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FREE | FEB. 8-14, 2017

Publisher Graham Jarrett Editor Jessica Bryce Young Editorial Staff Writer Monivette Cordeiro Calendar Editor Thaddeus McCollum Music Editor Matthew Moyer Digital Content Editor Colin Wolf Contributors Rob Bartlett, Jen Cray, Hannah Glogower, Scott Horn, Liv Jonse, Holly V. Kapherr, Faiyaz Kara, Seth Kubersky, Bao Le-Huu, Marissa Mahoney, Cameron Meier, Richard Reep, Sierra Reese, Joey Roulette, Steve Schneider, Abby Stassen, Ken Storey Editorial Interns Deanna Ferrante, Rachel LeBar, Nick Wills Advertising Major Accounts Specialist Leslie Egan Senior Multimedia Account Executive Debbie Garcia, Lori Green, Dan Winkler Multimedia Account Executives Scott Navarro, Scott Spar Classified and Legal Rep Jerrica Schwartz Advertising Coordinator Abby Stassen Marketing and Events Events Director Zackary Rowe Events and Promotions Manager Brad Van De Bogert Marketing and Events Coordinator Rachel Hoyle

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Cover design by Chris Tobar Rodriguez; photo by Rob Bartlett

Creative Services Creative Services Manager Shelby Sloan Editorial Designer Chris Tobar Rodriguez Graphic Designer Melissa McHenry Business Operations Manager Hollie Mahadeo Business Assistant Allysha Willison Circulation Circulation Manager Collin Modeste Euclid Media Group Chief Executive Officer Andrew Zelman Chief Operating Officers Chris Keating, Michael Wagner Human Resources Director Lisa Beilstein Digital Operations Coordinator Jaime Monzon euclidmediagroup.com National Advertising: Voice Media Group 1-888-278-9866, voicemediagroup.com

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NEWS + FEATURES

FOOD + DRINK

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MUSIC 57 Freakin’ out

Four decades after their formation and seven years into a hard-hitting renaissance, proto-punk trio Death visit Florida for the first time

7 Pulse: In Memoriam

45 Domu, arigato

A profile of Pulse Nightclub shooting victim Christopher Joseph Sanfeliz

We’re all quite thankful for East End Market’s new ramen-ya

7 This Modern World 7 ICYMI

45 Tip Jar

Great live music rattles Orlando every night

The New General opens on Park Avenue, Cress plans a travel ban protest dinner, plus more in our weekly food roundup

59 This Little Underground

News you need to know but may have missed in the past week

57 Picks This Week

The Orlando Phil expands horizons with Nickel Creek’s Sara Watkins, and Kurt Vile comes to life on stage

46 Bar Exam

8 People we love Fourteen people making Orlando a better place

Orlando Weekly Inc. 16 W. Pine St. Orlando, Florida 32801 orlandoweekly.com

Sanford Brewing Company serves up one of the greatest bar food-and-beer combos in Central Florida

49 Recently Reviewed Short takes on restaurants we’ve visited recently

Phone 407-377-0400 Fax 407-377-0420 Orlando Weekly is published every week by Euclid Media Group Orlando Distribution Orlando Weekly is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Copyright notice: The entire contents of Orlando Weekly are copyright 2017 by Euclid Media Group LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Publisher does not assume any liability for unsolicited manuscripts, materials, or other content. Any submission must include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. All editorial, advertising, and business correspondence should be mailed to the address listed above. Subscriptions: Additional copies or back issues may be purchased at the Orlando Weekly offices for $1. Six-month domestic subscriptions may be purchased for $75; one-year subscriptions for $125. Periodical Postage Pending at Orlando, FL POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ORLANDO WEEKLY 16 W. Pine St. Orlando, FL 32801.

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ARTS + CULTURE 36 Culture 2 Go

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FILM

CALENDAR

53 Short circuit

60 Selections

Love Your Shorts Film Festival returns to Sanford for a seventh year

62 The Week

The Orlando Philharmonic and Opera Orlando announce a new partnership, plus more news about the performing arts

53 Film Listings

37 Live Active Cultures

54 On Screens in Orlando

Back Pages

Movies playing this week: Fifty Shades Darker, John Wick: Chapter 2 and The Lego Batman Movie

77 Gimme Shelter

Beth Marshall Presents’ first musical may look light as air, but it conceals substance beneath the surface

63 Down the Road

Cinema-oriented events to go see this week

77 Savage Love 78 Classifieds orlandoweekly.com

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IN MEMORIAM: THE ORLANDO 49 Every week between now and the one-year anniversary of the Pulse Nightclub shootings, Orlando Weekly will profile a person killed on June 12, 2016. This week: Christopher Joseph Sanfeliz Christopher Joseph Sanfeliz shone bright, like a diamond, his childhood friend says. Nicole Irizarry remembers that Sanfeliz started calling the people he loved “diamonds” after they tried to stay up all night to watch a meteor shower on Cocoa Beach about two years ago. When it began, they started making wishes for each shooting star that fell across the sky. “I remember Chris said, ‘Oh my god, diamonds are falling out of the sky,’” she says. “From then on, he would tell his friends, ‘You’re my diamonds.’ There’s a wrenching feeling in my gut from just remembering it.” Irizarry can’t even listen to the song “Diamonds” by Rihanna after the death of Sanfeliz, 24, along with 48 other people in a mass shooting at the gay nightclub Pulse on June 12. A Tampa native of Cuban descent, Sanfeliz worked as a personal banker at JPMorgan Chase. He would do anything

for his family, especially his older brother, Carlos Sanfeliz Jr. After Sanfeliz’s death, his brother wrote on Facebook that his heart was “completely broken.” “My little brother, the most important person in my life, has passed away due to his injuries,” Carlos Sanfeliz Jr. wrote. “Everyone knows the bond that I had with my brother. We would finish each other’s sentences, knew each other’s thoughts, and could sense when the other was upset. … He was the light of my family and I know that he will continue to bless us and his light will be radiating down from a better place.” Irizarry remembers Sanfeliz as a good dancer who loved bachata. He was a “hopeless romantic” who found a particular enjoyment in planning his friends’ imaginary weddings and told her he would be her bride’s man. He adored mac and cheese, loaded mashed potatoes and restaurant bread baskets, Irizarry says. “He’s still a part of our lives,” she says. “He was like a brother. Chris had the best heart, he was kind and he put other people’s happiness before his own. “It’s hard not having him just to say hi in the morning or have his support. You know, we all have friends, but there are very few people we can actually trust. He was that for me. He was a really good soul, and I know he’s in a better place.” – Monivette Cordeiro

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ICYMI ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS TOBAR RODRIGUEZ

More anti-Trump protests in Florida, a troubled Winter Park jewelry company is exposed, someone is swiping guns from cop cars and other things you may have missed this week. »

Thousands rally in Florida as President Trump visits Mar-a-Lago:

Donald Trump just can’t catch a break. After two weeks on the job, the president tried to have a relaxing vacation at Mar-a-Lago, but was interrupted by thousands of protesters outside chanting, “Hey-hey, ho-ho, Donald Trump has got to go,” according to the Palm Beach Post. In Orlando and other cities, demonstrators protested largely against Trump’s executive order banning refugees and immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries. As of press time on Monday, a federal court had suspended Trump’s ban.

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Winter Park business accused of bilking overseas employees:

Bajalia International Group, a Winter Park jewelry company promoted on HSN, stands accused of bilking thousands of dollars from the female artisans it employs in countries like Afghanistan and India, according to a story from the Tampa Bay Times. Winter Park resident Debbie Farah was “portrayed as a savior for women in poor and developing nations” who made the handcrafted jewelry she sells on HSN and on her website, telling customers they were helping these craftswomen earn living wages and helping female entrepreneurs. Now those same craftswomen and former employees accuse Farah of exploiting them and owing them money for jewelry they made for Bajalia but were never paid for. In an interview with the Times, Farah admitted she owed money to different artisans and organizations and was planning to pay them but would not give a timeline.

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Orlando Police officer’s unmarked police car, submachine gun stolen:

Last weekend, an Orlando SWAT officer’s unmarked police car was stolen from an apartment complex in Baldwin Park, along with a UMP .45-caliber submachine gun, four loaded magazines, a helmet and two magazines for a handgun. During the same weekend, a short-barreled AR rifle was stolen from the marked car of a Tavares police officer. Both guns were reportedly locked in the cars under additional security.

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U.S. Reps Matt Gaetz, Stephanie Murphy make headlines for wildly different reasons:

Two of Florida’s congressional representatives caught the eye of national political pundits last week after filing interesting legislative proposals. Gaetz, a Republican, filed a measure to permanently abolish the federal Environmental Protection Agency. Murphy, a Democrat from Winter Park, filed a bill that would essentially remove Trump’s top political adviser, Stephen Bannon, who’s been described as a “white nationalist,” from his recently and controversially granted seat on the National Security Council. mcordeiro@orlandoweekly.com orlandoweekly.com

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FOURTEEN PEOPLE MAKING ORLANDO A BETTER PLACE BY M O N I V E TTE CO RD EI RO, D EANNA FERRANT E, SET H KU B E R S KY, M ATT HEW M OY ER, T HAD D EUS M CCO LLUM A N D JESSI CA B RYCE YO UNG P H OTO GRAPHS BY RO B B ART LET T

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n what we hope will become an annual tradition, we’d like to introduce some of the people who improved our lives this year. Orlando is a continually self-renewing organism, its strong core constantly refreshed by new people, new ideas, new growth. In a reflection of this city’s population, some of our honorees are multi-generation natives; many are fairly recent transplants. And they run the gamut from city employees to artists, college professors to activists. All are restless overachievers accomplishing extraordinary things and enriching the life of the city. With recent headlines too often focusing on trouble and strife, these 14 inspiring people are here to show that good things can and do happen right here in our own backyard.

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ARTIST

WANDA RAIMUNDI-ORTIZ

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ou might know Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz from her inclusion in the prestigious Florida Prize exhibition at Orlando Museum of Art. In portrait and video she appeared, face painted white, wearing a crown and brandishing a sword as “GuerrilleReina,” part of her Reinas/Queens performance series based on physical manifestations of personal anxieties. Or you might have seen her on YouTube as Chuleta Yoprimero, a no-shit-taking, doobie-wearing Nuyorican calling out art-world nonsense and teaching people how to bling out their coquito bottles for the holidays. Either way, Raimundi-Ortiz’s work holds a space uniquely her own. Throughout her life, Raimundi-Ortiz’s focus has been on using her art to tell the stories of people whose narratives are often blurred out, like her own feelings of “ni de aquí, ni de allá” and otherness, or stories from her Puerto Rican parents, who migrated to New York with limited academic education and worked hard to provide for seven children. “Without access to having their stories written, my parents were going to be forgotten,” she says. “They were going to live their lives and then die and be part of a faceless trajectory.” Telling those stories has included a performance series called El Camino where RaimundiOrtiz, dressed in typical white Puerto Rican bomba dress, tries to find a quebrada or ravine in the city in which to wash clothes by hand, and Wepa Woman, a series of comicbook style murals and paintings featuring a superhero tasked with Nuyorican cultural preservation. Raimundi-Ortiz moved to Orlando almost seven years ago for a job as an assistant professor at the University of Central Florida’s School of Visual Art and Design UCF and hasn’t missed the alternate-side parking since. In June she contributed a drawing (“Otra Vez/Not Again”) and essay for art magazine Hyperallergic about the Pulse shooting’s “eerie similarity” to what she’d experienced during 9/11 in New York City. “Like a nasty blow, you’re left stunned, then dull and throbbing,” she wrote. “The outpouring of love in Orlando has been beautiful to witness, but I am still numb.” She says the next installment of her Reinas series, in March, embodies a mother meditating on the loss of her child, which stems from her anxieties raising her brown son in a world where people of color still die from police brutality. “Parenting is already stressful enough,” she says. “Your skin being a dangerous place to live in is an extra element that your counterparts don’t have to think about.” Raimundi-Ortiz says going forward, she wants to bridge the gap between the academic art world and local Latino artists. “I’ve made enough noise and have enough clout inside the machine to speak to the people in here about the folks on the outside and wedge the door wider,” she says. “The onus is on the next generation to ask themselves, ‘You can draw? OK, now what?’ and walk through.”

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ENTERTAINMENT DESIGNER

MICHAEL AIELLO

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f you’ve ever gaped in awe at the magical live shows inside Diagon Alley, gone “awww” over E.T. flying across a curtain of water, or shrieked “aaah!” at a scareactor, you’ve got Michael Aiello to thank (or blame). Twenty years ago he was shouting at rubber sharks; today he’s senior director of creative development at Universal Orlando and the mind behind Halloween Horror Nights, proving that passion and kindness can coexist and even thrive in the corporate theme-park universe. Born and raised in Pine Hills and Apopka, Aiello says theme parks have been a part of his life from the very beginning. “Universal was important to my family because my grandfather was one of the inspectors for the Studios while it was in construction, so I was here before grand opening and walked down Hollywood Boulevard when it was a dirt path. I have an ingrained history here, even before being an employee.” Likewise, his love of horror and haunted houses is generational; Aiello’s father, a retired lieutenant with the Orlando Police Department, controlled security for Terror on Church Street, which “formed my love for the application of the haunted event.” Aiello got hired at Universal in 1996 at age 17 for a summer job as a Jaws skipper and loved it. Instead of completing a degree at Valencia, he auditioned for the now-closed Nickelodeon Studios. After playing everything from a Blues Brother to the Grinch, Aiello expanded into writing and directing, moving up even without that degree. “Universal’s been my education,” he says. “I’ve been here my entire professional life, always trying to try new things, [and] this company has allowed me to grow.” Aiello also grew up attending Halloween Horror Nights, and has been creatively involved with Universal’s annual event since 2003, helping it expand from a local phenomenon to a global brand, and earning 9 consecutive Golden Ticket Awards. Masterminding HHN means bringing to life favorite fright films from his childhood like American Werewolf in London and The Exorcist. Beyond the boos, Aiello spearheaded the award-winning street shows inside the Wizarding World of Harry Potter. “Being able to live in those worlds is amazing,” he says. “We are fans of the things that we create. It’s never just a job.” When able to escape Universal’s borders, Aiello and his wife, Summer (a fellow Universal entertainer), love attending Orlando City Soccer games and taking their kids to arts events, especially Kids Fringe. “One thing I’m thankful for, my kids are growing up more within the culture of Orlando than I ever did,” Aiello says. “I love the fact that I’m able to give them all the things that make Orlando Orlando.”

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ORGANIZERS

ANNA ESKAMANI, IDA ESKAMANI 14

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ne of the last lessons Anna and Ida Vishkaee Eskamani learned from their mother before they lost her to cancer as children was the power to turn grief into action. It’s a skill the 26-year-old first-generation Iranian-American twins have used to confront challenges to reproductive rights, racial inequalities, discrimination and now, President Donald Trump. In less than one day last month, they helped organize a protest against Trump’s executive order targeting refugees and immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim countries – a protest that mobilized almost 1,000 people at Orlando International Airport. “When this executive order came out and Iran reciprocated by saying it would ban U.S. citizens, I felt unwanted. I felt defeated,” Ida says. “But the rally was a moment of healing for me. I grieve through advocacy and action because when you have a mission, you can focus on serving this community and blocking everything out.” Born and raised in Orlando, Anna and Ida learned from their immigrant parents the value of not only hard work, but also political engagement. At 10 years old, they volunteered with the Al Gore campaign and started a career of organizing that continued while they earned their degrees at the University of Central Florida. Since then, the duo has been known as a progressive powerhouse. Anna teaches at UCF as well as working as senior director of public affairs and communications at Planned Parenthood of Southwest and Central Florida. Ida is a legislative aide in Tallahassee for state Rep. Carlos Guillermo Smith and previously worked for Equality Florida, where she started a GoFundMe for the Pulse victims’ families and survivors that raised millions. Both women say they recharge by talking to each other, going out into nature or listening to music, though Anna prefers the Beatles and Ida is more of a political punk-and-mosh pits type of girl. At the end of the day, Anna says a lot of their work is about honoring their mom and continuing her legacy. “She was one of the most courageous, strongest and selfless people you will ever meet,” she says. “Standing next to her during her battle with cancer taught us how to be resilient. … Finding power in pain motivates us to work more and do more, because you know the only way to honor their lives is through action.”

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HISTORIAN

JULIAN CHAMBLISS

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alking to Rollins College professor, History Department chair and coordinator of the African American Studies program Dr. Julian Chambliss can be a dizzying experience. And yet, Chambliss’ eagerness to share and discuss ideas and information is indicative of his commitment to community engagement and resource-sharing. “A professor’s job is to profess,” he states simply. Chambliss came to Rollins in 2003, with research interests in urban planning, popular culture and African-American history. While at Rollins, Chambliss has taught extensively on comic books as historical texts. That Chambliss can so effortlessly synthesize such far-flung areas of interdisciplinary study into a coherent and exciting body of research makes him somewhat superhuman himself. All of these intellectual pursuits came into sharp visual focus with the opening of AfroFantastic: Black Imagination and Agency in the American Experience, an art exhibit curated by Chambliss that opened in January at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum. The stunning visual survey was an attempt by Chambliss to “explore the idea of the black imaginary as a space of counter-narrative and resistance. Because the imaginary cannot be policed, you cannot police the black imagination. … When black people imagine the public sphere it’s a political act.” Chambliss engages with the community at large outside the environs of Rollins as well. He takes a keen interest in local and regional history in his teachings and research, with a particular focus on Winter Park’s Hannibal Square area and Eatonville. “I have this idea that there’s a black social world in Central Florida that intersects with larger national questions around the evolution of urban environments, social and political development,” he says. “I want to create throughlines for people to see this local context as part of a bigger picture.” Chambliss credits Rollins as being key in the development of his research, citing the school’s historical commitment to experimentation as the reason he was able to develop his comic-book curriculum. The community engagement work he does is particularly important to Chambliss. “For me as a historian, the goal is always to bring that theoryversus-practice dialogue into play. History has a place in a public debate.” When asked about what he has planned for the year post-AfroFantastic, he reels off an incredible list of multidisciplinary projects, from a talk on Luke Cage for the Orlando Public Library to the podcast “Every Tongue Got to Confess,” from a book project titled Imagined Urban Landscapes to various digital recovery projects. “I’m typically overcommitted,” Chambliss deadpans. “Idle hands, devil’s workshop.”

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CULTURE CREATOR

TOMMY MOT 18

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ivics nerds were justifiably excited late last year when the Milk District – the commercial area clustered around the intersection of Bumby Avenue and Robinson Street – was made an official Main Street District by the city. This designation gives businesses in the area access to special funding, managed by a board and implemented by a full-time director. It’s a goal that Spacebar owner Tommy “Mot” Barger has been working toward for several years. Mot’s ties to Orlando’s cultural scene run deep. He first rose to prominence as a DJ in Orlando’s heyday as a dance music capital, back in the early 1990s, and found success running Covert Skate Shop (now Spacebar) in the nascent Milk District. After Mot and other local business owners teamed up to brand the area, the Milk District gradually became known in local and national press as one of the hidden gems of Orlando. Now, though, the Milk District is anything but hidden. On any given night, one can find slam poets, comedians, DJs, bands, artists, food trucks and more crowding the core strip on Robinson Street. And a lot of that success ties back in to Mot and Spacebar. When Covert’s business took a hit due to the 2008 recession, Mot says, “I was left with a couple bucks in my pocket, got a beer and wine license, said, ‘Here’s a space for anyone to do something in. Whatever. Come to me.’ And we have beer and wine, but it’s not really a bar.” That attitude of viewing Spacebar as more of an event space than a regular bar still holds sway with Mot, and the variety of events – art shows, Bring Your Own Vinyl nights, parkinglot dance parties, punk shows, pop-up shops – shows that. During the day, Mot runs a T-shirt brand, Please Evolve, out of the same space. But he’s the first to attribute the bar’s current success to others. “I’m super, super grateful and thankful for having a great staff of people. I want to be the best boss I can be to them, because without them I wouldn’t be able to do what I do with the T-shirts.” Mot sees a lot of similarities between the scene that’s sprung up around the Milk District and the ’90s scene that revolved around downtown, and being able to foster new ideas is a source of pride for him. “That’s one of the things I love about having this space: young people coming in and doing cool shit. I love it. I had that energy. I was that dude for so long in this town. No money. Vision. Do it. Bam.”

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DEC H OE S

B E ST V I N TAG E O R U SED CLOTHI NG

A droolworthy selection of designer goods, vintage finds and gently used accessories makes Dechoes the kind of place you stop at on the regular to hunt for clothing bargains. Unlike a lot of resale stores, Dechoes has an upscale but edgy vibe, so you never have to feel like you’re slumming it when you shop here.

BEST ADULT ENTERTAINMENT STORE Fairvilla Megastore

BEST COMIC BOOK SHOP Gods & Monsters

BEST LIQUOR STORE Total Wine & More

BEST TATTOO STUDIO Trinity Tattoo Company

BEST ANTIQUE STORE Renninger’s Antique Center

BEST DOGGIE DAYCARE Happy Paws Pet Resort

BEST NAIL SALON Marilyn Monroe Spas

BEST VAPE STORE The Vapour Room of Orlando

BEST BARBERSHOP Floyd’s 99 Barbershop

BEST FARMERS MARKET Winter Park Farmers Market

BEST PET GROOMER Woof Gang Bakery & Grooming

BEST VETERINARIAN Loch Haven Veterinary Hospital

BEST BEAUTY SERVICES Honey Comb Hair and Makeup Studio

BEST FLORIST In Bloom Florist

BEST PET SUPPLIES STORE Petsmart

BEST VINTAGE OR USED CLOTHING STORE Dechoes Resale

BEST BICYCLE SHOP Orange Cycle

BEST FURNITURE STORE Washburn Imports

BEST PLACE TO ADOPT A PET Orange County Animal Services

BEST WINE SHOP Tim’s Wine Market

BEST BOOKSTORE Barnes & Noble

BEST HAIR SALON Alchemy

BEST RECORD STORE Park Ave CDs

BEST BOUTIQUE Cloak & Dapper

BEST LINGERIE STORE Fairvilla Megastore

BEST SMOKE SHOP Pipe Dreams

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MUSICIAN

EUGENE SNOWDEN

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he musical residency is a storied tradition in popular music, dating back to the Beatles at the Cavern Club or Thelonius Monk at the Village Vanguard – a performer using the concert stage as a proving ground. Orlando residents are lucky enough to have a seasoned performer brave enough to revive that tradition, just for the sheer joy of performing. On any given Wednesday night, at Lil Indies on Mills, longtime local soul institution and Legendary JCs frontman Eugene Snowden presents his Ten Pints of Truth residency. Snowden, interested in honing his solo chops and wanting to pay homage to the honky-tonks and chitlin circuit that he was historically indebted to, reached out to Will Walker for a stage. Walker readily offered up Indies. And so it is that Snowden holds court, with a rotating cast of collaborators, reveling in the boozy intimacy and rebel vibes. “The size of the room is perfect,” Snowden says. “Rock & roll, soul, all of it started in small joints, not huge halls. And they’ve got high-level cocktails. With high-test booze, you know things are gonna go right!” For someone who seems such a permanent part of the local musical landscape, it’s interesting to learn that it was just a chance event that brought him south from NYC in 1993: “It was the week before Thanksgiving. It was 59 degrees. I came down, got a hotel room, and I went swimming! And you know what? I moved the next week!” Within a year, Snowden – an experienced drummer – was playing in various outfits, not least of which was the beloved mid-’90s Afrobeat combo Umoja. Then he met up with the musicians who would become his most well-known outfit, the Legendary JCs. Fronting the group, a lethal soul ensemble, Snowden became a natural, confident and wild frontman. As the JCs put the brakes on their live work, Snowden went fullbore with his solo work. Snowden is effusive in his praise of the Orlando music scene for giving him the freedom to follow his restless muse and become the performer he is today. “Orlando is a place where you can take chances and an audience will actually come out to see you take those chances,” he says point-blank. “I’ve done five different groups, five different styles of music – I could only have done that here.”

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SUSTAINABILITY DIRECTOR, CITY OF ORLANDO

CHRIS CASTRO 22

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rowing up on a palm tree farm in Miami, Chris Castro quickly developed an appreciation for the natural world. His passion for the environment followed him throughout every part of his life, from being a surfer chasing waves along the coast to a college student looking to make a difference. It even led him to co-found the international nonprofit IDEAS for Us, a United Nations-accredited organization that creates global environmental solutions and works to provide local action groups with guidance and mentorship. Now, as the director of sustainability for the city of Orlando, Castro is helping to ensure that the City Beautiful stays that way. He works with Mayor Buddy Dyer to coordinate the city’s climate and energy policies. “I think that Orlando is primed to essentially be a hub for clean energy innovation,” he says. “Orlando is unprecedented in its opportunity: It has all of the pieces of the puzzle.” In addition to his work in city government, he also co-founded the Florida Green Chamber of Commerce, the clean energy consulting firm Citizen Energy, and Fleet Farming, an urban farming program turning front lawns into cropproducing “farmlettes” across the city. For Castro, whether it’s getting down and dirty in potting soil or drafting new energy initiatives, work and play seem to go hand-in-hand. He works over 50 hours a week on his various environmental projects, but he says all the effort only drives his passion. “I think it’s important to find that alignment, that grit, and the combination of passion, patience and persistence,” he says. Orlando was the only place he could realize that passion. Here, he says, we can create a “smart city,” a combination of sustainability and tech that will lead to a safer, more environmentally friendly community. To Castro, Orlando is a visionary city, a hub for art, food and culture that will pioneer a more efficient future for us all. “We have the ability to make the world what we want, a better place and a more sustainable future,” he says. “Not just here in Orlando, but around the world.”

