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FREE | FEB. 15-21, 2017

An action guide for resisting and persisting, pages 10-25

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ORLANDO WEEKLY ● OCT. 19-25, 2016

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ORLANDO WEEKLY ● FEB. 15-21, 2017

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ORLANDO WEEKLY ● FEB. 15-21, 2017

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FREE | FEB. 15-21, 2017

Publisher Graham Jarrett Editor Jessica Bryce Young Editorial Staff Writer Monivette Cordeiro Calendar Editor Thaddeus McCollum Music Editor Matthew Moyer Digital Content Editor Colin Wolf Contributors Rob Bartlett, Jen Cray, Hannah Glogower, Scott Horn, Liv Jonse, Holly V. Kapherr, Faiyaz Kara, Seth Kubersky, Bao Le-Huu, Marissa Mahoney, Cameron Meier, Richard Reep, Sierra Reese, Joey Roulette, Steve Schneider, Abby Stassen, Ken Storey Editorial Interns Deanna Ferrante, Rachel LeBar, Nick Wills Advertising Major Accounts Specialist Leslie Egan Senior Multimedia Account Executives Debbie Garcia, Lori Green, Dan Winkler Multimedia Account Executives Scott Navarro, Scott Spar Classified and Legal Rep Jerrica Schwartz Advertising Coordinator Abby Stassen Marketing and Events Events Director Zackary Rowe Events and Promotions Manager Brad Van De Bogert Marketing and Events Coordinator Rachel Hoyle

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Cover design by Chris Tobar Rodriguez

Creative Services Creative Services Manager Shelby Sloan Editorial Designer Chris Tobar Rodriguez Graphic Designer Melissa McHenry Business Operations Manager Hollie Mahadeo Business Assistant Allysha Willison Circulation Circulation Manager Collin Modeste Euclid Media Group Chief Executive Officer Andrew Zelman Chief Operating Officers Chris Keating, Michael Wagner Human Resources Director Lisa Beilstein Digital Operations Coordinator Jaime Monzon euclidmediagroup.com National Advertising: Voice Media Group 1-888-278-9866, voicemediagroup.com Orlando Weekly Inc. 16 W. Pine St. Orlando, Florida 32801 orlandoweekly.com Phone 407-377-0400 Fax 407-377-0420

NEWS + FEATURES

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FOOD + DRINK

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MUSIC 45 A simple song

Men at Work singer Colin Hay forges his own path, one tune at a time

7 Pulse: In Memoriam

29 Plating politics

A profile of Pulse Nightclub shooting victim Eric Ivan Ortiz Rivera

Emphasizing the power of food to bridge understanding

45 Picks This Week

7 This Modern World 7 ICYMI

29 Tip Jar

47 This Little Underground

News you need to know but may have missed in the past week

8 Informed Dissent The Trump administration is coming for your right to vote

10 The resistance will be organized Here are some tangible ways to help each other through the next four years

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Great live music rattles Orlando every night

Tin & Taco from the owners of Gringos Locos opens downtown, the Orlando Chili Cook-Off takes over Festival Park this weekend, plus more in our weekly food roundup

Endoxa goes synth with Gost and Moondragon, Parquet Courts make Orlando debut with Mary Lattimore

30 Bar Exam New downtown game lounge Joysticks goes heavy on ambience and nostalgia

31 Recently Reviewed Short takes on restaurants we’ve visited recently

Orlando Weekly is published every week by Euclid Media Group Orlando Distribution Orlando Weekly is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Copyright notice: The entire contents of Orlando Weekly are copyright 2017 by Euclid Media Group LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Publisher does not assume any liability for unsolicited manuscripts, materials, or other content. Any submission must include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. All editorial, advertising, and business correspondence should be mailed to the address listed above. Subscriptions: Additional copies or back issues may be purchased at the Orlando Weekly offices for $1. Six-month domestic subscriptions may be purchased for $75; one-year subscriptions for $125. Periodical Postage Pending at Orlando, FL POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ORLANDO WEEKLY 16 W. Pine St. Orlando, FL 32801.

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ARTS + CULTURE 24 Reading is fundamental Books to inspire you during these hard times

27 Live Active Cultures There’s much more to sound effect-spewing star Michael Winslow than just a repertoire of wacky noises

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FILM

CALENDAR

41 All is not well

48 Selections

Clarity is verboten in Gore Verbinski’s A Cure for Wellness

50 The Week

41 Film Listings Cinema-oriented events to go see this week

51 Down the Road

42 On Screens in Orlando

Back Pages

Movies playing this week: Fist Fight, The Great Wall and more

64 Gimme Shelter 64 Savage Love 65 Classifieds

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IN MEMORIAM: THE ORLANDO 49 Every week between now and the oneyear anniversary of the Pulse Nightclub shootings, Orlando Weekly will profile a person killed on June 12, 2016. This week: Eric Ivan Ortiz Rivera

Eric Ivan Ortiz Rivera was days away from celebrating his first wedding anniversary with his beloved husband, Ivan Domínguez. They married on June 26 – the same day the U.S. Supreme Court decided that same-sex couples across the country have a right to marry, with Justice Anthony M. Kennedy writing for the majority, “No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice and family. In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than once they were.” Ortiz Rivera and his husband could not be together to celebrate that union last year. On June 12, the 36-year-old was one of 49 people who died in the mass shooting at the gay nightclub Pulse. Domínguez told CNN Money his husband

came to Florida in 2007 from Dorado, Puerto Rico, for a better future after studying communications at Universidad Central de Bayamón. He worked two jobs, at Party City and Sunglass Hut. Ortiz Rivera was known for helping others and being a “shy, yet cheerful” person who liked to cook traditional Puerto Rican foods and go to theme parks in his free time, according to CNN. “My heart is torn to pieces,” his husband wrote on Facebook the day of Ortiz Rivera’s death. “Today, life has changed me completely, I lost one of the most important people in my life. Eric Ortiz, you were and will always be my angel, an angel that God put on the road for me and that I will always carry inside my heart. My dear Shaky, thank you for being part of my life, thank you for the trust, the affection you always had me, it was always mutual, I know you are in a better place. Divine justice will take care of everything … I will always carry you in my heart.” Ortiz Rivera’s sister Frances Ortiz paid tribute to her brother by getting a feather tattoo similar to one he got before his death. “This was the last tattoo [he] had done,” she wrote on Facebook. “The feather is a replica of his. The Pulse symbol for the club and the birds are there because he is flying high.” – Monivette Cordeiro

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ICYMI ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS TOBAR RODRIGUEZ

The “sanctuary community” debate comes to Orlando, a judge sides with Orlando bakery owners who refused to put gay-hating message on cake, and Publix nixes the courtesy meat slice. »

Advocates ask City of Orlando, Orange County to protect immigrant communities: In response to President Donald Trump’s recent executive order that cracks down on so-called “sanctuary” communities by taking away federal funding, advocates are asking local government officials to protect Central Florida’s immigrant community. “Sanctuary” cities, counties and campuses don’t detain undocumented immigrants for federal immigration officials. After advocates asked the Orange County Commission for a dialogue to talk about adopting similar principles, Mayor Teresa Jacobs said the federal government, not the county, must address immigration issues. Similarly, Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer gave us a bit of a runaround when asked about petitions to make the City Beautiful a “sanctuary” city. Dyer says the city will continue “not to focus on immigration enforcement” and find ways to overcome “hate, intolerance and injustice and embrace diversity, equality and fairness in Orlando and throughout the nation.”

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Cut the Cake bakery wins against customer who wanted anti-gay slogan on cake: A Florida judge found the Orlando bakery co-owned by Sharon Haller and her daughter, Cyndol Knarr, did not discriminate against potential customer Robert Mannarino for refusing to decorate a cake with the words, “Homosexuality is an abomination unto the Lord,” according to the News Service of Florida. Knarr believed Mannarino’s call to be one of the harassing phone calls they started receiving in 2015 after Arizona evangelist Joshua Feuerstein targeted the bakery in a similar way for refusing to put the phrase “We do not support gay marriage” on a cake. Administrative Law Judge J. Bruce Culpepper rejected Mannarino’s claim that the mother-daughter duo had discriminated against him for being a Christian, noting that Mannarino does not consistently go to church and displays “questionable knowledge about the Bible,” according to NSF.

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Publix deli counters will no longer offer the “courtesy slice”: To the dismay of many Floridians, the supermarket chain Publix recently nixed its tradition of automatically offering customers free slices of deli meat at the deli counter to examine the width. Customers can still get a free deli meat sample, but now they’ll have to ask for it. Publix, which says it’s trying to “naturalize” the exchange between deli clerks and customers, is now offering free “cheese of the week” samples, according to USA Today. mcordeiro@orlandoweekly.com orlandoweekly.com

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CLUBS AND CATTLE PRODS The Trump administration is coming for your right to vote Of all Donald Trump’s rogues-

wrote, “has used the awesome power of having debate anymore” – to silence the his office in a shabby attempt to intimidate senator from Massachusetts.) What makes King’s three-decadesand frighten elderly black voters. For this reprehensible conduct, he should not be ago letter so relevant isn’t just Sessions’ rewarded with a federal judgeship.” King alleged animus toward people of color was referencing a 1984 investigation into and other marginalized individuals. His alleged absentee voting fraud, in which, career in the U.S. Senate attests to that, she wrote, Sessions targeted only voters from the key role he’s played in derailing “in the Black Belt counties where blacks immigration reform to his fearmongering had finally achieved political power in the over criminal justice reform and marilocal government. Whites had been using juana decriminalization to the water he’s the absentee process to their advantage carried for the private prison industry. for years, without incident. Then, when Hell, on Friday, his second day leading Blacks, realizing its strength, began to use the Justice Department, he signaled that it with success, criminal investigations the Trump administration would reverse the Obama administration’s decision to were begun.” She continued: “Mr. Sessions’ con- include transgender individuals under duct as U.S. Attorney, from his politically Title IX anti-discrimination protections. No, what’s so chilling in King’s letmotivated voting fraud prosecutions to his indifference toward criminal viola- ter is her account of Sessions’ alleged willingness to use tions of civil rights the powers of his laws, indicates that office to make it he lacks the temmore difficult for perament, fairness SESSIONS HAS CLEARLY African-Americans and judgment to SIGNALED HIS WILLINGNESS to vote. Because be a federal judge. TO USE HIS POWERS TO now, Sessions … The irony of Mr. MAKE IT MORE DIFFICULT will control the Sessions’ nomiFOR AFRICAN-AMERICANS enforcement of the nation is that, if Voting Rights Act. confirmed, he will TO VOTE And just as imporbe given life tentant, the Trump ure for doing with administration has a federal prosecution what the local sheriffs accomplished signaled that a voting-rights crackdown is twenty years ago with clubs and cattle coming, and it’s quite likely that Sessions’ Department of Justice will be the tip of prods.” (It was Elizabeth Warren quoting the spear. On Sunday morning President Trump’s from this letter last week that moved Republican senators – including Florida’s senior adviser, 31-year-old Stephen Miller, Marco Rubio, who then had the gall to the ideologue and true Trump-believer lecture us about civility, complaining that behind the Muslim ban, went on ABC’s “we are becoming a society incapable of This Week and propagated – sans evidence,

gallery Cabinet appointments – the plainly incompetent Housing and Urban Development secretary, Ben Carson; the avarice-personified Labor nominee, Andrew Puzder; the loathsome Tom Price, who will use his perch atop the Department of Health and Human Services to help dismantle the Affordable Care Act; the positively clueless Education secretary, Betsy DeVos – the one who offends me most is the new attorney general, Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III, formerly a senator from Alabama. It’s not just the allegations of racism that have dogged Sessions for the better part of three decades, although they are worth discussing, and in a saner administration they alone would have been disqualifying. Take the time in the 1980s when Sessions, then the U.S. attorney in Mobile, “joked” to colleagues working a brutal hate crime that he thought the KKK was “OK until I found out they smoked pot.” An African-American assistant U.S. attorney general later testified that Sessions repeatedly called him “boy,” and another federal prosecutor testified that Sessions had called the NAACP “unAmerican” and said it and the ACLU had “forced civil rights down the throats of people.” Other attorneys with whom Sessions worked defended him, including some African-Americans, but in 1986, the Republican-led Senate Judiciary Committee declined to elevate him to the federal bench. As part of those hearings, Coretta Scott King, Martin Luther King Jr.’s widow, wrote an impassioned letter urging senators to reject Sessions. “Mr. Sessions,” she 8

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because there isn’t any – the president’s absurd falsehood that he’d narrowly lost New Hampshire because Democrats had bused in thousands of fake voters from neighboring Massachusetts. Then came the tell: “But I can tell you this,” Miller said, “voter fraud is a serious problem in this country. … And now we have – our government is beginning to get [set] up. But we have a Department of Justice and we have more officials. An issue of voter fraud is something we’re going to be looking at very seriously and very hard.” A few facts – real facts, not of the alternative variety – worth mentioning: First, widespread voter fraud, the kind where droves (tens of thousands, not isolated cases here and there) of voters intentionally illegally vote so as to influence the outcome of an election, is a myth. It doesn’t happen, and there’s no evidence to suggest it does. Second, the data often thrown around to support these claims – that there are millions of registered voters who are either registered in two states or dead – is not evidence of voter fraud, but rather of outdated registration systems. But ever since he took office – actually, before that, ever since Trump lost the popular vote by 3 million – this is what the president would have you believe: that voter rolls are overrun with illegal voters, that the system is rife with corruption and needs to constrained, that it’s too easy to vote, too easy for the wrong kind of people to vote. And in Sessions, Trump has just the man to lead the crackdown he so plainly desires. feedback@orlandoweekly.com @jeffreybillman on Twitter


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THE RESISTANCE WILL BE ORGANIZED Here are some tangible ways to help each other through the next four years BY MON IVETTE COR D EI R O, D EA N N A F ER R A N TE AND DAV E P LOT KI N , W I T H R EPO RTING BY RAC HEL L EBA R , N I C K W IL L S AND JESSIC A BRYC E YOU N G

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ince Jan. 20, the days in our fresh new hellscape start promptly around dawn, sometimes earlier if President Donald Trump decides he wants to tweet “FAKE NEWS” at the New York Times at 3 a.m. instead of 9 a.m. Throughout lunch, the endless onslaught continues with arguments over misleading misspeaks (also known as falsehoods), attacks on basic civil rights and debates over the word “ban,” sometimes with surprise tirades from White House counselor Kellyanne Conway and a Melissa McCarthy lookalike. By nightfall, if you’re not already numb, the lump of anxiety in your throat has crawled down to your stomach as the president releases another executive order or horribly offends another world leader. Like clockwork, the next day is just like the one before, though this time Trump might attack CNN and his executive order could be aimed at undocumented immigrants instead of Muslims. Lather, rinse and repeat. Trying to resist the gaslighting is enough to shut anyone up for the next four years, though we’re hoping you won’t. (We swear: You are not crazy; this is not normal.) To help in that effort, Orlando Weekly created an action guide to keep you grounded and busy for the rest of the Trump administration, whether it ends at the polls or in an impeachment hearing. We’ve included profiles of six local organizations that are going to need your help, listings of progressive state and national organizations for you to support, a protest guide, a list of apps and websites to assist the fight, instructions for reaching out to your representatives and books – a lot of them. There’s even a preview of a dinner honoring the cuisines of the seven nations affected by the travel ban. Sometimes it’s better to mute the noise. Get out of those Facebook fights where you’ve been called a cuck too many times to count, stop hate-scrolling Twitter all night, turn off your phone and connect with others in person. Find people who share your concerns. Support vulnerable communities. And please, don’t shut up. Resist. Persist.

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CAIR Florida teaches “Islam 101” courses for law enforcement officials, and “know your rights” workshops for civilians. They provide cultural competency training for doctors who see Muslim patients, and personal safety training at community centers. They help serve Muslim children through partnerships with organizations like Big Brothers/Big Sisters of South Florida. Rasha Mubarak, the Orlando regional coordinator for CAIR Florida, says these collaborations have grown and emboldened “the movement family” in Central Florida. Mubarak and a handful of local activist leaders organized a successful protest

inside Orlando International Airport on Jan. 29. The event made news and brought pro-immigrant demonstrators within earshot of the families of Syrian and Iranian travelers being questioned by U.S. Customs and Border Patrol. Many protesters heard about the action through online forums usually dedicated to UCF student progressive groups, Black Lives Matter and LGBTQ advocacy. “These relationships have been built over time, over being there together,” says Mubarak. “By joining one movement, you learn about other people doing great work without reinventing the wheel. None of us are free so long as any of us are oppressed.” CAIR and CAIR Florida need donations and volunteers, but Mubarak says there are other important ways for people to help. “We encourage people to donate but we also ask for support in the form of coming out to our events and inviting us to participate in your conversations, letting us now how can we provide our support at your organization or community center,” Mubarak says. “There are always volunteer opportunities like tabling with us, helping us set up new events, and making allies and connections with different interfaith groups and support groups.” Mubarak also recommends following CAIR Florida on social media, as well as following related groups like the Support Central Florida Muslim Community, Floridians Responding to Refugees and the Muslim Woman Organization. “Let us know how we can be there for you, too.” – DP

free to join: The League is nonpartisan. “What that means is that we don’t support particular parties or particular candidates,” Isaac says. “But we do take strong stands on issues, and we will call out politicians when they don’t take what we consider to be the right stand on issues.” One might wonder how, in this divisive time in our country, Democrats and Republicans can come together and agree on an issue. “In a country that is so increasingly divided politically, we are a third way,” Isaac says. “If you strip away the rhetoric, most people want the kind of thriving, inclusive community that we advocate for. So it’s a way of finding common ground.” That nonpartisan advocacy is what makes the League special: It’s a multi-issue organization with a set of positions that range from the local to the national level. In Orange County, the League advocates for improvements to the juvenile justice system, restoration of voting rights for felons, the use of natural resources, fair and affordable public transportation, gun safety, solutions to public education problems,

protecting women’s reproductive health and more. “We are fair, but we’re fierce,” Isaac says. “We’re going to study the issue. … When we take a position, we’re going to advocate it with all our might.” Asked if members are worried about the new administration in the White House, Isaac admits that the League has disagreed with some of the new president’s policies, like the recent executive order that temporarily banned immigration from seven predominately Muslim countries. “I think it’s reasonable to be worried, but I also think there has been a huge awakening of how important this is,” she says, referring to the recent rise of protests. The League welcomes anyone with a position they care about and is ready to give them the resources to fight for that issue. Isaac encourages anyone looking to get involved to join a committee, sign up for the newsletter, participate in a workshop or donate through the website. “It’s time for everybody to step up,” she says. “We need everyone to come out and advocate for their passions.” – DF

Rasha Mubarak PHOTO BY DEANNA FERRANTE

COUNCIL ON AMERICANISLAMIC RELATIONS

You already know the Council on American-Islamic Relations as the national Muslim civil liberties and advocacy group suing the Trump administration to stop what they call the “Muslim Exclusion Order.” You may not have known that our state’s chapter, CAIR Florida, supports these legal efforts by providing training to a wide range of people, and not just Muslims.

FLORIDA LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS, ORANGE COUNTY The League of Women Voters was founded right before women got the vote in 1920. The women’s suffrage movement had gone on for decades, and once founders of the organization suspected that the vote was on the horizon, they realized that this huge portion of the country needed to be educated about the voting process and the issues of the day. “That is the founding mission of the league and the mission we continue to fulfill today,” says Sara Isaac, the co-president of the Orange County chapter of the Florida League of Women Voters. Today, the league has grown to become one of the leading civic engagement organizations across the country. The chapter here in Orange County is the largest in the nation, with more than 700 members and still growing. Both men and women of any party are

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WOMEN’S RIGHTS: National Organization of Women Mission: Since 1966, NOW has worked through intersectional action to advance feminism, eliminate gender-based discrimination and promote equality in the lives of women and girls. Contact: 202-628-8669; membership@flnow.org Website: now.org Best way to help: Donate or become a member on their website.

REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS: Planned Parenthood Mission: To help people maintain the right to control their own sexual and reproductive health and empower them to make their own choices through medical services and education. Contact: Call 407-246-1788 for information on Planned Parenthood of Southwest and Central Florida. Call 800-230-7526 or email info@ myplannedparenthood.com for the national organization. Website: plannedparenthood.org/plannedparenthood-southwest-central-florida; plannedparenthood.org Best way to help: You can join the team or donate to the cause on their website.

The Center for Reproductive Rights Mission: The Center for Reproductive Rights advances and champions the idea of reproductive freedom as a human right through courts around the world. Contact: 917-637-3600; info@reprorights.org Website: reproductiverights.org Best way to help: You can donate at reproductiverights.org/about-us/donate.

National Abortion Rights Action League Mission: NARAL Pro-Choice America is made up of women and men across the country who want to protect choice and expand reproductive freedoms, such as legal abortion. Contact: 202-973-3000; CAN@ prochoiceamerica.org Website: naral.org Best way to help: Take action by becoming a member or making donations through their website.

CRISIS HELP: National Coalition Against Domestic Violence Mission: NCADV works with survivors to create zero-tolerance culture for domestic violence through public policy and education.

Contact: 303-839-1852 Website: ncadv.org Best way to help: Donate online or volunteer through their website.

Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network Mission: The nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization, RAINN assists victims in several ways, including through a 24/7 hotline, and helps prevent sexual violence through education programs. Contact: If you need help, call the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 800-656-4673 Website: rainn.org Best way to help: Get involved in different opportunities like donating and fundraising through their website.

Proyecto Somos Orlando Mission: Created in the aftermath of the Pulse massacre by the Hispanic Federation and other community members, Proyecto Somos Orlando addresses the long-term mental-health needs of the community by providing bilingual case management and crisis intervention. Contact: 407-270-0597; proyectosomosorlando@gmail.com Website: somosorlando.info Best way to help: Donate on their website and contact via email for volunteer opportunities.

LGBTQIA+ RIGHTS: GLBT Center of Central Florida Mission: The Center seeks to empower the local LGBT community by providing information, advocacy and help through support groups, counseling and clinical services like HIV testing. Contact: 407-228-8272 Website: thecenterorlando.org Best way to help: PayPal donations can be made through their website.

Equality Florida Mission: Equality Florida is the largest LGBT civil rights organization in the Sunshine State that’s dedicated to achieving equal rights for all, such as passing LGBT protections in cities and counties and a statewide non-discrimination law. Contact: 813-870-3735; info@eqfl.org Website: eqfl.org Best way to help: Join the team or donate to the cause on their website.

QLatinx Mission: Established in response to the Pulse tragedy, QLatinx creates a supportive healing space for community members directly impacted by the tragedy and elevates the Latinx voice. CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

Ann Kendrick PHOTO BY MONIVETTE CORDEIRO

HOPE COMMUNITY CENTER In the 40 years Sister Ann Kendrick has been working to support immigrant communities in Central Florida at the Hope CommUnity Center in Apopka, this is the worst it has ever been, she says. A sense of fear permeates the community. After the election, a group of about 100 kids who gather at the center reported racial slurs and bullying at their schools. Some people have already packed their suitcases as they anxiously wait to see what executive order President Donald Trump signs next after ordering a U.S.Mexico border wall and threatening to take away federal funds from sanctuary cities, among other actions. Kendrick says some children have come to the center crying, including an 8-year-old boy who was afraid his undocumented mom would be deported. “He was afraid his mother would be taken away because then who would take care of him,” Kendrick says. “People ask us what we’re going to do, and I tell them, ‘We’re doing what we always do, except the stakes are higher. We have to ratchet up.’” Kendrick, Sister Cathy Gorman and Sister Gail Grimes came to this area in the 1970s to help farmworkers and the working poor in the community. Decades later, they have set up two centers in Apopka where they provide a litany of services, including literacy classes, GED help, school tutoring, citizenship classes, youth groups and other resources for immigrant communities. orlandoweekly.com

Kendrick says now Hope CommUnity Center is working on two fronts to address what will possibly come down from the presidential administration. First, they’re teaching people to know their rights when stopped by the police, and also, they’re creating “safety and dignity” plans for undocumented immigrants. “Everybody, documented or not, is being caught up in this anti-immigrant attitude and scrutiny because some see immigrants as hostile and not adding to the fabric of our country,” she says. “We’re teaching them how to behave if you’re stopped by law enforcement, which is usually for driving without a license or can be racial profiling, and explaining to them what to say, what not to say, what can be incriminating.” The center is also helping undocumented immigrants put together “safety and dignity” plans consisting of medical records, school records, bank information, power of attorney letters, prescription information, letters from the community and other records that would be helpful to have readily at hand in case of detainment or deportation. Kendrick says community members who care can start assisting at the center by helping people put together their “safety and dignity” plans or by donating money to help a family in need. She adds that people can also help out by becoming tutors at the center and by letting the immigrant community know they have allies in the fight. “We can help by creating community,” Kendrick says. “We’re a safe place where people can come and be introduced to a bigger world. Now is the time to step up.” – MC FEB. 15-21, 2017

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VOTE WITH YOUR FEET: TIPS FOR ATTENDING AND ORGANIZING PROTESTS 1. PREPARE TO PROTEST SAFELY

Whether organizing or attending a protest, don’t do it by yourself. If possible, bring a buddy or accompany friends. Wear comfortable shoes and clothes, and avoid bringing a bag of any kind. Keep your ID and $20 cash in your pockets, along with a handkerchief or paper towel. Bring any medicines you might need (and a photocopy of your prescription if you need one). Do not wear jewelry or bring any valuables other than your cell phone. Speaking of your phone, disable the fingerprint-scanning security feature, which police can compel you to use, and instead enter a passcode that you can “forget” if your phone is seized. Sign out of your messaging apps and social media accounts. Keep your camera app on your home screen, so you can quickly take video. If you’re outdoors in the daytime, wear sunblock but rethink bringing a big water bottle with you. There might not be restrooms and you may want to keep your hands free. If you need to bring water, bring a disposable paper or (shudder) plastic bottle, not glass or something you want to keep.

2. UNDERSTAND YOUR RIGHTS WITH POLICE

Nearly all organized protests have a police presence. Though most people don’t attend protests with the intention of getting arrested, it can still happen, even to bystanders and journalists. Assuming you are not trying to get arrested, always follow police instructions on where to walk or stand. Protesting is allowed on most public property, but remaining on private property or in a designated no-protest zone can lead to handcuffs. If a police officer asks you to identify yourself, give your full name or they can arrest you. Florida is a “stop and identify” state. If you are stopped or questioned, ask if you’re free to go. If the answer is yes, walk away calmly and without responding. Don’t lie to the police or tell them anything you don’t have to. If organizers 14

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Contact: info@qlantix.org Website: qlatinx.org Best way to help: You can join their mailing list their website or just reach out to them through email.

Zebra Coalition Mission: The Zebra Coalition helps LGBTQ youth foster a sense of hope and support as they become adults. This organization provides mental health services, housing and education opportunities.

have planned for members to be arrested, encourage them to have a plan with bail money and an attorney at the ready.

3. BUILD RELATIONSHIPS TO STAY IN THE LOOP

Sign in to the protest with organizers and share contact info with other attendees. Find each other on Facebook and exchange cell numbers. Invite each other to events and organizers’ websites. Sign up to follow the organizations in this guide on social media, and accurately indicate whether you’ll be attending, in order to better help organizers prepare. Offer to volunteer and help with future actions and protests, rather than starting your own.

4. KEEP GROWING AND KEEP SHOWING UP

Learn why others are there with you. If you are not Muslim, black, transgender or otherwise a member of a vulnerable group, learn about the issues and policies affecting minorities, and how to be an effective ally. Join political campaigns, volunteering whenever possible, using the skills you are best at providing. Most candidates need a treasurer to keep track of the finances and reports. They need people who will bring them to their workplace and introduce them to the people who work there. They need sign makers and chant-starters. Seek out a campaign that is organized and able to win, but don’t expect volunteer opportunities to always be listed on their website. Offer your particular abilities, but be willing to help where needed. Avoid running for office until you have already volunteered on an organized campaign. This is the single best way to learn the basics, and it will lead you to other resources to learn about running. Learn the history of other resistance movements. Read up about non-violent direct action and civil disobedience from the ACLU and other organizations. There is comfort and clarity in recognizing cultural patterns, and it can help you find the best role for you. – DP

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Contact: 407-228-1446; info@zebrayouth.org Website: zebrayouth.org Best way to help: You can fill out an application to volunteer on their website, where you can also donate to the cause.

