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Issue 69 | MARCH 2016

essence Issue 69 | MARCH 2016

‘Bearing’ all Adventurer Gordon Buchanan

Also inside this issue

WILD EAST India’s Nagaland state

KELLY SIMPKIN Jazz age meets Bladerunner

MINCING AROUND Julian Clary on tour

RISING STAR Car maker BAC

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contents Issue 69 | MARCH 2016

8 | Interview | GORDON BUCHANAN

The Scottish wildlife filmmaker recently won an award for BBC Television’s The Bear Family And Me. essence talks to him as he embarks on a nationwide twelve date tour.

16 | Travel | INDIA NAGALAND

Nagaland’s dazzling beauty is found right on the edge of the India–Myanmar border. Until recently, some 16 headhunting Naga tribes valiantly fought off any intruders. Today it’s a shadow of its once savage self.

8

Interview | GORDON BUCHANAN

NATURAL WORLD

ADVENTURER ON TOUR

22 | Gardening | HTA

Gordon Buchanan, Scottish wildlife filmmaker, recently won an award for BBC Television’s The Bear Family And Me and gained over two million viewers for his The Snow Wolf Family And Me shown on BBC2. After travelling the world, the married father-of-two is embarking on a nationwide twelve date tour: Lost Adventures. essence talked to him about his life and work.

As the greys and pastel shades of winter gradually yield to more colour, plant a rainbow to welcome in spring with Primulas and Polyanthus plants.

26 | Motoring | BAC

Cheshire carmaker, Briggs Automotive Company (BAC), was ‘one to watch’ in the 2015 Sunday Times’ Fast Track 100 list. Euan Johns discovers more about the rise and rise of a company flying the flag overseas.

Gordon Buchanan

8 essence-magazine.co.uk | MARCH 2016

34 | Fashion | KELLY SIMPKIN

Beauty | EPSOM SKIN CLINICS

Kelly Simpkin’s collection for spring/summer 2016 marks a turning point in her journey as a designer.

Bridal beauty tips

Brides to be: it is time to prepare. Whilst there may be a myriad of wedding decisions keeping everyone occupied, make sure you think about yourself! This month we are going to explore alternative beauty treatments that may not have been considered, says Naomi Diamond of Epsom Skin Clinics.

38 | Food | CRATES LOCAL PRODUCE

Helpful tips leading up to the big day: • Stay hydrated! Whilst undertaking exercise routines, attempting weight loss and to aid healthy skin, it is important to stay hydrated. We all know drinking water is good for us, but starving the skin of water can lead to lost muscle tone where it will not support weight loss. Also, invest in a dry body brush and use it every other day. Work in sweeping motions towards the lymph nodes to help with cellulite: the aim is to get the circulation flowing and stimulate hard fat. • Life is busy enough, but time becomes very precious leading up to a wedding. Set aside a few hours at least once a week to treat yourself. Purchase a nourishing cuticle oil to promote strong nail growth and healthy cuticles for those ‘up close’ wedding ring pictures. Phenomen Oil from Jessica has vitamin E, rice and jojoba oils to deeply moisturise and can also be used on dry elbows, knees or chapped lips. For dry skin or eczema sufferers, try various body lotions and potions, but remember a doctor can always prescribe something stronger to target stubborn areas.

Crates chooses current seasonal offerings, including purple broccoli, culinary seaweed, beef and gin, together with recipes to enjoy.

42 | Baking | JEN’S CUPCAKERY

Treat mum to a delicious carrot cake this Mother’s Day.

For the beautiful bride experiencing problematic and oily skin: Many people suffering from acne may be at the end of their tether having tried multiple treatments, products and medications, which some may find have helped improve the skin, but not necessarily targeted the route of the problem. AGNES is a revolutionary new treatment which carries out selective sebaceous gland destruction. There are thousands of sebaceous glands over the face and these help to keep skin lubricated with oil; in an acne-prone skin these glands are more active and therefore over produce oil leading to spots. Studies suggest most acne recurs from the same damaged sebaceous gland and this is where AGNES comes in. To treat the recurring spot, Epsom Skin Clinics use a radio frequency needle to coagulate and remove the gland resulting in less spots and less

44 | Artisan food | EAT SURREY

Shirlee Posner of Eat Surrey introduces Secretts of Milford, produce growers for star chefs and food retailers to the public.

48 | Legal | MUNDAYS

Judith Fitton, partner at Mundays LLP, discusses the legal rights of cohabitees, examining a recent case.

50 | Finance | PMW

46

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MARCH 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 9

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future scarring. The same principle can be applied to treating fat pads under the eyes and sagging skin/eye bags using a non-surgical approach. For the bride who wants to hide a tattoo: ‘Think before you ink’ is a sentence that can come back to haunt from time to time, but there is another option! Laser tattoo removal, although uncomfortable, could reduce and fade unwanted ink before the big day. Epsom Skin Clinics offer the R20 Technique which means clients can have up to four treatments in one day and we have many brides starting sooner rather than later. Alternatively, or combined with laser treatment, brides can use camouflage make-up. Ask your make-up artist about it and have a practice session before the big day. For those worried about fine lines, wrinkles, scars and stretch marks: A collagen boosting treatment can be used to treat aging skin or those with scars. EnerJet is a system which delivers immediate and long-lasting results. Pneumatic technology provides precise and controlled release of hyaluronic acid into the dermis which immediately makes the skin appear rejuvenated and hydrated with more volume. It can also be used to break down scar tissue and improve the appearance of stretch marks by increasing collagen. Complement this treatment with some good skincare products such as the Swisscode Genistein collection that increases collagen by 53% in 28 days. So all you brides to be out there, book a complimentary consultation with Epsom Skin Clinics at the earliest opportunity to ensure there is plenty of time to treat any concerns, have a flawless make-up ready and skin radiant. Let us take one thing off your mind.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: AMY GWATKIN

essence INFO Epsom Skin Clinics Website: www.epsomskinclinics.com Telephone: 01372 737280 (Epsom) or 020 8399 5996 (Surbiton)

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Simon Lewis, CEO at Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd, looks at the economic issues that need to be considered before the choice is made about whether to go it alone and leave the European Union or not.

54 | Parenting | THE MOTHER MAGAZINE Actress Camilla Rutherford explains how she manages to balance new technology and old-fashioned play with her young family of four.

58 | Leisure breaks | MONACO

Monaco is the second smallest country in the world after the Vatican City, and has the world’s highest GDP per capita. Rebecca Underwood finds out more.

62 | Comedy | JULIAN CLARY

He’s toured the world and remains one of the country’s most popular entertainers. Emma Cox talks to Julian about his current UK tour, The Joy of Mincing.

66 | Events | SURREY

Linda Seward’s detailed diary of the best of what’s on in theatre, music, exhibitions, arts and countryside over the month.

72 | Sport | ST ENODOC

Known as Surrey-on-Sea, Rock in Cornwall is home to one of England’s finest golf clubs, St Enodoc. essence discovers the club is an intrinsic part of the so-called ‘Rock life’.

58

Leisure breaks | MONACO Prince's Palace, Monaco PHOTO COPYRIGHT: JOHNYPAN | DREAMSTIME.COM

The glamorous Principality of Monaco Monaco, the second smallest country in the world after the Vatican City, covers only 200 hectares and is subdivided into the traditional districts of La Condamine, which includes the port, Monaco Ville, known as ‘The Rock’, Fontvielle and Monte Carlo. Situated on the French Riviera, overlooking the sparkling translucent waters of the Mediterranean, Monaco is a tax haven and has achieved the world’s highest GDP per capita, writes Rebecca Underwood.

M

onaco is known for the glamorous Grimaldi royal family, now headed by Prince Albert II. In 1956 the world was captivated when the elegant Hollywood film star Grace Kelly married the dashing Prince Rainier III and since then the family has remained firmly in the public eye. Grimaldi descendants have ruled Monaco since 1297 when The Prince’s Palace was returned to the Grimaldi family Francesco Grimaldi, disguised as a Franciscan monk, seized the fortress on the Rock of Monaco. in 1814 and restored by each In 1633, Honoré II, the first prince of Monaco, successor. Today, the state achieved independent sovereignty from Spain and in 1641 Louis XIII of France signed the Treaty of apartments are open to the Péronne, leading to the Grimaldi family’s continuous public from April to October rule, with the exception of two decades during the and include the striking Mirror French Revolution when the family were exiled and Gallery, used during state visits. the palace seized and used as a military hospital. The Prince’s Palace was returned to the Grimaldi family in 1814 and restored by each successor. Today, the state apartments are open to the public from April to October and include the striking Mirror Gallery, used during state visits. The Red Room is sumptuously furnished in the style of Louis XV and leads onto the York Room where King George III’s younger brother, Prince Edward Duke of York and Albany, died in 1787 as a result of illness during a sea voyage bound for Genoa. The Blue Room, one of the highlights of the tour, is used for official functions and features portraits of the Grimaldi family hanging on walls lined with blue silk brocade and illuminated by sparkling Venetian chandeliers suspended from an ornate ceiling. After the tour, be sure to take a leisurely stroll along the Place du Palais where visitors gather to admire the striking palace exterior, reflecting a mixture of medieval fortifications and Renaissance architecture. Mingle with the crowds and view the changing of the guard, which takes place every day just before noon. Descendants of the Grimaldi family, including Princess Grace and Prince Rainier III, are buried in Monaco’s Roman Catholic Cathedral of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception, a short walk away from the palace. Consecrated in 1875, the magnificent cathedral was erected on the site of the first parish church built in 1252. Monaco's Grand Prix PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MONACO PRESS CENTRE PHOTOS

58 essence-magazine.co.uk | MARCH 2016

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Monte Carlo, the administrative district of Monaco, is the place to be seen, and appeals to a host of international celebrities, royalty and prominent figures on the world stage, all keen to attend popular events such as the annual Grand Prix motor race, which began in 1929. It is said that the 3.2 kilometre Formula One circuit takes six weeks to erect and is the most challenging racing track due to its narrow tunnel, elevation changes and hairpin bends. Stages of the Monte Carlo Rally are also held in the principality and it is thought to be one of the most arduous rallying events attended by thousands of ardent fans. For a more tranquil experience, head for the Terrasses de Fontvieille The Royal Guard PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MONACO PRESS CENTRE PHOTOS and view the personal collection of vintage cars owned by the late Prince Rainier III. Highlights include the champion William Grover-Williams’ Bugatti Type 35, which won the first Monaco Grand Prix in 1929, and the Citroën DS3 WRC, driven by Sébastien Loeb, the champion of the 2013 Monte Carlo Rally. The collection also includes some of the most celebrated models from Rolls Royce, Jaguar, Mercedes and Maserati. Nature lovers will find a visit to Fontvieille Park and the Princess Grace Rose Garden of interest. The picturesque lake bordered by lush lawns, colourful flower beds, swaying palms and olive trees is the ideal spot for a breather. The garden features a meandering footpath with >>>

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essence 69

COVER: Scallop bustier gown by Kelly Simpkin

essence team

Acting Editor: Andrew Guilor Contributing Editor: Louise Alexander-O’Loughlin Publishing Manager: Rebecca Peters Production Manager: Linda Seward Designer: Sharon Smith Senior Designer: Jason Mayes telephone: 01932 988677 email: editor@essence-magazine.co.uk Advertising Manager: Andrew Peters telephone: 07980 956488 email: marketing@essence-magazine.co.uk Advertising Sales: telephone: 01932 988677 email: marketing@essence-magazine.co.uk Advertising Sales Executive: Nadine Schioldan email: nadine@essence-magazine.co.uk Contributors: Emma Cox, Louise Alexander O’Loughlin, Shirlee Posner, Helen Heady, Subhasish Chakraborty, Rebecca Underwood, Judith Fitton, Simon Lewis, PJ Aldred, Jennifer Sutton, Naomi Diamond, Euan Johns, Camilla Rutherford, Linda Seward.

essence magazine

Maple Publishing Limited, the publishers, authors and printers cannot accept liability for errors or omissions. Any artwork will be at owner’s risk. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the copyright holder and publisher, application for which should be made in writing to the publisher. The opinions expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher.

essence is posted by Royal Mail to key addresses in Cobham, Oxshott, Esher, Weybridge, Guildford and outlying areas. Properties in all the major private estates, including St George’s Hill, the Crown Estate and Wentworth Estate, receive the magazine 10 times per year. essence is also distributed to selected estate agents and is

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On tour To some of us on the essence team, this time of year always heralded the annual rugby tour to some far-flung extreme of the British Isles, and was always accompanied by a mixture of trepidation and anticipation. Trepidation on two fronts: the first was not knowing the level of opposition to be faced, and the second was wondering if the reserves of stamina required to last the late nights and string of consecutive games would be enough. Tours, though, are terrific fun and seem to be a modern trend, not just for bands or entertainers, but also for a host of others from all walks of life. In this issue, essence chats to wildlife photographer Gordon Buchanan and comedian Julian Clary, both currently touring the country and appearing locally over the coming weeks. In addition, we travel to India’s wild east to experience native culture, and discover a rising star in the sublime shape of Cheshire-based BAC’s Mono supercar. In the garden, The Horticultural Trades Association has recommendations for seasonal colour, and Dunsborough Park prepares to open its doors for an explosion of blooms that is the annual Tulip Festival. Female fashion is represented by Kelly Simpkin, whose designs offer something simple and stunningly different, followed by Richard James’ menswear as the company serves up its spring summer collection. In addition, mother of four and actress Camilla Rutherford explains her battle to balance technology and traditional play with her children. As usual, essence has health, legal and finance advice, together with the best of a variety of activities highlighting food, events and competitions to win Thriller tickets and a stylish Silent Pool gin gift set. The essence team

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Interview_Layout 1 01/03/2016 17:01 Page 1

NATURAL WORLD

ADVENTURER ON TOUR Gordon Buchanan, Scottish wildlife filmmaker, recently won an award for BBC Television’s The Bear Family And Me and gained over two million viewers for his The Snow Wolf Family And Me shown on BBC2. After travelling the world, the married father-of-two is embarking on a nationwide twelve date tour: Lost Adventures. essence talked to him about his life and work.

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Interview | GORDON BUCHANAN

Gordon Buchanan

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Q What do you think influenced your choice of career? A Definitely growing up on the Isle of Mull was a big influence – for two quite opposite reasons. Mull offered freedom and a sense of wilderness, but being an island it was claustrophobic and limited in what it had to offer to someone with an adventurous spirit. Q The late Nick Gordon, wildlife filmmaker, gave you your first break; did you aspire to him when you were an early cameraman/ presenter? And why? A Nick was the first ever person I had ever met who had a truly enviable job, was ambitious, simply loved doing what he did and strived to be the best at it. Q What has been the highest point of your career so far? A For a job that is continually so rewarding, it is actually quite hard to pick one high point. Maybe getting through to the finals of the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival for cinematography for Tigers of the Emerald Forest. Didn’t win, so that high point was short lived. Q Eagle Island was a very successful film: is it your favourite? A In some ways it was great to be back on Mull roaming around as I did when I was a boy, but to be honest, it was a difficult one to make. Our daughter was born that year and I was working from home for the first time. To be a successful filmmaker you need 100% commitment, to be a successful father you need 100% commitment. It was a year I felt very torn. Q What’s the most important thing you’ve learnt during your time as a cameraman and presenter, so far? A Work hard, follow your nose, trust your instincts and good things will come in life and in the wild.