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PARTNER, LURE DESIGN

SARAH COLLINS

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eople who do things are important to a community, but so are people who make things. The visual aspects of a community are as important to reinforcing its personality as the policies – they literally set the tone. Designer and screenprinter Sarah Collins has been in most Orlandoans’ peripheral vision for 15 years now, whether they realize it or not. In 2001, after graduating from school in Knoxville, she moved to Orlando on a whim. She was immediately drawn to Lure Design, the award-winning firm founded by Jeff Matz and Paul Mastriani, and in 2002, she landed a job there. “When I started working at Lure, the first thing I started doing was making posters for [Jim] Faherty,” Collins recalls. “We would make posters for shows at the Social – the Sapphire, it was then – and go down and sit at the shows and sell them. It was a part of Orlando I didn’t know existed.” Until that point, she hadn’t clicked with the city. “I hated it,” she laughs. “Only one independent coffee place! It didn’t make sense to me. But once I started going to shows and getting to know people … I get mad at people now when they try to bash us. I’m like, you know, we’re doing pretty well for ourselves.” She sees beauty all over the city. “I love the Publix on Edgewater, the Orlando Public Library, the Kress and Rogers buildings. And signage including Lightstyles, LaBelle Furs, Wally’s, Fairfield Chapel … and Kraft Azalea Garden. And I just did a poster for Dickson Azalea Park.” So falling in love with the music scene was just the first step in falling in love with the city; now she’s inextricably intertwined. After 10 years with Lure, she became a partner, and along the way, her practice has diversified to include corporate and nonprofit clients: Collins has created work for Disney, the Fringe Festival, UCF, Enzian Theater and the Florida Film Festival, the YMCA, and several bars and restaurants. (Current biggie on the books: the rebranding of the Ravenous Pig and the launch of the Polite Pig, both from Orlando resto moguls James and Julie Petrakis.) Collins says, “Working on the Enzian Cult Classics posters is the most enjoyable to me – my favorites being Mallrats and The Life Aquatic, two films I heart.” A high point this year was when her poster for Wilco was chosen as the cover of the new book about the band, Beyond the Fleeting Moment: Wilco. That dichotomy between corporate design work and screenprinted passion projects is what makes the partners call Lure “Jekyll and Hyde” sometimes. But chances are if you’ve partaken in Orlando’s cultural life, Lure has been there, making it look cool.

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BARTENDER

RENÉ NGUYEN 26

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s any epicurean boozehound will tell you, craft cocktails have taken off in a big way, elevating drinking scenes not just in Orlando, but across the country. The focus on creative combinations of small-batch spirits, unique liqueurs and picture-perfect presentation has found plenty of devotees in Orlando, already known as something of a foodie city. One of the people most responsible for elevating our drinking – and, let’s face it, our bar tabs – is René Nguyen, the general manager and lead bartender at Hanson’s Shoe Repair and Herman’s Loan Office. But oddly enough, Nguyen never had aspirations to be a bartender until a few years ago. After graduating from University of Central Florida in 2006 with a business marketing degree, Nguyen found himself working a 9-to-5 office job in corporate sales. The paycheck was large enough to afford Nguyen plenty of travel opportunities, which he took advantage of by visiting friends in New York, San Francisco and Chicago. It was in Chicago that Nguyen was first bit by the cocktail bug. “All throughout college I just kind of drank Jack and Cokes or cheap beer and whatnot, and then kind of transitioned into craft beer,” he says. But in Chicago, Nguyen found himself at the pioneering Wicker Park cocktail bar Violet Hour. “I didn’t know you could have a drinking experience like that,” Nguyen says. “Everything about it stuck with me, from the ambience, the mood lighting, the modern decor of the venue itself and the presentation technique of the bartender himself. But yeah, I had my first craft cocktail there: a Sazerac. I thought it was going to kill me because I had never had anything that spirit-forward and strong before.” Nguyen’s trips away caused him to develop an expensive habit: home bartending. Nguyen says he would stock up on rare provisions, then have cocktail nights out of his house, introducing his friends to the classic drinks he found in vintage recipe books. Eventually, that turned into the occasional pop-up or bartending gig at friends’ weddings. But when he heard about a new speakeasy opening downtown, Hanson’s Shoe Repair, his first visit turned into something of an audition. “It was still very much in soft opening,” Nguyen says. “I don’t think they had planned on opening it [that night], but when they got some reservations, they decided to open it last second. But they didn’t have a bartender. They had parted ways with their one bartender hire, clearly the night before.” After trying to make do with a replacement, the original owners of Hanson’s caught wind of Nguyen’s reputation as an enthusiast and asked him if he wanted to help them out behind the bar. Fast-forward a few years later, and Nguyen is fully involved in Orlando’s craft cocktail scene. Together with his partners in the V Group, Nguyen manages both Hanson’s Shoe Repair and Herman’s Loan Office, designing cocktails and menus for both locations, educating the palates of novice drinkers, and always ready to jump behind the stick.

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PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, 90.7 WMFE

LAFONTAINE OLIVER

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hat’s the difference between a radio station that meets your basic news needs and stays in its lane, and a station that reflects your life? In the case of 90.7 WMFE, it’s a leader like LaFontaine Oliver. Oliver came to WMFE in 2013, finding a station “with good bones,” as he puts it. Under previous leadership, the station had gone from classical with short news breaks to 24-hour talk. But it was still sitting in that tidy, if generic, National Public Radio niche. As one of his first tasks in Orlando, Oliver “surveyed the landscape,” soliciting feedback from the board, from the station staff and from the community at large. “A lot of what I was hearing was, ‘Of course we love NPR,’ but folks wanted to see more of Orlando and Central Florida reflected in what we were doing,” he says. “Really successful stations are able to marry national content with equally compelling local content.” So Oliver almost doubled the news staff. WMFE’s newsroom has since expanded “Intersection,” their twice-weekly local news program; added a Friday arts roundup, community commentaries, longer pieces and series; and assigned reporters to regularly delve into topics including health, space and other beats rather than just hitting the headlines with “spot news.” Oliver also worked to increase the station’s visibility, participating in and hosting more local events and pressing the flesh with listeners – and non-listeners. “Being out there opens you up; sometimes the conversations aren’t comfortable,” Oliver admits. “We have to have the confidence to listen to feedback that’s not always comfortable and take it to heart.” “I’m very particular about saying ‘community engagement’ and not ‘community outreach,’” he continues. “Outreach is when you’re looking to change someone else, whereas engagement is when you yourself are changed. We were looking for the type of community interaction that changed who we were as an organization.” Oliver’s background in commercial and satellite radio may also have increased his flexibility. “In commercial radio, the [financial] competition that forces you to be creative. And satellite radio rewrote the playbook” of consumer expectations, he says, which may be why, as well as beefing up the newsroom, he’s focused on digital: launching a mobile app, redesigning the website, making the web player more robust, adding podcasts. “We had to get out of the mindset that listeners will be there when we broadcast, and make content available on their time. [It’s] all important to an organization like 90.7, which has to be thinking about some of the seismic changes that are coming.” Seismic changes like a possible existential threat – it’s been reported that the Trump administration plans to privatize the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Oliver says that only about 7 percent of WMFE’s budget depends on CPB funds, and says, “We’ve been here before. There’s strong support for public broadcasting on both sides of the aisle,” he says. “No matter what, we will find a way.”

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OWNER, LOCAL ROOTS

EMILY RANKIN 30

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mily Rankin’s serene exterior belies a steely will. It’s a will that’s transmuted her beliefs into tangible realities, in the process changing the life of a neighborhood and the plates of a region. After growing up in Audubon Park (she’s a thirdgeneration resident), Rankin, an urban planning student, went to work in Portland, Oregon. “I was really inspired by what was going on there, that they were thriving around a more sustainable lifestyle,” Rankin says, recalling the local-first ethos espoused in that city. It was while she was in Nicaragua that she experienced an evolution in her mindset. “I saw how a lot people were trying to change places that they weren’t from. They didn’t really understand them, and they were trying to make them what they wanted them to be. And I really felt if I was going to do community development, I needed to go back to my home.” So she returned. Rankin founded the Audubon Park Garden District and the Audubon Park Community Market, Orlando’s first all-local farmers market, in 2008. In the same year, she founded Orlando’s first buy local initiative, Ourlando. “You plant the seeds, and they inspire and encourage people to plant their own seeds,” she says, naming Stardust Video & Coffee the welcoming space she needed to create her market, which incubated countless small businesses, which inspired John Rife to create the East End Market, out of which grew the Fleet Farming projects, and so it goes. Her next project was Local Roots, an ambitious plan to buy the best food products Florida has to offer and distribute them to local restaurants. Rankin sells locally grown vegetables, locally made products, and locally raised and wild-caught meats. Over the years, Local Roots went from an indispensable resource to a mark of pride on savvy chefs’ menus. The Local Roots farm store at East End Market has just been rebranded Florida & Co., and will begin serving “98 percent local” meals soon. “I think sometimes people look in the fridge and are stumped. If we can get them tasting it and experiencing how delicious this food is, they’ll be more likely to use it at home.” Her deep love of Florida is evident in her palpable enthusiasm for mangoes, avocados, shrimp, kumquats, even millet – what she calls the “real Florida.” Also coming soon is the launch of the Florida & Co. website, which will host a webstore where anyone in the state can order Floridian products to be delivered via UPS. There’ll also be a host of educational resources and videos – cooking classes, recipes, gardening tips. “I’m a bridge-builder. I’m all about making that connection. I don’t think we’re going to get all the way to this idealistic place overnight. I know that more than anyone, because I’ve seen us baby-step our way over 15 years.”

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PRODUCER

BETH MARSHALL

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t first glance, you might not guess that Beth Marshall is among the most respected and influential members of Central Florida’s performing arts scene, but don’t let her bold tattoos and salty Southern twang – as seen in the films Sunlight Jr. and Cassadaga – fool you. Beneath Marshall’s larger-than-life exterior beats the heart of a Local Hero (as certified by a 2007 Bank of America award) who has been one of Orlando’s most effective arts advocates and a dedicated mentor to upcoming artists for over two decades. Nearly 23 years ago, an impromptu audition during an Orlando vacation led Marshall to abandon plans to buy a home in Kansas City, and instead relocate to Central Florida. Her résumé as an actor, director and instructor reads like a roll call of fondly remembered former theaters, from the Civic (“it was our bread and butter up until the day it closed its doors”), Stage Left and Acting Studio Company to Impacte, Temenos and Theatre Downtown. Marshall is best known for her former role as leader of the Orlando International Fringe Theatre Festival from 2003 to 2011, during the event’s transition from downtown to Loch Haven Park and its subsequent explosive growth. “The Fringe is something I thought was so necessary for Orlando,” says the woman who guided the organization from the brink of bankruptcy to being the longest-running such festival in America. “Fringe is the heart of the theatrical scene, the place where everyone comes together, and I don’t think that’s changing anytime soon. It put us on the map on a whole other level.” Since leaving the Fringe, her company Beth Marshall Presents has staged socially conscious dramas and original theatrical events (honoring Pulse Nightclub victims and Travyon Martin, among others), earning Marshall accolades from United Arts, the National New Play Network, National Women in Theater Conference, the Orlando Sentinel and Orlando Weekly. “Never in a million years would I have ever thought that I’d be living in this city this long. I always think ‘I’m going to move,’ and yet still I’m here,” Marshall admits. Her latest project, the comic musical 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, is an admitted departure. “With the state of the world right now, even I, who like deep dark drama and political art, am way OK with just having entertainment on stage. I’m enjoying the laughter.”

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PULSE SURVIVOR, GUN REFORM ACTIVIST

BRANDON WOLF 34

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he gravity of everything that happened after June 12 didn’t hit Brandon Wolf until he was about to go on stage in front of thousands of people at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. A month earlier, he had been partying with his two best friends, Christopher “Drew” Leinonen and Leinonen’s boyfriend, Juan Guerrero, at the gay nightclub Pulse. Leinonen said, “I love you,” and told Wolf to always remind others how much he loved them. Then suddenly, Leinonen was gone, along with Guerrero and 47 others who died in the mass shooting during those early morning hours. One moment Wolf, 28, was running, then he was going to funerals, then he was being held by President Barack Obama, who told him it would get better. Wolf could have hidden inside his home, as many did after the massacre. But instead, he walked onto the DNC stage with Leinonen’s mother, Christine, and held her hand as she told people how gun violence had taken away her only son. “It changed my life forever,” he says. “I remember as she was speaking about how it took five minutes to hear a bell toll 49 times, she started to come down. And I looked in to the front row, and I saw this guy, who had rainbow everything on, was sobbing uncontrollably and gave her a standing ovation from start to finish. A few of those moments helped me realize we had to do something. That’s what we were here for.” He’s channeled that passion into the Dru Project, an organization created in memory of Leinonen that builds gaystraight alliances in schools, and becoming one of the most powerful voices in the fight against gun violence. In a couple of weeks, he’ll be spending more time in front of Florida lawmakers in Tallahassee as he works to combat the many proposed expansions of gun carry in public places. “We want the message coming out of Orlando to be one of love and unity,” Wolf says. “After Pulse, a lot of people have the same fire burning as I do because they saw what failure to act can do in our community. It’s time to stand up and use your voices.”

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BY SETH KUBERSKY Larissa Humiston’s Emotions Dance Company is taking its audiences back in time with Twist: Throwback Edition at Orlando Shakespeare’s Mandell Theater Feb. 24 and 25. The fourth installment in a series, this Twist fuses tunes from the ’60s through the millennium with ballet, jazz and contemporary dance. The evening features guest choreographer Carrie Crawford, whose Greenville, South Carolina-based Crawford Jazz Project made its Orlando debut at the Rep in January, exhibiting impressive technical mastery and stylistic range for a corps with dancers still in their teens.

Last month, the Orlando Philharmonic and Opera Orlando announced a new partnership for the 2017-2018 season. Opera Orlando (formerly Florida Opera Theatre), which concludes its current season with Mozart’s Don Giovanni March 24-26, has been using Philharmonic musicians in its performances at the Dr. Phillips Center’s Pugh Theater. Next season’s joint schedule will feature Puccini’s La Bohème, holiday performances of Menotti’s Amahl and the Night Visitors and Rossini’s Cinderella. Both organizations hope to move into the Dr. Phil’s Steinmetz Hall, now scheduled to open in 2020.

Winter Park Playhouse recently announced their 2017-2018 season, which will commence in July with Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Some Enchanted Evening, and includes Life Could Be a Dream, Daddy Long Legs, the Florida premiere of Babes in Hollywood, Nunsense A-Men! and Honky Tonk Angels. If any of those titles makes you want to tap your way on stage, start practicing your comic-and-16 bars for the Playhouse’s season auditions on March 13; both Equity and non-union performers of all ages and ethnicity are invited.

Now Playing

Picasso at the Lapin Agile, through Feb. 19 at Mad Cow … The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, through Feb. 26 at Garden Theatre … The Great Gatsby, through March 26 at Orlando Shakes … Naked Boys Singing, through Feb. 11 at Parliament House … A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, through Feb. 12 at Dr. Phillips … Best of Broadway 2006-2010, through Feb. 13 at Breakthrough Theatre … Why Do Fools Fall in Love?, through Feb. 18 at Winter Park Playhouse … Geronimo Stilton: Mouse in Space, through March 5 at the Rep.

Upcoming

Josephine, Feb. 9-25 at the Venue … This Is Our Youth, Feb. 10-25 at Macbeth Studio … Spotlight Cabaret: Chris Leavy, Feb. 15-16 at Winter Park Playhouse … Constellations, Feb. 17-March 19 at Mad Cow … Janine Klein Is the Diva’s Diva: Tales of a Drag Queen Assistant, Feb. 18 and 25 at Parliament House … String Tea, Feb. 21 at Blue Bamboo … Love’s Labour’s Lost, Feb. 22March 24 at Orlando Shakes … 2020 Vision: A Survival Guide for the New World, Feb. 22-23 at Parliament House … Living Room Theater, Feb. 24 at Blue Bamboo … Brighton Beach Memoirs, Feb. 24-March 13 at Breakthrough Theatre … Everything Is Rosie, Feb. 25 at Winter Park Playhouse.

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BY SETH KUBERSKY BETH MARSHALL PRESENTS THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE | PHOTO BY PATTY WOLFE

From the Ziegfeld Follies, which

buoyed Broadway’s spirits during the Great Depression, through the British Invasion of my 1980s upbringing, to today’s mega-hit Hamilton, musical theater has played a key role in shaping American popular culture for over a century. So who doesn’t love a musical? Prolific producer Beth Marshall, for one, which is ironic because she’s currently presenting the Tony-winning musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee at the Garden Theatre. Why would someone best known for dark, socially aware dramas like The Whale, Doubt and 33 Variations want to mount her company’s first-ever published musical? “As a producer, I’m in a place where I really want to challenge myself with larger budgets and bigger-scale production values. That’s the part of musical producing that excites me,” Marshall explained to me in an interview last month. “As an actor and a director, there’s work that I just don’t get excited about, and I won’t do. But as a producer, if it’s challenging to me and the art of producing, I look at it and go ‘OK.’” With the show’s “next-level” budget came the opportunity to increase compensation for her cast and crew, as well as build a financial cushion so her company can afford to do less commercial work in future seasons. The show also afforded an opportunity for Kenny Howard – a Tonywinning producer and director of Bat Boy, Heathers, Cabaret and The Lion Queen – to direct for Marshall’s company, after having helmed Beth herself onstage in Wanzie’s Ladies of Eola Heights plays. After nearly a decade of bringing edgy art to Mayberry-esque Winter Garden, Marshall said she picked Putnam as her first musical production “because it’s a true ensemble piece, and it’s characterdriven.” The show satirically depicts the

BMP’s first musical may look light as air, but it conceals substance beneath the surface small-town competition, with all the awkward tween contestants played by either adult actors or preselected audience members. William Finn’s songs are breezily buoyant, even if most don’t lodge in your brain, and Rachel Sheinkin’s book makes each character endearingly unique. But it’s the actors who make Spelling Bee sink or swim, and this ensemble capture the show’s slyly silly spirit equally as well as the original New York cast I saw at Circle in the Square a dozen years ago. Take Kit Cleto as competitor William Barfee, for example: His “magic foot” gyrations are as entertainingly absurd as Dan Fogler’s (who won a Tony for creating the role long before becoming a big-screen star in Fantastic Beasts), but Cleto finds a tortured dignity in the sinusitus-stricken student that’s all his own. Likewise, Eric Desnoyers brings an eccentric physicality to Leaf Coneybear; Ricky Cona inhabits Chip Tolentino with the abrasive egotism of an erection-plagued Boy Scout; and Kayla Alvarez’s dictionary-loving Olive Ostrovsky is so adorably innocent you’ll want to adopt her away from her absentee parents. In the “adult” roles, Anachebe Asomugha is intimidating yet tenderhearted as ex-con Mitch Mahoney, always handy with a hug and a juice box for every loser; and Jeff Lindberg’s increasingly unhinged Vice Principal Panch with Rebecca Fisher’s former champion Rona Lisa Peretti make marvelously madcap moderators. Though it has a big budget by Marshall’s usual standards, this Spelling Bee wisely

avoids being too slick, instead embracing a charmingly handmade aesthetic. A set of cafetorium bleachers by Daniel Cooksley (designed with Marshall and Howard) is enlivened by Amy Hadley’s colorful lighting. Together they set the backdrop for Kyla Swanberg’s carefully observed costumes, which instantly communicate their wearers’ peculiarities; Coneybear’s crazy-quilt pants alone are practically their own one-man show. Live accompaniment is provided by master pianist Julian Bond, with select numbers choreographed by Dion Leonhard, and vocal coach Priscilla Bagley has done what I once thought impossible: stripped her singers of their well-trained vibratos in favor of appropriately immature tones that blend beautifully during songs like “Goodbye,” “The I Love You Song” and the catchy title tune. Summing up Spelling Bee’s appeal, Marshall says, “Unlike a lot of musicals, it doesn’t try to go for something and miss; it goes for exactly what it’s going for, and that’s it. It’s not major depth, but it’s fun and a good time.” While I certainly agree that it’s a good (even great) time, I have to quibble with her dismissal of its depth, especially with the timely tweaks Howard and company have made to the dialogue. The script has always had a progressive subtext about embracing diversity and overcoming adversity, but this production is peppered with offhanded topical references – including shoutouts to Jeff Sessions, Zika and the Mexican wall – that emphasize the contemporary context, making loser Logainne Schwartzandgrubenierre (Savannah Simerly) seem like an explicit stand-in for Hillary Clinton. Howard has also inserted “Easter Egg” references to other Broadway shows, resulting in a multilayered confection that may look light as air, but that conceals substance beneath the surface. skubersky@orlandoweekly.com orlandoweekly.com

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NEW YEAR

NEWYOU SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL SECTION

BALANCE DREAM

SPIRITUAL HEALTH AND POWER YOGA IN THE NEW YEAR Happy 2017! Welcome to the second entry in our new four-part series, “New Year, New You.” Whether it’s eating better, taking your vitamins or just generally bettering your mind and body, we’re here to help get you there. CONTINUED ON PAGE 40

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NEW YEAR

NEWYOU

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 39

There may not be a more zeitgeist-y, New Year’s resolution-centric lifestyle change than committing to a bi-weekly meditation and yoga classes. Like athleisure fashion, cold-pressed juices, or quinoa, Eastern spiritual and physical exercises have struck a pose in popular culture as of late. At the end of every yoga class, instructors guide students through meditative breathing exercises: a deep inhale, followed by a billowing exhale. Though all based in the ancient practices of another time, today’s yoga offers something for everyone, whether you delve into a full mind/body/ spirit approach or prefer keeping your focus primarily on the physical body and athletic conditioning. So unroll your floor mat, align your chakras (and spine!), and join us as we explore the worlds of spiritual health and Power Yoga.

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL SECTION

BREATHE IN

We’ve all heard “be the change you want to see in world.” But in accordance with these spiritual principles, we must first gaze inward at what needs changing within ourselves. Reflection and self-realization to understand and gauge spiritual health are jumping-off points toward better mental

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and emotional health. Along with meditation and exercise, auras and chakras—accurately reading them, taking the steps to harmonize them—are important factors when considering your overall 2017 health and wellness regimen. Also known as “electromagnetic fields” in the scientific community, auras (colorful, halo-like projections surrounding the human body) can help identify subconscious mental and spiritual imbalances in someone’s psyche. Although they’re invisible to the naked eye, meditation and healing centers like Soul Centre in Winter Park, founded and managed by locals Kari Ghanem and and Chelsea Michaud respectively, use finely calibrated machines that can read and display auras. “You know when you’re in a public place and your mood suddenly swings?” Michaud asks. “Often times, that’s your aura entangling and swapping energies with someone near you. But you can take steps to strengthen your aura and, consequently, your overall well-being.” A healthier aura will feature bright, vibrant colors with few gaps or holes, while flagging auras appear porous and washedout. Regular aura readings can help you set benchmarks for mental and emotional health moving into the new year. “Aura readings make us more cognizant of our own mindfulness and positivity, or


lack thereof,” Michaud says. “People have visited us assuming their auras would look unhealthy, have hopped on the reading machine, and their auras were spectacular.” Chakras are closely tied to an individual’s auras. Every human being possesses seven of these distinct energy centers. Aligned vertically from the crown of the head to the pubic bone, these non-physical nodes are linked to internal organ health and harmony. If any one of the seven chakras overpowers the others—say, your third eye outshines your throat chakra—the subtle body (that is, the physical body’s spiritual, non-corporeal energy) can become unstable and have a tangible impact on your emotional state and wellness. Gurus can identify and balance your wayward chakras, giving your juju a muchneeded jump start. Popular methods for balancing chakras are flower and crystal therapies. Like all of us, various flowers and crystals also project auras which can restore human auras and even rebalance chakras by absorbing negative energy for their wearers. “For instance, to balance my heart chakra, I would carry a rose quartz,” Michaud says. “This quartz’s aura removes resentments and emotional pain, which knock my heart chakra out of alignment.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 42

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NEW YEAR

NEWYOU SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL SECTION

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41

BREATHE OUT

If flower and crystal healing represent that deep inhale, Power Yoga is an outward push into the Universe. Derived from vigorous, dynamic disciplines including ashtanga, vinyasa, and Bikram styles, Power Yoga rarely rests on its laurels. Yogis flow between poses and positions, all the way through and back again, rather than holding single position for long moments at a time. “I was looking for something different to do with yoga,” Orlando Power Yoga founder Kelly Senn says. “I had been doing Bikram yoga for several years, and I started doing Power Yoga at home. There were more poses that were harder for me to do. … I fell in love with it and had the opportunity to open up a studio right away, which I did as I was going through teacher training. And here we are.” The traditional yoga styles Power Yoga draws from rely on fixed routines of asanas, or poses—a student attending a noon Bikram class, for example, will have a nearly identical experience to that of the 5 p.m. attendees. Not so with Power Yoga. Instructors can modify their routines midclass to fit students’ physical and spiritual needs. Power Yoga’s most renowned feature is perhaps the heat and humidity. It’s a pillar borrowed from Bikram yoga, and the sweltering environment is there for more than just evoking that euphoric, sweaty feeling. Beginners and yogis recovering from injury often discover the increased temperature and humidity help improve flexibility during classes. Over time Power Yogis will experience a slimming sensation—weight loss, lower blood pressure, and a lithe, toned physique. The constant movement and Power Yoga’s emphasis on upright poses strengthens the core and increases stamina. But instructors like Senn also incorporate meditation and breathing regimens into their classes for reflection and self-fulfillment. Power Yoga, when paired with proper spiritual health, can help balance the best of both worlds. “I have people there just for the fitness benefits in my classes,” Senn says. “I also have people who treat this studio like their church. Some are going through physical therapy. The beauty of Power Yoga is you can take anything you want from it and leave the rest.” 42

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tip jar

[ restaurant review ]

BY FAIYAZ KARA

DOMU DON: UNI, ROE, SPICY TUNA OVER RICE | PHOTO BY ROB BARTLETT

DOMU ARIGATO

You might even get away with an order of brothless uni ramen ($16), though don’t hold me to the fire if you’re told otherwise. I had hoped for a little more than a We’re all quite thankful for East End Market’s new ramen-ya measly dollop of “sea foie” atop the heap of noodles, but a nice uni butter sauce BY FAIYAZ KARA helped temper my dismay, and the addition of ikura (roe) and crispy red quinoa were amen! Ramen! Everywhere ramen! tunes,” said one of my guests) than it does textural strokes of genius. Still, I’d much (And tacos.) But back to ramen – the in the proper lounge, which has a proper rather hover over a steamy bowl of duckcity’s love affair with these noodly midcentury aesthetic and where one can fat-infused shoyu broth ($13), plucking out bowls has only deepened, and a break-up get a proper good drink. Signature cocktails fried chicken thighs and kikurage ’shrooms. isn’t very likely. In my estimation, the trend are designed by Rene Nguyen (of Herman’s On nights when allergies get the better of hasn’t even peaked, and that’s hardly a sur- Loan Office and Hanson’s Shoe Repair) and me, the sneaky heat of the curry ramen prise. Ramen is cheap, for one thing, and the bar is where many choose to enjoy their ($13) and its Siamese flavors (infernal Thai hots included) is my soup it’s wholly comforting. Plus it elicits a mild meal – so long as it’s not of choice. snobbery – “ramen connoisseurship,” as ramen. Desserts aren’t offered, Seems owner Sean Jonathan Gold calls it – particularly among DOMU though there is a fair millennials, many of whom gladly queue up “Sonny” Nguyen doesn’t 3201 Corrine Drive bit of candy – eye candy for hours for a chance to dribble tonkotsu want ramen served at the 407-960-1228 – in the form of a freakybar for some nebulous down their bearded yaps. domufl.com dreamy Boy Kong mural, At Domu, the (sometimes 45-minute) reason (maybe because $$ potted plants ensconced wait is for a tonkotsu simmered for 18 slurping is messy? No on walls, and a curious mix hours, then ladled into a bowl of al dente one I asked really had a of reading materials in the noodles. It’s called the “Richie Rich” ($13), clear answer), but everyand it lives up to its name. Ajitama, the thing else goes. So then, barflies: I suggest lounge. There are hanging tapestries one marinated soft-boiled egg with near-runny going to town on crazy-crisp Korean fried of my guests said were reminiscent of the yolk, and the heady essence of sesame only chicken ($8) shellacked in Korean butter ones in the hotel from The Shining. No sauce; perfectly grilled octopus ($9) with doubt Sonny Nguyen is conscious of the accentuate this opaque pool of luxuriance. Slurping it all in this familiar space smashed fingerling potatoes; a plate of impact such whimsical design flurries have makes you forget the mighty fine Basque bracing Sichuan cucumbers ($5); or a bowl on Domu’s target audience – an audience fare that was once served within these very of oh-so-cheesy corn ($6) blended with keenly aware that all work and no play walls. It feels brighter in the main dining melted mozzarella, Kewpie mayo, scallions makes Jack a dull boy. room (“I feel like I should be singing show and togarashi. fkara@orlandoweekly.com

R

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OPENINGS The New General, a modern general store with retail, a fresh food café and a coffee bar, has opened on New England Avenue, down the street from Luma. The store serves vegan and nonvegan breakfast … Taps Restaurant & Bar in Winter Park Village is now Firefly Bar & Kitchen Winter Park. The new owners have revamped the menu and are redoing the interior … Bad As’s Sandwich has opened in the old Se7en Bites space in the Milk District … Also in the Milk District, the owner of the Sandwich Bar will open Iron Cow Restaurant a few doors down … Opening date for Mexican resto Mesa21 in Ivanhoe Village is Tuesday, March 14, with a VIP event slated for Friday, March 10 … The owners of Cafe DaVinci and Neighbors Artisan Taqueria in DeLand will open The Table, a restaurant serving Southern fare, sometime in March … KISS frontmen Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley will open their second Rock & Brews in the Lee Vista Promenade near the airport in April … Wahlburgers will open another location in the former Amigo’s space later this month in the Waterford Lakes Town Center … Paddlefish has opened inside the Empress Lily steamboat in Disney Springs. NEWS/EVENTS Hari Pulapaka of DeLand’s Cress Restaurant will stage a seven-course dinner featuring the cuisines of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen to raise awareness of the culture and cuisine of the seven countries named in the White House travel ban. Details are being hammered out, but the event will happen this month … Mediterranean Blue is now serving Saturday brunch … Nova Restaurant holds a Brew & Tunes Dinner at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21, featuring six courses, bourbon or wine pairing, and an Elvis impersonator. Cost is $65$75 … The Winter Park Wine & Dine goes from 6:30-9 p.m. March 22 at the Winter Park Farmer’s Market with more than 30 food vendors (Boca, Lombardi’s, Nova, Chuy’s, Mitchell’s and more) in attendance. Cost is $45, or $100 for VIP admittance … James Beard Award-winning chef Tony Mantuano returns to Portobello in Disney Springs on Saturday, March 11, at noon to host a ravioli cooking class. Cost is $55.