Two Spirit Health Services Mission: Two Spirit creates a place where LGBTQ can receive medical care that includes mental health care, substance abuse care and health care specific to transgender people. The employees at Two Spirit strive to understand the unique needs of LGBTQ patients. Contact: 407-487-9868; info@twospirithealth.org Website: twospirithealth.org Best way to help: Learn more about the services provided by the center on their website, where you can also donate to help their cause.

Human Rights Campaign Mission: As the largest civil rights organization for LGBTQ Americans, HRC focuses on ending discrimination and ensuring LGBTQ people are treated equally. Contact: Questions and comments can be forwarded to feedback@hrc.org Website: hrc.org Best way to help: You can donate to their cause on their website.

Miracle of Love Mission: Miracle of Love provides comprehensive HIV/AIDS care and education in the Central Florida area. Contact: 407-843-1760; info@miracleofloveinc.org Website: miracleofloveinc.org Best way to help: You can donate directly to the website or you can send a check to Miracle of Love Inc. Attn: Accounting Dept., 741 W. Colonial Drive, Orlando, FL 32804.

Sylvia Rivera Law Project Mission: Inspired by the civil rights legend who helped lead the 1969 Stonewall uprising, the Sylvia Rivera Law Project works to protect transgender, intersex and other gender non-conforming people from harassment and violence.

Contact: 212-337-8550, info@srlp.org Website: srlp.org Best way to help: Become a member or donate through their website.

IMMIGRANT RIGHTS: The National Immigration Law Center Mission: NILC legally defends the rights of lowincome immigrants and their families to open the world of opportunity to everyone, regardless of race, religion, gender or immigration status. Contact: 213-639-3900; info@nilc.org Website: nilc.org Best way to help: You can volunteer by emailing volunteer@nilc.org or donate through their website.

Hope CommUnity Center Mission: HCC works with Central Florida’s immigrant communities to empower them by advancing education and providing services to the working poor. Contact: 407-880-4673 Website: hcc-offm.org Best way to help: You can sign up to help out or donate to the group on their website.

Florida Immigrant Coalition Mission: A Florida-based organization made up of unions, community members, farmworkers and other advocates to advance fair conditions for immigrants’ families. Contact: 305-571-7254; info@floridaimmigrant.org Website: floridaimmigrant.org Best way to help: You can both sign up to volunteer and donate on their website.

Coalition of Immokalee Workers Mission: CIW is a human rights organization created by the farmworker community of Immokalee, Florida. They specialize in ending human trafficking and genderbased violence in the workplace. Contact: 239-657-8311, workers@ciw-online.org Website: ciw-online.org Best way to help: Make a monthly recurring or one-time donation through their website.

RACIAL JUSTICE: Dream Defenders Mission: Created after the death of Trayvon Martin, the Dream Defenders are a group of students and other young people that seek to lift communities of color through the power of organizing. CONTINUED ON PAGE 17


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ten several articles on how to create a personal but flexible script for talking to your representatives (or, more likely, their staff ); check out her pieces at theslot. jezebel.com and lennyletter.com. Following @RoguePOTUSstaff on Twitter for insider leaks is amusing, but the list they’ve put together at potusstaff. com/resistance.html is a gold mine of national rallies, protests and actions. Plan your next vacation around one!

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Parramore Kidz Zone Contact: dreamdefendersorl@gmail.com Website: dreamdefenders.org Best way to help: You can sign up to volunteer or donate to the group on their website.

Campaign Zero

Mission: Created by the City of Orlando, the Parramore Kidz Zone tries to create a “level playing field” for children in Orlando’s historic Parramore community by reducing juvenile crime, teen pregnancies and school dropouts.

Mission: Campaign Zero seeks to hold police accountable by tracking policeinvolved deaths and changing policies to improve relationships between law enforcement and communities of color.

Contact: For more information, email Adamaris. Ramirez@cityoforlando.net Website: cityoforlando.net/parramorekidzzone Best way to help: Donate through PayPal.

Contact: feedback@joincampaignzero.org Website: joincampaignzero.org Best way to help: Donate or get involved through their website.

Mission: Based in several states, including Florida, Mi Familia Vota is a national civic engagement organization advocating for issues that impact the Latino community, especially immigrants and workers.

National Action News Network Mission: Founded by the Rev. Al Sharpton, the National Action Network is a leading civil rights organization committed to criminal justice, voter protection and antiviolence for all people regardless of race, religion, nationality and other factors. Contact: 212-690-3070; crisis@ nationalactionnetwork.net Website: nationalactionnetwork.net Best way to help: Become a member or donate through their website.

Black Youth Project Mission: Launched in 2004, the Black Youth Project examines the lives of African American youth and creates an online resource for this demographic that empowers them. Contact: 773-834-1706, info@blackyouthproject.com Website: blackyouthproject.com Best way to help: You can donate to their effort on their website and you can join their email list on Facebook.

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Mission: For more than a century, the NAACP has worked to ensure the equal political, educational, social and economic rights for everyone and to eliminate discrimination based on race. Contact: 407-969-1549, unit5120@naacpnet.org Website: naacp.org Best way to help: Donate or become a member on their website.

Black Orlando United Mission: Black Orlando United works to unite black communities with local business and organizations in Orlando to end violence and highlight the accomplishments of the community. Contact: Contact through their website Website: blackorlandounited.com Best way to help: Find donation and volunteer opportunities through their website.

Mi Familia Vota

Contact: info@mifamiliavota.org Website: mifamiliavota.org Best way to help: Find volunteering opportunities in Florida on their website.

National Council of La Raza Mission: As the largest national Hispanic civil rights organization in the United States, NCLR works to advance opportunities for Latinos. Contact: 202-785-1670, info@nclr.org Website: nclr.org Best way to help: Donate on their website.

Black Lives Matter Mission: While not representative of the entire “Black Lives Matter” movement, the Black Lives Matter national organization has chapters across the U.S. that work to improve the lives of black people. Contact: blacklivesmatter.com/contact Website: blacklivesmatter.com Best way to help: Donate through their website.

CIVIL LIBERTIES/ HUMAN RIGHTS: Council on American-Islamic Relations/CAIR-Florida Mission: CAIR is the leading civil rights organization for Muslim Americans in the United States. CAIR dedicates itself to defending the civil liberties of Muslims and non-Muslims and promoting a better understanding of Islam. Contact: Local number is 813-514-1414. Contact national at info@fl.cair.org or 202-488-8787 Website: cairflorida.org; cair.com Best way to help: Their upcoming events as well as a link to donate can be found on their website.

Anti-Defamation League Mission: The ADL was founded to “stop the defamation of the Jewish people and to secure justice and fair treatment to all.”

IS YOUR SMARTPHONE READY FOR RESISTANCE?

INSTALL AND USE THE SIGNAL APP Android and iPhone users both need Signal, an app that end-to-end encrypts messages. No one else, not your phone company or Signal itself, can read or store your messages. Police and snoops can use “stingray” devices that mimic real cell towers, intercepting unencrypted messages.

The tech world responded to the election and the actions of the Trump administration with an explosion of helpful apps and websites. Find the ones that work best for you, but also remember, if you are participating in direct action, to lock down your own personal web presence and devices. LET YOUR PHONE HELP YOU TAKE ACTION Just go to callyourrep.co, enter your email, and get a savable list of your Congressional representatives’ phone numbers. Text the word DAILY to the number 228466 and enter your ZIP code to get on the Daily Action alert list. You’ll get a text message every weekday about an issue Daily Action considers urgent based on your address. Tap the phone number in the text to hear a short recording about that day’s issue, and then the app will automatically route you to your senator’s phone. We’ve stressed throughout that faceto-face or phone calls are best, but we like the information aspects of Countable. The app gives you an overview of the bills your representatives are currently debating and can also auto-send emails telling them which way you’d like their vote to go. USE YOUR PHONE TO STAY INFORMED Follow @TownHallProject on Twitter and find your reps’ public appearances; face-to-face contact is the most effective form of communication. This progressive, volunteer-driven initiative could use your help in collating information, if you can give it. Shannon Coulter spearheads the #GrabYourWallet campaign to boycott retailers who carry Trump brands. Her highest-profile victory so far may be Nordstrom dropping the Ivanka Trump apparel line. Afraid you’re going to freeze up on the phone? Emily Ellsworth has writ-

TWO-STEP AUTHENTICATE YOUR EMAIL, CALENDAR, AND SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS If you don’t know what this is, Google it and set it up on all of your accounts that use a password to log in. It’s an essential for Gmail and Facebook, and sends a text if anyone else is trying to get in. LOCK IT WITH A PASSCODE, NOT YOUR FINGERPRINT Police can compel you to use your fingerprint to unlock, but a passcode can be conveniently “forgotten.” Since a court ruling in 2011*, you only need a smartphone video camera – and not a press pass – to functionally become a protected member of the press. It is legal to record police in a public place, as long as you are not otherwise doing anything illegal. Police can, however, still arrest you. BE READY TO RECORD AND REPORT The ACLU has not yet rolled out a Florida version of their Mobile Justice app (find it at mobilejusticeca.org), but you can still use it to enable instant video recording with a physical button on your phone. The app uploads videos to the California ACLU, so they are not lost even if deleted from your device. USE “AIRPLANE MODE” AT PROTESTS; TURN OFF GPS AND WIFI You may need to take pictures and video at a demonstration, but texting, using social media or playing Pokemon GO will needlessly expose your device to police interference. If you are planning to live-stream or upload video, use a different device than your personal phone. * U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit in Boston, August 2011: “The news-gathering protections of the First Amendment cannot turn on professional credentials or status.”

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Primarily, this organization combats antiSemitism and protects civil rights. Contact: Florida number is 561-988-2900. Contact national at 212-885-7700 Website: florida.adl.org; adl.org Best way to help: Call 866-386-3235 to donate by phone or donate online.

American Civil Liberties Union

Heather Wilkie PHOTO BY DEANNA FERRANTE

ZEBRA COALITION Even though the LGBT community only makes up between 10 and 12 percent of the U.S. population, LGBT youth account for 42 percent of all of the country’s homeless teenagers and young adults. In layman’s terms, LGBT youth are much more likely to end up on the street than other people in their age group. But here in Orlando, unlike in a lot of other cities, a network of organizations is working to stop this epidemic. The Zebra Coalition is made up of nearly 30 Central Florida social service providers, government agencies, schools, colleges and universities that provide resources for local LGBT youth between 13 and 24 years old. Heather Wilkie, the director of the coalition, says that the network’s main mission is working to create safe spaces for these young people. What is a safe space? “It’s an ability to connect with your peers and to have a commonality in order to connect,” Wilkie says. “Sometimes that’s a physical space … sometimes it’s having the support of a group.” Essentially, these organizations are working to create an atmosphere where young people, many of whom face discrimination and rejection on a daily basis, feel comfortable enough to be themselves. This is funded by donations, partnerships, fundraisers events and government grants. Currently, the coalition has three government grants that help support staff and services like mental health and substance abuse counseling. The coalition can house seven homeless young people in one family-style home and in one apartment at any given time. It recently unveiled a new rapid rehousing program that uses government 18

money to quickly move homeless youth from the coalition’s accommodations into their own new homes. The program helps them pay for rent and other needs until they can become self-sufficient. Last year, they housed 17 young adults, but with the addition of the rapid rehousing program, that number is sure to increase. The coalition also has a drop-in center on North Mills Avenue, another safe space where students can come to receive mental health counseling, meet with case managers and celebrate milestones with friends. The drop-in center is also home to workshops and meet-ups, and Wilkie encourages anyone with a talent or professional skill to help. Anyone can volunteer to teach a workshop. In the past, community members have taught classes on résumé writing, interview skills, smoothie making and cooking. Volunteers are always needed at fundraisers and events like Come Out With Pride. All it takes is filling out a form on the coalition’s website, although all volunteers must go through a vetting process. If you’re not into the hands-on approach, Wilkie says that donations are readily accepted. The coalition even has an Amazon wish list on its website from which one can directly send whatever is needed with a few clicks of a mouse. Every little bit, from cleaning supplies to gift cards, goes to enriching the lives of these young people, a group rocked by devastating hate last year – the Pulse massacre where 49 people, many in this age group, were killed. “It’s very important for our community to have youth-supportive programs where we provide safe spaces for LGBT youth,” Wilkie says. “It’s never been more important, considering what happened on June 12, that we send these youth a message that they are supported.” – DF

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Mission: The ACLU works through the court system to defend civil and individual liberties that are guaranteed under the U.S. Constitution. The ACLU has chapters in all 50 states, including Florida. Contact: You can request help from the ACLU of Florida at aclufl.org/get-help or call 786-363-2700 Website: aclufl.org; aclu.org Best way to help: You can join the team on the Orlando chapter’s website or donate to the cause online.

Southern Poverty Law Center Mission: The SPLC uses the law and education to battle against hate and discrimination aimed at marginalized communities. “The SPLC works toward the day when the ideals of social justice and equal opportunity will become a reality,” according to their website. Contact: 334-956-8200; webcontact@splcenter.org Website: splcenter.org Best way to help: You can donate to their cause by calling 888-414-7752 or by mailing your donation to 400 Washington Ave. Montgomery, AL 36105.

Brennan Center for Justice Mission: This nonpartisan law and policy institute based out of New York University School of Law works to improve the system by holding institutions of power accountable on issues such as voting rights and campaign finance reform. Contact: 646-292-8310; brennancenter@nyu.edu Website: brennancenter.org Best way to help: Donations can be made through their website.

Amnesty International Mission: Amnesty International fights discrimination and injustice around the world. This organization monitors the state of human rights in more than 150 countries. Contact: 212-807-8400; aimember@aiusa.org Website: amnestyusa.org Best way to help: Sign up, donate or take action through their website.

First Amendment Foundation Mission: Based in Florida, the First Amendment Foundation provides information and help to the public and the media regarding free speech, free press and the state’s Sunshine laws. Contact: Toll-free hotline at 800-337-3518 or call 850-222-3518 Website: floridafaf.org Best way to help: Donate at floridafaf. networkforgood.com.

Florida Rights Restoration Coalition Mission: The FRRC is a coalition of 70 organizations that seek to restore the right to vote to ex-felons in Florida that have been released, which affects about 1.6 million residents in the state. Contact: info.frrc@gmail.com Website: facebook.com/florida-rightsrestoration-coalition-307943569254319/ Best way to help: Contact them via email for more information.

Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund Mission: DREDF is a civil rights law and policy center run by people with disabilities that advance the human rights of disabled people. Contact: 510-644-2555, info@dredf.org Website: dredf.org Best way to help: Donate on their website through Square, PayPal, by mail or through other forms.

ORGANIZERS: The League of Women Voters of Florida Mission: A nonpartisan political organization, the League of Women Voters of Florida is engaged in activism on several fronts in Florida, including the battle to make congressional districts fairer. The League is currently heading the Florida Coalition to Prevent Gun Violence in an effort to reduce gun crimes and death. Contact: 850-224-2545; lwvfexecutivedirector@ gmail.com Website: thefloridavoter.org Best way to help: You can join the group or donate to the cause on their website.

Organize Florida Mission: Organize Florida, formerly known as the Orlando-based Organize Now group, is an organization of community members dedicated to the issues of social justice for an “equal and fair Florida for all.” Contact: 407-956-0997; organizer@ organizeflorida.org Website: orgfl.org


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HOW TO CONTACT YOUR REPRESENTATIVES

Don’t despair about not having any influence over national political decisions. The truth is, you often do.

1. CONTACT THEM ALL, ESPECIALLY YOUR LOCAL LEADERS. The U.S. Constitution gives ultimate authority to federal laws, but the federal government relies heavily on local policies and law enforcement officials to get things done. While huge portions of the federal government may seem out of reach to most voters, your elected officials and local leaders can be surprisingly accessible. The offices of your U.S. Congress members and Senators are often the first point of contact. But do not limit yourself to the highest offices, especially if you feel lost in the crowd. State governments handle the majority of issues most relevant to you, within each jurisdiction. Even your county and city leaders can take a stand on national issues, especially civil rights and immigration protections.

2. INTERACT WITH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS AND THEIR STAFF AS YOU WOULD WITH YOUR OWN BANK . A great rule of thumb for contacting your legislator is to treat your elected officials and their staff as you would with the staff of your own local bank. They are going to remember you, and staying positive works to your advantage. This makes more sense the more you think about it. First and foremost, get to know their names and treat them with politeness and respect, especially if you reach an intern. Introduce yourself when you call or visit and ask how they are. It is easy to establish a relationship, even if you only call their office a few times a year. Planned Parenthood’s senior director of public affairs, Anna Eskamani, says the most effective way of reaching out to elected officials is through in-person contact. “If available, personal meetings are always the best, and that includes their staff. Don’t wait until there’s an issue you are reacting to. Try to get to know them while they’re in the district to start to 20

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build the relationship. Then, when you make that call they will know you,” says Eskamani. “This moves it away from transactionalism and into a meaningful relationship.” As with your bank account, watch the activity coming from that official’s office, and call if you spot something you don’t like or understand. Call every time you spot an error, and let them know how you feel about it. Just as you can switch banks if they won’t reverse an error or they enforce a policy you don’t like, if a politician won’t change their decision, you can work to replace them. Be sure to call and thank officials when they do something you support, especially if they take a brave stand on politically contentious issues.

3. CONTACT THEM IN WAYS THAT COUNT. Phone calls are a great method of contact because you can program officials’ numbers into your phone and call about different issues. Staffers note the numbers of calls for and against policy, and offices feel the heat when an issue gets the phones ringing. Be brief on the phone and only request a response if you really need one. Reference the specific nominee or bill number you are calling about. Remember that your comments become public record as soon as you say or send them. Comport yourself as if everyone will be able to read or hear your words. Your voting history and campaign-donation history are also public record, and some elected officials will check to see if you are a constituent and a “super-voter.” Emails are usually read at the local level, but not reliably by federal representatives. If you email rather than calling, use your own words and do not use an automated message or form letter. Staff members virtually disregard these, unless they are part of a massive coordinated effort. Whenever possible, send a personal letter. “People are surprised to get a mailed, written letter, and the odds of them opening and reading it are pretty high,” says Eskamani. – DP


METHODS OF CONTACT Quick actions 1. Call their office 2. Mail a letter to their office 3. Email an original note 4. Tweet or tag them in a post 5. Sign up for legislative alerts from the Florida House and Senate, and like and follow the Facebook pages of activist organizations you care about. Legislative alerts: • Florida Senate Tracker: flsenate. gov/tracker • Florida House Tracker: myfloridahouse.gov/sections/ myhouse/login.aspx Facebook pages: • American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) • Floridians Responding to Refugees • Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR) Florida • Muslim Women’s Organization Orlando • Black Lives Matter • Central Florida Jobs With Justice • Equality Florida • Organize Florida Long-term actions 1. Schedule an appointment with the official or their staff, and invite local officials to community gatherings. Begin by inviting a Soil and Water District Supervisor to coffee. 2. Form relationships with that official and their staff through regular, courteous contact. Introduce yourself at public gatherings and follow up with an email. 3. Attend public meetings and speak about issues that move you. Be brief, bring business cards, and prepare to answer questions from officials or audience members. 4. Apply to join a county or city public advisory board, and contact your representative there to discuss your application. 5. Support candidates for office by volunteering, donating to them early, and introducing them to everyone you know. 6. After researching your local issues and districts, run for office yourself.

LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT

Keep a list on the fridge or in your phone of who represents you at every level.

The White House

Plan to buy a postage stamp. Your calls and emails may not reach anyone for a while. • Phone, official comments: 202-456-1111 • Phone, official switchboard: 202-456-1414 • Phone, unofficial White House Inc.: whitehouseinc.org • Mail: The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20500

What to contact them about: Trump’s cabinet nominees and U.S. Supreme Court nominees, responses to Trump’s executive orders and provocations, requests that the president disclose his full tax records and divest of his business holdings.

U.S. Senate

Capitol Hill Switchboard: 800-839-5276 Sen. Bill Nelson (Democrat) Nelson is running for re-election in 2018. Phone: 202-224-5274 Mail: 716 Hart Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510 Sen. Marco Rubio (Republican) Rubio just won re-election to the Senate, following his failed presidential bid. Phone: 202-224-3041 Mail: 284 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510 What to contact them about: Bills filed in the Senate, Trump’s cabinet and U.S. Supreme Court nominees, responses to Trump’s executive orders and provocations, votes in their assigned committees, stopping the Obamacare repeal, advocating for minorities and those affected most by federal policy.

U.S. Congress

Capitol Hill Switchboard: 800-839-5276 • • • •

U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan 7th District, U.S. Rep. Stephanie Murphy (D-Winter Park) 8th District, U.S. Rep. Bill Posey (R-Rockledge) 9th District, U.S. Rep. Darren Soto (D-Orlando)

responses to Trump’s executive orders and provocations, votes in their assigned committees, stopping the Obamacare repeal, all federal policy.

10th District, U.S. Rep. Val Demings (D-Orlando) 11th District, U.S. Rep. Daniel Webster (R-Lake County)

What to contact them about: Bills filed in Congress, responses to Trump’s executive orders and provocations, votes in their assigned committees, stopping the Obamacare repeal, all federal policy, advocating for minorities and those affected most by federal policy.

County Mayors and County Commissioners Find yours at: • • •

Florida Governor and Cabinet

Orange County: orangecountyfl.net Seminole County: seminolecountyfl.gov Osceola County: osceola.org

What to contact them about: Issues within the county, including taxation, property rights and zoning, civil rights and equality issues, wages and labor issues, district-specific issues, advocating for county issues happening in state government, environmental concerns, seeking support on legislation, touring government facilities.

Rick Scott is term-limited as governor and is rumored to be challenging Sen. Bill Nelson in 2018 for his Senate seat. Bondi and Putnam are possible candidates for governor. Governor Rick Scott Phone: 850-488-7146 Mail: Office of the Governor, The Capitol, 400 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001

School Board Chair and Members

Attorney General Pam Bondi Phone: 850-414-3300 Mail: The Capitol, Tallahassee, FL 32399-1050

Find names at: • •

Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam Phone: 850-617-7700 Mail: The Capitol, PL-10, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0800

Orange County: ocps.net/sb Seminole County: scps.k12.fl.us/ district/school-board Osceola County: osceolaschools. net/leadership/school_board

What to contact them about: Maintenance and replacement of school facilities, setting curriculum, school rule policies, budgeting, employment of superintendent, teachers union and collective bargaining agreements.

Florida Senate

Senate President Joe Negron Phone: 850-487-5229 Mail: 404 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100 Official email: go to flsenate.gov/offices/ president and fill in form

City Mayors and City Commissioners

Find yours at: myflorida.com/cities What to contact them about: Issues within the city, including taxation, property rights and zoning, civil rights and equality issues, wages and labor issues.

Florida House of Representatives

Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran (R-Land O’ Lakes) Phone: 850-717-5037 Mail: 420 The Capitol, 402 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399-1300 Official email: richard.corcoran@ myfloridahouse.gov The Orange County Supervisor of Elections website lets county residents look up every one of their government officials: ocfelections.com/voter_ lookup/voterlookup.aspx What to contact them about: Bills filed in the Florida Legislature,

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PLANNED PARENTHOOD OF SOUTHWEST AND CENTRAL FLORIDA Most American women have grievances about the new president, but few issues are as personal as Trump’s and Vice President Pence’s stated intentions to obstruct women’s access to basic healthcare and safe, legal abortions. On Jan. 23, Trump signed an executive action reinstating the so-called “Mexico City Policy,” which cuts U.S. government funding to international non-governmental organizations that perform or discuss abortions. The American Civil Liberties Union reports 238 abortion restrictions have been imposed at the state level since 2010, with 50 happening last year alone. Our own local Planned Parenthood of Southwest and Central Florida refuses to cede any ground in this latest national battle, steadfastly providing women and men with reproductive health services, education, and screenings. “Planned Parenthood is working in health centers, in state capitols, and out on the streets on behalf of reproductive health and rights,” says Anna Eskamani, senior director of public affairs and communications for Planned Parenthood of Southwest and Central Florida. PP-SWCF began operations in 1966, an affiliate of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., which now has 22 health centers in Florida. Eskamani began in April 2012, and has become a local icon of reproductive rights advocacy, an increasingly significant part of their mission. She says there are many different ways to volunteer for Planned Parenthood, including event volunteering on April 29, when the group’s Generations Gala: Orlando fundraiser will feature speakers Dahlia Lithwick of Newsweek and Slate, and Sonya Renee Taylor, founder of The Body Is Not an Apology movement. Besides helping at events, volunteers may escort patients at health centers, perform community outreach like tabling or writing letters to legislators, or help at the office. College students can get involved through Vox, Voices for Planned Parenthood, on campus. Faith leaders and congregants who support choice can join the Interfaith Coalition for Planned Parenthood. Planned Parenthood is also looking for some lobbying help in the form of “a new generation of leaders in the civic and legislative process.” The vast majority of Americans side with personal privacy and choice, but they aren’t always the voters calling legislators. “When the legislative session is unfolding, pay attention and write and call them. That is something that almost everyone can do,” says Eskamani. “You don’t have to leave the house. Know your legislators and know who your state reps and senators are, not just in Congress. Sign up for a Google alert for their names, so you’re the first to see it. Remember, this is a relationship.” – DP 22

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Best way to help: You can both sign up to join and donate on their website.

Valencia College Peace and Justice Institute Mission: The Peace and Justice Institute promotes harmonious values for all and seeks to engage in conversation that teach people about each other with respect. Contact: 407-582-2291; rallen@ valenciacollege.edu Website: valenciacollege.edu/pji Best way to help: Attend their events for community outreach that can be found on their Facebook page at facebook. com/valenciapeaceandjustice

Central Florida Jobs With Justice Mission: A coalition of working people, unions, community organizations and students, Central Florida Jobs With Justice works to build power in these communities. Contact: 407-451-2472 Website: cfjwj.org Best way to help: You can join the team or donate to the cause on their website.

ENVIRONMENTAL ADVOCATES: Speak Up Wekiva Mission: Speak Up Wekiva was formed to protect and conserve Wekiva River and the lands and wildlife that surround it in Central Florida. Contact: 407-399-3228 Website: speakupwekiva.com Best way to help: Join their Facebook group to stay informed and updated about Central Florida environmental issues at facebook.com/speakupwekiva

Sierra Club Mission: The Florida chapter of the Sierra Club has a mission to protect the natural parts of the Sunshine State and show others how to responsibly treat and use Florida’s fragile environment. Contact: Reach the Florida chapter by calling 727-824-8813 or by emailing frank. jackalone@sierraclub.org Website: sierraclub.org/florida Best way to help: Donate or take action by becoming a member through their website. n


Elliana Dix, Denise Diaz and Jonathan Alingo PHOTO BY MONIVETTE CORDEIRO

CENTRAL FLORIDA JOBS WITH JUSTICE The labor movement has always been a key part of the resistance in America, says Denise Díaz, and right now, organizers are preparing for a full-on attack if a fast-food chain executive takes over the federal Department of Labor. Díaz is the executive director of Central Florida Jobs With Justice, a coalition of labor unions, community organizations, students, faith-based groups and workers that strives to build power for working people through several campaigns, such as raising wages or protecting collective bargaining. Díaz says sometimes it involves supporting farmworkers and organizing airport baggage handlers to vote on a union, while other times it’s sending delegations to a work site. Right now, though, organizers are preparing their response to Trump’s nominee for labor secretary: Andrew Puzder, the CEO of CKE Restaurants, which runs the Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s chains. The millionaire opposes several worker protections, such as expanding overtime pay, and has complained about raising the minimum wage. “Florida is already a right-to-work state, so the little protections workers have on the federal level, like discrimi-

nation protections, we’re afraid will go away,” she says. “People are not really sounding alarms for worker’s rights, I think because people live it every day. But I think we’re going to start seeing a lot of workers organizing and learning their rights.” Central Florida Jobs with Justice is just the place to do that, Díaz says. With a team of two other people, Díaz is trying to make sure workers know their rights and teaching activists to become organizers. “Right now we’re in crisis mode,” she says. “We see emerging activists at protests, and I think we need to turn those people into organizers who can build power. You went to a protest; now how do you become someone who can lead a meeting and lead others in a protest?” Currently, the organization is looking for volunteers to participate in actions, phone banks and protests. Central Florida Jobs With Justice also provides organizer trainings to its members, Díaz says. “The labor movement is the resistance that keeps capital and corporations in check,” she says. “Now we’re seeing corporations in a place where profit comes before people. I think everyone has a stake in the labor movement being stronger, and it’s been rolled back so much that we really have to do what we can to keep it intact.” – MC orlandoweekly.com

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READING IS FUNDAMENTAL Books to inspire you during these hard times BY LO R R A I N E B E R RY

L

ike a lot of writers I know, the first month after the election of Donald Trump was spent trying to dig myself out of the abyss into which I had fallen. For me, one of the ways to get inspired to resist an administration that wants to set back the progress of several decades, and which threatens our constitutional rights, is to do something that the President has told us several times he doesn’t do: read books. I’ve put together a list of books that gave me, both at the original time I read them and in these uncertain times, a boost to my sense that all is not hopeless. Reading is not direct action, but reading is inspiration, and inspiration gets me up out of my chair. Obviously, none of these books were written as a direct result of the Trump election, but the stories they tell reveal the various ways in which human beings resist oppression. May they provide you with pathways out of the depressive funk in which the current regime would prefer we remain for the next four years.