10 essence-magazine.co.uk | MARCH 2016

“I think a lot of people think my job is inherently dangerous, but you build up a knowledge of the animals. Big cats are quite often scaredy cats themselves and will run away.” GORDON BUCHANAN


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Interview | GORDON BUCHANAN

Q If you had to be either a presenter or cameraman, which would it be? And why? A Cameraman! (but not just a wildlife cameraman). I think you can convey so much in filmmaking: you can tell a million different stories and provoke every emotion in a single film. There is so much art in making a great film, and I love every part of it. Presenting is just trying to be all the nice bits of you without swearing. Q If you hadn’t been a wildlife cameraman and presenter, what you would you have done? A I wanted to be a bush pilot, but would’ve probably been a fisherman or a diver if I hadn’t left Mull. An early career questionnaire revealed that I’d have made a good nanny! Q Have you found a balance between working and being with your young family? A Nope! But I’m getting there. I see that as my next goal in life. Q Have you ever missed an amazing filming opportunity? Perhaps due to being out of battery or tape or camera nonavailability? A I’ve seen amazing things happen unexpectedly, too fast to react to, but that comes with the territory, so I don’t beat myself up. I messed up pretty enormously one time. Can’t bear to put it in print; I’ll only say it was one of those once in a lifetime shots that I was running the camera on – or at least I thought I was running the camera on. I was so excited I hit the button twice so the camera wasn’t recording… Q What’s your record for the longest you have waited for an animal to turn up? A Did a couple of 48(plus) hour stints without sleep with finger on the button in Svalbard in the Arctic this summer waiting for Barnacle Geese to jump off their nesting cliff with their young, and for Arctic Foxes to show up to predate on them. It was mid summer so it is perpetual daylight. Great for filming, bad for sleeping. Q What’s been the strangest thing a fan has sent you? A A severed head…only kidding. Some guy once sent me a picture of me with his sister and a cup of tea she had made me… To be honest, I’ve never been sent anything other than letters. I have had the exact same handwritten letter sent to me three times over the last two years asking for a photo as if it were the first time she had contacted me. I had sent her one after the first! Q What are your hobbies and interests? A My work in one way or another really does incorporate all my hobbies and interests. So other than that, I like music, clothes, good food and drink, I’m addicted to good coffee and I simply love ‘people watching’ possibly as much as I enjoy watching wildlife. We are all animals after all. Q What’s your favourite part of the UK? And the world? A In the UK, the highlands of Scotland around Aviemore has a >>>

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special magic; it has some of the most grand and wild looking pine forest in the country. In particular, Abernethy Forest and the area around Loch Garten. Favourite part of the world? Alaska. It is the place most like the highlands of Scotland! Only bigger scenery, bigger animals and harsher weather. After many years of driving that road back to Mull, I never tire of the drive over Rannoch Moor and through Glencoe. Q If you were an animal, which would it be? A Depends on my mood: – a happy dog, stupid but loved! – a peregrine, nice to fly and hunt like that. – a brown bear in Alaska, great food, great scenery. Q What has been your closest encounter with a wild animal? A I’ve been chased by bears, elephants, tigers and many others, but one of the first and most memorable encounters was in Sierra Leone when I was 17, driving back to camp, when seven giant fruit bats escaped from a holding container in the back of the car. They were huge and they flapped and nipped me all the way back to camp. Memorable only really because at the time I was slightly terrified of bats! Q What’s your favourite animal to film? A A hunting leopard takes some beating, but any bird in flight is great fun and a challenge to film. Q What’s your favourite wildlife programme? A Possibly a film called Hokkaido – Garden Of The Gods made by Patrick Morris at the BBC Natural History Unit. I watched it a long time ago, it was a very emotional film. I don’t want to see it again in case it disappoints me all this time later. I love the memory, so don’t need to see it again. The early Alan Root films I loved at the time in my early teens. It’s what made me want to be a wildlife cameraman. I think the Expedition series would do the same for me nowadays if I were a young fella! Q What’s your proudest sequence of filmmaking? A I think I am a better filmmaker each year and am learning all the time. Some stuff I was really proud of a few years back, I look at now and think it is really badly shot or quite rubbish. So I would have to say something recent. I am most proud of the Russian Tiger film I made back in January – I think that it’s the best film I have made so far – by far! Sequence wise, I am really looking forward to seeing the Barnacle Geese from this summer too. We worked really hard to get it and I’m proud of that regardless of how it looks. Q Which do you prefer? Filming or presenting? A Depends on my mood, but both can be great fun and terribly hard work. I can film without too much mental effort – so with presenting I sometimes don’t like having to hide the fact that I am an absolute idiot.

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“It doesn’t matter if it’s a one-minute news report or a one-hour wildlife documentary, the principles of telling a story in the time are the same.”

Interview | GORDON BUCHANAN

Q Wildlife or people? A I love the simplicity of animals and the complexity of people.

NICK GORDON, WILDLIFE FILMMAKER

Q Birds or mammals? A I would have said mammals every time a year or so ago, but I am really ‘getting’ and loving birds for the first time ever! Q Spring or autumn? A I loved this last autumn as my life this year has mirrored the seasons, so I’m looking forward to a dormant winter. I do love the vitality of spring. Q Analogue film or digital tape? A Digital is great – given the choice I would never ever go back to shooting on film. Q Finish the sentence ‘Wildlife filmmaking is…’ A Nice work if you can get it. Q Have you got a family of young wildlife enthusiasts? A My son and daughter both really love wildlife. I’ve tried to instill in them that wildlife isn’t something you necessarily have to go and look for. It can be a bird or a fox in the garden, or the leaves changing colour; it’s something to try and appreciate in some way as often as possible. Q Are you optimistic about the planet they will inherit? A I have good days and bad days; sometimes I think it’s a great place to live and other days you read something and think ‘well, what hope is there?’ I thought my children were going to grow up in a world where there weren’t any tigers left in the wild, but I think I’ve completely changed my view on that. I think there will be tigers living in the wild in 50 years time – we just have to make sure that does happen. 

Profile: Gordon Buchanan Gordon has worked in wildlife documentaries for the past 25 years and is passionate about raising awareness about the world’s endangered species and habitats. He has led expeditions around the globe to places as diverse as South America, Asia, Africa, Papua New Guinea, Russia and Alaska. He is fast becoming a household name on the BBC having shot and presented a long list of popular nature programmes including ‘The Snow Wolf Family and Me’, ‘Super Cute Animals’, ‘Winterwatch’, ‘The Lost Land’ series, ‘The Polar Bear Family And Me’, ‘Wild Burma’ and the award-winning ‘The Bear Family And Me’. He has been incredibly busy having recently filmed three new wildlife commissions for the BBC. The two part series ‘Gorilla Family and Me’ was aired over Christmas. This year he is set to be a regular face on television with two new exciting series: ‘Wildest Tribes’ and ‘Into the Wild with Gordon Buchanan’. Working on nature and wildlife programmes as both a presenter and cameraman, Gordon has contributed to award winning BBC, Discovery and National Geographic wildlife series and documentaries. He has also received a Royal Television Award for his work on The Bear Family And Me.

essence INFO Gordon Buchanan: Lost Adventures UK Tour 22 March to 7 April 2016, various venues, and Friday 1 April at Dorking Halls Website: www.dorkinghalls.co.uk Telephone: 01306 881717

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INDIA’S WILD EAST

Nagaland’s dazzling primeval beauty can be found right on the edge of the India–Myanmar border. It’s an otherworldly place where until recently some 16 headhunting Naga tribes valiantly fought off any intruders. Times, of course, change and today it’s a shadow of its once savage self with much of the south fairly developed. Subhasish Chakraborty seeks and finds a different travel experience. ALL PHOTOS COPYRIGHT: TUTC

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Travel | INDIA NAGALAND

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A

team of anthropologists from a Paris-based French NGO wanted to visit the northeastern Indian state of Nagaland. They requested a French-speaking guide, so since I knew the lingo as well as the geography, I found myself entrusted with overall responsibility for the tour. Arriving at Nagaland’s only airport in Dimapur, we were received by representatives of the Touphema Tourist Village, our base for a weeklong sojourn. The tourist village was an enchanting and bewitchingly beautiful 100 kilometre drive through hills and valleys. This village, we were informed, showcases the very best of Nagaland’s tribal hospitality, and indeed we weren’t disappointed as a traditional Nagamese welcome awaited us. We’d chosen this village to appreciate the tribal nuances that exist in the state. In the villages, hutments are not merely meant to provide shelter: they signify social status, relevant adjustments to local climatic conditions. They are built with a judicious use of locally available materials and age-old cultural traditions all interwoven in a unique blend.

The entire complex is spread over the highest elevations of the terrain. There was an exclusive reception centre with even a well-stocked pub! The clustered Naga huts were well dispersed and the community lobby, kitchen and dining room signify their importance being located on the higher levels of the village. The kitchen is the central meeting place for guests of the village with comfortable seating arrangements and was spacious enough to store foodstuffs. The intricately designed goblets available for use are works of art and we were offered the locally brewed liquor. As the sun set, our group was entertained by a high-octane cultural performance by locals in traditional dress, complete with bows and arrows. My distinguished French charges were suitably astonished, having never seen such a raw display of tribal culture.

This village, we were informed, showcases the very best of Nagaland’s tribal hospitality, and indeed we weren’t disappointed as a traditional Nagamese welcome awaited us.

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Travel | INDIA NAGALAND

As darkness enclosed the village, we were urged to explore the huts. To our amazement, we realised they were theme based and the bedrooms were luxurious, with attached toilet and geyser. Solar battery powered lighting provided the biggest surprise and, in this remote corner of India, was something completely unexpected. Touphema Tourist Village is one of the best places to experience the tribal culture of Nagaland: the innovative way in which the native Angami Naga culture is portrayed in this dreamlike village is stunning. Kohima, the state capital, is located 74 kilometres away from Dimapur. The name ‘Kohima’ is derived from the Angami tribal word ‘Kewhira’ on whose land the township was established. Kohima was designated as the headquarters of the Naga Hills by the then chief commissioner of undivided Assam, Colonel Keating, largely due to its strategic importance. This nondescript Naga town was the centre of global attention in April 1944 during the Second World War when the Japanese Army captured the town for 64 days. Today there is a war memorial dedicated to over 4,000 British and Indian soldiers who died there. In the Battle of Kohima, two VCs were won, a battle described as the Stalingrad of the east. A visit to the war memorial is a must. Located 1,450 metres above sea level, the climate in Kohima is very comfortable. It’s a year round destination and offers a nice getaway from the humdrum of city life. A few of my French wards were keen trekkers so couldn’t resist the temptation to walk in the mountainous areas surrounding Kohima. The rest of us went for something less strenuous and visited buzzing bazaars, all a hive of activity and colour. Shops are stacked with hi-tech imported goods ranging from cameras to the latest laptop. Kohima has a cosmopolitan air and is an amalgam of diverse Naga tribes such as Ao, Angami and Rengma that seem to have adapted to live in harmony with the modern world. With high speed internet and mobile phones, Kohima is on the verge of rapid economic growth, with plans to develop trade and commerce with southeast Asia. An enduring landmark is the magnificent Catholic cathedral, ideally located on the impressive looking Aradurah Hill. The façade is notable for its geometrical design and it’s easily the largest cathedral of northeast India and a key place for christians. >>>

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As word gets out, numbers of tourists from western countries are increasing, as well as those from mainland India, who readily chat with locals over a sip or two of the locally brewed wine. In spite of increasing modernity, Nagaland gives the outward impression of being in a time warp, insulated as it were from the rapid advancement of science and technology. The region has retained its sanity, which augurs well for the future. Since we had visited with the main purpose of exploring anthropological traits of exotic Naga tribes, the Department of Tourism prepared an itinerary for our group that covered the Mokokchung – Wokha – Zunheboto tourist circuit with a day’s halt at each of these places where tribal wizardry is still in evidence. In these remote villages, the government of Nagaland has devised a novel method of promoting ecotourism where local tribes

Nagaland fact file: Getting there: The only airport in Nagaland is located at Dimapur. There are regular flights to Dimapur from Guwahati and Kolkata, which in turn are well connected by flights from other parts of India and internationally. From Guwahati to Kohima, the distance can be covered in about five to six hours and the drive is beautiful as one passes by quaint tribal villages, stretches of tropical forest, undulating hills and good wayside amenities. Note that a number of insurgent groups remain active in the state and visitors should check the political situation before travelling. It is very important that foreign guests retain at least five photocopies of their passport and Indian visa before entering Nagaland. Accommodation: If one desires to savour the quintessential Naga tribal hospitality, the best way is to seek rural accommodation located on the outskirts of Kohima. Places such as Khonoma Green Village and Touphema Tourist Village are much preferred by discerning guests. For visitors who intend to participate in the annual Hornbill Festival, www.hornbillfestival.com, one of the most outstanding luxury camp accommodations is Kohima Camp: www.kohimacampnagaland.com. For further information, contact www.tourismnagaland.com and info@tourismnagaland.com.

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It’s a good idea to time a visit to coincide with the annual Hornbill Festival, held every December in the charming village of Kisama. The theme of the festival is very apt – ‘Window to Nagaland’.

generate their own income through the community holding of tourism assets. At each of these locations, we found an exclusive ‘village tourism board’ run and administered by the villagers themselves. In order to maintain a rewarding traveller experience, the government routinely conducts workshops and seminars for villagers. Mokokchung is the domain of the Ao Nagas. We were told that the smallest social unit of the Ao Naga is the family. After marriage, the bride and groom leave their respective families and establish a new household. If a younger member of the family quarrels with a senior, it is believed to be a bad omen, not only for the family but also for the village. Ao Nagas also have clans and are patriarchal and exogamous. The ‘Morung’, or bachelor’s dormitory, plays a vital role in the social life of the village. Most Morungs are fine works of craftsmanship: they serve as both a guardhouse and clubhouse. Women are forbidden to enter a Morung, with young boys admitted every three years for practical training in order to become a ‘perfect man’. There is no chieftain and each village is run on democratic principles: every individual has an opportunity to take part in the administration of the village. Our trips to Wokha and Zunheboto revealed that each Naga tribe has a dialect and culture of its own. The language is basically ‘Tibeto Burman’ and our group found the local tribes to be very hospitable as they attach great importance to friendship. It’s a good idea to time a visit to coincide with the annual Hornbill Festival, held every December in the charming village of Kisama. The theme of the festival is very apt – ‘Window to Nagaland’ – and this particular festival is the largest, but there are many others held year round. Mysticism and magic abound here, heightened by the remoteness and natural geographical isolation. There are opportunities to savour ancient practices and bond with some most fascinating tribes – surely enough to invigorate and intrigue even the most travelled of us? Stepping inside a quintessential Naga village, visitors are bound by its tribal code of honour as a result of their intrusion. The resulting tribal hospitality extended is something to which the modern traveller is unaccustomed. It’s the element of unacquainted tribal generosity that awaits discovery. v


IOTC FP March2.indd 1

25/02/2016 10:56


Primula in bloom PHOTO COPYRIGHT: ADAM PASCO MEDIA

Perfect primulas We’re almost past the heart of the winter and there is a welcome feeling of increasing warmth and the occasional glimpse of the later setting sun on a clear evening. These hopeful signs mean that winter is on the back foot for another year and The Horticultural Trades Association (HTA) has some timely advice to brighten up the garden.

