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Issue 70 | APRIL 2016

Unbeatable

Poster Girl Launer of London

Also inside this issue

VIEW FROM ABOVE Five treasures of the snow

CHARGING AHEAD New BMW plug-in

WILD AT HEART Classic British fashion

LIVING ARCHITECTURE Perry’s place

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contents Issue 70 | APRIL 2016

8 | Travel | SIKKIM INDIA

Subhasish Chakraborty’s fascination for mountains has taken him to Annapurna, the Everest Base Camp, but never to the mystical Kanchenjunga or ‘five treasures of the snow’, until now.

16 | Motoring | BMW

BMW’s 3 series has long held sway in the packed compact executive car market. Now a new variant, the 330e plug-in hybrid, is here. Euan Johns looks at the allure of a possible petrol-free commute.

22 | Gardening | HTA

16

Canada’s iconic national flag shows a stylised maple leaf. Maples are, however, most prevalent throughout Asia and offer variety and stunning colours to add to any garden.

28 | Interview | LAUNER

Gerald Bodmer takes great pride in supplying Her Majesty The Queen’s signature accessory: her handbag. Andrew Peters chatted to the ever youthful 80-year young entrepreneur.

32 | Fashion | REALLY WILD

40

Really Wild has reinvented this year’s favourite tweeds, nurturing fresh-looking florals in breezy, spring hues for a bespoke look.

38 | Food | CRATES LOCAL PRODUCE

Crates chooses current seasonal offerings, garlic and rhubarb, together with recipes to enjoy.

44 | Review | THE RUNNING HORSES

This country inn sits in the beautiful village of Mickleham, a short distance from Box Hill. Cook and food writer Laura Scott samples its fare.

50 | Legal | MUNDAYS

Sofia Syed, associate in the Corporate/Commercial Team at Mundays LLP, advises on what to look out for when reviewing employment contracts.

52 | Finance | PMW

Simon Lewis, CEO at Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd, looks at the economic issues that need to be considered before the choice is made about whether to go it alone and leave the European Union or not.

54 | Education | CRANMORE SCHOOL

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Michael Connolly, headmaster of Cranmore School, reflects on the benefits provided by independent schools.

58 | Leisure breaks | VADUZ

The Principality of Liechtenstein, located on the banks of the Rhine at the heart of the majestic Alps, and nestled between Austria and Switzerland, is the ideal spot to unwind, discovers Rebecca Underwood.

62 | Surrey walks | SURREY WILDLIFE TRUST Sheepleas is a mosaic of woodland, grassland and scrub habitats that is both a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a Local Nature Reserve. This issue, SWT guides readers around this special area which holds a springtime surprise for walkers.

68 | Events | SURREY

Linda Seward’s detailed diary of the best of what’s on in theatre, music, exhibitions, arts and countryside over the month.

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78 | Architecture | LIVING ARCHITECTURE

Contemporary artist Grayson Perry’s designer building is a gloriously absurd secular chapel paying homage to the memory of Perry’s fictional Essex woman, Julie May Cope. Unique, slightly unsettling, but certainly moving, it’s a much oversubscribed holiday destination.

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APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 3


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View from Pelling PHOTO COPYRIGHT: DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM, GOVERNMENT OF SIKKIM

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essence 70

COVER: Launer's Aida Daffodil and Alabaster handbag

essence team

Acting Editor: Andrew Guilor Contributing Editor: Louise Alexander-O’Loughlin Publishing Manager: Rebecca Peters Production Manager: Linda Seward Designer: Sharon Smith Senior Designer: Jason Mayes telephone: 01932 988677 email: editor@essence-magazine.co.uk Advertising Manager: Andrew Peters telephone: 07980 956488 email: marketing@essence-magazine.co.uk Advertising Sales: telephone: 01932 988677 email: marketing@essence-magazine.co.uk Advertising Sales (supplements): telephone: 07971 937162 email: katie@ktmedia.co.uk Advertising Sales Executive: Nadine Schioldan email: nadine@essence-magazine.co.uk Contributors: Subhasish Chakraborty, Michael Connolly, Shirlee Posner, Andrew Peters, Rebecca Underwood, Sofia Syed, Simon Lewis, PJ Aldred, Jennifer Sutton, Naomi Diamond, Euan Johns, Linda Seward, Emily Bird, James Morris, Jane Pople.

essence magazine

Stability Amidst all the doom and gloom, terrorism, the imminent threat of Britain losing another core industry, the dreadful Batman v Superman film (how did that ever get past the suggestion list?), here at essence we feel there is something to uplift the spirits, and it’s not just the recent spring-like weather. It may have escaped your attention if you aren’t a die hard monarchist, but the Queen turns 90 this month. Amidst all, a symbol of stability and ‘Britishishness’: there’s a lot to be said for both. In this issue, essence talks to Gerald Bodmer, owner of Launer which has supplied the Queen with her handbags for over 50 years. Launer really is a great British company keeping alive craftsmanship in this country. Then there’s classic British elegance with Really Wild fashion and BMW’s new hybrid 330E plug-in car signals a brighter environmentally-friendly future. In the garden, The Horticultural Trades Association explores the numerous beautiful Acer species available, and in essence’s travel spot, we visit Sikkim, India to explore ‘the five treasures of the snow’ mountain range in a helicopter.

Maple Publishing Limited, the publishers, authors and printers cannot accept liability for errors or omissions. Any artwork will be at owner’s risk. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the copyright holder and publisher, application for which should be made in writing to the publisher. The opinions expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher.

Interior designer Sue Bellamy has used her art to produce some stunning cushions and we visit an unusual place to holiday, courtesy of Grayson Perry’s imagination and Living Architecture.

essence is posted by Royal Mail to key addresses in Cobham, Oxshott, Esher, Weybridge, Guildford and outlying areas. Properties in all the major private estates, including St George’s Hill, the Crown Estate and Wentworth Estate, receive the magazine 10 times per year.

As usual, essence has health, legal and finance advice, together with the best of a variety of activities highlighting food, events and a competition to win theatre tickets to the Theatre Royal Haymarket.

essence is also distributed to selected estate agents and is available at city businesses, London hotels and Heathrow airport lounges.

The essence team

Design and production www.domino4.co.uk © Maple Publishing 2016

APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 5


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FIVE TREASURES OF THE SNOW Subhasish Chakraborty’s fascination for mountains has taken him to Annapurna, the Everest Base Camp and the imposing Sheela Pass-Tawang circuit of Arunachal Pradesh in north east India, but never to the mystical Kanchenjunga, that is until now.

Yumthang PHOTO COPYRIGHT: DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM, GOVERNMENT OF SIKKIM

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Travel | SIKKIM

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K

anchenjunga literally means ‘Five treasures of the snow’ and is to India’s state of Sikkim what Everest is to Nepal. Worshipped in its festivals and dances and honoured in its traditions, Kanchenjunga is considered so sacred that successful expeditions have stopped short of the summit and it remains inviolate. The Kanchenjunga range spans the borders of Nepal, Tibet and Sikkim, its ridges forming a giant ‘X’, with peaks soaring 23,000 feet and above. I’d heard a lot about Sikkim and its mountains with Kanchenjunga as the guardian deity, the affable and easygoing hill people, the delicious Sikkimese cuisine, its predominant Buddhist culture and its world famous orchids. In March I was invited by my New Zealand-based photographer friend Tanmoy Das to join him on his Sikkim assignment. We were guests of the Department of Tourism, Government of Sikkim. I’d always had the opinion that being a predominantly mountainous state, travelling would be an arduous and grueling affair. But preconceived ideas were swept aside once in Gangtok, Sikkim’s breathtakingly beautiful capital.

Winter Carnival, Red Panda Festival at M.G. Marg, Gangtok PHOTO COPYRIGHT: DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM, GOVERNMENT OF SIKKIM

The drive from Bagdogra airport (North Bengal) to Gangtok is one of the most beautiful four hour drives to be experienced, offering spectacular views of the Sikkimese countryside nestling beside the turquoise-blue Teesta River that becomes a companion for the journey. Rhododendrons and orchids create a riot of pink, yellow and mauve colour. At Gangtok, we checked in at the Government of Sikkim-run Hotel Mount Jopuno, strategically located right in the centre of town. The Department of Tourism wanted us to take a helicopter tour of Sikkim, covering Gangtok, Yumthang, Singtam, Geyzing, Yuksom, Dikchu and the Zemu glacier, as well as high altitude monasteries. An early dinner and early night ensued, a necessity we felt for the prospect of viewing the imposing eastern Himalayas from the air.

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Travel | SIKKIM Khanchendzonga, as seen from Singik, North Sikkim PHOTO COPYRIGHT: DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM, GOVERNMENT OF SIKKIM

Fastening our seat belts next day, the Bell helicopter gradually began its ascent. The city of Gangtok with its urban landscape appeared like a million studded diamonds. As the helicopter increased altitude, the entire Himalayan panorama slowly began to reveal itself. For Tanmoy and the rest of the crew this was the opportunity of a lifetime, shooting breathtaking vistas of the Himalayan mountain range. Feathery clouds drifted slowly along, kissing the hill tops as they went; village hamlets appeared as if some fairytale community; the white, swift flowing Teesta River meandered through the mountainous terrain like a coiled serpent and the high altitude monasteries looked more like some secluded enchanted zones of ‘Eden on Earth’. The pilot punctuated the flight with information about how high we were flying and to make use of the oxygen masks should any of us feel giddy in the rarified atmosphere. From 14,000 feet, the alpine-forested landscape of Yumthang exploded in a profusion of colour, particularly with the fiery red rhododendrons. The cascading waterfalls, particularly Lachung, appeared as if a mythical deity was pouring milk over the steep mountains. I was reminded of my grandmother’s oft-repeated bedtime story of the river Ganga pouring out of Lord Shiva’s matted hairs. Leaving behind the majestic Yumthang, the far horizon revealed the ominous looking Kanchenjunga, snow clad and steep, precipitously steep. The imposing Kanchenjunga range

stood sentinel like, guardian to India’s 22nd state. Down below, row after row of snow clad Himalayan peaks aligned. Every now and then the helicopter would come to a peak that appeared close enough to touch. Kanchenjunga is all uneven peaks, icy curves, gushing mountain torrents and frozen fissures that create its own particular majesty and grandeur. I couldn’t help but admire the sheer ruggedness of Kanchenjunga. In my opinion the Kanchenjunga helicopter trip is on par with Everest, perhaps even a notch higher in terms of natural grandeur. Mountain Flights, operated by Sikkim From 14,000 feet, Tourism, offer a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to those who otherwise would the alpine-forested not be able to explore the beauty of the landscape of eastern Himalayas. Many tourists of varying Yumthang exploded age take this flight: we saw a courageous group of 65 plus. The prospect of viewing in a profusion of some of the tallest mountains in the world colour, particularly from on high is a real adrenalin rush at any with the fiery red age. Within an hour or so, visitors have the rhododendrons. opportunity to get up close and personal with snow clad mountain peaks. According to one of my companions, Las Vegas native Jonathan Agnew: “I’ve heard a lot about Everest and visited Nepal once, but as luck would have it was unable to get onboard a mountain flight due to limited tickets. However, all my disappointments vanished with the 90 >>>

APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 11


The sacred Gurudongmar Lake, North Sikkim PHOTO COPYRIGHT: DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM, GOVERNMENT OF SIKKIM

minute Kanchenjunga trip. I’ll definitely recommend my friends back home to embark on a Sikkim helicopter ride.” Heli tourism has changed the way people travel to Sikkim. It has come as a boon, particularly to visitors who love the mountains but are hard pressed for time to explore either by road or trekking. The rides are competitively priced; the one hour flight to West Sikkim cost US $85, while the most popular 90 minute Kanchenjunga flight costs US $170. Sikkim Tourism also operates exclusive mountain flights to Yumthang, Gangtok as well as to Bagdogra. These are booked at the office of Sikkim Tourism. We needed a quieter pastime after that adventure and so indulged in some ‘Dharma’, courtesy of the Sikkim monasteries. Rumtek monastery is the seat of the Seventeenth Karmapa, while the Pemayangtse Monastery, located in West Sikkim, belongs to the Nyigma order. Tibetan Buddhism came to Sikkim in the fifteenth century and there’s a great rivalry in the Tibetan order of Buddhism between the Red Hats and the Yellow Hats. The Gelugpa sect managed to ascend Tibet while the Nyingmapa sect sought asylum in Sikkim. The sight of red robed Lamas chanting mystical ancient mantras to the beat of drums, while butter lamps flicker before statues of the great Guru Padmasambhava has enchanted tourists from all over the world. The Buddhist trail in Sikkim is a world apart At times, visitors feel from most people’s lives. The inherent peace and really close to Godhead harmony of being at one with Mother Nature is tangible. At times, visitors feel really close to as the chanting of Godhead as the chanting of the Lamas blends the Lamas blends harmoniously with the droning prayer wheels. harmoniously with the Hollywood’s brush with Tibetan Buddhism is known the world over. Superstar Richard droning prayer wheels. Gere, one of the best-known faces of Tibetan Buddhism in the world, eulogised Buddhism and Tibet at the Academy Awards. Films like ‘Kundun’ and ‘Seven Years in Tibet’ also received worldwide attention. The monasteries of Sikkim are conspicuous for their frescoes depicting Buddhist legends, and there are always the Thangka paintings

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Tibetian lama praying at Ramtek Monastery PHOTO COPYRIGHT: KESSUDAP | DREAMSTIME.COM

Lachung PHOTO COPYRIGHT: DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM, GOVERNMENT OF SIKKIM


Mane Chokerling Monastery, Rabongla PHOTO COPYRIGHT: DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM, GOVERNMENT OF SIKKIM

Traveller’s fact file: made of rare silk and brocade that are very popular with both western and Indian tourists. Many monasteries have good collections of ancient Tibetan manuscripts. No visit to Sikkim is complete without a trip to the Nathula Pass. Now open to tourists, it’s situated 14,200 feet above sea level. We were taken aback by the sight of Indian tourists posing for selfies with soldiers of the Chinese Red Army: there was an air of informality at the Nathula Pass which belies expectations. The Pass used to serve as the gateway to Tibet and was the easiest way to reach Lhasa, the capital. It used to be referred to as the ‘Silk Route’ due to the flourishing silk trade conducted from Kalimpong on the Indian side to Lhasa in Tibet. Now open to tourists five days a week, it is a real ‘must see’. Our penultimate day was spent in Khangchendzonga National Park and with the tribal communities of neighbouring areas in west Sikkim. In this part of the world, The Mountain Institute (TMI) has played a significant role in protecting rare alpine forests and meadows. According to the Institute’s spokesperson, there are more than 400 orchid species, 144 mammals, 300 species of bird life and a mind boggling 400 plus butterfly species in the area. We were amazed to see how well The Mountain Institute involved local communities in promoting concepts such as community ecotourism, site maintenance and conservation education. From training tour guides to developing market strategies for promoting eco-tourism, the Institute has played a vital role in uplifting the local Himalayan economy around the Khangchendzonga National Park. We rounded off the trip with a fabulous get together dinner at the in-house restaurant – ‘Yatung’ – of the up-market Chumbi Residency hotel, renowned for its thematically designed ambience evoking the nostalgia of the watering holes along the historical Silk Route to Tibet. Local fare at Yatung is in a class of its own. Visitors should try the locally brewed ‘Chang’ which is prepared by fermenting millet. This signature brew is served in a light wooden tumbler and believed to have no hangover syndrome. Check that claim for yourself on any trip to Indian Shangri-La! v

Getting there The nearest airport from Gangtok is Bagdogra, 124 kilometres away in north Bengal. Scheduled flights arrive at Bagdogra from Calcutta, New Delhi and Guwahati. Major airlines such as Indian Airlines, Jet Airways, Spice Jet etc. offer regular flights to and from Bagdogra. For those who do not want to take the trouble of embarking on a road journey to Gangtok, there is the helicopter ride to Sikkim run by the Department of Tourism, Government of Sikkim, from Bagdogra to Gangtok and vice versa. Flight timings have been kept flexible so as to suit requirements of passengers arriving or departing Bagdogra and vice versa. Hired taxis and cabs are easily available at Bagdogra airport. Accommodation Gangtok is chock-a-block with hotels to suit every budget. Hotel Mayfair, Hotel Norkhil, Hotel Tashi Delek, Hotel Tibet and The Chumbi Residency are just some of its up-market hotels. All are centrally located and offer impeccable mountain hospitality. Most have a predominant Tibetan ambience. Hotel Tibet, in particular, is famed for its no-holds-barred Tibetan appeal. The in-house restaurants offer Chinese, continental and Indian cuisines, but try out the local Sikkemese delicacies prepared to perfection by the resident chef. For those interested in government run accommodation, Hotel Mount Jopuno is a great place to stay and is centrally located at P.S.Road. Permits In addition to an Indian visa, foreign travellers must posses an Inner Line Permit, issued by the Indian Ministry of Home Affairs or New Sikkim House, both in Delhi. The permit is valid for 15 days. A visit to the interiors of Sikkim requires a Protected Area Permit, which may be obtained in Gangtok from the Department of Tourism.

essence INFO

Sikkim Tourist Information Centre M.G. Marg, Gangtok, Sikkim, India. Website: www.sikkimtourism.gov.in

APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 13


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Motoring | BMW

CHARGING AHEAD

BMW’s 3 series has long held sway in the packed compact executive car market. That’s simply because it’s one of the best, offering a great blend of performance, sophistication, efficiency and luxury. It looks good too. Now a new variant, the 330e plug-in hybrid, has added to the choice. Euan Johns looks at the allure of a possible petrol-free commute.

APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 17


P

lug-in sounds a bit low tech, but nothing could be further from the truth. BMW has been at the forefront of technological development for some time now. Boosting engine performance through innovations, its first foray into hydrogen powered vehicles took place nigh on 40 years ago. Hard to believe, but the marque’s first electrically powered saloon appeared in the early seventies, and the company has always pushed boundaries. Now with government initiatives, increasing customer demand, and rapidly developing battery technology, BMW is well placed to offer its broadest ever spectrum of ‘new breed’ cars. This year BMW will offer an electric powered car and range extender variant, Plug-in-Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) and highly efficient petrol and diesel internal combustion engines. The company also intends to continue developing hydrogen cars. Four new for 2016 PHEV models arrive in the shape of the BMW 225xe

“The BMW i ChargeNow card already offers access to the world’s largest network of charging stations, and now it gives us great pleasure, in co-operation with our partners, to further expand this network with the help of the Light and Charge project. After all, a seamless charging infrastructure is essential if we want to see more electric vehicles on the road in our cities in the future.” PETER SCHWARZENBAUER, MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF MANAGEMENT, BMW

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Motoring | BMW

Charge of the light brigade BMW Light & Charge technology provides a charging solution with innovative technology allowing electric cars to be charged using state-ofthe-art LED street lights offering a solution for those without charging equipment at home. Light & Charge combines highly efficient LED street lighting with an integrated EV charging solution in a fully connected system. Due to its modular design, the streetlight is more energy-efficient than conventional street lighting, and provides more effective illumination. It can be installed anywhere and its modular design tailored to different locations. Up to four LED modules can be used to provide nighttime lighting on main roads, while one or two modules are sufficient to provide lighting on side streets and in residential areas. As already with vehicle headlights, LED technology allows more targeted light distribution with less ecologically undesirable ‘scatter’. The Power Link, a pole-mounted EV Charging Station, fits in with existing city infrastructure, making it cost-efficient without taking up additional space. An integrated smart energy meter keeps track of energy taken from the grid so that existing power cables can be used to run the charging unit. The charging station is also part of BMW’s i ChargeNow network that enables cashless payment. Via built-in internet access, it can be remotely managed, maintained and serviced. Component standardisation ensures full compatibility across all electric vehicle types with both the LED Street Light and the Charging Station engineered for retrofit applications. With a pleasing design, the system integrates into a historical city centre just as well as with contemporary architecture.

Active Tourer, BMW 330e Saloon, and later this year the BMW 740e and 740Le xDrive. The result? BMW will be able to offer this technology through its range of compact to luxury class cars. The 225xe shares the eDrive technology previously seen in the X5 xDrive40e which allows the driver to call on electrified all-wheel drive up to speeds of 78mph. The car has unique eDrive design elements: an example is eDrive Services being standard allowing remote access to various features of the vehicle and integrating elements of BMW’s online system. This will enable drivers to search for charging stations and access charge settings for off-peak charging. Remote access is via an app on compatible smartphones, tablet devices or computers, adding to the BMW My Remote app allowing users to check charging status, set charging times and to search for stations whilst on foot. Rather luxuriously, the app enables pre-conditioning of the car to heat or cool the interior whilst on charge. The 225xe arrives this month and prices start at £32,545. >>>

APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 19


New to the company executive’s 3-series choice list is the 330e offering combined fuel consumption at an amazing 148mpg and CO2 emissions of just 44g/km. The state-of-the-art plug-in hybrid technology combines a 2.0 litre petrol engine with a 65kW (88hp equivalent) electric motor. This dual output translates into a 0-62 mph acceleration time of a pretty decent 6.1 seconds and a top speed of 140mph, enough to satisfy all but Even more happily the 330e the most eager corporate executives. The high-voltage lithium-ion cell is eligible for congestion battery, located underneath the boot, charge exemption and the enables an all-electric, emissionGovernment’s Plug-in Car Grant free range of around 25 miles. So (PiCG) representing a significant pretty much perfect for city dwellers and commuters to achieve that all saving of around £2,500 elusive petrol free commute. There are three driving modes to choose from: AUTOeDRIVE, MAX eDRIVE and SAVE BATTERY. On AUTO eDRIVE the top electric speed is limited to 50 mph and ensures the combustion engine and electric motor work together to optimum effect in all driving situations. Even more happily the 330e is eligible for congestion charge exemption and the Government’s Plug-in Car Grant (PiCG) representing a significant saving of around £2,500 on a purchase price starting at £33,935. The 330e looks outside and in as any other 3 series. What it offers as an extra is a silent and smooth petrol free and subsidised commute, and that’s a huge plus. The drawbacks? Well, for those thrill seekers amongst us, the car is swift, but slowed down by some heavy electrical gear (boot space is reduced due to the battery). Handling is not the best, but then that’s really not the point and there has to be some room for improvement in an otherwise very impressive car. On balance, the 330e deserves to be up there on the company car favourite list. v

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Green cars across the UK The government plans to invest £40 million to boost electric vehicle usage (EVs) in the UK. Go Ultra scheme winners London, Nottingham, Bristol and Milton Keynes will be allocated the lion’s share of investment. The scheme encourages local residents to switch to a plug-in car. Elsewhere, the scheme is providing £5 million of funding for specific initiatives in Dundee, Oxford, York and north east regions to help kick-start a UK-wide clean motoring revolution. Each winning city was awarded a share of the fund for implementing technology such as rapidcharging hubs and Light & Charge technology from BMW. Oxford, where the majority of MINIs are produced, will receive £800,000 to trial different charging options. These innovations will support the green vehicle sector, improve air quality in urban hotspots (in the news recently regarding health concerns) and help meet emission cutting targets. Owners can benefit from local privileges such as access to bus lanes in city centres and up to 25,000 free parking spaces. This could save regular commuters a not to be sniffed at £1,300 a year.

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Website: bmw.co.uk


IOTC FP April.indd 1

16/03/2016 16:55


Magic maples Canada’s iconic national flag shows a stylised maple leaf, finally adopted as the national emblem in the sixties as the trees grow in every province of the country. Maples are, however, most prevalent throughout Asia and hold a huge attraction due to the variety and stunning colours they bring to any garden. The Horticultural Trades Association (HTA) has some advice on the best varieties to plant.

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apanese maples are the perfect choice of tree for any small, compact or courtyard garden. Their character and appeal makes them ideal for creating a focal point in a garden, brightening a shaded corner, or elegantly overhanging a pool or water feature. Many acers are commonly called Japanese maples, but their parents could be derived from several different species including Acer japonicum, Acer palmatum, Acer shirasawanum or others. Among them are some extremely slow-growing forms, with trees remaining a small, manageable size without the need for regular pruning. With their eastern origins in Japan, Korea and China, these small trees are suitable for developing gardens with Oriental themes and designs, choosing other suitable planting partners for them, like ferns, hostas, bamboo, azaleas, camellias, and more. Their natural shape and growing habit of branches make Japanese maples an ideal choice of small tree for gardens or growing in large patio pots. Their leaf shapes, sizes and colours vary immensely. Many have a broad palm shape, but these are often divided and dissected into the most delicate and intricate forms. Add to this their wide range of colours, from deep greens to yellow, gold, purple or even variegated patterns, and there is an immense variety to choose from. >>>

Top maples for any garden To help choose the best varieties with outstanding garden performance always look for maples that have received an Award of Garden Merit (AGM) from the Royal Horticultural Society. Here are some of the most widely available AGM varieties: w Acer palmatum ‘Bloodgood’ w Acer palmatum ‘Osakazuki’ w Acer palmatum ‘Sango-Kaku’ w Golden Shirasawa maple (Acer shirasawanum ‘Aureum’)

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Gardening | HTA

Top tips for growing Japanese maples: Choose a sheltered site where trees are protected from late spring frosts, cold winds and scorching summer sun. Maples prefer well-drained soil containing plenty of compost to lock in moisture and ensure the ground never dries out. Spread a deep mulch of leaf-mould, compost or shredded bark over the soil around maples to retain moisture and reduce annual weed growth. For growing in containers, choose large and stable terracotta pots with several drainage holes in their base. Line pots with a sheet of plastic before filling with compost to reduce water loss through the sides. As trees can remain in pots for several years, it’s best to plant them using a loam-based John Innes No.3 compost with extra grit added to ensure good drainage. Do remember that established trees will need repotting into larger pots every few years.

Acer Katsura PHOTO COPYRIGHT: THE FARPLANTS GROUP Japanese Maple leaves (Acer) PHOTO COPYRIGHT: THE FARPLANTS GROUP

Keep the top of the compost a few inches below the pot rim to make watering from above easier, covering the surface with a mulch of pebbles or ornamental gravel. Water regularly with collected rainwater, and stand pots in saucers of water to provide a reservoir for trees to take up each day during hot, dry periods. Tree roots can be susceptible to frost damage in winter, so either move pots to sheltered sites or wrap with bubble polythene insulation.

Acer shirasawanum ‘Aureum’ PHOTO COPYRIGHT: ADAM PASCO MEDIA

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Literature | IVY PRESS

Planting partners for Japanese maples Try combining maples with other plants, features and ornaments to create areas with Oriental charm. Japanese maples should not be smothered by neighbouring plants, so always give them space to flourish. Here are a few planting partners to consider: w Azalea w Bamboo w Bugle (Ajuga reptans) w Camellia w Cornus kousa and others w Ferns w Flowering cherries and plums (Prunus varieties) w Holly (Ilex varieties) w Hydrangeas w Japanese laurel (Aucuba varieties) w Junipers and other conifers w Magnolias w Dwarf Pinus varieties w Rhododendron w Wisteria w Yew (Taxus varieties)

Acer Osakazuki PHOTO COPYRIGHT: THE FARPLANTS GROUP

While some green or purple-leaved varieties will tolerate an open position in full sun, this can scorch the more delicate foliage of golden, variegated or dissected forms. A sheltered site is more suitable, and particularly one that provides shade during the hottest part of the day and protection from drying winds. Japanese maples put on a show right through the year, starting as soon as foliage unfurls in spring, and continuing until their autumn transformation into shades of gold and bronze before they eventually fall. With dozens of marvellous Japanese maples available from nurseries and garden centres, gardeners will be spoilt for choice when picking one to add a little maple magic to an outside space. v essence INFO

The Horticultural Trades Association (HTA) is the trade association for the UK garden industry. Website: www.the-hta.org.uk

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Heirloom Plants

A Complete Compendium of Heritage Vegetables, Fruit, Herbs & Flowers This book is the perfect companion for every home grower who wants to fill their garden with old and interesting varieties while helping to save threatened or forgotten plants. Heirloom plants often have a charm lacking in commercially produced varieties. Unless these seeds are grown and saved, they will not only be forgotten, but lost too. Based on the seed catalogues of Thomas Etty, the book lists exciting cultivars, along with profiles and growing tips. Responsible gardening, certainly, but with more than a hint of romance; who could resist the lure of the splendid Hubbard Green Warty squash, or the Green Zebra tomato? Thomas Etty Esq is the UK’s only dedicated heritage seed company and was set up over twenty years ago by Ray Warner. The company name is inspired by Ray’s great, great, great grandfather who himself dealt in seeds in the nineteenth century. Ray is the dedicated seedsman behind this heirloom seed company with Thomas Etty Esq sourcing seeds dating from the seventeenth century to the end of World War II, all from small-scale seed suppliers from the UK and Europe. Lorraine Harrison is a keen practical gardener with a master’s degree in garden history. In addition to contributing to the gardening quarterly Hortus, she has authored a number of books, among them the bestselling Latin for Gardeners. “A strikingly produced compendium of heirloom vegetables, fruit and flowers” – The Bookseller By Lorraine Harrison & Ray Warner, seed catalogues written by Thomas Etty 224 pages • Hardback • Illustrations throughout ISBN: 9781782403173 • RRP: £18.99 essence INFO

Published by Ivy Press Website: www.ivypress.co.uk


Festival | DUNSBOROUGH PARK

Festival of tulips Dunsborough Park, Ripley stages the spectacular Festival of Tulips next month with 20,000 new bulbs and over 15,000 one-year-old bulbs creating a breathtaking wild meadow at this country estate.

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unsborough House dates back to the fourteenth century and the dissolution of the monasteries. The land at Dunsborough Park was originally granted to a local nobleman by Newark Abbey. Located in Ripley, less than 20 miles from central London, the house is set in over 100 acres of grounds, including fields and woodland. Elizabeth Taylor spent one of her wedding nights at Dunsborough. The owners of this stunning estate, Baron Dolf and Baroness Caroline Sweerts de Landas Wyborgh, welcome visitors at various times of year. On the six garden open days, three are for the National Gardens Scheme (NGS) on 30 April, 12 June and 18 September. These raise funds for several invited charities: Shooting Star Chase, Naomi House Children’s Hospice, Art Research Creativity & Health (ARCH), Princess Alice Hospice and many more who benefit from attending the event and selling homemade teas. v

Profile Dutch born Baron and Baroness Sweerts de Landas Wyborgh moved to Dunsborough Park in 1994 and took on the task of renovating a tired house and transforming a six acre area surrounding the house into beautiful landscaped and formal gardens. These are now made up of a series of ‘garden rooms’ with their own style and charm, including: w The White Garden, with its ancient 300-year-old Mulberry tree, anemones, Solomon’s Seal and Iceberg roses. w The Classic Italian Garden. w The Old Romantic Rose Garden, with subtle colours of mostly pink roses, the Rose Walk with David Austin roses, including Queen of Sweden, Brother Cadfael, and scented Bourbon roses. w The Eighteenth Century Walled Garden is lined on one side with a large, 45 metre Victorian greenhouse. w The Dutch Garden has a wonderful 70ft ginkgo biloba hedge. This area is home to the wonderful tulip displays. w The Peacock Area with an impressive box parterre and a beautiful ‘peacock’ gate. w The Water Garden, originally created in the 1930s, features a dammed brook that rushes to join the Ockham Mill Stream and the River Wey. A stone bridge provides an excellent viewpoint.

essence INFO

Dunsborough Park is available for private garden tours and can offer an exclusive and romantic setting for spring and summer wedding receptions. Other activities are also available. For more information visit www.dunsboroughpark.com.

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www.dsautomobiles.com


LAUNER’S UNBEATABLE POSTER GIRL

The Queen turns 90 this month and will no doubt be sporting a Launer handbag on her arm at public engagements. Launer’s owner, Gerald Bodmer, takes great pride in supplying Her Majesty’s signature accessory. Andrew Peters chatted to the ever youthful 80-year young entrepreneur.

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Fashion accessories | LAUNER

>>>

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Q Launer is now a worldwide brand, but originally (having trained as a clarinettist to reach a concert level standard) you wanted to enjoy a career as a classical musician. Have you any regrets that this didn’t happen? A No, not at all. I certainly wouldn’t be as well off as I am now that’s for sure. If I’d gone down the musical path I probably would have ended up teaching music to some children somewhere, so no. Q Was it a conscious decision to change course or did it happen by chance? A I realised that although very driven, I might not make the cut as a musician and so started work for my father’s cousin who had a leather goods company. I began in sales as I like to talk to people – you’ve probably realised already. Q In what industry did you commence your working life? A I’ve always been in the leather goods industry. Like all manufacturing, it’s undergone a huge transformation and I’m proud that we are one of only three companies still making leather goods in the UK. Q When you bought the company in 1981 you retained Samuel Launer’s name. What was the reason you continued to uphold his ideal of constructing leather goods from the finest materials and using the finest craftsmanship? A Well, first and foremost, the company had a Royal Warrant and I wanted to keep that as the Warrant embodied all those qualities. It was also a good name; Sam Launer was a Jewish immigrant from Czechoslovakia, an entrepreneur, and I like entrepreneurs. I’m one myself and I suppose sub-consciously I kept the name as a homage to him. I’d be lying though if I said the main reason was any other than the Royal Warrant. They have to be renewed every five years, so they’re not handed out to everyone you know! Q In 1981 Britain was in the midst of a deep recession. You took the decision to concentrate on producing quality goods whilst others went in the opposite direction. Do you feel vindicated by this decision? A Absolutely. I could see the potential in the company, and the way manufacturing was moving overseas due to labour costs, so to concentrate on craftsmanship and quality was the natural thing to do and it made business sense. I was running another company when I bought Launer and merged the two. Q The Walsall factory, where the goods are made, is a listed building and the whole company exudes heritage. Is that something you instill in your employees? A Yes, it’s an amazing building that I own. I’m proud of the whole set up and the fact it’s based in Walsall which is historically where leather goods were made. Yes, I’m proud to keep this British tradition. Q Refreshingly many of your employees have been with the company a long time. Why do you think this is? A I have some amazing and loyal people who have worked with me for many years. I’d like to think I’m a good employer and offer an enjoyable environment in which to work. The important thing is we operate a total quality control system which means people can

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say what they think, offer ideas and change things to improve. That encourages involvement, a sense of achievement and team spirit. Q Is it hard to attract new blood into the company to train to carry on the exacting skills required to make the company’s products? A Yes it is. We have three apprentices at the moment, but it’s hard to attract youngsters. Without getting too political, there is a benefit culture that people can fall into and it seems to cut the incentive to work. Q Are all the ranges and styles individually made for each customer? A No, we will add small changes to the styles (a different handle for example) but we don’t custom make the bags from scratch. Q Sue, your wife, and yourself have had, and continue to have, a hand in the design of the ranges. You both obviously enjoy this having done so for a long time. Why did you initially take on this responsibility? A Well, women are good at fashion design aren’t they and it seemed a natural fit. Sue gets a lot of enjoyment out of it and does a very good job with some help from me of course!

PHOTO FEATUR


Fashion accessories | LAUNER Q Where does inspiration for the designs come from? A We travel to Italy and France each year, wander around, look, listen, soak up the atmosphere and the ideas come. Italy is the centre of fashion design, design as a whole is in the blood, and it can’t help but rub off on you if you’re there. Q What inspires the names for particular styles? A They used to be numbered, but now from opera almost exclusively. Kobbe’s Opera Book is very useful – I’m still finding new ones. Q You source all the leather used from Italy. With your musical background, do you have a special association with the country? A The leather and fittings come from Italy and it’s a wonderful country. I wouldn’t say there is a special association other than in my business it’s the place to go. Paris is the other destination: we make a lot of bags out of lizard and this all comes from France. Q The company refurbishes vintage handbags and I believe the Queen uses this service. Will you continue to offer this service in an increasingly throw away society? A Yes, we do refurbish Launer handbags and will continue to do so. We also correct any defects found by a client after purchase. Q Do you still play the clarinet? Is your favourite piece Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto or is this too populist? A Yes, I do. I play in some local concerts and enjoy doing so. Yes, this is a favourite piece of mine, but Brahms, Mozart and Weber all wrote some marvellous music for the instrument. Q The Queen’s continuing 50 year, and other members of the Royal Family’s, patronage is obviously hugely beneficial. That apart, can you place a finger on why the company and your handbags have been such a success? A The designs are classic, stylish, traditional and British. Yes, we have some famous patrons, but underlying it all is the quality of the product – after all that has to be there to attract them in the first place doesn’t it? Having said that, yes, of course, who could ask for a better person to showcase our work?