NOVELS Daughters of the North by Sarah Hall

An army of women hides in the north of England. Its members are all escapees from “urban centers” where women have been forced to go. All women have been fitted with devices that prevent them from conceiving; only those lucky enough to win a lottery are allowed to have children, the government’s reaction to an environmental crisis that has made life on the island difficult. The sanctuary provides women with reproductive freedom, but as the government launches a campaign to round up the sanctuary members, each member must decide whether she is willing to fight in order to hold onto her freedom.

The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver

Kingsolver has written a number of books that fit this category, but in The Lacuna, she places her character, Harrison Shepherd, in the household of Mexican artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. The two radical artists had a friendship with exile Leon Trotsky, who had split with Stalin over the direction of the Russian Revolution. The book’s action moves to America, where Shepherd witnesses the unions’ struggle for power in the 1930s.

Bartleby the Scrivener by Herman Melville Yes. That book you vaguely remember having read in high school actually has a message of resistance. Bartleby works as a scrivener, or copyist, for a New York attorney. His one act of resistance – “I prefer not to” – leads to a series of events that results in Bartleby’s imprisonment. One of the ultimate stories of the individual’s right to determine their own fate. 24

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My Year of Meats by Ruth Ozeki

A funny, sexy story that takes place in both the United States and Japan. A housewife is ordered to prepare meat dishes each night for dinner by her husband. He works for an American company that imports beef into Japan. At the same time, Jane works as a producer for a Japanese television show that is sponsored by the same meat-exporting business. Both women stage protests that cause international ramifications.

Half a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

The Biafran Civil War in Nigeria claimed a million lives between 1967-1970. This book, which was awarded the “Best of the Best” by the Women’s Prize for Fiction (formerly known as the Bailey’s Prize) follows the stories of five characters as it explores the themes of identity and women’s agency during times of crisis. One of the best novels that I’ve ever read.


Hope in the Dark and Mother of All Questions by Rebecca Solnit

Rebecca Solnit has been speaking truth to power for decades, but it was Hope in the Dark that sold out in the days following Trump’s election. Rather than allowing anyone to wallow in sadness, Solnit insists that hope is not naive optimism. Hope is “not a substitute for action, only a basis for it.” Out in March, her newest book, Mother of All Questions, further challenges those who want to use defeat as an opportunity to lapse into silence. She is especially critical of male silence, which she argues is the price exacted from them for their participation in patriarchy and rape culture.

The John Carlos Story as told to Dave Zirin

The photo of John Carlos on the Olympic Medal stand is one of the most iconic images of the ’60s. In 1968, he and Tommie Smith stood with their arms raised in a Black Power salute during the playing of the American anthem. Before Colin Kaepernick’s protests, there was John Carlos (Carlos and Kaepernick are great admirers of each other). The action had lifelong repercussions for Carlos, but he has spent his life dedicated to helping children reach their potential. It’s something to read if you’re still bummed about Trump supporters Tom Brady and Bill Belichick’s surprise victory on Super Bowl Sunday.

to men, whom she sees trapped in a “small, hard cage” of masculinity that keeps them from accessing their full humanity.

COLORING BOOKS Girls Are Not Chicks Coloring Book by Jacinta Bunnell and Julie Novak

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead

Whitehead won the 2016 National Book Award for this novel, which plays with the history of slavery in the United States. In addition to making the underground railroad into a literal series of train stations, Whitehead imagines an America where “states’ rights” has prevailed and each state has determined whether to hold onto slavery. The book is a subversive response to states’ rights activists who argue that state governments are superior to federal governance.

Sometimes the Spoon Runs Away With Another Spoon Coloring Book by Jacinta Bunnell and Nathaniel Kusinitz

Living My Life by Emma Goldman

Prior to the Iranian Revolution of 1979, Satrapi and her family lived a middle-class existence in a modern Iran. After the revolution, Marjane found ways to resist being told what music she could listen to or which books she could read. In this graphic novel, adolescent rebellion combines with nascent political awareness to create a new feminist heroine.

The most dangerous woman in America was stripped of her American citizenship and deported from this country in 1919. Her crime? Speaking out against the draft during World War I. Goldman served two years, from 1917 to 1919, and was then sent to Russia, where she discovered that the Bolshevik Revolution was a betrayal of the workers it claimed to represent. Goldman was a proponent of family planning, an opponent of marriage and a prolific writer. Living My Life is her fascinating autobiography.

Refuge by Terry Tempest Williams

We Gon’ Be Alright by Jeff Chang

NONFICTION Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

During one year, Williams, a naturalist, watched the Great Salt Lake flood and threaten to destroy the delicate plant life and birds that nest on its shore. At the same time, both her mother and grandmother were diagnosed with reproductive cancers. The events appear disconnected; by the end of the book, Williams has shown how we’re all tied to one another in the web of life.

Chang looks at the self-inflicted problems of this century – re-segregation and gentrification – and provides a primer on how these changes occurred, along with creative solutions to the problems he sees. He also looks at Ferguson and Black Lives Matter, and at his own life as an Asian-American man, an “in-between” minority.

The Fire This Time edited by Jesmyn Ward

In 1963, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his nephew that he titled The Fire Next Time. After the murder of Trayvon Martin, black writers contributed essays to this collection, talking about what has and hasn’t changed in the 50-plus years since Baldwin’s letter. Ward, whose own work as both a memoirist and a novelist is devastating, edited the collection, which includes work by some of the greatest writers working in America today.

If all this rebellious reading has got you stressed out at the end of the day, don’t worry: You can participate in a nice, stressrelieving activity like coloring and still find inspiration to fight the power. Wind down at the end of the day by coloring in images of subversive figures who don’t conform to the dominant gender narrative! Enjoy hours of fun with these books that feature feisty girls, sensitive boys, and princesses who are not interested in letting down their hair so they can be used as human ladders. Smash the patriarchy with your colored pencil. arts@orlandoweekly.com

We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

In addition to her award-winning fiction, Adichie has become one of the voices of feminism, and this book was adapted from a TED talk that she delivered. Notably, the book was distributed to every 16-year old in Sweden. Adichie doesn’t just address herself to a female audience, but also talks orlandoweekly.com

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BY SETH KUBERSKY MICHAEL WINSLOW | PHOTO BY C.A. BRIDGES

Over the past few years, the

performing arts center at Valencia College’s east campus has served as a Chicago nightclub, a Times Square dance hall and a 19th-century German school; this weekend it becomes a Gramercy Park apartment for the stage version of The Seven Year Itch. But last week, for one night only, the venue was repurposed as a comedy club, allowing students and the public a rare opportunity to see a comedy icon test out brand-new material. Michael Winslow, the sound effectspewing star of 1980s classics like Police Academy, Gremlins and Spaceballs, was a staple of my childhood VCR. And as his recent free performance at Valencia demonstrated, there’s much more to this Central Florida resident than just a repertoire of wacky noises.

AUDITORY ABSURDITY

As befits every big-name star, Winslow shared the stage with a pair of opening acts recruited from the ranks of local colleges, who warmed up the crowd with evidence that the art of stand-up is still alive and well among the up-and-coming generation. First, UCF “super-senior” Sean Philippe spun salacious yarns about ’shroom-addled dogs and armed infants with the cocky attitude of a young Chris Rock; he was followed by Valencia student Hannibal Callens, who harnessed his wildly theatrical physicality and command of dialects to deliver beat poetry one-liners with a political punch. The evening’s headliner was welcomed with a cleverly edited video montage that turned four decades of Winslow’s most recognizable appearances into a rap song. That soon segued into a steampunkstyle title sequence declaring the start of “Michael Winslow’s Sound Adventures.”

There’s much more to sound effect-spewing star Michael Winslow than just a repertoire of wacky noises The next 40 minutes were a fusion of gentle observational comedy, eerily accurate musical mimicry and adolescent auditory absurdities, all tailored to showcase Michael’s famously talented mouth. While best known for vocal imitations of inorganic objects – whether the beep of a grocery scanner, the flap of a toilet paper roll or the pop of bubble wrap, all instantly recognizable – Winslow is also like the black Rich Little, able to impersonate everyone from Chris Tucker and Eddie Murphy to Christopher Lloyd and Arnold Schwarzenegger. While I’d wondered if his 20th-century pop culture references would connect with a college-age audience, it seems the current obsession with the retro ’80s and ’90s serves Winslow well, because his humor drew hearty laughs from the Valencia crowd.

ONE-MAN BAND

Though primarily a comedian, Winslow’s equally impressive musical talents took center stage in tributes to Led Zeppelin, Prince and Jimi Hendrix. Not only is Winslow able to capture the original artists’ vocal stylings, but he also mimics every instrument in the band, from bass and drums to electric guitar. Thanks to a cutting-edge digital looping device provided by Roland, he can now play all the parts simultaneously, allowing him to build layers of his voice into a complex composition in front of a live

audience. A longtime audiophile, Winslow “was using Roland equipment in the ’70s,” he told me after the show, saying that the technology has “finally caught up to me.”

“I DARE YOU TO TRY”

Following his set, Winslow graciously stuck around for an audience question-andanswer session that was both intimate and inspirational. When asked if his unique performance style causes him physical problems, Winslow was painfully honest, saying “your throat can catch on fire. … It is a singular life, and I wouldn’t recommend it to everybody.” (Of course, that didn’t stop him from following up with a sample of Mongolian throat-singing and an ear-piercing bagpipe simulation.) The hurt he’s overcome hasn’t only been physical, either; as a military brat moving to a different country every two years, young Winslow “didn’t have a lot of friends, so [he] would end up making up [his] own soundtracks to movies.” Even as his career was getting started in the ’80s, Winslow struggled, he says. “I was living in my car at the time, and I just wanted to get a job” when he auditioned for the voice of Stripe in Gremlins, he admits. Despite the challenges he’s faced over the years, Winslow keeps looking forward; his Valencia performance was filmed as potential audition footage for the Bonnaroo Festival, Adult Swim or Disney. He also keeps encouraging young performers to pursue their ambitions, even if it isn’t always easy. “Just bear in mind, for all the folks who think, ‘I don’t think I can do this,’ remember I’m thinking about you. There are other performers out there more scared than you are, trust me,” Winslow told the students in conclusion. “You learn by doing, and you can do this. I dare you to try it!” skubersky@orlandoweekly.com orlandoweekly.com

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inspiring for me to learn and expand my own horizons and palate.” Reaction among his customer base was generally positive, though one Facebook follower felt the need to caution the Pulapakas, saying “We love your restaurant, but politics is not good fir (sic) business.” But the remark, ironically political, is also bogus. Patronizing a restaurant like Cress that champions ethical and sustainable approaches to agriculture, and is a vocal supporter of local farmers, is a political act in and of itself. “The decisions we make as consumers make their way into the marketplace as a sign of the overall demand,” says Pulapaka. “Producers, on the other hand, react to the demand and, in many cases, lead consumers with creative marketing. Amidst all this interplay, the extent of lobbying by food-related special interest groups in JENNEFFER AND HARI PULAPAKA | PHOTO COURTESY CRESS RESTAURANT Washington, D.C., is of an order of magnitude unimaginable by most consumers. So, yeah, food and politics have a strong connection.” For Pulapaka, a first-generation immigrant from India, his dismay at the strife caused by Trump’s poorly executed travel ban gave him cause to stage the event. “The Emphasizing the power of food to bridge understanding unsubstantiated fear-mongering related to BY FAIYAZ KARA a potential few seems unfitting for a country with the stature of the United States,” n the early 1990s, I worked at a small air- countries has been piqued. The ban has he says. “This event presents a tremenport between semesters to help fund my motivated and inspired chefs and restau- dous opportunity to showcase the bounty of college education. One night after work rateurs in the #notmypresident and #resist American farms to better understand cultures from faraway lands via the universal two co-workers, Sa’ad and Hassan, recent set to act. “Studying the delicious food of Iraq, language of food.” emigres from Somalia, invited me to a resThe dinner will be served, appropritaurant specializing in their native cuisine. Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan & Even as a 21-year-old, I had a penchant for Yemen,” noted Momofuku restaurateur ately enough, family-style and will cost eats outside the established Western culi- David Chang tweeted Jan. 28. “Plan to see a very reasonable $40, all inclusive. (It’s also BYOB.) Expect to nary canon. Nothing bored my palate more more of these food culsee marinated grilled than a plate of pasta and sauce – I grew up tures on @momofuku kebabs, fragrant stews, on Indian food, after all – so the thought of menus.” Chang later 7 COURSES, 7 COUNTRIES spiced chickpea and/ dining on fare as alien as Somalian cuisine told The Guardian, “I’m 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26 or lentil pancakes, herfrustrated and furious was one I found enticing. Cress Restaurant, baceous sauces, braised But when the plates arrived at our table about what is happen103 W. Indiana Ave., DeLand meats, and porridges. in that dingy suburban Toronto restaurant, ing, and I’m frustrated 386-734-3740 Those who can’t I saw similarities to Indian cuisine I didn’t with myself that I didn’t cressrestaurant.com make the dinner might expect – rice dishes reminiscent of biry- know about these cui$40 want to mark Sunday, ani, samosas my Somalian friends called sines either.” Feb. 19, on their calenIn DeLand, Florida, sambusas, and paratha-like bread called sabaayad. The real eye-opener, however, chef Hari Pulapaka followed suit, tweet- dar – it’s when the Arab American Cultural came when a plate of spaghetti and meat ing from the Cress Restaurant account, Festival takes place at Lake Eola Park. sauce was laid before us. Why the hell are “Look for an event showcasing the cuisine Neal Abid, executive director of the Arab we eating spaghetti and meat sauce in a of Syria, Sudan, Libya, Iran, Iraq, Somalia & American Community Center of Florida, Somalian restaurant? I thought to myself, Yemen.” (He was quickly retweeted by his who puts on the event, says Iraqi and Syrian but that was before I learned of Somalia’s wife and partner, Jenneffer, who handles refugees will cook, assemble and serve food Italian-colonial past. I came to the realiza- front-of-house and wine operations at the at the festival. The hope for Abid, as well as Pulapaka tion that homogeneity in food was about as restaurant.) That event, dubbed “7 Courses, bogus a notion as, oh, veracity in a Breitbart 7 Countries,” takes place Sunday, Feb. 26, and many others, is that those partial to from 4-6 p.m. and will feature dishes from Trump’s isolationist and xenophobic poliheadline. Since Donald Trump’s decree to bar the seven countries that he, admittedly, cies can be drawn to a common table for dialogue, understanding, even celebration refugees to the U.S. from Syria, Iran, Iraq, knows very little about. “I haven’t been to any of these countries,” simply by emphasizing the power of food. Yemen, Libya, Sudan and, yes, Somalia, interest in the cuisine of these seven says Pulapaka, “but that’s why it’s even more fkara@orlandoweekly.com

PLATING POLITICS

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tip jar BY FAIYAZ KARA

OPENINGS Reel Fish Coastal Kitchen & Bar has opened in the former Ravenous Pig space. Weekend brunch service commences this weekend … Tin & Taco, from the owners of Gringos Locos, has opened downtown on Washington Street. Hours are 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday … The owners of Orchid Thai in Winter Park open their second outpost in the old RW Blue/Fresh on the Fly/Whitewood space in Lake Mary this weekend … Ben & Jerry’s opens in the former Smart Coffee HD space on Park Avenue early next month. NEWS/EVENTS The 8th Annual Orlando Chili CookOff goes from noon to 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18, at Festival Park … Arab Fest 2017 goes from noon-7 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19 at Lake Eola Park … Domu now allows you to build your own ramen Mondays for $6; every Wednesday beginning March 1, Domu takes over the East End Market courtyard from 5:30 to 9 p.m. for a Neighborhood Meetup featuring bottomless wine, sangria, select draft beer, and complimentary small bites. Cost is $15 … Japanese wagyu beef from Matsusaka is being served at Capa at the Four Seasons Resort through Friday, Feb. 17. The From Matsusaka With Love tasting menu featuring a trio of three-ounce cuts is $225 per couple … Master sommelier George Miliotes (of the soonto-open Wine Bar George at Disney Springs) and Morimoto Asia executive chef Yuhi Fujinaga collaborate on a four-course Wok and Wines pairing dinner Feb. 28 at Morimoto Asia. Cost is $150. On March 9 at 6:30 p.m., Miliotes teams up with Fabrizio Schenardi for a five-course pairing dinner at Ravello at the Four Seasons Resort. Cost is $175 … Chefs John Rivers (4 Rivers Smokehouse, the Coop) and Kathleen Blake (Rusty Spoon) team up for the fourth edition of the Coop’s Guest Chef Series, a free interactive cooking demo, at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 22 … The 6th annual Pints n’ Paws Craft Beer Festival goes from 2-6 p.m. March 11 in downtown Sanford. The pet-friendly event costs $30, or $45 for VIP.

Got restaurant dish? Send tips to dining@orlandoweekly.com

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BAR E AM

PHOTO BY ABBY STASSEN

JOYSTICKS ARCADE LOUNGE AND RETRO BAR 69 E. Pine St., second floor; 407-613-5007; joysticksorlando.com

Ambience, ambience, ambience! Joysticks spares no detail when it comes to re-creating the neon frenzy of the 1980s. Homages to Jaws, The Goonies and other nostalgia-heavy flicks abound, and there are more than enough arcade and console video games to go around (including couches with old Nintendos hooked up to TVs for adventurous nerds on dates). The drink menu matches the bar’s over-the-top theme with specialty cocktails using dry ice and colorful liqueurs to concoct science-project worthy beverages. The Hooters-y vibe of the waitress uniforms is a bit off-putting, even for this colorful spot, but the free Ms. Pac Man and retro vibe guarantees we’ll hit “Continue” here instead of ending the game. ESSAY QUESTION: WHY SHOULD I DRINK HERE?

SHORT ANSWER/MULTIPLE CHOICE: AFTER WORK OR AFTER HOURS? Head over after work and beat the rush of other ’80s and ’90s kids yearning to break free BEER/WINE OR LIQUOR TOO? Beer staples and specialty themed cocktails CHECK ALL THAT APPLY: fancy cocktails make ’em strong and keep ’em coming wine list (5 choices or more) craft beer beer: the usual suspects wide selection of bottles/cans (more than 8) wide selection on tap (more than 8) FOOD SERVED? NO (but coming eventually) SMOKING ALLOWED INSIDE? NO OUTSIDE DRINKING? NO 30

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DOG-FRIENDLY? NO BATHROOMS: NIGHTMARE OR NOT BAD? Great as long as you don’t hate Pac-Man BAG HOOKS? NO TVS? YES WHAT’S ON? ’80s music videos DJS? NO LIVE MUSIC? sometimes LOUD MUSIC OR BACKGROUND MUSIC? Loud. A few songs we heard: “Sweet Caroline” by Neil Diamond, “Private Dancer” by Tina Turner, “Goonies ‘R’ Good Enough” by Cyndi Lauper GAMES? CHECK ALL THAT APPLY: pinball video games pool darts other: air hockey


recently reviewed EDITED BY JESSICA BRYCE YOUNG

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$10 OR LESS $10-$15 $15-$25 $25 OR MORE

The price range generally reflects the average cost of one dinner entree. Bakeries, ice cream shops, etc. reflect relative cost for one person. Search hundreds more reviews at orlandoweekly.com

DOMU Popular ramen joint lives up to the hype offering near-perfect bowls of tonkotsu, shoyu, miso and curry ramen. There’s an uni pasta for those who want to forgo broth for the richness of sea urchin, but don’t overlook other soupless options like the crackling good Korean fried chicken with Korean butter sauce, the grilled octopus, and Sichuan cucumbers. Cocktails crafted by Rene Nguyen (Herman’s Loan Office) are taken seriously here. 3201 Corrine Drive, 407-960-1228; $$

THE STUBBORN MULE

The folks who brought us RusTeak are behind this casual Thornton Park eatery where dishes veer toward the weighty, and beverages toward the crafty. Fried Wisconsin cheese curds and equally addicting pork belly slicked in an “Asian” sticky sauce make fine starters, while burgers, Reuben tacos, and the catch of the day make fine entrée choices. Ending with a cronut topped with vanilla bean ice cream will only cement your decision to return. Closed Mondays. 100 S. Eola Drive, 407-930-1166; $$$

BULLA GASTROBAR

South Florida Spanish joint serves up some mighty fine tapas and tipples. Chef Felix Plasencia gets it going with marvy croquetas, stellar octopus salad, and pintxos of charcoal-fired cuminmarinated pork. Jamon ibérico de bellota and Leonora cheese are good any time of day. For more substantial plates, consider the seafood paella, arroz marinero cooked with plankton, and the red snapper fired up in a charcoal oven. Torrijas (Spanish-style French toast) drizzled with honey and served with turrón ice cream is our choice to end the meal. Open daily. 110 S. Orlando Ave., Winter Park, 321-214-6120; $$$

TASTE OF YUCATÁN

No-frills Mexican joint serves up a taste of Yucatán cuisine with a grand selection of tacos, salbutes (deep-fried tacos) and panuchos (salbutes stuffed with CONTINUED ON PAGE 32

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refried beans), as well as tortas, quesadillas and rice bowls. Fillings you’ll fancy: cochinita pibil, al pastor, barbacoa and vegetarian rajas poblanas. Pollo adobado can be a tad dry, but superb housemade salsas, like tamarind-habañero and salsa macha, counter the effects. Closed Mondays. 1375 S. Semoran Blvd., 407-704-2248; $

BARTACO

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Beach-themed taquería fuses Mexican tradition with Latin, Mediterranean and Asian flavors and, for the most part, does so successfully. Tacos are on the small side, but when corn tortillas are filled with such succulent meats as duck confit in tamarind glaze, rotisserie pork pastor, and soy-, sesame- and sriracha-marinated Angus ribeye topped with kimchi, substance tends to trump size. Vegetarian options (falafel, cauliflower, portobello) abound, but don’t overlook other items like grilled corn rolled in lime, cayenne and cotija. Cocktails please even when desserts don’t wow. Open daily. 7600 Dr. Phillips Blvd., 407-801-8226; $$

EARLS KITCHEN + BAR

As in other cities, Canadian import Earls Kitchen + Bar “unchains the chain” with way-cool interior design, and that verve finds its way into the kitchen as well, with a menu of global greatest hits ranging from bibimbap to poke. English sticky toffee pudding makes a great ending (just ask for more toffee sauce), while an above-average cocktail program keeps it interesting on the libationary front. Open daily (until 2 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays). 4200 Conroy Road, 407-345-8260; $$

TENNESSEE TRUFFLE

Southern fare and French technique fuse at chef-owner Nat Russell’s down-home Sanford resto. His biscuits and gravy might be the best in Central Florida, and the same could be said of his maque-choux and creamed corn. Biscuit sandwiches, like the BLT and chicken salad, are wholly satisfying, though be wary of palateshreddingly firm biscuits. A scoop of house-made ice cream (brown butter and buttered popcorn, specifically) is the way to end. Breakfast and lunch only. Closed Sundays and Mondays. 125 W. First St., Sanford, 407-942-3977; $

TEAK NEIGHBORHOOD GRILL

This chill MetroWest hang developed a loyal following for its hefty half-pound burgers and craft brews, and it’s no wonder. Purists can indulge in the “Plain Jane” with American cheese, Bibb lettuce and tomato on a brioche bun, while braver souls can feel the heat with the peppery “Wholey Hell!!!”. There’s even a donut burger for heart haters. Open daily until 2 a.m. 6400 Time Square Ave., 407-313-5111; $$ n

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NEW YEAR

NEWYOU SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL SECTION

CLOSER TO YOUR ROOTS

Make Sustainable Living a Priority in 2017

HAPPY 2017! WELCOME TO THE FINAL ENTRY IN OUR NEW FOURPART SERIES, “NEW YEAR, NEW YOU.” WHETHER IT’S EATING BETTER, TAKING YOUR VITAMINS OR JUST GENERALLY BETTERING YOUR MIND AND BODY, WE’RE HERE TO HELP GET YOU THERE. CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

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NEW YEAR

NEWYOU

It’s 6 o’clock in the evening, you’ve just gotten off work and that creeping 21stcentury malaise is setting in. Instead of grabbing a burger from the drive-thru, like you would have done last year, might we recommend swinging by the supermarket produce section instead? Or maybe even the home improvement store’s gardening aisle? Whether it’s learning more about healthy eating or consulting with herbal specialists, leading a holistic life can help you lose weight and develop better mental health in 2017.

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL SECTION

Visit a Herbalist

Think of them as your accredited, herbhappy consultants. Herbalists can review your health history and create a custom self-care regimen, but instead of prescribing a kaleidoscope of pharmaceutical drugs, he or she can recommend a mix of plant and herbal extracts. “What we like to teach here is that sustainable living can be incorporated in our daily lives,” Stephanie Russ, the Florida School of Holistic Living’s director of operations, says, “by taking care of ourselves and our family through diet and food and the products we use.” The right herbal plan can pay all sorts of dividends—better sleep, healthier skin

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from left to right Stephanie Russ, Director of Operations, Emily Ruff, Executive Director,Regina Rozzi, School Administrative Assistant

and hair and nails, less stress and anxiety, weight loss—without the intense side effects of some prescription drugs. An herbalist can also work with your general practitioner to recommend herbs and tonics that will dovetail with any medicines you’re currently taking.

Check Out the Mediterranean Diet

If it’s all Greek to you, you’re on the right track. Nutritionists and holistic medicine professionals have lauded the Mediterranean Diet for its health benefits for decades. A reliance on olive oils, fruits and vegetables, unrefined cereals, and fish can reduce the risk of a plethora of ailments like cancer, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular diseases, and other long-term disorders. Bonus points: cheese, yogurt, and (moderate) wine consumption are all on the menu!

Look into Chinese Medicines

There’s a reason these remedies have CONTINUED ON PAGE 38

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NEW YEAR

NEWYOU SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL SECTION

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37

stood the test of time. Soothing teas and traditional Chinese herbs, when paired with a healthful diet, can greatly reduce anxiety. Mind and body exercises like tai chi offer practitioners a one-two punch against daily stress, while the most famous ancient Chinese practice of all, acupuncture, has been relieving migraine headaches and osteoarthritis for thousands of years.

Tend a Garden

Gardens: they’re not just for stocking the dinner table (although they certainly help!). The mental and physical benefits of sustenance gardening are as bountiful as they are varied, such as treating depression and high blood pressure, respectively—tending a garden can even take the edge off those 38

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● FEB. 15-21, 2017

New Year’s resolution nicotine cravings. “You can disconnect and spend time reflecting,” Russ says. “A lot of us are always looking for answers or information on our phones, on social media, and it’s very important to step and see things from a different perspective.” And if you don’t have the space or resources to plant your own little paradise, community gardens are peppered throughout Orlando, including at the Florida School of Holistic Living’s campus. The FSHL even conducts workshops in their classrooms before going into the garden to sift through all that green, growing goodness. “We just want people to know there’s something like that here in Orlando that people can come to,” Russ says. “We’re here for them.” ●

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Take a Plant Walk

If you don’t have the space to plant and tend a garden of your own, maybe consider taking a leisurely plant walk? The Florida School of Holistic Living takes their students on strolls through Mead Garden to identify all sorts of flowers and greenery. Being out in nature can help remove the unconscious distractions and clutter that years of modern life burdens you with. “There’s a lot of noise pollution here [in Orlando], and you don’t realize that’s all going on until you step back and go into nature,” Russ says.