T

he greys and pastel colours of winter gradually yield to more and more colour, so help this along by planting a rainbow of colour to welcome in spring. Pack patio pots and fill flowerbeds with Primulas and Polyanthus. These cheerful bedding plants offer great value, flowering their hearts out for weeks on end to brighten the outlook on the remaining dull days of winter as it gradually releases its grip. New varieties are continually being bred offering outstanding garden performance with larger flowers and improved resistance to the vagaries of British weather. Although single-coloured flowers are always popular, look out for bicolours, double and rosebud types, plus wonderfully scented new varieties too. Bold blocks of primulas always look striking, but impressive displays can also be created by combining them with other spring bedding, flowering bulbs and foliage plants too. Small pot grown plants are available now in full flower, making them perfect for creating instant displays in any garden, patio or courtyard. Primulas are one of the most popular wildflowers too. Make a grassy meadow or plant banks, verges

Primulas for summer colour For damp, shady sites and boggy or poolside gardens, there are several Asiatic Primulas that flower from late spring through into summer. Look out for: w Japanese Candelabra Primula (Primula japonica) w Chinese Candelabra Primula (Primula beesiana) w Orange Bulley’s Candelabra Primula (Primula bulleyana) Primula beesiana PHOTO COPYRIGHT: THE FARPLANTS GROUP

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Gardening | HTA

Cowslip in flower PHOTO COPYRIGHT: ADAM PASCO MEDIA

Spring planting combinations using Primulas Choose from a range of spring bedding plants, flowering bulbs and hardy perennials to create colourful displays for patio pots and flowerbeds. Here are some ideas of flowers that could be chosen as companion plants for Primulas and Polyanthus: w Bedding Daisies (Bellis) w Bugle (Ajuga) w Daffodils and Narcissus w Forget-me-nots (Myosotis) w Grape Hyacinths (Muscari) w Heuchera w Hyacinths w Pansies and Violas w Stocks w Sweet William w Tulips w Wallflowers (Erysimum)

Primula vulgaris PHOTO COPYRIGHT: THE FARPLANTS GROUP

MARCH 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 23

>>>


Primula bulleyana PHOTO COPYRIGHT: THE FARPLANTS GROUP

Literature | IVY PRESS

Heirloom Plants

A Complete Compendium of Heritage Vegetables, Fruit, Herbs & Flowers and other natural areas with dainty Primroses (Primula vulgaris) and Cowslips (Primula veris). Keep watered if conditions are dry and these hardy perennials will quickly establish, flowering and setting seed to slowly spread and cover the area with their progeny. Primula enthusiasts often move on from growing bedding varieties to picking choice varieties of Auricula to grow and display in small terracotta pots on patios or shelved Auricula Theatres. A Victorian favourite, hundreds of exquisite varieties of these evergreen perennials have been bred over the years. Many have deeply coloured and patterned petals surrounding a white or golden eye, with rosettes of leathery leaves often intriguingly coated with a powdery bloom. v

Top tips for growing Primulas w Deadhead regularly to remove faded flowers and keep displays looking their best.

w The compost in patio pots can get waterlogged during wet weather, so always put a layer of coarse gravel or similar drainage material in the base of pots before filling with compost. w Raise pots off the ground by standing them on ‘feet’ to avoid drainage holes in the base of pots becoming blocked. w Temporarily move pots to a sheltered position if snow or bad weather is forecast. w Cheeky sparrows and other birds sometimes peck at primroses, damaging their blooms. It’s hard to stop these antics, especially with plants growing in borders, but try moving pots closer to the house to scare them away. Some people have noted that blue varieties often avoid bird attention. Fancy growing Primulas from seed? Check the flower seed range in the local garden centre to see what’s available.

essence INFO

The Horticultural Trades Association (HTA) is the trade association for the UK garden industry. Website: www.the-hta.org.uk

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This book is the perfect companion for every home grower who wants to fill their garden with old and interesting varieties while helping to save threatened or forgotten plants. Heirloom plants often have a charm lacking in commercially produced varieties. Unless these seeds are grown and saved, they will not only be forgotten, but lost too. Based on the seed catalogues of Thomas Etty, the book lists exciting cultivars, along with profiles and growing tips. Responsible gardening, certainly, but with more than a hint of romance; who could resist the lure of the splendid Hubbard Green Warty squash, or the Green Zebra tomato? Thomas Etty Esq is the UK’s only dedicated heritage seed company and was set up over twenty years ago by Ray Warner. The company name is inspired by Ray’s great, great, great grandfather who himself dealt in seeds in the nineteenth century. Ray is the dedicated seedsman behind this heirloom seed company with Thomas Etty Esq sourcing seeds dating from the seventeenth century to the end of World War II, all from small-scale seed suppliers from the UK and Europe. Lorraine Harrison is a keen practical gardener with a master’s degree in garden history. In addition to contributing to the gardening quarterly Hortus, she has authored a number of books, among them the bestselling Latin for Gardeners. “A strikingly produced compendium of heirloom vegetables, fruit and flowers” – The Bookseller By Lorraine Harrison & Ray Warner, seed catalogues written by Thomas Etty 224 pages • Hardback • Illustrations throughout ISBN: 9781782403173 • RRP: £18.99 essence INFO

Published by Ivy Press Website: www.ivypress.co.uk


Festival | DUNSBOROUGH PARK

Festival of tulips Dunsborough Park, Ripley stages the spectacular Festival of Tulips next month with 20,000 new bulbs and over 15,000 one-year-old bulbs creating a breathtaking wild meadow at this country estate.

D

unsborough House dates back to the fourteenth century and the dissolution of the monasteries. The land at Dunsborough Park was originally granted to a local nobleman by Newark Abbey. Located in Ripley, less than 20 miles from central London, the house is set in over 100 acres of grounds, including fields and woodland. Elizabeth Taylor spent one of her wedding nights at Dunsborough. The owners of this stunning estate, Baron Dolf and Baroness Caroline Sweerts de Landas Wyborgh, welcome visitors at various times of year. On the six garden open days, three are for the National Gardens Scheme (NGS) on 30 April, 12 June and 18 September. These raise funds for several invited charities: Shooting Star Chase, Naomi House Children’s Hospice, Art Research Creativity & Health (ARCH), Princess Alice Hospice and many more who benefit from attending the event and selling homemade teas. v

Profile Dutch born Baron and Baroness Sweerts de Landas Wyborgh moved to Dunsborough Park in 1994 and took on the task of renovating a tired house and transforming a six acre area surrounding the house into beautiful landscaped and formal gardens. These are now made up of a series of ‘garden rooms’ with their own style and charm, including: w The White Garden, with its ancient 300-year-old Mulberry tree, anemones, Solomon’s Seal and Iceberg roses. w The Classic Italian Garden. w The Old Romantic Rose Garden, with subtle colours of mostly pink roses, the Rose Walk with David Austin roses, including Queen of Sweden, Brother Cadfael, and scented Bourbon roses. w The Eighteenth Century Walled Garden is lined on one side with a large, 45 metre Victorian greenhouse. w The Dutch Garden has a wonderful 70ft ginkgo biloba hedge. This area is home to the wonderful tulip displays. w The Peacock Area with an impressive box parterre and a beautiful ‘peacock’ gate. w The Water Garden, originally created in the 1930s, features a dammed brook that rushes to join the Ockham Mill Stream and the River Wey. A stone bridge provides an excellent viewpoint.

essence INFO

Dunsborough Park is available for private garden tours and can offer an exclusive and romantic setting for spring and summer wedding receptions. Other activities are also available. For more information visit www.dunsboroughpark.com.

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Motoring | BAC

RISING STAR

Luxury Cheshire car maker Briggs Automotive Company (BAC) was recently picked as ‘One to Watch’ in the 2015 Sunday Times’ Fast Track 100 list, heralding a rapid rise for the niche car maker. Euan Johns discovers more about the rise and rise of a British company firmly flying the flag overseas.

>>>

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N

o roof, no windscreen, a single seat: BAC constructs the well received and highly acclaimed Mono supercar. The company earned its distinction on the Fast Track list due to its recent expansion, and was lauded for its efforts to increase awareness in international markets. Brothers Neil and Ian Briggs started the company in 2009 with the aim of creating a pure driving experience. BAC’s team is able to know each of its customers by name. This provides the basis for an almost tribal connection and feeling of pride and involvement in something very special and different. The company boasts of its ‘total ownership experience’ emanating from a superbly made product and unparalleled level of service. What’s on offer? Well, an intimate and visceral connection to a car that fulfils the inner dream to sit at the controls of a formula car. Climbing into the car’s central seat is an event in itself. There’s more than a whiff of formula here and the thought does flit through my mind: is this seriously road legal?

“We are delighted to be recognised by Fast Track and the Sunday Times for our recent success. We hope to continue this going into 2016, and are well placed to do so with our new dealerships in Japan and Hong Kong. With strong sales in America, and our recently gained EU approval, we are well placed to take BAC onto the next stage of its exciting development.” NEIL BRIGGS, BAC FOUNDER

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Motoring | BAC

So what exactly is all the fuss about? Well, the Mono is a lightweight, ultra high performance, road legal supercar designed and made using the latest racing technology. So, it ticks all the boxes for drivers seeking a ‘pure’ driving experience. Forget the children and dog, this is a toy for grownups to enjoy. The design is superb: it’s got a single seat smack bang in the middle of the car’s subtle and sculptured form. Being there means the car is perfectly balanced, enabling the power from the Cosworth 2.3 litre engine (2015 version) to be used to the full, especially when cornering. BAC’s motivated staff of just 22 made it the smallest company on the list of 10 rising stars. It enjoyed sales of over £2.4 million in the last year, selling 21 supercars worldwide, and has now attracted investment from international backers to help push this further. Investment has helped the firm open several new showrooms around the world. The result? BAC has already more than doubled sales for 2016, and is poised to accelerate even further. The newest showroom was opened in Hong Kong’s Kowloon Bay last November: the dealership selling eight of its annual allocation of 12 cars on the launch night alone. The presence in Hong Kong is further proof of the company’s strong position in the Far East, following a successful introduction into Japan earlier last year. BAC’s unique nature appeals strongly to customers in this part of the world, who value the car’s bespoke driver fitment programme offering each customer a custom-made seat, peddle reach and steering wheel positioning, all built around and to suit the client’s frame. There’s also almost limitless variations for personalisation with the choice of differing levels of trim and paint options. Far East customers will get the 2016 Model Year Mono, which comes equipped with an all-new 305bhp, 2.5-litre Mountune four-cylinder engine capable of a 0-60mph time of just 2.8 seconds. This ultra lightweight supercar weighs in at just 580kg, and so can boast a staggering power-to-weight ratio of 526bhp per tonne. It may appear a bit pricey at just shy of £80,000, and is of course totally impractical, but this sort of fun is surely priceless?  essence INFO Website: www.bac-mono.com Facebook: facebook.com/bacmono Twitter: twitter.com/DiscoverMono

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www.dsautomobiles.com


SHARP EDGE

Raspberry chino £125 Printed weave shirt £75 Blue flyfront mac £295

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Fashion | RICHARD JAMES

Richard James Seishin Jacket Puppytooth £645

>>>

Forward thinkers Since 1992, Richard James has established a reputation as a leading luxury brand, setting the standard for contemporary tailoring and menswear. The first of the ‘new establishment’ tailors on Savile Row, Richard James has contributed to revitalising what has long been acknowledged as the world centre for tailoring with a bold, progressive take on the timeless and traditional. The Richard James’ philosophy is to produce classic clothing of quality and push boundaries through design, colour and cut. Richard James Mayfair offers a well-edited collection of full tailored suits through to separates such as simple printed shirts and ties. Prices for a full suit start at £395 and shirts start at £65 each.

essence INFO:

Website: www.richardjames.co.uk Available from House of Fraser nationally, as well as Peter Jones and John Lewis.

Richard James Hyde Suit £845

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Fashion | KELLY SIMPKIN

Mongolian circle jacket £825 Lace slip £275

Jazz age cocktails meet Bladerunner Kelly Simpkin’s collection for spring/summer 2016 highlights the designer’s sensibility and signature modern luxury aesthetic, marking a turning point in her journey as a designer. Feminine, sculptural, with an urban edge, Kelly uses a skilled eye and the paradox of leather and lace to create romance. From a Mongolian fur circle jacket, over a lace slip reminiscent of a 1930s’ siren, this key capsule collection is old school glamour with a modern take. To coin a phrase, this is jazz age cocktails meeting Bladerunner. The show stopping piece in the collection is an extraordinary silk lined, leather bridal gown, with extravagant and billowing tulle like an explosion of blossom falling at the bride’s feet. All fabrics are sourced from British suppliers, and all garments demonstrate Kelly’s eye for detail. The Mongolian circle jacket is lined with pink duchess satin and gold leather facing. As with all Kelly’s pieces, it’s the added detail that makes them truly unique.

essence INFO

All available via private appointment with Kelly Simpkin or via www.kellysimpkin.com.

>>> Mesh circle coat £1870

Bridal gown £3200

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Mesh cross over dress ÂŁ1600

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Fashion | KELLY SIMPKIN

Scallop bustier gown £4200

Mesh bustier gown £2050

Lace bodysuit £660 Ribbon over-skirt £385

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Food_Layout 1 01/03/2016 16:56 Page 1

At their best right now Seasonal and local food offers taste, health and even economic benefits. Crates Local Produce highlights the amazing seasonal produce available from our region.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: KAREN APPLEYARD | DREAMSTIME.COM

Purple sprouting broccoli

A type of cabbage, purple sprouting is far from a new fashion in trendy vegetables, but has been cultivated before Roman times. It is actually the true broccoli with smaller, many more flower heads and thinner stalks, whilst the much larger, heavier vegetable we call broccoli is actually calabrese, developed from the sprouting variety. A couple of hundred years ago it was considered as much of a delicacy as asparagus and came in different colours, including brown, cream and red. A real treat so early in the season, this tender vegetable is best sourced as fresh as possible and eaten on the same day. It is packed with both taste and goodness, but the flavour can quickly diminish after picking, so choose wisely and avoid prepackaged offers that are likely to have been travelling for a while or even cold stored. Easy and quick to cook and, if tender enough, every bit of it can be eaten, although larger leaves may require trimming and the very ends of the stem.

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PHOTO COPYRIGHT: HLPHOTO | DREAMSTIME.COM

Culinary seaweed

Seaweed is no stranger to the Japanese who have been enjoying it for centuries. Even around our own shores, it has been embraced since medieval times and was once the best source of nutrients for coastal dwellers and, of course, free to collect. The Welsh still eat plenty of it, often serving laverbread, whilst the Scots traditionally use it in soups and broths. In Ireland, it is used in a wide variety of dishes and dulse, a dark red seaweed, is dried and eaten like crisps. It seems it is the English who have shunned this great food source, but we now are rediscovering the benefits. With up to 40 different edible varieties of seaweed available in our waters, it is often cleaner waters that provide the best source, especially the Outer Hebrides. A handful of producers are creating the most amazing seasonings from seaweed harvested from these cold, clean waters that can almost totally replace the use of salt in a diet as well being a fabulous source of natural umami.


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Food | CRATES LOCAL PRODUCE

Crates Local Produce is located centrally within the historic market town of Horsham and bursts with fresh, seasonal food sourced directly from local producers. For more details see www.crateslocal.co.uk. Follow on Twitter @crateslocal or Facebook page Crates Local.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MORADOHEATH | DREAMSTIME.COM

Beef

Any avid fan of the Archers, the longest running soap in the world, will happily reel off the virtues of beef from Brookfield’s herd of Herefords and, similar to the Aberdeen Angus, these breeds are widely raised throughout the world. For even more flavour, and to gain a knowledge of beasts ‘just down the lane’, it is worth discovering locally-reared beef. With a few very exciting and dedicated farmers in our area rearing rare-breeds and cross-breeds to very high welfare standards, the real taste of superior beef can be found. In the Surrey hills, there is the distinctive Belted Galloway, a hairy and hardy breed, particularly suited to the rough grazing in the area and producing quality marbled beef. The Galloway has its roots in Scotland, but is believed to have been a cross with a Dutch belted breed. The Sussex, of course, has its roots more locally in the Weald and is traditionally a small breed that is easy to look after. One Sussex farm is now producing incredible beef from Sussexcross Wagyu and Angus cattle that is rapidly becoming the most sought after beef by some of the area’s top restaurants.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: ALNAT | DREAMSTIME.COM

Gin

You cannot escape the recent gin revival, brought back after decades in the shadows, despite it once being the most popular drink of the country. However, we cannot lay claim to gin as a juniper flavoured spirit was first distilled in the Netherlands. English soldiers got the taste for ‘genever’ when supporting the Dutch against the Spanish in 1585, hence the term ‘Dutch courage’. In later years, low rates of duty on English spirits and heavy taxation on imports ensured the success of gin, leading to the ‘gin craze’ of the 1700s. Blaming most criminal activity on gin consumption, the government then introduced higher taxation, causing riots, but the drink was destined to fall out of favour. Today’s revival has been fuelled by the resurgence of cocktails, creative bartenders and small distilleries creating their own unique blends of botanicals. The only thing that gin must have is a dominant flavour of the juniper berry; apart from that it is all down to the distiller’s imagination. Exploring different gins on offer is a journey well worth undertaking and even our local gins are already winning international awards. The difference in these small batch gins to the high street offerings is quite phenomenal, usually far smoother and more complex in taste. >>>

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Broccoli, sprouts and bacon Serves four as a side www.crateslocal.co.uk

Ingredients: 200g purple sprouting broccoli 400g brussel sprouts Four to six thick rashers back bacon Two cloves garlic Two tablespoons rapeseed or olive oil One tablespoon butter One teaspoon dijon mustard Method: w Heat the oven to 200 degrees centigrade/gas mark 6. w Remove any woody ends and leaves from the broccoli stems and cut the sprouts in half. w Finely chop the garlic and fry with the oil and butter. w Cut the bacon into pieces of around one to two centimetres and fry off in the butter and oil until they start to crisp. w Add in the prepared vegetables, toss through and fry for another couple of minutes only. w Transfer all into a shallow casserole dish or roasting pan and roast for fifteen minutes.