The Launer story

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: FEATUREFLASH | DREAMSTIME.COM

Launer London epitomises the best of British craftsmanship. This, combined with a reputation for meticulous quality and style, has seen Launer awarded the Royal Warrant to Her Majesty The Queen for handbags and small leather goods.

Launer was established around 1941 with a defined mission: to make elegant handbags and leather goods from the very best materials, superbly finished and handmade by the highest skilled craftspeople. Launer pioneered British made goods when others opted to manufacture abroad and has remained true to this pledge more than 70 years later. Each item is handmade using traditional methods in a Grade II listed building, the premises have been a home for the manufacturing of leather goods since its construction in 1904. Since Gerald Bodmer took over the firm, Launer has built an enviable reputation with royalty, heads of state and society ladies. Distinguished figures and political leaders have carried Launer bags including The Duchess of Cornwall, the late Baroness Thatcher and Japan’s Crown Princess Masako, alongside national treasures such as Dame Judi Dench and Dame Maggie Smith.

Q You are still very involved with the company. Have you any plans to take things a little easier in the future? A I still enjoy it all immensely. You have to keep going, don’t you, otherwise you’ll come to a stop. My son will carry on with the business when I feel it’s time, but I can’t see that just yet. I suppose this echoes my most high profile client! Q What would you wish your legacy to be? A Simply quality, that’s something the company has maintained and developed over the years and that one word reflects our standards and has brought success. There’s no reason that it won’t continue to do so in the future. v essence INFO

Website: www.launer.com

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Fashion | REALLY WILD

Wild at heart Invigorate a spring/summer wardrobe with a splash of Really Wild. Founded by Natalie Lake 14 years ago, Really Wild Clothing is designed for women who move easily and confidently between city life and countryside pursuits. Realising the only shooting clothing available to women was based on unflattering designs for men, Natalie created elegant and practical women’s clothing. The company remains faithful today to its country roots, but encompasses ladies’ clothing for all outdoor pursuits. Really Wild has reinvented this year’s favourite tweeds and nurturing fresh-looking florals in breezy, spring hues for a bespoke look. The collection includes mixing and matching bold prints with contrasting separates to offer flexible wardrobe solutions for every event. Drawing on nature’s finest offerings, there is a diverse mix of floaty, feminine shirts in characteristic Really Wild shades, alongside fresh, citrus dresses, antique pink tweeds and chic city separates. The Aston Coat in biscuit is a season staple and transitions perfectly between town and country, or for that last minute reception, find jewelled, navy blacks for a more sophisticated silhouette. Pink grey cashmere mix wraps are perfect for layering, adding a touch of warmth as we say goodbye to the final chill of winter. Really Wild’s online style guide offers tips and suggestions: there’s something distinctive to suit every occasion.

essence INFO

Website: www.reallywildclothing.co.uk

>>>

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Albermarle coat in fawn herringbone £425 Leather zip skirt in dark brown £345 Geelong roll neck jumper in charcoal £125 Boots model’s own

Classic cotton shirt in lilac dogtooth £95 Austin coat in hazel £375 Austin sheepskin gilet £475 Jeans and boots model’s own

Swing jacket in rose white £325 Trousers with turn-up in black ecru pink check £215 Safari shirt in white £115 Shoes model’s own

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Fashion | REALLY WILD

Brondesbury coat in black white £350 Safari shirt in white £115 Trousers, belt and shoes model’s own

Liberty print shirt in lemon dove £135 Skirt in grey ivory dogtooth £165 Shoes model’s own

Downton coat in citrus fawn dogtooth £395 A-line dress in citrus £175 Shoes model’s own

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Style | LINDBERG

The eyes have it LINDBERG is the world’s leading independent manufacturer of designer eyewear. Their eyewear is a statement about aesthetics, technical innovation and impeccable craftsmanship. Danish design traditions produce a discreet, classic elegance and carefully considered simplicity. LINDBERG designs have won many prestigious awards, with a unique blend of no-compromise attention to detail, patented technologies and individual craftsmanship, they create a real visual impact. Materials are responsibly sourced and exclusive materials selected for elegance, exceptional strength and distinctive look. Select materials include titanium, acetate, gold, platinum and diamonds. Technical innovations have revolutionised modern eyewear by removing everything deemed non-essential, including all screws, rivets and welds. The resulting frames are incredibly strong, flexible and amongst the lightest and most comfortable on the market today. Each LINDBERG frame is made to order and customised to a client’s particular preferences, hand-finished and individually numbered.

essence INFO

www.lindberg.com

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Crates Local Produce is located centrally within the historic market town of Horsham and bursts with fresh, seasonal food sourced directly from local producers. For more details see www.crateslocal.co.uk. Follow on Twitter @crateslocal or Facebook page Crates Local.

At their best right now Seasonal and local food offers taste, health and even economic benefits. Crates Local Produce highlights the amazing seasonal produce available from our region.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: DMYTRO PAUK, 123RF.COM

Garlic

Garlic has been added to food for thousands of years as flavouring. A member of the onion family, related to shallots, leeks and chives and originally found in central Asia, for centuries garlic has been hailed as a healer. It is now proved that allicin is the active component in garlic that fights infection, helps to prevent heart disease and combats many other disorders. Today, there are hundreds of sub-varieties of garlic, all differing in taste, but what most share is an ability to naturally dry, making them ideal for storing. The south of England has become a regional garden for garlic, with several producers embracing these wonderful healthy bulbs of tastiness. Look out for the many varieties that come as fresh, dried or even smoked, and discover wild garlic freshly available in spring. For anyone concerned about garlic breath, the odour can be neutralised by chewing parsley, cardamom, mint, lemon, fennel, cloves, anise seeds, coffee beans and even drinking milk or tea.

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PHOTO COPYRIGHT: VALENTYN VOLKOV, 123RF.COM

Rhubarb

Outdoor rhubarb is quite a different story to earlier forced rhubarb. It is more astringent and not as tender, but a fabulous addition to any oily fish and for many puddings. Main crop rhubarb is available at a much better price point without the large overheads of forced rhubarb grown in huge, dark sheds and picked by candlelight. Even though officially a vegetable, rhubarb is usually treated as a fruit and, therefore, one of the first of the ‘fruits’ of the warmer season. Rhubarb is too tart to eat raw, but works very well stewed with any natural sweetener and is fabulous with ginger. Go for the crispest and plumpest stems, but definitely discard the leaves as they contain a poisonous oxalic acid. After washing, strip off the tough, stringy ribs and slice the rest of the stalk. It will wilt quickly, so store in the fridge with the leaves still on until ready to eat.


Food | CRATES LOCAL PRODUCE

Escargots a la Bourguignonne

Rhubarb and ginger puddings

Ingredients: Four dozen snails plus shells – live, pre-blanched or tinned One cup white wine or cider topped up with water to make one litre quantity Three cloves garlic Two shallots One carrot One of each: chilli, clove, bay leaf Pinch of cinnamon and nutmeg Large handful parsley Sprig thyme 250g butter

Ingredients: 300g main crop rhubarb 140g butter – unsalted 140g caster sugar Two eggs, beaten 175g self-raising flour One teaspoon ground ginger Two stem ginger balls One tablespoon of ginger syrup (from the jar of stem ginger)

Serves four

Crates Local Produce, Horsham

Method: w Snails can be purchased as tinned, but there are now local snail farms selling live or blanched snails by mail order which are particularly good. If using live snails, follow the farm’s instructions on preparing and boiling. w Make up a litre of stock by combining the wine (or cider), water, two crushed garlic cloves, one crushed shallot, chopped carrot, all the cinnamon, nutmeg, bay leaf, chopped chilli, clove, thyme and half of the parsley. w Bring the stock to the boil, add the prepared snails (out of their shells) and simmer for at least an hour and a half, allowing the snails to really soften. w Pre-heat the oven to 200 degrees centigrade, gas mark 6. w Finely chop the remaining garlic and shallot and gently fry with a little of the butter in a small pan until translucent. Do not allow to brown. Add the rest of the butter and chopped parsley. Allow to melt down. w Fill each shell to about a third each with the melted garlic butter, add a snail into each shell and pour in the remaining butter to cover each. w Put in an ovenproof dish and cook for around five to ten minutes, just until the butter starts to bubble. Serve immediately with warm, crusty bread.

Six individual puddings

Method: w Line six ramekins with some softened butter and pre-heat oven to 180 degrees centigrade, gas mark 4. w Chop the rhubarb into chunks of one to two centimetres and gently cook with one tablespoon of the caster sugar in a small pan. Stir continuously until the rhubarb just softens. w Mix together the remaining butter and sugar until it becomes fluffy, then add in the beaten eggs slowly. Fold in the flour and ground ginger and, finally, add in the stem ginger with syrup. w Using around three quarters of the softened rhubarb, divide between all the ramekins. Pour the sponge mixture on top of the rhubarb and place the ramekins in a deep roasting dish. w Fill the roasting dish with hot water to around half way up the ramekins. Bake for approximately fifteen minutes and add the remaining rhubarb to the top. Finish baking for a further ten minutes or until just browning. Serve with custard or ice cream whilst still warm, straight from the ramekins (no need to turn out).

essence INFO

Crates Local Produce 24a Carfax, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 1EB Telephone: 01403 256435 Website: www.crateslocal.co.uk Follow on Twitter @crateslocal or Facebook page Crates Local

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Baking | JEN’S CUPCAKERY

Tangy lemon and lime polenta cake Nowadays, a food intolerance doesn’t mean missing out on delicious baked goods. This tangy citrus sponge is egg, wheat and dairy free, but full of taste. Moist sponge with a crunchy top, it makes a perfect teatime treat and is delicious served on its own or with a dollop of soya yoghurt. Ingredients w 100g dairy-free margarine w 150g caster sugar w 100g ground almonds w 100g polenta w 50g gluten-free plain flour w One teaspoon bicarbonate of soda w One teaspoon baking powder (gluten free) w 200g plain soya yoghurt w Two unwaxed lemons, juiced w One tablespoon cornflour w One lime w 25g granulated sugar Method w Preheat the oven to 180 degrees centigrade/ 350 degrees fahrenheit/gas mark 4. Grease a 21cm x 11cm loaf tin with vegetable oil. w Cream together the margarine and caster sugar and then add the ground almonds, polenta, flour, bicarbonate of soda and baking powder. w Add the yoghurt and the grated zest of one lemon and whisk all together. w Spoon two tablespoons of juice into a cup and heat the rest in a small saucepan. Add the cornflour to the cup with the juice and then stir until there are no lumps. Pour into the pan, whisking constantly. As the mix starts to boil, it will thicken. Whisk it into the cake mixture and then transfer everything to the cake tin. w Bake for 45–50 minutes until the cake has browned and the sides have shrunk away from the tin. Check by inserting a skewer: it should come out clean. w Remove the cake from the oven, but leave in the tin. While the cake is still hot, juice the lime into a cup and stir in the granulated sugar (which will not dissolve completely). Gently prick the cake and pour the sugary juice over evenly. Allow the cake to cool before serving.

essence INFO

TOP TIP: Serve the cake with a dollop of soya yoghurt and top with some slices of candied lemon for an extra punch of citrus.

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Website: www.jenscupcakery.com Telephone: 07751 553106 Facebook: www.facebook.com/jenscupcakery Twitter: @jenscupcakery Blog: http://ilovejenscupcakery.wordpress.com


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Woking: AN EMERGING

CENTRE OF CULINARY EXCELLENCE!

This is a two-part tale of the Tante Marie Culinary Academy in Woking and new artisan food start up eINDIE which held its product launch there in March 2016, says Shirlee Posner of Eat Surrey.

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or the well-heeled young in post war Britain who weren’t suited to academic life, it was often a choice (for young ladies in particular) of learning secretarial or cooking skills. On the cooking front, selection usually came down to two venues: the Cordon Bleu Cookery School in London or the Tante Marie Culinary Academy in Woking. Nowadays Leith’s and other colleges have joined the party and there’s a wealth of courses to choose from. Recently, Tante Marie in Woking’s move to a new purpose built venue has meant it’s topping the leader board again. The academy (the first of its kind in the UK) is famous for professional chef courses and celebrity graduates. Being part of the local community is also high on the agenda, and with a new restaurant and a plethora of short courses, the academy is gaining a loyal following. Tante Marie has changed ownership three times since opening in 1954. Today, former chef and deputy principal Andrew Maxwell and Gordon Ramsay Holdings own the academy. With a new lease of life and investment, Tante Marie moved from an old red brick Victorian building to a new purpose built site in central Woking in 2015. In addition to the culinary academy, there is also a modern European restaurant staffed by graduates of the Cordon Bleu Diploma where they work for one year to gain a Level 5 Diploma in Culinary and Hospitality Management. I have dined there twice and been impressed by the delightful service, innovative and professionally dispatched menu. The attention to detail in the food and service is faultless as overseen by tutor Rhubarb fool with handmade biscuits manager Marco Di Michele.

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The restaurant’s food is fresh, seasonal and skilfully prepared and presented. To give staff the full range of food service skills, amuse-bouche accompanies menu selections, as does handmade bread. Appetising nibbles on offer include smoked mackerel paté on Melba toast or shot glasses of leek and potato soup with truffle oil. Starters on the seasonal menu may include scallops and black pudding or crab rarebit. For mains, steak with creamy mash and panPan-fried seabass fried sea bass. The fish was served on a bed of pearl barley risotto, intensely green from the addition of baby spinach, to contrast in taste and texture with spicy chorizo. Desserts included pear and frangipane tart with clotted cream and a rhubarb fool with handmade biscuits. The food is so good here it’s hard to believe the staff are all new graduates. Well run and managed, the space is modern, clean and comfortable. Wine is reasonably priced and offered by the glass or bottle, and it was good to see local gin Silent Pool available here too. Located centrally in Woking, Tante Marie and other newcomers have really started to put Woking on the map as a foodie destination. Incentives from the council have been successful, which has also helped street traders from the old market move to permanent homes, such as Araceli’s, maker of fantastic burritos. Cellar Magneval, a wine bar, has also benefitted and has just opened its third venue in Ripley. I recently returned to Tante Marie for the launch of a new artisan food start up. Sonal Sher, a local resident, had signed up to a local business initiative. After some re-evaluation and encouragement from friends the result is new brand eINDIE, a small selection of spiced fusion chutneys. Whilst walking


Artisan food | EAT SURREY

Hot chilli relish chicken skewers

These recipes were kindly shared by the Tante Marie graduates who worked on the launch event for eINDIE Chutneys and Relish.

Brie and mellow mango chutney filo parcels Ingredients (makes 24 mini parcels) w 200g pack filo pastry w 200g Brie, diced to small cubes w 100g eINDIE mango chutney w 30g melted butter Method w Cut the filo pastry into 72 equal sized squares w Place the Brie and mango chutney in a bowl and mix well. w For each parcel, take three squares of filo and arrange on top of each other at an angle to form a star. Place one teaspoon of the cheese and mango chutney mix in the centre of the star. Draw the edges of the filo pastry up to form a parcel. Brush with melted butter. w Bake in a preheated oven at 190 degrees centigrade/gas 5 for six to ten minutes until crisp and golden. w Arrange on a platter and garnish with amaranth or any other decorative leaves.

Hot chilli relish chicken skewers Ingredients (makes 24 skewers) w 24 mini chicken fillets w 1 jar of eINDIE hot chilli relish w 24 skewers w Four dessertspoons vegetable oil w Salt and pepper to taste Method w Marinade the fillets overnight in the chilli relish. w Thread the chicken onto the skewers. w Drizzle a little oil over the skewers then place on a griddle* and cook until juices run clear. Don’t turn too often allowing for chargrilled lines. w Serve straight away. * If griddle pan is not available, the skewers can be cooked under a hot grill and in the summer on a BBQ.

past Tante Marie on the way to a meeting, she fell in love with the space and popped in to see if it was possible to hold a launch event there. Manager Marco spoke to his team and decided it was a perfect fit for their desire to be more ‘communitycentric’ and they also came up with a range of canapés showcasing Sonal’s chutneys. Originally from Pakistan, Sonal has a rich heritage of cooking with spices and unusual ingredients. With just four tried and tested products to launch, Sonal says once established she has many more combinations up her sleeve. For her core range, she has taken pointers from established favourites and added her own special twist. For example, the sweet red onion marmalade has an unusual addition of nutmeg, and her mellow mango is fragrant from the addition of cardamom with a kick of chilli. The food at the launch event really helped illustrate the versatility of Sonal’s new product range. It was also a great opportunity for Tante Marie students to develop a range of canapés to their own recipes. Tante Marie is keen to work with other local artisan food producers as it adds a new dimension for students to develop skills. The local press, food writers and the Mayor of Woking, Derek McCrum, also attended giving a real sense of community. In addition, Sonal’s friend, Lord Dolar Popat, opened the event, introducing her as a ‘mumpreneur’ for developing her business alongside a part time job and being a single parent to two young children. With a food festival each year and a host of new food outlets opening, Woking is definitely worth a visit. I’m going back to Tante Marie for a food photography course and highly recommend a visit to the restaurant. Short courses are a great idea for gifts or for anyone who wants to further develop kitchen skills. Look out for eINDIE products currently on sale in Cellar Magneval’s delicatessen in Ripley.

Brie and mellow mango chutney filo parcels

essence INFO

Tante Marie Culinary Academy, 57–61 Commercial Way, Woking GU21 6HN Telephone: 01483 726957 Website: www.tantemarie.co.uk eINDIE Chutneys and Relish Website: www.eindie.co.uk Woking Works for small business advice and mentoring Website: www.wokingworks.com

APRIL 2016 essence-magazine.co.uk 43


Winner by a short head The Running Horses country inn sits in the beautiful village of Mickleham, a short distance from Box Hill, Leith Hill and the award-winning Denbies vineyard. Cook and food writer Laura Scott raced along to sample its fare.