Make New Friends (While Learning New Hobbies)

Stress, resentments, grief, and general

tension can build up and wreak havoc without a mental and spiritual release. It’s crucial to have a safe, healthy outlet for those feelings and expressions—learning to play a musical instrument, or taking up another creative pursuit like painting, can do wonders for your mental health. “As humans, we have energies inside us, and we’re using energy all the time,” Russ says. “You don’t have to be an amazing painter or an amazing drummer. As long as you’re feeling that movement and being a part of that movement, you’re moving energy in and out, toward your physical body and then outside of yourself.” The Florida School of Holistic Living hosts numerous creative classes where students can pick up a new hobby and make new friends in the process.


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FILM LISTINGS

[ festival preview ]

An Affair to Remember On board an ocean

liner, Nickie (Cary Grant) and Terry (Deborah Kerr) fall deeply in love and, although they’re already engaged to other people, promise to meet six months later atop the Empire State Building. Wednesday, 2 & 7 pm; multiple locations; $13.31; fathomevents.com. FilmSlam Monthly showcase of the best in local

independent film. Vote for each month’s winner. Sunday, 1 pm; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $8; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone in Concert Relive the magic of the first Harry Potter

film on a giant screen while hearing the Orlando Philharmonic perform the score live. Saturday, 7:30 pm, Sunday, 1 & 6:30 pm; Walt Disney Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $45-$75; 844-513-2014; drphillipscenter.org. I Am Ali Celebrate Black History Month with

films that highlight the achievements of black Americans. Friday, 11 am; Orlando Public Library,

MIA GOTH IN A CURE FOR WELLNESS | PHOTO COURTESY OF FOX

101 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info.

Goth’s character is also ridiculous, she gives the best performance. Indeed, when the film goes bat-shit crazy in its third act, she becomes infinitely watchable, harnessing an eroticism that is both mesmerizing and disturbing considering the character’s age Clarity is verboten in Gore Verbinski’s Cure and family ties. BY CAMERON MEIE R The film premiered at the 2016 ButtNumb-A-Thon Film Festival, which is he trailer for the new Gothic thriller ply can’t find the will to leave, and Lockhart appropriate considering its 146-minute A Cure for Wellness refers to direc- – helped by a mysterious patient, Hannah runtime. If 20 minutes had been excised, it tor Gore Verbinski as “visionary.” (Mia Goth) – is determined to find out why. would have at least had a chance at clarity. Much like Jack Nicholson in The Shining, But at its current length, the film would be The film’s promotional team must have mistaken having visions for being visionary. DeHaan is expected to do the film’s heavy better suited to the Brain-Numb-A-Thon That’s not all bad. Sure, Verbinski’s cre- lifting while depicting his own slide into Festival, as the smart, surreal premise slowation is a storytelling trainwreck, but this is insanity and undergoing torture on par ly, slowly unravels into schlock. Spoiler alert: One interpretation is that the Orient Express that’s crashing, and you with Malcolm McDowell’s in A Clockwork Lockhart – who is can’t look away from its crumpled beauty, Orange – and he’s not injured in a car crash especially because Verbinski (Rango, The up to the task. At least A CURE FOR WELLNESS – is dead for most Ring, The Lone Ranger, the Pirates of the he has company, as opens Friday, Feb. 17 of the movie. That Caribbean movies) so boldly mimics the other patients are also would explain some of cinematography of Stanley Kubrick and forced to undergo “the Verbinski’s wild plot the themes of The Third Man. Throw in an treatment.” Even a explorations and his embrace of Thomas Mann’s Death in Venice couple of CGI animals drift toward pure “art and Magic Mountain, and you have the are harmed unnecesmakings of something special – if it didn’t sarily, seemingly to support Verbinski and film.” Another explanation is that Lockhart all collapse in a tedious, bloated cacophony writer Justin Haythe’s misguided, mud- is delusional, or a patient from the outset, in dled metaphors about the life essence and, the vein of I Am the Cheese, an underrated of silliness. Dane DeHaan, perhaps best known for um, precious bodily fluids. Admittedly, the mindbender from 1983. Personally, I was playing the Green Goblin in The Amazing symbolism would be arresting, if we only rooting for the latter, but, frankly, I would Spider-Man 2 in 2014, plays Lockhart, a understood it. Similarly, the film’s com- have settled for anything other than the young American executive. After his boss mentaries on commercial greed and mental actual conclusion. Meat Loaf taught us that we’ll never visits a secluded spa in the Swiss Alps and health would have been more impactful if find a Coupe de Ville at the bottom of a refuses to return, the company assumes they hadn’t been devoid of context. As Volmer, the sanatorium’s director, Cracker Jack box. Conversely, Verbinski he’s had a nervous breakdown and sends Lockhart to retrieve him. But, once there, he Jason Isaacs is well-cast, but, like DeHaan, has reminded us that we might one day realizes the sanatorium has both a haunted he too is a prisoner of a nonsensical script crack open a Fabergé egg and find a Yugo. history and a bizarre attraction. People sim- and an unrelateable character. Though film@orlandoweekly.com

ALL IS NOT WELL

Movie Classics on Magnolia: Rebel Without a Cause This landmark 1955 film, starring

James Dean, Sal Mineo and Natalie Wood, blew away the image of middle-class suburban teens. Thursday, 7:30 pm; Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, 201 S. Magnolia Ave.,

T

Sanford; $5; 407-321-8111; wdpac.com. Music Mondays: A Poem Is a Naked Person Documentary about singer-songwriter

Leon Russell, filmed between 1972 and 1974. Monday, 9:30 pm; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $11; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. Oscar Shorts 2017: Animated Short ani-

mated films nominated for this year’s Academy Awards. Through Thursday;

HHHHH

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Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $11; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. Oscar Shorts 2017: Live Action Short films nomi-

nated for this year’s Academy Awards. Through Thursday; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $11; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. Within Our Gates Abandoned by her fiancé, an ed-

ucated black woman dedicates herself to helping a school for impoverished black youths. Filmed in 1920. Wednesday, 6 pm; Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona State College, Daytona Beach; free; 386-506-4475; smponline.org. ●

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ON SCREENS IN ORLANDO

Fist Fight

BY STE V E S C H N E I D E R OPENING THIS WEEK: Fist Fight It isn’t easy being a teacher in the Betsy DeVos era. You get a good but expensive degree from an education college to prepare you for doing important work you love. You land a gig at an institution that’s woefully underfunded, unsafe and at risk. The students don’t respect you, the parents are unengaged in their kids’ education, and you have to pay for every goddamn protractor yourself. And then one day, you run afoul of one of your colleagues, who threatens to beat your ass after the work day is done. Oh, and that guy is Ice Cube. Yes, we have entered the era in which the fabulous O’Shea Jackson is now believable as a public-school teacher. Hey, it worked for Fonzie and Mark Harmon. And really, playing The Teacha Ya Love ta Hate is a bit closer to Cube’s N.W.A wheelhouse than was his protracted stint as cinema’s favorite befuddled dad. Now we just have to figure out if Fist Fight is a loose adaptation of 1987’s Three O’Clock High – which is the official story being advanced in some quarters – or if it was instead based on an original idea devised by producer Max Greenfield, as has been claimed elsewhere. Since Greenfield is best known as a cast member on New Girl, I’m going to go with the latter explanation. Just because it means I can hold out hope for a sequel, I’m-a Beat the Schmidt Out of You. (R) The Great Wall Here’s a product that could

keep our new President up at night, if he ever slept in the first place. It’s about a big wall, which is good. But it’s the most expensive co-production ever between our country and the dreaded Jina, which is bad. Or is it? Does a collaboration between a Western nation and an Asian one benefit the country that’s artificially devaluing its currency? Do we want a strong dollar or a weak one? Better call the Secretary of the Interior and find out. Whatever the intention, The Great Wall is turning out to be the Bill the Cat of major international releases, finding bad luck in just about every move it makes. First, director Zhang Yimou (Hero, House of Flying Daggers) took heat for casting Caucasian actor Matt 42

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● FEB. 15-21, 2017

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Damon in a story that’s ostensibly set in ancient China. Then, reviewers back home were less than kind to the final result, which depicts a bunch of mercenaries of the Song Dynasty protecting the Great Wall from monsters from beyond the stars: Reactions to this shall-wesay-unconventional story were so tepid that the communist People’s Daily castigated the critics for having harmed their own country’s movie industry. Then, just one week before the picture’s American debut, a teaser trailer had to be removed after viewers spewed mass derision all over the CGI monsters in question, saying they couldn’t possibly represent completed work. Since the movie has been out in China since December, I’m guessing they really kinda do. Which has to be a huge humiliation for Zhang, whose Hero was just about the loveliest visual advertisement I’ve ever seen for a brutally repressive regime. Meanwhile, the ho-hum performance of his new film at Asian box offices is being taken as just one sign that the commingling of their movie market and ours might not be the economic slam dunk industry-watchers had foreseen. Such confusion. I hope the Secretary of Agriculture can straighten it all out. (PG-13) ALSO PLAYING: Julieta In Pedro Almodovar’s latest, two dif-

ferent actresses play the same woman at different stages of her life. (As opposed to Catherine Zeta-Jones movies, in which one actress plays two different women at the same stage of her life. But I kid the mentally ill!) Julieta was Spain’s official entry for this year’s foreign film Oscar, but failed to make the cut. Instead, one of those coveted slots went to ... (R) The Salesman ... a French-Iranian drama about a married couple who are playing the leads in a stage production of Death of a Salesman. Things get really heavy for them after they move into an apartment that had been previously occupied by a woman who was working as a prostitute. If you ask me, somebody passed up a big opportunity by not titling this thing Attention Must Be Laid. (PG-13)


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[ concert preview ]

GREAT LIVE MUSIC RATTLES ORLANDO EVERY NIGHT Orlando Language Exchange Local DIY enthusiasts are putting on this event for bilingual, trilingual, etc. folks to meet up with fellow language enthusiasts, share information and practice speaking face to face. 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 15, at the Sandwich Bar, free

Richard Sherfey and All God’s Children Seriously gritty, blue-collar rock from Sherfey and friends; live, expect a lot of hootin’, hollerin’, testifyin’ and urgency. 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16, at Will’s Pub, $7-$10

Classic Albums Live: Fleetwood Mac Rumours Standard disclaimer: We look askance at tribute shows like these. THAT SAID, it would be really cathartic to hear the immaculate four-way love/hate songs that formed the tormented Rumours live right about now. 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17, at Hard Rock Live, $14-$24

PHOTO BY SEBASTIAN SMITH

A SIMPLE SONG

the shoulder from the universe, telling you to look out for yourself. It could be a health scare, or on a macro level, the climate telling us we need to take care of Men at Work singer Colin Hay forges his own path, one tune the planet. Otherwise, there are extremely at a time serious environmental challenges that we are facing at the moment. We get a lot BY ALYSON LAMOSO of fierce reminders of those things,” Hay or Colin Hay, there is little compari- brightest achievements, Waiting for My says. “It’s an interesting phrase. I like the son between Men at Work and his Real Life lets us peek into the rollercoaster weight to it.” When asked about inspiration for the own success as a solo singer-song- ride of Hay’s life and career, through loops writer. “I’ve been playing solo since I was and dips of megastardom, lawsuits, family rest of the songs he simply replies, “I try 14 years old,” Hay tells Orlando Weekly crises and solo accomplishments. “Well, and write the best songs that I can. There’s during a quick phone chat ahead of his you just got to roll with the punches, all kind of songs about different things. I don’t think of songs in terms of topics. I’m upcoming show at the Plaza Live. “Men at whatever happens.” just trying to be as creAlthough it was iniWork broke up in 1984. That’s a long time. ative as possible.” I don’t think about it since it was so long tially released in 2015, Besides a repertoire ago. Men at Work lasted for four years. Hay sees a clear conCOLIN HAY of songs that encomI’ve been on my own for so long now that nection between the 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 20 pass his entire career I don’t really think what it was like when I documentary and the The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave. and his impeccable new album. “The film was in Men at Work, you know?” 407-228-1220 singing voice, fans of Along with his current tour and upcom- has been ready for a litplazaliveorlando.com Hay’s live shows look ing album, Fierce Mercy, Hay stays busy tle while. … The record $29.50-$49.50 forward to his storyscreening his documentary, Waiting [is] ready to go for telling and humor, like for My Real Life in film festivals across March 3. It is powerful “the perks” of life after the country. “I was approached by Nate having them come out Gowtham and Aaron Faulls. They had a at the same time as they complement one prostate cancer, for example. With any great performer, timing is treatment that they wanted to do and it another.” Hay’s favorite song on the record is everything, and Hay handles it like a triedseemed to fit with my touring schedule. I had already started stuff with another called “Frozen Fields of Snow,” but it’s and-true master who’s been through it and friend of mine from Australia, but it wasn’t from a different song that he takes the seen it all. He holds the audience captive, really going anywhere. Then Nate and title. “A term that my songwriting partner baring just enough of his soul to keep us Aaron came along when it seemed like the [used] led to a song called ‘The Last to enthralled. His secret? “It’s my job. It’s what I enjoy doing.” Know,’ one of the songs on the album. right time.” “On a personal level, it could be a tap on Exposing his toughest challenges and music@orlandoweekly.com

Contour Hazy, sleep-deprived and sublimely opiated alien soul/trip-hop from this young and prolific South Carolinian. Postmillennium tension. 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18, at Spacebar, free

F

orlandoweekly.com

The Digs Afternoon vinyl swap meet will be soundtracked by a phalanx of DJs spinning live, and your already poor impulse control will be melted down by heady cocktails. What, like savings really mean anything anymore? 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19, at Lil Indies, free

Joe Bonamassa Blues-rock true believer guitarist hits the road again. We’re hoping he airs some tracks from his recent collab with Mahalia Barnes on the Betty Davis tribute album Ooh Yea! 8 p.m. Monday, Feb. 20, at the Dr. Phillips Center, $69-$149

Lolo Soulful belter is a modern pop Zelig, connected at various points in her life and career with Lisa Marie Presley, Panic at the Disco!, and Talib Kweli. 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21, at the Social, $12-$15 ●

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BEST PH O | PH O 8 8

BE ST PR E SC R I PT I ON F OR LIV IN G T HE SA N C T UM

You won’t need burgers for a fast-food fix once you find this Vietnamese noodle shop. Specializing in gigantic, weirdly addictive bowls of very thin rice noodles and various cuts of beef submerged in delicately seasoned broth, they also serve the usual exotics of shrimp paste and grilled pork – but the soup’s the thing. 730 N. Mills Ave., 407-897-3488; also 9728 E. Colonial Dr., 407-930-7670,

Plant-based eatery deftly disproves the antiquated notion that meatless and wheatless equates to tasteless with boldly flavored green, grain and pasta bowls. Oh, and they can also pull a proper espresso. Note: Dairy and gluten options are available. 715 N. Ferncreek Ave., 407-757-0346

BEST BAKERY Valhalla Bakery

BEST CUPCAKE Sweet! by Good Golly Miss Holly

BEST INDIAN Tamarind Indian Cuisine

BEST PHO Pho 88

BEST SUSHI Seito Sushi

BEST BARBECUE 4 Rivers Smokehouse

BEST DELI TooJay’s Gourmet Deli

BEST ITALIAN (NOT JUST PIZZA) Prato

BEST PIZZA Mellow Mushroom

BEST TACOS Gringos Locos

BEST BRUNCH Santiago’s Bodega

BEST DESSERTS Better Than Sex

BEST JUICE/SMOOTHIES Planet Smoothie

BEST PLACE TO BUY MEAT Freshfields Farm

BEST TEAHOUSE Pom Pom’s Teahouse & Sandwicheria

BEST BURGER BurgerFi

BEST DINER Christo’s Café

BEST KOREAN Korean BBQ Taco Box

BEST PLACE TO BUY PRODUCE Freshfields Farm

BEST THAI SEA Thai Restaurant

BEST CARIBBEAN Bahama Breeze

BEST DOG-FRIENDLY PATIO The Hammered Lamb

BEST LATE-NIGHT RESTAURANT Gringos Locos

BEST PUB GRUB Oblivion Taproom

BEST THEME PARK BAR Margaritaville

BEST CHEAP EATS Gringos Locos

BEST FOOD TRUCK Korean BBQ Taco Box

BEST LATIN Black Bean Deli

BEST RAMEN Noodles & Rice

BEST THEME PARK RESTAURANT Be Our Guest, Magic Kingdom

BEST CHEF James Petrakis

BEST FRENCH Le Coq au Vin

BEST MEXICAN Gringos Locos

BEST RESTAURANT TO TAKE A DATE The Ravenous Pig

BEST VEGAN Ethos Vegan Kitchen

BEST CHINESE Hawkers Asian Street Fare

BEST FRIED CHICKEN The Coop

BEST MIDDLE EASTERN Bosphorous Turkish Cuisine

BEST SANDWICHES/SUBS Publix deli

BEST VEGETARIAN Dandelion Communitea Café

BEST COFFEE Drunken Monkey

BEST GREEK Mediterranean Blue

BEST NACHOS Tijuana Flats

BEST SEAFOOD Winter Park Fish Co.

BEST VIETNAMESE Pho 88

BEST CUBAN Black Bean Deli

BEST ICE CREAM Jeremiah’s Italian Ice

BEST OUTDOOR DINING Hillstone Restaurant

BEST STEAKHOUSE Linda’s La Cantina Steak House

BEST WINGS Gator’s Dockside

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plaque visit: orlandoweekly.newskeepsake.com To participate in this page call: (407) 377-0400 ext 278


BY B AO L E - H U U GOST | PHOTO BY JEN CRAY

If that photo above doesn’t

impel you to read on, nothing will. So let’s.

THE BEAT

Like an encyclopedia of heavy metal, probably no other promoter in the Orlando area covers the spectrum as well as Endoxa Booking. But when it reaches out to the genre’s furthest extremities, like 2015’s amazing Author and Punisher show, Endoxa makes some of its best, deepest and most interesting marks on the scene. Count the latest synth-thick production featuring Gost, Autarx and Moondragon (Feb. 5, Will’s Pub) as one of its most memorably bold. Headliner Gost is, by careful design, an interesting figure. Musically, his hammering dark-synth sound borrows from ’80s horror soundtracks, takes aesthetic cues from black metal and drops the crunching thunder like Justice. In presence, the mysterious American producer executes with dramatic flair, athletic performance and a fantastic skull mask. The performance was so physical at one point that he overturned his whole rig in the heat of the moment, stopping the show, only to recover with maybe his most pulverizing song of the night. It’s a winning formula filled with hooks that in some ways makes perfect sense and in other ways is total alchemy. Had Gost come along during the golden age of the industrial scene, he would’ve been not only a sensation but possibly a salvation. He packs way more modern aggression and relevance than the terrible gothic techno that industrial dance music has become. The damned now have their Deadmau5.

Had Gost come along during the golden age of the industrial scene, he would’ve been not only a sensation but possibly a salvation. The damned now have their Deadmau5. Synth music is getting an increasingly fairer shake right now, but the live bar for such acts is almost institutionally low. Gost, however, brings the excitement on stage even without a fancy setup. This could easily get big. Not that there’s necessarily much demographic overlap, but he packed out Will’s Pub despite it being Super Bowl Sunday. If Gost takes inspiration from ’80s sounds, local one-man act Moondragon is straight worship. Armed with a video screen and a whole lotta synth, he’s a direct warp back to the sleek electro drama of what was perhaps, sonically, the last true brave new world. His retrofuturism is all in on the digital dream and excess of the ’80s – no arty abstraction, just pure fidelity and revivalist immersion. The thing is, though, it’s also very well done. His set was essentially a half-hour Knight Rider soundtrack, which middle school me will simply not permit adult me to reproach. When experienced in concert with vintage video loaded with action and speed from jets, racecars and movies like The Last Starfighter, The Wraith and

The Terminator, it’s sweet neon nostalgia. With a sound that’s a coil of nerve, sinew and weirdness, NYC indie darlings Parquet Courts rocketed to almost immediate “it” status upon their debut album’s national release and have gone on to cement their stake in a pretty short span of time. On those wings, they made their Orlando debut (Feb. 6, the Social) to a crammed and enthused crowd. You know how hype can be. But in their case, it’s anything but hollow. One of the more original bands in indie rock right now, Parquet Courts’ wiry whim melds the energy and spark of punk with the unpredictable id of art rock. That said, their flights of fancy aren’t exactly the easiest ride around. That’s why the more dialed-in and streamlined approach they’ve been taking since 2016’s Human Performance has been manna. Instead of dulling their individuality, it’s only distilled it, yielding an exponential result. Moreover, the added muscle of the live stage was yet another welcome anchor for their music, lending its obliqueness some great heft and giving full kick to their punk tendencies. It’s always nice to see an interesting band like Parquet Courts hit it big, and even nicer to see that their dizzying evolution is showing such effective refinement. Opening was the very well-connected Mary Lattimore, the Philadelphia artist who just played Will’s Pub last November with True Widow. A gossamer latticework that occasionally melts at the edges, her experimental harp playing is classically beautiful but also capable of real strangeness. And it bewitched a full house. baolehuu@orlandoweekly.com orlandoweekly.com

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Wednesday, 15

Wednesday, 15

Loudar

Richard Thompson

MUSIC

Say you forgot about Valentine’s Day, or maybe you and your sweetie’s schedules just didn’t allow for a romantic night out. You could do worse than catching Loudar to make up for it. A project that tends to only happen whenever French poet Patrick Sacleux is in town, Loudar started out as just readings of poetry from Sacleux, accompanied by his son, Pascal, on guitar. The musical portion has grown with repeat performances and now incorporates Sacleux fils on guitar, Phil Longo on bass, Shae Charles MacPherson on drums and Joseph Davoli on trumpet. The atmospheric backgrounds produced are largely improvised, providing a stirring soundtrack to Sacleux père’s bilingual (French and English) wordplay. – Thaddeus McCollum 8 p.m. | Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park | 407-636-9951 | bluebambooartcenter.com | $10

Thursday, 16

F.L.A.M.E. ART

PHOTO BY VINCENT DIXON MUSIC

OUR PICKS FOR THE BEST EVENTS THIS WEEK

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Whereas the words “solo acoustic show” and “Rolling Stone’s Top 20 Guitarists of All Time” would normally fill us with varying degrees of cold dread, Richard Thompson is one of the few so-called “guitar heroes” you can actually enjoy. Despite the heavy baggage of pyrotechnics and puffy shirts that immediately spring to mind, Thompson is more in the school of Neil Young, Bert Jansch and John Fahey, where the song is favored over the technique. It’s a through-line that applies to all of Thompson’s work, from his beginnings in English psych-folk legend Fairport Convention, through his duo work with then-wife Linda Thompson, and all of his hefty solo discography. And if you’re still on the fence, Richard Thompson gifted us with one of the single greatest self-loathing breakup albums of all time, the monolithically bleak Shoot Out the Lights (1982), wherein he and Linda held up the tatters of their marriage to the cold, unforgiving light of day. Expect a career-spanning survey of solo work and perhaps even some Fairport Convention nuggets. – Matthew Moyer 7 p.m. | The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave. | 407-228-1220 | plazaliveorlando.com | $39.50-$69.50

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● FEB. 15-21, 2017

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Nobody doesn’t love a good art party, and F.L.A.M.E. promises to fit into the mold Orlando has come to enjoy: cool space, cool artists, free entry but plenty of cool stuff to buy, plus the satisfaction of ephemerality – if you miss it, you missed out. F.L.A.M.E. also promises to break out of that mold a bit, though, in a fittingly one-off manner: not only will there be local goods for sale, an exhibition by a respected local artist (Lesley Silvia) and an artist creating work on the spot (19-year-old New Yorker Goyart, who’s as influenced by Walt Disney "THE THREE GRACES" BY LESLEY SILVIA as he is by Basquiat), there’ll also be one-off fashion created on the spot by Fire the Help. Organizer Winston Taitt says, “It’s so cool to me that kids want to be creative, instead of being herded by commercialism. Instead of the latest Gucci/Prada/Hermes, they want these one-of-ones.” Get fired up and satisfy your desire for distinction with a jacket or shirt from Fire the Help, minis from Political Sculptor, pins and patches from Secret Society, and a plethora of beverage choices: cocktails by Will’s Pub, fizzy probiotics from Orlando City Kombucha, caffeine by Vita Luna, and beer from Ten10 and MIA Brewing. – Jessica Bryce Young 6-9 p.m. | Orange Studio, 1121 N. Mills Ave. | free


Thursday, 16

Saturday, 18

Retro Modern Home Tour

Makk Day

PHOTO BY DOREEN TURCHETTI EVENTS PHOTO BY FUTURE ARTISTS MUSIC

We don’t need to rehash how bad 2016 was for musician deaths, but it’s important to recognize that the bizarre wave of death that swept the globe touched down locally too. Big Makk (neé Samisoni Koroitamudu), known for curating the tropical bootythumping Shake N Bass night at Backbooth, died in a car crash in August. He was only 22 years old, but had released tracks on respected labels like Dim Mak and Mad Decent. Tonight, Backbooth pays tribute to the beloved DJ with a party in his honor. DJ Craze, a three-time DMC world champion with major old-school turntablism skills, headlines. But the night is all about Makk, with all proceeds going to the Big Makk Foundation, which provides scholarships for young adults who want to pursue careers in the music industry, ensuring that Big Makk’s name lives on. – TM with DJ Craze, K1K0, Ivarr, Ma-Less, Mezmriz, OG Nacho | 11:30 p.m. | Backbooth, 37 W. Pine St. | 407-999-2570 | backbooth.com | $10

Saturday, 18

Janine Klein: The Diva’s Diva THEATER

Assisting a drag queen: It isn’t all bonbons and marabou mules, brushing out wigs and playing rounds of Name That Barbara Stanwyck Quote. In fact, if you work for Ginger Minj (who said, “I like to describe myself as a glamour-toad” in her premiere episode of RuPaul’s Drag Race) as Janine Klein did, it sounds more like a cross between It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World and The Poseidon Adventure. This show, subtitled “Tales of a Drag Queen’s Assistant,” follows Klein as she fills in as factotum to her BFF, a selfdescribed “overweight, asthmatic, chain-smoking crossdresser from Orlando, Florida” on a tour from Dublin to … Peoria. Sounds scintillating, no? Well, no – except when Klein, who’s got more than a dash of diva herself, tells it. Grab three cocktails and fasten your seatbelts for this one, it’s going to be a lumpy night. – JBY 8 p.m. | also Feb. 25 | Parliament House, 410 N. Orange Blossom Trail | 407-425-7571 | parliamenthouse.com | $15

Sometimes we grow weary of our own surroundings and long for something greater – namely, other people’s much nicer homes. Audubon Park Garden District’s Retro Modern Homes Tour is the perfect excuse to explore interior design ranging from vaguely unaffordable to Zooey Deschanel-level quirky while staring longingly at top-shelf liquor collections resting atop a Mad Men-era bookshelf. But what is a retro modern home? How do you know if you’re in one right now? Mid-century modern architecture is noteworthy for its post-and-beam construction, which replaced the controversial blanket fort construction that Americans relied on to keep monsters out for decades prior. The style takes cues from Scandinavian design (aka furniture that looks really uncomfortable but is completely fine if you’re a thin blonde woman who doesn’t need much back support anyway), wide-open interiors to physically manifest the emotional distance you’ve achieved with your spouse, and lines so simple even an alternative-facts guru could follow them straight out the door and into our terrifying hellscape of a country. But while we’re inside the homes, we’re back in the middle of the 20th century, enjoying a welcome respite from the bizarre plot twists of our current century. – Abby Stassen 1-7:30 p.m. | Audubon Park Garden District, East Winter Park Road and Corrine Drive | audubonparkgardens.com | $35

Sunday, 19

Arab Fest EVENTS

If you’re reading this at 4 a.m. under a blanket doing your early-morning Twitter check to make sure the world hasn’t totally fallen off the rails, maybe it’s time to get back to a slight sense of normality. Take this weekend to reconnect with what’s still good in America at downtown Orlando’s 2017 Arab American Cultural Festival. Get some quality falafel, watch a live performance of folk dances like the dabke, and explore traditional arts and crafts at this free fest organized by the Arab American Community Center of Florida. Chances are you’ll have a good time and learn a little more about the inner lives of our Iranian, Iraqi, Syrian, Sudanese, Somalian, Libyan and Yemeni neighbors. – Monivette Cordeiro 11 a.m.-7 p.m. | Lake Eola Park, 195 N. Rosalind Ave. | aaccflorida.org | free

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THEWEEK

submit your events to listings@orlandoweekly.com at least 12 days before print to have them included

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15-TUESDAY, FEB. 21 COMPILED BY THADDEUS MCCOLLUM

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15

CONCERTS/EVENTS Abraham & the Old Gods, Will Brack, Sticky Steve 9 pm; Uncle Lou’s Entertainment Hall, 1016 N. Mills Ave.; $5; 407-270-9104. Dusty Fuss 9 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $5. Eugene Snowden’s Ten Pints of Truth 10 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free. Loudar 8 pm; Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park; $10; 407-636-9951. Richard Thompson 7 pm; The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave.; $39.50$69.50; 407-228-1220. THURSDAY, FEB. 16

CONCERTS/EVENTS Brother Hawk, Richard Sherfey & All God’s Children, Native Culture 8 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $7-$10. Chanel West Coast 10 pm; Gilt Nightclub, 740 Bennett Road; $10; 407-504-7699. Create: EDX, Lux Groove 10 pm; Venue 578, 578 N. Orange Ave.; $5-$10; 407-872-0066. Hart Bothwell 9 pm; Copper Rocket Pub, 106 Lake Ave., Maitland; free; 407-636-3171. Jamestown Revival & the Record Company, Smooth Hound Smith 7 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $20-$22; 407-246-1419. Kaleigh Baker 10 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free. Lucy Woodward 7:30 pm; Timucua White House, 2000 S. Summerlin Ave.; $20; 407-595-2713. 50

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[MUSIC] The Piano Guys Thursday at the Dr. Phillips Center

PHOTO BY ERIC RYAN ANDERSON

Makk Day: DJ Craze, K1K0, Ivarr, Ma-Less, Mezmriz, OG Nacho 11:30 pm; Backbooth, 37 W. Pine St.; $10; 407-999-2570. The Mellow Relics 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540.