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Rapid steak teppanyaki

Serves two as main or four as starter www.crateslocal.co.uk

Ingredients: Two beef steaks, fillet or sirloin One tablespoon rapeseed or sesame oil Two garlic cloves Four tablespoons dark soy sauce Two tablespoons mirin (or rice wine with a little sugar added) Two teaspoons butter One shallot One tablespoon tomato purĂŠe One chilli Method: w Finely chop the garlic, chilli and shallot and fry gently in the butter. w Once soft, add the soy sauce, mirin and tomato purĂŠe. Allow to simmer gently. w Slice the steaks into generous pieces. w Heat a flat skillet or heavy flat frying pan and add the oil. Once smoking, add the beef and sear on one side. w Turn the steak pieces over and pour over the sauce. w Allow to sizzle for around a minute and serve immediately with stir fry vegetables or rice.

Orange cake

Gin toddy

Ingredients cake: 225g butter 225g self-raising flour One level teaspoon baking powder Half level teaspoon FlaVit Sea Seaweed Seasoning 100g golden caster sugar 100g brown sugar Four large eggs Finely grated zest of two oranges

Ingredients: 50ml gin Two teaspoons brown sugar One lemon Cinnamon stick One star anise

Makes one 20 centimetre layered cake www.flavit.co.uk

Ingredients filling: 150ml double cream and a topping of orange curd if feeling indulgent Ingredients glaze: 25g caster sugar Juice of two oranges One clementine for decoration Method: w Heat oven to 180 degrees centigrade/gas mark 4. w Grease and line with greaseproof paper two 20 centimetre, loosebottomed sandwich tins. w Measure all the cake ingredients into a large bowl (reserving some zest for decoration) and whisk until combined and smooth. w Divide between the tins and bake for 20-25 minutes until well risen, lightly golden and shrinking away from the sides of the tins. w Remove from the oven, leave for five minutes and then move to a wire rack to cool. w For the glaze, put the sugar and orange juice in a saucepan, stirring constantly to dissolve the sugar. Bring to the boil to reduce by half. w Brush the glaze onto the underside of one of the cakes and the top of the other. w Whip the cream or use the orange curd to sandwich the halves together. w Decorate with clementine segments.

Makes two cups www.crateslocal.co.uk

Method: wDissolve the sugar in a little hot water. wSqueeze in at least half of the juice of the lemon, add the gin and star anise. wMix thoroughly with the cinnamon stick. wAdd in around a quarter cup of hot water and serve immediately.

essence INFO Crates Local Produce 24a Carfax, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 1EB Telephone: 01403 256435 Website: www.crateslocal.co.uk Follow on Twitter @crateslocal or Facebook page Crates Local


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Food | CRATES LOCAL PRODUCE

Broccoli, sprouts and bacon

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Baking | JEN’S CUPCAKERY

Carrot, orange and cinnamon cake for Mothering Sunday Treat mum to a delicious cake this Mother’s Day that not only offers a sumptuous spoonful, but is packed with at least one of the five a day! One of our bestsellers, the moist sponge is crammed with currents and raisins, has a hint of orange and cinnamon, and is then topped with a creamy mascarpone cream cheese frosting. Truly a treat for mums (and all) this March.

Ingredients cake: w 500g carrots, peeled and trimmed w 260g raisins w Four large eggs w 260g golden caster sugar w 240ml corn oil w One teaspoon good quality vanilla extract w Grated zest of one large orange w 240g plain flour w Two teaspoons bicarbonate of soda w Two teaspoons ground cinnamon w One teaspoon baking powder w Pinch of salt Ingredients frosting: w 175g mascarpone w 175g cream cheese w 250g unsalted butter w 900g sifted icing sugar w Grated zest of one small orange Method wPreheat oven to 180 degrees centigrade/gas 6. Grease and line two eight inch sandwich tins. wGrate the peeled carrots into a bowl and add the raisins. wWhisk the eggs and sugar together until a creamy mixture forms: this will take at least five minutes in an electric mixer, more if combining manually. wAdd the oil, vanilla and orange zest and mix well. wSift the flour, bicarbonate of soda, cinnamon, baking powder and salt into a separate bowl. Add to the egg and sugar mixture a little at a time, beating well. Scrape the sides of the bowl down to make sure all of the mix is included. wAdd the carrots and raisins and stir until all is combined well. wSpoon into the two sandwich tins and place in the oven for around 30 minutes to start. Check at five minute intervals until a skewer comes out clean. wLeave cakes to cool in tins for ten minutes and then turn out on to a wire rack. wPrepare the frosting by mixing together all of the ingredients as above. This makes plenty of icing and the quantities can be halved if preferred. wWhen the cakes are cool, sandwich together with the icing and then using a palette knife or a piping bag, cover the top. Finish off with some grated orange, some sugar carrots and/or wafer flowers.

essence INFO

TOP TIP: When making the cream cheese frosting, mix the icing sugar and butter first until it resembles a crumb consistency, then add the cream cheese/mascarpone as this method makes for a smoother consistency.

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Website: www.jenscupcakery.com Telephone: 07751 553106 Facebook: www.facebook.com/jenscupcakery Twitter: @jenscupcakery Blog: www.ilovejenscupcakery.wordpress.com


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Secretts: DIVERSIFYING DELICIOUSLY Shirlee Posner of Eat Surrey introduces readers to Secretts of Milford, produce growers for culinary stars and food retailers to the rest of us!

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ith an impressive portfolio of thirty different baby salad leaves on sale at the height of the season, Secretts of Milford is famous for them throughout the south east and London. Used to decorate plates by many top chefs, it’s no surprise that 1.2 tonnes are sold every week, of which 550 kilos are transported into the metropolis. In context, the average weight of a bag of rocket in a supermarket is 30g, so in unit terms this is 41,300 bags! Freshly picked to order too, this is a tightly run business with a lot of early mornings. Organisation falls to Nicola Secrett who manages the team of growers, pickers and packers with great enthusiasm and is a fountain of leaf knowledge. Chefs just can’t get enough of these gorgeous leaves: they add colour and texture to dishes. Placed strategically on top of scallops or scattered on venison Carpaccio, combinations are endless. Matt Edmonds, an award-winning chef formerly at the Gherkin in London, has just opened his first eaterie in Surrey, The Grantley Arms in Wonersh. Matt, when sourcing ingredients, was delighted to be able to buy the leaves he had been using in London and call them local. These leaves, he agrees, finish his plated savoury dishes with naturally beautiful shapes, colours and flavours. It wasn’t that long ago that Secretts grew the first rocket for a British supermarket as an experiment, and at that time the farm had no idea these tender leaves would become such an important element of future business. Today Secretts is run by father and son team Charles and Greg Secrett, but they partly owe their success to a fascinating heritage. The story starts with Charles’ grandfather (Frederick Augustus Secrett) who chose horticulture from the range of options open to a young man in the early 1900s. Starting his first growing venture in 1908, Frederick was, by the time he died, a legendary figure known for his innovative growing techniques, irrigation inventions and mobile glasshouses. In addition, he was passionate about training and education and responsible for igniting a passion for horticulture in

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those with whom he came into contact. Frederick’s great grandson, Greg, has carried on his tradition for growing and as well as supplying Secretts’ famous salad leaves to virtually every restaurant in the south east of England, Greg also grows a huge range of speciality vegetables for many top London restaurants. On direct dial to many of London’s most feted chefs (I wouldn’t say no to his contact list), Greg’s vegetable portfolio has cast iron street credibility. The 100 acre Secretts farm, whilst having a thriving wholesale business, also grows for its own farm shop, so while supply is seasonal, it’s food metres not miles here. Known to be one of the most productive farms during the Second World War, Secretts was a supplier to local wholesale and retail markets. But like many growers, business was hard hit by the emergence of supermarkets and changing wholesale buying practices. Cheaper imports and changing consumer behaviour means that many of the original crops grown on the farm were discontinued. Leeks, for example, last year had an all time low price on the market making them cheaper to leave in the ground than to harvest. This is, sadly, an all too common reality for many farmers. However, by creatively diversifying, Secretts has found a niche market for its young, tender vegetables and leaves. In addition, a farm shop opened in 1977, and a ‘pick-your-own’ a few years later, have both proven successful whilst being challenged by two large supermarket chains opening in close proximity. Stocking the farm shop with a wonderful range of artisan products and well known quality brands has allowed Secretts to maintain a large and loyal customer base. For example, the cheese counter has over three hundred cheeses and visitors travel from as far away as Brighton to shop. The farm shop is also famous for its wonderful confectionery displays at Christmas and Easter. Regular ‘meet the producer’ events are a hit with locals, as are Easter Egg hunts and farm animal petting events for children.

Charles Secrett


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Artisan food | EAT SURREY

Goat’s cheese and roasted butternut squash salad with pumpkin seed dressing Last year I photographed the new menu for Eliza’s Teashop, next to the farm shop, at Secretts. The recipes were the work of talented local food consultant and caterer Sally Iddles of Sally’s Fabulous Food (www.sallyiddles.co.uk). With such great produce available on site, it made sense to feature the mixed leaves on the menu. All the dishes we worked with on that day were fantastic, but this salad was so colourful to photograph it made my job easy – it also contains some of my favourite ingredients! I have eaten this since at Eliza’s and it’s replicated beautifully each time. When choosing a goat’s cheese, there are lots of options and it’s really a personal decision. I like Sister Sarah goat’s cheese made by High Weald Dairy in West Sussex as it is locally made and has a great texture. Whatever cheese is chosen, make sure it is not too soft, but still has a creamy texture to complement the roasted squash. Serves 4 Ingredients: One small butternut squash, peeled, deseeded and cut into chunks One dessertspoon olive oil 75g pumpkin seeds 300g firm, creamy goat’s cheese (see note above) Two tablespoons pumpkin seed oil Two dessertspoons aged balsamic vinegar or balsamic syrup Salt and freshly ground black pepper One bag of Secretts’ mixed leaves Method: w Pre-heat oven to gas mark 6/200 degrees centigrade/ fan 190 degrees centigrade. w Place the chunks of butternut squash in a mixing bowl and coat in the olive oil by mixing vigorously with a metal spoon. Season and lay out on a baking sheet. Roast in the pre-heated oven for 25-30 minutes. w Place the pumpkin seeds in a small tin and place in the oven for the last ten minutes of the cooking time. Allow the squash and seeds to cool while preparing the salad. w Cut the cheese into even sized chunks. w Make the dressing by simply mixing the oil and vinegar together. Either toss the leaves in the dressing before placing in bowls, or drizzle over as part of the assembly stated below. w Place four large handfuls of salad leaves in a salad spinner, wash gently and spin to remove excess water. Divide the leaves between four salad bowls. Place the cheese and butternut squash on top of the leaves. Drizzle with the salad dressing and garnish with the roasted pumpkin seeds.

Innovation and experimentation is still important to the farm today. It grows a range of produce and selects from hybrid seeds which can be more disease resistant than heritage (true to type) seeds. Heritage seeds are used to grow Secretts’ gorgeous golden and red candy stripe beetroots and multi coloured carrots. Seeds are planted almost every day in the growing season and picked at just six weeks old. Famous throughout the south east at farmers’ markets and from Secretts’ farm shop, customers love these vegetables for their sweet taste and tender texture. In addition, on a smaller scale for individual chefs, Greg also grows crops of more unusual vegetables such as scorzerona and salsify. More recently, he has also grown a vegetable called celtuce (a cross between a lettuce and celery) prized for its thick stem. Chefs love the flavour and texture of this for accenting dishes. As part of the education heritage of Secretts, the farm hosts a chef event each year to allow chefs to see the farm in growing season and understand the intricacies of horticulture. These events are growing in popularity and the pick your own area is used for education purposes out of season. In addition to tender market vegetables, Secretts’ asparagus is also a high profile crop. Thriving in the soil here, even though the established beds are elderly (in asparagus terms), they still produce good yields. Weather willing, asparagus should start to crop in early to mid April with a characteristically short season. Greg is currently looking at innovative methods that could increase the growth and harvest of asparagus by at least a couple of months. For locals, asparagus going on sale in Secretts’ farm shop signifies the end of spring. For food service enquiries, visit the farm page of the website for contact details and ordering information. To visit the farm shop it’s good to know they have an onsite tea room, Eliza’s Teashop, serving delicious home cooked food, salads with Secretts’ leaves and gorgeous cakes. Ethical clothing company, Jo’s Jumpers, also offering fair-trade jewellery, is opposite the tea room. On the third Sunday of each month, Secretts’ hosts the Surrey Farmers Market which showcases local food producers. In the summer (from June) there is pick your own, featuring berries, beans, apples and plums. For information on opening times, click on the ‘visit us’ page of the website. Shirlee Posner essence INFO Secretts, Hurst Farm, Chapel Lane, Milford, Surrey GU8 5HU Websites: www.secretts.co.uk and eatsurrey.co Telephone: 01483 520500

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Beauty | EPSOM SKIN CLINICS

Bridal beauty tips

Brides to be: it is time to prepare. Whilst there may be a myriad of wedding decisions keeping everyone occupied, make sure you think about yourself! This month we are going to explore alternative beauty treatments that may not have been considered, says Naomi Diamond of Epsom Skin Clinics. Helpful tips leading up to the big day: • Stay hydrated! Whilst undertaking exercise routines, attempting weight loss and to aid healthy skin, it is important to stay hydrated. We all know drinking water is good for us, but starving the skin of water can lead to lost muscle tone where it will not support weight loss. Also, invest in a dry body brush and use it every other day. Work in sweeping motions towards the lymph nodes to help with cellulite: the aim is to get the circulation flowing and stimulate hard fat. • Life is busy enough, but time becomes very precious leading up to a wedding. Set aside a few hours at least once a week to treat yourself. Purchase a nourishing cuticle oil to promote strong nail growth and healthy cuticles for those ‘up close’ wedding ring pictures. Phenomen Oil from Jessica has vitamin E, rice and jojoba oils to deeply moisturise and can also be used on dry elbows, knees or chapped lips. For dry skin or eczema sufferers, try various body lotions and potions, but remember a doctor can always prescribe something stronger to target stubborn areas. For the beautiful bride experiencing problematic and oily skin: Many people suffering from acne may be at the end of their tether having tried multiple treatments, products and medications, which some may find have helped improve the skin, but not necessarily targeted the route of the problem. AGNES is a revolutionary new treatment which carries out selective sebaceous gland destruction. There are thousands of sebaceous glands over the face and these help to keep skin lubricated with oil; in an acne-prone skin these glands are more active and therefore over produce oil leading to spots. Studies suggest most acne recurs from the same damaged sebaceous gland and this is where AGNES comes in. To treat the recurring spot, Epsom Skin Clinics use a radio frequency needle to coagulate and remove the gland resulting in less spots and less

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SPECIAL OFFER 50% OFF THERAPIST TREATMENT FOR ESSENCE READERS. JUST QUOTE ESSENCE1 WHEN BOOKING.

future scarring. The same principle can be applied to treating fat pads under the eyes and sagging skin/eye bags using a non-surgical approach. For the bride who wants to hide a tattoo: ‘Think before you ink’ is a sentence that can come back to haunt from time to time, but there is another option! Laser tattoo removal, although uncomfortable, could reduce and fade unwanted ink before the big day. Epsom Skin Clinics offer the R20 Technique which means clients can have up to four treatments in one day and we have many brides starting sooner rather than later. Alternatively, or combined with laser treatment, brides can use camouflage make-up. Ask your make-up artist about it and have a practice session before the big day. For those worried about fine lines, wrinkles, scars and stretch marks: A collagen boosting treatment can be used to treat aging skin or those with scars. EnerJet is a system which delivers immediate and long-lasting results. Pneumatic technology provides precise and controlled release of hyaluronic acid into the dermis which immediately makes the skin appear rejuvenated and hydrated with more volume. It can also be used to break down scar tissue and improve the appearance of stretch marks by increasing collagen. Complement this treatment with some good skincare products such as the Swisscode Genistein collection that increases collagen by 53% in 28 days. So all you brides to be out there, book a complimentary consultation with Epsom Skin Clinics at the earliest opportunity to ensure there is plenty of time to treat any concerns, have a flawless make-up ready and skin radiant. Let us take one thing off your mind.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: AMY GWATKIN

essence INFO Epsom Skin Clinics Website: www.epsomskinclinics.com Telephone: 01372 737280 (Epsom) or 020 8399 5996 (Surbiton)


Page 47 Advert and Comp_Layout 1 01/03/2016 15:21 Page 1

WIN

a stunning Silent Pool Gin gift box

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Shirlee’s food reviews of independently owned cafes, restaurants, artisan food producers and farm shops in Surrey. A supporter of the local food movement with an aim to promote, support and champion their work. I always tell a personal story by taking the time to meet the people behind the products or the brand. Read my reviews here www.eatsurrey.co Twitter: @eatsurrey Instagram: @eatsurrey Telephone: 07917 891881 Email: eatsurrey@gmail.com

The black and copper foil gift box contains a bottle of award winning Silent Pool Gin and matching Silent Pool ‘Copa’ glass in which to enjoy delicious a gin and tonic over plentiful ice. Silent Pool recommends Fevertree Tonic and a twist of orange zest over the top to spray a burst of citrus flavour over the gin. Silent Pool Gin is a classic, full-bodied gin, fresh with a great flavour produced from a combination of 24 botanicals. It’s a rich and clean juniper-driven spirit with floral layers of lavender and chamomile, citrus and kaffir lime and the subtle sweetness of local honey. It all creates a well-balanced, traditional and refreshingly individual gin. To win, simply visit www.essence-magazine.co.uk and answer the following question: How many botanicals are contained in Silent Pool Gin? a) 22 b) 24 c) 26 Closing date: 30 March 2016.

essence INFO

Telephone: 01483 229136 Website: www.silentpooldistillers.com Terms and conditions apply. Prize is as stated and cannot be transferred or exchanged. No cash alternative will be offered.