Got restaurant dish? Send tips to dining@orlandoweekly.com

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BAR E AM

PHOTO BY SCOTT HORN

SANFORD BREWING COMPANY 400 S. Sanford Ave., Sanford, 407-732-6419, sanfordbrewing.com

Sanford Brewing Company serves up one of the greatest bar food-and-beer tandems in Central Florida. The wood-paneled taproom’s sumptuous bacon flights, hand-breaded chicken tenders and customizable mac & cheese delightfully twist the typical bar menu, while they also sling tasty home-spun brews that stand among Orlando’s best. ESSAY QUESTION: WHY SHOULD I DRINK HERE?

SHORT ANSWER/MULTIPLE CHOICE: AFTER WORK OR AFTER HOURS? Head on down as soon as work hits done o’clock.

BATHROOMS: NIGHTMARE OR NOT BAD? Not bad

BEER/WINE OR LIQUOR TOO? A rotating roster of delectable house brews, guest taps and meads aplenty

BAG HOOKS? YES

CHECK ALL THAT APPLY: fancy cocktails make ’em strong and keep ’em coming wine list (5 choices or more) craft beer beer: the usual suspects wide selection of bottles/cans (more than 8) wide selection on tap (more than 8) FOOD SERVED? YES SMOKING ALLOWED INSIDE? NO OUTSIDE DRINKING? YES 46

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DOG-FRIENDLY? YES On outdoor patio

TVS? YES WHAT’S ON? Sportsball DJS? NO LIVE MUSIC? YES Every Thursday LOUD MUSIC OR BACKGROUND MUSIC? Middle-of-the-road classic rock GAMES? CHECK ALL THAT APPLY: pinball video pool darts other: Cornhole on weekends


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recently reviewed EDITED BY JESSICA BRYCE YOUNG

$$$$ $$$$ $$$$ $$$$

$10 OR LESS $10-$15 $15-$25 $25 OR MORE

The price range generally reflects the average cost of one dinner entree. Bakeries, ice cream shops, etc. reflect relative cost for one person. Search hundreds more reviews at orlandoweekly.com

THE STUBBORN MULE

The folks who brought us RusTeak are behind this casual Thornton Park eatery where dishes veer toward the weighty, and beverages toward the crafty. Fried Wisconsin cheese curds and equally addicting pork belly slicked in an “Asian” sticky sauce make fine starters, while burgers, Reuben tacos, and the catch of the day make fine entrée choices. Ending with a cronut topped with vanilla bean ice cream will only cement your decision to return. Closed Mondays. 100 S. Eola Drive, 407-930-1166; $$$

BULLA GASTROBAR

South Florida Spanish joint serves up some mighty fine tapas and tipples. Chef Felix Plasencia gets it going with marvy croquetas, stellar octopus salad, and pintxos of charcoal-fired cuminmarinated pork. Jamon ibérico de bellota and Leonora cheese are good any time of day. For more substantial plates, consider the seafood paella, arroz marinero cooked with plankton, and the red snapper fired up in a charcoal oven. Torrijas (Spanish-style French toast) drizzled with honey and served with turrón ice cream is our choice to end the meal. Open daily. 110 S. Orlando Ave., Winter Park, 321-214-6120; $$$

TASTE OF YUCATÁN

No-frills Mexican joint serves up a taste of Yucatán cuisine with a grand selection of tacos, salbutes (deep-fried tacos) and panuchos (salbutes stuffed with refried beans), as well as tortas, quesadillas and rice bowls. Fillings you’ll fancy: cochinita pibil, al pastor, barbacoa and vegetarian rajas poblanas. Pollo adobado can be a tad dry, but superb housemade salsas, like tamarind-habañero and salsa macha, counter the effects. Closed Mondays. 1375 S. Semoran Blvd., 407-704-2248; $

BARTACO

Beach-themed taquería fuses Mexican tradition with Latin, Mediterranean and Asian flavors and, for the most part, CONTINUED ON PAGE 50

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 49

does so successfully. Tacos are on the small side, but when corn tortillas are filled with such succulent meats as duck confit in tamarind glaze, rotisserie pork pastor, and soy-, sesame- and sriracha-marinated Angus ribeye topped with kimchi, substance tends to trump size. Vegetarian options (falafel, cauliflower, portobello) abound, but don’t overlook other items like grilled corn rolled in lime, cayenne and cotija. Cocktails please even when desserts don’t wow. Open daily. 7600 Dr. Phillips Blvd., 407-801-8226; $$

EARLS KITCHEN + BAR

As in other cities, Canadian import Earls Kitchen + Bar “unchains the chain” with way-cool interior design, and that verve finds its way into the kitchen as well, with a menu of global greatest hits ranging from bibimbap to poke. English sticky toffee pudding makes a great ending (just ask for more toffee sauce), while an above-average cocktail program keeps it interesting on the libationary front. Open daily (until 2 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays). 4200 Conroy Road, 407-345-8260; $$

TENNESSEE TRUFFLE

Southern fare and French technique fuse at chef-owner Nat Russell’s down-home Sanford resto. His biscuits and gravy might be the best in Central Florida, and the same could be said of his maque-choux and creamed corn. Biscuit sandwiches, like the BLT and chicken salad, are wholly satisfying, though be wary of palateshreddingly firm biscuits. A scoop of house-made ice cream (brown butter and buttered popcorn, specifically) is the way to end. Breakfast and lunch only. Closed Sundays and Mondays. 125 W. First St., Sanford, 407-942-3977; $

TEAK NEIGHBORHOOD GRILL

This chill MetroWest hang developed a loyal following for its hefty half-pound burgers and craft brews, and it’s no wonder. Purists can indulge in the “Plain Jane” with American cheese, Bibb lettuce and tomato on a brioche bun, while braver souls can feel the heat with the peppery “Wholey Hell!!!”. There’s even a donut burger for heart haters. Open daily until 2 a.m. 6400 Time Square Ave., 407-313-5111; $$

1921 BY NORMAN VAN AKEN

Reflecting the culinary traditions of Florida old and new, 1921 by Norman Van Aken dazzles with art, decor and menu focusing on the flora and fauna of the Sunshine State, like dumplings filled with mousse of spiny lobster and rock shrimp in a country ham dashi. Pan-roasted duck breast with mole poblano is staggeringly good. The tres leches popsicle is poetry on a plate. Closed Mondays. 142 E. Fourth Ave., Mount Dora, 352-385-1921; $$$$ n

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FILM LISTINGS

[ festival preview ]

An Affair to Remember On board an ocean

liner, Nickie (Cary Grant) and Terry (Deborah Kerr) fall deeply in love and, although they’re already engaged to other people, promise to meet six months later atop the Empire State Building. Sunday, 2 & 7 pm; multiple locations; $13.31; fathomevents.com.

town Sanford and Clermont to re-create the Italian countryside. For the scenes that take place inside his home, we re-created the small apartment he grew up in on a warehouse stage near the Florida Mall from plans my mother drew up from memory. [But] I needed true Italians to pull this off … so what I did was leverage my social network on Facebook and found an entire club of Italians in Orlando and Tampa who ended up booking the starring roles.” Even better is the German-language Nelly, a beautifully filmed, dreamlike examination of what it means to go home. It plays on opening night while another German production, Pitter Patter Goes My Heart, screens in Sunday’s drama group. The latter, which gazes deeply into the heart of a romantic idealist and asks how far one should go for love, will likely be a contender for best film. But the festival is not just about watching movies. NELLY | PHOTO COURTESY OF INTERSPOT FILM “We always offer an educational component,” says festival co-founder Gene Kruckemyer. “This year our Thursday ‘education day’ has three workshops for veteran and aspiring filmmakers that are focused on animation. And for the first time, we have a Saturday demonstration for middle- and returns to Sanford high-school students interested in filmmaking, so they can experience what it’s like to be on a working film set with green screens, cameras and other equipment.” Organizers have a history of picking local winner from each block goes on to the “Best of the Fest.” Because the audience moviemakers to shoot fun, promotional is partially comprised of filmmakers and films that introduce each block. This year others who may be supporting a particular they turned to LYSFF veterans TL Westgate film, the voting is somewhat skewed and and Dale Metz. (Westgate’s Shadows in the occasionally results in the highest-qual- Dark plays the Florida Flavor block on ity films not reaching the awards block. Sunday.) The two co-directed several Star Nevertheless, the system gives the festival Trek-inspired shorts that include cameos a friendly, interactive feel while allowing a by festival director Nelson Beverly and vice panel of qualified judges to pick the overall president Chris Wise, who play spoofy versions of Spock and Bones. best film. “As a local filmOrlando Weekly maker, I love the previewed a dozen Love Your Shorts films, and while qualLOVE YOUR SHORTS FILM FESTIVAL Film Fest,” says ity is mixed (as at all Thursday-Sunday, Feb. 9-12 Westgate. “An actor such festivals), three Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, friend of mine stood out. Amerigo, 201 S. Magnolia Ave., Sanford [called it] a boutique an Italian-language loveyourshorts.com festival – very aptly production screen$8-$55 put. It’s intimate but ing in Sunday’s still has the best of “Florida Flavor” the bigger festivals: block, is especially impressive when you consider it was shot great parties and mixers, great networking, great people and a great location. If you’re with limited resources in Central Florida. “Amerigo is a foreign film shot 99.9 per- local, you should attend just to absorb the cent in Central Florida,” says director Todd atmosphere.” A ticket to one block costs $8 (except the Thompson. “It is a true story about my grandfather. … Due to budget constraints, $2 “E for Everyone” group) while a festival I couldn’t make the film in his hometown pass is $55. For a schedule and list of films, of Montelanico [Italy], as I had hoped, visit loveyourshorts.com. so we found locations in historic downfilm@orlandoweekly.com

The Autopsy of Jane Doe A father-and-son team of coroners unravels a mystery revolving around an eerily well-preserved corpse. Through Wednesday; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $11; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. Beat Street Scratchin’ and makin’ it, rappin’ and breakin’ it, on the street. Rap-sploitation classic. Wednesday, 7:30 pm; The Swirlery, 1508 E. Michigan St.; free; 407-270-6300; swirlery.com. Cult Classics: True Romance Quentin Tarantino wrote the screenplay for this crime-romance thriller starring Christian Slater and Patricia Arquette. Tuesday, 9:30 pm; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $8; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. The Help Celebrate Black History Month with films that highlight the achievements of black Americans. Friday, 11 am-1 pm; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info.

SHORT CIRCUIT Love Your Shorts Film Festival for a seventh year BY CAMERON MEIE R

I

n seven years, Sanford’s Love Your Shorts Film Festival has grown from a small-town dream into one of the most highly regarded movie events in the Orlando area. Indeed, only the Florida, Orlando and Global Peace film festivals draw significantly more than LYSFF’s roughly 2,400 attendees. This year’s festival, scheduled for Feb. 9-12, features 71 short films of 30 minutes or less (nine more than last year) from 12 countries, chosen from 325 submissions. After Thursday’s free filmmaker workshops at the Greater Sanford Chamber of Commerce, and short movies from University of Central Florida students at the historic Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, the festival gets into full swing on Friday at the Wayne Densch with the first of nine film blocks. That initial block offers various genres, but the next seven cover one genre or theme each. They are “E for Everyone,” documentary, animation, comedy and sci-fi/horror on Saturday, and drama and “Florida Flavor” on Sunday. The festival finishes with the “Best of the Fest,” containing the top films from the previous blocks, as voted by attendees. The voting process allows audience members to select their favorites on electronic devices provided to them. One

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More Q Than A: Amelie The story of a selfless

woman who takes on a life mission of bringing happiness to those around her, while struggling with her own loneliness and isolation. Free crème brûlée for the first 25 people through the door. Wednesday, 7 pm; The Gallery at Avalon Island, 39 S. Magnolia Ave.; $5-$7. Oscar Shorts 2017: Animated Short animated

films nominated for this year’s Academy Awards. Friday, 3:30 pm; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $11; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. Oscar Shorts 2017: Live Action Short films nominated for this year’s Academy Awards. Friday, 6:30 pm; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $11; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. Popcorn Flicks in the Park: Harold and Maude Offbeat classic about a suicidal young

man who develops a deep friendship and romance with a vibrant woman several decades his senior. Thursday, 7 pm; Central Park, Winter Park, North Park Avenue and West Morse Boulevard, Winter Park; free. Saturday Matinee Classics: It Happened One Night Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert

star in this 1934 romantic comedy from director Frank Capra. Saturday, noon; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $8; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. You & Me Every Day Valentine’s Brunch: The Notebook Celebrate Valentine’s Day with

a buffet brunch, live music from the Cook Trio and a screening of the Nicholas Sparks romance. Sunday, 10 am; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $120-$190 per couple; 407-629-0054; enzian.org. ●

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ON SCREENS IN ORLANDO

The Lego Batman Movie

BY STE V E S C H N E I D E R OPENING THIS WEEK Fifty Shades Darker Just in case you needed more proof that things do not in fact get better. In a sane universe, Fifty Shades of Grey would have been consigned to history as a profitable laughingstock – one of those movies that grabs a lot of box office on the front end but is so universally reviled that a sequel is out of the question. I mean, the thing only got a C-plus Cinemascore, for God’s sake! And that was from people who had actually wanted to see it! But Hollywood just ain’t gonna scoop up its winnings and run for the door like any respectable gambler, because a mere two years later, here’s an adaptation of the second book in the trilogy that put BDSM right up there with red wine and Grumpy Cat among Americans’ greatest obsessions. In this installment, renowned fannysmacker Christian Grey tries to have a more normal relationship with his conflicted little Ana; complicating things are the respective jealousies of one of his past submissives and the older woman who introduced him to the rough stuff in the first place. In the latter role is one Kim Basinger, whose prostrations before Mickey Rourke in 9 1/2 Weeks once made her the Ana of her day. That turnabout is clearly somebody’s idea of clever post-modernism, although I’m more interested in the detail that the character Basinger is playing is apparently described in the books as being in her late 30s or early 40s. Seriously, Kim: If you’re expecting us to fall for that one, you are ... well, you are a rude, thoughtless little pig! Smack! (Oh, and the third 50 Shades picture was shot back-toback with this one, so don’t even think about having a good time on Valentine’s Day 2018. Bunch of sadists.) (R) John Wick: Chapter 2 The phrase “wellreceived Keanu Reeves movie” is one of the least uttered in the popular lexicon, so of course we’re getting another John Wick adventure. And who knows? Maybe lightning

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will strike twice, and Chapter 2 will once again delight audiences and critics alike with some smooth and smart criminal capering. Which isn’t to say there aren’t certain challenges to re-milking this cash cow: When your first outing somehow made a viable narrative out of the hoary trope of a hitman being called out of retirement, where is there left to go? The clever answer here is that Wick is being called out of retirement again – a strategy that must have made screenwriter Derek Kolstad happy he shelled out for that Robert McKee seminar. A battle royale with a team of international assassins ensues, and out in front of the villains is Common, playing the head of security for a female drug lord. Wait – so if he works for her, how isn’t she the main villain? Is this one of those things I’m going to have to read Jezebel to figure out? (R) The Lego Batman Movie Sometimes I get things totally wrong. Like, when Live by Night died a swift death, I assumed it was going to make Ben Affleck quit his dithering about filmable scripts and just agree to be the guy who makes Batman movies forever. Instead, he dropped out of directing The Batman, and at press time, rumors were flying that he might be exiting the lead role as well. By the time you read this, he may have mounted a behind-the-scenes campaign to have the work print of Justice League burned. In the meantime, we have The Lego Batman Movie, which just might ensconce Will Arnett as the definitive modern-day Dark Knight – as long as you get off on seeing crusty old Bruce microwaving leftover Lobster Thermidor while ignoring the pesky orphan he won in a millionaires’ auction. And if you don’t, what the hell is wrong with you? All signs here point to a delightful comedy that’s still in the spirit of the character. At least I hope so, because I bought one of the T-shirts last week. (Good thing I never got off the fence about that Batfleck Funko Pop.) (PG)


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[ concert preview ]

GREAT LIVE MUSIC RATTLES ORLANDO EVERY NIGHT

ing in the U.S. and overseas, Death pays a visit to Florida this week for the first time. “You’ve never seen us and we’ve never seen you, so it’s going to be a get-to-knoweach-other party,” Dannis Hackney says. “We’re looking forward to coming down South and rocking out. I’m still excited to see the reactions we get when we go somewhere new.” Surprisingly, that kind of optimistic spirit infused every second of Orlando Weekly’s conversation with the brothers – as if waiting 35 years to finally earn your due were normal. “We always said that our first album and our tour would be called ‘For the Whole World to See,’” Bobby Hackney says. “My brother David picked that moniker way back when, and it’s still our mission today – playing that album for the whole world to see, even if it’s in each place only once.” Even by today’s hypercritical standards, Death’s sound – a mix of primal R&B, psychedelic blues, jittery New Wave, funk and soul that predated genre-blenders like the Clash and the Ramones – boasts unmistakable swagger. Duncan chalks PHOTO BY SAMDARKO ELOTSAM that up to the current trio’s longstanding chemistry (he played with Bobby and Dannis Hackney in their reggae band, Lambsbread, for decades before Death re-formed). “When we record today, the Four decades after their formation and seven years into a approach is the same as it was for Bobby hard-hitting renaissance, proto-punk trio Death visit Florida and Dannis and David in that first session in 1975,” Duncan says. “Get mic’d up, plug for the first time in, and capture that magical performance. BY NICK MCGREGOR We interact together, which you miss in a lot of new music.” Death’s music retains the venomous he story of Death is one of the what should have been their due credit as snarl it had in the mid-’70s, when the most triumphant in rock history. proto-punk pioneers. But in 2009, cult Chicago label Drag brothers Hackney were lighting it up to In 1973, Detroit brothers David, Bobby and Dannis Hackney started kick- City Records rediscovered Death’s origi- baffled Motor City crowds. Given the ing out brawny jams in the vein of fellow nal demos, shining a light on the Hackney currently apocalyptic state of American Motor City hard-hitters MC5, the Stooges brothers’ propensity for unpredictable affairs, a song like “Politicians in My Eyes” deserves its place in and Alice Cooper. The difference for the punk melodies and the halls of the new Hackney brothers? They were young forward-thinking blasts African-American African-American men who didn’t fit in of heavy rock. Critics DEATH with Golden History Museum at the with the overwhelming white rock scene fawned over the remasPelicans, Moonmen From Smithsonian. Speaking or with Motown’s traditional R&B and tered and rereleased Mars, Vicious Dreams with Orlando Weekly For the Whole World to soul community. 8 p.m. Monday, Feb. 13 the night before Donald Still, in 1975, Columbia Records presi- See, and a fascinating Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave. Trump was inaugudent Clive Davis funded Death’s first documentary, approwillspub.org rated, Bobby Hackney recording session – but begged the priately named A Band $15-$18 said, “We rehearsed brothers to adopt a more commercially Called Death, followed. about 20 minutes ago digestible name. David Hackney, Death’s And even though David creative and spiritual anchor, decided to Hackney succumbed to lung cancer in and played the most spirited version of decline, though, and the band released 2000, Bobby and Dannis saw a chance to that song in a long time. We appreciate 500 copies of one single, “Politicians honor his memory, recruiting longtime everyone who made it one of the most in My Eyes,” with the B-side “Keep on friend Bobbie Duncan to join the trio so popular songs on the internet during the Knocking.” Two years later, the Hackney they could present the work that their election – it’s going to be a hallmark song throughout the next four years. And I can brothers moved to Vermont and started brother believed in so passionately. After the subsequent release of two believe that because our resolve has never playing Christian rock and reggae. When David moved back to Detroit in 1982, more archival records, an album of newly changed.” Death was officially done, quietly ceding written material in 2015, and steady tourmusic@orlandoweekly.com

Stephen Kellogg Americana dude turns 40, decides to go on a grueling 18-city tour instead of buying a Ferrari banjo or whatever. Interesting sublimation of a mid-life crisis. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 8, at the Social, $18-$20

The Welzeins Unhinged Orlando guitar/drums duo merges Wipers weight with garage rock kinetics. 9 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9, at Will’s Pub, $5

Rhythm of Fear Relentless Jacksonville thrashers continue their slow rise with a coveted opening slot for metalcore legends All Out War. Teeth will fly.

FREAKIN’ OUT

7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10, at Backbooth, $15-$17

Indie Folkfest Terri Binion and Eugene Snowden headline this annual music/arts/food/drinks get-down. Perfect for the whole family – just throwing it out there. noon Saturday, Feb. 11, at Mennello Museum

T

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of American Art, free

Freddie McGregor Reggae/ska/dancehall/lover’s rock maestro McGregor has been plying his trade since the age of 7 (!) with the Studio One-affiliated Clarendonians. On this night he’s appropriately headlining the Reggae Love Fest. 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 12, at Hard Rock Live, $35.50-$50.50

Holy Human Shambling Daytona freak-psych cult channels Brian Jonestown Massacre and Dinosaur Jr. to hazy effect. 8 p.m. Monday, Feb. 13, at 64 North, $5

Tall Dog Member of Factory-influenced outfit RV steps out with a suite of elegant and lo-fi agoraphobic pop songs. 9 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 14, at Uncle Lou’s, $5 ●

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BY B AO L E - H U U SARA WATKINS | PHOTO BY MIKE DUNN

This week, the Phil gets unex-

pectedly fresh and yields the surprise discovery that a new star is in our midst.

THE BEAT

The Orlando Philharmonic is in the middle of an interesting new three-part series at the Plaza Live called Women in Song. The premise is self-explanatory, but the aspect worth special attention is the stylistic ground it spans. As you’d expect, it opened on a classical foot with opera singer Ariadne Greif back in November. Its next step out, however, was the recent performance by noted indie-folk artist Sara Watkins (Feb. 1). The skilled singer-fiddler rocketed to visibility as a teenager in fresh-faced crossover bluegrass act Nickel Creek but has since built a solo career with its own accomplished legs, with releases on notable labels like New West and Nonesuch. Now grown up, she blends folk, pop and indie like a rootsier, earthier Jenny Lewis. As it turns out, Watkins’ music is overall much more alive on stage. The live setting especially flatters her by unchaining the power in both her voice and the emotions that are often subdued in the studio treatment. And about that voice, it’s pure femininity in all its power and lure. It’s got plenty of crisp pop appeal but also shows peeks of the kind of authority that was the hallmark of country music’s gutsiest grandes dames. Musically, her own trio covers the ground of a much fuller band, including drums, bass, guitar, piano and the array of instruments that Watkins herself wields (fiddle, guitar, ukulele). But here’s where the Orlando Phil comes in.