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rakspear, The Running Horses’ new owners, undertook an extensive refurbishment of the pub in late 2014 and has created an attractive gourmet destination (with accommodation) in the heart of the Surrey Hills. Daniel Donohue leads the kitchen at The Running Horses and prefers to source local ingredients for his oft-changing menus. His rustic British flavours perfectly suit the modern British gastro pub. We visited on a busy Saturday evening when the pub was packed full of happy customers relaxing in the bar and restaurant. When a pub situated on a country lane in the middle of the countryside on a chilly spring evening is full, it must be doing something right. Apparently, new Top Gear presenter Chris Evans is a fan and the pub holds the number eight slot in The Times ‘25 Best Foodie Pubs With Rooms’ (November 2015). Having lived in Surrey for nine years, I’ve been encouraged by the rise of improved pub food. Customers are more demanding and knowledgeable than ever before and higher standards in both quality of food and service are essential in order to become a successful venture. To obtain a proper taste of the menu, my dining partner and I sampled six dishes. There were two stars of the meal. One was the starter of wood pigeon wellington served with hot pickled red cabbage; it was so good I could have done with more of its sweet and sour loveliness. The crisp, flaky, golden glazed pastry encased a beautifully cooked and well seasoned gamey pigeon breast. The second was the calves liver and bacon. Calves liver is an absolute classic of a dish and one that doesn’t appear often enough on menus any more. The liver was served pink, buttery soft and thinly cut to perfection. The syrupy onion gravy,

44 essence-magazine.co.uk | APRIL 2016

iron rich spinach and a slick of ultra smooth mash were just as they should be. My only wish was that they served a chunkier slab of salty bacon, as opposed to the more pancetta cut we had. Portions are serious, so visit The Running Horses with appetite fully whetted. My starter of queen scallops (below, left) served in their shell was the right choice. Light morsels of sweet scallop meat with a delicate dressing. The other main course, a braised oxtail stew (far right), was hearty, unctuous and totally comforting as a dish. If deeply rich meaty dishes appeal, then this is the ideal menu. Dessert was always going to be a challenge after such a generous meal with a menu crammed full of classic comfort puddings. After a pleasantly long break, we opted to share a hot chocolate mousse with salted caramel ice cream and a cheeseboard. The mousse (more of a chocolate fondant) defeated two of us at the end


Food review | THE RUNNING HORSES

of a bountiful meal. It did have a perfectly melting middle with a crisp outer edge, and the scoop of salted caramel ice cream worked well, although some of caramel flavour was lost against the rich chocolate taste of the mousse. Vanilla would have been more appropriate. The cheeseboard was a little disappointing. A board of British cheese should be something to celebrate. After all, we Brits are excellent cheese makers. Apart from the local Norbury Blue, there was a disappointing selection of Bath soft, Emmental and smoked Lincolnshire poacher. The latter two were more plastic than cheese. This message was passed on, so I’m hoping this is an area of improvement, especially as the cheeses were served with excellent crackers and fruity home made chutney.

The Running Horses The building’s history dates back to the sixteenth century. Being on the main London Road, it became a coaching house and, in those days, the inn’s clientele provided rich pickings for highwaymen. The racing connection is from the days before the iron horse arrived, as the building was a favourite stabling for horses racing at Epsom. It was named The Running Horses in 1828 owing to a famous and rare tie at the Epsom Derby that year for which the race became known as the ‘Dead Heat Derby’. The two horses involved, Colonel and Cadland, now adorn either side of the inn’s sign, and its two bars are named after them.

Whilst eating, we sat in one of the intimate, softly lit booths somewhat reminiscent of vintage railway carriages, with old luggage racks adorning the walls. I highly recommend booking one for privacy as well as comfort: the stylish brushed zinc tabletops and plush red banquette seating make for a welcome dining experience amongst the oak panelled bustling dining room filled with tables of contented diners. So, for lovers of comfort food which is well executed and served in abundance at an historic pub surrounded by beautiful Surrey countryside, then trot along and pay The Running Horses a visit. essence INFO

The Running Horses Website: www.therunninghorses.co.uk Laura Scott: www.howtocookgoodfood.co.uk

APRIL 2016 essence-magazine.co.uk 45


Beauty | EPSOM SKIN CLINICS

Skin rejuvenation and micro needling

Cosmetic and micro needling has been available for years, but what makes the skin treatment so special? essence found out more from Naomi Diamond of Epsom Skin Clinics.

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or those who have read about micro needling, or have heard of Dermaroller, the treatment may seem like a daunting concept, however it is very effective. Micro needling penetrates the skin with thousands of microscopic needle columns, encouraging the skin’s natural repair process and creating tiny channels that allow peptide rich products or hyaluronic acid to penetrate deeper. As the skin regenerates, new collagen and skin cells are formed and blood supply is enhanced creating a rejuvenating effect to soften and reduce fine lines and wrinkles. Here at Epsom Skin Clinics, we can also use the treatment to target specific skin remodelling for areas suffering from scarring and even stretch marks. For those not wanting injectables, but who are still interested in reducing wrinkles or improving skin texture, this is a great place to start. By encouraging cell turnover, micro needling results in smoother, more radiant skin with fine lines and wrinkles appearing more subtle and reduced. The treatment can be intensified for those with acne scarring. Combined with microdermabrasion, micro needling can improve texture and tone, whilst re-educating the skin to appear more even in appearance. Immediately after treatment, skin can feel quite warm and tight – almost like mild sunburn – and it will look quite red. I would say it takes about two days before the redness subsides and can be covered with make-up, and a week for the skin to return to normal. The rejuvenation process will continue over following months, providing a natural and long lasting enhancement.

46 essence-magazine.co.uk | APRIL 2016

I normally recommend a series of three to four micro needling treatments, with approximately six weeks between each one. For the treatment of acne scars, other types of scarring and stretch marks it may be necessary to extend the micro needling therapy, as well as perhaps combining it with other treatments to obtain optimum results. Treatment times vary for each area of the skin and from clinic to clinic. Here at Epsom Skin Clinics, treatment time is approximately 30 minutes for the face and up to 60 minutes for face, neck and décolletage, or stretch mark treatment. A topical anaesthetic is applied 30 minutes before the treatment to make it more comfortable. Why not add in a Dermalux? This LED light therapy stimulates individual skin cells and improves every cell function. Don’t forget the aftercare. To maintain results after micro needling treatment, clients should have a homecare plan depending on their main concerns. In general, the rejuvenating and repairing benefits of Endocare ampoules are a must alongside the micro needling course. Aiding the remodelling of skin with powerful elements found in the protective serum of a snail, Endocare can encourage repair and healing after micro needling. In addition, homecare rollers used with a peptide serum two times a week can really help with problem areas. A step up from micro needling, but not quite at surgery level, is the Enerjet. With only approximately 15 devices in the UK, this unique treatment uses kinetic energy to fire hyaluronic solution under the skin without the use of needles. The way it works on the skin is the same process as micro needling, however, Enerjet offers a much enhanced lifting effect on skin laxity and scarring.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: DARREN BAKER | DREAMSTIME.COM

essence INFO

Epsom Skin Clinics Website: www.epsomskinclinics.com Telephone: 01372 737280 (Epsom) or 020 8399 5996 (Surbiton)


Bath nirvana An Olverum bath is like a warm, comforting hug that helps recovery when feeling mentally and physically depleted. Whether the bath oil is used to relieve stress, revive aching muscles and joints, rebalance dry skin, or simply to luxuriate in a blissful aromatic 'me time' moment, Olverum promotes a feeling of renewal. Olverum Bath Oil was originally created in 1931 by Franz Otto Klein, a wine merchant in the Mosel valley in Germany, who developed a keen interest in the beneficial properties of natural essential oils. The bath oil he produced from two years of research contains extracts from 10 aromatic plants. Carefully selected for their individual therapeutic properties, as well as their ability to work synergistically, the extracts are blended to a closely guarded formula passed from father to son for over 50 years and remains largely unchanged today. Olverum Bath Oil is a highly concentrated and unique blend of eucalyptus, lavender, juniper, lavandin, lemon peel, Siberian fir needle, exotic verbena, lime, geranium and rosemary. Key benefits • Deep relaxation and stress relief. • Inhaling the aromatic vapours released by a warm Olverum bath helps relieve tension and aids a deep and untroubled night’s sleep. • Soothes aches and pains. • Stimulates the circulation and helps bring relief to aching muscles and joints. • Beautifully soft skin: the light non-greasy oil is easily absorbed by the skin, leaving it feeling beautifully soft and pampered.

essence INFO

Olverum Bath Oil is available from: www.olverum.com and Harvey Nichols, Fenwick and House of Fraser 125ml (25 baths) – rrp £23.50; 200ml (40 baths) – rrp £36.95.

PRODUCT FOCUS

APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 47


James Morris (here and right) demonstrates how to practice the Pose Method of Running

Pose running

The Pose Method of Running helps participants reduce the risk of injuries and improve athletic performance, whilst reducing stress on knees. Personal trainer James Morris, based at The River Bourne Club in Chertsey, explains.

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ompetitive running reputedly dates back to the Tailteann Games in Ireland in 1829 BC, and it seems it has always been the world’s most accessible sport. Running has many benefits such as aiding weight loss, improving cardiovascular fitness, reducing total blood cholesterol, strengthening bones (and potentially increasing bone density), possible strengthening of the immune system and improving self-esteem and emotional state. Running, as with all forms of regular exercise, can effectively slow or reverse the effects of ageing. Traditionally, runners have trained with volume which has led to injuries. This risk can increase if taking part in a running event with undulating hills, tarmac and mud. So, as a coach, I thought there had to be a better way to train without compromising on speed and endurance.

48 essence-magazine.co.uk | APRIL 2016

The original purpose of the Pose Method of Running was to help runners reduce the risk of injury while improving performance. The Method reduces stress on knees by 53%, a big plus for a runner experiencing pain or injury. Created in 1977 by Dr Nicholas Romanov, a Ph.D sports scientist, it became the first method to offer a clear standard in both teaching and learning the method of running, or learning another athletic technique, ie cycling or swimming. I learnt directly from Dr Romanov in San Diego, while meeting the Russian triathlon team, all of whom were using the Pose Method. Their race placings have been getting better year on year. Practicing this Method for the last five years, my race times have decreased and I’ve seen fewer injuries to myself and my athletes.


Fitness | JAMES MORRIS

The basics of the Pose Method of Running There are only three key factors involved in the Pose Method of Running: Pose – Fall – Pull.

What is the Pose Method of Running?

The Pose Method looks at running as a movement skill. Aerobic conditioning can only take participants so far, therefore an efficient movement is necessary to achieve maximal speed and distance. The Method breaks running down into three simple parts: the running Pose, the fall and the pull. Pose – Fall – Pull. All the runner has to do to run is change support from one leg to the other by pulling the supporting foot from the ground. It is simple, but takes a lot of practice to retrain muscle memory to learn the movement and to unlearn old habits, especially for veteran runners. The four forces acting upon the body in movement are gravity, muscle elasticity, ground reaction and muscle contraction. These forces drive the body forward when they are unbalanced. The runner must create a constant state of unbalance to allow the gravity force to drive the body forward. Running comes down to the level of skill of the runner to interact with gravity throughout the gait cycle, and to use gravity to move forward. To break balance and fall forward, the weight of the body must be on the ball of the foot. Landing on the toes or the heel is not as efficient as a ball of the foot landing, and this may be one of the biggest adjustments for runners practicing the Pose Method of Running. While it may be difficult to master, running in the Pose technique is quite simple. The main goal, besides Pose – Fall – Pull, is to get the body out of the way and let gravity do all the work. essence INFO

James Morris is a personal trainer based at The River Bourne Club in Chertsey, Surrey. Website: www.jamesmorrispt.co.uk Email: james@jamesmorrispt.co.uk

Pose. Pose is the point at which the foot passes under the centre of mass and the runner makes the shape of the number four when in contact with the floor. Practice Pose daily until able to hold the Pose Method of Running positioning for a full one minute. Key points: w Weight is on ball of standing foot and foot stays flat on the ground. w Knee is bent on standing leg. w Ankle lifted foot is under hip, ankle and foot is relaxed. w Upper body is in alignment. Ears over shoulders, shoulders over hips, hip over ankles. Fall. The Fall happens when the runner lets go and uses the advantage of gravity to move from one pose to the next. Key points: w Practice by using a wall with both feet on the ground, knees bent. w Fall only as far as possible whilst maintaining good alignment: shoulders stay over hips with no bending at the waist. w Then stand in Pose and Fall. Keep increasing the distance away from the wall as long as it is possible to hold the correct position. Pull. The Pull is where the supporting foot is pulled, instead of pushed, from the ground and movement continues. Key points w Pull the supporting foot from the ground, up to Pose. Use hamstrings to pull the foot, making sure the knee points down and the ankle pulls up under the hip. w Perhaps slide the ankle up the leg (barefoot) just to feel the sensation of pulling up rather than back. w Then try pulling up quickly, using muscle elasticity, and allow gravity to pull the leg down to the ground. Remember to make sure the foot lands on the ground at exactly the same time as the other foot is picked up.

Putting the Pose – Fall – Pull together w When first using the Pose Method of Running, practice the change of support by starting in the Pose position and pull the foot from the ground before the lifted foot lands. Then work up to three changes of support in a row and start running on the spot and fall to move forward. w To run faster, the runner needs to be able to hold the Pose at a high fall angle, generating a higher cadence, and this requires a large amount of strength. Keep falling, pull quick and stay relaxed. Runners are amazed at how fast they can go! w Aim to run at 180 cadence a minute; this ideal cadence will help to achieve more speed and greater elasticity. Using a metronome can be a beneficial tool for practice. w Be patient and practice Pose drills one day a week while integrating them into short intervals. For example, one minute of falling drills and then run out 100 metre sprints to incorporate the drill being practiced into a running routine. What next? The best way to learn the Pose Method of Running is via a coach. James Morris Personal Training, located at The River Bourne Club in Chertsey, provides a video analysis of a client’s running in order to really see running form. Once a client has been taken through the basics, it then takes about six weeks of solid practice until the Method becomes less about learning and more about running. Plan on being a lifelong student, as with any skill there is always room for improvement.

APRIL 2016 essence-magazine.co.uk 49


You’re hired!

Sofia Syed, Associate in the Employment Team at Mundays LLP, advises on what to look out for when reviewing your employment contract.

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Sofia Syed is an Associate in the Employment Team at Mundays LLP, advising on all aspects of contentious and non-contentious matters. Her work ranges from preventing employment claims by ensuring the correct documentation is in place, through to advising on employee management (disciplinary, grievances, sickness management) as well as advising on termination (re-structuring, dismissal, redundancy procedures, handling tribunal claims) or negotiating settlements agreements and packages. Sofia has experience in advising employers operating in a variety of business sectors, including healthcare and education. She also has a particular expertise and interest in advising on matters relating to domestic workers and advises on bespoke agreements and solutions tailored to suit individual client arrangements. Sofia is a regular speaker on employment law issues and her articles and contributions are published regularly in national or specialist media. Sofia can be contacted by telephone on 01932 590581 or by email at sofia.syed@mundays.co.uk.

50 essence-magazine.co.uk | APRIL 2016

f employment is likely to continue for more than one month, your employer must provide a written statement setting out certain terms of your employment. This must be given within two months of the start of the employment. The details may be provided in the form of a ‘statement’ or as a letter of engagement or contract of employment. Contracts are usually drafted by the employer on a standard form which may have been adapted to suit you. Depending on your bargaining position, you may be able to negotiate certain terms and senior employees often seek legal advice prior to signing in order that their lawyers can negotiate the best deal for them. In some cases, the employer may even contribute towards legal fees for obtaining advice on their contract. If you have recently been hired for a new role, here are some key pointers to look out for in a contract of employment: Start date: This is usually negotiable. Note, if you do have previous unbroken service with the employer, this should be stated in the

contract. Ensure you do not start work for your new employer until the expiry of your previous notice period. Restrictions from previous employment: Check that you are not under any restrictions from your previous employer; they can get very upset if you breach valid post termination restrictions. If you are under restrictions, it is best to provide your new employer with a copy. Length of notice: You may prefer a longer notice period as it provides greater protection. Even if the parties are required to give longer periods of notice, you may be able to negotiate an earlier exit and the employer may decide to terminate early by paying you in lieu of notice. Payment in lieu of notice (PILON): If you don’t have a clause permitting the employer to pay you in lieu of notice, but they do so, it could be more tax advantageous to you. If you do have this clause, it can be more beneficial to you if it is payable in one lump sum and includes elements of pay for benefits and bonus. Bonus: If possible try to have the bonus as a contractual right, not discretionary. Also PHOTO COPYRIGHT: ANDRES RODRIGUEZ | 123RF.COM


Legal | MUNDAYS

ensure you are not precluded from receiving a bonus if your employer places you on garden leave, under notice or suspends you. If it is paid on termination, ensure you have a pro-rated entitlement. Duties/role: Ensure these are specific and the employer can’t change them unilaterally or without your consent. Place of work: The employer will usually include a mobility clause allowing them to change your place of work within a particular area. You should ensure they need your consent prior to making any changes. Depending on your seniority you may be required to travel, you may wish to insist on a particular mode or class of travel, eg. first class air fares! Hours of work: You cannot be forced to opt out of the average maximum 48-hour working week or suffer any detriment if you decide not to opt out. Salary: Try to include a guaranteed salary increase in line with the RPI or at least in line with the average increase of your colleagues. Pensions: Check when you can join. It may be possible to negotiate additional salary payments to be paid to compensate you for the period before the employer’s pension contributions begin. Car: Do you have a choice between a company car and cash equivalent? The cash equivalent may be more tax efficient; what you choose may depend on your family situation and the number of your existing cars! If you opt for the company car, ensure you are happy with the make and model, or that it will be commensurate with your position. Consider the usage of the car and fuel costs and negotiate in respect of what the employer will cover. Benefits: Try and obtain coverage for yourself and any dependents as soon as possible. Depending on your bargaining position upon joining, you could negotiate that benefits from your previous employment are at least replicated in the new offering. Holidays: The statutory full-time minimum entitlement is 28 days, which includes bank holidays. Ensure you can carry over any unused contractual holiday which exceeds your statutory entitlement.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: SCANDINAVIAN STOCK | 123RF.COM

If you are an employer looking to dismiss an employee who has been employed with you for over two years, here are five key points to be aware of: Unfair dismissal: Any dismissal must be both procedurally and substantively fair. The employee may successfully claim unfair dismissal unless the employer can show that the reason (or principal reason) for the dismissal was a potentially fair reason and that you acted reasonably in treating that reason as a sufficient reason for dismissal. Reason and procedure: There are five potentially fair reasons. These are: (a) capability or qualifications (b) conduct (c) redundancy (d) breach of a statutory duty or restriction and (e) some other substantial reason. Often the facts of a case may mean the employee is dismissed for more than one reason. Different procedures apply to the different reasons and can be carried out concurrently if necessary. To minimise the risk of a successful claim you should follow appropriate procedures. Notice: Ensure that you give the employee the correct period of notice. Check the contract, but if the contract states less than the statutory notice period, you should give at least the minimum statutory period of notice. Decide whether you wish them to work their notice, go on garden leave or whether you will pay in lieu of notice. Again, check the contract, this will also determine the tax payable. Holidays: The employee is entitled to be paid for accrued but untaken holiday up to the date of termination. Remember, the employee will have accrued holiday during periods of sickness and maternity leave. The employer cannot claw back any excess holiday taken by the employee unless their contract allows it. Post termination: If the employee has contractual restrictions, re-state these in the termination letter. If you are going to give a reference, follow your reference policy or play it safe and keep it vanilla! For further tips on ‘Vanilla’ reference or tell it like it is...? select Legal from the Magazine menu at essence-magazine.co.uk this month.