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MARCH 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 47


The rise in couples living together Judith Fitton, Partner at Mundays LLP, discusses the legal rights of cohabitees, examining a recent case in the courts.

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Judith Fitton is a Partner in the Family Team at Mundays LLP and has over 20 years of experience in the field of high net worth divorces. She has a particular skill in the forensic aspect of cases and investigating complex financial arrangements. Judith also has a niche practice in cohabitee matters and any disputes between non-married couples as to their property interests. She has recently been accredited as a Specialist in the fields of Cohabitee and Trusts of Land Disputes and Complex Financial Remedies on Divorce by Resolution (a national organisation of family lawyers). She has been mentioned in The Legal 500 UK as a recommended family lawyer and is known for her pragmatic and constructive advice to clients. She is a regular contributor to articles in the national press.

he number of those cohabiting (and not marrying) is increasing in the UK. A bulletin from the Office of National Statistics, published in November, revealed that the number of cohabitating couples grew by 29.7% between 2005 and 2015. Whilst married and civil partners are still the most common family type in the UK (both with and without dependent children), cohabitees have now reached about a quarter of their total and are growing at nearly three times the rate. But this isn’t matched by a growing awareness of legal rights amongst this group. I help such couples resolve disputes about their home or their children and many do not

Judith can be contacted by telephone on 01932 590557 or by email at judith.fitton@mundays.co.uk Twitter: @judith_fitton Mundays’ Private Wealth Department can be contacted via Julie Man by telephone on 01932 590643 or julie.man@mundays.co.uk

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: LPOC

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understand that they have no personal claims on a split against each other under English law, even if they have been living together in a committed relationship for many years. There is no such thing as a ‘common law husband or wife’ and this can lead to misunderstandings or financial hardship. Similarly, people do not often understand the ways in which a property can be jointly owned, the importance of formally recording financial contributions towards the family home or agreements about who is to own what percentage of the equity. It may be awkward to broach such delicate financial issues, but early legal advice can enable couples to avoid many common disputes.


Legal | MUNDAYS

The case of the plumbing tycoon, his girlfriend and their country cottage The need for early legal advice is neatly illustrated by the recent case involving plumbing tycoon John Hoggins, who had his claim to a £650,000 house in Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire, which he bought for his girlfriend, turned down by the First-Tier Tribunal of the Land Registry. Mr Hoggins paid a deposit of £100,000 on the house, bought as a second home, in 2009 and thereafter paid the mortgage. He had been in a relationship with his girlfriend, Greta Cerniauskaite, for five years at that point and it was decided the house would be registered in her sole name. When the parties split up in 2013, the dispute arose as to who was the true legal and beneficial owner. Mr Hoggins claimed the house was really a joint purchase, but that as he had debts, it was “easier” to get a mortgage this way. But the Judge disagreed and accepted Ms Cerniauskaite’s evidence that both parties intended the house to be hers, although they never actually lived in it; it was one of a series of generous gifts by Mr Hoggins, who also bought her a £160,000 Bentley car. It seems that Mr Hoggins made the gift when all was well in the relationship, but when things turned sour, he regretted the gift and sought to reclaim an interest in the property. He failed because he could not prove that the parties had always intended the equity was to be shared – that they had a ‘common intention’. This can be shown by a written agreement or evidence that the parties had verbal discussions. But without it, his case was doomed. The Court can only give effect to the intention of the parties. If the property is put into the sole name of one party, then this is clear evidence that this is how the parties intended the equity (or value in the property) to be held.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: ALEUTIE | DREAMSTIME.COM

Ministry of Justice form error It has been reported that ‘thousands’ of couples who settled their divorces in the last twenty months may have to reconsider the terms of their settlements. It has been discovered that due to a faulty code in the divorce disclosure statement (the Form E) on the Ministry of Justice website, any debts of the parties would not have been reflected in the final total for the family’s net financial worth. At Mundays, we have a separate software package and any Form E prepared by us on behalf of our clients will not be subject to this error. In any event, it is likely that in any case involving a solicitor, even if the Form was initially prepared on the MoJ software, that the figures would then have been transposed to a separate Excel spreadsheet. The totals would then have been recalculated and the problem avoided.

The Court does not have the power or discretion under the Trusts of Land Act to rewrite history and to adjust the shareholdings, unless there is clear evidence that the parties intended something else or that the claimant had made a clear contribution to the purchase and had then relied to their detriment upon an agreement that they would have a share in the equity. This is why it is so important to spell out the agreed split in a property at the time of purchase (ideally via a Deed of Trust, which our Private Wealth Department can assist with, as well as reflecting it in your Will). It is also crucially important to revisit that agreement each time the contributions to the property change (for instance when one owner funds an extension or refurbishment works without a matching contribution from the other owner).

Another aspect of this case is that the newspapers treated it as a ‘quasi-divorce’ claim and implied that Mr Hoggins’ girlfriend was seeking a share of his wealth. Despite several abortive attempts at reforming the law, cohabitees do not have personal claims against their former partners in this way and this is a prime example of the disparity between the position of a married spouse and an unmarried girlfriend. v

essence INFO

Mundays LLP Cedar House, 78 Portsmouth Road, Cobham KT11 1AN Telephone: 01932 560500 Website: www.mundays.co.uk

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High Stakes for Brexit Gamble 0n 23 June we will be asked to cast our vote on whether the UK should remain within or leave the European Union. Simon Lewis, CEO at Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd, begins to take a look at the economic issues we need to consider before we make our choice about whether to go it alone.

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n paper the European Union (EU) is such a good idea. A liberal democracy with a population of 500 million providing the economic benefit and global influence that comes from scale and uniformity. The problem is that in many ways the EU is neither liberal nor democratic and more recently, far from providing economic vigour through uniformity, competing internal dynamics have encouraged procrastination and economic stagnation.

"The global economy is not growing enough to achieve the improvements in prosperity that encourage peace and stability. In such circumstances, nationalism and protectionism are likely to thrive.� 50 essence-magazine.co.uk | MARCH 2016

Nearly 20 years ago I spent a few days at the European Parliament as part of a Department of Trade and Industry trip for young entrepreneurs. We were granted a privileged level of access and I travelled there with a sense of excitement, only to return disillusioned. I was startled by the scale of self indulgent largesse and the evident waste of European taxpayers’ hard earned money. I lost count of the number of champagne receptions I walked past, the number of idle interpreters at the European Parliament and the amount of parliamentary time wasted bickering about procedural issues rather then matters of substance. I was particularly disconcerted by how far removed the bubble


Finance | PMW

"An independent UK would be less able to assert its influence in the world and the EU, our largest trading partner, would be weakened by its absence." process. I shall cover some in this article although the subject is so broad that I will need to revisit it later.

of the Brussels elite was from the real world and somewhat perturbed that they often only described themselves as ‘Europeans’ and were somewhat disdainful of national identity. You might be thinking that I am a Eurosceptic poised to vote leave but the truth is I haven’t yet made up my mind. I am certainly sceptical about European institutions and believe that there is far too much cronyism and corruption. However, I also believe in the economic benefit of being part of the EU, provided that doesn’t require us to surrender our national identity. Over the next few months I shall continue to sift through the economic evidence and hopefully filter out some of the propaganda and scare-mongering that is a feature of both sides of the public debate. I can then make an informed choice and hopefully choose correctly from the perspective of my children and their future because this decision is likely to have a more profound effect on how the UK will fare in the longer term. I have unearthed some interesting facts that have kick started my own thought

Trade, Wealth and Influence The long term prosperity of the UK will be largely influenced by its ability to trade freely with the rest of the world. At present approximately 50% of the UK’s goods exports are to the EU and a further 13% are to countries where there is reliance upon their free trade agreement with the EU. In other words, 63% of the UK’s goods exports are linked to membership of the EU. Contrast this with the fact that the UK receives less than 10% of the EU’s exports. In other words, from the perspective of trade, it would seem that the UK is more dependant on Europe than Europe is dependant on the UK. It is certainly true that an independent UK would be free to negotiate its own trade deals with the EU but if we wanted full access to the single market there would be a price to pay. For example, both Switzerland and Norway are both required to accept the free movement of people and make substantial payments towards the EU budget in order to achieve their special status. Of course, we would also be free to negotiate trade deals outside the EU and other nations might well find it easier to agree terms with an independent UK than deal with the bureaucracy of Brussels. Nevertheless, we need to be realistic about our commercial appeal with our population of only 85 million potential customers, albeit relatively wealthy ones. Other nations and regional groups are likely to be far more interested in devoting their resources to negotiating access to the EU’s single market of 500 million potential customers. Another factor is that the goods and services we wished to export to the EU would still need to comply with EU regulations and having left the EU we would have even less influence over how they were developed.

Geopolitics The global economy is not growing enough to achieve the improvements in prosperity that encourage peace and stability. In such circumstances, nationalism and protectionism are likely to thrive. Donald Trump’s rhetoric on this subject illustrates how the mood might change. An independent UK would be less able to assert its influence in the world and the EU, our largest trading partner, would be weakened by its absence. Uncertainty for Investors The lead up to the referendum is likely to create uncertainty for investors and there has already been a slump in sterling’s value. Nevertheless, most of the consequences of Brexit are long term ones so I do not expect stock markets to be particularly affected by the issue over the next few months. I will look at immigration and red tape next time. 

essence INFO

Simon Lewis is writing on behalf of Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd (PMW), Chartered Financial Planners, based in Esher. The Company has specialised in providing wealth management solutions to private clients for 47 years. Simon is an independent financial adviser, chartered financial planner and chartered fellow of the Chartered Institute for Securities and Investment. The opinions outlined in this article are those of the writer and should not be construed as individual advice. To find out more about financial advice and investment options please contact Simon at Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd. Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Telephone: 01372 471 550 Email: simon.lewis@pmw.co.uk Website: www.pmw.co.uk

MARCH 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 51


Literature | REVIEW

An Infamous Mistress Divorced wife, infamous mistress, prisoner during the French Revolution and the reputed mother of the Prince of Wales’ child, notorious courtesan Grace Dalrymple Elliott lived an incredible life in eighteenth and early nineteenth-century London and Paris. Strikingly tall and beautiful, later lampooned as ‘Dally the Tall’ in newspaper gossip columns, she left her Scottish roots and convent education behind to re-invent herself in a ‘marriage a-la-mode’. The authors intersperse the story of Grace’s tumultuous life with anecdotes from those who knew Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, and who helped to abolish slavery, to those who were, like Grace, mistresses of great men. The book is a definitive biography of Grace Dalrymple Elliott, but is also much more; it is Grace’s family history which traces her ancestors’ origin in the Scottish borders. It follows them to France, America, India, Africa and elsewhere, offering a broad insight into the social history of the Georgian era. Sarah Murden and Joanne Major are joint authors, brought together through their shared passion for history and genealogy. By Sarah Murden and Joanne Major RRP: £25 245 pages • Hardback • 16 pages illustrations ISBN: 9781473844834 Published by Pen & Sword Books Limited www.pen-and-sword.co.uk

Escaping Hitler A true story, covering ninety years, of a fourteen-year-old boy, Günter Stern, who, when Adolf Hitler threatened his family and future, resolved to escape from his rural village of Nickenrich in the German Rhineland. In July 1939 Günter boarded a bus to the border with Luxembourg, illegally crossed the river and walked alone for seven days through Belgium into Holland, intent on catching a ferry to England and freedom. The outcome was not exactly as he had planned. The author, Phyllida Scrivens, gathered her information through interviews with Günter, now known as Joe Sterling, and with those closest to him. During an emotional ‘foot-stepping’ journey in September 2013, Phyllida visited Günter’s birthplace, discovered the apartment in Koblenz where he fled following Kristallnacht in 1938, drove the route of Günter’s walk and retraced the final steps of his parents prior to their deportation to a Nazi death camp in Poland during 1942. Phyllida lives with husband Victor on the River Yare in Norwich. At the age of sixty she fulfilled a long-term ambition when awarded a Masters Degree in Biography and Creative Non-Fiction from the University of East Anglia. But it was a weekly biographical interview feature, ‘Meeting People’, published in the Farnham Herald newspaper during the 1990s, that unwittingly prepared her for this debut full-length biography. By Phyllida Scrivens RRP: £25 208 pages • Hardback • 70 illustrations ISBN: 9781473843646 Published by Pen & Sword Books Limited www.pen-and-sword.co.uk

Horror, notoriety and Suffragettes 46 New Little Black Classics

  To celebrate the first ever Penguin Classic in 1946, Penguin has launched a further 46 titles into the Little Black Classics series this month, including authors and works new to the Penguin Classics list. Launched in February 2015, the extraordinarily successful Little Black Classics series has now sold over 2.2 million copies worldwide. The 46 new Little Black Classics contain more texts from the most loved authors – Tolstoy, Dickens and Shakespeare – as well as introducing intriguing, lesser known books. The list features works from pioneering female authors, including How To Be a Medieval Woman by Margery Kempe, the irrepressible creator of the first autobiography; one of the earliest English novels, Oroonoko, by spy and traveller Aphra Behn; and The Suffragettes, a new collection of speeches, pamphlets and letters from the women who changed the world. Following the popularity of horror stories in the list last year, this new batch of 46 titles will include Sheridan Le Fanu’s Green Tea, one of the greatest Victorian ghost stories ever written, and the sinisterly gothic tale of E.T.A Hoffmann’s The Sandman, whose eye-stealing character has inspired Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman. The new Little Black Classics also feature Jane Austen’s wicked early novella Lady Susan, the basis of the upcoming Whit Stillman film Love and Friendship and stylish fin-de-siècle stories, poems and illustrations from the notorious Victorian magazine. By various authors RRP: Paperbacks £1-2. eBooks available Published by Penguin Books Limited www.penguin.co.uk

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WEALTH MANAGEMENT. EXECUTED BEAUTIFULLY. www.pmw.co.uk


Old fashioned values in a new techno world Actress Camilla Rutherford has four children and explains how she manages new technology and old fashioned play with her young family.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: HELENE SANDBERG