The Sara Watkins concert showed the possibilities of what an affair like Women in Song can be when curated with this much relevance and executed with this much collaboration. It’s a fresh face for the Phil. They didn’t simply organize the event – they were integrative and even collaborative in the performance, lending the concert a four-piece string section that included Philharmonic music director Eric Jacobsen on cello. As Watkins herself noted, the local players didn’t just render the string sections in some of her songs that usually don’t get played in full live – they actually did some special arrangements just for this show. And, of course, it was beautiful, underscoring the grace of her songs in incomparably rich ways. The Watkins concert showed the possibilities of what an affair like Women in Song can be when curated with this much relevance and executed with this much collaboration. It’s a fresh, out-of-the-box face for the Phil. Across classical, folk, indie and pop, it’s also a great crossroads of worlds that don’t often mingle. Right now, we could maybe all use a little bit more of that. The best news is that it’s not over yet. The next and final edition is on

March 1, and it should be similarly good with Aoife O’Donovan of esteemed progressive bluegrass band Crooked Still. If you were at the Sara Watkins show, you got a nice taste of what’s in store because O’Donovan made an unannounced cameo for several songs. But as big a surprise as that was, the bigger one is the revelation that this notable music figure married the Phil’s music director last summer and is now a part-time local. Maybe if you’re lucky, you’ll spot her at Publix or something. Well, Kurt Vile (Jan. 31, the Social) is a full-blown phenomenon now. Good for the indie hero for striking this broad a chord, especially considering that he’s not the most linear or immediate of artists. Vile’s left-handed, slacker blend of rock and folk is a stylistically restless thing. Long on mood and tone but filigreed with signature doodles of note and voice, his music is defined more by impression than structure, and is given latitude to sate its wayfaring spirit at will. But whatever crooks, nooks or flights Vile explores, it’s always with that trademark loose-limbed gait and golden haze. Even though Vile’s studio craft, intent and texture are notable, his music benefits greatly from the live vigor he showed on stage with the Violators. Such a detail matters when you walk a line between vibe and hypnosis like he does. Instead of the reclined cloud-gazing daydreams his records often conjure, his band’s live show is something worth standing for, showcasing both his blue-collar vernacular and arty flourishes in more palpable and rousing ways. baolehuu@orlandoweekly.com orlandoweekly.com

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Wednesday, 8

Thursday, 9

Orlando Cringe: The Valentine’s Show

Popcorn Flicks in the Park: Harold and Maude

LITERARY

If there’s one thing you can go your entire life without reopening, it’s probably your all-knowing childhood diary. You know, the place where you would write down all your most intimate thoughts about whether or not your crush likes you back, or that really awkward moment in class. Those deep, dark secrets that most people would like to hide forever are back to be read out loud in a room full of strangers. It sounds like either a hysterical comedy act or someone’s worst nightmare, but four brave souls have decided to step up and read their diaries in front of an audience for Orlando Cringe. Along with these personal readings, the show includes a “Newlywed Game,” in which couples win prizes by answering questions about each other and completing physical challenges. So grab your partner and embrace schadenfreude; this is a date night you won’t forget. – Rachel LeBar 7 p.m. | The Abbey, 101 S. Eola Drive | facebook.com/orlandocringe | $15

Wednesday, 8

The Great Gatsby

FILM

2017: The year the world fell apart. 2017: The year that Harold and Maude somehow got classified as a popcorn flick. So there's that silver lining that we've all been searching for. There was a temptation to chuckle pretentiously about the pitch-black humor of the 1971 Hal Ashby deathtrip masterpiece being considered mass-market enough for a free screening in a bucolic outdoor setting to a bunch of unsuspecting families, but we’re too busy looking up helicopter charters so we can be airdropped into the front row. Because, come on, Harold and Maude is a goddamn beautiful movie. The tale of the star-crossed and, um, unconventional love (but really, what is conventional anymore?) between a 78-year-old woman and a 20-ish man who bond over a fascination with death and a realization that the world is fucked and you’d better grab any shred of happiness and human connection while you can, is just a timeless piece of filmmaking. Is it morbid? Yes, but so is the world. Does it have heart? 24-karat gold; it’s one for the ages. The performances are spot-on, the surreal and absurdist humor stands up, and even the garish, oversaturated color palettes have aged incredibly well. This film even made us enjoy a Cat Stevens song. The perfect antidote to Valentine’s Day treacle. – Matthew Moyer 7 p.m. | Central Park, North Park Avenue and West Morse Boulevard, Winter Park | enzian.org | free

PHOTO BY LUKE EVANS THEATER

OUR PICKS FOR THE BEST EVENTS THIS WEEK

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We’re assuming that Orlando Shakes wasn’t trying to make an explicit point by scheduling The Great Gatsby for its 2016-2017 season. After all, the season was announced back in the halcyon days of winter 2016, back when it was clear that the presidential election would undoubtedly go to one of two Democratic senators. But the tricky Electoral College fooled us all and ushered in our current nightmare, summed up by the prescient words of John Lydon and Afrika Bambaataa, “the rich get richer / the poor are getting poorer / fascist, chauvinistic government fools.” So this adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s best known work – often seen as an indictment of the selfishness and narcissism of wealthy Americans in the years just before the Great Depression – couldn’t have a more timely debut. – Thaddeus McCollum 7:30 p.m. | through March 24 | Orlando Shakespeare Theater, 812 E. Rollins St. | 407-447-1700 | orlandoshakes.org | $13-$40

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Thursday, 9

Death Stuff MUSIC

Atlanta’s Death Stuff come down hard on the punk side of the post-punk equation. Though the bass may be appropriately dour, the guitars stabby and the vocals muddy, there’s some serious muscle behind the young trio’s sound. Songs like the title track to last year’s Surprise Ex tape often explode into drum-punishing speed riffs that owe as much to Black Flag as they do to Christian Death. Local kindred spirits Tight Genes and Autarx join the bill to lend more punk/post-punk heft, along with rockabilly trio the Wildtones, who don’t really fit the theme on paper, but yeah, we can see it. – TM with Tight Genes, Autarx, the Wildtones | 8 p.m. | Uncle Lou’s Entertainment Hall, 1016 N. Mills Ave. | 407-898-0009 | $5


Sunday, 12

Tuesday, 14

Dionne Warwick

Valentine’s Music Festival MUSIC

Don’t listen to the haters: Valentine’s Day is great – as long as you have a date on your arm. Revel in passion and romance at CFE Arena this weekend with an all-out tribute to love featuring R&B superstar Keith Sweat. Sweat (real name!) is hitting the tripledecade mark in his career, sitting comfortably on a discography that features some of the smoothest jams to grace the Quiet Storm airwaves. He’s joined by fellow New Jack Swing pioneer Bobby Brown, ’80s throwback El DeBarge (“Rhythm of the Night”) and new-school smoothie Avant (“Makin’ Good Love”). Fair warning: Babies will probably get made after this show. – TM with Keith Sweat, Bobby Brown, El DeBarge, Avant | 7 p.m. | CFE Arena, 12777 N. Gemini Blvd. | 407-823-3070 | cfearena.com | $52.50-$125

Tuesday, 14

Jucifer

PHOTO BY STEFAN RADUTA MUSIC

If you are searching for a Valentine’s Day event either to (a) prove that you are a thoughtful yet edgy date for the evening or (b) drown out the incessant chatter of happy couples, fear not, Jucifer has you covered. Jucifer, the Georgian sludge-riot duo of Gazelle Amber Valentine (guitar/vocals) and Edgar Livengood (drums) headline Will’s Pub on Valentine’s Day, with the tenderly named event “Blow Your Load on Valentine’s Day with Jucifer.” And it may very well be the hot ticket tonight for nondevotees of awkward exchanges of flowers, chocolate or handcuffs. Jucifer has been a going concern since 1993, specializing in volume and sleaze, like this mad-eyed hybrid of the White Stripes and Melvins. Live, they excel at excess, cramming the equivalent of the Who’s backline of amps into whatever small club unwittingly agrees to sacrifice their rooftop. Let love in. – MM with the Ludes | 7 p.m. | Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave. | willspub.org | $8-$10

MUSIC

If you are searching for a Valentine’s Day event that is (a) full of some of the greatest pop love songs ever written and (b) benefits a good cause … Jesus, are you ever picky! Fear not, though, Dionne Warwick (!) has got you covered. One of the pre-eminent voices of 20th-century R&B, Warwick rolls into town to play THE HITS. And when we say the hits, we mean a whole other level of refined pop perfection; Warwick was the chosen voice for smooth heartbreak overlords Burt Bacharach and Hal David. It was Warwick who breathed vivid life into melancholy symphonies like “Walk On By,” “I Say a Little Prayer for You,” and “Anyone Who Had a Heart.” And that was only the launching point for a stacked discography and career that continues today. All proceeds from this show go to the Port Orange-based Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3282. – MM with Myles Savage’s Motown Party Tour | 7:30 p.m. | Walt Disney Theater, Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts | 445 S. Magnolia Ave. | 844-513-2014 | drphillipscenter.org | $39.50-$140

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THEWEEK

submit your events to listings@orlandoweekly.com at least 12 days before print to have them included

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8-TUESDAY, FEB. 14 COMPILED BY THADDEUS MCCOLLUM

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8

CONCERTS/EVENTS Innocent Victims 10 pm; Peek Downtown, 50 E. Central Blvd. Suite B; contact for price. John Ginty & Aster Pheonyx 9 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $7. Paleface 9 pm; The Lucky Lure, 1427 N. Orange Ave.; free; 407-250-6949. Pearl 10 pm; Tier Nightclub, 20 E. Central Ave.; $10$15; 407-317-9129. Stephen Kellogg, Harrow Fair 7:30 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $18$20; 407-246-1419. Yonder Mountain String Band, G. Love & Special Sauce 7 pm; The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave.; $25-$40; 407-228-1220. [MUSIC] Blind Pilot Friday at the Beacham THURSDAY, FEB. 9

CONCERTS/EVENTS Aaron Lewis, Travis Marvin 7 pm; House of Blues, Disney Springs, Lake Buena Vista; $31; 407-934-2583. Carbon Leaf, the Trews 7 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $15; 407-246-1419. Create: 3LAU, Prince Fox, Justin Caruso, Looside, 9 pm; Venue 578, 578 N. Orange Ave.; $15$30; 407-872-0066. Death Stuff, Autarx, the Wildtones, Tight Genes 8 pm; Uncle Lou’s Entertainment Hall, 1016 N. Mills Ave.; $5; 407-270-9104.

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PHOTO BY ERIC RYAN ANDERSON

Watoto Children’s Choir 6:30 pm; One Church, 1675 Dixon Road, Longwood; contact for price. The Welzeins, Mia Mota, Volcanist 9 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $5. FRIDAY, FEB. 10

CONCERTS/EVENTS AFI, Nothing, Souvenirs 7 pm; The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave.; SOLD OUT; 407-228-1220.

All Out War, Rhythm of Fear, Mindfield, Kaleigh Baker 10 pm; Lil Consequence, Guttwrench, Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free. Nailed Shut, KTA 7 pm; Backbooth, 37 W. Pine Poblano & Rose 9 pm; Sloppy St.; $15; 407-999-2570. Taco Palace, 4892 S. Kirkman Road; free; 407-574-6474. Blind Pilot, Quiet Life 6 pm; The Beacham, 46 FEB. 8-14, 2017 ● orlandoweekly.com

N. Orange Ave.; $20$25; 407-648-8363. Excision, Cookie Monsta, Barely Alive, Dion Timmer 7:30 pm; House of Blues, Disney Springs, Lake Buena Vista; $33; 407-934-2583. Famous Dex 7 pm; Venue 578, 578 N. Orange Ave.; $20-$60; 407-872-0066. Mickey Avalon 8 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $15-$20; 407-246-1419. Sadie Hawkins Dance: SugarPlum, Zoya Zafar, Pathos Pathos 8 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $10. Thicket, Guverra, Chlover, Arakara 7 pm; The Haven, 6700 Aloma Ave., Winter Park; $5-$7; 407-673-2712.

Al Di Meola 7 pm; The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave.; $28.50-$60; 407-228-1220.

Eve to Adam, Message From Sylvia, Blaine the Mono, Who Was I, Atomic Fate, Janani 6 pm; The Haven, 6700 Aloma Ave., Winter Park; $10-$25; 407-673-2712.

Andrea Bocelli 8 pm; Amway Center, 400 W. Church St.; $75-$855; 800-745-3000.

Farruko 9 pm; House of Blues, Disney Springs, Lake Buena Vista; $50$80; 407-934-2583.

Body//Talk: Donkng, Thrift House, Phil Santos, Expedition 10 pm; The Milk District Pavilion, 2432 E. Robinson St.; $5-$7.

Fea, Grave Return, Picking Up Pedro, Abandon the Midwest, Disfunction 6:30 pm; West End Trading Company, 202 S. Sanford Ave., Sanford; $10; 407-322-7475.

SATURDAY, FEB. 11

CONCERTS/EVENTS

Common Kings, Mayday, Makua Rothman 8 pm; The Social, 54 N. Orange Ave.; $17-$20; 407-246-1419. The Cook Trio 10 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free.

Gatorcowboys 9 pm; Bombshell’s Tavern, 5405 Edgewater Drive; free; 407-730-3999. CONTINUED ON PAGE 65


Andrea Bocelli

Blame the Booze The award for best bang for your buck this week goes to the V Group. Enjoy unlimited samples of craft cocktails made with Mount Gay Rum at three different bars: Hanson’s Shoe Repair, Bauhaus and Herman’s Loan Office. With cocktail prices at those places running in the $10 and up range, you’re basically making money after your second drink. Space is understandably limited. 7 p.m. Wednesday; Hanson’s Shoe Repair, 27 E. Pine St.; $22; vgroupconcepts.com Pick-A-Trick Southern Nights’ annual preValentine’s party is sort of a clearing house of potential dates. If you see someone you fancy and they’re wearing a number, you can try wooing them by sending secret notes to them. You can play even if you don’t want to throw a number on yourself, but why wouldn’t you? The infamous all-you-can-drink special is back, ranging from $10-$25 for all the wells, calls or top shelf liquor you can handle. What could go wrong? 9 p.m. Thursday; Southern Nights, 375 S. Bumby Ave.; free-$5; southernnightsorl.com Andrea Bocelli Hey, so it didn’t work out and you weren’t able to secure a Valentine this year. That’s OK, sweetie. Take the opportunity to take your mom out on a date. Heck, grab grandma too. Bring those ladies out to the Amway Center, because there’s nothing moms like more than seeing a mostly blind Italian pop opera star sing “Time to Say Goodbye.” If you’re lucky, maybe you’ll have a meet-cute with your soulmate as your respective moms get into a fight over the last mini-box of red wine at the concession stand. It could happen! 8 p.m. Saturday; Amway Center, 400 W. Church St.; $75-$855; amwaycenter.com

Bump & Grind With Your Valentine A long time ago, in days of yore, Lil Indies hosted a weekly dance party devoted to ’90s R&B called Bump & Grind. It was known for getting a little … uh … weird. This Valentine’s Day, Indies presents a special menu of sweet cocktails and sour beers, lets returning DJ Waldo Faldo pick the tunes, and waits to see just what kind of freaky shit’ll happen around last call. 10 p.m. Tuesday; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free; willspub.org PHOTO BY LAURA OCKEL

Portugal, the Man April 7 26 at the Plaza Live PHOTO BY HAYLEY YOUNG

The Piano Guys, Feb. 16 at the Dr. Phillips Center

Bryan Ferry, March 12 at Hard Rock Live

We the Kings, April 1 at the Beacham

Big Wild, April 28 at the Social

City and Colour, March 14 at the Beacham

Clipping., April 3 at the Social

Sheryl Crow, April 29 at Bob Carr Theater

Voodoo Glow Skulls, March 16 at Will’s Pub

Flaming Lips, April 3 at House of Blues

Ben Harper, May 1 at Hard Rock Live

Minus the Bear, March 20 at the Beacham

Portugal, the Man, April 7 at the Plaza Live

State Champs, May 5 at the Beacham

Tortoise, March 20 at the Social

Shovels & Rope, April 7 at the Beacham

Stevie Nicks & the Pretenders, March 21 at Amway Center

Chronixx, April 12 at the Beacham

Steve Winwood, May 6 at Hard Rock Live

311, Feb. 27 at House of Blues

St. Paul & the Broken Bones, March 23 at the Beacham

Acid Mothers Temple, April 14 at the Social

Bishop Briggs, May 16 at the Social

Smokey Robinson, March 3 at the Dr. Phillips Center

Demetri Martin, March 23 at the Plaza Live

Ariana Grande, April 15 at Amway Center

Richard Cheese, May 19 at the Beacham

Potty Mouth, March 7 at the Social

The Menzingers, March 23-24 at the Social

Gaelic Storm, Feb. 17 at the Plaza Live Colin Hay, Feb. 20 at the Plaza Live AJR, Feb. 22 at the Social Devendra Banhart, Feb. 24 at the Beacham Jonathan Richman, Feb. 26 at the Social

Dropkick Murphys, March 8 at House of Blues Norah Jones, March 8 at Bob Carr Theater You Blew It!, March 10-11 at Will’s Pub

Brian Wilson, March 27 at the Dr. Phillips Center

Chris Rock, April 1617 at the Dr. Phillips Center Red Hot Chili Peppers, April 26 at Amway Center

Dinosaur Jr., March 30 at the Beacham

Clap Your Hands Say Yeah, April 27 at the Social

Steve Miller Band, March 31 at the Dr. Phillips Center

Umphey’s McGee, April 27 at House of Blues

New Found Glory, May 8-10 at the Social

Morbid Angel, May 23 at the Beacham Real Friends, May 24 at the Beacham Say Anything, May 25 at House of Blues Beach House, May 26 at the Social

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PHOTO BY MINDY COLTON

TUESDAY, 14

The Mennello Museum Invitational ART

Nothing screams Valentine’s Day like a thorough examination of life through the lens of contemporary art, and the Mennello Museum’s new annual exhibition of work from local artists sounds like a perfect match. The featured artists are also donating 50 percent of their proceeds from the sale of the art to benefit the Mennello Museum. What’s not to love about such giving partners? We’re sure this experience won’t be like the time an OkCupid conquest took us on a date to an art museum, when we found out far too late that the museum’s special Valentine’s event was actually a singles mixer. And the other singles had already slammed all of the event’s alcohol before we arrived, leaving us way too sober while we listened to anecdotes about all of the other women our date was currently meeting through OkCupid, Tinder, Match.com, EHarmony, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and probably the goddamn Yellow Pages at that point. Needless to say, we put our foot down after that and dated him for almost three years. But times have changed, and we’re not bitter! It’s time to get back on that horse and give another contemporary art exhibit a chance. – Abby Stassen 5:30-7:30 p.m. | through March 3 | Mennello Museum of American Art, 900 E. Princeton St. | 407-246-4278 | mennellomuseum.com | $5

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Goldroom 10 pm; Gilt Nightclub, 740 Bennett Road; contact for price; 407-504-7699. The Hackensaw Boys, Terri Binion, Rickey Dickens 8 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $10-$12. The Him 10 pm; The Attic, 68 E. Pine St.; $10.

Indie Folkfest Noon-5 pm; Mennello Museum of American Art, 900 E. Princeton St.; free; 407-246-4278. Love & Beats: Evan Gamble Lewis 10 pm; Peek Downtown, 50 E. Central Blvd. Suite B; $5. Tears of a Tyrant, Milka, Fighting the Silence 9 pm; Orlando Brewing, 1301 Atlanta Ave.; free; 407-872-1117. SUNDAY, FEB. 12

Holy Human, the Dewars, the Young Step 9 pm; The Hourglass Brewery, 255 S. Ronald Reagan Blvd., Longwood; free; 407-719-9874.

CONCERTS/EVENTS Ancient Sun 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540.

Lordis, Nomvdic, Beshiba, Untomoria, Seek Well, Tusk, Jynzo 5 pm; Uncle Lou’s Entertainment Hall, 1016 N. Mills Ave.; $8-$10; 407-270-9104. Reggae Love Fest: Tessanne Chin, Freddie McGregor, Romain Virgo, Jahmiel, Qupid and more 6:30 pm; Hard Rock Live, 6050 Universal Blvd.; $33.50-$43.50; 407-351-5483. Southern Fried Sunday: Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys, the Wildtones, Clem McGillicutty & the Burnouts 5:30 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $10.

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Valentine’s Music Festival: Keith Sweat, Bobby Brown, El DeBarge, Avant 7 pm; CFE Arena, 12777 N. Gemini Blvd.; $52.50-$125; 407-823-3070. MONDAY, FEB. 13

Jazz Meets Motown 8-11 pm; The Abbey, 100 S. Eola Drive; $20; 407-747-7223. Kief Catchers, Holy Human, Slumberjack 8 pm; 64 North, 64 N. Orange Ave.; $5 suggested donation; 321-245-7730.

The Groove Orient 10:30 pm; Tanqueray’s, 100 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-649-8540.

Michael Franti & Spearhead 7 pm; The Plaza Live, 425 N. Bumby Ave.; $27.50-$40; 407-228-1220.

Jucifer, the Ludes 7 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $8-$10.

CONCERTS/EVENTS Death, the Golden Pelicans, Moonmen From Mars, Vicious Dreams 8 pm; Will’s Pub, 1042 N. Mills Ave.; $15-$18.

Dionne Warwick 7:30 pm; Walt Disney Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $39.50-$140; 844-513-2014.

TUESDAY, FEB. 14

CONCERTS/EVENTS Carnifex, Fallujah, Rings of Saturn 6:30 pm; Backbooth, 37 W. Pine St.; $17; 407-999-2570.

THEATER The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee Thursdays-Sundays, 8 pm; Garden Theatre, 160 W. Plant St., Winter Garden; $25-$33; 407-877-4736; gardentheatre.org.

Best of Broadway: 2006-2010 Friday -Saturday, 8 pm, Sunday, 3 pm, Monday, 8 pm; Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park, 419A W. Fairbanks Ave., Winter Park; $20; 407-920-4034. A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder Wednesday-Friday, 8 pm, Saturday, 2 & 8 pm, Sunday, 1 & 6:30 pm; Walt Disney Theater, Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave.; $33.75$143.75; 844-513-2014; drphillipscenter.org. The Great Gatsby Wednesday-Friday, 7:30 pm, Saturday, 2 & 7:30 pm, Sunday, 2 pm; Margeson Theater, Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 812 E. Rollins St.; $13-$40; 407447-1700; orlandoshakes.org. Josephine A play by Tod Kimbro about the iconic Josephine Baker. Thursday, 8 pm, Sunday, 8 pm and Tuesday, 8 pm; The Venue, 511 Virginia Drive; $20; 321-438-3059; thevenueorlando.com. Naked Boys Singing Friday-Saturday, 7:30 pm; Footlight Theatre, The Parliament House, 410 N. Orange Blossom Trail; $20-$30; 407-425-7571; parliamenthouse.com. Picasso at the Lapin Agile ThursdaySaturday, 7:30 pm, Sunday, 2:30 pm; Mad Cow Theatre, 54 W. Church St.; $16-$40; 407-297-8788; madcowtheatre.com. Teatro Español: Yerma Spanish-language production of Federico Garcia Lorca’s play. Wednesday, 7:30 pm; Mad Cow Theatre, 54 W. Church St.; $12; 407-297-8788; madcowtheatre.com. This Is Our Youth In 1982, on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, three pot-smoking teenagers are resoundingly rejecting the 1960s ideals of their affluent parents. Friday-Monday, 8 pm; Macbeth Studio, 37 N. Orange Ave.; $23; 407-961-2858; macbethstudio.com. Why Do Fools Fall in Love? WednesdayThursday, 2 pm, Friday, 7:30 pm, Saturday, 2 & 7:30 pm, Sunday, 2 pm; Winter Park Playhouse, 711-C Orange Ave., Winter Park; $20-$40; 407-645-0145; winterparkplayhouse.org.

COMEDY A Good Trip with Shane Mauss A standup comedy show about science and psychedelics. Wednesday, 7 pm; Orlando Improv, 9101 International Drive; $12; 407480-5233; theimprovorlando.com. I’m With Cupid Standup from JR McCollum. Tuesday, 7 pm; Orlando Improv, 9101 International Drive; $15; 407-480-5233; theimprovorlando.com. Rob Little Thursday, 7 pm, Friday, 6:30 & 9:45 pm, Saturday, 6 & 9:45 pm, Sunday, 6 pm; Orlando Improv, 9101 International Drive; $17; 407-480-5233; theimprovorlando.com.

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[FILM] Cult Classics: True Romance Tuesday at Enzian Theater

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DANCE Emerald City Cabaret: Emotions Explore the complexity of emotions through burlesque and cabaret performances. Friday, 9 pm; The Venue, 511 Virginia Drive; $15-$20; 407-412-6895; thevenueorlando.com. Rock Hard Revue Fully costumed and choreographed Vegas-style production featuring sexy male performers, themed numbers, live vocals and audience participation. Saturday, 7 pm; Gilt Nightclub, 740 Bennett Road; $25; 407504-7699; rockhardrevue.com.

ART OPENINGS/EVENTS Art Sandwiched In Lunchtime screening of Snow Hill, a documentary about the life and work of painter Andrew Wyeth. Wednesday, noon; Orlando Museum of Art, 2416 N. Mills Ave.; $3; 407-896-4231. Mennello Museum Invitational Inaugural group exhibition of local artists selected by the museum. Opens Tuesday, 5:30-7:30 pm, through March 3; Mennello Museum of American Art, 900 E. Princeton St.; $5; 407-2464278; mennellomuseum.com. Ocular Flora Opening reception for a solo show from Elisabeth Thorington.

Thursday, 8 pm; The Hammered Lamb, 1235 N. Orange Ave.; free; 407-704-3200. Studio One: The Depths of True Blue - Scarf Dyeing Embellish a silk scarf utilizing an array of beautiful blue and green papers for a dye process that is reminiscent of ocean waves. Saturday, 10 am; Orlando Museum of Art, 2416 N. Mills Ave.; $25; 407-896-4231. Zombie Dog First solo show for artist Zombie Dog, aka Steve Lafave. Opens Friday, 6 pm, through March 4; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free; willspub.org.

CONTINUING THIS WEEK Adorn Through Feb. 25; Arts on Douglas, 123 Douglas St., New Smyrna Beach; free; 386-428-1133. AfroFantastic: Black Imagination and Agency in the American Experience Through April 2; Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-646-2526; rollins.edu. An Awareness of Gravity Through April 2; Museum of Art DeLand, 600 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand; $10; 386-7344371; moartdeland.org. The Black Figure in the European Imaginary Through May 14; Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-646-2526; rollins.edu.

Bo Bartlett: American Artist Through May 7; Mennello Museum of American Art, 900 E. Princeton St.; $5; 407-2464278; menellomuseum.com. Contemporary Visions of Frantz Zéphirin: Haitian Mystic Through April 16; Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Gardens, 633 Osceola Ave., Winter Park; $5; 407-647-6294. Dancers Through April 9; Museum of Art DeLand, 600 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand; $10; 386-7344371; moartdeland.org. Don’t Bring a Pillow to a Knife Fight Through Saturday; Redefine Gallery, 29 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-648-7060. Good Vibes Through Feb. 28; Dandelion Communitea Cafe, 618 N. Thornton Ave.; free; 407-362-1864; dandelioncommunitea.com. Historic Threads Through Friday; Art & History Museums - Maitland, 231 W. Packwood Ave., Maitland; $3; 407-539-2181. Jack King: Searching for Truth Through April 29; Crealde School of Art, 600 St. Andrews Blvd., Winter Park; free; 407-671-1886; crealde.org. Layer Upon Layer Through Saturday; CityArts Factory, 29 S. Orange Ave.; free; 407-648-7060.