OPERA/CLASSICAL Guest Recital 7 pm; Featuring Shelby VanNordstrand, soprano, and Mary Perkinson, violin. University of Central Florida Rehearsal Hall, 4000 Central Florida Blvd.; free; 407-8231500; music.ucf.edu.

The Piano Guys 8 pm; Walt Disney Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $45; 844-513-2014.

CONCERTS/EVENTS

Raleigh Estes and Friends 8 pm; Muldoon’s Saloon, 7439 Aloma Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-657-9980.

Brian Smalley 8-11 pm; Dead Lizard Brewing Company, 4507 36th St.; free; 407-777-3060.

Secondhand Serenade, Hawthorne Heights, Red Jumpsuit Apparatus 6 pm; Backbooth, 37 W. Pine St.; $20; 407-999-2570.

Classic Albums Live: Fleetwood Mac Rumours 8 pm; Hard Rock Live, 6050 Universal Blvd.; $14-$24; 407-351-5483.

FRIDAY, FEB. 17

Dave Wiseman 9:30 pm; Little Fish Huge Pond, 401 S. Sanford Ave., Sanford; free; 407-221-1499. Default Showcase: Exander, Eyecue, Ediz 10 pm; Sandwich Bar, 2432 E. Robinson St.; $5; 407-401-3456. Elle Carpenter 9 pm; Copper Rocket Pub, 106 Lake Ave., Maitland; $5; 407-636-3171. Ether, Junior Bruce, Ad Nauseum, Freakazoid, Acid Baptism 9 pm; Uncle Lou’s Entertainment Hall, 1016 N. Mills Ave.; $6; 407-270-9104. Gaelic Storm 7 pm; The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave.; $24.50$39.50; 407-228-1220.

Matt Pryor, Dan Andriano 7:30 pm; Backbooth, 37 W. Pine St.; $15; 407-999-2570. Music in the Library: Shirley Wang and Mark Looney Noon; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323. Rage of Astrology: Soundamind, Navitas, TimeBomb, Rich D., Analyze, Pimp Squad 10 pm; Peek Downtown, 50 E. Central Blvd. Suite B; free-$5. Talk Yo Shit Presents: The Left Field Theory, Swamp Posse, Fiona, Grape La Flame 9 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $5; 407-246-1419.

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Hair of the Dog Day The Bakery Bar Grand Opening The upstairs space in the alley between Church and Pine streets has struggled in recent years, with Rok Room going through two incarnations separated by a long period of inactivity. But the Bakery Bar, already in soft opening, looks to reverse that trend with craft cocktails sculpted around the flavors of classic desserts. If sweet’s your thing, you may want to check out the menu at a discounted price on their grand opening night. 7 p.m. Thursday; The Bakery Bar, 41 W. Church St.; various menu prices; facebook.com/thebakerybarorlando Bach and Beer This annual collaboration between the Bach Festival Society and Cask & Larder Brewing is probably our favorite local Baroque/craft beer crossover. While C&L launches this year’s batch of Brandenburger Bock (get it?), the Bach Festival Society Choir takes the stage to provide guests with heavenly musical accompaniment straight out of the 18th century. And now that the Ravenous Pig has taken over the kitchen at the former Cask & Larder space, expect the special German menu for the evening to be unglaublich. Noon-3 p.m. Saturday; The Ravenous Pig, 565 W. Fairbanks Ave., Winter Park; various menu prices; bachfestivalflorida.org

Bowmore Oyster Luge Kickoff and Tasting If you got excited hearing the words “oyster luge” and pictured yourself puckering up to a chute carved out of ice to knock back a steady stream of raw, briny bivalves, we have bad news. It turns out that an oyster luge has little to do with the Jägermeister luge you swore you’d never try but did anyway (and loved!). Bowmore’s luge is more like those lime-salt-tequila shots that approximate a margarita. Only this shot is out of an oyster shell and involves single malt scotch. Now we’re talking. The price includes samples of five different scotches from Bowmore – including an out-of-your-price-range 25-year – oysters, charcuterie and cheese. Reservations required. 5-7 p.m. Saturday; The Osprey Tavern, 4899 New Broad St.; $42; 407-960-7700; ospreytavern.com

Hair of the Dog Day Bring your pooch over to the Topher for this puppy party. Sponsored by Lagunitas (because of the dog in their logo, we assume), Hair of the Dog Day features free dog treats made from spent brewer’s grain, raffles and giveaways, and even a caricature artist on site to sketch silly portraits of your main mutt. Plus, comedian Big Tim Murphy will be on site in a culinary capacity, slinging (you guessed it) hot dogs. 2-7 p.m. Sunday; The Thirsty Topher, 601 Virginia Drive; various menu prices; facebook.com/thethirstytopher PHOTO BY ANITA PEEPLES

Lucinda Williams March 3 at the Plaza Live PHOTO BY DAVID MCCLISTER

City and Colour, March 14 at the Beacham

Clipping., April 3 at the Social

Sheryl Crow, April 29 at Bob Carr Theater

Voodoo Glow Skulls, March 16 at Will’s Pub

Flaming Lips, April 3 at House of Blues

Ben Harper, May 1 at Hard Rock Live

Devendra Banhart, Feb. 24 at the Beacham

Minus the Bear, March 20 at the Beacham

Portugal, the Man, April 7 at the Plaza Live

State Champs, May 5 at the Beacham

Jonathan Richman, Feb. 26 at the Social

Tortoise, March 20 at the Social

Shovels & Rope, April 7 at the Beacham

311, Feb. 27 at House of Blues

Stevie Nicks & the Pretenders, March 21 at Amway Center

Chronixx, April 12 at the Beacham

Steve Winwood, May 6 at Hard Rock Live

St. Paul & the Broken Bones, March 23 at the Beacham

Acid Mothers Temple, April 14 at the Social

Bishop Briggs, May 16 at the Social

Demetri Martin, March 23 at the Plaza Live

Ariana Grande, April 15 at Amway Center

Richard Cheese, May 19 at the Beacham

Chris Rock, April 1617 at the Dr. Phillips Center

Nora En Pure, May 19 at the Social

Red Hot Chili Peppers, April 26 at Amway Center

Morbid Angel, May 23 at the Beacham

AJR, Feb. 22 at the Social Agent Orange, the Queers, Feb. 23 at Will’s Pub

Smokey Robinson, March 3 at the Dr. Phillips Center Potty Mouth, March 7 at the Social Dropkick Murphys, March 8 at House of Blues Dua Lipa, March 8 at the Social

The Menzingers, March 23-24 at the Social

New Found Glory, May 8-10 at the Social

Norah Jones, March 8 at Bob Carr Theater

Brian Wilson, March 27 at the Dr. Phillips Center

A Tribe Called Red, March 9 at the Social

Dinosaur Jr., March 30 at the Beacham

Clap Your Hands Say Yeah, April 27 at the Social

Real Friends, May 24 at the Beacham

You Blew It!, March 10-11 at Will’s Pub

Steve Miller Band, March 31 at the Dr. Phillips Center

Umphey’s McGee, April 27 at House of Blues

Say Anything, May 25 at House of Blues

Bryan Ferry, March 12 at Hard Rock Live

We the Kings, April 1 at the Beacham

Big Wild, April 28 at the Social

Beach House, May 26 at the Social

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SATURDAY, 18

Northwestern Mutual Orlando Chili Cook-Off E V E N TS

Orlando is bringing the heat this weekend at the 8th Annual Northwestern Mutual Chili Cook-Off. This isn’t your grandma’s watered-down, lumpy stew either: We’re talking over 80 different chili samples, each with its own unique meaty, spicy bite. While you’re enjoying unlimited tastes of chili goodness, stop by the World Chili Eating Challenge, where 10 major league eaters will have only six minutes to shovel as much con carne as they can down their throats. And if that doesn’t sound like a good time to you, just remember that proceeds from this event will go to Alex’s Lemonade Stand, an organization fighting to find cures for children battling cancer. – Deanna Ferrante noon-6 p.m. | Festival Park, 2911 E. Robinson St. | orlandochilicookoff.com | $15-$50

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Tides of Man, Kinder Than Wolves, Henrietta 8 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $10-$12. TMD Combination 5: DJ 1235, DJ Watever, DJ Deviantart Heaux 9:30 pm; Spacebar, 2428 E. Robinson St.; $1; 407-228-0804. Useless Jester, Scholars and Scoundrels 10 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 305546-6522.

OPERA/CLASSICAL Guest Composer Recital: Shawn Allison 8 pm; Works

by guest composer Shawn Allison presented as part of the Central Florida Student Composers Symposium. University of Central Florida Rehearsal Hall, 4000 Central Florida Blvd.; free; 407823-1500; music.ucf.edu. Todd Wilson 7:30 pm; Classical. Rollins College, Knowles Memorial Chapel, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-646-2000. Yukiko Sekino 8 pm; A soloist noted for her performances of Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, and Scriabin. Sekino is the Gold Medalist of the 2006 International Russian Music

Piano Competition. Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park; $15; 407-636-9951; bluebambooartcenter.com. SATURDAY, FEB. 18

CONCERTS/EVENTS Adam Oam, Nicholas Armand, Rob Hazen, DJ 818 10 pm; Peek Downtown, 50 E. Central Blvd. Suite B; contact for price. Afton Showcase 6:30 pm; Bombshell’s Tavern, 5405 Edgewater Drive; $11-$14; 407-730-3999. CONTINUED ON PAGE 54

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Atlas Moon 8 pm; Copper Rocket Pub, 106 Lake Ave., Maitland; $5; 407-636-3171. Austin Miller, Matthew Fowler, Terri Binion 8 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $8. Blues B-Q: The Fabulous Thunderbirds, Robert Randolph & the Family Band, Three Forks Road 4-10 pm; City Commons Plaza, 400 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-246-2728. Bomi Boys, Pocket of Lollipops 8:30 pm; Little Fish Huge Pond, 401 S. Sanford

Ave., Sanford; free; 407-221-1499. Cash Cash 10 pm; Gilt Nightclub, 740 Bennett Road; $15-$30; 407-504-7699. Cheryl Anderson 8 pm; Aloma Bowl, 2530 Aloma Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-671-8675. Chris Macdonald’s Memories of Elvis in Concert 6 pm; The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave.; $28-$48; 407-228-1220. Cindy Scott and Brian Seeger 8 pm; Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park; $15; 407-636-9951.

The Company 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540. Contour, Infinitefreefall, Nory 8 pm; Spacebar, 2428 E. Robinson St.; free; 407-228-0804. Doc Martin, Julio, Mathew Scot 10 pm; Sandwich Bar, 2432 E. Robinson St.; contact for price; 407-421-1670. Gurf Morlix 6:30 pm; Fodor’s Grove, 2218 Vincent Road; $20 suggested donation. Heart Shaped Box (Tribute to Nirvana) 9 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $10; 407-246-1419.

Music in the Library: Balalaika Duo 11 am; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323. Music in the Library: Balalaika Duo 3-4 pm; Hiawassee Branch Library, 7391 W. Colonial Drive; fee; 407-835-7323. Vox Audio 7:30 pm; Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, 201 S. Magnolia Ave., Sanford; $24.95$34.95; 407-321-8111.

OPERA/CLASSICAL UCF Symphony Orchestra Concert 7 pm; Part of the St. Luke’s Lutheran Church annual concert series. St. Luke’s Lutheran Church and School, 2021 W. State Road 426, Oviedo; free; 407-823-1500; music.ucf.edu. SUNDAY, FEB. 19

CONCERTS/EVENTS Ancient Sun 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540. The Digs: Chrono, DJ Stranger, Jaymob 4 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free. GWADCIP$ 9 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free. Kaleigh Baker & Her Enablers, Louie Louie, Hannah Harber & the Lionhearts 6 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $10. Suppy Dudes, Diamond Aces, Fox Tails, March Onto April, the Ned, Frequent Seas, Comfort, Holding Hope 5:30 pm; Uncle Lou’s Entertainment Hall, 1016 N. Mills Ave.; $7; 407-270-9104. Tommy Emmanuel, Andy McKee 7 pm; The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave.; $29.50-$49.50; 407-228-1220. UCF Concert and University Bands 7 pm; UCF Visual Arts Building, 4000 Central Florida Blvd.; free; 407-823-1500. Unearth, Oh Sleeper 5 pm; Backbooth, 37 W. Pine St.; $15; 407-999-2570.

OPERA/CLASSICAL Spiritual Spaces: Peace and Serenity 5 pm; Classical. Rollins College, Knowles Memorial Chapel, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; $25; 407-646-2000. MONDAY, FEB. 20

CONCERTS/EVENTS Colin Hay 7 pm; The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave.; $29.50-$49.50; 407-228-1220.

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Joe Bonamassa 8 pm; Walt Disney Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $69-$149; 844-513-2014. Oriented Music Group Funk Jam 9 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; free. Phoenix Jazz Orchestra 8 pm; Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-636-9951. Reggae Mondae With Hor!zen 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540.

The Diva’s Diva: Tales of a Drag Queen Assistant One-woman show from Janine Klein about her experiences on tour with Ginger Minj. Saturday, 8 pm; Footlight Theatre, The Parliament House, 410 N. Orange Blossom Trail; $15; 407-425-7571; parliamenthouse.com. The Dynamic Duo Cabaret from Gerianne and Eric, a dueling piano sing-along act. Sunday, 7:30 pm; Footlight Theatre, The Parliament House, 410 N. Orange Blossom Trail; $15; 407-425-7571; parliamenthouse.com. The Great Gatsby Thursday-Friday, 7:30 pm; Margeson Theater, Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 812 E. Rollins St.; $13$40; 407-447-1700; orlandoshakes.org.

Josephine A play by Tod Kimbro about the iconic Josephine Baker. Saturday, 8 pm, Monday, 10 pm; The Venue, 511 Virginia Drive; $20; 321-438-3059; thevenueorlando.com.

A Piece of My Heart This powerful play portrays the lives of five nurses and a country western singer before, during, and after their deployment in the Vietnam War. Friday-Saturday, 8 pm and Sunday 4 pm; Rollins College, Annie Russell Theatre, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; $20; 407-646-2145; rollins.edu.

Newsies: The Broadway Musical Filmed performance of the Broadway musical based on the Disney film about a bunch of Socialist paperboys who throw their bodies on the gears of capitalism. Thursday, 7 pm, Saturday, 12:55 pm; multiple locations; $21.30; fathomevents.com.

Romeo and Juliet In the 1930s, located in American speakeasies, young lovers Romeo and Juliet are caught in these turf wars and hatred as the Montague and Capulet families vie for control of the clubs, the distribution of alcohol and ownership of the American Dream. Thursdays-Saturdays, 7:30 pm, Sundays, 2 pm;

Picasso at the Lapin Agile Einstein and Picasso’s worlds collide in Steve Martin’s play. Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 pm, Sundays, 2:30 pm; Mad Cow Theatre, 54 W. Church St.; $16$40; 407-297-8788; madcowtheatre.com.

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Robotman 10 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free. Torque: Jaybee 10 pm; Native Social Bar, 27 W. Church St.; contact for price; 407-403-2938. TUESDAY, FEB. 21

CONCERTS/EVENTS The Daniel Heitz Band 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540. Justin Hayward, Mike Dawes 6:30 pm; The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave.; $39.50-$64.50; 407-228-1220. Kolars, Solaseria 7 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $6-$8. Lolo, Ocean Park Standoff 7 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $12-$15; 407-246-1419. Turncoat, Nailed Shut, Scatter Shot, Cemetery Circles 7 pm; Uncle Lou’s Entertainment Hall, 1016 N. Mills Ave.; $10; 407-270-9104.

THEATER The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee Six young people in the throes of puberty candidly disclose hilarious and touching stories from their home life. Thursdays-Sundays, 8 pm; Garden Theatre, 160 W. Plant St., Winter Garden; $25-$33; 407-877-4736; gardentheatre.org. Allegiance Filmed performance of George Takei’s Broadway musical about Japanese Americans forced into internment camps during World War II. Sunday, 12:55 pm; multiple locations; $19.17; fathomevents.com. Constellations Sparks fly between a physicist and a beekeeper in this explorations of love’s many manifestations in the multiverse. Thursdays, 8 pm, Fridays, 8 pm, Saturdays, 8 pm and Sundays, 3 pm; Mad Cow Theatre, 54 W. Church St.; $30$40; 407-297-8788; madcowtheatre.com. Dishwasher Brian Feldman comes to your home and washes dishes. Times and locations determined when you sign up. Through Feb. 28; multiple locations; $10; brianfeldman.com. orlandoweekly.com

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Theatre UCF, 4000 Central Florida Blvd.; $20; 407-8231500; theatre.ucf.edu. The Seven Year Itch Friday-Saturday, 7:30 pm, Sunday, 2 pm, Monday, 7:30 pm; Valencia East Campus Black Box Theater, 701 N. Econlockhatchee Trail; $12; 407-582-2900; valenciacollege.edu/arts. String Tea Tuesday, 7:30-9:30 pm; Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park; $10; 518-328-4773; bluebambooartcenter.com. This Is Our Youth In 1982, on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, three pot-smoking teenagers are resoundingly rejecting the 1960s ideals of their affluent parents. Friday-Saturday, 8 pm, Sunday, 8 pm; Macbeth Studio, 37 N. Orange Ave.; $23; 407961-2858; macbethstudio.com. Why Do Fools Fall in Love? Wednesday-Thursday, 2 pm, Friday, 7:30 pm, Saturday, 2 & 7:30 pm; Winter Park Playhouse, 711-C Orange Ave., Winter Park; $20-$40; 407-645-0145; winterparkplayhouse.org.

COMEDY Chris Kattan Standup. Wednesday, 7 pm; Orlando Improv, 9101 International Drive; $20; 407-480-5233; theimprovorlando.com. The Comedy Get Down: Cedric the Entertainer, Eddie Griffin, D.L. Hughley, George Lopez, Charlie Murphy Saturday, 8 pm; Amway Center, 400 W. Church St.; $46.75-$86.75; 800-7453000; amwaycenter.com. Other Bar Open Mic with Ken Miller Comedy open mic with rotating hosts. Mondays, 8 pm; The Other Bar, 18 Wall St.; free; 407-843-8595. Ryan Hamilton Thursday, 7 pm, Friday, 6:30 & 9:45 pm, Saturday, 6 & 9:45 pm, Sunday, 6 pm; Orlando Improv, 9101 International Drive; $15-$17; 407-480-5233; theimprovorlando.com. 58

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Shit Sandwich Comedy showcase. Show up early to grab a good seat. Saturday, 9 pm; Bull and Bush, 2408 E. Robinson St.; free; 407-896-7546. Upright Citizens Brigade: Touring Company The best improv comedians from the legendary Upright Citizens Brigade Theatres in New York and Los Angeles. Wednesday, 7:30 pm; Alexis & Jim Pugh Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $35; drphillipscenter.org.

DANCE Blacklist Babes Cabaret: Love Is the New Black Cabaret show with live music, singing, dancing and burlesque performances. Friday, 9 pm; The Venue, 511 Virginia Drive; $15-$25; 407-412-6895; thevenueorlando.com. Coming Together in Unity Standing Ovation Talent Group unmasks African artistry through harmonious music and rhythm. Friday, 8 pm; Alexis & Jim Pugh Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $30; drphillipscenter.org. Peek-a-Boo Birthday Celebration of Blue Burlesque tribute to Blue Star. Wednesday, 9:30 pm; Stardust Lounge, 431 E. Central Blvd.; $7; 407-839-0080. Tapas & Tango Guests enjoy wine, tapas, dance lessons and live entertainment. Friday, 8-10 pm; Arthur Murray Dance Studio, 6700 Conroy Windermere Road; $30 per couple; 407-719-5190; orlandodatenightguide.com.

ART OPENINGS/EVENTS Antiques Vintage and Garden Show This show combines fine antiques, art, jewelry, vintage and unique collectibles, garden blooms and more into an outstanding threeday show. Friday-Saturday, 10 am-5 pm, Sunday, 11 am-4 pm; Orlando Museum of Art, 2416 N. Mills Ave.; $15; 407896-4231x254; omart.org.

Black Spaces, White Faces Pop-up exhibition of work from Trevon Jakkar and Christopher Santos, along with an open mic poetry slam. Friday, 6-9 pm; Guava Tree Gallery, 811 Briercliff Drive; free. F.L.A.M.E. A one-night event combining fashion, live art and music. Thursday, 6-9 pm; The Orange Studio, 1121 N. Mills Ave.; free; orangestudio4rent.com. Kujichagulia A group show celebrating Black History Month. Opens Thursday, 6 pm, through March 11; CityArts Factory, 29 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-648-7060. Nude Nite Three-day annual art event with more than 200 original juried works showcased, all featuring creative takes on the nude human form. Entertainment includes burlesque, performance artists, installations, pole performances, body paint and more. ThursdaySaturday, 6 pm; Central Florida Fairgrounds, 4603 W. Colonial Drive; $25-$35; 321-229-8110; nudenite.com. Pablo Picasso: The Diary of a Master Artwork by Pablo Picasso, including the entire 347 series, numerous signed etchings, aquatints and linocuts. Opens Saturday, 7:30 pm, through May 5; Baterby’s Art Gallery, 6848 Stapoint Court, Winter Park; $5-$50; 888-682-9995; baterbys.com. Raw Orlando: Cusp Art and fashion party with a visual art gallery, runway fashion show, performing arts and more. Wednesday, 7 pm; Venue 578, 578 N. Orange Ave.; $22-$30; 407-872-0066. Shapeless Hunger Exhibition of graffiti and street art from Kit Mizeres and Revost. Opens Thursday, 6 pm, through March 11; Redefine Gallery, 29 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-648-7060. Sumi-e Art by Lenin Ovalles featuring East Asian-inspired brush painting and calligraphy. Opens Thursday, 6 pm; Canvs, 101 S. Garland Ave.; free; 407-378-4150; canvs.org. CONTINUED ON PAGE 60


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Virunga Photographs by conservation photographer Adam Kiefer of Africa’s oldest National Park, home to the last mountain gorillas. Also appearing: work by Ya La’ford, Jaime Margary and Peterson Guerrier. Opens Friday, 7-10 pm; Snap Downtown, 420 E. Church St.; free; snaporlando.com.

CONTINUING THIS WEEK Adorn Through Feb. 25; Arts on Douglas, 123 Douglas St., New Smyrna Beach; free; 386-428-1133. AfroFantastic: Black Imagination and Agency in the American Experience Through April 2; Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-646-2526; rollins.edu. An Awareness of Gravity Through April 2; Museum of Art DeLand, 600 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand; $10; 386-7344371; moartdeland.org.

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B-Side: Unrecorded Through Feb. 28, 10 am-6 pm; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. The Black Figure in the European Imaginary Through May 14; Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-646-2526; rollins.edu. Bo Bartlett: American Artist Through May 7; Mennello Museum of American Art, 900 E. Princeton St.; $5; 407-2464278; mennellomuseum.com. Contemporary Visions of Frantz Zéphirin: Haitian Mystic Through April 16; Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Gardens, 633 Osceola Ave., Winter Park; $5; 407-647-6294. Dancers Through April 9; Museum of Art DeLand, 600 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand; $10; 386-7344371; moartdeland.org. Good Vibes Through Feb. 28; Dandelion Communitea Cafe, 618 N. Thornton

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● FEB. 15-21, 2017

Ave.; free; 407-362-1864; dandelioncommunitea.com. Jack King: Searching for Truth Through April 29; Crealde School of Art, 600 St. Andrews Blvd., Winter Park; free; 407-671-1886; crealde.org. Learning Contentment From the Dutch Through March 5; The Art Gallery at Mills Park, 1650 N. Mills Ave.; free; 855-336-3653; thegalleryatmillspark.com. Mennello Museum Invitational Through March 3; Mennello Museum of American Art, 900 E. Princeton St.; $5; 407-2464278; mennellomuseum.com. Painting and Sculpture Through April 2; Museum of Art DeLand, 600 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand; $10; 386-7344371; moartdeland.org. Philip Evergood & William Gropper: Social Realists Through April 2; Museum of Art DeLand, 600 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand; $10; 386-7344371; moartdeland.org.

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[EVENTS] Deepak Chopra Wednesday at the Dr. Phillips Center


Bo Bartlett: American Artist Through April 23; Orlando Museum of Art, 2416 N. Mills Ave.; $15; 407896-4231; omart.org. Raymond Smith: In Time We Shall Know Ourselves Through April 15; Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona State College, Daytona Beach; free; 386-506-4475; smponline.org. Reframing the Picture, Reclaiming the Past Through April 2; Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-646-2526; rollins.edu. Third Thursday Gallery Hop Thursday, 6 pm; CityArts Factory, 29 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-648-7060; cityartsfactory.com. The Wyeths and American Artists in Maine Through April 23; Orlando Museum of Art, 2416 N. Mills Ave.; $15; 407-896-4231; omart.org. You Are My Sunshine Ongoing; Art of Healing Gallery at Florida Hospital - Altamonte, 601 E. Altamonte Drive, Altamonte Springs; free; 407-303-5395; flhosp.com. Youth in Focus: Moments in Nature Through July 18; Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona State College, Daytona Beach; free; 386-506-4475; smponline.org. Zombie Dog Through March 4; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free; willspub.org.

EVENTS Arab Festival A cultural heritage festival celebrating Arabic art, food and traditions organized by the Arab American Community Center. Sunday, 11 am-7 pm; Lake Eola Park, 195 N. Rosalind Ave.; free; 407-985-4550. Bach & Beer The Bach Festival Choir performs live while the 2017 Brandenburger Bock is released. Special German food menu also. Saturday, noon-3 pm; The Ravenous Pig, 565 W. Fairbanks Ave., Winter Park; various menu prices; 407-6282333; bachfestivalflorida.org.

Bowmore Oyster Luge Kickoff and Tasting A scotch and oyster pairing, followed by charcuterie and cheese. Saturday, 5-7 pm; The Osprey Tavern, 4899 New Broad St.; $22-$42; 407-9607700; ospreytavern.com.

with more than 80 different chilis, live music, a chili eating competition and more. Saturday, noon-6 pm; Festival Park, 2911 E. Robinson St.; $15-$50; 407-381-5310; orlandochilicookoff.com.

Chili for Charity Enjoy creative chili dishes from area restaurants and caterers, beer and wine, live entertainment and a silent auction. Wednesday, 5:30 pm; Winter Park Farmers Market, 200 W. New England Ave., Winter Park; $25-$30; 407-8981671; chiliforcharity.org.