Termination by events of default: You should limit the events which permit your employer to terminate your contract summarily without notice. Garden leave: If you are a senior employee, the employer is likely to insist on a garden leave clause. This enables them to keep you out of the working sphere, whilst still bound by your contractual terms (including pay) for a set period of time. You should ensure the period is limited to your notice period and that you continue to receive all salary and benefits.

Restrictions: It may be difficult to resist post-termination restrictions being included in the contract, but you can seek to limit their effect either by limiting the scope or duration. If you have these and you are concerned about their limiting effect on your future activities, you should seek legal advice. v

essence INFO

Mundays LLP Cedar House, 78 Portsmouth Road, Cobham KT11 1AN Telephone: 01932 560500 Website: www.mundays.co.uk

APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 51


Finance | PMW

High Stakes for Brexit Gamble 0n 23 June we will be asked to cast our vote on whether the UK should remain within or leave the European Union. Simon Lewis, CEO at Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd, continues his exploration of the economic issues we need to consider before we make our choice about whether to go it alone.

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y first chapter (March edition) focused on the subject of trade and geopolitical influence. This generated many interesting responses from both sides of the debate and, with further relevant facts being unearthed as we get closer to the referendum, it is a subject that I will certainly return to. I said that I would look at the issues of immigration and red tape on this occasion but the complexity of the latter and growing importance of the former have encouraged me to deal with them separately. Polls say that immigration is voters’ primary concern, a trend that has been

“A recent study has shown that whereas 27% of British-born residents over 15 years old have benefited from a tertiary education, the figure is 47% for those who are foreign-born. Although these figures might well be distorted by the likelihood that the mean age of the foreign born cohort is probably lower, it does indicate that immigration brings skills and expertise that might otherwise not be available to the UK economy.” 52 essence-magazine.co.uk |APRIL 2016

evidenced in recent years by the rise of UKIP and David Cameron's ill-conceived (because it could not be delivered) electoral pledge to cap net annual migration to the UK to 100,000. The correlation between hostility to immigration and support for Brexit is high, which perhaps explains why Mr Cameron (who advocates staying in the EU) was so desperate to incorporate a 4-year delay in the granting of in-work benefits as part of his recent EU reform deal. It is hard to get a true sense of the immigration position from the daily media because there is so much hyperbole and disinformation. My primary objective is to focus on the economic aspects of immigration rather than consider the social and moral perspectives. The financial assessment that needs to be made is whether EU migrants make a positive contribution to the UK economy and also whether they make a fiscal contribution to the UK government’s finances. These aspects should be considered from both a short and long term perspective.

It is estimated that there are currently 3 million EU migrants in Britain, representing roughly 5% of the population. The number has risen strongly in recent years, in part as a result of an influx from Southern Europe. Nevertheless, over half of net immigration to Britain comes from outside the EU and would not therefore be affected by the outcome of the referendum. Statistics show that EU nationals of working age are more likely to be in work than UK nationals and non-EU citizens. For example roughly 80% of working age EU citizens in the UK are in work, compared to 75% of their UK national counterparts. In the circumstances, it would seem unlikely that benefit cuts and deferral of entitlements will act as a material deterrent as most migrants appear to want to come to Britain to work. In reality, the introduction of the new national living wage (which took effect on 6 April) is likely to encourage immigration, because those in work over the age of 25 years will see the minimum hourly wage increase from £6.72 to £7.20; rising progressively thereafter to £9.00 per hour by 2020. Simplistically, some might argue that with the official UK unemployment figure at around 5%, if we didn't have any EU migrants working in the UK we would have full

employment. This of course ignores the fact that those currently unemployed might not have the aptitude or skill levels to undertake the work required of them. In fact, a recent study has shown that whereas 27% of Britishborn residents over 15 years old have benefited from a tertiary education, the figure is 47% for those who are foreign-born. Although these figures might well be distorted by the likelihood that the mean age of the foreign born cohort is probably lower (reflecting an increase in immigration over the last 20 years) it does indicate that immigration brings skills and expertise that might otherwise not be available to the UK economy. The presence of such skills encourages businesses to invest, from both within and outside the UK. There is no doubt that a skills shortage would impair the UK’s economic growth potential. Research indicates that on a year by year basis, EU migrants contribute on average £1.34 to the UK public purse for every £1.00 taken out. If we look at the figures in more detail they show that the economic contribution is lower (£1.12) for migrants from the 10 countries that joined the EU in 2004 (mainly Eastern Europe) while those originating from the rest of the EU contribute £1.64 for each £1.00 taken out. This might be indicative of generally lower skill levels from those coming to the UK from some Eastern European countries and as a consequence lower levels of earnings and tax contributions. Therefore, if Britain were to stay in the EU it might be wise to encourage it to temper its expansionary ambition because a high longterm influx of low skilled migrants might not be affordable for many member states, particularly those with generous and expensive to maintain welfare arrangements. Of course, the best return for the UK public purse is from those who are here while at working age but leave before getting old. Figures for longer term UK residents from the EU show a reduction in public purse contribution to £1.15 for every £1.00 taken out; reflecting increased pension and healthcare costs. However, for long-term nonEU immigrants the contribution is as low as 85p for every £1.00 taken out, partly the result of a higher birth rate and consequently higher education costs. Although there are many advocates of an

Australian style points system that would allow Britain to cherry pick the best and brightest, we cannot escape the fact that to retain full access to the single market Britain would need to accept the free movement of people from the EU. This is the case for both Norway and Switzerland, both of which have proportionately more EU migrants than Britain. It is also worth remembering that migration is not only an inward phenomenon. There are currently around 1.25 million British nationals living in other EU countries and every year the British expatriate population is increasing. In 2015 around 40,000 more British nationals left the UK to live abroad than returned. Furthermore, within the EU, UK nationals represent the fifth largest expatriate population. For those who believe EU migrants should be sent home to reduce the burden on the UK welfare state it is worth remembering that UK expatriates might also be encouraged to return home. Given that they are likely to be older, the impact on the finances of the welfare state might actually be negative. Readers of my first two chapters might be forgiven for concluding that my allegiance lies with the ‘stay’ campaign but the truth is that I have still not made up my mind. My instinct tells me that there are further surprising facts to discover. With that in mind I still believe it’s too risky to place a firm bet at this stage; so my chips remain racked. 

essence INFO

Simon Lewis is writing on behalf of Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd (PMW), Chartered Financial Planners, based in Esher. The Company has specialised in providing wealth management solutions to private clients for 47 years. Simon is an independent financial adviser, chartered financial planner and chartered fellow of the Chartered Institute for Securities and Investment. The opinions outlined in this article are those of the writer and should not be construed as individual advice. To find out more about financial advice and investment options please contact Simon at Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd. Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Telephone: 01372 471 550 Email: simon.lewis@pmw.co.uk Website: www.pmw.co.uk

APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 53


Finance | PMW

High Stakes for Brexit Gamble 0n 23 June we will be asked to cast our vote on whether the UK should remain within or leave the European Union. Simon Lewis, CEO at Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd, continues his exploration of the economic issues we need to consider before we make our choice about whether to go it alone.

M

y first chapter (March edition) focused on the subject of trade and geopolitical influence. This generated many interesting responses from both sides of the debate and, with further relevant facts being unearthed as we get closer to the referendum, it is a subject that I will certainly return to. I said that I would look at the issues of immigration and red tape on this occasion but the complexity of the latter and growing importance of the former have encouraged me to deal with them separately. Polls say that immigration is voters’ primary concern, a trend that has been

“A recent study has shown that whereas 27% of British-born residents over 15 years old have benefited from a tertiary education, the figure is 47% for those who are foreign-born. Although these figures might well be distorted by the likelihood that the mean age of the foreign born cohort is probably lower, it does indicate that immigration brings skills and expertise that might otherwise not be available to the UK economy.” 52 essence-magazine.co.uk |APRIL 2016

evidenced in recent years by the rise of UKIP and David Cameron's ill-conceived (because it could not be delivered) electoral pledge to cap net annual migration to the UK to 100,000. The correlation between hostility to immigration and support for Brexit is high, which perhaps explains why Mr Cameron (who advocates staying in the EU) was so desperate to incorporate a 4-year delay in the granting of in-work benefits as part of his recent EU reform deal. It is hard to get a true sense of the immigration position from the daily media because there is so much hyperbole and disinformation. My primary objective is to focus on the economic aspects of immigration rather than consider the social and moral perspectives. The financial assessment that needs to be made is whether EU migrants make a positive contribution to the UK economy and also whether they make a fiscal contribution to the UK government’s finances. These aspects should be considered from both a short and long term perspective.

It is estimated that there are currently 3 million EU migrants in Britain, representing roughly 5% of the population. The number has risen strongly in recent years, in part as a result of an influx from Southern Europe. Nevertheless, over half of net immigration to Britain comes from outside the EU and would not therefore be affected by the outcome of the referendum. Statistics show that EU nationals of working age are more likely to be in work than UK nationals and non-EU citizens. For example roughly 80% of working age EU citizens in the UK are in work, compared to 75% of their UK national counterparts. In the circumstances, it would seem unlikely that benefit cuts and deferral of entitlements will act as a material deterrent as most migrants appear to want to come to Britain to work. In reality, the introduction of the new national living wage (which took effect on 6 April) is likely to encourage immigration, because those in work over the age of 25 years will see the minimum hourly wage increase from £6.72 to £7.20; rising progressively thereafter to £9.00 per hour by 2020. Simplistically, some might argue that with the official UK unemployment figure at around 5%, if we didn't have any EU migrants working in the UK we would have full

employment. This of course ignores the fact that those currently unemployed might not have the aptitude or skill levels to undertake the work required of them. In fact, a recent study has shown that whereas 27% of Britishborn residents over 15 years old have benefited from a tertiary education, the figure is 47% for those who are foreign-born. Although these figures might well be distorted by the likelihood that the mean age of the foreign born cohort is probably lower (reflecting an increase in immigration over the last 20 years) it does indicate that immigration brings skills and expertise that might otherwise not be available to the UK economy. The presence of such skills encourages businesses to invest, from both within and outside the UK. There is no doubt that a skills shortage would impair the UK’s economic growth potential. Research indicates that on a year by year basis, EU migrants contribute on average £1.34 to the UK public purse for every £1.00 taken out. If we look at the figures in more detail they show that the economic contribution is lower (£1.12) for migrants from the 10 countries that joined the EU in 2004 (mainly Eastern Europe) while those originating from the rest of the EU contribute £1.64 for each £1.00 taken out. This might be indicative of generally lower skill levels from those coming to the UK from some Eastern European countries and as a consequence lower levels of earnings and tax contributions. Therefore, if Britain were to stay in the EU it might be wise to encourage it to temper its expansionary ambition because a high longterm influx of low skilled migrants might not be affordable for many member states, particularly those with generous and expensive to maintain welfare arrangements. Of course, the best return for the UK public purse is from those who are here while at working age but leave before getting old. Figures for longer term UK residents from the EU show a reduction in public purse contribution to £1.15 for every £1.00 taken out; reflecting increased pension and healthcare costs. However, for long-term nonEU immigrants the contribution is as low as 85p for every £1.00 taken out, partly the result of a higher birth rate and consequently higher education costs. Although there are many advocates of an

Australian style points system that would allow Britain to cherry pick the best and brightest, we cannot escape the fact that to retain full access to the single market Britain would need to accept the free movement of people from the EU. This is the case for both Norway and Switzerland, both of which have proportionately more EU migrants than Britain. It is also worth remembering that migration is not only an inward phenomenon. There are currently around 1.25 million British nationals living in other EU countries and every year the British expatriate population is increasing. In 2015 around 40,000 more British nationals left the UK to live abroad than returned. Furthermore, within the EU, UK nationals represent the fifth largest expatriate population. For those who believe EU migrants should be sent home to reduce the burden on the UK welfare state it is worth remembering that UK expatriates might also be encouraged to return home. Given that they are likely to be older, the impact on the finances of the welfare state might actually be negative. Readers of my first two chapters might be forgiven for concluding that my allegiance lies with the ‘stay’ campaign but the truth is that I have still not made up my mind. My instinct tells me that there are further surprising facts to discover. With that in mind I still believe it’s too risky to place a firm bet at this stage; so my chips remain racked. 

essence INFO

Simon Lewis is writing on behalf of Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd (PMW), Chartered Financial Planners, based in Esher. The Company has specialised in providing wealth management solutions to private clients for 47 years. Simon is an independent financial adviser, chartered financial planner and chartered fellow of the Chartered Institute for Securities and Investment. The opinions outlined in this article are those of the writer and should not be construed as individual advice. To find out more about financial advice and investment options please contact Simon at Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd. Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Telephone: 01372 471 550 Email: simon.lewis@pmw.co.uk Website: www.pmw.co.uk

APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 53


Cranmore ski squad, Les Houches

Why independence is good for the soul Michael Connolly, headmaster of Cranmore School, reflects on the benefits provided by independent schools.

I

Many also forget the enormous financial assistance which independent schools provide through scholarships and bursaries to thousands of pupils all over the country.

54 essence-magazine.co.uk | APRIL 2016

ndependent schools are rarely out of the news. Occasionally it might be a tabloid story about some misdemeanour committed by a pupil, especially if he or she happens to have famous parents. Other articles appear which cite the considerable cost of independent education, particularly as fees have generally outstripped inflation during the last decade. Unlike the maintained sector, independent schools have no set catchment area or natural intake each September. They have to market themselves strongly to actively recruit families within a highly competitive market. Nationally, about 7% of children attend an independent school, but the proportion is much higher in the south east, especially in London and Surrey.

Cranmore School Mandarin lesson


Education | CRANMORE SCHOOL

There are remarkable opportunities to develop skills in sport at Cranmore where children can play team games such as rugby, hockey or cricket, and also join the swim squad, rowing squad or even the ski squad. It is widely known that the majority of independent schools are registered charities. This has been a political football over the years with some politicians arguing for the abolition of their charitable status. This view ignores the enormous saving to the public purse as a diminished independent sector would inevitably put more strain on local authorities which would need to find additional capacity in their own schools. Many also forget the enormous financial assistance which independent schools provide through scholarships and bursaries to thousands of pupils all over the country. Another accusation is that independent schools are elitist and are bracketed with grammar schools. As far back as the 1960s there was a determination to ensure that comprehensive schools would be the only ones allowed. Anthony Crosland and, subsequently, Roy Hattersley were both unsuccessful in implementing this totalitarian educational regime. The current educational market has become more varied with the proliferation of academies, many of which are sponsored by leading independent schools. However, it begs the question: why are so many families still willing to make a financial sacrifice to send their child to an independent school when academies are free? Clearly, the answer lies in the fact that parents recognise that their investment brings added value to their child’s education and represents good value for money. It is no surprise that boarding

Cranmore rowers taking part in the Hyne Cup

schools are undergoing a resurgence due to the demand from families based overseas who recognise that British education is world class in many respects. A short browse of the website from any good independent school will quickly reveal how such schools do add value. The government has forced league tables on state schools and used narrow criteria in Ofsted inspections which have compelled state schools to focus on a narrow curriculum. Fortunately, independent schools do not suffer such constraints and are therefore able to offer greater breadth and depth. For example, at Cranmore School, pupils can study French, Spanish, Mandarin, Latin, Greek and Philosophy. There is also significant time given to Music, not just as an integral part of the curriculum, but the rich extra-curricular programme with choirs, various ensembles and a full-blown orchestra. There are remarkable opportunities to develop skills in sport at Cranmore where children can play team games such as rugby, hockey or cricket, and also join the swim squad, rowing squad or even the ski squad. Another important factor which has made the national press is the rapid progress of pupils in independent schools. In some cases it has been suggested they are two years ahead of their peers in the maintained sector. This is sometimes attributed to having smaller classes and better resources. However, upon closer examination, it is clear that high expectations and the quality of teaching have a significant part to play too.