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Learning Contentment From the Dutch Through March 5; The Art Gallery at Mills Park, 1650 N. Mills Ave.; free; 855-336-3653; thegalleryatmillspark.com. Painting and Sculpture Through April 2; Museum of Art DeLand, 600 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand; $10; 386-7344371; moartdeland.org. Philip Evergood & William Gropper: Social Realists Through April 2; Museum of Art DeLand, 600 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand; $10; 386-7344371; moartdeland.org. Preview of Bo Bartlett: American Artist Through April 23; Orlando Museum of Art, 2416 N. Mills Ave.; $15; 407-896-4231; omart.org. Raymond Smith: In Time We Shall Know Ourselves Through April 15; Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona State College, Daytona Beach; free; 386-506-4475; smponline.org.

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Reframing the Picture, Reclaiming the Past Through April 2; Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-646-2526; rollins.edu. Vanessa Diaz: The Original Purpose Has Slipped Our Memory Through; Alt_Space Gallery, 123 Douglas St., New Smyrna Beach; free; 386-423-1753. The Wyeths and American Artists in Maine Through April 23; Orlando Museum of Art, 2416 N. Mills Ave.; $15; 407-896-4231; omart.org.

EVENTS Art & Music in the Park Enjoy live music, local vendors and a food truck bazaar every month. Friday, 6-9 pm; Secret Lake Park, 200 N. Lake Triplet Drive, Casselberry; free; casselberry.org. Blame the Booze Sample craft cocktails made with Mount Gay Rum at three different bars: Hanson’s, Bauhaus and Herman’s Loan

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Office. Wednesday, 7 pm; Hanson’s Shoe Repair, 27 E. Pine St.; $22; facebook. com/hansonsshoerepair. Downtown Wedding Crawl Gather your bridal party and walk from venue to venue experiencing the area’s best wedding products and services. Sample, taste and meet the professionals that will be creating your perfect wedding day. Sunday, noon-4 pm; Citrus Club, 255 S. Orange Ave.; $15; 941-448-1542; downtownweddingcrawl.com. Dragon Parade Lunar New Year Festival Community parade and festival featuring Asian entertainment, including dragon and lion dancing, cultural dances, martial arts, taiko drummers, arts and crafts and Asian food. Saturday, 11 am-5 pm; Fashion Square Mall, 3201 E. Colonial Drive; free; 407-808-0497; centralfloridadragonparade.org. HamCation Weekend convention for amateur radio enthu-

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[DANCE] Emerald City Cabaret: Emotions Friday at the Venue


407-645-3990

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siasts. Friday-Sunday, 9 am; Central Florida Fairgrounds, 4603 W. Colonial Drive; $15; 407-295-3247; hamcation.com. Happy Birthday Oblivion Oblivion celebrates one year under new ownership with happy hour apps and drinks, raffle giveaways and birthday cake. Sunday, 4 pm; Oblivion Taproom, 5101 E. Colonial Drive; various menu prices; 407-8024800; obliviontaproom.com. Melrose Creative Expo Features live music from Terri Binion, Tony Miracle and the Timucua Arts Foundation, an appearance by the Tourist City Ghostbusters, drone demonstrations, VR games, vendors and more. Saturday, 1-4 pm; The Dorothy Lumley Melrose Center, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. Paws in the Park Central Florida’s largest community dog walk and festival benefiting Pet Alliance of Greater Orlando. Saturday, 9 am; Lake Eola Park, Eola Drive, North Eola Drive and East Robinson Street; free; 407351-7722; pawsinthpark.org. Pride Skate for Zebra Coalition Charity fundraiser roller disco. Sunday, 5 pm; Semoran Skateway, 2670 Cassel Creek Blvd., Casselberry; $20; 407834-9095; zebrayouth.org. Stouts for Snouts Make a donation to Sniffing Snouts Pit Bull Rescue and get happy hour pricing on beer for the rest of the day. Sunday, noon-6 pm; Orlando Brewing, 1301 Atlanta Ave.; $5; 407-8721117; orlandobrewing.com. Vintage Valentine Parking lot vintage market with clothes, vinyl, gifts, food and more. Sunday, 1-6 pm; Park Ave CDs, 2916 Corrine Drive; free; 407-447-7275.

LEARNING Cuba at the Crossroads Academics and researchers present proposals on current domestic issues in Cuba, Cuba-US relations or Cuban foreign relations. Friday, 7:30 am-5 pm; Galloway Room,

Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park; $50; rollins.edu. Macrame Plant Hanger Workshop Make a beautiful macrame plant hanger while making some new friends. Drinks included. Wednesday, 5 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; $25; willspub.org. Works With Sound A free weekly composition-training program for students of all skill levels and ages with musicians from the Timucua Arts Foundation. Sunday, 2-4 pm; The Dorothy Lumley Melrose Center, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; ocls.info.

Spilled Milk Literary Open Mic Literary open mic for all genres and forms. Thursday, 8 pm; The Milk Bar, 2424 E. Robinson St.; free; 407-896-4954. Tea & Conversation Monthly gathering where book lovers bring in recently read or favorite books and discuss them over tea. Monday, 1-3 pm; Writer’s Block Bookstore, 124 E. Welbourne Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-335-4192; writersblockbookstore.com. There Will Be Words Live lit. Tuesday, 7 pm; The Gallery at Avalon Island, 39 S. Magnolia Ave.; free; avalongallery.org.

CIVICS

FAMILY

Shattering Racial Walls Discussion on improving race relations with retired Florida Supreme Court Judge James Perry, former State Sen. Geraldine Thompson, Dr. Lavon Bracy and Mable Butler. Wednesday, 11:30 am; Sorosis of Orlando, 501 E. Livingston St.; $35; 407-4227572; lwvoc.clubexpress.com.

Free Family Days Make your own crafts, get a tour with a docent or check out the museum’s open house. Sunday, noon; Mennello Museum of American Art, 900 E. Princeton St.; free; 407-246-4278; mennellomuseum.com.

This Is Your Home Too Information session for refugees on how to budget their money. Thursday, 9 am-8 pm; UCF Student Union, Pegasus Ballroom, University of Central Florida; free.

LITERARY Diverse Word Spoken word open mic. Tuesdays, 8 pm; Dandelion Communitea Cafe, 618 N. Thornton Ave.; free; 407-362-1864; dandelioncommunitea.com. Open Mic Poetry and Spoken Word Poetry and spoken word open mic. Wednesdays, 8:30 pm; Austin’s Coffee, 929 W. Fairbanks Ave., Winter Park; free; 407-9753364; austinscoffee.com. Orlando Cringe: The Valentine Show A unique showcase where adults read from their childhood diaries and journals. Love, lust and heartbreak will be on display for this edition. Wednesday, 7-9 pm; The Abbey, 100 S. Eola Drive; $10-$15; 407-2421547; abbeyorlando.com.

SPORTS Central Florida Mah Jongg Experienced American Mah Jongg players meet weekly using the National Mah Jongg 2015 card and rules. Wednesdays, 12:30-4 pm; Tuscawilla Country Club, 1500 Winter Springs Blvd., Winter Springs; free; 561-704-9302. I Believe in Wrestling Live pro wrestling. Friday, 8-10 pm; Team Vision Dojo, 6923 Narcoossee Road; $10-$15; 407-334-2200; ibelieveinwrestling.com. Orlando Magic vs. Philadelphia 76ers NBA basketball. Thursday, 7 pm; Amway Center, 400 W. Church St.; $13-$149; 800-745-3000; amwaycenter.com. Ten10 Run Club A group run series on the Orlando Urban Trail beginning and ending at the Ten10 Brewery. Tuesday, 6:30 pm; Ten10 Brewing, 1010 Virginia Drive; free; 407-9308993; ten10brewing.com. n

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Club Staq’d Valentine’s Party: Grown & Sexy Edition Valentine’s party with DJ Ninjai and Captain Celsius and drink specials all night long. Saturday, 9 pm; Uncle Lou’s Entertainment Hall, 1016 N. Mills Ave.; free; 407-270-9104.

VALENTINE’S PLANS

$20; 407-636-9951; bluebambooartcenter.com. There Will Be Verse Valentine’s Day Massacre Four poets compete to be the next No. 1 contender for the There Will Be Verse championship. Saturday, 8 pm; Henao Contemporary Center, 5601 Edgewater Drive; $5; henaocenter.com.

For the Love of Food and Wine Dinner A special four-course dinner with wine pairings for each course. Saturday, 6:30 pm; Bikes Beans & Bordeaux, 3022 Corrine Drive; $65; 407-427-1440; bikesbeansandbordeaux.com. In Love With Lodi Wine Dinner A special five-course dinner from Uncommon Catering with California wine pairings with each course. Saturday, 6:30 pm; The Swirlery, 1508 E. Michigan St.; $65; 407-270-6300; swirlery.com. Kingdom Hearts: Love by Midnight Video game-themed Valentine’s party with DJs Ralfington, Ben Briggs, Lotus Cloud and Cosmicosmo. Cosplay encouraged. Saturday, 9 pm; The Geek Easy, 114 S. Semoran Blvd., Winter Park; free; 407-332-9636.

Jorge Celedon’s San Valentin Concert Romantic Latin concert. Thursday, 9:30 pm; Mango’s Tropical Cafe Orlando, 8126 International Drive; $50; 407-673-4422; mangos.com. Pick-A-Trick Send secret notes to whomever you fancy while enjoying all-you-candrink specials. Thursday, 9 pm; Southern Nights, 375 S. Bumby Ave.; free-$5; 407412-5039; southernnightsorl.com.

Love Sux Bring in a torn up or destroyed photo of your ex for goodies and closure. Enjoy drinks, games and live music. Friday, 6 pm; Howl at the Moon Saloon, 8815 International Drive; $10; 407-354-5999; howlatthemoon.com. Valentines Day Dinner A four-course dinner with DJ entertainment. Friday-Tuesday, 11 pmmidnight; Tapa Toro, 8441 International Drive; $65; 407-226-2929; tapatoro.restaurant.

Valentine’s Doughnut and Beer Pairing A guided pairing with sweet and savory doughnuts from Orlandough paired with Orlando Brewing beers. Saturday, 4 pm; Orlando Brewing, 1301 Atlanta Ave; $18-$34; 407-872-1117; orlandobrewing.com. Love Bites Brunch Live acoustic performances and a tasty brunch menu. Sunday, 10:30 am; Rabbitfoot Records Coffee Lounge, 307 E. Second St., Sanford; various menu prices; 321-926-3417; rabbitfootrecords.com.

Love Festival A festival meant to bring people together, whether they’re single, married, dating or engaged. Saturday, 3-11 pm; Downtown Orlando, Church Street, Orange Avenue and Church Street; $25-$400.

Love Bites, Love Brewses Beer & Dessert Pairing A special Valentine’s pairing of Au Naturale stout with a flight of Chef Bob Aungst’s handcrafted desserts. Sunday, 5-7 pm; The Hourglass Brewery, 255 S. Ronald Reagan Blvd., Longwood; various menu prices; 407-719-9874.

Orlando Gay Chorus: Love Is Members of the Orlando Gay Chorus celebrate love and tell their own tales in this evening of cabaret performances. Saturday, 7:30 pm; Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park;

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Valentine’s Concert Treat your sweetheart to a beautiful evening with performances by Jeff Howell, Dr. Otto Group and Bird Dog Bobby Blues Band. Saturday, 7 pm; Harry P. Leu Gardens, 1920 N. Forest Ave.; $15$20; 407-246-2620; leugardens.org.

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Pre-Galentine’s Day Join your gal pals and treat yo self to a special menu and treats for all reserved parties. Ladies celebrating ladies. Sunday, 4 pm; Cloak and Blaster, 875 Woodbury Road; various menu prices; cloakandblaster.com. You & Me Every Day Valentine’s Brunch: The Notebook Celebrate Valentine’s Day with a buffet brunch, live music from the Cook Trio and a screening of the Nicholas Sparks romance. Sunday, 10 am; Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland; $120-$190 per couple; 407629-0054; enzian.org. Akyros Love Print Party A night of screen printing and live music. Entry fee includes a screen printed poster designed by Akyros and a free drink. Tuesday, 7-10 pm; Vespr Craft Coffee & Allures, 626 N. Alafaya Trail; $10. Broken Heart Bash Drink specials and trivia. Couples welcome but frowned upon. Tuesday, 7 pm; Graffiti Junktion - College Park, 2401 Edgewater Drive; free; 407377-1961; graffitijunktion.com. Bump and Grind With Your Valentine DJ Waldo Faldo spins ‘90s R&B while patrons enjoy a special menu of sweet cocktails and sour beers. Tuesday, 10 pm; Lil Indies, 1036 N. Mills Ave.; free; willspub.org. Heartburn: The Un-Valentine’s Day Event An event filled with everything to hate about Valentine’s Day. Ages 11–18. Tuesday, 6-7 pm; Chickasaw Library, 870 N. Chickasaw Trail; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. Movie Screening: Valentine’s Day A screening of the starstudded movie Valentine’s Day. Tuesday, 11 am; Orlando Public Library, 101 E. Central Blvd.; free; 407835-7323; ocls.info. Rustic ValenDine All-inclusive evening featuring a gourmet buffet, sunset cocktail hour, meet and greet with guest wildlife ambassadors and live music from violinst 76

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Brianna Shirin. Tuesday, 6-9 pm; Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge, 10525 Clapp Simms Duda Road; $50-$75; 407568-5138; btnwildlife.org.

Valentines Day Meal Four course prix fixe menu. Tuesday, noon-11 pm; Taverna Opa, 9101 International Drive; $85; 407351-8660; opaorlando.com.

Share and Connect: A Valentine’s Day Art Session A night of queer poetry and art celebrating the bonds of friendship and love. Art supplies and refreshments provided. Tuesday, 6-8 pm; Proyecto Somos Orlando, 6900 S. Orange Blossom Trail, Suite 200; free; proyectosomosorlando.org.

Valentine’s Day Party at Bombshell’s Karaoke and live music all night, along with champagne and roses. Tuesday, 9 pm; Bombshell’s Tavern, 5405 Edgewater Drive; free; 407-730-3999; bombshellstavern.org.

Valentine Moon Zoom A special nocturnal trek for two. Reservations required. Tuesday, 6:30-9:30 pm; ZOOm Air Adventure Park at the Central Florida Zoo, 3755 NW Highway 17-92, Sanford; $90; 407-330-0767; zoomair.us. Valentine Origami Cut, fold and paste Valentine’s Day cards. Tuesday, 4-5 pm; Herndon Library, 4324 E. Colonial Drive; free; 407-835-7323; ocls.info. Valentine’s Day at Highball & Harvest Southern-Inspired Sweetheart specials, à la carte signature options and handcrafted cocktails. Reservations recommended. Tuesday, 5:30-10 pm; The Ritz-Carlton Orlando, 4012 Central Florida Parkway; contact for price; 407-393-4648; ritzcarlton.com. Valentine’s Day Beer Flight Valentines beer flights and candy pairings with wine specials all day. Tuesday, 3 pm-midnight; World of Beer - Altamonte, 155 Cranes Roost Blvd., Altamonte Springs; free; 407-834-2337; wobusa.com/altamonte. Valentine’s Day Chocolate & Beer Pairing Organic brews and locally made chocolates. Limited availability; prepurchase online. Tuesday, 3-10 pm; Orlando Brewing, 1301 Atlanta Ave.; $16; 407-8721117; orlandobrewing.com. Valentine’s Day Dining Prix fixe menus at Ravello and Capa Steakhouse & Bar. Reservations required. Tuesday, 5:30-10 pm; Four Seasons Resort, 10100 Dream Tree Blvd., Lake Buena Vista; $75-$95; 407313-6161; fourseasons.com.

Valentine’s Day Pint Night Bring a significant other or beloved friend and create canvas paintings. Chocolatecovered strawberries and glass of champagne included. Tuesday, 8-10 pm; GB’s Bottle Shop, 531 Virginia Drive; $30; 407-634-0110; letsgoghartcentralflorida.com. Valentine’s Open Mic Share your worst Tinder stories, heartsick spoken word, bad love ballads, erotic fan-fiction or whatever else tickles your fancy. Tuesday, 8 pm; The Falcon, 819 E. Washington St.; free; 407-423-3060. Valentine’s Pajama Party Wear pajamas to this all-night cartoon marathon with breakfast food specials. Reservations recommended. Tuesday, 6 pmmidnight; Cloak and Blaster, 875 Woodbury Road; 407-6747435; cloakandblaster.com. Valentine’s Wine Dinner at Restaurant ASH Four-course dinner with wine pairings selected by the chef. Tuesday 6:30 pm; Restaurant ASH, 912 N. Mills Ave.; $68; 407-2334274; restaurantash.com. Very Vegan Valentine’s Dinner A four-course vegan dinner hosted by guest chef Sam Spence. Reservation only; call ahead. Tuesday, 6:15 & 8:30 pm; Infusion Tea, 1600 Edgewater Drive; $49; 407-999-5255; infusionorlando.com. n


“WILBUR & RENSSELAER”

B Y D A N S AVA G E

Are you looking for a new pet? Meet Duke!

Last week, I spoke at the Wilbur Theater in Boston and the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. Audience members submitted their questions on tiny cards before the show, allowing them to remain anonymous while forcing them to be succinct. Here are some of the questions I didn’t have time to get to at both events.

people are born that way.” (Google “Evan Urquhart,” “trans” and “race” to read the rest of his essay.)

My girlfriend wants to explore her sexuality with another woman but be “heterosexually exclusive” with me. She wants me to have equal freedom but doesn’t think it’s fair for me to be with another woman. I am a heterosexual man. How can we achieve sexual equality?

Before the shops open, get in the face of your elected officials to make sure licenses are made available to pot entrepreneurs of color. Once legal weed shops are open, go out of your way to patronize pot shops owned by people of color and insist all legal weed shops employ people of color and pay a living wage. And once the profits start rolling in, demand that pot activists and shop owners stay in the fight to demand that people convicted of possessing or selling pot in the past – primarily POC – get full pardons and restitution.

An open relationship for her but a closedon-a-technicality relationship for you? Yeah, no. Want to achieve sexual equality? Explore your sexuality with other women – as a single man.

Duke (A368238) is a 2-year-old dog who is looking for a home. He is a little shy at first, but he’s a sweet dog and he’ll warm up to you. He enjoys eating treats and he walks well on a leash. Duke is a mellow boy who really just wants to spend time with you. He does have heartworm disease, but it is

I am a 50-year-old queer man who never really came out – except to people I’m cruising or fucking. Oh, and to my wife. Is there any social or political value to coming out now, in the shadow of a Trump presidency? There’s tremendous social and political value to being out, whoever the president is. There’s also social and political risk, whoever the president is. If you’re in a position to come out – and you must be, otherwise you wouldn’t be asking – not coming out is a moral failing.

treatable, so don’t let that deter you from adopting him. The adoption fee for pets at OCAS will be reduced to $14 for the first 14 days of February. Fees include sterilization, vaccinations and a microchip. However, Duke’s adoption fee has been waived due to his heartworm disease.  Orange County Animal Services is located at 2769 Conroy Road, near the Mall at Millenia. The shelter is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, please call 407836-3111 or visit ocnetpets.com.

I’m a 31-year-old straight woman. I have an intermittent sexual relationship with a married polyamorous friend. Each time we hook up, he says he regrets it. But several months later, he will contact me and we will hook up again. Should I say no? What do you think is up? Your friend’s head is what’s up – up his own ass. Stop letting him stick his dick up yours. (P.S. His regret has me wondering if his marriage is actually open or if he’s cheating on his wife. If you’ve never discussed their polyamorous arrangement with her, that‘s probably what’s up.) Why are liberals OK with people selfidentifying their gender but not their race? Aren’t both considered social constructs? “If race and gender are both social constructs,” Evan Urquhart writes at Slate, “and if both have been built around observable biological traits, then what is the crucial difference that makes a felt gender identity a true one, but a felt racial identity fraudulent? The short answer is that most trans people and their allies suspect that transgender

I see you’ve resurrected your ITMFA campaign. (Bragging rights: I got the Massachusetts license plate ITMFA. The DMV tried to take it back when someone complained, and the ACLU won the case for me! I removed the plate, of course, after Obama won.) My question: If Trump is removed from office – if we “impeach the motherfucker already” – we’ll have Mike Pence. Do you really think he’d be any better?

We just legalized weed here in Massachusetts! Yay! How can I, as a consumer but industry outsider, help to ensure more diversity in the legal selling business?

We already have Mike Pence. And Pence, as awful as he is, oscillates within a predictable band of Republican awfulness. With a President Pence, we’ll get shitty Supreme Court nominees, attacks on queers and people of color, and fiscal mismanagement. With President Trump, we get all that plus war with Mexico and Australia. And you don’t have to remove your ITMFA buttons once Trump is removed from office – keep ’em on until Pence is impeached, too.

Please elaborate on your suggestion that an open relationship could save a marriage.

Speaking of impeachment: Four in 10 Americans support impeaching Trump. Nixon didn’t hit that number until 18 months into the Watergate scandal. And speaking of my ITMFA campaign: We’ve already raised $100,000 at ITMFA.org, with all proceeds going to the ACLU, Planned Parenthood and the International Refugee Assistance Project. Get your ITMFA hats, buttons and T-shirts at ITMFA.org! (Coming soon: coffee mugs and stickers!)

Here’s an example: married couple, together a long time, low-conflict relationship, good partners. Spouse No. 1 is done with sex – libido gone, no interest in taking steps to restore it – but Spouse No. 2 isn’t done with sex. This can play out two ways: 1) Spouse No. 1 insists on keeping the marriage closed, and Spouse No. 2 opts for divorce over celibacy. 2) Spouse No. 1 allows for outside contact – they open the marriage up – and monogamy is sacrificed but the marriage is saved.

DEAR READERS: Valentine’s Day is coming up. This is your annual reminder to #FuckFirst – have sex and then go out to dinner. Don’t have a heavy meal, drink, eat some chocolate gut-bomb of a dessert, and then write to me on the 15th whining about how you didn’t get laid on the 14th. Fuck first! Or better yet, stay home and fuck all night on the 14th and go out to dinner on the 15th. You’re welcome.

How do you get over the guilt of being a straight guy? I used to feel a lot of sexual shame from hearing that men are pigs all the time. I got over most of it, but I still have leftover shame. I want to be respectful of women without having to take responsibility for the actions of every asshole straight man out there.