Orlando Home & Garden Show Offers endless home improvement ideas, exhibits and expert speakers. Featuring landscape and gardening experts, kitchen and bathroom designers, and related businesses exhibiting everything from front entrance décor to backyard landscapes. Friday, noon-7 pm, Saturday, 10 am-7 pm, Sunday, 11 am-5 pm; Orange County Convention Center, 9800 International Drive; $9; 407-685-1061.

Deepak Chopra Join Deepak Chopra as he creates a roadmap for “higher health” based on the latest findings in mainstream and alternative medicine. Wednesday, 7:30 pm; Walt Disney Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $45-$75; 844-5132014; drphillipscenter.org. The Enchanted Jungle Benefit night for the GLBT Center with music, a full casino, food, a silent auction and more. Saturday, 6 pm; Venue 578, 578 N. Orange Ave.; $50-$150; 407-872-0066; junglepartyorlando.com. Erth’s Dinosaur Zoo Live Interact with a collection of life-like dinosaurs and other creatures brought to life by a team of skilled performers and puppeteers. Friday, 7 pm; Walt Disney Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $17.50-$49.50; 844-5132014; drphillipscenter.org. Hair of the Dog Day Puppy party with free dog treats, raffles, giveaways, hot dogs, a doggy caricature artist and more. Sunday, 2-7 pm; The Thirsty Topher, 601 Virginia Drive; various menu prices; 407-491-4342; facebook. com/thethirstytopher. Longwood Community Yard Sale Monthly community yard sale. Saturday, 8:30 am-12:30 pm; Old Longwood Elementary School, 840 Orange Ave., Longwood; free; 407-2603497; longwoodfl.org. Northwestern Mutual Chili Cook-Off Chili competition

Retro Modern Home Tour A walking tour of some of Audubon Park’s finest mid-century modern living spaces, accompanied by light bites, cocktails, raffles and more. Saturday, 1-7:30 pm; Audubon Park Garden District, East Winter Park Road and Corrine Drive; $35; audubonparkgardens.com. Winter Carnival Midway carnival with rides, games and food. Thursday, 5-10 pm, Friday, 5-11 pm, Saturday, 3-11 pm, Sunday, 3-10 pm, Monday, noon-9 pm, Tuesday, 5-10 pm; Orlando Live Events, 6405 S. U.S. Highway 17-92, Fern Park; free-$20; 407-951-8751; orlandoliveevents.com. Winter Garden Blues & BBQ Festival Pairs the hottest blues and roots musicians with award-winning local BBQ connoisseurs for an afternoon celebration of true Southern soul. Saturday, 4-10 pm; Downtown Winter Garden, West Plant Street and South Park Avenue, Winter Garden; free; 407656-4155; cwgdn.com.

LEARNING Black Panther: This World Wakanda Discussion of the ways writers have used the Black Panther’s fictive world to explore black concerns with the African Diaspora. Presented by author and urban historian Julian Chambliss. CONTINUED ON PAGE 62

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[MUSIC] Kolars Tuesday at Will’s Pub

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Wednesday, 6:30 pm; Eatonville Branch Library, 200 E. Kennedy Blvd., Eatonville; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. Orlando Language Exchange A safe space for language learners and enthusiasts. Meet new people from all over the world and practice your languages in a friendly environment. Wednesday, 7 pm; Sandwich Bar, 2432 E. Robinson St.; free; 787-234-1937. Works With Sound A free weekly composition-training program for students of all skill levels and ages with musicians from the Timucua Arts Foundation. Sunday, 2-4 pm; The Dorothy Lumley Melrose Center, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; ocls.info.

CIVICS Minnijean Brown Trickey A surviving member of the Little Rock Nine, black children who had to have to National Guard escort them to desegregated schools in 1957, speaks about her experiences. Thursday, 5:30 pm; Valencia College West Campus, 1800 S. Kirkman Road; free; valenciacollege.edu.

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SPORTS

Brian Downes The local author reads from his new work, followed by a Q&A. Tuesday, 7-9 pm; The District at Mills 50, 1221 N. Mills Ave.; free; 407-601-3363; facebook. com/thedistrictatmills50.

Falcon Run Club Biweekly runners club with discounted beer afterwards. Monday, 6:30 pm; The Falcon, 819 E. Washington St.; free; 407-423-3060.

Diverse Word Spoken word open mic. Tuesdays, 8 pm; Dandelion Communitea Cafe, 618 N. Thornton Ave.; free; 407-362-1864; dandelioncommunitea.com. The Giggity Slam With Danny B. Competitive slam with a featured reader themed around love, erotica and related poetry. Thursday, 8 pm; The Milk Bar, 2424 E. Robinson St.; free; 407-896-4954. Meet the Author: Mathieu Cailler Mathieu Cailler conducts a reading, answers audience questions and signs books. Tuesday, 7 pm; Chickasaw Library, 870 N. Chickasaw Trail; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. Winter With the Writers: Chris Abani An on-stage reading and interview with the novelist, screenwriter and playwright. Thursday, 7:30 pm; Bush Auditorium, Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-646-2000.

The Orlando (Afternoon) Shuffle Free shuffleboard event. Equipment provided. Saturday, 3-5 pm; Beardall Senior Center, 800 S. Delaney Ave.; free; 407-230-5356. Orlando Magic vs. San Antonio Spurs Wednesday, 7 pm; Amway Center, 400 W. Church St.; $35-$357; 800-7453000; amwaycenter.com. Orlando Solar Bears vs. Norfolk Admirals Ice hockey. Thursday-Friday, 7 pm, Sunday, 1:30 pm; Amway Center, 400 W. Church St.; $12-$45; 800-7453000; amwaycenter.com. Orlando Waves Professional Basketball Game Friday, 6 pm, Sunday, 2 pm; Kissimmee Civic Center, 201 E. Dakin Ave., Kissimmee; $12; 321-3001922; orlandowaves.com. Thunder Fight Night Mixed martial arts. Saturday, 6:30 pm; Orlando Live Events, 6405 S. U.S. Highway 17-92, Fern Park; $35-$70; 407-951-8751; orlandoliveevents.com. ■


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B Y D A N S AVA G E

I’ve been reading your advice column in ‘The Coast’ in Halifax for a while, and it seems that most solutions to relationship problems revolve around sex. Everyone wants it or needs it, we should fuck before dinner, we can spice up our sex life in this certain way to be happy. What about someone who doesn’t want to have sex, ever? I’ve asked other people for advice, and the answer is usually “take one for the team,” have sex to keep them happy. Is that the only way I could find happiness in a relationship? It’s not something I want to do – but at this point, I don’t see any other options. All Alone Ace I’m a sex-advice columnist. Consequently, AAA, people tend to write me when sex (needing it, wanting it, getting it but not the kind you want, etc.) is the problem, and sex (in some new and improved form) is often-but-not-always the solution. I also get and respond to questions from asexuals, and I’ve urged sexuals not to regard asexuals as defective – or, for that matter, to view committed-but-sexless relationships as defective. So long as both people in the relationship are content and happy, it’s a good and healthy and functional relationship, whether the sex is vanilla or spicy or nonexistent. Strictly companionate marriages can be good marriages. As for “taking one for the team,” that’s not advice given only to asexuals. A woman who’s married to a foot fetishist, for instance, may be advised to “take one for the team” and let her husband perv on her feet. A vanilla guy married to a woman corrupted by Fifty Shades of Grey (it’s baaaaaack) may be advised to “take one for the team” and tie the wife up once in a while. And while there are certainly lots of asexuals out there taking one for the team – having sex to please/keep/shut up their partners (or allowing their partners to seek sex elsewhere) – you know who doesn’t have to take one for the team, ever? Asexuals with other asexuals. Dating another asexual is the other option, the obvious option, and may be the best option for you, AAA. (Don’t want to take one for the team, ever? Don’t draft anyone onto your team who wants one, ever.) A quick Google search brings up several asexual dating sites: asexualitic.com, asexualmatch.com, ace-book.net, asexualpals.com. You can also choose to identify as asexual – and search for other asexuals – on mainstream dating sites like OkCupid and Match. I can already hear you composing your response, AAA: Asexuals are just 1 percent of the population. There are 400,000 people in Halifax, which means there are 3,999 other asexuals. Sounds like a lot, but most will be too young, too old or unappealing for political or personal reasons (loves Kevin O’Leary, hasn’t seen Moonlight, picks their nose with 64

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an oyster fork). And a significant chunk of that number may not be aware – yet – that they’re asexual. So realistically, AAA, your local dating pool is much smaller than 3,999. But! Good news! There are 7.5 billion people on the planet! And 75 million of them are asexual! I have a good friend with a unique array of kinks – a crazy, specific and rare constellation of kinks – and he cast a wide net on kink dating apps. After he met someone on the other side of the world with all the same kinks and they hit it off via Skype and the guy provided my friend with references (put my friend in touch with friends who could vouch for him), my friend flew to the other side of the world to go on a first date. Two months later, he went back, stayed for a few months and then moved abroad to be with Mr. Kink Match on the Other Side of the World. My friend did things people are typically advised against – who gets on a 12-hour flight to go on a first date? – because he knew there weren’t many lids out there for his particular pot. Asexuality isn’t a kink, I realize, but you can and should cast a wide net, AAA, like my kinky expat friend. Don’t let geography limit you in your search. You may not be able to afford to do what my friend did – fly halfway around the world for a first date – but you can get your ass to the next province over if you hit it off with an asexual in New Brunswick or Quebec. Good luck. I’m a 22-year-old lesbian living in Utah. I’m finally going back to college this fall. I have autism (high functioning), and I couldn’t handle going to school full-time while working. Thus I will be stuck living at my parents’ house, as I couldn’t afford rent and living expenses on my own. The problem is, my parents are super Republican and religious. While I live at home, I can’t date (they are against me being gay), I can’t drink and I can’t watch movies with swears. They also force me to participate in daily scripture study, which I hate. I don’t know what to do. I can’t be myself or have any fun while I live at home because I’m afraid my parents will kick me out. But I can’t afford to move out, either. I’m shy and socially nervous, so I don’t have any friends who could help me out, and I can’t see living with roommates who are strangers. I’ll be 29 by the time I graduate, and I don’t want to live like this for that long. Any advice? Maybe I could work something out with my parents, but they are set in their ways and I don’t want to hurt them. Under Their Authoritarian Homophobia If they were just enforcing “their rules” about booze in their house, that would be one thing. But requiring your adult daughter not to date anyone, or not to be a lesbian at all, is just mean. (A lot of insane religious ●

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“ PA I R O F AC E S ”

people believe homosexuality is an act, not an identity, so someone who isn’t currently having gay or lesbian sex isn’t actually gay or lesbian. By that standard, I haven’t been gay for hours.) And leveraging their daughter’s autism and social isolation and economic dependence against her in order to control her? Meaner still. You say you don’t want to hurt your parents – you’re a good daughter – but it’s clear your shitty parents don’t care if they hurt you. Typically my advice would be to tell your mean and shitty parents what they want to hear – to feel free to lie to them under duress – and then lean on your friends, do your own thing outside of the house and be careful not to get caught. But that’s not an option for you. So you’ll have to ask yourself what you value more: freedom now or getting your degree sooner rather than later. If it’s your freedom, move out, get a job, go to community college and take your time getting that degree. If it’s getting your degree before turning 30, knuckle under, spend a lot of late nights “studying in the library,” and go to the student resource center on your campus and ask if there are any campus services/ support groups for students with autism or Asperger’s syndrome. Who knows? You might meet some people who you could see yourself living with, as roommates and friends, and be able to get out of your parents’ house sooner rather than later. P.S. You’re in Utah, UTAH. If there’s an LGBT student group on your campus, go to the meetings and share your story. You might meet a gay Mormon boy with parents like yours – shitty and mean – who could use a fake girlfriend until he graduates, and you could use a fake boyfriend until you move out of mom and dad’s.

On the Lovecast, two tricky pregnancies: savagelovecast.com. @fakedansavage on Twitter mail@savagelove.net

 Are you looking for a new furry friend? Meet Lady!

Lady (A370060) is a 14-yearold dog who was surrendered because her owner could no longer keep her. Lady is a little shy, but she’s a sweet senior girl. Her previous owner said that she is car-trained, leash-trained and housebroken. She knows basic commands, and gets along with children and other dogs. Lady can’t wait to find a new family! The adoption fee for dogs is $55; however, Lady’s adoption fee has been waived due to our Senior Pets promotion. Fees include sterilization, vaccinations and a microchip. Orange County Animal Services is located at 2769 Conroy Road, near the Mall at Millenia. The shelter is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, please call 407836-3111 or visit ocnetpets.com.


Auto Cash for cars and trucks Running or not Any Condition 352-771-6191. WANTED - All motorhomes, fifth wheels and travel trailers. Cars, vans and trucks any condition. Cash paid on the spot. Call 954-789-7530.

Research Studies DO YOU HAVE OSTEOARTHRITIS? –

Osteoarthritis studies are enrolling now. Those who qualify may receive*: -Compensation which varies by study up to $1,000 -No-cost study-related care from doctors -No-cost study medication. Call today at 866-290-5847 Or visit www.OAresearchstudies. com. *In a clinical research study, the participants may receive investigational study product or may receive an inactive substance, or placebo, depending on the study design. Participants receive study-related care from a doctor/research team for the duration of the study. Reasonable payments will be made for participation and the length of the study may vary.

DO YOU HAVE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS? –

Rheumatoid Arthritis studies are enrolling now. Those who qualify may receive*: -Compensation which varies by study up to $625 -No-cost study-related care from doctors -No-cost study medication Call today at 1-866-291-3330 Or visit www.raresearchstudiestoday.com. *In a clinical research study, the participants may receive investigational study product or may receive an inactive substance, or placebo, depending on the study design. Participants receive study-related care from a doctor/research team for the duration of the study. Reasonable payments will be made for participation and the length of the study may vary.

Health, Beauty & Fitness MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855-732-4139 (AAN CAN)

Struggling with DRUGS or ALCOHOL? Addicted to PILLS? Talk to someone who cares. Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 800-9786674.

Legal, Public Notices NOTICE OF SALE Vehicles will be sold as is, no warranty. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid. Terms of bids are cash only. Buyer must have funds on hand at time of sale: 2000 Honda VIN# 2HKRL1866YH580950 2006 Mazda VIN# JM1BK12F261408643 2006 Chevy VIN# 2CNDL13F766142551 2007 Toyota VIN# 4T1BE46KX7U124110 2005 Volvo VIN# YV1MS682252070724 2001 Honda VIN# 1HGEM22531L016807 2001 Audi VIN# WAUBH64B51N093048 To be sold at auction at 8:00 a.m. on March 1, 2017, 7301 Gardner Street, Winter Park, FL. 32792 Constellation Towing & Recovery LLC

Notice of Auction 2001 Lufk Semi Trailer with VIN# 1L01A482211147464 will be auctioned on 2/20/2017 at 9:00 am. Nicholas Gerard DelGiudice & Robert Joseph Sears Sr. 8550 Old Winter Garden Rd., Orlando, FL. 32835.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 15-CA- 11422-O VENTURES TRUST 2013-I- H-R BY MCM CAPITAL PARTNERS, LLC ITS TRUSTEE, Plaintiff, v. KRISTEN BENEDETTO; et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in the cause pending in the Circuit Court of the Ninth Judicial Circuit, in and for Orange County, Florida, Case No. 2015-CA- 11422-O in which VENTURES TRUST 2013-I- H-R BY MCM CAPITAL PARTNERS, LLC ITS TRUSTEE, is the Plaintiff, and ROBERT BENEDETTO, KRISTEN BENEDETTO, SUNTRUST BANK, THE RESERVE AT WEDGEFIELD HOA, Defendants, and all unknown parties claiming interests by, through, under or against a named defendant to this action, or having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the Property herein, situated in Orange County, Florida described as follows: LOT 13, RESERVE AT WEDGEFIELD UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 53, PAGES 16 THRU 18 INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with an undivided percentage interest in the common elements pertaining thereto, the Orange County Clerk of Court will offer the above-referenced property at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m. on the 7th day of March, 2017, at www.myorangeclerk.realforeclose. com. Any person claiming interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 31st day of January, 2017. /S/ Jason R. Hawkins, CAMERON H. P. WHITE, Florida Bar No.: 021343, cwhite@ southmilhausen.com, JASON R. HAWKINS, Florida Bar No.: 11925, jhawkins@southmilhausen.com, South Milhausen, P.A., 1000 Legion Place, Suite 1200, Orlando, Florida 32801, Telephone: (407) 539-1638, Facsimile: (407) 539-2679, Attorneys for Plaintiff.

Rentals CONDO FOR RENT

1st Floor: 2 bed, 2 bath John Young Pkwy & 441 $955 a month - Call 407-2176767.

ROOMS FOR RENT

$100-$125 per wk. OBT and 23rd St Call 347-419-6990

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Legal, Public Notices NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. PERSONAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS & OTHER PERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF AT PUBLIC SALES ON FEBRUARY 24, 2017 AT LOCATIONS & TIMES INDICATED BELOW, TO SATISFY OWNERS LIEN FOR RENT & FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. ALL ITEMS OR SPACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH SPACE PURCHASED IS REQUIRED. 1080 E ALTAMONTE DR, ALTAMONTE SPRINGS FL AT 9:30 AM: B005 - BOWEN, DOUGLASS, B008 - GREEN, ARRIA, B022 JONES, SIMONE, B025 - FADER, NICOLE, B026 - DOUGLAS, ASHLEY, B032 - FERNANDEZ, MELVA, B050 - SEARS, BIRCH, B056 - PHILLIPS, RANDALL, B110 - NIEVES, JOSE, B130 - TUBMAN, BRETT, B150 - LANDIS, STOREY, B194 - TIMPANARO, THOMAS, B211 - HOGAN, JOANN, C026 - GARRITY, LADAWN, C049 - DENNISON, LAKESA, C054 - WALTERS, JARVIS, C076 BARRETO, JASON, C083 - LONG, KATHRYN, C091 - DAVIS, CASSANDRA, D002 - STEPHENS, JERRISH, D003 - PADGETT, PAMELA, D014 - HILL, ELAINE, D017 - GROFFEL, CHRIS, D027 - BUCKLAND, JAMES, D028 - HIXON, LEONARD, D044 - THOMAS, MARK, D060 - REED, LISA, D066 - TULLOCH, JAMES, D067 - MARSHALL, MARY, D071 - BENJAMIN, DANNY, D083 BABER JR, AMOS,D086 - SCOTT, JOHN, F028 - PARISI, MICHAEL. 310 W CENTRAL PARKWAY, ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL, 32714 AT 9:45 AM: 0018 - PRESSLEY, ANEDRA, 0024 - FLORIDA SURGERY CENTER, 0058 - MADDUX, MATTHEW, 0268 - KING HUNT, ANNETTE, 0318 - FLEMING, HELEN, 0342 - BLOSER, JAYSON, 0395 - HOWARD, WALTER, 0416 HOWARD, WALTER, 0496 – MARBREY, RON, 1025 - QUINONES, DANIEL, 2058 - DENNIS, ROBERT, 3022 - PLAZA ECHEVARRIA, FREDDIE, 3028 - LINCOLN, ROSEEN, 3055 - NEEDHAM, ROGER, 3086 - HANAFUSA, AMBER, 4005 - HERZOG, LISA, 4013 - CARABALLO, ILIANA, 4022-BRIDGES- POWELL, TONJIA, 4043 - CAPUTO, ERIN, 4049 - GRAY, LISA, 4060 - SPRAGUE, JAMES, 5011 - EVALUVEST BRANCH OPERATIONS,5011 – CORRERA, CLAUDIA, 6007 BURNS, VICTOR. 2800 W STATE ROAD 434 , LONGWOOD , FL, 32779 AT 10:00 AM: 0284 - LANGE, JENNA, 0357 - RAPHINO, DARLENE,

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0423 - MELENDEZ, PEDRO, 0641 - BUCKLEY, GREGORY, 0652 - AZZARA, SUSAN, 0674 - BROOM SR., DUANE, 0702 DENNIS, BILLY, 0764 - THOMAS, CASSANDRA, 0804 - COTTON, ROBERT, 0816 - SCOTT, KEVIN, 0823 - GARFINKEL, SCOTT, 0846 – WARING, MICHAEL, 0875 - CHADEAYNE, DONALD, 0906 - COWAN, MELISSA, 0942 TABURY, NANA. 521 S STATE ROAD 434, ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL, 32714 AT 10:15 AM: 1012 - EASON, TIMOTHY, 1024 - MOORE, ANTONNETTE, 3021 - MANGUAL, ARIEL, 3030 - COLON, JOHN, 4003 - JOHNSON, SYBLE, 4006 - BRANCH, SUZANNE, 4014 - WILLIAMS, WES, 4030 - SMITH, GERALD, 4034 - WILLIAMS, ANGELA, 5025 - BAYS, SHAWN, 5033 - VEGLIO, GIULIO, 5046 - VALLEJO, CALEB, 5051 JOHNSON, DORA, 5086 - SMITH, VERONICA, 5091 - LOPEZ, JASMIN, 5124 - VILLEGAS, TERRIANN, 5140 - JONES, SIERRA, 5154 - POBLANO, DAVID, 6001 - HOLMES, ZETA, 6006 - VEGLIO, GIULIO, 6011 - EDWARDS, KRISTINA, 6028 - FRANCIS, KIRK, 6081 - SMITH, VERONICA, 6083 - BALLARD, ABNER, 6107 - MARTINEZ, JESSICA, 6146 GONZALEZ, FRANKIE. 455 S HUNT CLUB BLVD, APOPKA, FL, 32703 AT 10:30 AM: 2011 - NOTTAGE, LEESA, 2019 MARTIR, CARLA, 3035 - PUGH, JERONICA, 3040 - GEHRIS, PETER, 3044 - MUNOZ, MAGLADENA, 4006 - RIVERA, JEFFREY, 4079 - LEE, CONNIE, 5026 ROSA, ABIGAIL, 5046 - SMITH, BRITTNEY, 5050 - HAMMONDS, DOMINIQUE, 5054 - ROBINSON, ANGEL, 6003 - SHAW, TONI, 6053 - ROBERTS, JOHN, 6119 - ROBINSON, ANGEL, 6164 - PADILLA, EUNICE, 6192 - JALBERT, RONALD, 6201 - JALBERT, MEGHAN, 6202 - FRANK, JELDA, 7006 NASSAR, KERIM. 2431 S ORANGE BLOSSOM TRAIL, APOPKA, FL, 32703 AT 10:45 AM: B009 - FEES, DAVID, B022 - JOHNSON, DEWAUN, C014 - KING, NICHOLAS, C025 - SIMON, ROBERT, D051 - MCCANT, AATRON, D064 - RANDOLPH, TONI, D065 HALL, TRACEY, D090 - YINGST, THOMAS, D095 - O NEILL, MISSIE, F015 - CHATIGNY, BRIANA, F019 - DUNSTON, DENESE, G002 - HARDY, BETTY, G026 - HOUSEAL, LASHAURNE, H028 - POLINGO, KATHY, H040 HUNT, DEMARCUS, H044 - LEE, RASHAUN, H057 - LAMBERT, D CARIS, NA04 - COLON, ALBERTO, NA07 - COSSAIRT, JASON, NA16 - GRANT, KENNLEY, NA17 - JAMES, YOLANDA, NA23 RIVERA, LUCIA, NB23 - BOURCIER, TRAVIS, P089 - BAREFOOT, ANDREW, P093 - GUZMAN, ROBERTO, P096 - MOORE, HARLEY, S017 - HENRY, AESHA, S028 - WHITE, TAMIA, S038 WALMER, BARBIE, U016 - GORE, CHRISTINA, U030 - MESSENGER, JEFFREY, V006 - ROSS, YALONDA, V011 - VALLEJO, CHRISTIAN, V016 - CAMPBELLS,

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● FEB. 15-21, 2017

JACQUELINE, W003 - CLOVIS, ROSALIN. 108 W MAIN ST , APOPKA , FL, 32703 AT 11:00 AM: 0112 - NEWMAN, KENNETH, 0117 - SPARKMAN, LUCILLE, 0124 - DURHAM, ARIKA, 0217 - DANIELS, RAEKWON, 0305 - PORTER, ROBIN, 0313 - ACAJABON, KATHERINE, 0406 - SPEARS, MARILYN, 0511 - NEIL, ANTOINETTE, 0612 - LEWIS, JOSEPH, 0708 - JONES, JUANITA, 0713 – DYSON, ALISA, 0715 - LAWSON, LATOYA, 0805 - YARBOUGH, DION, 0817 - JAMES, LATASHA, 0820 - BROWN, TONIQUE, 0925 - SULLIVAN, JAMES, 1005 TAICLET, DANIEL, 1124 - GOINS, ROGER, 1202 - SMITH, NICOLE, 1209 - BRANOM, SAMANTHA, 1233 - SYMANSKI, PATRICIA, 1303 - WALLACE, JENNIFER, 1355 - KNIGHT, ANGIE, 1388T - COBB, JAMAICA, 1404T WILLIAMS, DAHAVELIEN, 1456 - HARRIS, JOHNATHAN, 1476 SIMPKINS, MEGGAN, 1484 - RIVERS JR, CALVIN, 1708 - TYLER, CORINTHIAN, 1726 - BECKETT, RACKEL, 1732 - HOLLIS, DEIDRE, 1735 - KUNKEL, BRANDON, 1738 - SIGYRDSSON, GUDNY, 1741 - WORTHAM, BONITA, 1742 - THOMAS, CHRISTINA, 1767 LOWRY, MARK. 8255 SILVER STAR ROAD ORLANDO, FL 32818 AT 11:15 AM: 1212 - WRIGHT, SHANA, 1223 - RAMOS, YARITZA, 1224 - PERDUE, DEBRA, 1305 - JOHNSON, DUANE, 1313 - PLUMMER, BRIAN, 1330 - BLAKE, LEIGHTON, 1350 - STEVENS, LACHARLES DERRICK, 1353 - DELEON JR., JOSE, 1359 - WILSON, REVA, 1408 - BEAVERS, DASHE, 1444 - JOHNSON, DEVON, 1446 GRIGLEY, COREY, 1473 - ROSS, EMMA, 1483 - FOOTMAN, ALPHA, 1502 - WILSON, DEVONA, 1508 - LEE, CAROL, 1523 - JONES, TASHA, 1617 - COLE, GINA, 1624 - WILKERSON, JENNIFER, 1718 - LAWRENCE, DWIGHT, 2024 - BIRDSONG, TAMARA, 2047 - VAZQUEZ, CHRISTIAN, 2120 - HAMILTON, SHARDAI, 2136 - TIWARI, NARUPA, 2164 - NELSON, EVELYN, 2210 - LEE, TIM, 2213 - MOYA, DINA, 2233 - MARSHALL, ASHA, 2234 - MARABLE, AR JAY, 2238 - CRUZ, MARCOS, 2260 - CLARK, ARIELLE, 2291 - MONTERO, JOSE, 2307 - SANTIAGO, KATHRYN, 2308 - DENARD, ROSANNE, 2337 - MCZEAL, ELLENA, 2408 - SINCLAIR, DENESE, 2422 - DE ST AUBIN, NICOLE, 2472 - RILEY, EVANDER, 2603 - BLOODWORTH, NANCY, 3122 - MAURICE, CHOIZILIEN, 3123 - VARHOL ELECTRIC CO., 3125 - LEE, CHERIE. 3150 N. HIAWASSEE RD ORLANDO, FL 32818 AT 11:30 AM: 1113 - SOBERS, DELESHA, 1206 RISPER, BEVERLY, 1407 - MAYS, SHAUNWA, 1413 - FORMOR, PAMELA, 1509 - COOPER, SHEARICO, 1611 - SIMS, BEATRICE, 1703 - PRENTICE, BRYANT, 1808 - HERNANDEZ, MICHELLE, 1833 - LOUIS, NATASHA, 1907B CLANCY, MISTY, 1908D - IWUAGWU, JANNELLE, 1926 - ROSA, FRANCES, 2109 - CLAY, TARA,

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2116C - MORSON, MAURICE, 2223 - GARCIA-MUSAH, CONNIE, 2230 - JENKINS, STACEY, 2302 - HASTINGS, NOUCHELLE, 2321 - PERCIVAL, DERELYN, 2419 - WARDE, GREGORY, 2422 - MASSANI, CHANDNI, 2501 - MICHEL, WILDITHE, 2504 - LINARES, CHRISTOPHER, 2522 - CLAY, TARA, 2524 - SIMMONS, ADRIANE, 2606 - JOHNSON, JANICE, 2620 - LONGSTREET, CHARLEEN, 2629 - NEAL, TRENITRICE, 2716 - ALMONDS, DEAN, 2719 - WASHINGTON, LYSTASIA, 2728 - ECCLES, SHERNETT, 2730 - PORTERFIELD, MORRIS. 6770 SILVER STAR ROAD ORLANDO, FL 32818 AT 11:45AM: 0005 - PERFECTING PRAISE MINISTRIES, INC., 0005 BAXTER JR., ROBERT, 0033 - AUGUSTE, RUBERT, 0036 - BROWN, KATHLEEN, 0056 - BRYNILDSEN, BENJAMIN, 0099 - CHANNEL, ALBERT, 0110 - STEPHENS, KIMBERLY, 0114 THORNTON, COURTNEY, 0119 - PRUITT, AMINA, 0127 - SEARS, JUNE, 0150 - SHAW, SHANTAZA, 0154 - MCPHAUL, CHERYL, 0156 - GODBOLT, TRACEY, 0160 - GIPSON, SASHA, 0171 - ADDERLEY, TYREESE, 0193 - STEPHENS, BRIANA, 0198 - SERVICE, DAMIAN, 0199 - PIRANT, MARY, 0237 - ANDERSON JR, DUDANE, 0247 - HARRIS, SHERRILL, 0255 - COLEMAN, ALVIN, 0265 - COAR, GEORGE, 0267 - SCHILT, RONALD, 0268 - GILMORE, ERNEST, 0281 - FLORES-ESQUILIN, NORMA, 0308 - LEEKS, RODRIGUEZ, 0319 - DALGE, JOSEPH, 0321 - HARRIS JR, GARLAND, 0335 - THOMAS, VERONICA, 0336 - WOODALL, ASHLEY, 0337 - BHOOPCHAND, AMITH, 0339 - JACKSON, EVELYN, 0377 - BAZZINI, PAUL, 0429 - JEAN, KEVINS, 0460 - HALL, CELESTE, 0473 - NICHOLS, SHARON, 0490 KENDRICK, EZEL, 0494 - DEVITT, MICHAEL, 0495 - NOEL, CLAIRE, 0505 - BALDWIN, SAMUEL, 0539 - VERDIEU, RICHARDSON, 0544 - WILLIAMS, ASHLEY, 0550 - WILLIAMS, ELVAY, 0558 - DUMERCY, ALBERT, 0563 - ROBINSON, DEQUAN, 0568 SATCHELL, LAKITA, 0573 - TORRES CALDERON, AILED, 0574 - SNELL, WILLIAM, 0588 - MOSS, SADE, 0600 - KERR, HERMIA, 0613 - BENITEZ CONTRERA, JOSE, 0634 - LAMPKIN, BRYANT, 0642 - CIPRIANI, BERYL, 0660 - DAREUS, ROODLY, 0661 - HENKLE, JACK, 0669 - GUNN, DORIS, 0723 - ROJAS, JESSICA, 0736 - HURDLE, SHIRLEY, 0763 - RAY, BRAIN, 0766 - WARRELL, MAKILA, 0776 - ROSS, SHELLEN, 0783 - FANT, NICHOLE, 0786 - JACKSON, QUINCY, 0788 - BIVINS, BARBARA, 0806 - CASSEUS, FABIOLA, 0813 - CHIN, DAVID, 0846 - NOEL, HERIBERT, 0853 - CONDE, FREDDY, 0857 - CUTLIFF, TIFFANY, 0866 - MARTINEZ, WENDY, 0867 - WARREN, NAQUITA, 0869 - FIGUEROA -RUIZ, NEREIDA, 0870 – OELHOFFEN, KAM, 0873 - PENA, ROSA, 0885 - BRADLEY, WANYE, 0914 - WATSON, BARBARA, 0921 - HOPKINS, GEORGE.

NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. PERSONAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS & OTHER PERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF AT PUBLIC SALES ON FEBRUARY 24, 2017 AT LOCATIONS & TIMES INDICATED BELOW, TO SATISFY OWNERS LIEN FOR RENT & FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. ALL ITEMS OR SPACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH SPACE PURCHASED IS REQUIRED. 8149 Aircenter Court, Orlando, FL 32809-7414 AT- 9:30AM- 1003 - Sabia, Allison, 1012 - Huertas, Elizabeth, 1018 - Segui, Angel L., 1115 - Passalacqua, Mirtha, 1128 - Parker, Dora, 1175 - Heslin, Charlotte, 1218 - Rivera, Jose, 2015 - Bowden, Thomas, 2032 - Rinaldi, Ronald, 2064 - Williams, Barnett, 2106 - Torres, Geomares, 2107 Jenkins, Evelyn, 2119 - Heidkamp, Christopher, 2136 - heifetz, avee, 2138 - Mitchell, Trayjon, 2168 CITY OF BELLE ISLE CHARTER SCHOOLS INC. 2190 - Rabassi, Rick, 2202 - HEENY, WYZEENA, 2206 - Vargas, Olga, 2207 Alsaiari, Omar, 2212 - Mccarthy, Danelle, 2216 - Mackey, Gregory, 3010 - Johnson, Donna Lea, 3055 Black, Bhrett, 3058 - Watkins, Timothy, 3073 - IGLESIA PENTECOSTAL EL CAMINO, 4043 - Hagness, Sheri, 4044 - Restaurant, Chuys, 4045 - Reece, Thomas, 4047 Teixeira, Marcos, 6016 - Rivera Ortiz, Shelly, 6106 - cardona, paul, 6152 - Taylor, Christopher, 7204 Ninos Professional Painting LLC. 4801 S Semoran Blvd, Orlando, FL, 32822-2316 AT- 10:30AM0115 - Vendlands-Figueroa, Patricia, 0116 - Greene, Koady, 0123 - Santiago, Gloribeth, 0126 Sanchez, Pedro, 0150 - Larribeau, Annelle, 0151 - CLEVELAND, MELANIE, 0155 - Anglero, Hamilton, 0180 - Stevens Jr., James S., 0192 - Vecco, Maria, 0202 - Young, Olando, 0215 - Biggs, Keith, 0216 - sanchez, felix, 0246 - Johnson, Denise, 0253 - Acevedo, Luis, 0256 - Acosta, Laura, 0260 - Kinard, Alyson, 0265 - Marsh, Glendell, 0291 - Swink, Brian, 0292 - Gerling, William, 1004 - Wild, John, 1014 - Scott, Shannon, 1025 - Virginia, Anna, 3021 - Weller, William, 3026 - Winkle, Tracey, 3067 - Batista, Evelyn, 3074 - Kuhn, Donna, 4026 - Hernandez, Jorge, 4030 - Starks, Angela, 5001 - Rosado, Nitza, 6019 - Turpin, Shannone, 7007 - Antonun, Bethel, 7008 - Ewen, Monica, 7022 - Aquino Perez, Reynaldo, 7056 - Dela Fuente, Nancy, 7060 - Walker, Benjamin, 7064 - Garcia, Wilda, 7097 - Roman, Carlos, 7105 - Roach, Tony, 7123 - Cusiccanqui, Cammie, 7127 - Torres, Domingo, 7137 - Gutierrez, Abel, 7146 Oquendo, Jose, 7149 - Rodriguez, Diana, 7150 - Matos, Kinberly, 8005 - Henry, Ruth, 8032 - Torres, Jerome, 8038 - Vegerano, Dannie,

8094 - Rojas, Yesenia, 8095 - Rojas, Rafael, 8123 - Sanchez, Felix, 8138 - lhoest, tracy, 8144 - Wise, Justin, 8150 - Oliver, Marilyn, 8169 - Lund, Anthony. 2275 S Semoran Blvd, Orlando, FL, 32822-2703 AT 11:30AMA126 - Lewis, Chanece, A130 - Wilcox, Kimberly, B105 - Viering, Christine, B121 - Belcher, Grant, B124 - Rogers, Christopher, B130 - Negron, George, B140 - Bronson, Demitrius, B145 - Mole, Frances, B162 - Maldonado, Yolanda, B163 - Perez, Joel, B164 - king, rosalind, B172 - MUNIZ, STEPHANIE, B193 - Jarvis, Kelly, B199 - Velez, Yahaira, B201 - Flanagan, Christy, B218 - cecilio Reyes, Josephine, B228 - Grant, Roger, C106 - Rodriguez, Orlando, C139 - Bolling, Justin, C148 - HILL, DOUGLAS, C152 - Robinson, Marquilla, C153 - Ranson, Clark, C156 - Chviek, Tanda, C181 - Jackson, Harry, C186 - Rivera, Eugenio,C195C - Sanchez, Roberto, C195D Martinez, Tricia, C195I - Cesareo, Samantha, C199D - Melendez, Luz, C199G - Blackwell, Elizabeth, C208 - Shomefun, George, C211E - Walker, Nifisha, P0007 - Miller, Kim. 2525 E Michigan St , Orlando , FL, 32806-5039 AT 12:30PM 1007 - Hyche, Myers, 2008 - Lowe, David, 2021 - Maldonado, Marisol, 2035 - McNash, Meg, 4011 - Smith, Benjamin, 4033 - Zeek, Jason, 5003 - Songao, Kenneth, 5053 Hinson, Christina, 5057 - Molina, Lidia, 5218 - Warren, Nils, 5321 - Youtsey, Adam, 5322 - Rountree, Jesse, 5337 - Barrow, James, 6219 - Bohanna, Gwen, 6306 - Hayman, Quinn, 6315 - Myers, Josephine, 6411 - Zabukovec, Constance, 6422 - wilding, nicole, 6501 Pinkney, Prince, 6502 - BJanes, Beth, 6528 - Kolson, Gary, 6551 - Meyers, Mark, 6615 - Modeste, Julian, 6643 - Ryder, Laurie, 6650 - Holzer, Brandon, 6655 - Gay, David. 903 S Semoran Blvd, Orlando, FL, 32807-3004 AT 1:30PM - A004 - Rivera, Miguel, B002 - Wiley, John, B005 - Rosello, Arturo, B023 - Faraldo, Jessica, B043 - Boutot, Amanda, B047 - Padilla, Cary, C011 - Ramirez, Francis Milena, C015 - TEJADA, MARITZA, C022 - Munoz Centeno, Manuel, C027 - Hardy Jr, Boice, C054 - Lewis, Kelly, C059 - Perez, Secundino, C068 - Rivera, Lorena, C071 - Montero, Gabriel, C077 - Sims, Joseph, D002 - Romero, cristino,D019 - Nobles, Cristopher, D027 - Conway, Leon, D038 Orange County Democratic Exec. Cte., D085 - De Leon, Darlene, D090 - Torres, Alexander, D098 Grillo, Gabriel, D101 - Nesbitt, Sharon, D108 - Gonzalez, Hector, D120 - Newlan, Cynthia, D182 - Chaisson, Michelle, D188 - Wilkerson, Jamall, D203 - Benjamin, Danny, D207 - Maldonado, Jessica, D221 Figueroa, Vladimir, D227 - Spruell, Shelley, D230 - Zapata, Osman, D232 - hassert, chris, E007 - Hill, Kimaron, E026 - Resilard, Michelle, E034 - Sanchez Jr, Ricardo, E042 AGOSTO, LILLIAN, E062 - Cancel, Keila, E065 - Mitchell, John, E069 Correa, Estefani, E080 - Rodriguez, Juan, E093 - Ramos, Luis, E094 - Hagy, Susan.


NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. PERSONAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS & OTHER PERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF AT PUBLIC SALES ON FEBRUARY 23, 2017 AT LOCATIONS & TIMES INDICATED BELOW, TO SATISFY OWNERS LIEN FOR RENT & FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. ALL ITEMS OR SPACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH SPACE PURCHASED IS REQUIRED. 5602 Raleigh St. Orlando FL 32811 AT 9:30 AM: 0025 - Griffin, Megan, 0026 - Richards, Roger, 0037 - Mesilien, Sauphia, 0045 Washburn, Chelsea, 0049 - Canole, Beverly, 0067 - Suffrena, Marie, 0078 - Leonard, Zeke, 0086 Rodriguez, wilfredo, 0095 - ELLIS, CYNTHIA, 0107 - Graham, Brittany, 0112 - Mills, Frederick, 0113 Hamilton, Joseph, 0122 - smoll, christopher, 0123 - Smith, Jennie, 0133 - Trevisam, Alcides, 0143 Carr, Kyanna, 0151 - Goodman, Diandre, 0152 - siganoff, Brian, 0158 - Whitmore, Vincent, 0201 - Croom, Gwendolyn, 0208 - Johnson, Marstel, 0211 - Bridges, Kim, 0245 Fiveash, Amanda, 0255 - St Pierre, Djoulie, 0260 - Plaisimond, Darline, 0277 - Wimberly, Ashley, 0280 Morris, Shiquita, 0286 - Fregis, Asmin, 0301 - Jones, Jazlyn, 0304 - Modeste, Randy, 0318 - Chery, Bianca, 0320 - Cherry, Michael, 0333 - Thomas, Greg, 0339 - Sinclair, Algernon J, 0344 - Chapman, Jamarr, 0346 - Gold, Versa, 0352 - Lewis, Valerie, 0361 - Johnson, Danny, 0395 - Brown, Kevin, 0397 - Barto, Tim, 0398 - Pickett, Marcus, 0419 Mills, Earnest, 0420 - Featherman, Pamela, 0430 - Catlin Jr, Bruno, 0452 - Morrison, MONTRESS, 0456 - Johnson, Christopher, 0462 - Sheldon, Bridget, 0464 - Shurns, Thalia, 0477 - Simmons, Latorya, 0479 - Bell, Laquentin, 0480 taylor, kenya, 0496 - Emanuel, Queleisha, 0499 - Upchurch, Sie, 0500 - oliver, Rashard, 0507 Windom, Calvin, 0511 - Rhodes, Patricia, 0547 - Henriquez, Denise, 0550 - Norman, R, 0560 - Lee, Andi, 0565 - Ebanks, Tarajade, 0573 - Anderson, Aja, 0574 - Toya Jones, Samara 900 S. Kirkman Rd Orlando FL 32811 AT 9:40 AM: 1102 - Austin, Deanna, 1205 - WHITE, JENNY, 1415 - Dinkins, Bilandra, 1417 - Hanes, Michael, 1503 - Lloyd, Dapsie, 2110 - Sears, Steven, 2120 - Hamilton, Sylvia, 2315 - Hall, Peggy, 2421 - Davis, Shaunte, 2423 - Emile, Madeline, 2424 Davis, Jennifer, 2505 - James, Hennice, 2512 - Ciali, Brett, 2610 - BUSER, SUSAN, 3103 - Thomas, Dale, 3127 - Trimble, Briana, 3210 - Austin, Steven, 3218 - Rodriguez, Marvin, 3304 - McCoy, Felicia, 3307 - Simmons, Renee, 3327 Alteme, Merline, 3408 - Dalton, Mark, 3415 - Suero, Kelly, 3519 -

Saint Vil, Marjorie, 3526 - Thornton, Sheila, 3608 - Price, Roxanne, 4104 - Maldonaldo, Bernadette, 4107 - Engram, Jshone, 4125 Gaglio, James, 4126 - Robinson, Darnell, 4214 - Rivero, David, 4323 - Torres, Demitry, 4415 - Council, Tracey, 4505 - Rodriguez, Hilcias, 4518 - Santiago, Ruben, 5103 Alexander, Phyllis, 5109 - Elizza, Kathy, 5110 - Bernard, Mia, 5111 - Thigpen, Quantane, 6115 - wood, brandon, 7110 - Jackson, Carol, 7116 - Blunt, Dawn, 7117 - Mosby, Lat ka, 8112 - Gonzalez, Benito, 8115 - Irland, Chantel 3900 West Colonial Dr. Orlando, FL, 32808 AT 9:50 AM:A012 Harrison, Angela, A023 - Sesler, Jacinda M, A025 - Rivers, David, A028 - Martin, Mona, A046 - TSAR, B007 - Coe, Darrell, B011 - Coleman, Howard, B013 - Delossantos, Lardwin, Scooter 2009 Vin#1306, B022 - Clore, John, B023 - Tejeda, Alberis, B029 Denham, Derrick, B050 - Johnson, Celeste, B056 - Jackson, Doret, C009 - Reed, Laketha, C021 Edwards, George, C028 - Lockhart, Stinette, C034 - Smith, Diane, C036 - Jean, Pasquese, C058 COOK-WILLIAMS, TAMARA, C063 - Brown, Suddaney, C075 - Angulo, Shanika R, D004 - Willingham, Javan, D010 - Adil, Reda, D011 Houston, Gregory, D014 - Graham, William, D017 - Revel, Janean, D021 - Graves-Billings, Kelia, D027 - Holland, Roy W, D036 - Sneed, Meloda, D048 - Long, Todd, D052 - Goodwin, Kelli, D072 - Fleming, Brooke, D081 - Cox, Curtina, D101 - Hughes, Antonio, D104 - Baskerville, Roxieanna, D121 - Matthews, Carole, D143 - Egan, Lev & Siwica, P.A., D143 - Orantes- Aguilar, Mario, E013 - Abaskharoun, John, E021 - Van Rynsoever, Ted (johannes), E030 - David, Ryan, F004 - Wilson, Cliff, F011 - Gopaul, Valencia, F053 - Alston, Jaime, P002 - Guits, Marlon, P016 - Melo, Ingrid, P017 - Dodd, Dennis, P018 Mcdonnaugh, Daron 2308 N John Young Parkway Orlando, FL, 32804 AT 10:00 AM: A005 - Franklin, Kevin, A007 - Mason, Audrey, A008B - Smith, Wanda, A017 - Scott, Nicole, A019 - Myrtil, Renand, A040 - EMBAUGH, DONALD, A049 - Wilson, Emmanuel, A055 - SINCLAIR, EVERELL, B005 - Ashby, Camila, B007B - Abraham, Jennifer, B015B - dickens, crystal, B025B - Wilson, Mauketia, B027B - Hayes, Bakari, B032B - Robenson, TaMika, B033A - rodriguez, joel, B036A - MONTANEZ, JORGE, B069B Williams, Jason, B071A - Young, April, B079 - Taylor, Doris, B088 - Nieves-Rivera, Migdalia, B098 Scott, Lysa, C005 - Garcia, Deleah, C009 - Giddens, Keshavia, C014 - Finley, Teanna, C026 - JamesSandy, Jeanine, C032 - Bingham, Nick, C067 - Dorsey, Kristen, C070 - Abraham, Jennifer, D004 - Banks, Mattie, D036 - Combs, Alfonse, D039 - Jackson, Cynthia, D044 - Simmons, Eric, D045 - Horton, Aaron, D054 - Williams, Junior, D058 - Kieffer, Kent, D060 - Wynn, Anna, D069 - Johnson, Kimberly, D070 - Green, Quanshavia, D108 - Ferguson, Sisse Sy, D136 coleman, clarence, D148 - Boles,

Andera, E030 - Cooper, Angela, E035 - Brown, Carlos, E041 - Adornato, Joseph, E045 - Ingram, Tara, E060 - Myles, Angel, E063 - Francois, Marie, E067 - Moore, Andrea, E075 - MONTANEZ, JORGE, E113 - nugent, nakosha, F011 - Barnes, Sonya, F018 - Brown, Eva, F021 - Wade, Jimmy, F022 - Paige, Dondrelle, F024 - Cross, Danielle, F058 - Gordon, Tameka, F067 - WHIPPER, KENNETH, F069 - Arce, Crystal, F074 - Carter, Cammis, F077 - Palmer, Jamal, F113 - Goolsarran, Jennifer, G005 - Zygmunt, Eric, G011 - Sone, Roland, G012 - Steiner, William, G017 - Bridgewater, Frederick, G018 - Bridgewater, Frederick, G039 - Villada, Christopher, O026 - Danner, Justin, O028A - Farmer, Sheila, O039 - Theodore, Donfred 4100 N. John Young Parkway Orlando, FL, 32804 AT 10:10 AM: A109 - Johnson, Iris, A118 - Wallace, Tawanda, A122 - Guarnaccia, Karrie, A125 - Vanrynsoever, Johannes, B204 - Hagans, Whitney, B222 - Brown, Jeff, B226 - Rhynes, Michelle, B238 - Parker, Shelbi, B253 - Peterson, Sherman, C350 - Jimenez, Ziomara, C353 - Morris, Samuel, C362 - Coker, Nakita, D407 - Sallett, Oliver, E003 Walker, Gail, E005 - Mathis, Glenn, E007 - Flemming, Omari, E008 - Porten, Mindy, E022 - Gassett, Jamaal, E026 - Nesmit, Ky ani, E030 - Dennard, Jaime, E037 - Ford, Salena, E050 - Norwood, Lacarla, E058 - Patrick, Rahshaud, E062 - Brewster, Shunathan, E065 Stephens, Denesha, E069 - Wolfe, Jodi, E070 - Evans, Marchaee, E072 - Epps, Jerry, E079 - Rhodes, Antonio, E086 - Billings, Bobby, E088 - Moore, Keetundra, E091 - Savage, Jessica, E101 - Sapp, Oliver, E114 - Brown, Glen, E115 Hayes, Angela, F615 - Champion, Robin, F617 - Collins, Natasha, F618 - Bonitto, Lascelles, F619 Johnson, Ericka, F624 - Cleveland, Jestin, F631 - Ross, Ronnie, F634 - Tobin, Jerry, F652 - Barton, Margaritte, F663 - Henry, Laura, G702 - Moore, Antavia, G709 - Leonard, Jeffrey, G720 - Martin, Osie, G734 - Manuel, Jeremy, H806 - Henderson, Christopher H813 - Seco World Wide Resources, H813 – Wagnac, Evens, H818 Marshall, Joshua, J917 - Ashcraft, Jared, P006 - Bartenstein, Jeffrey, P011 - Concepcion, Edgar, P022 - Nordstrom, Henrik, 2007 Coach Craft Vin# 6430, P027 - Concepcion, Edgar 1241 S. Orlando Ave. Maitland FL, 32751 AT 10:20 AM: 0030 - Freeman, Tery, 0176 - Allen, Danielle, 0206 - Hub Internation, 0206 – Gardner, Christopher, 0377 - Evans- Epps, Elsie Marie, 0377 - Evans- Epps, Elsie Marie, 0393 - Strait III, James, 0472 - Prevesk, Steve, 4012 - Paul, George, 5003 - Bergaman, Rodney, 6025 - Paul, Ryan 1842 W. Fairbanks Ave Winter Park, FL, 32789 AT 10:30 AM: 1005 - St. Cyr, Joseph, 1020 - St. Cyr, Joseph, 1034 - St. Cyr, Joseph, 1043 - Pinkney, Kathy, 1084 - Landwer, Nathan, 2057 - Baker, Pat, 2132 - White, Travis, 3048 - Gursky, Rick, 3194 - Emanuel, Chelsea, 3232 - Foster, Stephen,

3236 - Jones, Diane 1023 N. Mills Ave ORLANDO, FL 32803 AT 10:40 AM: 1041 - Reading, Anthony, 1053 - Rehabilitation and Fitness Consultants, PLLC, 1053 – Henderson, Nicholas, 2005 - Peden Channell, Sandra, 2044 Kline, Raberta, 2069 - Junod, Jeff, 2073 - Laws, Phillip, 3019 - Lott, Vincent, 3138 - Proficio Bank, 3138 – Fink, Chris, 4054 - Livingston, Melinda, 4076 - Kalange, Andrew, 4104 - Branch, Douglas, 4118 Peden Channell, Sandra 653 Maguire Blvd. ORLANDO, FL 32803 AT 10:50 AM: 0201 - Rath, Mark, 0412 - Williams, James, 0623 - Kinsey, Heather, 1031 - Balderson, Melissa, 2034 - Foster, Maria, 2048 - Morris & Hancock P.A., 2048 – Hancock, Christopher, 2058 - Roland, Brett, 2105 - Lucena, Amber, 2111 - Packer, Terris, 2141 - Tucker, Todd, 2142 - Beveridge, Mark, 3052 - Best, David, 3065 Pizzini, Ramon, 3106 - Saunders, Keith, 3126 - Law Office Michael E Martinko, 3126 – Martinko, Michael.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2016-CA-004677-O VENTURES TRUST 2013-I-H-R BY MCM CAPITAL PARTNERS, LLC ITS TRUSTEE, Plaintiff, v. PEDRO E. LECUSAY, SR.; HILDA LECUSAY; LUIS E. LECUSAY; PEDRO E. LECUSAY, JR.; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY; AVALON PARK PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; together with any grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, heirs, devisees or trustees of said defendants, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION: TO: LUIS E. LECUSAY, 2324 Wild Tamarind Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32828. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose the following property in Orange County, Florida: LOT 140 OF AVALON PARK NORTHWEST VILLAGE PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 62, PAGE(S) 10 THROUGH 15, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on JASON R. HAWKINS, ESQUIRE, the plaintiff s attorney, whose address is: Suite 1200, 1000 Legions Place, Orlando, Florida 32801 on or before thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiff s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Tiffany Moore Russell, Orange County Clerk of the Circuit Court. Lisa R Trelstad, Deputy Clerk. 2017.01.27 10:20:29 - 05 00 By: As Deputy Clerk, Civil Division, 425 N Orange Avenue, Room 310, Orlando, Florida 32801.

NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. PERSONAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS & OTHER PERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF AT PUBLIC SALES ON FEBRUARY 24, 2017 AT LOCATIONS & TIMES INDICATED BELOW, TO SATISFY OWNERS LIEN FOR RENT & FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. ALL ITEMS OR SPACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH SPACE PURCHASED IS REQUIRED. 1051 BUENAVENTURA BLVD – KISSIMMEE, FL 34743 – AT 9:30AM: 01201 - RUBIO, JAIME, 02108 - FELICIANO, LUIS, 02620 - JEAN LOUIS, ANDRE, 04119 CINTRON, MILTON, 05162 - DIAZ, JUAN, 05215 - ROMAN, ALEJANDRO, 05307 - VALLADARES, RICARDO, 05364 - GARCIA, YADIRA 1800 TEN POINT LN – ORLANDO, FL 32837 – AT 9:40 AM: 0156 - MIRANDA, DANIEL, 0306 - KLEIN, MICHAEL, 1039 - LOS MILLOS INC, 1045 - MONTES, DALYS, 3033 - BERNABE, MARILYN. 3041 - ALICEA, GEENA, 7004 - BOOR SANS, KELLY, 7132 - VILLEGAS, TAINA 2783 N. JOHN YOUNG PKWY – KISSIMMEE, FL 34741 – AT 9:50 AM: 1064 - TORRES, RAYMOND, 1113 - TOLEDO, ALEXIS, 11212 GREGORY, PATRICIA, 1159 - GILBERT, WANDA, 1164 - CUADROS, ANTHONY, 12063 - ADORNO, ANGEL, 12406 - WILSON, BRIAN, 1268 - POWELL, MARJORIE, 291 - VILLARROEL, EVELYN, 306 - HACKER, ALTEREESE, 343 - DUQUE, JULIAN, 409 - CUEVAS, MARILYN, 506 - VALESQUEZ, MERALYS, 915 - SEONATH, RAVINDRANAUTH 1701 DYER BLVD, KISSIMMEE, FL 34741 – AT 10:00 AM: 0105 - ESTRADA RIVERA, OMAR, 0314 - CHACON, JAIME, 2003 - KITTERMAN, KENNETH, 2008 - ROCHESTER, SADE, 2022 - PENTON, MATTHEW, 2042 - OTERO, JOSE, 2066 - SOLER, JONATHAN, 2083 - CRUZ, CYNTHIA, 2113 - GUILLERMO, JIMMY, 5007 - VELASCO, MARCOS, 5010 - HERNANDEZ VAZQUEZ, YOMARIE, 6006 - DE LA CRUZ, NICOLAS, 6016 - CRUZ, JOHN, 6017 - PEARCE, JESSICAH, 6058 - HERNANDEZ, NICHOLAS, 6080 - JOHNSON, BRIAN, 6163 BATTLE, KAREN, 6165 - YOUNG, MICHELLE, 6175 - SERRANO, VERONICA, 6182 - RAMOS, ROSA, 6205 - LUDFORD, PRINCESS, 6216 - FRANCO, JOSE, *7218 - RIVERA, JUAN, CUTLASS OLDSMOBILE, 1908 VIN #4470, 8036 - EDMONDS, OLGA, 8060 OLAN, ASHLEY, 8068 - BARANDICA, JOELY, 8072 - RUBIO, JAIME, 8080 - SHARRER, RENATE 951 S. JOHN YOUNG PKWY – KISSIMMEE, FL 34741 – AT 10:10 AM: 1013 - PINCKNEY, ALETHIA,

orlandoweekly.com

FEB. 15-21, 2017

1027 - KING, RONALD, 1311 DAVILA, EFRAIN, 1530 - GILSON, PETER, 1539 - DEL VALLE, LUZILENIA, 1707 - BROWN, ANNE, 1714 - EUSTACE, JOHN, 1716 - SURICO, ROCCO, 1801 - DEL VALLE, LUZILENIA, 2014 BAKER, AZIZMA, 2150 - PARTIN, ADA, 2194A - KORONDI, PETER, 2217 - FOSTER, JACOB, 2223 BLAKE, TAKONYA, 2413 - ABDUL MUNTAQIM, SAYEED 227 SIMPSON RD - KISSIMMEE, FL 34744 –AT 10:20 AM: 019 - HERNANDEZ, PAMELA, 1002 - HENDERSON, TRICIA, 245 - CARDE, RAFAEL, 445 - RIOS, MICHAEL, 511 - RIVERA, BRYAN, 579 - HERNANDEZ, +IVAN, 620 - BROWN, ALEJANDRO, 838 SOTO AYALA, ANGEL.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA DIVISION: 03 CASE NO.: DP15-264 IN THE INTEREST OF: C.B., a male minor child, DOB: 11/30/2010. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS STATE OF FLORIDA To: Angel Herra Hernandez, Address unknown. WHEREAS a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this court regarding the above-referenced child(ren), a copy of which is attached. You are hereby commanded to appear before Judge Daniel P. Dawson on 23 rd March, 2017, at 2:30 p.m. at the Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, Florida 32806, for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and at the time specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS/ THESE CHILD(REN). IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MIGHT LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD(REN) NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. Pursuant to Sections 39.802(4)(d) and 63.082(6)(g), Florida Statutes, you are hereby informed of the availability of private placement with an adoption entity, as defined in Section 63.032(3), Florida Statutes. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at Orlando, Orange County, Florida this 12th day of January, 2017. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (Court Seal) By: (Signed) Deputy Clerk. This summons has been issued at the request of: Kirsten Teany, Esq., Florida Bar No.: 981540, Children s Legal Services, State of Florida, Department of Children and Families, 822 S. Kirkman Road, Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32811, (407) 563-2380 - Telephone, Kirsten.teany@my families.com. ●

ORLANDO WEEKLY

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Legal, Public Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF HELEN ELAINE KEMP a/k/a ELAINE KEMP, Deceased. File No.2017-CP- 000178-FA- B NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Helen Elaine Kemp a/k/a Elaine Kemp, deceased, whose date of death was October 30, 2016, is pending in the Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 301 N. Park Avenue, Sanford, FL 32771. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is 2/15/17. Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Ale ander J. Ombres, Attorney, Florida Bar Number: 278521 MATEER & HARBERT, TWO LANDMARK CTR , 225 E ROBINSON ST STE 600 , ORLANDO, FL 32801, Telephone: (407) 425-9044, Fa : (407) 4232016, E-Mail: AOmbres@mateerharbert.com, Secondary: LDana@ mateerharbert.com. Personal Representative: /s/ Edwin Stanley Kemp, Jr., 8366 Seven Oaks Drive, Jonesboro, GA 30236. NOTICE OF SALE Vehicles will be sold as is, no warranty. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid. Terms of bids are cash only. Buyer must have funds on hand at time of sale. 2001 CHRYSLER VIN# 1C4GJ25B61B101437 2000 CHEVROLET VIN# 1GCFG15W8Y1183419 1998 HONDA VIN# 1HGCG2252WA021336 2008 MAZDA VIN# JM3ER293080209309 To be sold at auction at 8:00AM on MARCH 10TH, 2017, at 2500 N. Forsyth rd, Orlando Fl 32807. Around The Clock Towing inc.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION FOR MONIES DUE ON STORAGE LOCKERS LOCATED AT UHAUL COMPANY FACILITIES. STORAGE LOCATIONS AND TIMES ARE LISTED BELOW. ALL GOODS SOLD ARE HOUSEHOLD CONTENTS, MISCELLANEOUS OR RECOVERED GOODS. ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD TO SATISFY OWNER S LIEN FOR RENT AND FEES IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807, STARTS AT 8 am and RUNS CONTINOUSLY. Uhaul Ctr Kirkman-600 S Kirkman Rd-Orlando 03/08/17 2073 Ronald Smith, 8021 Antonio Collins, 2099 Janashia Carter, 5003 Shavonda Campbell, 4010 Heidi Hornsby 2118 Kashmir Haley- Palmore 3067 Randy Harmon, 3003 Frederick Dauley, 1122 Elaina Jacobs, 3054 Torri Ray, 3002 Wanda Jones, 2074 Nick Bradford, 2120 Winston Fortune, 2034 Katrina Edwards, 1009 Joyce Trimble, 3015 Jamie Mcintosh, 2002 Christian Vaz uez, 3094 Jacklyn Baker, 4026, Desiree Ortiz 2097 Wagner Alves, 2111 Stephanie Uhaul Ctr Orange Ave-3500 S Orange Ave 03/08/17 - Orlando 1070 Dean Mosley, 1924 Matthew Nelson, 1704 Martha James, 1733 Natalie Graham, 2303 Rawn Haynes, 1210 Henry Roman, 1809 Oranusi Obiora, 1429 Michael Stefanavage, 1114 Susan Anderson, 1413 Patrick Skiffington, 1910 Reginald Hicks, 1837 Sam Pierre Uhaul Ctr Baldwin Park- 4001 E Colonial Drive-Orlando 03/08/17 - D186 Maria Bordao, D213 Kayla Hamm, C144 Kamesha Burgess, C170 Dawn Gregor, C135 Rhyan Clark, B117 Christina Hinson, C102 Carla Perez, A121-22 Fernando Bouffard, A103 Dave Desormeau, B146 Kristal Stewart Uhaul Ctr Goldenrod-508 N Goldenrod Rd-Orlando 03/08/17 - 532 Neftali Perales Pena, 642 Yahaira Colon, 1301 Chris Talbert, 744 Olga Martinez Gomez, 507 James Ashbridge, 512 Greg Brown, 606 Marissa Betz, 230 Diana Capetillo, 211 Adrain Robinson, 741 Hector Natan, 333 Heriberto Morlas, 518 Fritchie Bayan, 506 Jared Sylvia, 739 Santiago W Saavedra, 510 Lizette Mcmillian, Uhaul Ctr Alafaya-11815 E Colonial Drive-Orlando 03/08/17 - 1113 Sacha Comrie, 1262 Jacey Nicholes, 1201 Tyler Benson, 1516 Steve Camargo, 1213 Eduardo Avila, 1132 Jennifer Johnson, 1908 Ashley Taylor. NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned, John Bean Technologies Corporation, of 70 West Madison, St. 4400, Chicago, IL 60602, pursuant to the requirements of the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, is hereby advertising the following fictitious name: JBT AeroTech, Jetway Systems It is the intent of the undersigned to register JBT AeroTech, Jetway Systems with the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations. Dated: 2/6/2017

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● FEB. 15-21, 2017

NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. PERSONAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS & OTHER PERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF AT PUBLIC SALES ON FEBRUARY 23, 2017 AT LOCATIONS & TIMES INDICATED BELOW, TO SATISFY OWNERS LIEN FOR RENT & FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. ALL ITEMS OR SPACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH SPACE PURCHASED IS REQUIRED. 4729 S Orange Blossom Trail, Orlando, FL, 32839—AT 9:30AM: 0102 - Acree, Shundra, 0106 Bynes, Glenn, 0117 - Latimer, Rashounthia, 0123 - Irizarry, Cindy, 0130 - Hunter, Paula, 0133 - Fort Jr., Ritchie, 0141 - Brown, Deborah, 0142 - GRACIA, MAX, 0149 Briette, Odwine, 0154 - Stennett, Sheena, 0156 - Sabourin, Marie, 0158 - Charles, Kevin, 0202 Dingui, Maria, 0206 - Buchana, Jo Ann, 0212 - Jenkins, Dennis, 0213 - Adams, Aneisha, 0218 - Baptiste, Paulette, 0228 - Ralston, Nicole, 0231 - Johnson, Jermaine, 0238 Rios, Gladys, 0242 - Thompson I I, Keith, 0248 - Anderson, Peggy, 0311 - Ousley, Baretta, 0318 Browdy, Marquis, 0327 - Anderson, Audra, 0349 - Fraser, Christopher, 0351 - Martinez, Migdalia, 0353 Naylor, John, 0414 - White, Estella, 0422 - Abrams, Cydney, 0433 West, William, 0518 - Farias Sosa, Yanet, 0529 - Ellis, Theodore, 0605 - Joseph, Dieunel, 0612 - Jean, Prosper, 0621 - Sheppard, Darryl, 0622 - Stodtko, Katherine, 0623 Hanshaw, Ezmone, 0624 - Weeks, Tylishia, 0627 - Acevedo, Martin, 0706 - Cameron, Andrea, 0719 Rivera, Ivette, 0722 - Oleaga, Fior, 0806 - Longley, Chelsia, 0820 Pherai, Dian, 0821 - Allen, Jasmine, 0824 - Karshner, Beverly, 0835 Alicea, Moses, 0844 - Leyva-Leon, Fernando, 0847 - Strouse, Ashley, 0903 - Jackson, Santana, 0906 Mayfield, Dwight, 09102 - Obena, Willy, 09108 - Dangleben, Paul, 09109 - White, Emanuel, 09125 - Dais, Julius, 0923 - Johnson, Chazaty, 0932 - Gardner, Daphne, 0940 - Phillips, Elita, 0955 - Butler, Cordice, 0983 - Estle, Lennie, 0989 - Butler, Johnny, 1008 - Yarber, Kelly, 1012 - Lee, Bryant, 1015 Grimsley, Loise, 1024 - Johnson, Jaliesa, 1055 - Willis, Edward, 1057 - Ward, Travick, 1059 - Yannetti, Nicole, 1064 - Burke, Kaishma, 1086 - Smith, Athena, 1104 Thomas, Simeon, 1111 - Griffin, Frank, 1116 - Mcneil, Queenesther, 1127 - Truss, Gwendolyn, 1128 - Dennis Jr., John, 1129 - Brown, Suddaney, 1130 - Greggs, Joshua, 1133 - Blake, Jasmine, 1147 Cudjoe, Richard, 1160 - Alberhasky, Danmarie, 1161 - Caldwell, Johnnie, 1167 - Briskey, Bradley, 1173 - Pimental, Miguel, 1207 - Almonte, Allendy, 1208 - Deas, Angel, 1227 -

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Medina, Luis, 1239 - Sawdy, Robin, 1277 - Donaldson, Bacari, 1318 - Brown, Jenyne, 1326 - Miranda, Rene, 1343 - james, shaquana, 1362 - Brevard, Wakemah. 1365 - Sutton, Fitima, 1390 - Angulo, Rafael. 235 E Oak Ridge Road, Orlando, FL, 32809 AT 10:30AM- A111 Ellis, Hannah, A127 - Mercado, Jose, A144 - Bryan, Pearl, A146 Roman, Edelmiro, B205 - Calderon, Jose, B210 - Martinez, Erica, B223 - Arroyo, Brandaly, B237 - leyva, fernando, B239 - Williams, Jahliese, B247 - Hughey Jr., Neil, C308 - Castillo, Sonia, C323 - Bennett, Anqunette, D403 - Simon, Johnesha, D409 - Rivera, Jennie, D418 - Winn, Jaleesa, E506 - Regis, Felix, E511 - Blazier, Kandi, E515 - Johnson, Jessica, E529 - Hylton, Candace, E547 Esquilin, Diana, F603 - Vargas, Pedro, F630 - Echevarria, Sally, F636 - Marcelin, Immaculee, G711 - Diaz, Randy, G726 - Aggar, Mary, H804 - Camacho, Lewis, H806 Burnes Bowles, Kimberly, H812 - Robinson, Mecell,H818 - Lazo Zuniga, Jorge, H820 - Lee, Cynthia, I906 - Bascos, Ruth, I907 - Viera, Darlyn, I909 - Mccoy, Megan, I924 - Lalanne, Vedette, J010 - Hilario, Elvin, J040 - Luna, Iris, K103 Santos Rodriguez, Arcadio, K108 Destin, Marc, K110 - Dorsey, Errick, K111 - Rigg, Taj, K114 - Ortega, Alberto, K120 - Smith, Labrina, K122 - Butler, Thomas, K125 - Reynes, Elsie, L201 - Lucas, Miguel, L209 - Olson, Ronald, L221 - Shaw, William, M303 - Ramos, Yajaira, M317 - Doggett, Brenda, N401 Coleman, Brittany, N405 - Joseph, Jeremy, N412 - Israel, Jean, N418 - barnes, john, O511 - Salgado, Nilda, P009 - Henderson, Michael, P014 - Roman, Jeffrey. 1801 W Oakridge Rd Orlando, FL 32809 AT- 11:30AM B025 - Candelario, Menona, B039 - Stephenson, Shamica, B041 - Oliver, Barbara, C004 - Allen Walker, Joseph, C015 - Rodriguez, Rene, C019 - Rodriguez, Edward, C036 - Joseph, Jolaine, C037 - Divra, Anly, C040 Thomas, Natiska, C048 - Greenwood, Dennis, D016 - Sparrow, stephen, D018 - Lightbourne Marrero, Shantell, D025 - Jean-Louis, Wilda, D028 - Bell, Warnika, D049 - Jacques, Scardy, D058 - Romero, Dalia, D061 - Shuler, Tony, D064 - Gerling, William, D069 - Numa, Christopher, E023 - Pierre, Marida, E031 - Rodriguez, Kiara, E033 Wilson, April, E045 - Vega, Carlos, F005 - Reyes, Rachel, F009 - Correa, Loida, F021 - Greater Florida Title Co. inc., F036 - Lemon, Adrianna, G004 - Matticks, Jordan, G025 - ABDUSH, YOSI, G037 Roques, Gaudy, G043 - De Melo Faria, Sandro, H002 - Louissaint, Marie, H019 - Jones, Sharon, H025 - Washington, Raniskia, H027 - Ward, Christopher, J005 Patterson, Sidney, J035 - Adam, Danny, J038 - Anthony, Brando, J040 - Radiano, Kimberly, J048 MARTINEZ, JUAN, J072 - Odell, Monty E, J073 - King, Sierra, J080 - Powell, Teofila, J082 - Matos, Diana, J083 - Rodriguez, Bernadette, J088 - FOSTER, KATHY, J092 - Forbes, Joel, J097 - coffman,

eugene, J100 - Hare, Amy, J116 - kanarick, yvette, J118 - Danza, Michelle, J124 - Best, Ernest, J131 - Bryant, William, J133 - Berno, Melissa, J141 - Davy, Kenton, J152 - Richardson, Cheva, J158 - Weidman, Tammi, J160 - Rivera, Sonia, J167 - Asomaning, Felicia, K021 Spurling, Domonique, K025 - Cobb, Breandra,K036 - Ellis, Jadae, K053 - Wilson, Victor, K057 - Hodgson, Jayson, K059 - Oliveras, Lizette, K075 - Garay, Theresa, K080 Prophete, Sahembe, K083 - Pierre Fils, Dieurilus, K092 - Martinez, Carmen, K093 - Gomez, Simona, K095 - Hargrette, William, K108 - rodriguez, oscar, K109 - Danza, Michelle, P006 - Fils Aime, Kepler. 1313 45th Street, Orlando, FL 32839-AT 12:30PM: A105 - Fairley, Arantes, A110 - Williams, Lalita, A113 - Claire, Bernadine, A117 - Stanley, Lawanda, A137 - Do Vale, Christopher, B205 - Simon, Kyle, B212 - Marrero, Misael, B228 - Davis, Anita, B230 - Monroe, Cy, B260 - Johnson, Velshoef, B281 - Mcknight, James, C307 Rene, Nicole, C308 - Campbell, Gloria, C309 - Shaw, Walter, C314 - Blocker, Craig, C318 - Fountain, Diego, C328 - Pierre, Emmanuael, C332 - Daise, Marvin, C333 Jordan, Jennay, C334 - Hammond, Ann, C338 - Ruemmeley, Elizabeth, C342 - Simon, Bericia. D409 Woodson, Lesine, D421 - Hair, Jennifer, D426 - Smalarz, Laura, D432 - Uribe, Viviana, D484 - Kidd, Carmen, E503 - Tape, Latarsha, E508 - Wright, Althea, E533 - Proficio Bank, E581 - Beckford, Marion, F620 - Proficio Bank, F630 - Simon, Karen Ingrid, F636 - Proficio Bank, F640 - Brown, Randy, F642 - Moore, Norika. G710 - Fraser, Christopher. H822 - Perez, Juan, H846 - Hamilton, Terrence, H848 - Bernard, Yvette, J901 - Honore, Nicole, J908 - Occimable, Marie, J915 - Perez, Madeline.

LOST OR ABANDONED PROPERTY FOUND OR RECOVERED WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF ORLANDO, FLORIDA. PROPERTY NOT CLAIMED WILL EITHER BE SURRENDERED TO THE FINDERS OR RETAINED FOR USE BY THE DEPARTMENT. CITY LIMITS OF ORLANDO, FLORIDA PICTURE IDENTIFICATION IS REQUIRED. FEBRUARY 2017 1.Bike, La Costa/Semoran 2. Bike, 5700 Blk St. Charles Prado 3. Bike, 3700 Blk Millenia Bv 4. Bike, 3700 Blk Millenia Bv 5. Money, 3900 E. Colonial 6. Money, Colonial/Bumby 7. Bag, Princeton/Brengle 8. Purse with BaG, 100 Blk George De Salvia 9. Cell Phone, 5400 Blk N OBT 10. KeyFob, 6200 Blk Pershing 11. Cell Phone, Magnolia/South 12. Walle,t 6400 Blk Raleigh St 13. Keys, 3800 Blk S. Semoran 14. Cell Phone, 3800 S Semoran 15. Bag, 3800 Blk S. Semoran 16. Headphones, 3800 Blk S. Semoran 17. Sunglasses, 3800 Blk S Semoran 18. Charger, 1200 Blk S Hiawassee 19. Cell phone, Hughey/Central 20. Cell Phone, 800 Blk Don Quixote 21. Tablet, 700 Blk Hardman 22. Clothes, 5400 Blk DelVerde 23. Musical Instrument in case, 5400 Blk Del Verde 24. Tool, 10000 Blk Granite Bay 25. Cell Phone, Tampa/Washington 26. WalkieTalkie, Hughey/Central 27. Tablet and Keyboard, 1400 Blk Mt. Vernon 28. Tablet, 6800 Blk EagleWAtch 29. Cell phone, Colonial/Primrose 30. Bag with misc Items, 4500 Blk Lake Martin Ln FOR INFO CALL (407) 246-2445, MONDAYS – THRU- THURSDAYS, 8:00 AM TILL 4:30 PM

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Notice of Public Auction for monies due on storage units located at U-Haul company facilities. Storage locations are listed below. All goods are household contents or miscellaneous and recovered goods. All auctions are hold to satisfy owner s lien for rent and fees in accordance with Florida Statutes, Self-Storage Act, Sections 83.806 and 83.807. The auction will start at 8:00 a.m. on March 9, 2017 and will continue until finished U-Haul Moving and Storage of Maitland, 7815 North Orange Blossom Trail, Orlando, FL 32810; D21 Tex Quesenberry $305.40, D51 Tex Quesenberry $874.60, A40 Reneka Logan $223.61, B34 Raul Rodriguez $591.32, C66 Robert McCarty $733.35, B05 Melanie Burnside $399.25, E23 Tex Quesenberry $1091.50, C15 Billy Donathan $588.40, U115 Julie Fitzgerald $412.60 U-Haul Moving and Storage at Apopka, 1221 E Semoran Blvd, Apopka, FL 32703; 1113 Jeffrey Dwinal $697.48, 1131 David Desch $429.35, 1020 Freida Parker $811.75, 1231-33 Ronald Summey $836.07, 1358 Clarence Mott $576.92 U-Haul Moving and Storage at Altamonte Springs, 598 W Semoran Blvd, Altamonte Springs, FL 32714,AA3367F Billy Patterson $514.25 U-Haul Moving and Storage of Semoran, 2055 N Semoran Blvd, Winter Park, FL 32792; 1369 Paul Crane $443.60, 1402 Lizette McMillian $336.60, 1029 Kenneth Coleman $646.60, 1365 Kenneth Coleman $437.65 U-Haul Moving and Storage of Lake Mary, 3851 S Orlando Ave, Sanford, FL 32773; 2454 Lenora Gipson $486.30, 1007 Mary Thomas $680.00, 2545 Steven Brickhouse $312.35, 1407 Shakiyla Blake $518.90, 1752 Keith Baxter $374.00, 2528 Betty Schultz $321.35, 2425 Betty Schultz $513.20, 1043 NAtalie Paradise $610.65, 2063 Juan Cruze $312.35, 1777 Robie Warren $435.15, 2364 Luis Sandoval $452.35, 1410 Charity Havener $350.60, 1659 Jordan Bonilla $797.90, 2447 Lenora Gipson $486.30, 1460 Gerald Nelson $368.40, 1201 Donovan Mcgill $665.20 U-Haul Moving and Storage at Rinehart, 1811 Rinehart Road, Sanford, FL 32771;3035 Brian Revels $603.95, 3097 Jack Ortez $454.25, 3152 Michael White $868.50, 4111 Derek Marion $614.75, 1057 Heather Kelsey $833.60, 4176 Jeri Brannon $328.40, 2156 Mychaela Carmen $710.80, 2138 Elijah June III $518.20.

Notice of Auction 1997 Nissan Pathfinder XE with VIN# JN8AR05Y1VW107477 will be auctioned on 2/20/2017 at 9:00 am. Gardy Bien-Aime & Beverly April Ley Wynne. 8550 Old Winter Garden Rd., Orlando, FL. 32835

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FEB. 15-21, 2017

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OR LAND OW EEK LY.CO M/JO B S Employment Drive with Uber!

No experience is required, but youʼll need a Smartphone. Itʼs fun and easy. For more information, call: 1-800-871-9782

IT/Software ServiceNow Inc, enterprise IT platform provider, has openings in Orlando, FL for Technical Support Engineer (6481) Analyze and resolve technical software issues for ServiceNow platform customers; Sr Technical Support Engineer (5751) Analyze and resolve the most challenging issues for the Technical Support team focusing on Integrations and Interfaces. Mail resume & reference job code to ServiceNow Inc Attn Global Mobility Ref #### 2225 Lawson Ln Santa Clara, CA 95054

Marketing Specialist, Real Estate, 40-hr week, Bachelorʼs Degree in Advertising or Marketing. Open new markets, strengthen & increase sales of vacation home sales and rentals targeting Brazilian market. Develop & implement marketing plan & strategies to support sales/rental process & position on direct, indirect & social channels. Contact: Ricardo Castillo Molina, Managing Member, Innovare Homes, LLC, 8681 W. Irlo Bronson Memorial Hwy., #124, Kissimmee, FL 34747.

PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.IncomeStation.net (AAN CAN)

Ravago Americas, LLC d/b/a Polymerline seeks a Petrochemical Trader to develop business opportunities for the regular supply and sourcing of petrochemicals for export to global markets. Requires Bachelorʼs degree in Finance, Economics or related, & 2 yrs. exp. working in the polymers and/ or petrochemical industries with at least 1 year of petrochemicals trading experience. This position requires 40% domestic and international travel. Send resume to Gerren Bray, 1900 Summit Blvd, Ste 900, Orlando, FL 32810.

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AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

Service Engineer needed for Lancaster Auto & Tire Co Inc, Orlando, FL to diagnose & srvce engines, transmissions, differentials, suspension, steering systs, brakes, ABS, traction/stability systs, EGR systs & High voltage hybrid systs, in house chip level srvce of electronic cntrl modules. Programm g & coding all electronic cntrl modules; Install & mainten of shop machineries; Reqs BS in Mechanical Engring or frgn equiv & 2yrs. exp in the job offrd. F/T. Mail res attn. Yogi, 500 W Lancaster Rd. Orlando, FL 32809.

Appliance Technician Lake County Schools 6203639

Food and Nutrition Services Assistant Osceola Regional Medical Center 6214335

Endo Technician (Days) Central Florida Regional Hospital 6216290

Director of Sales Hilton Grand Vacations 6218595

Medical Assistant - Orlando Health Physician Associates 6215643

Lab Specialist - DEV231 Database Structures Full Sail University 6215036

Plumber I/II - City of Orlando 6214294

Associate Designer Concept Universal Orlando 6218301

Sr. Analyst Web - Digital Analytics - Universal Orlando 6218300

Entertainment Stage Technician (Part-Time) Walt Disney World Resort 6215540

Culinary Chef Assistant (FullTime) -Walt Disney World Resort 6215541

Business Development Account Manager - OrlandoJobs.com 6197885

Lobby Attendant (AM shift) Caribe Royale Orlando 6218530

Internal Auditor - Cru 6218528

Machinist - CNC Pro Image Solutions 6213636

Painter Diamond Resorts International 6215434

CNA - Avante Group Inc. 6218115

Water Safety Instructor City of Casselberry 6215509

Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) Guardian Care 6203633

Workforce Manager Tourico Holidays Inc. 6215516

Youth Sports Referees / Officials YMCA of Central Florida 6203635

Student Tour Guide Full Sail University 6215019

Leisure Sales Manager Villas of Grand Cypress 6214288

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● FEB. 15-21, 2017

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Group Exercise Instructor YMCA of Central Florida 6201106

Registered Charge Nurse Village on the Green 6197844

Senior Sales Manager Embassy Suites Orlando - Lake Buena Vista South 6218122

Claims Representative - Liability - Lakeland, FL GEICO 6217187

Mortgage Loan Officer Northwest Federal Credit Union 6218116

Driver - Box Truck (Part-Time) Nimlok Orlando 6218110

Warehouse - Order Selector Kelly Services 6216597

Mechanical Inspector Reedy Creek Improvement District 6201101

Registered Nurse OR Surgical Care Affiliates 6198141

Maintenance - Repair - Technicians - Handyman - Drywall ComRes Ind., Inc 6218108

Server (Part-Time) Marriott International 6218107

Implementation Consultant II ADP, LLC 6218077

Sous Chef The Alfond Inn at Rollins 6214287

Web Project Manager Assistant University of Central Florida 6218074

Book Keeper / Office Administrator Pro Stat LLC 6217906

Sheetfed Press Operator Central Florida Press 6198031

Dynamic Inside Sales Representative 21st Century Distributing 6208464

Plumber Smart Ride, Inc. 6217228

Customer Service Team Lead Booking.com 6217276

Chief Program Officer Early Learning Coalition of Orange County 6217263

Sales Manager Shopper Approved 6217215

Food Production Chef Assistant Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida 6216599

Education Program Director Marketing Degree The Los Angeles Film School 6216603

Hemodialysis Nurses Mobil Dialysis 6216596

Benefits Analyst Lakeland Regional Medical Center 6215543

Pizza Cook (Part-Time) Give Kids The World 6216444

Safety Supervisor Confidential Employer 6214286

Fleet Mechanic Supervisor County Materials Corporation 6197659

Chief Engineer Services Orlando Health 6216100

General Manager / Floating Project Manager MV Transportation 6198150

Customer Service Representative (Bilingual Japanese) Wyndham Vacation Ownership 6197842

Electrician / Electrician Helper Terryʼs Electric Inc. 6216609

Lead Family Support Worker IMPOWER (Intervention Services, Inc) 6213708

Dispatch / Field Support Technician Summit Broadband 6216371

Ice Cream Machine Operator Muse Gelato 6198028

Plumber / Drain Cleaner ARS Of Orlando 6216608

Deputy Sheriff - Reserve Orange County Sheriffʼs Office 6197980


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Orlando Weekly February 15, 2017