In the end, the clue to the success of independent schools is in the title – they are truly ‘independent’ and enjoy an autonomy which means they are not subjected to the vagaries of central government. Sir Michael Wilshaw, Ofsted chief, admitted as much back in 2013 when he addressed a conference for independent school heads. As state schools become increasingly more autonomous, Sir Michael suggested, they could learn much from the long experience of independent schools at running their own affairs. Finally, independent schools recognise that parents have a choice and it is vital to meet their expectations. Cranmore School epitomises the very best of independent education as described in the Good Schools Guide: “An all-round school maintaining high standards and impressive results from a non-selective intake, with so much on offer that every child can find something in which to succeed.” v

essence INFO

Cranmore School has embarked on a programme of change progressing to full co-education for pupils aged two and a half to thirteen years. Children study the standard subjects as well as a stimulating curriculum including French, Mandarin, Spanish, Latin, Greek and a wide selection of extra-curricular activities. The excellent facilities include a golf course, swimming pool, fitness suite and also a Forest School so that the youngest pupils from the nursery onwards can experience real ‘outdoors education’. Telephone: 01483 280340 Website: www.cranmoreprep.co.uk

APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 55


Literature | REVIEW

Hidey Holes

Beautiful Hideaways, Bolt Holes & Harbours in England & Wales Hidey Holes charts Robin Whitcomb’s journey, via motorhome, through Cornwall, Devon, Pembrokeshire and Northumberland in search of Britain’s unknown natural wonders. The south west coastline is teeming with the most stunning nooks and crannies: Robin even wandered into the diminutive Porthgwarra, a remote old fishing cove that was surprisingly instantly recognisable as the setting of hit BBC TV series, Poldark. Robin’s light-hearted account of his mishaps and discoveries is accompanied by landscapes by local painters and his own photography, as he marvels at the castles which line the rugged Northumbrian coast and pays a visit to Greenway House, once home to Agatha Christie. We are all familiar with the picture-postcard holiday spots, but can miss the coves, fishing villages and tiny harbours which are just as beautiful. Robin Whitcomb was born in Scarborough in 1945. After leaving school he spent two years working for his grandfather’s oil business in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Latterly, he has also worked as a journalist and played cricket for the MCC and rugby for Richmond RFC. He now coaches sport at St. Paul’s Junior School and has two sons, Patch and Beanie. By Robin Whitcomb RRP: £14.99 ISBN: 9781785890642 Published by Troubador Publishing www.troubador.co.uk

Somme 100th Anniversary

Major & Mrs Holt’s Definitive Battlefield Guide • Seventh GPS edition The Somme was deeply marked by the battles of the First World War: the August invasion and the race to the sea in September 1914, the battle of the Somme from July to November 1916, the German spring offensive in March 1918 and the consequent Allied counter-offensives in Picardy from August to September 1918. In 1916, in contrast to the Franco-German dual at Verdun, the Somme became a world arena: a meeting point for more than 20 nationalities and where three million soldiers fought on the 45-kilometre front line. This is the most helpful, practical and detailed battlefield guide to make the best of any visit to the Somme. Because Major and Mrs Holt have been touring, travelling and exploring the Somme for over 35 years, they are able to share their own moving experience of the battlefields. Knowing each country road, trail, cemetery, memorial and site perfectly, they have chosen not to write another academic history book, but have developed their own way to help visitors and provide human, historical and literary information which depict an essential dimension of the Great War. This book will take readers from the largest and most well known memorials to the smallest and well-hidden ones in the countryside. Major and Mrs Holt have mastered the secret of making the book very informative and a pleasant read. By Major Tonie and Mrs Valmai Holt RRP: £16.99 304 pages • Paperback ISBN: 9781473866720 Published by Pen & Sword Books Limited www.pen-and-sword.co.uk

56 essence-magazine.co.uk | APRIL 2016

The Somme

The Epic Battle in the Soldiers’ Own Words and Photographs The offensive on the Somme took place between July and November 1916 and is perhaps the most iconic battle of the Great War. It was there that Kitchener’s famous ‘Pals’ Battalions were first sent into action en masse and it was a battlefield where many of the dreams and aspirations of a nation, hopeful of victory, were agonisingly dashed. Because of its legendary status, the Somme has been the subject of many books. However, nothing has ever been published on the Battle in which the soldiers’ own photographs have been used to illustrate both the campaign’s extraordinary comradeship and its carnage. “It was the bloodiest battle in our history. Yet it’s taken 100 years to get an insight as vivid as this – a brilliant book commemorating the centenary, astonishing photographs taken by soldiers’ illicit cameras... and their mesmerising, humbling descriptions of the horrors they endured,” says Event magazine. Richard van Emden has interviewed over 270 veterans of the Great War and has written widely on the 1914-18 conflict. Previous books include Britain’s Last Tommies, Boy Soldiers of the Great War, All Quiet on the Home Front, Prisoners of the Kaiser and the top five best-selling The Trench. He has visited the Somme and Ypres every year since 1985 and has an expert knowledge of the First World War battlefields. He currently lives in London. By Richard van Emden RRP: £25 356 pages • Hardback ISBN: 9781473855212 Published by Pen & Sword Books Limited www.pen-and-sword.co.uk


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APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 57


An alpine adventure in Vaduz For those seeking a short-term distraction from the pressures of life in the fast lane, the Principality of Liechtenstein, located on the banks of the Rhine at the heart of the majestic Alps, and nestled between Austria and Switzerland, is the ideal spot to unwind, says Rebecca Underwood.

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iechtenstein was so named after Prince Johann Adam Andreas purchased the Lordship of Schellenburg in 1699 and the County of Vaduz in 1712. This lead to the unification of the regions after only five years, when Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Bohemia, Croatia, Hungary and Serbia, commanded that the territory be named Liechtenstein and it became a sovereign member state of the Holy Roman Empire. As a result of Napoleon’s victory at the Battle of the Three Emperors at A gentle trail, which meanders Austerlitz in 1805, and the abdication of Emperor through the woods, leads to Francis II, the feudal government ended and paved tranquil spots where walkers the way to Liechtenstein’s independence. Today, Liechtenstein remains a constitutional monarchy are richly rewarded with and in 1989, on the death Prince Franz Joseph II, breathtaking views of the castle his son, Prince Hans Adam II, assumed the regency. and its stunning surroundings. At around 160 square kilometres, Liechtenstein PHOTO COPYRIGHT: LIECHTENSTEIN MARKETING is the sixth smallest country in the world and prospered greatly after WWII due to the introduction of a low corporation tax, attracting a large number of international companies. Liechtenstein now has more registered companies than citizens and has achieved the third highest GDP per person worldwide. Vaduz, the capital of Liechtenstein, offers visitors an intriguing glimpse of a colourful history and fascinating culture. One of the most admired attractions is Vaduz Castle, an imposing palace and residence of the Prince of Liechtenstein, which was constructed as a fortress in the twelfth century and is located on a hill, 120 metres above the capital. Although the castle and its grounds are closed to visitors, a gentle trail, which meanders through the woods, leads to tranquil spots where walkers are richly rewarded with breathtaking views of the castle and its stunning surroundings. For devoted fans of challenging outdoor sports, Liechtenstein offers 400 kilometres of walking paths leading from the valley right up into the Alps. The Liechtenstein Panorama Trail is one of the most popular marked hiking trails, which covers a total distance of 48 kilometres and departs from the mountain village of Malbun, which TRAVEL TIP is also the sole skiing area, and only 13 kilometres from Vaduz. For more information on the Falconry Galina, For nature lovers, the Falconry Galina Hotel in Malbun is where visit www.galina.li. it is possible to get close and personal with birds of prey and admire

58 essence-magazine.co.uk | APRIL 2016


Leisure breaks | LIECHTENSTEIN

Vaduz Castle PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MARTIN WALSER

the artistry of a professional falconer. The ‘birds of prey in flight’ performance, which features hawks, eagle owls, buzzards, falcons, common ravens and golden eagles, takes place from Wednesday to Sunday afternoons, subject to weather conditions. There is also the opportunity to go on an ‘eagle hike’, taking the chairlift from Malbun to Sareis, escorted by the falconer and a golden eagle. Once you reach the top, visitors can witness the eagle’s expert flying skills, gliding through the air with ease, on the descent back down to the valley. Liechtenstein is a well respected producer of wine and one of the the Prince of Liechtenstein’s winery most popular attractions in Vaduz is the Prince of Liechtenstein’s winery, Hofkellerei, PHOTO COPYRIGHT: LIECHTENSTEIN MARKETING home to the Herawingert vineyards, spread out over four hectares. Visitors are welcome to wander around the vineyards and sample the produce, which includes an excellent Pinot Noir. For a scrumptious luncheon, head for the Torkel Restaurant, also located in the royal vineyard. The medieval building, which dates back to 1712, now houses this impressive eatery, which features an enormous old wine press dating back to the eighteenth century. The menu offers a wide range of traditional fare and, of course, food and service are first rate. For weary travellers seeking the highest level of comfort and service, the Park Hotel Sonnenhof, located on Mareestrasse, is just the ticket. Consider relaxing in a junior suite, measuring 40 to 45 square >>>

APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 59


Park Hotel Sonnenhof, Mareestrasse Vaduz PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MARTIN WALSER

metres, which is furnished to a very high standard and features an ultra comfortable bed swathed in crisp linens, a spacious seating area and a terrace with a view of the Rhine Valley and the Alps. Room amenities include free WI-FI, a Nespresso machine and a soft robe and slippers. Hotel amenities include an excellent spa, a Finnish sauna and an indoor heated pool, perfect for a late afternoon dip. For an excellent dining experience, the hotel’s Marée restaurant, recipient of a coveted Michelin star, provides outstanding service and an inspired menu. Sample the delicious fillet of sea bass, served with lemon grass, tarragon spinach and mango Basmati rice. It simply melts in the mouth. And be prepared to take quite some time selecting one of the tempting treats on the dessert menu. Be sure to take a leisurely stroll around the pedestrian only zone between the government district and the town hall and pause for a while to breathe in that Alpine air. Stop off at one of the local cafés and perhaps order a generous helping of käsknöpfle, a Landesmuseum PHOTO COPYRIGHT: LIECHTENSTEIN MARKETING dish similar to pasta and oozing with melted cheese. Accompanied by a couple of local beers, this hearty dish will put a spring in the step. Visit the Landesmuseum (the National Museum), housed in an impressive building dating back to 1438. Wander around at leisure and view the permanent exhibition, which presents an extensive collection of objects expertly displayed throughout 42 rooms providing a deep insight into the culture and history of this charming country. One of the main exhibits, which instantly catches the eye, is Eye-popping trinkets include Karl a glittering gold coin, minted in 1694 to celebrate the day when Prince Fabergé’s Apple Blossom Egg, Johann Adam Andreas I was admitted to the Order of the Golden Fleece. an elaborately decorated gauntlet The Liechtenstein Treasure Chamber, which opened last year, is sure to attract a large number once worn by the Holy Roman of visitors. Exhibits, belonging to the Princes of Emperor Maximilian II, and a replica Liechtenstein and other private collectors, include a of the ducal coronet worn by Prince selection of works of art made using precious materials. Karl I of Liechtenstein (1569–1627). There are fascinating examples of historic weaponry and knives and a range of dazzling gifts once owned by Prince Friedrich II and Emperor Kaiser Joseph II of Austria. Eye-popping trinkets include Karl Fabergé’s Apple Blossom Egg, an elaborately decorated gauntlet once worn by the Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian II, and a replica of the ducal coronet worn by Prince Karl I of Liechtenstein (1569–1627). There is also a fine collection of lunar rocks gathered by astronauts on board Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 missions. For lovers of contemporary art, visit the Kunstmuseum, also within the pedestrian zone. The painting and sculpture exhibition features exceptional works dating from the classical modernism era right up to the present time. Artists featured include Picasso, Gauguin, Hodler, Miró, Magritte, Kricke and Klein. For an enchanting spring break consider an alpine adventure in Karl Fabergé’s Apple Blossom Egg Vaduz: visitors will not be disappointed. v PHOTO COPYRIGHT: LIECHTENSTEIN MARKETING

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Adverts_Flavour_Layout 1 29/11/2013 11:03 Page 2


Rabbit feeding at Sheepleas PHOTO COPYRIGHT: JON HAWKINS

A spring walk in Surrey

Sheepleas is a mosaic of woodland, grassland and scrub habitats that is both a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a Local Nature Reserve. It is owned by Surrey County Council and managed by Surrey Wildlife Trust. This issue the SWT guides readers around this special area which holds a springtime surprise for walkers.

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heepleas lies on the chalk slopes of the North Downs, within the Surrey Hills’ Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, and covers an area approximately 110 ha (270 acres). One of the original 284 ‘Rothschild Reserves’, it has long been known as a special place for wildlife. It was described in the early twentieth century as ‘the finest piece of botanical and entomological ground within 30 miles of London’ and boasts over 30 It was described in the early species of butterfly, many species of vascular plants and a myriad of twentieth century as ‘the invertebrates that depend on its finest piece of botanical and diverse flora. In addition, plentiful entomological ground within deadwood, both standing and lying 30 miles of London’ and boasts on the ground, provides habitat for a rich variety of invertebrates, fungi, over 30 species of butterfly. bryophytes and lichens. This biodiversity is the result of both the underlying chalk geology and the way Sheepleas has been managed over the centuries. Most of the grassy areas that are home to a wide variety of species have escaped modern farming techniques, having never been ploughed or artificially fertilised. The site’s name is a pointer to its ancient use as sheep-grazed meadows, or ‘leas’, supporting the wool industry in Guildford and Farnham.

Are you a member of Surrey Wildlife Trust? Help protect Surrey’s wildlife by joining as a member or making a donation. Surrey Wildlife Trust cares for more than 9,000 ha of the county’s countryside and could not carry out vital conservation work without the support of members, supporters and volunteers. To join and find out more about the benefits of SWT membership, visit www.surreywildlifetrust.org/how-you-can-help/become-a-member.

62 essence-magazine.co.uk | APRIL 2016

Cowslip pollenation PHOTO COPYRIGHT: JON HAWKINS


HAWKINS

Surrey walks | SWT

Grizzled skipper butterfly PHOTO COPYRIGHT: JON HAWKINS

One of these, the Cowslip Meadow, is a well-known spring phenomenon, and in April and May visitors come from far and wide to admire its stunning display. In 2013, to celebrate the sixtieth anniversary of the Coronation, the meadow was named Surrey’s ’Coronation Meadow’. This project was initiated by HRH The Prince of Wales to highlight the fact that so many of our wildflower meadows have been lost in the last 60 years. It is hoped that green hay and seed taken from the meadow can be used to help restore other sites and create new wildflower meadows in Surrey. The woodland at Sheepleas changed dramatically following the great storm of 1987. Around 75% of its dominant mature beech trees were lost overnight. While this seemed catastrophic at the time, it provided new areas for meadow flowers to grow and allowed the open areas to be linked with wide rides and glades, which enables species to migrate. Over the past 20 years, plantations of larch have been removed and replanted with trees more appropriate for this area such as beech, field maple, wild cherry, ash and whitebeam. Sustainable woodland management is undertaken throughout the reserve and many areas of hazel are regularly coppiced. This kind of traditional woodland management technique fell out of favour in the twentieth century, mainly because of a lack of demand for its products, which in turn led to a general decline in woodland biodiversity. Today, cut material at Sheepleas is used for coppice fencing, bean and pea sticks for local community projects, and added to kilns on site to make charcoal. There is an informal picnic area near the Shere Road car park and the nearby Millennium Viewpoint on a clear day provides views of the London skyline, including the BT Tower and the Shard. v >>>

APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 63


Sheepleas self-guided walk

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64 essence-magazine.co.uk | APRIL 2016

The trail turns left and the walk continues through an open area managed as grassland since the 1987 storm. The number of stumps indicates how many trees used to grow here. Walk through this glade until arriving at a wide ride and follow this as it heads south. On either side, see the replanting that has taken place following the storm. Young beech trees are in guards to protect them from browsing rabbits and deer, though grey squirrel have damaged some of the upper canopies of the planted trees.

Sheepleas Grassland Walk

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Cowslip Meadow PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MIKE WAITE

Walking up the hill, on either side of the trail, see young ash saplings which now grow where there were once many beech trees. Dead and decaying wood is left in situ wherever possible as it is vitally important to a healthy woodland ecosystem, providing shelter, food and nutrients to many species.

Jews ear fungus at Sheepleas PHOTO COPYRIGHT: KATY GOWER

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This meadow is known as Summerhouse Meadow due to the building that once stood behind the bench. All that now remains is the step and brick hardcore that makes the surface of the nearby track and the remains of an ‘ice hole’. This meadow was ploughed during World War II and German prisoners of war tended potatoes. During the summer there is a diversity of wildflowers, including wild orchids. On sunny days, visitors should see butterflies, including common and chalk hill blues, marbled whites, ringlets and meadow browns. Late spring is the best time to see grizzled and dingy skipper butterflies.

Back on the trail, now heading south, follow the bridleway for about 400 metres, and then turn right onto a permissive horse ride. As the trail moves from the open into woodland, look for recently coppiced hazel areas on the left. These are usually fenced initially to prevent deer browsing off the new shoots that sprout from the base of cut hazel stools. An information board here details how the process is undertaken, and how it benefits our resident wildlife, such as the hazel dormouse (Muscardinus avellanarius).

Leatherhead

Walk down the hill and through the ‘valley’. The trail now enters woodland containing some large beech trees that managed to survive the 1987 storm. The trail then crosses a permissive horse ride and leads into a large, open, grassy area.

Follow the trail into Cowslip Meadow, a surviving example of an ‘unimproved grassland’. At the end of the meadow is a 180° gate, designed to open easily in both directions. At this point walkers can continue on the trail by turning left and following the green way markers or go through the gate to visit St Mary’s Church.

Chalk Lane

Park at Shere Road car park. Walk past the information board, down the track and cross the junction of bridleways into the picnic area, also known as ‘the cricket pitch’, where there are interesting clumps of mature beech and yew trees. From here, continue north and enter the ‘valley’ past the Millennium Viewpoint, erected in 2000 by Horsley Parish Council. This area was once beech woodland, much of which was lost following the storm of 1987. Subsequent removal of tree stumps, regular grazing and mowing has created a grassland area.