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hen I was a little girl, technology was not part of mainstream living the way it is today. My father was a journalist and one of my childhood memories was the sound of his typewriter as he wrote his articles. One day my father told me that there would, in the future, be an invention called ‘the internet’ – a library to roam via a computer. It would be vast and available to everybody. We loved our local library – the idea was fantastic. Not long after my first child was born, his father and I, unfortunately, divorced. I was a single mother, balancing work and new motherhood. I did many activities with my son: taking him to dance lessons, to play football, cycling, and on play-dates. There were quiet moments too: playing, reading, drawing, and

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chatting with him. Sometimes I was too busy to play and when Hector’s godfather gave him an Xbox as a present, Hector’s contentment when playing was an occasionally useful distraction. I knew almost nothing about computer games, but thought of them as an interactive form of television, sometimes with amazing graphics and fun challenges. I watched my son’s pleasure as he played when I was busy around him. We were living in an Edwardian house with two downstairs’ reception rooms next to the kitchen. One of the reception rooms became a playroom and the other my sitting room. I was able to get things done when he played. With no nanny, partner, or siblings, computer games were very handy when I was busy. When I spoke to other mothers it seemed to be what their sons


Parenting | THE MOTHER MAGAZINE

were doing in their spare time too. Any moments of doubt that the activity was overly absorbing and perhaps not very good for you were met with guffaws. Playing computer games was good for eye-to-hand coordination and speedy reactions. Had people not said in the seventies that watching too much television would give you square eyes? Some people are so averse to change! Hector did well at “Acting is always what I primary school. He was wanted to do. Being able a popular boy, always aware of the latest to act is like winning the fashion. Hector became lottery the first time. If a whizz at Instagram Quentin Tarantino walked before I knew what it was. Social media was into a pub and said: “Do you want to be an actor?”, the way to communicate with friends, lots of everyone would say yes. fun and it seemed only a ‘fuddy duddy’ It’s not like wanting to be would have ignored an architect or a doctor.” it. His proficiency at hashtagging and photographing ‘cool’ pictures of himself brought him many followers. I was impressed. I felt slow and behind the times. Technology was everywhere, at school and at home, not like when I was growing up. Technology was to be embraced – it was the way of the future, the beginning of a new world, just as my father had said it would be. However, my doubts prevailed. Playing computer games and the use of social media were invariably the activities of choice over other forms of play or stimulus: they had become addictive and stopping them put Hector in a bad mood. I did not want Hector to be unaware of popular culture, and even less for him to be unaware of modern technology, but I wanted to encourage Hector’s other interests: he is a very talented sportsman, dancer, and actor. These talents, amongst others, were not being developed as much as they could with an Xbox in the house. The start of secondary school required a more focused approach to school, work, and the classroom: not helped by spending time on social media and the Xbox. I began to limit the playing of computer games and the use of Instagram to Friday evenings and weekends. Hector’s friends would come by, the Xbox came on, and the iPad was

used for Instagramming. The atmosphere was not wholesome or healthy. This attempt at the controlled use of technology for fun felt like a waste of time. It was only by giving up completely that a fresh approach to work and play could be enjoyed. I sold the Xbox and put the iPad away. I would have disposed of the iPad entirely, but sometimes it is more comfortable to read a script in a reclining position. It no longer mattered to me that other boys had Xboxes in their bedrooms to be played with whenever they wanted. Hector was not pleased. He raged about unfairness. By then I was certain about ridding the house of computers for use as entertainment. It is now alarming to me to see the use of technology to distract and seemingly amuse children. I now see playing computer games and children using social media as a way of distracting them from the real pleasures in life, in actual and not virtual things. Technology as entertainment hindered my child’s focus, imaginative playing, conversation, and it was addictive and vacuous. There is, of course, nothing like retrospect. At the hairdresser the other day, one stylist held an iPad in a child’s eye line while another washed the child’s hair. It was the child’s mother who had requested this for her “It no longer mattered daughter. The shampoo to me that other boys bottles, sounds, smells and activity of this busy had Xboxes in their Knightsbridge salon bedrooms to be played could not penetrate the with whenever they interest of the six-yearold girl. It has become wanted. Hector was not de rigueur to use pleased. He raged about technology to distract unfairness. By then I was children while travelling. certain about ridding the The clouds, lights or fields from the window house of computers for of a moving car, or use as entertainment.” indeed conversation, are considered not enough to spark the imagination of a young mind. I was ignorant about how best to use technology when I had Hector and not confident about the things I do know. I know that sport and being outdoors is good for you, I know that learning and talking are nourishing and that discipline, however hard, brings greater long-term >>>

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satisfaction than succumbing to the hypnotic trance of watching TV or playing computer games. Being a mother was a new experience. It took time for me to have the courage to stick to my convictions. I know that being bored is not a bad thing. Just as ‘necessity is the mother of invention’, boredom leads ultimately to productivity and creativity – if not that, then time to be still and let the mind wander (a luxurious pastime later in life!).

Since the Xbox left the house and the iPad is out of reach, television is losing its daily appeal. Sometimes television is forgotten about altogether. Hector’s focus and concentration have improved. Now, not only does it not bother me when the children have ‘nothing’ to do, it pleases me. I know it is good for them. I watch what happens: imaginations kick in and pictures are drawn, games invented, conversations begin and flourish. Yesterday evening the children acted the witches’ scene from Macbeth! Children should play, jump, talk, make noise, read, paint and feel – this is their childhood – a time to dream, dance, and laugh on a whim, when the sun shining on a dusty path can bring pebbles to life. In preparation for the future, children need also to learn the discipline of focus. It has always been my dream to be a mother. I must make the best of my responsibility to show them how to enjoy life, live well, and reach their potential. Since Hector was born, our household has evolved; there is not just me and Hector anymore. There is me and Dominic, Hector, Maud, Nancy, and my youngest son, Blaise. I have more experience and trust myself more. We will never have an Xbox again, but we love our computer. The easy access it gives us to information is even more amazing than the invention I imagined it would be when I was a little girl. We also love pens, paints, books, sport, cooking, the outdoors, and each other, and that is the most fun of all! Issue 71 Autumn 2015 £5 / $9 US

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: FEATUREFLASH | DREAMSTIME.COM

Mothering & Intuition

Profile

Camilla Rutherford is an English actress best known for her roles in Gosford Park, Rome and, more recently, the television mini series, Fleming. Camilla grew up with her sisters in Holland Park. Her father was a writer for The Financial Times and her mother was a magistrate. She studied mathematics at Newcastle University and was a top model, appearing on the covers of Spanish Vogue and Spanish Harper’s Bazaar. Camilla was the face of Max Factor in 2004. She will next be seen in the film Alleycats, released later this year. Camilla feels happiest when she is being creative and has started a blog called ‘The English Mother’ as an outlet for her creative pursuits: www.theenglishmother.com.

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Featuring:

Camilla Rutherford

Families and Technology

Elizabeth Pantley Intuition and Sleep

Michel Odent

Do We Need Midwives?

Naomi Aldort

Intuition or Anxiety?

Issue No. 71 ISSN 1476-0150

THE MOTHER 95

essence INFO

Website: www.themothermagazine.co.uk This article was first published in The Mother magazine issue 71.


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The glamorous Principality of Monaco Monaco, the second smallest country in the world after the Vatican City, covers only 200 hectares and is subdivided into the traditional districts of La Condamine, which includes the port, Monaco Ville, known as ‘The Rock’, Fontvielle and Monte Carlo. Situated on the French Riviera, overlooking the sparkling translucent waters of the Mediterranean, Monaco is a tax haven and has achieved the world’s highest GDP per capita, writes Rebecca Underwood.

M

onaco is known for the glamorous Grimaldi royal family, now headed by Prince Albert II. In 1956 the world was captivated when the elegant Hollywood film star Grace Kelly married the dashing Prince Rainier III and since then the family has remained firmly in the public eye. Grimaldi descendants have ruled Monaco since 1297 when Francesco Grimaldi, disguised as a Franciscan monk, seized the fortress on the Rock of Monaco. In 1633, Honoré II, the first prince of Monaco, achieved independent sovereignty from Spain and in 1641 Louis XIII of France signed the Treaty of Péronne, leading to the Grimaldi family’s continuous rule, with the exception of two decades during the French Revolution when the family were exiled and the palace seized and used as a military hospital. The Prince’s Palace was returned to the Grimaldi family in 1814 and restored by each successor. Today, the state apartments are open to the public from April to October and include the striking Mirror Gallery, used during state visits. Take a leisurely stroll along the The Red Room is sumptuously furnished in the style of Louis XV Place du Palais where visitors and leads onto the York Room gather to admire the striking where King George III’s younger palace exterior, reflecting a brother, Prince Edward Duke of mixture of medieval fortifications York and Albany, died in 1787 as a result of illness during a sea voyage and Renaissance architecture. bound for Genoa. The Blue Room, one of the highlights of the tour, is used for official functions and features portraits of the Grimaldi family hanging on walls lined with blue silk brocade and illuminated by sparkling Venetian chandeliers suspended from an ornate ceiling. After the tour, be sure to take a leisurely stroll along the Place du Palais where visitors gather to admire the striking palace exterior, reflecting a mixture of medieval fortifications and Renaissance architecture. Mingle with the crowds and view the changing of the guard, which takes place every day just before noon.

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The Royal Guard PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MONACO PRESS CENTRE PHOTOS


Leisure breaks | MONACO

Prince’s Palace, Monaco PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MONACO PRESS CENTRE PHOTOS

Monaco’s Grand Prix PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MONACO PRESS CENTRE PHOTOS

Descendants of the Grimaldi family, including Princess Grace and Prince Rainier III, are buried in Monaco’s Roman Catholic Cathedral of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception, a short walk away from the palace. Consecrated in 1875, the magnificent cathedral was erected on the site of the first parish church built in 1252. Monte Carlo, the administrative district of Monaco, is the place to be seen, and appeals to a host of international celebrities, royalty and prominent figures on the world stage, all keen to attend popular events such as the annual Grand Prix motor race, which began in 1929. It is said that the 3.2 kilometre Formula One circuit takes six weeks to erect and is the most challenging racing track due to its narrow tunnel, elevation changes and hairpin bends. Stages of the Monte Carlo Rally are also held in the principality and it is thought to be one of the most arduous rallying events attended by thousands of ardent fans. For a more tranquil experience, head for the Terrasses de Fontvieille and view the personal collection of vintage cars owned by the late Prince Rainier III. Highlights include the champion William GroverWilliams’ Bugatti Type 35, which won the first Monaco Grand Prix in 1929, and the Citroën DS3 WRC, driven by Sébastien Loeb, the champion of the 2013 Monte Carlo Rally. The collection also includes some of the most celebrated models from Rolls Royce, Jaguar, Mercedes and Maserati. Nature lovers will find a visit to Fontvieille Park and the Princess Grace Rose Garden of interest. The picturesque lake bordered by lush lawns, colourful flower beds, swaying palms and olive trees is the ideal spot for a breather. The garden features a meandering footpath with contemporary sculptures displayed along the way and the fragrance of 8,000 rose bushes hangs in the air. Another attraction is the Jardin Exotique, which houses the world’s largest collection of succulents and cacti. Exhibits include species from Central and South America, South Africa, Eastern Arabia and the USA. Note the entry ticket for the Exotic Garden includes access to the Observatory Cave, 100 metres above sea level, at the foot of the cliff. >>>

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The Oceanographic Museum resembles a palace and reflects the architectural style of the Baroque Revival with a striking façade towering over the Mediterranean.

A local at the Oceanographic Museum PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MONACO PRESS CENTRE PHOTOS

Another popular attraction is the Oceanographic Museum, located on the side of the Rock of Monaco. Founded in 1910 by Prince Albert I, the building resembles a palace, known as the temple of the sea. The palace reflects the architectural style of the Baroque Revival with a striking façade towering over the Mediterranean. Visit aquariums and view the extensive collection of marine life, which includes jellyfish, sea urchins, sea cucumbers, starfish and seahorses. Be sure to visit the six metre deep Shark’s Lagoon and Turtle’s Island located on the terrace where there is a café. Sit comfortably while enjoying a snack ‘al fresco’ and admire panoramic views across the ocean below. For those with funds to spare and intent on ‘breaking the bank of Monte Carlo’, the Casino de Monte Carlo beckons, or others may prefer to splurge on a high end shopping experience at the Metropole Shopping Centre. Temptations include Max Mara, Kenzo, Tommy Hilfiger and Hugo Boss and if weighed down with purchases, there’s not far to go to The Princess Grace Rose Garden PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MONACO PRESS CENTRE PHOTOS

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Hotel Metropole, Monte Carlo

relax. The luxurious Hotel Metropole, which dates back to 1886, is steps away. The opulent accommodation is spacious and comfortable and the service is of the highest standard. Features include the Odyssey swimming pool, designed by Karl Lagerfeld, with plump sun loungers, verdant gardens and a sundeck overlooking the pool. For a very special dining experience, Joël Robuchon, the hotel’s main restaurant, offers a wide range of Mediterranean dishes. The ‘small portions’ menu is an interesting concept: proving popular with diners as they are free to choose any number of dishes to taste. The deep fried shrimps in a vermicelli coating with a delicious herb and jasmine dip need to be reordered. For night birds, The Living Room Club, located on Avenue des Spélugues, is one of the ‘coolest’ places to be and an ideal spot to practice dance moves. Music is an eclectic mixture of disco, summer hits and classics, and the action begins at 11pm and continues until sunrise. Should visitors prefer a more relaxed spot, head for the terrace, which overlooks the casino gardens. Alternatively, for a quiet tipple accompanied by a jazz band, visit the Sass Café on Avenue Princess Grace. Join the jet set and visit the Principality of Monaco for a taste of the finer things in life. v


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MARCH 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 61


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Mincer of the British Empire Julian Clary has toured the world with his one-man shows and remains one of the country’s most popular entertainers. Emma Cox talked to him about his current nationwide tour, The Joy of Mincing. Q Why have you named your tour, The Joy of Mincing? A I always like to get ‘mincing’ into the title. We’ve had Lord of the Mince, Natural Born Mincer and Mincing Machine was my first tour in 1989. I don’t know why; it sets the tone, doesn’t it? I suppose mincing, apart from being a means of walking around, is a way of life. The Joy of Mincing is a declaration of the joy of life despite disapproval, perhaps. Q Do you still feel people disapprove? A Well, exactly. I think there probably is some (disapproval). And mincing, which is an old fashioned word, was probably in its day borne out of standing up in the face of that disapproval. Q Is the show as rude as ever – you haven’t toned things down? A No, I don’t think so. It’s the one time you can let rip a bit, on stage. I don’t want to be filthy for the sake of it, but I think it’s a comic device. You just exaggerate who you really are on stage. I’m quite fond of moments of vulgarity. Q You’ve been performing for 30 years. How has comedy changed during that time? A Yes, it’s my 30th anniversary next year. Comedy has changed beyond all recognition. It used to be an eclectic selection of people in small rooms above pubs, in the 1980s. Our comedy was a reaction against the rightwing men in bow ties who were being offered as light entertainment in those days. Q And has your comedy changed? A Yes, a bit. I think you evolve, whether you want to or not. There was a certain amount of anger and delight in confronting people when I started, which has more or less gone now. Making people laugh is my main aim in life these days. I don’t think there’s so much to be angry about now.

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BOTH IMAGES PHOTO COPYRIGHT: EDDIE BOTSIO


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Comedy | JULIAN CLARY

Q Do you have fans who have been following your career for that full 30 years? A There are, and they bring their children along now. I’m very fond of them, you know. You don’t know their names necessarily, but it’s always a joy to see a familiar face. There’s a delightful family from Tunbridge Wells I’ve known since the boy was 13 and now he’s a grownup. It’s charming. We talk about the old days at the Hackney Empire, or our aches and pains. There’s a connection there, even though we don’t really know each other, because on one level we do.

bored if you’re just reeling off the same old nonsense. I’m always interested in the audience and their stories. People are very funny; they never fail to amuse.