On the Lovecast, Dan chats with polyamory luminary Cunning Minx: savagelovecast.com. @fakedansavage on Twitter mail@savagelove.net

As a gay man, I’m not responsible for the actions of Roy Cohn, Jeffrey Dahmer or Peter Thiel. Likewise, I deserve no credit for the accomplishments of Michelangelo, Alan Turing or Stephen Sondheim. When you feel the shame and guilt welling up, all you can do is remind yourself that you’re not responsible for the piggishness of Donald Trump or the awesomeness of Chris Kluwe. (And just to complicate things: While most straight women hate straight male pigs, most straight women want their men to be pigs – but only now and then, and only for them. A dash of controlled/vestigial piggishness is a desirable trait, not a disqualifying one.) orlandoweekly.com

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Legal, Public Notices NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. PERSONAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV’S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS & OTHER PERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF AT PUBLIC SALES ON FEBRUARY 24, 2017 AT LOCATIONS & TIMES INDICATED BELOW, TO SATISFY OWNERS LIEN FOR RENT & FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. ALL ITEMS OR SPACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH SPACE PURCHASED IS REQUIRED. 1080 E ALTAMONTE DR, ALTAMONTE SPRINGS FL AT 9:30 AM: B005 - BOWEN, DOUGLASS, B008 - GREEN, ARRIA, B022 JONES, SIMONE, B025 - FADER, NICOLE, B026 - DOUGLAS, ASHLEY, B032 - FERNANDEZ, MELVA, B050 - SEARS, BIRCH, B056 - PHILLIPS, RANDALL, B110 - NIEVES, JOSE, B130 - TUBMAN, BRETT, B150 - LANDIS, STOREY, B194 - TIMPANARO, THOMAS, B211 - HOGAN, JOANN, C026 - GARRITY, LADAWN, C049 - DENNISON, LAKESA, C054 - WALTERS, JARVIS, C076 BARRETO, JASON, C083 - LONG, KATHRYN, C091 - DAVIS, CASSANDRA, D002 - STEPHENS, JERRISH, D003 - PADGETT, PAMELA, D014 - HILL, ELAINE, D017 - GROFFEL, CHRIS, D027 - BUCKLAND, JAMES, D028 - HIXON, LEONARD, D044

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● FEB. 8-14, 2017

- THOMAS, MARK, D060 - REED, LISA, D066 - TULLOCH, JAMES, D067 - MARSHALL, MARY, D071 - BENJAMIN, DANNY, D083 BABER JR, AMOS,D086 - SCOTT, JOHN, F028 - PARISI, MICHAEL. 310 W CENTRAL PARKWAY, ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL, 32714 AT 9:45 AM: 0018 - PRESSLEY, ANEDRA, 0024 - FLORIDA SURGERY CENTER, 0058 - MADDUX, MATTHEW, 0268 - KING HUNT, ANNETTE, 0318 - FLEMING, HELEN, 0342 - BLOSER, JAYSON, 0395 - HOWARD, WALTER, 0416 HOWARD, WALTER, 0496 – MARBREY, RON, 1025 - QUINONES, DANIEL, 2058 - DENNIS, ROBERT, 3022 - PLAZA ECHEVARRIA, FREDDIE, 3028 - LINCOLN, ROSEEN, 3055 - NEEDHAM, ROGER, 3086 - HANAFUSA, AMBER, 4005 - HERZOG, LISA, 4013 - CARABALLO, ILIANA, 4022-BRIDGES- POWELL, TONJIA, 4043 - CAPUTO, ERIN, 4049 - GRAY, LISA, 4060 - SPRAGUE, JAMES, 5011 - EVALUVEST BRANCH OPERATIONS,5011 – CORRERA, CLAUDIA, 6007 BURNS, VICTOR. 2800 W STATE ROAD 434 , LONGWOOD , FL, 32779 AT 10:00 AM: 0284 - LANGE, JENNA, 0357 - RAPHINO, DARLENE, 0423 - MELENDEZ, PEDRO, 0641 - BUCKLEY, GREGORY, 0652 - AZZARA, SUSAN, 0674 - BROOM SR., DUANE, 0702 DENNIS, BILLY, 0764 - THOMAS, CASSANDRA, 0804 - COTTON, ROBERT, 0816 - SCOTT, KEVIN, 0823 - GARFINKEL, SCOTT, 0846 – WARING, MICHAEL, 0875 - CHADEAYNE, DONALD, 0906 - COWAN, MELISSA, 0942 TABURY, NANA. 521 S STATE ROAD 434, ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL, 32714 AT 10:15 AM: 1012 - EASON, TIMOTHY, 1024 - MOORE, ANTONNETTE, 3021 - MANGUAL, ARIEL, 3030 - COLON, JOHN, 4003 - JOHNSON, SYBLE, 4006 - BRANCH, SUZANNE, 4014 - WILLIAMS, WES, 4030 - SMITH, GERALD, 4034 - WILLIAMS, ANGELA, 5025 - BAYS, SHAWN, 5033 - VEGLIO, GIULIO, 5046 - VALLEJO, CALEB, 5051 JOHNSON, DORA, 5086 - SMITH, VERONICA, 5091 - LOPEZ, JASMIN, 5124 - VILLEGAS, TERRIANN, 5140 - JONES, SIERRA, 5154 - POBLANO, DAVID, 6001 - HOLMES, ZETA, 6006 - VEGLIO, GIULIO, 6011 - EDWARDS, KRISTINA, 6028 - FRANCIS, KIRK, 6081 - SMITH, VERONICA, 6083 - BALLARD, ABNER, 6107 - MARTINEZ, JESSICA, 6146 GONZALEZ, FRANKIE. 455 S HUNT CLUB BLVD, APOPKA, FL, 32703 AT 10:30 AM: 2011 - NOTTAGE, LEESA, 2019 MARTIR, CARLA, 3035 - PUGH, JERONICA, 3040 - GEHRIS, PETER, 3044 - MUNOZ, MAGLADENA, 4006 - RIVERA, JEFFREY, 4079 - LEE, CONNIE, 5026 ROSA, ABIGAIL, 5046 - SMITH, BRITTNEY, 5050 - HAMMONDS, DOMINIQUE, 5054 - ROBINSON, ANGEL, 6003 - SHAW, TONI, 6053 - ROBERTS, JOHN, 6119 - ROBIN-

orlandoweekly.com

SON, ANGEL, 6164 - PADILLA, EUNICE, 6192 - JALBERT, RONALD, 6201 - JALBERT, MEGHAN, 6202 - FRANK, JELDA, 7006 NASSAR, KERIM. 2431 S ORANGE BLOSSOM TRAIL, APOPKA, FL, 32703 AT 10:45 AM: B009 - FEES, DAVID, B022 - JOHNSON, DEWAUN, C014 - KING, NICHOLAS, C025 - SIMON, ROBERT, D051 - MCCANT, AATRON, D064 - RANDOLPH, TONI, D065 HALL, TRACEY, D090 - YINGST, THOMAS, D095 - O’NEILL, MISSIE, F015 - CHATIGNY, BRIANA, F019 - DUNSTON, DENESE, G002 - HARDY, BETTY, G026 - HOUSEAL, LASHAURNE, H028 - POLINGO, KATHY, H040 HUNT, DEMARCUS, H044 - LEE, RASHAUN, H057 - LAMBERT, D’CARIS, NA04 - COLON, ALBERTO, NA07 - COSSAIRT, JASON, NA16 - GRANT, KENNLEY, NA17 - JAMES, YOLANDA, NA23 RIVERA, LUCIA, NB23 - BOURCIER, TRAVIS, P089 - BAREFOOT, ANDREW, P093 - GUZMAN, ROBERTO, P096 - MOORE, HARLEY, S017 - HENRY, AESHA, S028 - WHITE, TAMIA, S038 WALMER, BARBIE, U016 - GORE, CHRISTINA, U030 - MESSENGER, JEFFREY, V006 - ROSS, YALONDA, V011 - VALLEJO, CHRISTIAN, V016 - CAMPBELLS, JACQUELINE, W003 - CLOVIS, ROSALIN. 108 W MAIN ST , APOPKA , FL, 32703 AT 11:00 AM: 0112 - NEWMAN, KENNETH, 0117 - SPARKMAN, LUCILLE, 0124 - DURHAM, ARIKA, 0217 - DANIELS, RAEKWON, 0305 - PORTER, ROBIN, 0313 - ACAJABON, KATHERINE, 0406 - SPEARS, MARILYN, 0511 - NEIL, ANTOINETTE, 0612 - LEWIS, JOSEPH, 0708 - JONES, JUANITA, 0713 – DYSON, ALISA, 0715 - LAWSON, LATOYA, 0805 - YARBOUGH, DION, 0817 - JAMES, LATASHA, 0820 - BROWN, TONIQUE, 0925 - SULLIVAN, JAMES, 1005 TAICLET, DANIEL, 1124 - GOINS, ROGER, 1202 - SMITH, NICOLE, 1209 - BRANOM, SAMANTHA, 1233 - SYMANSKI, PATRICIA, 1303 - WALLACE, JENNIFER, 1355 - KNIGHT, ANGIE, 1388T - COBB, JAMAICA, 1404T WILLIAMS, DAHAVELIEN, 1456 - HARRIS, JOHNATHAN, 1476 SIMPKINS, MEGGAN, 1484 - RIVERS JR, CALVIN, 1708 - TYLER, CORINTHIAN, 1726 - BECKETT, RACKEL, 1732 - HOLLIS, DEIDRE, 1735 - KUNKEL, BRANDON, 1738 - SIGYRDSSON, GUDNY, 1741 - WORTHAM, BONITA, 1742 - THOMAS, CHRISTINA, 1767 LOWRY, MARK. 8255 SILVER STAR ROAD ORLANDO, FL 32818 AT 11:15 AM: 1212 - WRIGHT, SHANA, 1223 - RAMOS, YARITZA, 1224 - PERDUE, DEBRA, 1305 - JOHNSON, DUANE, 1313 - PLUMMER, BRIAN, 1330 - BLAKE, LEIGHTON, 1350 - STEVENS, LACHARLES DERRICK, 1353 - DELEON JR., JOSE, 1359 - WILSON, REVA, 1408 - BEAVERS, DASHE, 1444 - JOHNSON, DEVON, 1446 GRIGLEY, COREY, 1473 - ROSS,

EMMA, 1483 - FOOTMAN, ALPHA, 1502 - WILSON, DEVONA, 1508 - LEE, CAROL, 1523 - JONES, TASHA, 1617 - COLE, GINA, 1624 - WILKERSON, JENNIFER, 1718 - LAWRENCE, DWIGHT, 2024 - BIRDSONG, TAMARA, 2047 - VAZQUEZ, CHRISTIAN, 2120 - HAMILTON, SHARDAI, 2136 - TIWARI, NARUPA, 2164 - NELSON, EVELYN, 2210 - LEE, TIM, 2213 - MOYA, DINA, 2233 - MARSHALL, ASHA, 2234 - MARABLE, AR’JAY, 2238 - CRUZ, MARCOS, 2260 - CLARK, ARIELLE, 2291 - MONTERO, JOSE, 2307 - SANTIAGO, KATHRYN, 2308 - DENARD, ROSANNE, 2337 - MCZEAL, ELLENA, 2408 - SINCLAIR, DENESE, 2422 - DE ST AUBIN, NICOLE, 2472 - RILEY, EVANDER, 2603 - BLOODWORTH, NANCY, 3122 - MAURICE, CHOIZILIEN, 3123 - VARHOL ELECTRIC CO., 3125 - LEE, CHERIE. 3150 N. HIAWASSEE RD ORLANDO, FL 32818 AT 11:30 AM: 1113 - SOBERS, DELESHA, 1206 RISPER, BEVERLY, 1407 - MAYS, SHAUNWA, 1413 - FORMOR, PAMELA, 1509 - COOPER, SHEARICO, 1611 - SIMS, BEATRICE, 1703 - PRENTICE, BRYANT, 1808 - HERNANDEZ, MICHELLE, 1833 - LOUIS, NATASHA, 1907B CLANCY, MISTY, 1908D - IWUAGWU, JANNELLE, 1926 - ROSA, FRANCES, 2109 - CLAY, TARA, 2116C - MORSON, MAURICE, 2223 - GARCIA-MUSAH, CONNIE, 2230 - JENKINS, STACEY, 2302 - HASTINGS, NOUCHELLE, 2321 - PERCIVAL, DERELYN, 2419 - WARDE, GREGORY, 2422 - MASSANI, CHANDNI, 2501 - MICHEL, WILDITHE, 2504 - LINARES, CHRISTOPHER, 2522 - CLAY, TARA, 2524 - SIMMONS, ADRIANE, 2606 - JOHNSON, JANICE, 2620 - LONGSTREET, CHARLEEN, 2629 - NEAL, TRENITRICE, 2716 - ALMONDS, DEAN, 2719 - WASHINGTON, LYSTASIA, 2728 - ECCLES, SHERNETT, 2730 - PORTERFIELD, MORRIS. 6770 SILVER STAR ROAD ORLANDO, FL 32818 AT 11:45AM: 0005 - PERFECTING PRAISE MINISTRIES, INC., 0005 – BAXTER JR., ROBERT, 0033 - AUGUSTE, RUBERT, 0036 - BROWN, KATHLEEN, 0056 - BRYNILDSEN, BENJAMIN, 0099 - CHANNEL, ALBERT, 0110 - STEPHENS, KIMBERLY, 0114 THORNTON, COURTNEY, 0119 - PRUITT, AMINA, 0127 - SEARS, JUNE, 0150 - SHAW, SHANTAZA, 0154 - MCPHAUL, CHERYL, 0156 - GODBOLT, TRACEY, 0160 - GIPSON, SASHA, 0171 - ADDERLEY, TYREESE, 0193 - STEPHENS, BRIANA, 0198 - SERVICE, DAMIAN, 0199 - PIRANT, MARY, 0237 - ANDERSON JR, DUDANE, 0247 - HARRIS, SHERRILL, 0255 - COLEMAN, ALVIN, 0265 - COAR, GEORGE, 0267 - SCHILT, RONALD, 0268 - GILMORE, ERNEST, 0281 - FLORES-ESQUILIN, NORMA, 0308 - LEEKS, RODRIGUEZ, 0319 - DALGE, JOSEPH, 0321 - HARRIS JR, GARLAND, 0335 - THOMAS, VERONICA, 0336 - WOODALL, ASHLEY, 0337 - BHOOPCHAND, AMITH,

0339 - JACKSON, EVELYN, 0377 - BAZZINI, PAUL, 0429 - JEAN, KEVINS, 0460 - HALL, CELESTE, 0473 - NICHOLS, SHARON, 0490 KENDRICK, EZEL, 0494 - DEVITT, MICHAEL, 0495 - NOEL, CLAIRE, 0505 - BALDWIN, SAMUEL, 0539 - VERDIEU, RICHARDSON, 0544 - WILLIAMS, ASHLEY, 0550 - WILLIAMS, ELVAY, 0558 - DUMERCY, ALBERT, 0563 - ROBINSON, DEQUAN, 0568 SATCHELL, LAKITA, 0573 - TORRES CALDERON, AILED, 0574 - SNELL, WILLIAM, 0588 - MOSS, SADE, 0600 - KERR, HERMIA, 0613 - BENITEZ CONTRERA, JOSE, 0634 - LAMPKIN, BRYANT, 0642 - CIPRIANI, BERYL, 0660 - DAREUS, ROODLY, 0661 - HENKLE, JACK, 0669 - GUNN, DORIS, 0723 - ROJAS, JESSICA, 0736 - HURDLE, SHIRLEY, 0763 - RAY, BRAIN, 0766 - WARRELL, MAKILA, 0776 - ROSS, SHELLEN, 0783 - FANT, NICHOLE, 0786 - JACKSON, QUINCY, 0788 - BIVINS, BARBARA, 0806 - CASSEUS, FABIOLA, 0813 - CHIN, DAVID, 0846 - NOEL, HERIBERT, 0853 - CONDE, FREDDY, 0857 - CUTLIFF, TIFFANY, 0866 - MARTINEZ, WENDY, 0867 - WARREN, NAQUITA, 0869 - FIGUEROA -RUIZ, NEREIDA, 0870 – OELHOFFEN, KAM, 0873 - PENA, ROSA, 0885 - BRADLEY, WANYE, 0914 - WATSON, BARBARA, 0921 - HOPKINS, GEORGE.

NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. PERSONAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV’S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS & OTHER PERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF AT PUBLIC SALES ON FEBRUARY 23, 2017 AT LOCATIONS & TIMES INDICATED BELOW, TO SATISFY OWNERS LIEN FOR RENT & FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. ALL ITEMS OR SPACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH SPACE PURCHASED IS REQUIRED. 5602 Raleigh St. Orlando FL 32811 AT 9:30 AM: 0025 - Griffin, Megan, 0026 - Richards, Roger, 0037 - Mesilien, Sauphia, 0045 Washburn, Chelsea, 0049 - Canole, Beverly, 0067 - Suffrena, Marie, 0078 - Leonard, Zeke, 0086 Rodriguez, wilfredo, 0095 - ELLIS, CYNTHIA, 0107 - Graham, Brittany, 0112 - Mills, Frederick, 0113 Hamilton, Joseph, 0122 - smoll, christopher, 0123 - Smith, Jennie, 0133 - Trevisam, Alcides, 0143 Carr, Kyanna, 0151 - Goodman, Diandre, 0152 - siganoff, Brian, 0158 - Whitmore, Vincent, 0201 - Croom, Gwendolyn, 0208 - Johnson, Marstel, 0211 - Bridges, Kim, 0245 Fiveash, Amanda, 0255 - St Pierre,


Djoulie, 0260 - Plaisimond, Darline, 0277 - Wimberly, Ashley, 0280 Morris, Shiquita, 0286 - Fregis, Asmin, 0301 - Jones, Jazlyn, 0304 - Modeste, Randy, 0318 - Chery, Bianca, 0320 - Cherry, Michael, 0333 - Thomas, Greg, 0339 - Sinclair, Algernon J, 0344 - Chapman, Jamarr, 0346 - Gold, Versa, 0352 - Lewis, Valerie, 0361 - Johnson, Danny, 0395 - Brown, Kevin, 0397 - Barto, Tim, 0398 - Pickett, Marcus, 0419 Mills, Earnest, 0420 - Featherman, Pamela, 0430 - Catlin Jr, Bruno, 0452 - Morrison, MONTRESS, 0456 - Johnson, Christopher, 0462 - Sheldon, Bridget, 0464 - Shurns, Thalia, 0477 - Simmons, Latorya, 0479 - Bell, Laquentin, 0480 taylor, kenya, 0496 - Emanuel, Queleisha, 0499 - Upchurch, Sie, 0500 - oliver, Rashard, 0507 Windom, Calvin, 0511 - Rhodes, Patricia, 0547 - Henriquez, Denise, 0550 - Norman, R, 0560 - Lee, Andi, 0565 - Ebanks, Tarajade, 0573 - Anderson, Aja, 0574 - Toya Jones, Samara 900 S. Kirkman Rd Orlando FL 32811 AT 9:40 AM: 1102 - Austin, Deanna, 1205 - WHITE, JENNY, 1415 - Dinkins, Bilandra, 1417 - Hanes, Michael, 1503 - Lloyd, Dapsie, 2110 - Sears, Steven, 2120 - Hamilton, Sylvia, 2315 - Hall, Peggy, 2421 - Davis, Shaunte, 2423 - Emile, Madeline, 2424 Davis, Jennifer, 2505 - James, Hennice, 2512 - Ciali, Brett, 2610 - BUSER, SUSAN, 3103 - Thomas, Dale, 3127 - Trimble, Briana, 3210 - Austin, Steven, 3218 - Rodriguez, Marvin, 3304 - McCoy, Felicia, 3307 - Simmons, Renee, 3327 Alteme, Merline, 3408 - Dalton, Mark, 3415 - Suero, Kelly, 3519 Saint Vil, Marjorie, 3526 - Thornton, Sheila, 3608 - Price, Roxanne, 4104 - Maldonaldo, Bernadette, 4107 - Engram, Jshone, 4125 Gaglio, James, 4126 - Robinson, Darnell, 4214 - Rivero, David, 4323 - Torres, Demitry, 4415 - Council, Tracey, 4505 - Rodriguez, Hilcias, 4518 - Santiago, Ruben, 5103 Alexander, Phyllis, 5109 - Elizza, Kathy, 5110 - Bernard, Mia, 5111 - Thigpen, Quantane, 6115 - wood, brandon, 7110 - Jackson, Carol, 7116 - Blunt, Dawn, 7117 - Mosby, L ’ ,8 2-G n , B ni , 8115 - Irland, Chantel 3900 West Colonial Dr. Orlando, FL, 32808 AT 9:50 AM:A012 Harrison, Angela, A023 - Sesler, Jacinda M, A025 - Rivers, David, A028 - Martin, Mona, A046 - TSAR, B007 - Coe, Darrell, B011 - Coleman, Howard, B013 - Delossantos, Lardwin, Scooter 2009 Vin#1306, B022 - Clore, John, B023 - Tejeda, Alberis, B029 Denham, Derrick, B050 - Johnson, Celeste, B056 - Jackson, Doret, C009 - Reed, Laketha, C021 Edwards, George, C028 - Lockhart, Stinette, C034 - Smith, Diane, C036 - Jean, Pasquese, C058 COOK-WILLIAMS, TAMARA, C063 - Brown, Suddaney, C075 - Angulo, Shanika R, D004 - Willingham, Javan, D010 - Adil, Reda, D011 Houston, Gregory, D014 - Graham, William, D017 - Revel, Janean, D021 - Graves-Billings, Kelia, D027 - Holland, Roy W, D036 - Sneed, Meloda, D048 - Long, Todd, D052

- Goodwin, Kelli, D072 - Fleming, Brooke, D081 - Cox, Curtina, D101 - Hughes, Antonio, D104 - Baskerville, Roxieanna, D121 - Matthews, Carole, D143 - Egan, Lev & Siwica, P.A., D143 - Orantes- Aguilar, Mario, E013 - Abaskharoun, John, E021 - Van Rynsoever, Ted (johannes), E030 - David, Ryan, F004 - Wilson, Cliff, F011 - Gopaul, Valencia, F053 - Alston, Jaime, P002 - Guits, Marlon, P016 - Melo, Ingrid, P017 - Dodd, Dennis, P018 Mcdonnaugh, Daron 2308 N John Young Parkway Orlando, FL, 32804 AT 10:00 AM: A005 - Franklin, Kevin, A007 - Mason, Audrey, A008B - Smith, Wanda, A017 - Scott, Nicole, A019 - Myrtil, Renand, A040 - EMBAUGH, DONALD, A049 - Wilson, Emmanuel, A055 - SINCLAIR, EVERELL, B005 - Ashby, Camila, B007B - Abraham, Jennifer, B015B - dickens, crystal, B025B - Wilson, Mauketia, B027B - Hayes, Bakari, B032B - Robenson, TaMika, B033A - rodriguez, joel, B036A - MONTANEZ, JORGE, B069B Williams, Jason, B071A - Young, April, B079 - Taylor, Doris, B088 - Nieves-Rivera, Migdalia, B098 Scott, Lysa, C005 - Garcia, Deleah, C009 - Giddens, Keshavia, C014 - Finley, Teanna, C026 - JamesSandy, Jeanine, C032 - Bingham, Nick, C067 - Dorsey, Kristen, C070 - Abraham, Jennifer, D004 - Banks, Mattie, D036 - Combs, Alfonse, D039 - Jackson, Cynthia, D044 - Simmons, Eric, D045 - Horton, Aaron, D054 - Williams, Junior, D058 - Kieffer, Kent, D060 - Wynn, Anna, D069 - Johnson, Kimberly, D070 - Green, Quanshavia, D108 - Ferguson, Sisse Sy, D136 coleman, clarence, D148 - Boles, Andera, E030 - Cooper, Angela, E035 - Brown, Carlos, E041 - Adornato, Joseph, E045 - Ingram, Tara, E060 - Myles, Angel, E063 - Francois, Marie, E067 - Moore, Andrea, E075 - MONTANEZ, JORGE, E113 - nugent, nakosha, F011 - Barnes, Sonya, F018 - Brown, Eva, F021 - Wade, Jimmy, F022 - Paige, Dondrelle, F024 - Cross, Danielle, F058 - Gordon, Tameka, F067 - WHIPPER, KENNETH, F069 - Arce, Crystal, F074 - Carter, Cammis, F077 - Palmer, Jamal, F113 - Goolsarran, Jennifer, G005 - Zygmunt, Eric, G011 - Sone, Roland, G012 - Steiner, William, G017 - Bridgewater, Frederick, G018 - Bridgewater, Frederick, G039 - Villada, Christopher, O026 - Danner, Justin, O028A - Farmer, Sheila, O039 - Theodore, Donfred 4100 N. John Young Parkway Orlando, FL, 32804 AT 10:10 AM: A109 - Johnson, Iris, A118 - Wallace, Tawanda, A122 - Guarnaccia, Karrie, A125 - Vanrynsoever, Johannes, B204 - Hagans, Whitney, B222 - Brown, Jeff, B226 - Rhynes, Michelle, B238 - Parker, Shelbi, B253 - Peterson, Sherman, C350 - Jimenez, Ziomara, C353 - Morris, Samuel, C362 - Coker, Nakita, D407 - Sallett, Oliver, E003 Walker, Gail, E005 - Mathis, Glenn, E007 - Flemming, Omari, E008 - Porten, Mindy, E022 - Gassett, Ja, E02 - N i , ’ ni, E030 - Dennard, Jaime, E037 - Ford, Salena, E050 - Norwood, Lacarla,

E058 - Patrick, Rahshaud, E062 - Brewster, Shunathan, E065 Stephens, Denesha, E069 - Wolfe, Jodi, E070 - Evans, Marchaee, E072 - Epps, Jerry, E079 - Rhodes, Antonio, E086 - Billings, Bobby, E088 - Moore, Keetundra, E091 - Savage, Jessica, E101 - Sapp, Oliver, E114 - Brown, Glen, E115 Hayes, Angela, F615 - Champion, Robin, F617 - Collins, Natasha, F618 - Bonitto, Lascelles, F619 Johnson, Ericka, F624 - Cleveland, Jestin, F631 - Ross, Ronnie, F634 - Tobin, Jerry, F652 - Barton, Margaritte, F663 - Henry, Laura, G702 - Moore, Antavia, G709 - Leonard, Jeffrey, G720 - Martin, Osie, G734 - Manuel, Jeremy, H806 - Henderson, Christopher H813 - Seco World Wide Resources, H813 – Wagnac, Evens, H818 Marshall, Joshua, J917 - Ashcraft, Jared, P006 - Bartenstein, Jeffrey, P011 - Concepcion, Edgar, P022 - Nordstrom, Henrik, 2007 Coach Craft Vin# 6430, P027 - Concepcion, Edgar 1241 S. Orlando Ave. Maitland FL, 32751 AT 10:20 AM: 0030 - Freeman, Tery, 0176 - Allen, Danielle, 0206 - Hub Internation, 0206 – Gardner, Christopher, 0377 - Evans- Epps, Elsie Marie, 0377 - Evans- Epps, Elsie Marie, 0393 - Strait III, James, 0472 - Prevesk, Steve, 4012 - Paul, George, 5003 - Bergaman, Rodney, 6025 - Paul, Ryan 1842 W. Fairbanks Ave Winter Park, FL, 32789 AT 10:30 AM: 1005 - St. Cyr, Joseph, 1020 - St. Cyr, Joseph, 1034 - St. Cyr, Joseph, 1043 - Pinkney, Kathy, 1084 - Landwer, Nathan, 2057 - Baker, Pat, 2132 - White, Travis, 3048 - Gursky, Rick, 3194 - Emanuel, Chelsea, 3232 - Foster, Stephen, 3236 - Jones, Diane 1023 N. Mills Ave ORLANDO, FL 32803 AT 10:40 AM: 1041 - Reading, Anthony, 1053 - Rehabilitation and Fitness Consultants, PLLC, 1053 – Henderson, Nicholas, 2005 - Peden Channell, Sandra, 2044 Kline, Raberta, 2069 - Junod, Jeff, 2073 - Laws, Phillip, 3019 - Lott, Vin n , 3 38 - r fi i B n , 3 38 – Fink, Chris, 4054 - Livingston, Melinda, 4076 - Kalange, Andrew, 4104 - Branch, Douglas, 4118 Peden Channell, Sandra 653 Maguire Blvd. ORLANDO, FL 32803 AT 10:50 AM: 0201 - Rath, Mark, 0412 - Williams, James, 0623 - Kinsey, Heather, 1031 - Balderson, Melissa, 2034 - Foster, Maria, 2048 - Morris & Hancock P.A., 2048 – Hancock, Christopher, 2058 - Roland, Brett, 2105 - Lucena, Amber, 2111 - Packer, Terris, 2141 - Tucker, Todd, 2142 - Beveridge, Mark, 3052 - Best, David, 3065 Pizzini, Ramon, 3106 - Saunders, i , 3 2 - L Offi Mi E Martinko, 3126 – Martinko, Michael.