P

Angel Clump

Green Dene Plantation

P Key

ne

n ee

De

Gr

Bridleway Self-guided trail

P

500 yards

Car park 0

© Crown copyright and database right 2016. Ordnance Survey Licence Number AL100031669. Based upon the Ordnance Survey 1:10,000 scale map

essence INFO

Surrey Wildlife Trust School Lane, Pirbright, Woking, Surrey GU24 0JN Telephone: 01483 795440 Email: info@surreywt.org.uk Website: www.surreywildlifetrust.org

N

500 metres

Size:110 hectares (270 acres)


essence | COMPETITION

WIN

a pair of tickets to see How The Other Half Loves Alan Ayckbourn’s farcical tale of matrimonial mishaps, How The Other Half Loves, receives its first major West End revival this spring, directed by Alan Strachan. As Bob and Fiona clumsily try to cover up their affair, their spouses’ intervention only adds to the confusion. William and Mary Featherstone become hopelessly stuck in the middle, falsely accused of adultery and with no idea as to how they’ve become involved. The plot culminates in two disastrous dinner parties on successive nights, shown at the same time, after which the future of all three couples seems in jeopardy. The star cast includes Olivier Award nominee Nicholas Le Prevost (Up The Garden Path), Jenny Seagrove (Judge John Deed), Tamzin Outhwaite (Hotel Babylon), Jason Merrells (Lark Rise to Candleford), Matthew Cottle (Game On) and Gillian Wright (EastEnders). Fondly loved as one of his most popular plays, Ayckbourn’s tale of social graces and personal misunderstanding remains one of the celebrated writer’s most famous comedies. To win a pair of tickets to How The Other Half Loves at the Theatre Royal Haymarket, London, simply visit www.essence-magazine.co.uk and answer the following question: Who wrote How The Other Half Loves? a) Alan Arkin b) Alan Alda c) Alan Ayckbourn Closing date 30 April 2016.

essence INFO

Theatre Royal Haymarket 18 Suffolk Street, London SW1Y 4HT Website: www.trh.co.uk Tickets available from £15 (gallery) To book tickets: 020 7930 8800, 24 hours Terms and conditions apply Prize is subject to availability. Winner’s tickets are valid for Monday–Thursday performances until 09/06/2016. Prize is as stated and cannot be transferred of exchanged. No cash alternative will be offered.

“One of the classic comedy scenes of not just British but world theatre.” The Guardian

competition APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 65


Events_Layout 1 06/04/2016 15:41 Page 1

All that Jazz

The Investec International Music Festival is one of Surrey’s cultural highlights taking place across the Surrey Hills in early May 2016. This year the star studded line-up includes Clare Teal, one of the UK’s most celebrated and much loved jazz singers. Here she talks to Andrew Peters about herself, music and the festival. Q You developed an interest in Jazz from an early age; did anything in particular spark this? A Yes it was my dad playing my grandmother’s Big Band 78’s and I was hooked instantly. From there I moved onto jazz but I did subscribe to Smash Hits to keep my street cred intact with my school cohort! Q After starting your career you soon set up your own label, MUD records, why did you give it this name? A In 2009, after 9 years in contract with Candid, Sony and Universal, my partner Mud and I decided it was time to bite the bullet and start our own company. We’ve never looked back – it’s truly liberating to choose exactly what you want to record and where you want to release it. Q Did you ever expect the spectacular success you’ve had? A I was a late starter, signing my first record deal in my late 20’s, and although there is a lot of luck in this business I firmly believe the harder you work the luckier you get. I have also had wonderful support throughout my career. Q You’ve toured a lot across the country and this year is no exception, even performing on your birthday. You obviously enjoy touring; it seems to be in your blood. Can you see yourself ever easing up? A I love what I do so as long as my voice holds out I will continue performing live. Q You’re a Yorkshire girl but have lived in the West Country for some time. Is there any particular attraction to this part of the world? A I’m from the country originally and like being out in the sticks and there are other similarities – tremendously welcoming and friendly people and then of course the West Country has extremely good cider.

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Events | INVESTEC

Q Your website states you’re ‘on a mission’ to bring big band and swing to the populous that sounds like a strong, passionate commitment! Do you ever waver? A It’s often overlooked that Big Band music was the pop music of the 30’s and 40’s. As big bands can handle almost any music that is put in front of them these music machines are still relevant today and I will continue to collaborate with talented musicians and arrangers to keep this music alive and grow its mass appeal. Q You’ve won the British Jazz Singer accolade 3 times, the last win was last year after an eight year gap. Was this a surprise? A British Jazz Singer of the Year Award is voted by the public so it was pretty special to win for a third time last year and of course it’s always nice to be recognised in your chosen field – although I try not to take awards too seriously. Q Do you think you are still evolving as a performer? A There are aspects of my singing that have definitely changed over the years and I am always working on my sound and developing different areas of my voice. Q The Mail on Sunday refered to you as ‘a sensation in the world of Jazz’, Ken Bruce simply stated ‘We love her’ – which sits most comfortably with you? A I’m flattered by both, jazz is a tiny word for a vast sound and sometimes people have preconceived ideas about the music you make without ever hearing it because of the ‘jazz’ label, I try to avoid pigeonholing wherever possible - I have only 2 categories I put music into – good and bad. Q You’re appearing in this year’s Surrey Hills Music Festival on 5th May will this be your first time? A This is my first time at the festival but not in the area – we’ve played at various venues over the years and always to great music loving audiences. Q What attracted you to perform at the Festival? A There is something special about being part of a festival, it’s an opportunity to play your music to people who might not ever hear your music were it not for their local festival. My mantra is ‘Live Music is Good for You’ - what better way to promote that than through a festival line-up offering a variety of music. Q The Festival takes place in some interesting venues; you are performing at Denbies Wine Estate. Will you feel tempted to try some of the wines? A As many of my audience might well know, my preferred tipple is gin and malt whiskey (not together) but I might be tempted by some locally produced wine during the festival!

Q On the evening you’ll be performing under the banner of “The divas and me’ feauturing the songbooks of Ella Fitzgerald, Doris Day and Peggy Lee which is your favourite? A Impossible to answer – Ella, Doris and Peggy were all giants of popular song who had great taste in music. I suppose my all time hero would have to be Ella as she never sang a bum note. I’ve always loved her attitude to the songs she sang, always musical and always uplifting. Q You do both with ease and panache but what do you like more performing or presenting? A They are very different animals but at the same time surprisingly similar and I enjoy the challenges that both present. I’ll never turn down any opportunity to share the music I love be it over the airwaves or to a live audience. Q You obviously enjoy performing in public but do you ever get nervous performing in public? A There is always an adrenalin rush when you are performing live but I love what I do and luckily don’t suffer too much with nerves. I always thought if I had to down a bottle of gin before going to work, it probably wouldn’t be the right job for me! Q Your latest album is due for release at the end of April what are the highlights on Twelve o’clock Tales for you? A Twelve O’Clock tales, my 15th album and 1st full orchestra recording has to be our most ambitious project to date. It was an absolute privilege to sing with the renowned Hallé and to release the 7th album on our own label MUD Records. The repertoire, arranged by world class composer and trumpet maestro Guy Barker and celebrated jazz pianists Grant Windsor and Jason Rebello, explores timeless classics, contemporary standards as well as our own material.  essence INFO The Investec International Music Festival Website: www.shimf.co.uk

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essence events

spotlight on... Investec International Music Festival 2016 Thursday 5 to Saturday 7 May The Investec International Music Festival returns for its seventh season with a programme of world class music performed at stunning venues. The timetable this year is as follows: Thursday 5 May, 8pm: The Clare Teal trio presents ‘The divas and me’ at Denbies Wine Estate, Dorking. Jazz singer and BBC Radio 2 presenter Clare will draw on the songbooks of Ella Fitzgerald, Doris Day and Peggy Lee. Friday 6 May, 7.30pm: Dmitry Sitkovetsky plays Bach at the Holy Trinity Church, Guildford. The eminent Russian violinist, composer and conductor will perform his famed arrangement of Bach’s Goldberg Variations and will be joined on stage by violinist Alexander Zemtsov and cellist Kati Raitinen. Saturday 7 May, 7.30pm: Violinist Nicola Benedetti (pictured right) performs with the London Mozart Players under the baton of conductor and viola player Maxim Rysanov.

Information: 01483 444334 or visitguildford.com and iimf.co.uk

Richmond Theatre Richmond Monday 11 to Saturday 16 April The Father Award-winning play starring Kenneth Cranham. Tuesday 19 to Saturday 23 April An Inspector Calls J.B. Priestley’s classic thriller. Monday 25 to Saturday 30 April Clybourne Park A razor-sharp satire on its first national tour. Monday 2 to Saturday 7 May Rocky Horror Show Get ready for the Time Warp as Richard O’Brien’s musical returns.

Thursday 14 to Saturday 16 April The Mousetrap Sixtieth anniversary production starring Louise Jameson. Tuesday 19 to Saturday 23 April Goodnight Mister Tom A modern classic starring David Troughton. Monday 25 to Saturday 30 April Derren Brown – Miracle The master of psychological illusion returns with a new show. Monday 2 to Saturday 7 May Thriller Live A concert celebrating the career of Michael Jackson. Tickets: 0844 871 7645 or ambassadortickets.com/woking

Dorking Halls

Tickets: 0844 871 7651 or

Dorking

ambassadortickets.com/richmond

Thursday 28 April Pasha Kovalev: It’s All About You A new tour from the Strictly dancer full of favourite music and lots more. Thursday 5 May Julian Clary: The Joy of Mincing A show in which Julian celebrates thirty years as a camp comedian. Age 16+.

New Victoria Theatre Woking To Saturday 9 April The Bodyguard Award-winning musical starring Alexander Burke. Tuesday 12 to Wednesday 13 April Nederlands Dans Theater 2 Celebrated dance company performs.

68 essence-magazine.co.uk | APRIL 2016

Information: 01306 881717 or dorkinghalls.co.uk

Photo copyright: Simon Fowler

theatre


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essence events The Electric Theatre Guildford Wednesday 20 to Saturday 23 April Jerusalem The Pranksters return with a hard-hitting black comedy. Sunday 24 April Gyles Brandreth: Word Power! A trip around the awesome world of words with the word-meister. Friday 29 April 100 Watt Club: Burlesque & Cabaret Guildford Fringe Theatre presents a naughty springtime evening. Information: 01483 444789 or electrictheatre.co.uk

Epsom Playhouse Epsom Monday 25 April Gyles Brandreth: Word Power! See listing above for Electric Theatre. Tuesday 26 April TJ Higgs and Friends Psychic medium returns. Information: 01372 742555 or epsomplayhouse.co.uk

Farnham Maltings Farnham Saturday 9 April Simon Callow: One Man Band – Orson Welles Biography Vol3 Simon Callow looks closely at one of the most complex artists of the twentieth century: Orson Welles. With post-show Q&A. Saturday 16 April Gyles Brandreth: Word Power! See listing above for Electric Theatre. Information: 01252 745444 or farnhammaltings.com

Tuesday 19 to Saturday 23 April Avenue Q Award-winning show on tour. For age 14+. Thursday 5 May Graeme of Thrones A theatrical and wicked take on the Game of Thrones phenomenon. Information: 01483 369350 or glive.co.uk

Guildford Shakespeare Company St Mary’s Church, Quarry Street, Guildford Saturday 30 April Cymbeline Celebrating 400 years of Shakespeare, a staged reading of one of the Bard’s most exciting late plays. Information: 01483 304384 or guildford-shakespeare-company.co.uk Derren Brown – Miracle, New Victoria Theatre, Woking

Rose Theatre Kingston-upon-Thames To Sunday 10 April The Witches Fabulous, scary Roald Dahl book brought to life for the whole family. Friday 15 to Saturday 16 April Ockham’s Razor: Tipping Point Ground-breaking physical theatre. Monday 18 to Saturday 23 April Bad Jews Hit play where a treasured family heirloom is up for grabs. Tuesday 26 April to Saturday 7 May The Herbal Bed A powerful thriller about human desire based upon real events in Stratford-upon-Avon in 1613.

Graeme of Thrones, G Live

Information: 020 8174 0090 or rosetheatrekingston.org

The Star Inn, Quarry St, Guildford

Yvonne Arnaud Theatre

Saturday 16 April, 8pm Guildford Gag House Comedy Club For the full line-up, see website.

Guildford

Information: guildfordfringe.com

G Live Guildford Wednesday 13 April Ruby Wax: Frazzled! Much loved comedienne, actor and writer brings her Guide to Mindfulness: A forum for discussion to G Live.

Monday 11 to Saturday 16 April Rehearsal for Murder Classic thriller starring Robert Duncan and Susan Penhaligon. Tuesday 19 to Saturday 23 April Travels with My Aunt Four actors take on 20 characters. Tuesday 26 to Saturday 30 April Bad Jews See listing for Rose Theatre above. Tickets: 01483 440000 or yvonne-arnaud.co.uk

Photo copyright: Catherine Ashmore

Guildford Fringe

70 essence-magazine.co.uk | APRIL 2016 The Witches, Rose Theatre


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spotlight on... Birds of Prey Flying Display, Painshill Park, Cobham

Photo copyright Henfold Birds of Prey

Sunday 24 April, 2–4pm Painshill Park hosts Henfold Birds of Prey as this family-run firm with over thirty years experience in handling and flying these beautiful birds provide fantastic flying displays. Discover more about the world of falconry and don’t miss this opportunity to see owls, hawks and falcons up close. In addition, Painshill has a Bird Song Walk on Sunday 24 April, 8–10.30am, where visitors can enjoy a short introduction about bird identification before entering the landscape garden to learn how to identify birds by song and sight. Children over 12 years are welcome, with one adult required for every two children. Lastly, don’t miss the historic tour of Painshill’s fully restored Crystal Grotto on Wednesday 13 April, 11am–12.30pm. Find out how the Grotto was created and see the stalactites, along with other follies and plantings.

Information: 01932 868113 or painshill.co.uk

music

Investec International Music Festival 2016

exhibitions

Various venues

Cranleigh Arts Centre Cranleigh Saturday 30 April, 8.30pm The Blues Band Premier blues band perform in the intimacy of Cranleigh Arts Centre.

Thursday 5 to Saturday 7 May See Spotlight on page 68.

The Art Agency

Information: 01483 444334 or

Tuesday 12 April to Saturday 28 May Jo Quigley Jo works in a variety of media, but particularly in acrylic, and her favourite subjects are wildlife and people.

visitguildford.com or iimf.co.uk

Leith Hill Musical Festival

Esher

Guildford House Gallery Guildford Saturday 30 April to Sunday 22 May Threads of Meaning The latest textile exhibition from The Wey Valley Workshop. Information: 01483 444751 or guildford.gov.uk/guildfordhouse

Haslemere Museum

Information: 01483 278000 or

Dorking Halls, Dorking

cranleighartscentre.org

Thursday 14 to Saturday 16 April The April festival opens with Division 1 choirs competing and performing Vaughan Williams’ Serenade to Music. On Friday, Division 2 choirs compete and perform Schubert’s Mass in G and finally, on Saturday, the final day of competition sees the choirs of Division 3 perform Verdi’s mighty and majestic Requiem.

Tuesday 12 to Saturday 23 April Three’s Company An exhibition of collage, pastel painting and photography by three artists: John Newsham, Beth Osler and Owen Osler.

Information: 01306 881717 or

Information: 01483 278000 or

The Lightbox Gallery and Museum

dorkinghalls.co.uk or lhmf.org.uk

cranleighartscentre.org

Woking

Southern Pro Musica

Dorking Museum

Holy Trinity Church, Guildford

West Street, Dorking

Wednesday 4 May, 7.30pm The Royal Grammar School Concerto Concert The chamber orchestra performs works by Gershwin and Bruch conducted by Peter White.

Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays throughout April Dorking High Street: Market or Football Pitch? Oil and watercolour paintings focusing on Dorking’s historic high street.

Information: 01252 745444 or

Information: 01428 682158 or

Information: 01306 876591 or

farnhammaltings.com

southernpromusica.org

dorkingmuseum.org.uk

Epworth Choir Holy Trinity Church, Guildford Saturday 23 April, 7.30pm For Queen & Country Concert Music for choir, brass and organ with a royal connection in support of the Phyllis Tuckwell Hospice. Information: 01483 768136 or epworthchoir.org

Farnham Maltings

Information: 01372 466740 or

Haslemere

theartagency.co.uk

To Saturday 23 April The Rise and Fall of the English Switzerland An exhibition of local history from the mid-1880s using the Museum’s photographic archive

Cranleigh Arts Centre Cranleigh

Farnham Tuesday 3 May, 8pm Courtney Pine and Zoe Rahman Pine’s latest project sees him showcasing a more intimate show as he takes to the stage playing bass clarinet, accompanied only by award-winning pianist Zoe Rahman.

Information: 01428 642112 or haslemeremuseum.co.uk

To Sunday 8 May John Constable: Observing the Weather An exhibition which concentrates on Constable’s unique ability to combine artistic skill with scientific observation to record changes in weather phenomena. The works range from pen and ink studies to watercolour and oil sketches.

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essence events

cinemas

Cranleigh Arts Centre 01483 278000 or cranleighartscentre.org Farnham Maltings 01252 745444 or farnhammaltings.com Odeon Esher 0871 2244007 or odeon.co.uk/fanatic/film_times/s89/esher Odeon Epsom 0871 2244007 or odeon.co.uk/fanatic/film_times/s88/epsom Odeon Guildford 0871 2244007 or odeon.co.uk/fanatic/film_times/s92/guildford The Screen Walton 01932 252825 or screencinemas.co.uk The Ambassadors Cinema, Woking 0844 871 6743 or ambassadortickets.com/cinema

Information: 01483 737800 or thelightbox.org.uk

festivals Dunsborough Park Ripley, Woking Sunday 17, Thursday 21, Sunday 24 and Saturday 30 April Festival of Tulips 20,000 new bulbs planted and over 20,000 one year old bulbs replanted in grass to create a wild meadow.

McAllister Thomas

Information: 01483 225366 or

Godalming

dunsboroughpark.com

To Tuesday 26 April The Spring Exhibition Gallery artists on display.

