony Munez unit 5242 personal items, Ruth Maldonado unit 516 hhold goods, personal items, Josher Isiaha Cano unit 594 fridge, stove, Melinda Diane Bright unit 5081 hhold goods, personal items, Richard Gazard unit 5213 hhold goods, Ismael Antonio Centeno Ortiz unit 542 construction equipment, Gregory Brown Unit 216 mattress, dresser. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the time of sale. All goods are sold as is and must be removed at the time of purchase. Extra Space Storage reserves the right to bid. Sale is subject to adjournment. Thank You, Extra Space Storage.

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JUNE 7-13, 2017 ● ORLANDO WEEKLY

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