Notice of Auction 2001 Lufk Semi Trailer with VIN# 1L01A482211147464 will be auctioned on 2/20/2017 at 9:00 am. Nicholas Gerard DelGiudice & Robert Joseph Sears Sr. 8550 Old Winter Garden Rd., Orlando, FL. 32835.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that on Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the following locations: February 21st , 2017 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored therein by the following: 1:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 4390 Pleasant Hill Rd Kissimmee, Fl. 34746 (407) 944-1408 #P0713 - Israel Pagan-Boat, #P1075- Ulysses Mcneal -Rv, #5229- Juanita Delgado Couches,Household Items , #350Shawn White- Furniture,Household Items, #812- Yolande Prevalom - Household Goods, #5249 - Jessica Zayas Jimenez- Household Goods,Personal Items, #5226Ruth Miranda Dunn - Household Goods, #146- Eunice Patricia Fagan- Personal Items, Household Goods,#5162- Hector Manuel Torres- Household Goods, Personal Items, # 5238- Richard Kevin Carhart -Household Goods,Personal Items Lawnmover tractor, #202- Melissia Crow- Furniture, #5004- Shawn White- Boxes,Totes. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

NOTICE OF SALE Vehicles will be sold as is, no warranty. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid. Terms of bids are cash only. Buyer must have funds on hand at time of sale: 1994 Saturn 1G8ZF5598RZ267092 2006 Scion JTLKT324336410778 2002 Toyota 1NXBR12E32Z596127 1995 Nissan 1N4AB41D8SC715865 To be sold at auction at 8:00 a.m. on February 22, 2017, 9881 Recycle Center Rd. Orlando Florida 32428 New Generation Towing

orlandoweekly.com

FEB. 8-14, 2017

NOTICE OF SALE Vehicles will be sold as is, no warranty. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid. Terms of bids are cash only. Buyer must have funds on hand at time of sale: 2003 Mitsubishi 4A3AC44G03E170938 2004 FORD 1FAFP44694F201674 2003 Saturn 1G8AV14F63Z197910 To be sold at auction at 8:00 a.m. on February 27, 2017, 9881 Recycle Center Rd. Orlando Florida 32428 New Generation Towing

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Legal, Public Notices NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, BEDDING, TOYS, GAMES, PACKED CARTONS, FURNITURE, TOOLS, TRUCKS, CARS, ETC. THERE’S NO TITLE FOR VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE. OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS. LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ONLINE WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2017 AT THE TIMES INDICATED BELOW. VIEWING AND BIDDING WILL ONLY BE AVAILABLE ONLINE AT www.storagetreasures.com BEGINNING AT LEAST 5 DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED SALE DATE AND TIME. www. personalministorage.com PERSONAL MINI STORAGE FORSYTH - 2875 FORSYTH RD. WINTER PARK, FL 32792 - AT 10:00AM: #405- Melita Chantelle Wootson; #422- Ricardo Dasilva/ William Norman Cotton 1983 Suzu Motorcycle Vin# JS1GP51A7D2105105; #456- Lesa Ann Kaleski; #468Richard Vincent; #508- Tacairon La Von Thomas; #553- Leonardo Candelario Jr MICHIGAN MINI STORAGE - 200 W. MICHIGAN ST ORLANDO, FL 32806 - AT 10:30AM: #43- Brittany Mascia; #47- Janice Sistrunk Carlton; #97- Justinina Strum; #123Scott Zubarik; #132- Scott Zubarik; #191- Nancy Nixon; #201- Roberta Lindeman PERSONAL MINI STORAGE LAKE FAIRVIEW - 4252 N ORANGE BLOSSOM TR. ORLANDO FL 32804 - AT 11:00AM: #33Griffin Jr, A L i - Gr , Verrisa Erica; #260- Ellis, Trinette Quinae; #305- Thompson,Denise Rosalee; #337- Williams, Cordney Shantel; #350- Austin,Brandi Janai; #928- Gonzalez, Erica PERSONAL MINI STORAGE WEST - 4600 OLD WINTER GARDEN RD. ORLANDO FL 32811 AT 11:30 #74- Kurt Castor; #81- Nerilia Laurent; #147- Walter J Harris Jr; #186- Marcia Talbert; #161- Angelique C James; #191- Allen M Baker Jr; #200- Terry A Beden; #204- Terry A Beden; #284- Ernesto Velez Rodriguez; #305- Mark W Middlebrooks Jr; #386- Yesenia Pagan; #391- Dave Hanno; #411Sheree N Brady; #414- Cammy P Mack; #440- Denise Holloman; #450- Christopher B Singh; #479Paul Royal Jr; #486- Jamohn J Mack; #537- Octavia V Peterson; #539- Andrea Jackson; #586- Kietta Mayweather Gamble; #635- Ursula B Baker; #641- Stephanie L Sanders; #647- Ursula B Baker; #731Winifred Destin 1991 Lexis 4D Green VIN#JT8UF11E5M0057993; #298B- Eldrika L Washington, #319-Leroy Shaw Jr.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that on Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the following locations: February 23rd, 2017 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored therein by the following: 1:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at 3501 S. Orange Blossom Trail Orlando, FL. 32839 (407)839-5518 #3052- Shae Edwards- Bed set, tv, clothes, table, #1031- Roslyn Scott-Household items, beds #1083- Zinet MuediniHousehold goods, #2022- Teresa Hemmings- House hold items, clothes #4109- Shakina Jones-Kids toys towels blankets and house hold items #3089-Jordan Paul De La Cruz- Household items, #1102Ronald Young- Household items, #1103- Reginald Rashard Joneshousehold items, personal items, #3081- Laerika Johnson-Household items, #1034- William SandersHousehold items, #2118- Patricia Lograsso- Boxes and furniture, #2124- James Hammond-bags and clothing, #1039- Rachel Guerrelus - Household items #4058- Donald Fleming Jr- Household items, beds, clothes #3028- Habbas HabbasMattresses, tv, tv stand #4101Angela Beatrice Louis- Household items.

NOTICE OF SALE Vehicles will be sold as is, no warranty. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid. Terms of bids are cash only. Buyer must have funds on hand at time of sale: 1999 Ford VIN# 1FAFP4049XF174727 2009 Chevy VIN# 1G1AT58H097152361 1992 Honda VIN# 1HGEG8649NL035170 2006 Nissan VIN# 1N4AL11D26N388448 2007 Chevy VIN# 1GCFG15X571107776 2001 Nissan VIN# JN1CA31A11T310714 2010 Bmw VIN# WBANW1C56AC167090 2000 Buick VIN# 2G4WS52J9Y1222992 2001 Toyota VIN# JT3GN87R110186396 2010 Dodge VIN# 2B3CJ4DVXAH296540 2008 Nissan VIN# 3N1AB61E08L649150 1997 Saturn VIN# 1G8ZH5283WZ236589 To be sold at auction at 8:00 a.m. on February 22, 2017, 7301 Gardner Street, Winter Park, FL. 32792 Constellation Towing & Recovery LLC

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● FEB. 8-14, 2017

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY STATE OF FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION: 07/Dawson CASE NO: DP16-757 IN THE INTEREST OF: I.F. DOB: 02/02/2009, Minor Child SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF TPR ADVISORY HEARING STATE OF FLORIDA TO:Amanda Blackenship-Florentino Garcia Address Unknown A Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has n fi in i r r r in the above referenced child(ren), a copy of which is attached. You are to appear on March 6, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. at the Thomas S. Kirk Juvenile Justice Center, 2000 East Michigan Street, Orlando, FL 32806, before honorable Judge, Daniel P. Dawson, for a TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You must appear on the date and time specifi . FAILURE TO ERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE CHILD(REN). IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. Pursuant to Sections 39.802(4)(d) and 63.082(6)(g), Florida Statutes, you are hereby informed of the availability of private placement with an adoption entity, fin in S i n 3.032 3 , Florida Statutes. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone 407-836-2303 within two working days of your receipt of this summons. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. Witness my hand and seal of this court at Orlando, Orange County Florida on this 6th day of January, 2017. CLERK OF COURT By: /s/ Deputy Clerk. Jill Fowler, Esquire, Florida Bar No.: 0045276, Senior Attorney for C i r n’ L S r i ,S of Florida, Department of Children an Families, 400 West Robinson Street, Suite N211, Orlando, FL 32801, (407) 317-7417 - Telephone (407) 317-7126 - Fax. NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that on Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction at the storage facilities listed below, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the following locations: February 23rd, 2017 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored therein by the following: 9:30a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 1101 Marshall Farms Rd. Ocoee, Fl. 34761

orlandoweekly.com

(407) 877-0191 #H446-Francesco C rn - ffi f rni r n fi #F388-Allen James-household goods #D235-Cheryl Knott- household items #F370-Michelle Arrantslove seat, Household goods, Boxes 11:00a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 5603 Metrowest Blvd. Orlando, FL 32811 (407) 445-0867 #05166 Willie Gardner hsehold goods; #08010 Henry Byrant hsehold goods; #02070 Ivelisse Martinez clothes, smaller items; #02188 Nichol Thomas hsehold goods; #01049 Lauren Sedik bed, kitchen ware, dishes, table/chairs, clothes; #05108 Takeya Howard hsehold furniture/items etc; #02078 Brittany Schlawiedt boxes, hsehold items, clothes 12:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 5592 L. B. McLeod Rd. Orlando, Fl. 32811 (407) 445-2709 #605 Pascale Feuer- HHG #639 Pascale Feuer - HHG #869 Pascale Feuer -HHG #361 Christina Anderson –HHG #887 Asha Jiawan –HHG #307 Lerry Williams – HHG #603 Pascale Feuer –HHG #337 Jermaine Ivery– HHG #134 Najee Abdullah– HHG #145 Ten 55 Productions Inc–HHG #881 Ten 55 Productions Inc–HHG #139 Goarmored LLC–Spare parts to truck #706 Betty Davis–HHG #711 Shirley Burns–Bike, Boxes #375 Dandrea Ikner–HHG #031 Mary Harris–HHG #300 Berci Joseph– Kitchen table, Couches #780 Ten 55 Productions Inc- Furniture, Electronics #057 Tyrone Holley– HHG #124 Michael Flesher–HHG #626 Ernst Louis–HHG #829 Ellen Taverez–HHG #739 Yashica Freeman–HHG 3:00p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 1420 N Orange Blossom Trail Orlando, FL 32804 (407) 650-9033 #783 Melitsa Fuentes- Boxes; #337 Misty Simmons – Furniture, Household Goods; #853 Robert Brooks – Boxes, Clothes. 4:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 1001 Lee Rd. Orlando, FL 32810 (407) 539-0527 #3097 Olive Manley- boxes, clothes, totes, crib, r fin i . 300 R i S ri Solutions LLC- boxes, shelves, cables, ladders, vacuum. #1117 Adebayo Fatila- chair, couch, dresser, mattress, table, computer, boxes, totes, coolers. #3111 Carline Charles- couch, dresser, mattress, table, bags, boxes, clothes, totes, lamps, vacuum, microwave. #4085 Kathlene Tronolone- bags, boxes, totes, toys. #1094 Monica Dennis- bed, chair, dresser, mattress, table computer, microwave, bags, boxes, clothes, pictures, totes, toys, kitchen aid, Christmas décor. #4055 Arthur Owens- armoire, bed, chair, table, dvd player, television, boxes, clothes, totes, sofa bed. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that on Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction at the storage facilities listed below, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the following locations: February 24th, 2017 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored therein by the following: 11:00a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 2631 E Semoran Blvd. Apopka, FL 32703 (407) 818-1681 #1206-Bruce Swyers-Household #1223-Jesse Maddox-Household #2272-Denese Dunston- Household #3078-Robert Black-Household #1414-Shirley Lipgens-Household #2005-Richard Wallace. 12:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 831 N Park Ave. Apopka, FL 32712 (407) 450- 0345 #1604 Carmen HamerHousehold Items, #2702 Vincent L Taylor- Household Goods, #2405 Lois Jenkins- Household Items, #1425 Terri Ann Propst- Household Goods, #2509 Michael StewartHousehold Goods, #2021 Luz Rivera- Household Goods, #2064 Sabrina Mizell- smallest storage bags clothes 4-5 boxes. 2:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 610 Rinehart Rd. Lake Mary, FL 32749 (321) 420-1686 0793- Sandra Lentz- boxes & bedroom suite, 0256-Tawanna Oatman-household goods, 0581- Rodney Morganmisc. items, 0227-Leonard Danielshousehold goods. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that on Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction at the storage facilities listed below, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the following locations: February 22nd, 2017 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored therein by the following: 12:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 11971 Lake Underhill Rd. Orlando, Fl. 32825 (407) 380-0046 #210 – Pressure King Inc. – tools, pressure washing equipment, tubs, misc. #558 – Ashley Pettway – household items. #608 – Thomas Litteer – furniture, boxes, household items. #1327 – Kendra Branker – household goods and furniture. #1611 – Candido Lopez – furniture, electronics. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that on Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the following locations: February 22nd , 2017 at the times and locations listed below. The personal goods stored therein by the following: 9:30a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 13125 S. John Young Pkwy. Orlando, Fl. 32837 (407) 240-0958 #122- Peter Bobrek- Boxes, bookcases, microwave, #140-Brian A Segura- Household Items, #648 -Karen AdamsHome Items, #314A- Alexis Cedeno - Household Items, #824-Jennifer Gomez- Home Items, #809-Tgifridays- Construction, #647- Michael Blake- Household Items, #631-Jessica Preu-Home Items. 11:00a.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility located at: 5753 Hoffner Avenue Orlando, FL 32822 (407) 212-5890 #5020-Garcia Andres A-Household goods, #1005- ONE GMA- Household goods, #3025-Sahroian Solina Rulona- Household goods, #1266-Lisa Faye Rognlie -Household goods, #1480-Charitin Centeno-Household goods, #4031 Mairim Castillo -Household goods, #5011- Marc Wilfred Chang Yen-Household goods, #4019- Alex Alberto BorreroHousehold goods, #1005- David Santiago- Household goods, #1260David Santiago-Household goods. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

Notice is hereby given that Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction, to satisfy the lien of the owner, personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at location indicated: 1751 Fortune Rd Kissimmee FL 34744, 407-414- 5303 & 02/21/17 @ 11:00am Claudia Henriquez 3069 household goods and furniture, Kristopher Dunaway 5014 household goods and furniture, Monica Moncayo 4115 Fruniture, Ayinde Sprewell Jr 1008 boxes, tables and misc, Jessy Lucumi 1069 tools, Jason Cintron 5081 household goods and furniture, Juan Gomez 2093 2 couches, dinning set, mattress, Manuel Sanchez Jr 3102 couch and bags, Robert Bracy III 3026 toys, furniture, miscellaneous items, Joseph Granger 5002 household goods, Wendy P Hunter 1003 boxes, mattresses, small table, clothes, Ismael Rivera 5036 trailer. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA DIVISION 03 CASE NO. D 5-2 4 IN THE INTEREST OF C.B., in r i , DOB 30 20 0. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF ARENTAL RIGHTS STATE OF FLORIDA T Angel Herra Hernandez, Address unknown. HEREAS i i n f r T r in i n f r n Ri n r n fi in i r r r in -r f r n i r n, f i i .Y r r n r f r J D ni . D n n 23 r M r , 20 , 2 30 . . J ni J i C n r, 2000 E Mi i n S r , Or n , F ri 3280 , f r TERMINATION OF ARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. Y r n n i ifi . FAILURE TO ERSONALLY A EAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF ARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS THESE CHILD REN . IF YOU FAIL TO A EAR ON THE DATE AND TIME S ECIFIED, YOU MIGHT LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A ARENT TO THE CHILD REN NAMED IN THE ETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. r n S i n 39.802 4 n 3.082 , F ri S , r r inf r f i ii f ri n i n i n ni , fin in S i n 3.032 3 , F ri S . ITNESS n n f i C r Or n , Or n C n , F ri i 2 fJ n r , 20 . CLER OF THE CIRCUIT COURT C r S B Si n D C r .T i n ni r f ir n T n , E ., F ri B r N . 98 540, C i r n’ L S r i , S f F ri , D r n f C i r n n F i i , 822 S. ir nR , S i 200, Or n , FL 328 , 40 5 3-2380 - T n , ir n. n f ii . .

Notice of Sale N – r r – Uni r C , , ri , , i n r n – 00 H, J B r rS In . J B rr - Mirr r, in , ir, ir , , r r , i n r n i – 023H, A r C M in - Sn n , , i in , i n r n i – 025H, Br n G nM -C r r, i in, fi in , f n, n r , i n r n i – 033H, T i D MCC ni -Br n -C ,r , , , i n r n i – 29, D i A -L n r, ir , ri , , r, fi in , i n r n i – 3 ,T S -F , r , i , , , i n r n i – , S RL - ir , i r , , , n, n i n r , i n r n i – 8, Ni L Ri r M n in r, , , fi in , i , i n r n i – 9 , Br n S Ri r r , , r r, r, in in – 229, J i C r Bi , r, i in , r , , i n r n i – 252, D ni B r i in , i , , rri r, ir , , i n r n i – 340, J n R R n-M r , ir , , i n r n i – 34 , S A C in - Bin , r , TV, , r r, i n r n i – 35 , Eri Ri r -T , , r i r, i , i n r n i - 455 Ample Storage, 6493 E Colonial Dr, Orlando FL 32807, r i n n r in r i ni .A i f r n r r r in r n r in f i n n 2/21/2017 at 2:00PM in r r n fr . T i 493 E C ni Dr, Or n FL 3280 .

Notice of Sale Orlando Business Center 2200 F r R . S M-0 , Or n , FL 3280 , 40 - 5 - 0098. T , Uni . D ni L C i – C r, n ir, r n n ,r i ir r , Fi in , Mi . I - Uni L08 S n M S ir – L n M r, , i n ,L f B r, S r r - Uni M39 S r in E C r– r – Ni n 300 , r r - Uni M50. Or n B in C n r, 2200 F r R . S M-0 , Or n , FL 3280 , r i n n f r in r i ni .A i f r n r r r in r n ri n f i n n 2/21/17 at 11:00 A.M. in r r n fr .T i 2200 F r R . S M-0 , Or n , FL 3280 . T i i J n r 2 , 20 .

NOTICE i r i n n r i n , F ri F ri , LLC, f C i Tr i , M i n , FL 32 5 , r n r ir n f F ri D r n fS , Di i i n f C r r i n ,i r r i in f in fi i i n Unum Florida I i in n f n r i n r i r “Unum Florida” i F ri D r n f S , Di i i n f C r r i n . D 2 20

Notice of Auction 99 Ni n fin r XE i VIN JN8AR05Y V 0 4 i i n n 2 20 20 9 00 . G r Bi n-Ai B r A ri L nn . 8550 O in r G r n R ., Or n , FL. 32835

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA DIVISION 03 S CASE NO. D 0 -343 IN THE INTEREST OF S.R.M. DOB 09 09 2002, M.R.M. DOB 08 0 2004, Min r C i r n. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF ARENTAL RIGHTS STATE OF FLORIDA T ERIC MCINTYRE, Address unknown. HEREAS i i n f r T r in i n f r n Ri n r n fi in i r r r in -r f r n i r n, f i i .Y r r n r f r J Ti R. S n 20 f F r r , 20 , 9 30 . . J ni J i C n r, 2000 E Mi i n S r , Or n , F ri 3280 , f r TERMINATION OF ARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. Y r n n i ifi . FAILURE TO ERSONALLY A EAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF ARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS THESE CHILD REN . IF YOU FAIL TO A EAR ON THE DATE AND TIME S ECIFIED, YOU MIGHT LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A ARENT TO THE CHILD REN NAMED IN THE ETITION ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. r n S i n 39.802 4 n 3.082 , F ri S , r r inf r f i ii f ri n i n i n ni , fin in S i n 3.032 3 , F ri S . ITNESS n n f i C r Or n , Or n C n , F ri i fJ n r , 20 . CLER OF THE CIRCUIT COURT C r S B Si n D C r .T i n ni r fS M D ffi , E ., F ri B r N . 5 020, C i r n’ L S r i , S f F ri , D r n f C i r n n F i i , 822 S. ir nR , S i 200, Or n , FL 328 , 40 5 3-2380 - T n , S . ffi f ii . .

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 15-CA- 11422-O VENTURES TRUST 20 3-I- H-R BY MCM CA ITAL ARTNERS, LLC ITS TRUSTEE, in iff, . RISTEN BENEDETTO ., D f n n . NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE i r i n r n Fin J n n r in n in in Cir i C r f Nin J i i Cir i , in n f r Or n C n , F ri , C N . 20 5-CA- 422-O in i VENTURES TRUST 20 3-I- H-R BY MCM CA ITAL ARTNERS, LLC ITS TRUSTEE, i in iff, n ROBERT BENEDETTO, RISTEN BENEDETTO, SUNTRUST BAN , THE RESERVE AT EDGEFIELD HOA, D f n n , n n n n ri i in in r , r , n r r in n f n n i i n, r in r i in n ri , i r in r in r r r in, i in Or n C n , F ri ri f LOT 3, RESERVE AT EDGEFIELD UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE LAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN LAT BOO 53, AGES THRU 8 INCLUSIVE, OF THE UBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA. T r i n n i i r n in r in n n r inin r , Or n C n C r f C r i ff r -r f r n r r i , i n i rf r 00 . . n f M r , 20 , . r n r .r f r . . An r n i in in r in r fr , if n , r n r r n r f f i n n fi i i in 0 f r . DATED i 3 f J n r , 20 . S J n R. H in , CAMERON H. . HITE, F ri B r N . 02 343, i i n. , JASON R. HA INS, F ri B r N . 925, in i n. , S Mi n, .A., 000 L i n ,S i 200, Or n , F ri 3280 , T n 40 539- 38, F i i 40 539-2 9, A rn f r in iff.

NOTICE OF SALE V i i i ,n rr n .S rr r ri r f n i .T r f i r n .B r f n n n i f 2003 Mi i i 4A3AC44G03E 0938 2004 FORD FAF 44 94F20 4 2003 S rn G8AV 4F 3 9 9 0 T i n 8 00 . . n F r r 2 , 20 , 988 R C n r R . Or n F ri 32428 New Generation Towing

NOTICE OF SALE V i i i ,n rr n .S rr r ri r f n i .T r f i r n .B r f n n n i f 2000 V n 3V CA2 C0YM4890 995 C r GBJG3 XSF 8 488 2002 H n HGCG5 4 2A05224 2003 i NDJD 33 3505248 T i n 8 00 . . nF r r , 20 , 988 R C n r R . Or n F ri 32428 New Generation Towing

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2016-CA-004677-O VENTURES TRUST 20 3-I-H-R BY MCM CA ITAL ARTNERS, LLC ITS TRUSTEE, in iff, . EDRO E. LECUSAY, SR. HILDA LECUSAY LUIS E. LECUSAY EDRO E. LECUSAY, JR. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DE ARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AVALON AR RO ERTY O NERS ASSOCIATION, INC. UN NO N TENANT UN NO N TENANT 2 r i n r n , i n , r i r , i n r , ir , i r r f i f nn , n r r n i in , r , n r r in f n n ,D f n n . NOTICE OF ACTION TO LUIS E. LECUSAY, 2324 i T rin B r , Or n , FL 32828. YOU ARE NOTIFIED n i n f r f in r r in Or n C n , F ri LOT 40 OF AVALON AR NORTH EST VILLAGE HASE , ACCORDING TO THE LAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN LAT BOO 2, AGE S 0 THROUGH 5, OF THE UBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA n fi in n r r ir r f r ri n f n , if n , i n JASON R. HA INS, ES UIRE, in iff’ rn , r i S i 200, 000 L i n , Or n , F ri 3280 n r f r ir 30 fr f fir i i n f i n i , n fi ri in i r f i r i r f r r i n in iff’ rn ri i r f r r i f i n r in f r r i f n in in r i i n. Tiff n M r R , Or n C n C r f Cir i C r . Li R Tr ,D C r . 20 .0 .2 0 20 29 - 05’00’ B A D C r , Ci i Di i i n, 425 N Or n A n , R 3 0, Or n , F ri 3280 .

NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. ERSONAL RO ERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV’S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS OTHER ERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE ILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHER ISE DIS OSED OF AT UBLIC SALES ON FEBRUARY 24, 2017 AT LOCATIONS TIMES INDICATED BELO , TO SATISFY O NERS LIEN FOR RENT FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE ITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.80 AND 83.80 . ALL ITEMS OR S ACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH S ACE URCHASED IS RE UIRED. 1051 BUENAVENTURA BLVD

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FEB. 8-14, 2017

– KISSIMMEE, FL 34743 – AT 9:30AM 0 20 - RUBIO, JAIME, 02 08 - FELICIANO, LUIS, 02 20 - JEAN LOUIS, ANDRE, 04 9 CINTRON, MILTON, 05 2 - DIA , JUAN, 052 5 - ROMAN, ALEJANDRO, 0530 - VALLADARES, RICARDO, 053 4 - GARCIA, YADIRA 1800 TEN POINT LN – ORLANDO, FL 32837 – AT 9:40 AM 0 5 - MIRANDA, DANIEL, 030 - LEIN, MICHAEL, 039 - LOS MILLOS INC, 045 - MONTES, DALYS, 3033 - BERNABE, MARILYN. 304 - ALICEA, GEENA, 004 - BOOR SANS, ELLY, 32 - VILLEGAS, TAINA 2783 N. JOHN YOUNG PKWY – KISSIMMEE, FL 34741 – AT 9:50 AM 0 4 - TORRES, RAYMOND, 3 - TOLEDO, ALEXIS, 2 2 GREGORY, ATRICIA, 59 - GILBERT, ANDA, 4 - CUADROS, ANTHONY, 20 3 - ADORNO, ANGEL, 240 - ILSON, BRIAN, 2 8 - O ELL, MARJORIE, 29 - VILLARROEL, EVELYN, 30 - HAC ER, ALTEREESE, 343 - DU UE, JULIAN, 409 - CUEVAS, MARILYN, 50 - VALES UE , MERALYS, 9 5 - SEONATH, RAVINDRANAUTH 1701 DYER BLVD, KISSIMMEE, FL 34741 – AT 10:00 AM: 0 05 - ESTRADA RIVERA, OMAR, 03 4 - CHACON, JAIME, 2003 - ITTERMAN, ENNETH, 2008 - ROCHESTER, SADE, 2022 - ENTON, MATTHE , 2042 - OTERO, JOSE, 20 - SOLER, JONATHAN, 2083 - CRU , CYNTHIA, 2 3 - GUILLERMO, JIMMY, 500 - VELASCO, MARCOS, 50 0 - HERNANDE VA UE , YOMARIE, 00 - DE LA CRU , NICOLAS, 0 - CRU , JOHN, 0 - EARCE, JESSICAH, 058 - HERNANDE , NICHOLAS, 080 - JOHNSON, BRIAN, 3BATTLE, AREN, 5 - YOUNG, MICHELLE, 5 - SERRANO, VERONICA, 82 - RAMOS, ROSA, 205 - LUDFORD, RINCESS, 2 - FRANCO, JOSE, 2 8 - RIVERA, JUAN, CUTLASS OLDSMOBILE, 908 VIN 44 0, 803 - EDMONDS, OLGA, 80 0 OLAN, ASHLEY, 80 8 - BARANDICA, JOELY, 80 2 - RUBIO, JAIME, 8080 - SHARRER, RENATE 951 S. JOHN YOUNG PKWY – KISSIMMEE, FL 34741 – AT 10:10 AM 0 3 - INC NEY, ALETHIA, 02 - ING, RONALD, 3 DAVILA, EFRAIN, 530 - GILSON, ETER, 539 - DEL VALLE, LU ILENIA, 0 - BRO N, ANNE, 4 - EUSTACE, JOHN, - SURICO, ROCCO, 80 - DEL VALLE, LU ILENIA, 20 4 BA ER, A I MA, 2 50 - ARTIN, ADA, 2 94A - ORONDI, ETER, 22 - FOSTER, JACOB, 2223 BLA E, TA ONYA, 24 3 - ABDUL MUNTA IM, SAYEED 227 SIMPSON RD - KISSIMMEE, FL 34744 –AT 10:20 AM: 0 9 - HERNANDE , AMELA, 002 - HENDERSON, TRICIA, 245 - CARDE, RAFAEL, 445 - RIOS, MICHAEL, 5 - RIVERA, BRYAN, 5 9 - HERNANDE , IVAN, 20 - BRO N, ALEJANDRO, 838 SOTO AYALA, ANGEL.