Q What sort of stories will you be telling on this tour? A Well, there’s a rather long story about how I once saved Joan Collins’ life in a swimming pool in St Tropez. It’s a true story, which I won’t give away now, but it’s a long, meandering tale that fills the first half. Then the second half is about MBEs. I’ve noticed a lot of my friends in the business are getting these awards. They’re handing them out like Smarties. I think, “Ooh, I’d like one of those”, but it’s never happened so I’m obviously not favoured by the Establishment. I can only blame myself… So during the show, I give myself an award and call it ‘Mincer of the British Empire. I’m making lots of these MBEs and handing them out to people in the audience. Just the lucky few, you understand: it’s not included in the ticket price. I’m always looking for an excuse to talk to the audience. That’s what keeps me going. You can get

Q Is there anywhere you’re particularly looking forward to visiting on your tour? A I love Glasgow. My rule used to be that the further north you go, the more extrovert people are. But I’ve changed my mind about that because I’ve had lovely gigs down south as well as in grim northern towns. I’m an ‘any time, any place’ kinda gal, I guess.

Q I assume that if you were offered an MBE in real life, you would accept? A I’d bite their hands off! I think I’ve been too rude about the Royal Family over the years, unfortunately. I’m probably on some kind of black list somewhere.

Q Do you find it difficult being on tour? Other comedians complain it is lonely and you eat badly because you’re constantly on the road. A Well, nobody’s making you do it. And there’s a Waitrose in every town these days. It’s probably just the dreary, married heterosexual types that complain. This is what I wanted to do 30 years ago, and I’m still doing it – standing on stage, talking about myself and getting applause for it. What’s not to like? I suppose it’s a bit weird coming off stage and being on your own, but it doesn’t bother me. Q What was your worst ever gig? A It was in Chatham, in Kent. I don’t know what was wrong with them, but nobody laughed for two hours. I was seething. I refused to ever go back. If you search through all of my novels, I’m rude about Chatham in all of them. It clearly scarred me for life, and I’m still seeking revenge. My children’s books are translated into twelve different languages and I’m refusing to change the name of Chatham in any of them. They will know, even in Brazil, the horrible truth that Chatham is not a town where they laugh at Julian Clary. Q Your personal life seems to have changed as much as your career – you’ve turned your back on partying and now live an idyllic, rural lifestyle in a village in Kent. Is that right? A Yes. Well that’s what I’m telling you anyway. I think there’s nothing drearier than a 56 year old homosexual hanging around Soho in lycra. Mercifully, one grows out of that. Thank goodness. Q You don’t miss those days, at all? A Absolutely not. You’d have to pay a lot of money to get me into a nightclub, sniffing and snorting and dragging some trollop home with me. Yuck. I like to keep myself nice these days. Q What’s happened to the old outfits? A I’ve still got them, though goodness knows what I’ll ever do with them. I might bring some of them on tour as it’s my 30-year anniversary… A kind of retrospective fashion show. I used to look at all these drawings of rubber outfits covered in feathers and think, “My goodness, that’s outrageous, I couldn’t possibly.” But that was part of the fun. >>>

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PHOTO COPYRIGHT: TONY BRIGGS

Q What hobbies do you have? A I used to like yoga, although I haven’t been for ages. It started morphing into an encounter group with people talking about depression and marriage problems. I just wanted my hamstrings stretched. So I said “Namaste” and didn’t return. I like pottering around my garden. Am I good? I’m very good at walking around and telling my gardener what to do. Q If I’d have told you years ago you would end up living in the country with dogs, pottering around your garden, would you have believed me? A I probably would, actually. Because as a child I was very into animals and nature. Obviously I got distracted for a few years. With gay urban and all the rest of it. So I’ve come full circle.

Profile: Julian Clary Julian is a comedian, entertainer and novelist who has toured the world with his one-man shows. He became a household name in the late 1980s, and remains one of the country’s most popular entertainers. Julian has appeared on numerous popular TV shows including Celebrity Big Brother (which he won), Strictly Come Dancing, This Morning, QI, Have I Got News For You and is a regular panelist on BBC Radio 4’s Just a Minute. Julian also hosted his own natural history series for ITV entitled Nature Nuts in August 2015. He has starred in West End productions of Taboo and Cabaret, and appears in pantomime most years. Julian publishes his second children’s book, The Bolds to the Rescue, this month.

Q Are you ever tempted to wear them again? A Don’t be silly. I sniff them sometimes. Just for old times’ sake. Scent is very evocative, isn’t it? A lung full of my old diamante jockstrap and I’m immediately transported back to the London Palladium in 1993.

Q What do you think the public perception is of you, and do you think they'd be surprised by your real life? A Maybe people imagine I’m camp and outrageous all the time and that I wear full make-up and glittery outfits when I’m at home doing the hoovering. In fact I wear just a touch of raspberry lip balm and a drip-dry kimono. Just like anyone else. Q Are you well known in your village? A Well, who knows? Most people here have got better things to do than get excited about celebrities in their midst. Mind you, I was in the front garden recently and a woman drove past with a friend and then I heard her car screech to a halt. I heard her say, “There he is, look, there he is.” Then she shouted out to me, “Where’s the other one?”, meaning Paul O’Grady, who lives in the same village. Quite rude, I thought. Probably from Ashford. I am aware that I am sometimes slightly snappy with members of the public.

Q Do you ever wear make-up anymore? A Only on tour. I like the glittery lips and all of that. Not for television. I think on high definition it looks a bit peculiar.

Q Your children’s book, The Bolds, was hugely successful. Did you feel any pressure writing the second one? A No. I’m onto my third now. They flow out of me, I don’t know where they’re all coming from. Making children laugh is a whole new thing for me, it’s lovely. No child pretends to laugh – it’s very genuine.

Q How do you feel about ageing – do you enjoy it? A It’s not on the top of my list of enjoyable things, no. Although I am thrilled with my grey hair. I’ve turned from a fluffy chicken into a silver fox. It’s very interesting: when you’re young, there are all these things you want to achieve. Then when you get to your fifties you’ve either done them or you haven’t, so the physical deterioration is offset by the things you can tick off the list. In that respect, each decade is better than the last. Although I’m sure one reaches a tipping point where that’s not the case anymore.

Q What about acting? A I don’t have any burning desire to act. I’ve spent so long creating my persona that it seems strange to let go and be someone else. I’m always looking for a surprising offer, mind you. Good things often come along as a sort of divine intervention. Just as you’re thinking, “What am I going to do next year?”, something wonderful comes along. And if it doesn’t, I’ll think up my own fun and games in the privacy of my luxury home. And I’ll make sure I draw the curtains before I start. 

Q How do you feel when you look in the mirror? A I think it’s very easy to delude yourself. I might think to myself, “I need to lose some weight”, so I won’t have any butter on my toast, and the next day I look again and think, “Gosh, I’ve lost two stone.” I’m fine about myself, really. It could have been a lot worse.

essence INFO

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The Joy of Mincing tours nationwide from 25 March to 27 May 2016 and at Dorking Halls on 5 May. Websites: www.dorking halls.co.uk & www.julianclary.co.uk Telephone: (Dorking Halls) 01306 881717


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WIN

a pair of tickets to THRILLER Live Now in its record breaking eighth year, THRILLER Live is a spectacular concert created to celebrate the career of the world’s greatest entertainer. Already seen by over 3.5 million people in over thirty countries, THRILLER Live continues to moonwalk around the world, taking theatregoers on a visual, audio and electrifying journey through the magic of Michael Jackson’s forty year musical history. Experience over two hours of non-stop hits, from pop to rock, soul to disco, in a show that pays homage to Jackson’s legendary live performances and innovative dance moves executed with flair, precision and passion. Expect favourite songs delivered by an exceptionally talented cast and band, including: I Want You Back, ABC, Can You Feel It, Off The Wall, The Way You Make Me Feel, Smooth Criminal, Beat It, Billie Jean, Dirty Diana, Bad, Rock With You, They Don’t Care About Us and Dangerous. To win a pair of tickets to THRILLER Live at the Lyric Theater, Shaftesbury Avenue, London, simply visit www.essence-magazine.co.uk and answer the following question: Who recorded ‘Thriller’ and made it a hit in 1982? a) Michael Bublé b) Michael Bolton c) Michael Jackson Closing date 30 March 2016.

essence INFO

Lyric Theater 29 Shaftesbury Avenue, London W1D 7ES Box office: 0844 482 9674 Website: www.thrillerlive.com and www.lyric.theater/london Terms and conditions apply. Prize is valid for Monday-Thursday performances until 28 April 2016. Subject to availability. Prize is as stated and cannot be transferred or exchanged. No cash alternative will be offered. Images show previous cast member.

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essence events

spotlight on... Kat Rusby in concert at G Live, Guildford Friday 8 April, 7.30pm English folk singer and songwriter Kate Rusby will appear at G Live for one night only on Friday 8 April. Kate is known as a remarkably interpretive singer with the ability to transport an audience via the simplicity of the songs she chooses to sing. From being a nominee for 1999’s Mercury prize – almost unknown for a folk singer then and now – to her second solo album Sleepless to 2014’s Ghost, Kate has stayed true to her folk and acoustic roots. At G Live she will, as ever, be joined on stage by the best of British folk musicians who form her band, including husband Damien O’Kane on banjo and tenor guitar; Duncan Lyall, double bass; Nick Cooke, diatonic accordion and Steve Byrnes on bouzouki. Kate has a winning combination of beautiful singing, engaging Yorkshire wit and intuitive support of the band, all leading to an unforgettable concert experience.

Information: 01483 369350 or glive.co.uk

theatre Richmond Theatre Richmond Tuesday 8 to Saturday 12 March 42nd Street With a classic score including Lullaby of Broadway. Tuesday 15 to Saturday 19 March Get Carter An adaptation of the story from Mike Hodge’s film starring Michael Caine. Sunday 20 March Ed Byrne Outside, Looking In Comic on tour with new show. Tuesday 22 to Saturday 26 March Gangsta Granny The world premiere of David Walliams’ adventure story. Tuesday 5 to Saturday 9 April Goodnight Mister Tom The Olivier award-winning production returns to the stage. Tickets: 0844 871 7651 or ambassadortickets.com/richmond

New Victoria Theatre Woking Monday 7 to Saturday 12 March The Last Tango Vincent Simone and Flavia Cacace perform on their last tour.

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Tuesday 15 to Saturday 19 March Hairspray The Musical Smash hit musical comedy. Tuesday 29 March to Saturday 9 April The Bodyguard Award-winning musical starring Alexander Burke. Tickets: 0844 871 7645 or ambassadortickets.com/woking

Cranleigh Arts Centre Cranleigh Friday 18 March The Noise Next Door: Noise In The Hood A night of mind-blowing songs, characters and punchlines from masters of off-the-cuff comedy. Information: 01483 278000 or cranleighartscentre.org

Dorking Halls Dorking Friday 1 April Gordon Buchanan An evening of recollections from this acclaimed wildlife cameraman and presenter of The Bear Family and Me. See the interview with Gordon earlier in essence. Information: 01306 881717 or dorkinghalls.co.uk


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essence events Guildford Thursday 31 March to Saturday 2 April The Man in the Moon presents: James and the Giant Peach Roald Dahl’s adventure tale performed by the Electric Theatre’s resident youth theatre.

Sunday 13 March Adam Hills: Clown Heart Popular comedian on tour. Recommended for ages 14+. Tuesday 22 to Saturday 26 March The Merry Wives Northern Broadsides presents this fun, physical comedy with a bevy of colourful characters.

Information: 01483 444789 or

Information: 020 8174 0090 or

electrictheatre.co.uk

rosetheatrekingston.org

Epsom Playhouse

Yvonne Arnaud Theatre

Epsom

Guildford

Thursday 17 March Vienna Festival Ballet’s Coppelia A magical and comical classic tale for all the family. Tuesday 29 March Rapunzel A familiar tale, with a new spin, creating a musical for all. Thursday 31 March Lee Nelson: Suited & Booted Bane of Kanye and Sepp Blatter, Lee extends his tour into 2016.

Saturday 12 to Saturday 19 March Our House: The Madness Musical Madness hit songs are brought to the Yvonne Arnaud by the Guildford School of Acting. Monday 21 to Saturday 26 March Toast Acclaimed drama starring Matthew Kelly and Simon Greenall. Tuesday 29 March to Saturday 2 April The Father Kenneth Cranham reprises his West End performance in this winner of the 2014 Molière Award for Best Play.

Information: 01372 742555 or epsomplayhouse.co.uk

Farnham Maltings

Tickets: 01483 440000

Farnham

or yvonne-arnaud.co.uk

Tuesday 15 March Backstage in Biscuit Land, by Touretteshero Two woman show comprising comedy, puppetry, singing and more. Friday 1 April Ground Control A perfect space tale for children aged seven to 12 years. Information: 01252 745444 or farnhammaltings.com

Guildford Fringe

The Boileroom Guildford Monday 21 March, 7pm October Drift Rising newcomers perform a high energy live show for one night only at The Boileroom. Entry requirement: age 14+. Information: 01483 440022 or

Saturday 19 March, 8pm Guildford Gag House Comedy Club For the full line-up, see website.

theboileroom.net

Information: guildfordfringe.com

Cranleigh

Kingston-upon-Thames Tuesday 8 to Saturday 19 March Beryl: The Greatest Woman on Two Wheels Maxine Peake’s stage writing debut, the play celebrates the life of sporting legend Beryl Burton.

The Last Tango, New Victoria Theatre, Woking

music

The Star Inn, Quarry St, Guildford

Rose Theatre

Photo credit: Manuel Harlan

The Electric Theatre

October Drift, The Boileroom

Cranleigh Arts Centre Wednesday 16 March, 7.30pm Júlia Pusker: violin Hungarian violinist performs Bach, Beethoven and more. Saturday 19 March, 8.30pm Jo Harman & Company Female blues/soul singer. Information: 01483 278000 or cranleighartscentre.org

68 essence-magazine.co.uk | MARCH 2016 The Noise Next Door, Cranleigh Arts Centre


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Children walk among daffodils in spring, RHS Garden Wisley. Credit: RHS/Adam Duckworth

spotlight on... Easter Garden Detectives and the Lindt Gold Bunny Hunt, RHS Garden Wisley, Woking Saturday 19 March to Sunday 10 April RHS Garden Wisley has a multitude of events on offer this spring, including the chance to take part in the trail of the Lindt gold bunny. A full day of Easter fun is guaranteed from 19 March to 10 April with arts and crafts sessions available, as well as following the clues leading to a delicious Easter treat. In addition, Wisley has its Spring Plant Fair running between Friday 18 to Sunday 20 March where quality spring plants from specialist growers and nurseries will be available. Other unmissable events will be Wisley’s Shohin Bonsai Weekend, Saturday 2 to Sunday 3 April, and the Birds of Prey Weekend on Saturday 9 and Sunday 10 April where agility displays by these magnificent birds will take place at 11am and 2pm.

Information: 0845 260 9000 or rhs.org.uk/wisley

The Electric Theatre Guildford Monday 14 to Saturday 19 March The Guildford Spring Music Festival 2016 The seventh Festival presents a week of performances from Michael Collins, University of Surrey Big Band, the GSA Singers, The Surrey Mozart Players and many more. Information: 01483 444789 or

Tuesday 29 March, 8pm The ELO Experience The acclaimed tribute band. Thursday 31 March, 8pm Christy Moore The king of Irish roots music performs for one night only. Friday 8 April, 7.30pm Kate Rusby See Spotlight on page 66.

exhibitions The Art Agency Esher

Information: 01483 369350 or

Monday 14 March to Saturday 30 April Pam Carter Scottish artist Pam Carter exhibits her strong and expressive landscape paintings of Skye and the Outer Isles.

glive.co.uk

Information: 01372 466740 or

electrictheatre.co.uk

theartagency.co.uk

Occam Singers Holy Trinity Church, Guildford

Corner Gallery

Farnham

Saturday 12 March, 7.30pm Saint John Passion A performance of Johann Sebastian Bach’s masterpiece. Occam Singers will be accompanied by baroque orchestra Ars Eloquentiae and conducted by David Gibson.

Carshalton Beeches

Information: 01252 745444 or

To Saturday 2 April Nicky Chubb Surrey-based artist Nicky Chubb continues her first solo exhibition.

occamsingers.co.uk

Southern Pro Musica

Information: 01483 444751 or guildford.gov.uk/guildfordhouse

Haslemere Museum To Saturday 26 March Shared Art annual exhibition A large range of artwork to view with the theme: ‘Up the garden path’. Information: 01428 642112 or haslemeremuseum.co.uk

Information: 020 8669 5899 or

The Lightbox Gallery and Museum

Dorking Museum

Woking

West Street, Dorking

To Sunday 8 May John Constable: Observing the Weather An exhibition which concentrates on Constable’s unique ability to combine artistic skill with scientific observation to record changes in weather phenomena. The works range from pen and ink studies to watercolour and oil sketches.