Farnham Beerex 2016

Information: 01483 860591 or mcallisterthomasfineart.co.uk

New Ashgate Gallery Farnham To Saturday 16 April Rising Stars 2016 Exciting new crafts by emerging makers including jewellery, stoneware, paintings and lots more. Information: 01252 713208 or newashgate.org.uk

Watts Gallery Compton, Guildford To Sunday 5 June Poetry in Beauty: The Pre-Raphaelite Art of Marie Spartali Stillman An exhibition demonstrating the quality and importance of a most admired female artist.

Farnham Maltings Thursday 21 to Saturday 23 April This is the 40th festival showcasing 70 real ales, 40+ ciders and perries selected from around the UK. Live music and good food contribute to a great atmosphere.

Festival of Tulips, Dunsborough Park Evening tide ® Tim Rudman. Selenium and thiourea toned silver gelatin print

Saturday 23 April to Sunday 3 July Tim Rudman: Iceland – An Uneasy Calm One of Britain’s finest landscape photographers, Tim Rudman transforms his work into silver gelatin prints. This exhibition celebrates Tim’s travels through the land of fire and ice: Iceland.

Tim Rudman: Iceland – An Uneasy Calm, The Lightbox

Information: farnhammaltings.com or farnhamlions.org.uk

Taste at King Edward’s King Edward’s School, Witley, Godalming Sunday 17 April, 10am–3pm Taste is a food and crafts festival run by Splendid Fairs and Festivals at King Edward’s, Witley. There will be a bustling food and craft market, with offerings from around 30 local producers, with cakes, burgers, homemade curry sauces, chocolates and hand-crafted jewellery on offer.

Information: 01483 813593 or

Information: kesw.org or

wattsgallery.org.uk

splendidoccasions.co.uk

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national trust

out & about

National Trust properties offer

Birtley House

perfect venues in which visitors

Bramley, Guildford

can play and relax. A few are shown

Sunday 17 April, 11am–4pm Rare plant fair Buy traditional and unusual plants direct from growers and view Birtley’s grounds and gardens.

here, but visit nationaltrust.org.uk for more.

Claremont Landscape Garden

Information: 0845 468 1368 or Auto Italia Italian car day, Brooklands Museum

Esher

rareplantfair.co.uk or

Saturday 23 April, 5.45–8am Dawn chorus bird walk Greet the birds with NT gardener and ‘birder’ Matt Phelps.

birtleyhouse.co.uk

Information: 01372 467806

Hatchlands Park

To Sunday 10 April Easter Eggstravaganza Newborn lambs, goats and cows.

East Clandon, Guildford

Information: bockettsfarm.co.uk

Monday 2 May, 11am–3pm Have-a-go archery For age 6+.

Brooklands Museum

Guildford

Weybridge

Friday 22 to Sunday 24 April, 10am–5pm Spring garden show Plant sales, garden stalls, driftwood sculpture, food stalls and the chance to view Loseley’s spring bedding displays. All set in the stunning Walled Gardens.

Information: 01483 222482

Leith Hill Place Dorking Friday 29 April, 6.30pm Concert: Trio Martinu A piano trio perform works by Haydn and Dvorak. Information: 01306 711685

Polesden Lacey

Godstone Farm

Surrey Wildlife Trust

Bocketts Farm

Godstone, near Caterham

Various locations

Leatherhead

Until Sunday 10 April Easter fun Baby animals galore.

Tuesday 19 April, 10am–12 noon Spring about Ockham Common A weekday wander around the heathlands of Wisley and Ockham. Sunday 24 April, 2–4.30pm Chobham Common ramble Explore the southeast area of this National Nature Reserve learning about wildlife and heathland. Tuesday 26 April, 1–4pm Nower Wood Educational Reserve, Leatherhead Identification and survey techniques for woodland wildflowers.

Loseley Park Sunday 17 April, 10am–5pm London Bus Museum spring gathering Up to 200 visiting buses and coaches, old and new. Saturday 30 April, 9am–5pm Auto Italia Italian car day An all-Italian car event: previously there have been over 200 Ferraris!

surreywildlifetrust.org

Information: 01932 857381 or

RHS Garden Wisley

brooklandsmuseum.com

Woking

sport

Until Sunday 10 April, 11am–3pm Cadbury Easter egg hunt A mystery trail to follow.

Guildford Shakespeare Company

Information: 01372 452048

Saturday 23 and Sunday 24 April Sonnet Walks Celebrate 400 years of Shakespeare and take part in these mystery walking tours to encounter Shakespeare and his characters in the least likely of places.

near Egham Sunday 1 May, 11.30am–1pm Bluebells and the wonders of the woodland guided walk Swathes of bluebells on view during this guided walk on May Day.

Information: 01483 795440 or

Information: loseleypark.co.uk

Great Bookham, near Dorking

Runnymede

Information: godstonefarm.co.uk

Guildford

Information: 01483 304384 or guildford-shakespeare-company.co.uk

Information: 01784 432891

Winkworth Arboretum

Hobbledown Children’s Farm

Godalming

Horton Lane, Epsom

Sunday 1 May, 5.30–8am Dawn walk Enjoy International Dawn Chorus Day with a walk around the Arboretum. Information: 01483 208477 or

Open all year See animals, visit the aerial adventure course, find a route through the willow maze, have fun in the play barn and lots more.

nationaltrust.org.uk

Information: hobbledown.com

Monday 11 to Sunday 17 April National Gardening Week Explore the many ways in which gardening enhances health and fitness. Free entry to Wisley on Friday 15 April.

Sandown Park Esher

Information: rhs.org.uk/wisley and

Friday 22 to Saturday 23 April bet365 Friday and Jump Finale The return of the flat and finale of the jump racing seasons.

nationalgardeningweek.org.uk

Information: sandown.co.uk

farmers’ markets Camberley Saturday 16 April, 10am–3pm Cranleigh Every Friday, 9.30–11am Epsom Sunday 3 April and 1 May, 9.30am–1.30pm Farnham Sunday 24 April, 10am–1.30pm Guildford Tuesday 5 April and 3 May, 10.30am–3.30pm Haslemere Sunday 3 April and 1 May, 10am–1.30pm Milford Sunday 17 April, 10am–1.30pm Ripley Saturday 9 April, 9am–1pm Walton-on-Thames Saturday 2 April and 7 May, 9.30am–2pm Woking Thursday 14 April, 9am–2pm

APRIL 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 73


TRANSLATING ART INTO CUSHIONS Fashion editor turned home accessory designer Susi Bellamy has a host of inspirational experiences to draw on. From working with legendary photographer David Bailey to living in Florence for six years, this former Condé Nast employee has brought art to the sofa in the form of her stunning cushion line. Here she chats to Jane Pople about why she left the fashion magazine world to set up her own brand and shares her top three tips on revamping a living space. Q You used to work as a fashion editor at Condé Nast publications; how and why did you first get into the fashion industry? A I studied fashion journalism at the London College of Fashion and when I graduated at 21 I was taken on as a fashion assistant on a London magazine. However, after a couple of shoots on my own, they made me the fashion editor and I never looked back. I had done some work experience when I was at college at Brides Magazine at Condé Nast and a few years later they invited me to interview for the job of fashion editor. It was wonderful working there and a naturally happy environment considering the subject matter. I spent every December in the Caribbean photographing the summer issues and was lucky enough to also work with David Bailey, Norman Parkinson and Lord Snowdon to name a few. Also, we were one of the first magazines to use Kate Moss as a model when she was only 16. Working behind the camera definitely helped me as an artist in the future with a view to composition and colour. It has informed my work ever since. Q What led you to leave the fashion world behind to pursue design and setting up your own brand? A I left the magazine world after my first child, Jack, was born and my husband was posted to the States for his work. This secondment didn’t include a green card for me, so I took up painting as a hobby. I never stopped painting and after years of practice as an artist I eventually completed an MA in fine art in 2013, which led to me having my own studio in Newcastle. It was only 11 months ago that I set up my own brand when I decided my artwork could translate well into cushions. Q Can you tell us about your time living in Florence? Would you say that has inspired your designs today? A Living in Florence for almost seven years was like a dream come true. I was not only inspired by the history of the city, but also by the fashion and the Italian innate sense of colour. When I created my Madonna series of collages, inspired by the street corner shrines, I worked closely with an artisan framer whose ability with carving and gilding had been handed down for generations. Living and working in such an environment was a daily inspiration and has informed all my work since. The crumbling plaster of the palazzo walls and the beautiful countryside also inspired my abstract work which I create using a plasterer’s trowel to give a textured and layered effect.

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Interiors | SUSI BELLAMY

on some of the crops and left others – I then photographed them and had them digitally printed using dye-sublimation printing (this high quality process harnesses the rich texture of the artwork onto a silky flat surface) by a British printer in Nottingham. I found this the best sort of printing to harness the colour. I also work from marbled paper I had produced in Florence to create a second range of cushions which I felt worked well with the abstracts. All the cushions are piped, which gives a frame-like effect to the printed artwork, and the backing fabric is chosen carefully to complement the colour palette. This led me to describe them as ‘art for the sofa’. I enjoy the transition from 2D to 3D. Q All of your cushions are made in England. Is that something that is important to you? A It is very important to me that my product remains very British. Quality is of the utmost and I didn’t want to compromise that by printing abroad where I had no control over the process. I also feel proud to be showing my work with integrity and supporting our economy. Q Can you tell us about your work with The Colour Group? A The Colour Group (GB) is a non-profit organisation that promotes colour education and shares information to anyone interested in colour. A lot of the members and committee members are scientists and they approach colour from a completely different angle to me, but I was brought in to help organise events around art and fashion. I have organised art workshops, lectures at the Tate Modern on Malevich and Sonia Delaunay as well as a science event in Newcastle. We meet at City University in London once a month and it has opened my eyes to many aspects of colour and a broad range of interesting people. You could describe us as ‘colour nerds’!

PHOTOS COPYRIGHT: PETER ATKINSON

Q Why did you decide to create a line of cushions, and can you tell us about the design process from initial concept to finished product? A I had created some large paintings on wood in my studio and I think it was my background working on magazines that led me to edit and crop them. So I took the large painting downstairs to the woodwork studio and asked them to cut it up into eight equal squares. I placed this work on a shelving system I have in my studio and studied them for a while. It then became apparent to me that they could possibly work well as cushion designs and the rest is history. I carried on working

Susi’s top three tips for revamping a living space Colour – colour can transform a space and be uplifting. There are so many beautiful colours to choose from, but I particularly like the tertiary tones – the ones that are slightly slubby and toned down versions of the primaries Interesting and eclectic art and objects – I love to mix old and new, traditional and abstract. It adds a twist to an interior. I particularly like sculptural objects on plinths. Lighting – a good mixture of lighting adds mood and allows change.

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Q What is your most treasured possession and why? A I have a copy of a Michelangelo bust in gesso that an Italian friend of mine made in Florence. Her father had owned a shop in the historic centre and owned moulds of Renaissance sculpture – the father died and the shop closed down, but every time I look at it I am transported back to Florence and the Bargello (sculpture museum) and the Uffizi. I can even smell the coffee! Q How would you describe your own home style and what is your favourite room in your house and why? A I would describe my home style as classic with a twist and full of colour. We live in the main wing of a large house in the Tyne Valley near Hadrian’s Wall, and my favourite room is my kitchen as it has uninterrupted views from a bay window across the valley with not one blot on the landscape and a great view of my neighbour’s beautiful horses. The kitchen was handmade by a local Northumberland craftsman and has lovely high ceilings and original coving. It is also painted in various ‘shades of grey’, but then punctuated by brightly coloured ticking, faux coral sculpture and Tuscan pottery. In the same way as I was keen to have my cushions made in the UK, I also have worked with local craftspeople on my home. We have so much talent here. Q What has been the hardest part of setting up your own brand and so far what has been the most rewarding part of the experience? A The hardest part of setting up my own brand has been working to get things right and making mistakes. It is not just the creation of the design and the choosing of the backing fabric, but the whole infrastructure of building a brand and the everyday practicalities such as postage and packing that need to be addressed. The most rewarding part of the experience has been when I have received positive responses to the range and the few times I have been lucky enough to get some lovely press. v

PHOTOS COPYRIGHT: PETER ATKINSON

essence INFO

Susi’s cushions are filled with an over-stuffed duck feather filling. Beautifully made, they work visually as groups of contrasting designs, or used alone in conjunction with plains for a more classic look. The combination of uniqueness, colour and vibrancy will impact on any interior in the same way as a piece of artwork. Susi has an MA in fine art from Northumbria University which culminated in a degree show at Baltic 39 in 2013. She now works from Cobalt Studios in the Ouseburn, Newcastle. Discover Susi Bellamy’s beautiful range of cushions now available at Amara: www.amara.com. About Jane Pople Jane Pople has over five years experience writing about interiors and the design industry favouring emerging designers and new talent. This article first appeared in The Lux Pad, www.amara.com/luxpad.

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Humphrey Munson design and make award-winning and beautiful handmade kitchens. Each bespoke kitchen is handcrafted by a team of the finest cabinetmakers who combine a passion for their craft with expert technical knowledge. The Nickleby design (shown) embodies the true spirit of the classic contemporary kitchen. Using a combination of painted solid wood cupboards and natural wood accent units, this kitchen features touches of luxury throughout.

www.humphreymunson.co.uk


A house for Essex Contemporary artist Grayson Perry’s designer building is a gloriously absurd secular chapel paying homage to the memory of Perry’s fictional Essex woman, Julie May Cope. Unique, slightly unsettling, but certainly moving, it’s a much oversubscribed holiday destination. Emily Bird investigates a phenomena in the small village of Wrabness.

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iving Architecture’s aim is to shift the perceptions of modern architecture by allowing people to eat, sleep and live in spaces designed by outstanding architectural practices. With many properties dotted throughout the UK, there is a selection of unique buildings to stay in, but no project has been quite as attention grabbing as Grayson Perry’s and FAT Architecture’s A House for Essex which is the architectural embodiment of the noted artist’s daring talent. Born in Chelmsford, Grayson Perry is one of the UK’s leading contemporary artists and winner of the coveted Turner Prize in 2003. Going on to achieve huge critical and popular acclaim, he specialises in ceramic pots, tapestries and sculptures and has also curated a series of high profile exhibitions around the globe. An icon in popular culture due to his eccentric attire, Grayson Perry is celebrated by art lovers and critics alike and his project for Living Architecture enables fans to immerse themselves in his art.

“The moment I saw it I knew it was perfect. It’s in a little hamlet, the last property in the village of Wrabness, as you walk down a path to the River Stour. It was an old farmhouse: we knocked it down and started again.” Grayson Perry

PHOTOS COPYRIGHT: JACK HOBHOUSE

78 essence-magazine.co.uk | APRIL 2016


Architecture | LIVING ARCHITECTURE

Charles Holland of FAT with Grayson Perry PHOTO COPYRIGHT: KATIE HYAMS

Profile FAT (Fashion, Architecture, Taste) is an architecture studio with an international reputation for delivering outstanding and award winning projects. Specialising in architecture, cities and design, the company works for cultural, commercial and government clients including Igloo Regeneration, BioRegional/Quintain, Tate, Grosvenor, Selfridges and Rotterdam City Council and is committed to developing client briefs into extraordinary projects. FAT is directed by three of Britain’s leading architectural and design figures, Sean Griffiths, Charles Holland and Sam Jacob, all committed to developing architectural culture both through practice and design research at institutions including Yale and the Architectural Association. The directors are closely involved in the design of all projects which are managed by a project architect or leader in close contact with the client. Current projects include the BBC Media Village in Cardiff, The International School, Birmingham, residential schemes in Sheffield and Middlesborough and an art academy in Eindhoven. Recent projects include a library in south east London, a cultural centre and park in Rotterdam and a new build mixed use development in Amersfoort, Netherlands.

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FAT Architecture has been one of the most challenging and provocative voices in UK architecture during the last two decades and embraces decoration, ornament and explicit communication in its designs, making FAT the perfect pairing for the artist on this project. Conceived as a landmark in the tradition of wayside and pilgrimage chapels, A House for Essex is dedicated to a saint of Perry’s creation, Julie May Cope, and gives architectural expression to her life. Described by the artist as an ‘Essex Everywoman’, a working-class woman who went with the default settings of her generation, such as choosing marriage over education, but who had a redemptive second act. Julie’s image is visible throughout the house and the artist’s handmade pots and tapestries depict her colourful life. Looming over it all is the motor scooter that killed her: running over her whilst delivering a curry. Charles Holland of FAT Architecture describes the space as a radical statement about architecture and its capacity for narrative and communication to tell a rich and complex story. The house itself is reminiscent of a Russian doll with a series of archetypal house shapes that step up in scale as it descends the hill. Built around a striking decorative object which is part medieval rood screen, part baroque façade, it frames a ceramic statue of Julie Cope. The two bedrooms include walk through cupboards leading to internal balconies overlooking the “When Living Architecture offered me chapel space below and benefit from views to both the east and west. The exterior of the property is the building’s the opportunity to collaborate with FAT, tour de force clad with more than 1,900 green and it was a golden chance to realise a long white ceramic tiles cast from originals made by held ambition to build a secular chapel. Perry depicting Julie as a mother and icon, along Charles Holland and I batted ideas back with symbols associated with her life. A House for Essex is available to rent on a and forth until a bonkers yet dignified short-term holiday basis and can sleep up to four design emerged glistening. The resulting people. Due to the extremely high demand for this property, holidays are sold via a ballot open building is a total artwork, a fiction in at various points throughout the year offering the which you can live, a digital age shrine chance to purchase a two to three night stay. You and a homage to Charles’ and my home can register for newsletter alerts for future ballots county. I hope the people who stay in via the Living Architecture website. v essence INFO

Websites: www.living-architecture.co.uk and www.fashionarchitecturetaste.com This article first appeared in The Lux Pad: www.amara.com/luxpad

80 essence-magazine.co.uk | APRIL 2016

A House for Essex find it playful yet monumental, cosy and maybe slightly disturbing. It is a three dimensional musing on religion, local history, feminism, happiness and death.” Grayson Perry


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essence Issue 70  

essence magazine is a premier lifestyle publication available in print and online. The printed magazine is distributed via Royal Mail to Sur...

essence Issue 70  

essence magazine is a premier lifestyle publication available in print and online. The printed magazine is distributed via Royal Mail to Sur...

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