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Legal, Public Notices NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. PERSONAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV’S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS & OTHER PERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF AT PUBLIC SALES ON FEBRUARY 23, 2017 AT LOCATIONS & TIMES INDICATED BELOW, TO SATISFY OWNERS LIEN FOR RENT & FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. ALL ITEMS OR SPACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH SPACE PURCHASED IS REQUIRED. 4729 S Orange Blossom Trail, Orlando, FL, 32839—AT 9:30AM: 0102 - Acree, Shundra, 0106 Bynes, Glenn, 0117 - Latimer, Rashounthia, 0123 - Irizarry, Cindy, 0130 - Hunter, Paula, 0133 - Fort Jr., Ritchie, 0141 - Brown, Deborah, 0 42 - GRACIA, MAX, 0 49 Briette, Odwine, 0154 - Stennett, Sheena, 0156 - Sabourin, Marie, 0158 - Charles, Kevin, 0202 Dingui, Maria, 0206 - Buchana, Jo Ann, 0212 - Jenkins, Dennis, 0213 - Adams, Aneisha, 0218 - Baptiste, Paulette, 0228 - Ralston, Nicole, 0231 - Johnson, Jermaine, 0238 Rios, Gladys, 0242 - Thompson I I, Keith, 0248 - Anderson, Peggy, 0311 - Ousley, Baretta, 0318 Browdy, Marquis, 0327 - Anderson, A r , 0349 - Fr r, C ri r, 0351 - Martinez, Migdalia, 0353 Naylor, John, 0414 - White, Estella, 0422 - Abrams, Cydney, 0433 West, William, 0518 - Farias Sosa, Y n , 0529 - E i , T r , 0 05 - Joseph, Dieunel, 0612 - Jean, Prosper, 0621 - Sheppard, Darryl, 0622 - Stodtko, Katherine, 0623 Hanshaw, Ezmone, 0624 - Weeks, Tylishia, 0627 - Acevedo, Martin, 0 0 -C r n, An r , 0 9 Rivera, Ivette, 0722 - Oleaga, Fior, 0806 - Longley, Chelsia, 0820 Pherai, Dian, 0821 - Allen, Jasmine, 0824 - Karshner, Beverly, 0835 Alicea, Moses, 0844 - Leyva-Leon, Fernando, 0847 - Strouse, Ashley, 0903 - J n, S n n , 090 M fi , D i , 09 02 - O n , i , 09 08 - D n n, , 09 09 i , E n , 09 25 - D i , J i , 0923 - J n n, C , 0932 - G r n r, D n , 0940 - i i , E i , 0955 - B r, C r i , 0983 - E , L nni , 0989 - Butler, Johnny, 1008 - Yarber, Kelly, 1012 - Lee, Bryant, 1015 Grimsley, Loise, 1024 - Johnson, Jaliesa, 1055 - Willis, Edward, 1057 r , Tr i , 059 - Y nn i, Nicole, 1064 - Burke, Kaishma, 1086 - Smith, Athena, 1104 T , Si n, - Griffin, Frank, 1116 - Mcneil, Queenesther, 1127 - Truss, Gwendolyn, 1128 - D nni Jr., J n, 29 - Br n, Suddaney, 1130 - Greggs, Joshua, 1133 - Blake, Jasmine, 1147 Cudjoe, Richard, 1160 - Alberhasky, Danmarie, 1161 - Caldwell, John-

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nie, 1167 - Briskey, Bradley, 1173 - Pimental, Miguel, 1207 - Almonte, Allendy, 1208 - Deas, Angel, 1227 M in , L i , 239 - S , R in, 1277 - Donaldson, Bacari, 1318 - Brown, Jenyne, 1326 - Miranda, Rene, 1343 - james, shaquana, 1362 - Brevard, Wakemah. 1365 -S n, Fi i , 390 - An , Rafael. 235 E Oak Ridge Road, Orlando, FL, 32809 AT 10:30AM- A111 Ellis, Hannah, A127 - Mercado, Jose, A144 - Bryan, Pearl, A146 Roman, Edelmiro, B205 - Calderon, Jose, B210 - Martinez, Erica, B223 - Arroyo, Brandaly, B237 , f rn n , B239 - i liams, Jahliese, B247 - Hughey Jr., Neil, C308 - Castillo, Sonia, C323 - Bennett, Anqunette, D403 - Si n, J n , D409 - Ri r , Jennie, D418 - Winn, Jaleesa, E506 - Regis, Felix, E511 - Blazier, Kandi, E515 - Johnson, Jessica, E529 - H n, C n , E54 Esquilin, Diana, F603 - Vargas, Pedro, F630 - Echevarria, Sally, F636 - Marcelin, Immaculee, G711 - Diaz, Randy, G726 - Aggar, Mary, H804 - Camacho, Lewis, H806 Burnes Bowles, Kimberly, H812 - Robinson, Mecell,H818 - Lazo Zuniga, Jorge, H820 - Lee, Cynthia, I90 - B , R , I90 - Vi r , D r n, I909 - M ,M n, I924 - Lalanne, Vedette, J010 - Hilario, Elvin, J040 - Luna, Iris, K103 Santos Rodriguez, Arcadio, K108 Destin, Marc, K110 - Dorsey, Errick, K111 - Rigg, Taj, K114 - Ortega, Alberto, K120 - Smith, Labrina, K122 - Butler, Thomas, K125 - Reynes, Elsie, L201 - Lucas, Miguel, L209 - O n, R n , L22 - S , William, M303 - Ramos, Yajaira, M317 - Doggett, Brenda, N401 Coleman, Brittany, N405 - Joseph, Jeremy, N412 - Israel, Jean, N418 - barnes, john, O511 - Salgado, Ni , 009 - H n r n, Mi , P014 - Roman, Jeffrey. 1801 W Oakridge Rd Orlando, FL 32809 AT- 11:30AM B025 - Canderi , M n n , B039 - S n n, Shamica, B041 - Oliver, Barbara, C004 - Allen Walker, Joseph, C015 - R ri , R n , C0 9 - R driguez, Edward, C036 - Joseph, Jolaine, C037 - Divra, Anly, C040 Thomas, Natiska, C048 - Greenwood, Dennis, D016 - Sparrow, stephen, D018 - Lightbourne Marrero, Shantell, D025 - Jean-Louis, i , D028 - B , rni , D049 - Jacques, Scardy, D058 - Romero, Dalia, D061 - Shuler, Tony, D064 - G r in , i i , D0 9 - N , Christopher, E023 - Pierre, Marida, E031 - Rodriguez, Kiara, E033 Wilson, April, E045 - Vega, Carlos, F005 - R ,R , F009 - Correa, Loida, F021 - Greater Florida Title Co. inc., F036 - Lemon, Adrianna, G004 - Matticks, Jordan, G025 - ABDUSH, YOSI, G037 Roques, Gaudy, G043 - De Melo Faria, Sandro, H002 - Louissaint, M ri , H0 9 - J n , S r n, H025 - Washington, Raniskia, H027 - Ward, Christopher, J005 Patterson, Sidney, J035 - Adam, Danny, J038 - Anthony, Brando, J040 - Radiano, Kimberly, J048 MARTINEZ, JUAN, J072 - Odell, Monty E, J073 - King, Sierra, J080 , T fi , J082 - M , Diana, J083 - Rodriguez, Bernadette,

ORLANDO WEEKLY ● FEB. 8-14, 2017

J088 - FOSTER, ATHY, J092 -F r , J , J09 - ff n, eugene, J100 - Hare, Amy, J116 - kanarick, yvette, J118 - Danza, Michelle, J124 - Best, Ernest, J131 - Bryant, William, J133 - Berno, Melissa, J141 - Davy, Kenton, J152 - Richardson, Cheva, J158 - Weidman, Tammi, J160 - Rivera, Sonia, J167 - Asomaning, Felicia, K021 Spurling, Domonique, K025 - Cobb, Breandra,K036 - Ellis, Jadae, K053 - Wilson, Victor, K057 - Hodgson, J n, 059 - O i r , Li , K075 - Garay, Theresa, K080 Prophete, Sahembe, K083 - Pierre Fi , Di ri , 092 - M r in , C r n, 093 - G , Si n , 095 - H r r , i i , 08 - r ri , r, 09 - D n , Michelle, P006 - Fils Aime, Kepler. 1313 45th Street, Orlando, FL 32839-AT 12:30PM: A105 - Fairley, Arantes, A110 - Williams, Lalita, A113 - Claire, Bernadine, A117 - Stanley, Lawanda, A137 - Do Vale, Christopher, B205 - Simon, Kyle, B212 - Marrero, Misael, B228 - Davis, Anita, B230 - Monroe, Cy, B260 - Johnson, Velshoef, B281 - Mcknight, James, C307 Rene, Nicole, C308 - Campbell, G ri , C309 - S , r, C3 4 - Blocker, Craig, C318 - Fountain, Diego, C328 - Pierre, Emmanuael, C332 - Daise, Marvin, C333 Jordan, Jennay, C334 - Hammond, Ann, C338 - Ruemmeley, Elizabeth, C342 - Si n, B ri i . D409 Woodson, Lesine, D421 - Hair, Jennifer, D426 - Smalarz, Laura, D432 - Uribe, Viviana, D484 - Kidd, Carmen, E503 - Tape, Latarsha, E508 - ri , A , E533 - r ficio Bank, E581 - Beckford, Marion, F 20 - r fi i B n , F 30 - Sin, r n In ri , F 3 - r fi i Bank, F640 - Brown, Randy, F642 - Moore, Norika. G710 - Fraser, Christopher. H822 - Perez, Juan, H846 - Hamilton, Terrence, H848 - B rn r , Y , J90 - H n r , Ni , J908 - O i , M ri , J9 5 - r , M in . NOTICE OF SALE PS ORANGECO, INC. PERSONAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF COUCHES, BEDS, TV’S, CLOTHES, BOXES OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS & OTHER PERSONAL ITEMS USED IN THE HOME, OFFICE OR GARAGE WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF AT PUBLIC SALES ON FEBRUARY 24, 2017 AT LOCATIONS & TIMES INDICATED BELOW, TO SATISFY OWNERS LIEN FOR RENT & FEES DUE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUES, SELF STORAGE ACT, SECTIONS 83.806 AND 83.807. ALL ITEMS OR SPACES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE. ORIGINAL RESALE CERTIFICATE FOR EACH SPACE PURCHASED IS REQUIRED. 8149 Aircenter Court, Orlando, FL 32809-7414 AT- 9:30AM- 1003 - Sabia, Allison, 1012 - Huertas, Elizabeth, 1018 - Segui, Angel L., 1115 - Passalacqua, Mirtha, 1128 - Parker, Dora, 1175 - Heslin, Charlotte, 1218 - Rivera, Jose, 2015 - Bowden, Thomas, 2032 - Rinaldi, Ronald, 2064 - Williams, Barnett,

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2106 - Torres, Geomares, 2107 J n in , E n, 2 9 - H i , Christopher, 2136 - heifetz, avee, 2138 - Mitchell, Trayjon, 2168 CITY OF BELLE ISLE CHARTER SCHOOLS INC. 2 90 - R i, Rick, 2202 - HEENY, WYZEENA, 2206 - Vargas, Olga, 2207 Alsaiari, Omar, 2212 - Mccarthy, Danelle, 2216 - Mackey, Gregory, 3010 - Johnson, Donna Lea, 3055 Black, Bhrett, 3058 - Watkins, Timothy, 3073 - IGLESIA PENTECOSTAL EL CAMINO, 4043 - Hagness, Sheri, 4044 - Restaurant, Chuys, 4045 - Reece, Thomas, 4047 Teixeira, Marcos, 6016 - Rivera Ortiz, Shelly, 6106 - cardona, paul, 6152 - Taylor, Christopher, 7204 Ninos Professional Painting LLC. 4801 S Semoran Blvd, Orlando, FL, 32822-2316 AT- 10:30AM0115 - Vendlands-Figueroa, Patricia, 0116 - Greene, Koady, 0123 - Santiago, Gloribeth, 0126 Sanchez, Pedro, 0150 - Larribeau, Annelle, 0151 - CLEVELAND, MELANIE, 0155 - Anglero, Hamilton, 0180 - Stevens Jr., James S., 0 92 - V , M ri , 0202 - Y n , Olando, 0215 - Biggs, Keith, 0216 - sanchez, felix, 0246 - Johnson, Denise, 0253 - Acevedo, Luis, 0256 - Acosta, Laura, 0260 - Kinard, Alyson, 0265 - Marsh, Glendell, 029 - S in , Bri n, 0292 - G r in , William, 1004 - Wild, John, 1014 - Scott, Shannon, 1025 - Virginia, Anna, 3021 - Weller, William, 3026 - Winkle, Tracey, 3067 - Batista, Evelyn, 3074 - Kuhn, Donna, 4026 - Hernandez, Jorge, 4030 - Starks, An , 500 - R , Ni , 0 9 - Turpin, Shannone, 7007 - Antonun, Bethel, 7008 - Ewen, Monica, 7022 - Aquino Perez, Reynaldo, 7056 - Dela Fuente, Nancy, 7060 - Walker, Benjamin, 7064 - Garcia, i , 09 - R n, C r , 05 - Roach, Tony, 7123 - Cusiccanqui, Cammie, 7127 - Torres, Domingo, 7137 - Gutierrez, Abel, 7146 O n ,J , 49 - R ri , Diana, 7150 - Matos, Kinberly, 8005 - Henry, Ruth, 8032 - Torres, Jerome, 8038 - Vegerano, Dannie, 8094 - R , Y ni , 8095 - R jas, Rafael, 8123 - Sanchez, Felix, 8138 - lhoest, tracy, 8144 - Wise, J in, 8 50 - O i r, M ri n, 8 9 - Lund, Anthony. 2275 S Semoran Blvd, Orlando, FL, 32822-2703 AT 11:30AMA126 - Lewis, Chanece, A130 - Wilcox, Kimberly, B105 - Viering, Christine, B121 - Belcher, Grant, B124 - Rogers, Christopher, B130 - Negron, George, B140 - Bronson, Demitrius, B145 - Mole, Frances, B162 - Maldonado, Yolanda, B163 - Perez, Joel, B164 - king, rosalind, B172 - MUNIZ, STEPHANIE, B 93 - J r i , , B 99 - V , Yahaira, B201 - Flanagan, Christy, B218 - cecilio Reyes, Josephine, B228 - Grant, Roger, C106 - Rori , Or n , C 39 - B in , Justin, C148 - HILL, DOUGLAS, C152 - Robinson, Marquilla, C153 - Ranson, Clark, C156 - Chviek, Tanda, C181 - Jackson, Harry, C 8 - Ri r , E ni ,C 95C -S n ,R r , C 95D M r in , Tri i , C 95I - C r , S n , C 99D - M n , L , C 99G - B , Ei , C208 - Shomefun, George, C211E r, Nifi , 000 - Mi r, Kim. 2525 E Michigan St , Orlando

, FL, 32806-5039 AT 12:30PM 1007 - Hyche, Myers, 2008 - Lowe, David, 2021 - Maldonado, Marisol, 2035 - McNash, Meg, 4011 - Smith, Benjamin, 4033 - Zeek, Jason, 5003 - Songao, Kenneth, 5053 Hinson, Christina, 5057 - Molina, Lidia, 5218 - Warren, Nils, 5321 - Youtsey, Adam, 5322 - Rountree, J , 533 - B rr , J , 2 9 - Bohanna, Gwen, 6306 - Hayman, Quinn, 6315 - Myers, Josephine, 6411 - Zabukovec, Constance, 6422 - wilding, nicole, 6501 Pinkney, Prince, 6502 - BJanes, Beth, 6528 - Kolson, Gary, 6551 - Meyers, Mark, 6615 - Modeste, Julian, 6643 - Ryder, Laurie, 6650 - Holzer, Brandon, 6655 - Gay, David. 903 S Semoran Blvd, Orlando, FL, 32807-3004 AT 1:30PM - A004 - Rivera, Miguel, B002 - Wiley, John, B005 - Rosello, Arturo, B023 - Faraldo, Jessica, B043 - Boutot, Amanda, B047 - Padilla, Cary, C011 - Ramirez, Francis Milena, C015 - TEJADA, MARITZA, C022 - Munoz Centeno, Manuel, C027 - Hardy Jr, Boice, C054 - L i , , C059 - r , Secundino, C068 - Rivera, Lorena, C071 - Montero, Gabriel, C077 - Sims, Joseph, D002 - Romero, ri in ,D0 9 - N , Cri r, D027 - Conway, Leon, D038 Orange County Democratic Exec. Cte., D085 - De Leon, Darlene, D090 - T rr , A n r, D098 Grillo, Gabriel, D101 - Nesbitt, Sharon, D108 - Gonzalez, Hector, D120 - Newlan, Cynthia, D182 - Chaisson, Michelle, D188 - Wilkerson, Jamall, D203 - Benjamin, Danny, D207 - Maldonado, Jessica, D221 Figueroa, Vladimir, D227 - Spruell, Shelley, D230 - Zapata, Osman, D232 - hassert, chris, E007 - Hill, Kimaron, E026 - Resilard, Michelle, E034 - Sanchez Jr, Ricardo, E042 AGOSTO, LILLIAN, E062 - Cancel, i , E0 5 - Mi , J n, E0 9 Correa, Estefani, E080 - Rodriguez, J n, E093 - R , L i , E094 - Hagy, Susan. Notice of Public Sale: Pursuant to F.S. 713.78 on February 24, 2017 at 9:00 am, Riker’s Roadside Services, LLC, 630 E Landstreet Rd, Orlando, FL 32824, will sell the following vehicles and/ or vessels. Seller reserves the right to bid. Sold as is, no warranty. Seller guarantees no title, terms cash. Seller reserves the right to refuse any or all bids; B3LC5 B 9N55 589 2009 DODGE B4G 4439 B258 54 2001 DODGE ; 1FMYU02133KB81368 2003 FORD ; 1FMYU03184DA17246 2004 FORD ; 1FTBR10C0JUB41045 988 FORD FTEX2 XVNC95884 99 FORD G ND52M9VY 38452 99 CHEVROLET G 5 B88F2908 2008 CHEVROLET ; G2JB 245X 50329 999 ONTIAC G4AG85M T 409308 99 BUIC 1GNDT13S422468162 2002 CHEVROLET ;

1HGCD5638TA072127 99 HONDA HGCG225 YA029992 2000 HONDA ; J4FT 8S2 L2 4893 998 JEE J4FT88S8NL 29545 992 JEE JCNJ 8N5DT045849 983 JEE NXBR 2E9 429995 2001 TOYOTA ; NXBU4EE9A 349804 2010 TOYOTA ; 2D4RN5D XAR2 2010 DODGE ; 2T BU4EEXDC939435 2013 TOYOTA ; 3FAH 0 38R 9 590 2008 FORD ; 3V SB 9M 2M 5 0 2002 VOLKSWAGEN ; 4N2 N T 2D8 3 9 2002 NISSAN ; 4NUES16P446702002 2004 ISUZU ; JA3AU2 U 8U00089 2008 MITSUBISHI ; JF1SG65616H712716 2006 SUB ; JM1BJ2220Y0276013 2000 MAZDA ; JM FE 3X40 304 9 2004 MAZDA ; JN1DA31D12T204330 2002 NISSAN ; JNKCV54E13M207865 2003 INFINITI ; JNRAR0 Y2X 0 8 999 INFINITI JNRAR0 Y2X 0 8 999 INFINITI JTHBA30G2 5 49 0 200 LEXUS MHCT4AEXDU3 0 0 2013 HYUNDAI ; MHFC4 F4 A2 089 2007 HYUNDAI ; NAFU4A29C555208 2012 KIA ; NAFX4A 8E5093955 2014 KIA ; SALME 4 4A 359 2004 LAND ROVER ; WBADN63411GM71326 2001 BMW ; DBCA39E A44 85 989 MERCEDES-BEN 998 J , Vin J4FT 8S2 L2 4893 2003 Infini , Vin#JNKCV54E13M207865; 992 J , Vin J4FT88S8NL 29545 2009 D , Vin B3LC5 B 9N55 589 99 C r , Vin G ND52M9VY 38452 2007 Hyundai, Vin MHFC4 F4 A2 089 2003 Ford, Vin#1FMYU02133KB81368; 999 n i , Vin G2JB 245X 50329 2013 Hyundai, Vin MHCT4AEXDU3 0 0 983 J , Vin IJCNJ 8N5DT045849 2008 Ford, Vin 3FAH 0 38R 9 590 988 F r , Vin#1FTBR10C0JUB41045; 2002 Chevrolet, Vin#1GNDT13S422468162; 2001 Dodge, Vin B4G 4439 B258 54 2006 Lexus, Vin JTHBA30G2 5 49 0 2001 BMW, Vin#WBADN63411GM71326;


20 2 IA, Vin NAFU4A29C555208 200 S r , Vin JF SG 5 H 2 989 M r , Vin DBCA39E A44 8 2002 V n, Vin 3V SB 9M 2M 5 0 1997 Ford, Vin FTEX2 XVNC95884 2000 Honda, Vin HGCG225 YA029992 2004 I , Vin 4NUES 44 02002 1996 Honda, Vin HGCD5 38TA0 2 2 2004 F r , Vin FMYU03 84DA 24 2008 Mi i i, Vin JA3AU2 U 8U00089 200 T , Vin NXBR 2E9 429995 20 0 D , Vin 2D4RN5D XAR2 2002 Ni n, Vin JN DA3 D 2T204330 2004 M , Vin JM FE 3X40 304 9 2000 M , Vin JMLBJ2220402 0 3 99 B i , Vin G4AG85M T 409308 2002 Ni n, Vin 4N2 N T 2D8 3 9 999 Infini i, Vin JNRAR0 Y2X 0 8 20 0 T , Vin NXBU4EE9A 349804.

NOTICE i r i n n r i n , CHANCE 2 DANCE, INC., f 820 . C rin Cr Cir, L M r FL 32 4 C n f S in , r n r ir n f F ri D r n fS , Di i i n f C r r i n , i r r i in f in fi i i n Chance 2 Dance Foundation I i in n f n r i n r i r “Chance 2 Dance Foundation” i F ri D r n f S , Di i i n f C r r i n . D 3 20

NOTICE OF SALE V i i i ,n rr n .S rr r ri r f n i .T r f i r n .B r f n n n i f 2004 H n HGEM22 54L03852 T i n 8 00 . . n F r r 25, 20 , 988 R C n r R . Or n F ri 32428 New Generation Towing

NOTICE OF SALE V i i i ,n rr n .S rr r ri r f n i .T r f i r n .B r f n n n i f 99 H n i MHJ 24M2TU03894 T i n 8 00 . . n F r r 2 , 20 , 988 R C n r R . Or n F ri 32428 New Generation Towing

NOTICE i r i n n r i n , F ri F ri , LLC, f C i Tr i , M i n , FL 32 5 , r n r ir n f F ri D r n fS , Di i i n f C r r i n ,i r r i in f in fi i i n Unum Florida I i in n f n r i n r i r “Unum Florida” i F ri D r n f S , Di i i n f C r r i n . D 2 20

NOTICE OF SALE V i i i ,n rr n .S rr r ri r f n i .T r f i r n .B r f n n n i f 2004 C G T548 4F 90 90 T i n 8 00 . . n F r r 20, 20 , 988 R C n r R . Or n F ri 32428 New Generation Towing

NOTICE i r i n n r i n , M r i A. Mi r, f 44 5 Vi D L B , in r G r n, FL 34 8 , r n r ir n f F ri D r n fS , Di i i n f C r r i n ,i r r i in f in fi i i n Three Palms Snack Shack I i in n f n r i n r i r “Three Palms Snack Shack” i F ri D r n f S , Di i i n f C r r i n . D 2

NOTICE OF SALE T f in i i i A i nf r i f lien pursuant to F.S. 713.78 on FEBRUARY 22ND, 2017 at 9:00 am at Dynamic Towing, 408 O C n H ., Or n , FL. 40 2 3-5880 2000 SAAB YS3DD 8H0Y 000083 2000 TOYT 4TANL42N9Y 882 99 TOYT JT4TN 2D8V0030830 200 INFI JN BV E8 M 0 84 NOTICE i r i n n r i n , M r i A. Mi r, f 44 5 Vi D L B , in r G r n, FL 34 8 , r n r ir n f F ri D r n fS , Di i i n f C r r i n ,i r r i in f in fi i i n Three Palms Snack Shack I i in n f n r i n r i r “Three Palms Snack Shack” i F ri D r n f S , Di i i n f C r r i n . D 2

NOTICE OF SALE V i i i ,n rr n .S rr r ri r f n i .T r f i r n .B r f n n n i f 2004 C G T548 4F 90 90 T i n 8 00 . . n F r r 20, 20 , 988 R C n r R . Or n F ri 32428 New Generation Towing

NOTICE OF SALE V i i i ,n rr n .S rr r ri r f n i .T r f i r n .B r f n n n i f 2004 H n HGEM22 54L03852 T i n 8 00 . . n F r r 25, 20 , 988 R C n r R . Or n F ri 32428 New Generation Towing

Sr Engr, Atomtn & Dvlpmt @ C S , In . Or n , FL F T. G i f n fr r f f r r n n n f r r . Anr r r r n r r r n n , r n , i n n in f r f r C Sf r fr . R M r’ r f r i n i in En , CS, IS, IT, M rr r in ff’ r T n S ff, Sf r D r, E-S r D r, A Cn n r r . E i B 5 r r r .E in D n n fr r C .N , S L, SOA , XML A i r ,J S ri , An r IIS, REST, LIN . E i n i f , r inin , r .S n r T r H ffn C , C , Tin n F , NJ 0 24. R f CV2-2017. EOE.

NOTICE OF SALE V i i i ,n rr n .S rr r ri r f n i .T r f i r n .B r f n n n i f 99 H n i MHJ 24M2TU03894 T i n 8 00 . . n F r r 2 , 20 , 988 R C n r R . Or n F ri 32428 New Generation Towing

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FEB. 8-14, 2017

ORLANDO WEEKLY

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Orlando Weekly February 08, 2017  
Orlando Weekly February 08, 2017