G Live

Holy Trinity Church, Guildford

Guildford

Friday 11 March, 7.30pm Saint John Passion The professional chamber orchestra performs works by Haydn, Mozart and Malcolm Arnold.

Until Saturday 26 March Dorking 1915: WW1 Home Front exhibition Following on from Dorking 2014, an exhibition focusing on the changes and sacrifices made by the people of Dorking during 1915.

Information: 01428 682158 or

Information: 01306 876591 or

southernpromusica.org

dorkingmuseum.org.uk

Monday 14 March, 7pm The Stranglers Veteran band on a UK tour showcasing the legendary Black and White album, along with other material, both new and old.

Saturday 12 March to Saturday 2 April Surrey Photographic Association Biennial Exhibition 2016 Showcasing the work of over 50 camera clubs in Surrey, west Sussex and north-east Hampshire.

corner-gallery.com

Information: 01252 783977 or

farnhammaltings.com

Guildford

Haslemere

Farnham Maltings Saturday 19 March, 7.45pm Farnborough Symphony Orchestra Spring Concert The orchestra will be joined by critically-acclaimed violinist So-Ock Kim to perform Elgar’s Violin Concerto.

Guildford House Gallery

MARCH 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 69


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essence events

Cranleigh Arts Centre 01483 278000 or cranleighartscentre.org Farnham Maltings 01252 745444 or farnhammaltings.com Odeon Esher 0871 2244007 or odeon.co.uk/fanatic/film_times/s89/esher Odeon Epsom 0871 2244007 or odeon.co.uk/fanatic/film_times/s88/epsom Odeon Guildford 0871 2244007 or odeon.co.uk/fanatic/film_times/s92/guildford The Screen Walton 01932 252825 or screencinemas.co.uk The Ambassadors Cinema, Woking 0844 871 6743 or ambassadortickets.com/cinema

To Sunday 13 March Heath Robinson – Saved for the Nation A cross-section of Robinson’s cartoons from the inter-war years. To Sunday 10 April Not all Contemporary Art is Rubbish! The Ingram Collection Works from up-and-coming artists.

national trust

Information: 01483 737800 or

hunts. A few are shown here, but

thelightbox.org.uk

visit nationaltrust.org.uk for more.

McAllister Thomas

Box Hill

Godalming

near Dorking

Saturday 12 to Tuesday 29 March Featured artists are Emma Haggas and Dominique Kenway.

Friday 25 to Monday 28 March, 10am–2pm Cadbury Easter Egg hunt Box Hill is also a great place to fly a kite, ride a bike and lots more.

Information: 01483 860591 or mcallisterthomasfineart.co.uk

Courtesy The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

cinemas

Cloister Lilies, 1891, watercolour and gouache on paper by Marie Spartali Stillman, Watts Gallery

National Trust properties offer perfect venues in which visitors can play and relax. This Easter, don’t miss the Cadbury Easter Egg

Information: 01372 220644

New Ashgate Gallery To Saturday 16 April Rising Stars 2016 Exciting new crafts by emerging makers including jewellery, stoneware, paintings and lots more. Information: 01252 713208 or newashgate.org.uk

Watts Gallery Compton, Guildford To Sunday 5 June Poetry in Beauty: The Pre-Raphaelite Art of Marie Spartali Stillman An exhibition demonstrating the quality and importance of a most admired female artist. Information: 01483 813593 or wattsgallery.org.uk

Claremont Landscape Garden Esher Friday 25 and Saturday 26 March, 10.30am–4pm Cadbury Easter Egg hunt With an Easter bonnet competition and parade on Saturday at 3pm. Monday 4 to Friday 8 April, 10.30am–12.30pm Children’s craft activities Holiday craft activities. Information: 01372 467806

Hatchlands Park East Clandon, Guildford Friday 25 to Monday 28 March, 11am–4pm Cadbury Easter Egg hunt Chocolate prizes for solving clues, a

© National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

Farnham

Easter at Bocketts Farm

70 essence-magazine.co.uk | MARCH 2016 Cadbury Easter Egg hunt, Polesden Lacey, National Trust


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children’s natural adventure area, Sylvanian Families Nature Trail plus 400 acres of woodland to explore. Information: 01483 222482

out & about Bocketts Farm

near Dorking

Leatherhead

Saturday 26 March, 1–4pm Cadbury Easter Egg hunt A trail in woodlands once owned by William the Conqueror.

Friday 25 March to Sunday 10 April Easter Eggstravaganza See newborn lambs, goats, cows and follow an Easter trail.

Information: 01372 220644

Information: bockettsfarm.co.uk

Leith Hill Place

Birdworld

Dorking

Farnham

The Living Planet Centre

Surrey Wildlife Trust

Friday 25 to Monday 28 March, 11am–4pm Cadbury Easter Egg hunt A musical trail to follow at the childhood home of composer Ralph Vaughan Williams.

Wednesday 30 March Easter Egg hunt Crack the clues to claim an egg. Monday 4 to Friday 8 April Pirate Week Themed shows, games and trails.

Woking

Various locations

Information: 01306 711685

Information: birdworld.co.uk

Tuesday 5 and Thursday 7 April Panda power workshops Create a collaged panda capturing the world around us that WWF works to protect. Suitable for children aged four and over.

Polesden Lacey

Brooklands Museum

Great Bookham, near Dorking

Weybridge

Loseley Park

Friday 25 March to Sunday 10 April, 11am–3pm Cadbury Easter Egg hunt A mystery trail to follow.

Tuesday 29 March to Friday 8 April , 10am–5pm Easter school holiday family fun On weekdays take part in the car rides, look out for Bertie Bear or try the family workshop.

Guildford

Saturday 12 March, 2–4pm Coulsdon Common A walk through newly-created wood pasture and along hedgerows. Thursday 7 April, 1–2.30pm and 3–4.30pm Undersea Explorers Jump into a pool at Goldsworth Primary School, Woking, transformed into an underwater environment. For ages seven to 11. Booking essential.

Information: 01932 857381 or

Information: loseleypark.co.uk

Courtesy SWT/Nick Blake

Holmwood Common

Undersea Explorers, Surrey Wildlife Trust

Information: wwf.org.uk/whatson

Information: 01372 452048

Runnymede and Ankerwycke

Thursday 17 March, 7.30pm ‘Jane Austen at Home’ in the Great Hall of Loseley House A recital and dinner celebrating the life of one of our greatest novelists.

brooklandsmuseum.com

Painshill Park

near Egham

Information: 01483 795440 or surreywildlifetrust.org

sport

Dorking Museum

Cobham

West Street, Dorking

Swan Barn Farm

Saturday 19 March, 2–4pm Family activity Saturday: Easter Egg hunt Follow the clues around the museum to claim a prize.

Tuesday 29 March to Friday 1 April and Monday 4 to Friday 8 April Wild Easter Camp Bivouac building and mud sculptures for ages eight to 13. Advance booking required.

Haslemere

Information: 01306 876591 or

Information: 01932 868113 or

Sunday 20 March, start 9am The Palace Half Starting on the driveway of the Palace, the course is flat with a mixture of terrain.

Saturday 2 April, 10.30am–3.30pm Cadbury Easter Egg hunt Chocolate on offer with great picnic and walking opportunities.

dorkingmuseum.org.uk

painshill.co.uk

Information: palacehalf.com

Information: 01428 652359

Hampton Court Green

Winkworth Arboretum

Friday 25 to Tuesday 29 March Traditional funfair on the Green.

Godalming

Information: irvinleisure.co.uk

Saturday 26 and Sunday 27 March, 10.30am–4pm Cadbury Easter Egg hunt Trail at the site of politics. Information: 01784 432891

Sunday 27 and Monday 28 March, 10.30am–4pm Cadbury Easter Egg Hunt A trail with special activities for children, along with impressive displays of spring flowers.

George Irvin’s Ultimate Funfair

Godstone Farm Godstone, near Caterham

Information: 01483 208477 or

Friday 25 March to Sunday 10 April Easter fun Baby animals galore and plenty of Easter activities on offer.

nationaltrust.org.uk

Information: godstonefarm.co.uk

Hampton Court Palace Half Marathon 2016 Hampton Court

farmers’ markets Camberley Saturday 19 March, 10am–3pm Cranleigh Every Friday, 9.30–11am Epsom Sunday 6 March and 3 April, 9.30am–1.30pm Farnham Sunday 27 March, 10am–1.30pm Guildford Tuesday 1 March and 5 April, 10.30am–3.30pm Haslemere Sunday 6 March and 3 April, 10am–1.30pm Milford Sunday 20 March, 10am–1.30pm Ripley Saturday 12 March, 9am–1pm Walton-on-Thames Saturday 5 March and 2 April, 9.30am–2pm Woking Thursday 17 March, 9am–2pm

MARCH 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 71


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Golf at St Enodoc intrinsic to Cornwall’s ‘Rock life’ Once a quiet fishing village in north Cornwall, Rock is now better known as a holiday spot for the sailing, windsurfing and waterskiing set and the destination of choice by the likes of none other than Prince William during his younger years. Indeed, such is the abundance of second home owners in the vicinity that Rock is often referred to as the Kensington of Cornwall or, more recently, as Surrey-on-Sea. Rock is also home to one of England’s finest golf clubs, St Enodoc, that forms an intrinsic part of the so-called ‘Rock life’.

L

ocated on the Camel Estuary, opposite the lively and fashionable fishing port of Padstow, made famous of course by celebrity chef Rick Stein, Rock is host to St Enodoc Golf Club. It was founded over 125 years ago and designed by the legendary James Braid to romp in between and up and down the natural contours of the seaside sand dunes, giving rise to a course considered one of Braid’s greatest masterpieces. This revered championship links, as the saying goes, is ‘once trodden, never forgotten’. For many taking time off in Rock, a visit to St Enodoc is all part of the holiday enjoyment. Despite its venerable age, this forward-thinking golf club has shifted away from the stuffy scene that many of the traditional clubs are so often associated with and today it welcomes visitors, including families and children, with wide open arms. St Enodoc not only offers a great round of golf, but the chance to have a lesson (it has a flourishing junior section), hone one’s skills over its excellent practice facilities or simply sit back, relax and take in the panoramic views. A recent renovation of the clubhouse in the New England style – suited to its coastal location – has created a bright, comfortable and relaxed place to go and enjoy a beer or a Pimm’s on the terrace or indulge in locally-sourced lunches prepared by head chef, David Wheeler. A local Cornish lad, David grew up just a mile down the road in Pityme and cites Cornish mussels and asparagus, grown in the neighbouring farm to the golf course, as his favourite dishes to prepare in spring and summer. The heart of St Enodoc is, however, its stunning golf course. Positioned in front of the clubhouse, high on the rolling dunes, St Enodoc’s Church Course offers some of the greatest sea and estuary views of any course in the world from almost every hole. Its spectacular vistas are liable to distract some golfers from the tricky, undulating greens and numerous treacherous blind shots, including one in particular on the sixth hole where the green is protected by the mighty Himalaya bunker, reputedly the tallest in Europe. However, it is the tenth hole that is often described as the course’s signature hole as it winds its way towards the eleventh century St Enodoc

72 essence-magazine.co.uk | MARCH 2016

The par 5, 16th hole at St Enodoc Golf Club, Rock


Sport_Layout 1 01/03/2016 17:00 Page 2

Sport | ST ENODOC

Padstow, Cornwall

Buzzard on the 9th tee of St Enodoc PHOTO COPYRIGHT: ADAM GIBBARD

Church where Poet Laureate Sir John Betjeman lies buried in the graveyard beside his favourite course. A challenging hole, it requires a good drive, followed by an even better second aimed directly at the church porch in order to avoid the lateral hazard that runs the length of the hole which creeps ever closer to the left hand side of the green. At 6,547 yards, St Enodoc is not long by today’s standards, yet the course record stands at 65, four under par, giving golfers a good indication of how demanding the course really is. It is often said that many links courses are easy if there is no wind – even St. Andrews – but be warned, this does not apply to St Enodoc. Today golfers still play the course as essentially laid out by Braid: a tremendous tribute to this great golfer’s vision and skill as it has stood the test of time despite the enormous changes in clubs and balls in the last 70 years. Over the years, this championship links has lured a host of legendary Open Champions to its fairways, including James Braid of course, Henry Cotton, Jim Barnes and Tom Watson, which has added to its prestige. St Enodoc also boasts a second course, the Holywell, shorter than the Church Course and so ideal for juniors, seniors and those looking for slightly less of a challenge. For those with less time on their hands, the Holywell offers the chance to play a full 18 holes in less than three hours for just £25. Several of its original holes were of Braid’s design while holes 14, 15 and 16 are often referred to as its ‘Amen Corner’, so the Holywell should certainly not be discounted. Both courses benefit from being situated in one of the driest parts of Cornwall and the fact that they are perched on sand ensures excellent golf throughout the year. Thanks to the warm Gulf Stream climate, frost and snow are rare even in the depths of winter allowing for good course conditioning even in the winter months. As well as giving its clubhouse a makeover, St Enodoc has invested a >>>

MARCH 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 73


Sport_Layout 1 01/03/2016 17:00 Page 3

The Camel Estuary forms a backdrop to the green on the par 4, 1st hole at St Enodoc

Clubhouse and terrace, St Enodoc

great deal into its two courses over the last few years, with both layouts benefiting hugely from the refurbishments which included the laying of numerous new greens and tees. In addition to the golf and water sports available in Rock, there are plenty of other things to do when visiting the area. The nearby Camel Estuary, for example, provides many activities. Walking round the National Trust coastal footpath to the north and south provide spectacular scenery and from here you can visit the Norman Church, set alongside the golf course which was only The National Trust's Porthcurno Beach, Cornwall uncovered from being buried in the sand dunes during Victorian times. Padstow, opposite St Enodoc, can easily be reached by ferry from Rock. From here, bicycles can be hired to ride along the old railway line up river to Wadebridge on the Camel Trail. Both towns have a good selection of quaint shops, Several of its original holes artisan outlets and art galleries. Whilst Padstow’s were of Braid’s design while success in recent years is attributed largely to the holes 14, 15 and 16 are often success of Stein and his famous seafood restaurants and cafés, it is also home to a host of independent referred to as its ‘Amen Corner’, establishments and restaurants offering local produce. so the Holywell should certainly Further afield, the biggest single attraction is The not be discounted. Eden Project (about a forty minute car trip towards the south coast) which showcases 100,000 plants from around the world in two giant transparent domes, each recreating different climate conditions. Other well-known gardens include The Lost Gardens of Heligan and Trebah, whilst on the south coast the new Maritime Museum in Falmouth is worth a visit. For artistic types, the famous Tate Gallery has a base in St Ives which includes the Barbara Hepworth Museum and sculptural garden. So next time, when heading off down to Cornwall for some ‘Rock life’, don’t forget to pack the golf clubs and book a tee time, a lesson or simply a table for lunch at St Enodoc, now very much a part of the experience and enjoyment for those visiting Rock and its environs.  essence INFO St. Enodoc Golf Club, Rock, Wadebridge, Cornwall PL27 6LD Website: www.st-enodoc.co.uk Email: enquiries@st-enodoc.co.uk

74 essence-magazine.co.uk | MARCH 2016


MORE THAN JUST A LAWN TENNIS CLUB Membership provides lawn, indoor and outdoor tennis, all glass exhibition and glass backed squash courts, a heated indoor swimming pool and state of the art health and fitness facilities along with a boutique spa. The historic Clubhouse is set against our lakeside terrace and our friendly staff provide

a social environment in which to relax and make friends over lunch, dinner or after sporting activity. The Club enjoys welcoming new members and visitors and hope that our passion and sense of pride for the Club encourages you to stay a little longer.

To arrange your private viewing contact 01932 268954 or 01932 843541 St_G_Essence_Ad.indd 1

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essence Issue 69  
essence Issue 69  

essence magazine is a premier lifestyle publication available in print and online. The printed magazine is distributed via Royal Mail to Sur...